Page 1


contents

closeups

18

history’s stories: lewis littlepage our heritage: 60 years enhancing fxbg community

19

what’s in a riverbank? ....the pump house

Larry hinkle ... making ukuleles with va style

20

Senior Care: in sickness & in health

21

its all energy: relieve pain

15

trapper young drive home companion

22

august fun facts emancipated patients: benefits of play

23

ditch the itch

31

Andy Lynn and Roxbury Farm & Garden

25

mYSTERY hOUSE STORIES OF FXBG: edwin

5

15

Porch talk .3

slide fxbg

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

6

master gardeners....container & raised bed gardens

7

on the trails: rescue on the rappahannock

8

I have a friend: reason to celebrate

9

fxbg porchfest

11

dan gatto...man behind the bar

12

cocktails: fav summer drinks

13

season’s bounty: meals in a bowl

14

cooking with kyle:

16-17

Calendar of events

26

art in the burg: remix, refresh,& the sea

27

poetryman: an alternative everything greens

28

companions: compassionate care camp

29

everything greens: sprouts

30

fredericksburg sketches

31

from my porch: kindness of strangers

V IRGINIA IS FOR ...S LIDERS ? Perfect Summer sendoff - sliding into the city by Clint Manning included the Idlewild neighborhood, Hospital Hill, and Fall Hill Avenue. Ultimately, both the City of Fredericksburg’s Department of Economic Development & Tourism and the University of Mary Washington felt that the atmosphere for adding Eagle Nation Day to the mix would've been better served beside Hanover Street on Trench Hill, with grassy areas and trees for shade. The slide itself is owned and operated by Kodiak Events and they market it as the Urban Slide. They have hosted a number of events in major cities all over the country, such as Jacksonville, Denver, Dallas, and Montgomery, Ala. The company, which is based in Houston, has also crossed the border into Canada and hosted a number of slide events there. Slide FXBG is being hosted by the

11

...And more! 10

10

bikes, trikes & Kids: chef blake cycles

24

music by moonlight.....30 years of music

23

new on the scene: darbytown art studio Cover: “Kayakers” By David C. Kennedy

SlideFXBG is a one-day waterslide event that will feature a three-lane, 1 000ft slip-and-slide along Hanover Street, beginning at the Jepson Alumni Executive Center and ending at the Sunken Well tavern at the junction of Hanover and Littlepage Street. From 10am – 6pm on Saturday, September 1st, thrill seekers of all ages will be able to ride an inflatable tube down the Urban Slide as often as they’d like in a two-hour block. The cost per person per two-hour timeslot is $25 and tickets can be purchased through the event’s website at www.slidefxbg.com. However, if you think that is all, think again! SlideFXBG will be in conjunction with the University of Mary Washington’s annual Eagle Nation Day; a free, kid-friendly festival being held on the grounds of Trench Hill. In addition to the slide, there will be moon bounces, an American-Ninja-Warrior-type course for children, sporting activities being hosted by UMW student-athletes, food trucks, and much more. The location on Hanover Street was not only selected due to its steadily-

services of its sponsors Cary Street Partners, Coldwell Banker Elite, Hilldrup, Lifecycle Construction Services, Rappahannock Development Group, Rappahannock Orthodontics, Shifflet’s Waste Services, Union Bank & Trust, and Wack General Contractor. Ticket sales began on July 2nd, and, within two weeks, more than 20% of the 1,200 tickets available had been sold. The first video posted on SlideFXBG’s Facebook page has been viewed more than 68,000 times and has garnered more than 1,300 shares. Additionally, while the majority of ticket purchases have come from within the Fredericksburg Region, quite impressively, there are sliders who have purchased tickets coming from as far north as Philadelphia, as far south as Norfolk and Virginia Beach, and as far west as Honaker, Va. Should the joint SlideFXBG and UMW Eagle Nation Day Event be a success, the City and UMW hope to make it an annual occurrence.

Clint Manning is the Tourism Product & Event Developer for the City of Fxbg

Slide FXBG

Labor Day, September 1 Start: UMW Jepson Center

descending gradient, but also due to the fact that its closure would’ve created the least impact on traffic. The idea of using William Street – between College Avenue and Littlepage Street – was dismissed for this very reason. Other potential venues

City of Fredericksburg and the Economic Development Authority of the City of Fredericksburg, in partnership with the University of Mary Washington. The event is being made possible thanks to the generous financial support and in-kind

Tkts: slidefxbg.com eventbrite.com Sliders must be a minimum of 44-iinchestall, or be supervised by their parents. But the event isn’t limited to children. The oldest person ever to ride an inner tube down The Urban Slide was a 95year-o old woman

Eagle Nation Day September 1 Trench Hill

723 Caroline St 899.8077 Daily 10-5:30 Sunday 12-5 2

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

3


contents

closeups

18

history’s stories: lewis littlepage our heritage: 60 years enhancing fxbg community

19

what’s in a riverbank? ....the pump house

Larry hinkle ... making ukuleles with va style

20

Senior Care: in sickness & in health

21

its all energy: relieve pain

15

trapper young drive home companion

22

august fun facts emancipated patients: benefits of play

23

ditch the itch

31

Andy Lynn and Roxbury Farm & Garden

25

mYSTERY hOUSE STORIES OF FXBG: edwin

5

15

Porch talk .3

slide fxbg

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

6

master gardeners....container & raised bed gardens

7

on the trails: rescue on the rappahannock

8

I have a friend: reason to celebrate

9

fxbg porchfest

11

dan gatto...man behind the bar

12

cocktails: fav summer drinks

13

season’s bounty: meals in a bowl

14

cooking with kyle:

16-17

Calendar of events

26

art in the burg: remix, refresh,& the sea

27

poetryman: an alternative everything greens

28

companions: compassionate care camp

29

everything greens: sprouts

30

fredericksburg sketches

31

from my porch: kindness of strangers

V IRGINIA IS FOR ...S LIDERS ? Perfect Summer sendoff - sliding into the city by Clint Manning included the Idlewild neighborhood, Hospital Hill, and Fall Hill Avenue. Ultimately, both the City of Fredericksburg’s Department of Economic Development & Tourism and the University of Mary Washington felt that the atmosphere for adding Eagle Nation Day to the mix would've been better served beside Hanover Street on Trench Hill, with grassy areas and trees for shade. The slide itself is owned and operated by Kodiak Events and they market it as the Urban Slide. They have hosted a number of events in major cities all over the country, such as Jacksonville, Denver, Dallas, and Montgomery, Ala. The company, which is based in Houston, has also crossed the border into Canada and hosted a number of slide events there. Slide FXBG is being hosted by the

11

...And more! 10

10

bikes, trikes & Kids: chef blake cycles

24

music by moonlight.....30 years of music

23

new on the scene: darbytown art studio Cover: “Kayakers” By David C. Kennedy

SlideFXBG is a one-day waterslide event that will feature a three-lane, 1 000ft slip-and-slide along Hanover Street, beginning at the Jepson Alumni Executive Center and ending at the Sunken Well tavern at the junction of Hanover and Littlepage Street. From 10am – 6pm on Saturday, September 1st, thrill seekers of all ages will be able to ride an inflatable tube down the Urban Slide as often as they’d like in a two-hour block. The cost per person per two-hour timeslot is $25 and tickets can be purchased through the event’s website at www.slidefxbg.com. However, if you think that is all, think again! SlideFXBG will be in conjunction with the University of Mary Washington’s annual Eagle Nation Day; a free, kid-friendly festival being held on the grounds of Trench Hill. In addition to the slide, there will be moon bounces, an American-Ninja-Warrior-type course for children, sporting activities being hosted by UMW student-athletes, food trucks, and much more. The location on Hanover Street was not only selected due to its steadily-

services of its sponsors Cary Street Partners, Coldwell Banker Elite, Hilldrup, Lifecycle Construction Services, Rappahannock Development Group, Rappahannock Orthodontics, Shifflet’s Waste Services, Union Bank & Trust, and Wack General Contractor. Ticket sales began on July 2nd, and, within two weeks, more than 20% of the 1,200 tickets available had been sold. The first video posted on SlideFXBG’s Facebook page has been viewed more than 68,000 times and has garnered more than 1,300 shares. Additionally, while the majority of ticket purchases have come from within the Fredericksburg Region, quite impressively, there are sliders who have purchased tickets coming from as far north as Philadelphia, as far south as Norfolk and Virginia Beach, and as far west as Honaker, Va. Should the joint SlideFXBG and UMW Eagle Nation Day Event be a success, the City and UMW hope to make it an annual occurrence.

Clint Manning is the Tourism Product & Event Developer for the City of Fxbg

Slide FXBG

Labor Day, September 1 Start: UMW Jepson Center

descending gradient, but also due to the fact that its closure would’ve created the least impact on traffic. The idea of using William Street – between College Avenue and Littlepage Street – was dismissed for this very reason. Other potential venues

City of Fredericksburg and the Economic Development Authority of the City of Fredericksburg, in partnership with the University of Mary Washington. The event is being made possible thanks to the generous financial support and in-kind

Tkts: slidefxbg.com eventbrite.com Sliders must be a minimum of 44-iinchestall, or be supervised by their parents. But the event isn’t limited to children. The oldest person ever to ride an inner tube down The Urban Slide was a 95year-o old woman

Eagle Nation Day September 1 Trench Hill

723 Caroline St 899.8077 Daily 10-5:30 Sunday 12-5 2

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

3


Mark Bass

Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists Rita Allen Barbara Anderson Chuck Archer A.E. Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Waverly Brown Lynda Baer Mark Bass Aby Bethem Debie Bliss Collette Caprara Renee Dunn Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe k. Jeanne frazer Rich Gaudio Joan M. Geisler Jon Gerlach Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Erika V. Horn Maddie Huddle Karl Karch David C. Kennedy Jo Loving Clint Manning Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Pete Morelewicz Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Allie Names Sharon Null Sarah Perry M.L. Powers Paula Radenbush Rob Rudick Casey Alan Shaw Patricia Smith Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Tina Will Sonja Wise Norma Woodward Suzy Woollam Siobhan Young

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2018 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

Hinkle Ukulele

ON THE PORCH

August 2018

That Virginia Style

Buy Local

By A.E. Bayne

by mark bass

adopted it as their national instrument.” Hinkle says his friends have suggested that he may have a touch of Ukulele Acquisition Syndrome. Not only does he build

Earlier this year, we started a “buy local” campaign on both B101.5 and WFVA News talk 1230. You may have heard them. “Buy local, shop with your friends, family and neighbors, make new friends and help the local economy.” Pretty simple message but getting people to do this is another matter. Everyone will tell you that we all should buy local, but how many Amazon boxes do you see coming and going at the office and in your own neighborhood? At Centennial Broadcasting and Digital we depend on local businesses. They are our life blood. The only way we can maintain profitability. We meet with business owners and leaders every day and they all tell us that they also depend on the local community to insure their viability. Do we really get anything from Amazon as a community? They offer no local investment, no taxes, no employment, no local charitable contributions, nothing. LOCAL businesses, however, DO pay taxes, contribute to our local economy and employ your friends and family. They keep the schools open, the roads repaired, provide for police and fire protection and a lot more. Many local businesses allow you to order directly from their websites so you don’t have to go to an online retailer that is not connected to our area. Billions of dollars are spent online every year. Local businesses can compete if they change the way they do business. Many startups, tech firms and consultants are offering tools to help smaller retailers adjust. Some of the more interesting ones promise to narrow the gap between what e-commerce sites and physical stores know about their customers. Floor mats can measure store traffic, video analytics will track shoppers’ age, sex and mood, and beacons can gather data about what customers do in the shop

once they have signed up for free Wi-Fi. For now though, many American firms are reluctant to invest in such expensive new technology for stores that may not be open much longer. Despite troubles, there are examples of how brickand-mortar shops might thrive. One strategy is to offer distinctive products that are not available elsewhere (as does Zara, a clothing chain owned by Inditex), or which are difficult to sell online. A second is to give shoppers a great deal. TJX, an American firm, offers manufacturers’ surplus goods at bargain prices. Another option is a great experience. Champagne at Louis Vuitton stores or personalized advice at Nike are good examples. The most difficult route is to try to match Amazon’s retail standards including pricing and offer more. When local businesses learn about their client base, they are then empowered with the knowledge of how to retain and grow their client base and without growth local businesses will wither away. The pressure is not so much on all of us asking everyone to “buy local”. The real pressure is how to stand out, be different and make the story about your local business compelling to a point that the community knows about you. Advertising is one path to making you stand out among the crowd; however the message has to be relevant to the audience and must have a “call to action”. We speak often with advertisers who really do not have a concise message about their business and why anyone would want to actually go in and buy

messages

Virginia & Front Porch: Thanks for the Throwdown articles (Sophia Street Pottery Throwdown", May, June 2018). The event was a great success. Thanks for your help. Dan Finnegan

Front Porch Staff Great article on a great FXBG symbol ("Copper Shop", May, 2018). Thanks for reminding us that it is “alive & well”! Thomas Yost

Thank you, Virginia, for putting the information in the Front Porch for Stafford High School.("Night on Broadway", June, 2018) It is so appreciated, Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy

I’m so blessed to have picked up this copy of Front Porch (June, 2018) at Castiglias Restaurant.... Thankful the community has had Linda Bailey (“Giving Gifts to . the Community”), the great Johnny & Jean Johnson (“Teacher, Humanitaria”)....So many treasures. Susan Cooke

Hey Hey Virginia, 22 years is amazing! Congrats to the Front Porch! What would this city do without this awesome publication! Sandra Fedowitz

Virginia: Thanks for making a great paper every month. I know it's no easy task. Sarah Perry

Front porch fredericksburg

something. Amazon has people trained to believe that they have the lowest prices, they are much more convenient and somehow have your best interest at heart. Amazon is so bold they even charge an annual fee if you want the best “experience” when purchasing something from them. Imagine if the local hardware store charged an annual fee to get the best deals; they wouldn’t make it 30 days! However, the local hardware store can offer something Amazon can’t; superior personalized service and local community involvement. It all starts with one simple move. Resist the urge to shop online unless it’s a local business where you can purchase whatever it is you want online. At Centennial Broadcasting and Digital we strive to be a good citizen in our community. Twice a year we give away cash on-air to keep our listeners interested and we are also involved just about every major event that happens in our area. Whether you’re selling or buying Radio advertising, shoes or anything else; remember to keep it local. Our community will be much stronger for your effort. Don’t forget to support your local Radio Stations….and your local Front Porch Magazine…I read Front Porch “Cover-to-Cover” Mark Bass is Market Manager for Centennial Broadcasting & Digital He can be reached at mbass@wbqb.com or 540-274-4085

Like fine art, woodcraft can take a lifetime to perfect. Wasn’t it Malcolm Gladwell that suggested it takes 10,000 hours to master a skill? Larry Hinkle, a local musician and woodcrafter, is has certainly surpassed that then. Not only has he been known in the Fredericksburg area for his fine craftsmanship in cabinetry and carpentry, but he is also the man behind Hinkle Ukulele, a resource for fine, handcrafted ukuleles that are widely recognized around Fredericksburg. With his lifetime of expertise on guitar and a talent for woodcraft and conservation, Hinkle’s one-time interest in a new instrument quickly evolved into a passion. Today, one can purchase one of his locally sourced, handcrafted ukuleles for an affordable $600.00. Ironically, Hinkle says he himself has never been to Hawaii, but it was a move by a portion of his family that prompted him to really play his first ukulele. He doesn’t consider himself an esoteric ukulele player who wears Hawaiian shirts and leis, opting instead to call upon his punk rock roots and practice what he calls “Virginia-sstyle” Ukulele. To him, it’s just a further evolution of the ukulele. Hinkle explains, “The ukulele is not native to Hawaii. It arrived there from Europe. Ukuleles evolved from the machete, a four-string guitar that Portuguese merchant ships picked up off their own coastline on the island of Madeira. They introduced the ukulele to the Hawaiians in the late 1800s, who

them, he owns quite a few. Hinkle claims it is purely a matter of convenience so that he doesn’t have to tote one around everywhere he goes. At this point he has one stashed at most places that he frequents around town. He even started a band with some friends called Colonial Seafood to feature the ukulele as a lead instrument. For many new owners, the ukulele is an accessible instrument that can be a non-threatening introduction to music that won’t thwart a novice player’s drive to learn. Hinkle says, “The ukulele

makes it easy to become comfortable with playing music. You can learn a bunch of songs really quickly.” Hinkle continually perfects his ukulele craft and playing. He follows other makers on Instagram, and reads about how other makers craft the instruments. He says, “I like to think I’m getting better, I have been taking old soundboards from pianos to make my ukuleles recently, a trick I learned master Tommy maker Rodriguez out of S t a u n t o n (Virginia). Tommy makes exquisite, highend ukuleles. It’s a lot of work to break down old pianos, but the soundboards are like gold. Wood vibrates as the pianos are played, creating a standing wave, and the lignans in the wood will settle into the nodes where it doesn’t vibrate opening up the other parts of the wood. Wood that is older and has been vibrating its whole life is already broken in. When I’ve used fresh wood to make a ukulele, I have to break it in; it will sound better a year later. But with the piano wood ukuleles, they sound good straight off the bench.” The ukulele also doesn’t have to take a huge chunk out of your wallet, a detail Hinkle is keenly aware of since his

reason for constructing his first ukulele was born of his desire to save money when times were tight. Rather than shelling out $500 for a new uke, Hinkle purchased a kit for half the price and put his considerable woodworking expertise to good use by making his first ever Hinkle Ukulele. He’s learned a lot since that first model, but he tries to keep his ukes affordable so that everyone can enjoy them. Hinkle uses locally sourced wood in his ukuleles, like walnut, cherry, and white oak. He says, “Walnut is my favorite material to work with, not necessarily because it grows here, but because the location of the tree its from can be historically significant. I can honestly say to buyers, ‘This tree grew across from Kenmore Plantation, and I have the whole tree.’ Lately, I’ve really enjoyed using white oak for the body. It’s beautiful and sounds really good. I use cherry for my necks. Excluding the piano wood, I’ve taken a lot of the materials in my ukuleles from the log all the way to the finished product. I do the milling, curing, and all of it. “Over the past decade, the ukulele has gained legitimacy due to more musicians picking it up and using it in their sets”. Hinkle says, “I hope I have had something to do with that. I got a little bit of ribbing about playing it at first, but this is my jam. Playing it makes me feel really good, so that’s why I’m drawn to it. I wish I’d started playing it a lot earlier.”

A.E. Bayne is a veteran educator, writer, and artist. She publishes Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review, where this article first ran, and is a partner in the Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival. photos by Erika V. Horn.

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

5


Mark Bass

Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists Rita Allen Barbara Anderson Chuck Archer A.E. Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Waverly Brown Lynda Baer Mark Bass Aby Bethem Debie Bliss Collette Caprara Renee Dunn Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe k. Jeanne frazer Rich Gaudio Joan M. Geisler Jon Gerlach Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Erika V. Horn Maddie Huddle Karl Karch David C. Kennedy Jo Loving Clint Manning Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Pete Morelewicz Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Allie Names Sharon Null Sarah Perry M.L. Powers Paula Radenbush Rob Rudick Casey Alan Shaw Patricia Smith Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Tina Will Sonja Wise Norma Woodward Suzy Woollam Siobhan Young

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2018 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

Hinkle Ukulele

ON THE PORCH

August 2018

That Virginia Style

Buy Local

By A.E. Bayne

by mark bass

adopted it as their national instrument.” Hinkle says his friends have suggested that he may have a touch of Ukulele Acquisition Syndrome. Not only does he build

Earlier this year, we started a “buy local” campaign on both B101.5 and WFVA News talk 1230. You may have heard them. “Buy local, shop with your friends, family and neighbors, make new friends and help the local economy.” Pretty simple message but getting people to do this is another matter. Everyone will tell you that we all should buy local, but how many Amazon boxes do you see coming and going at the office and in your own neighborhood? At Centennial Broadcasting and Digital we depend on local businesses. They are our life blood. The only way we can maintain profitability. We meet with business owners and leaders every day and they all tell us that they also depend on the local community to insure their viability. Do we really get anything from Amazon as a community? They offer no local investment, no taxes, no employment, no local charitable contributions, nothing. LOCAL businesses, however, DO pay taxes, contribute to our local economy and employ your friends and family. They keep the schools open, the roads repaired, provide for police and fire protection and a lot more. Many local businesses allow you to order directly from their websites so you don’t have to go to an online retailer that is not connected to our area. Billions of dollars are spent online every year. Local businesses can compete if they change the way they do business. Many startups, tech firms and consultants are offering tools to help smaller retailers adjust. Some of the more interesting ones promise to narrow the gap between what e-commerce sites and physical stores know about their customers. Floor mats can measure store traffic, video analytics will track shoppers’ age, sex and mood, and beacons can gather data about what customers do in the shop

once they have signed up for free Wi-Fi. For now though, many American firms are reluctant to invest in such expensive new technology for stores that may not be open much longer. Despite troubles, there are examples of how brickand-mortar shops might thrive. One strategy is to offer distinctive products that are not available elsewhere (as does Zara, a clothing chain owned by Inditex), or which are difficult to sell online. A second is to give shoppers a great deal. TJX, an American firm, offers manufacturers’ surplus goods at bargain prices. Another option is a great experience. Champagne at Louis Vuitton stores or personalized advice at Nike are good examples. The most difficult route is to try to match Amazon’s retail standards including pricing and offer more. When local businesses learn about their client base, they are then empowered with the knowledge of how to retain and grow their client base and without growth local businesses will wither away. The pressure is not so much on all of us asking everyone to “buy local”. The real pressure is how to stand out, be different and make the story about your local business compelling to a point that the community knows about you. Advertising is one path to making you stand out among the crowd; however the message has to be relevant to the audience and must have a “call to action”. We speak often with advertisers who really do not have a concise message about their business and why anyone would want to actually go in and buy

messages

Virginia & Front Porch: Thanks for the Throwdown articles (Sophia Street Pottery Throwdown", May, June 2018). The event was a great success. Thanks for your help. Dan Finnegan

Front Porch Staff Great article on a great FXBG symbol ("Copper Shop", May, 2018). Thanks for reminding us that it is “alive & well”! Thomas Yost

Thank you, Virginia, for putting the information in the Front Porch for Stafford High School.("Night on Broadway", June, 2018) It is so appreciated, Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy

I’m so blessed to have picked up this copy of Front Porch (June, 2018) at Castiglias Restaurant.... Thankful the community has had Linda Bailey (“Giving Gifts to . the Community”), the great Johnny & Jean Johnson (“Teacher, Humanitaria”)....So many treasures. Susan Cooke

Hey Hey Virginia, 22 years is amazing! Congrats to the Front Porch! What would this city do without this awesome publication! Sandra Fedowitz

Virginia: Thanks for making a great paper every month. I know it's no easy task. Sarah Perry

Front porch fredericksburg

something. Amazon has people trained to believe that they have the lowest prices, they are much more convenient and somehow have your best interest at heart. Amazon is so bold they even charge an annual fee if you want the best “experience” when purchasing something from them. Imagine if the local hardware store charged an annual fee to get the best deals; they wouldn’t make it 30 days! However, the local hardware store can offer something Amazon can’t; superior personalized service and local community involvement. It all starts with one simple move. Resist the urge to shop online unless it’s a local business where you can purchase whatever it is you want online. At Centennial Broadcasting and Digital we strive to be a good citizen in our community. Twice a year we give away cash on-air to keep our listeners interested and we are also involved just about every major event that happens in our area. Whether you’re selling or buying Radio advertising, shoes or anything else; remember to keep it local. Our community will be much stronger for your effort. Don’t forget to support your local Radio Stations….and your local Front Porch Magazine…I read Front Porch “Cover-to-Cover” Mark Bass is Market Manager for Centennial Broadcasting & Digital He can be reached at mbass@wbqb.com or 540-274-4085

Like fine art, woodcraft can take a lifetime to perfect. Wasn’t it Malcolm Gladwell that suggested it takes 10,000 hours to master a skill? Larry Hinkle, a local musician and woodcrafter, is has certainly surpassed that then. Not only has he been known in the Fredericksburg area for his fine craftsmanship in cabinetry and carpentry, but he is also the man behind Hinkle Ukulele, a resource for fine, handcrafted ukuleles that are widely recognized around Fredericksburg. With his lifetime of expertise on guitar and a talent for woodcraft and conservation, Hinkle’s one-time interest in a new instrument quickly evolved into a passion. Today, one can purchase one of his locally sourced, handcrafted ukuleles for an affordable $600.00. Ironically, Hinkle says he himself has never been to Hawaii, but it was a move by a portion of his family that prompted him to really play his first ukulele. He doesn’t consider himself an esoteric ukulele player who wears Hawaiian shirts and leis, opting instead to call upon his punk rock roots and practice what he calls “Virginia-sstyle” Ukulele. To him, it’s just a further evolution of the ukulele. Hinkle explains, “The ukulele is not native to Hawaii. It arrived there from Europe. Ukuleles evolved from the machete, a four-string guitar that Portuguese merchant ships picked up off their own coastline on the island of Madeira. They introduced the ukulele to the Hawaiians in the late 1800s, who

them, he owns quite a few. Hinkle claims it is purely a matter of convenience so that he doesn’t have to tote one around everywhere he goes. At this point he has one stashed at most places that he frequents around town. He even started a band with some friends called Colonial Seafood to feature the ukulele as a lead instrument. For many new owners, the ukulele is an accessible instrument that can be a non-threatening introduction to music that won’t thwart a novice player’s drive to learn. Hinkle says, “The ukulele

makes it easy to become comfortable with playing music. You can learn a bunch of songs really quickly.” Hinkle continually perfects his ukulele craft and playing. He follows other makers on Instagram, and reads about how other makers craft the instruments. He says, “I like to think I’m getting better, I have been taking old soundboards from pianos to make my ukuleles recently, a trick I learned master Tommy maker Rodriguez out of S t a u n t o n (Virginia). Tommy makes exquisite, highend ukuleles. It’s a lot of work to break down old pianos, but the soundboards are like gold. Wood vibrates as the pianos are played, creating a standing wave, and the lignans in the wood will settle into the nodes where it doesn’t vibrate opening up the other parts of the wood. Wood that is older and has been vibrating its whole life is already broken in. When I’ve used fresh wood to make a ukulele, I have to break it in; it will sound better a year later. But with the piano wood ukuleles, they sound good straight off the bench.” The ukulele also doesn’t have to take a huge chunk out of your wallet, a detail Hinkle is keenly aware of since his

reason for constructing his first ukulele was born of his desire to save money when times were tight. Rather than shelling out $500 for a new uke, Hinkle purchased a kit for half the price and put his considerable woodworking expertise to good use by making his first ever Hinkle Ukulele. He’s learned a lot since that first model, but he tries to keep his ukes affordable so that everyone can enjoy them. Hinkle uses locally sourced wood in his ukuleles, like walnut, cherry, and white oak. He says, “Walnut is my favorite material to work with, not necessarily because it grows here, but because the location of the tree its from can be historically significant. I can honestly say to buyers, ‘This tree grew across from Kenmore Plantation, and I have the whole tree.’ Lately, I’ve really enjoyed using white oak for the body. It’s beautiful and sounds really good. I use cherry for my necks. Excluding the piano wood, I’ve taken a lot of the materials in my ukuleles from the log all the way to the finished product. I do the milling, curing, and all of it. “Over the past decade, the ukulele has gained legitimacy due to more musicians picking it up and using it in their sets”. Hinkle says, “I hope I have had something to do with that. I got a little bit of ribbing about playing it at first, but this is my jam. Playing it makes me feel really good, so that’s why I’m drawn to it. I wish I’d started playing it a lot earlier.”

A.E. Bayne is a veteran educator, writer, and artist. She publishes Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review, where this article first ran, and is a partner in the Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival. photos by Erika V. Horn.

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

5


On the Trails

How Does A Master Gardener Grow? Container and Raised Bed Gardens By Tina Will

Versatile, Practical, and Productive Do you have visions of growing your own vegetables and fruits…but ‘oh the work’…and ‘oh that tough clay soil!’ There are solutions to these problems, and two of our Master Gardeners are reaping a harvest this summer. Both container and raised bed gardens have been successfully promoted in recent years because many people enjoy the rewards of vegetable gardening and find it easier to establish a good gardening soil without digging through heavy clay. Years of traditional gardening gave way to a different method when Master Gardener Waverly Brown saw an idea she hadn’t considered: growing vegetables in containers. She was intrigued and realized that perhaps she could continue to enjoy raising vegetables with less work. She made a careful evaluation of

what would be involved and r e c o m m e n d s starting with one or two containers in order to get to know what will work for the different things being grown. There are many factors to consider: What type of container, how to provide drainage, and what mix of soil components are all questions that need the right answer. Plain garden soil is too dense for container plantings. Purchase a commercial planting mix or make your own soil from equal parts compost, a fine textured mulch, and vermiculite or perlite to lighten the soil and retain moisture. She uses large containers and has conveniently located them on the wide brick ledge by the door.

Rescues on the Rappahannock By Kevin Brown

result is a rich harvest of vegetables and fruits. If you’ve never tasted a homegrown potato, you really are missing their authentic flavor. He enjoys all the effort and grows enough to share with others. Few of us find it easy to garden in this area’s mostly clay soil, but it’s no use complaining about the soil any longer. Ready-made gardening soils solve the clay soil challenge, and all types of boxes and containers are available and provide plenty of good choices. It’s not too late; start the cool weather crops in mid to late August. Spinach, kale, parsley, and several others can be grown in Autumn and root crops improve as temperatures get cooler. Planning your garden is important. Virginia Cooperative Extension has two publications (pubs.ext.vt.edu) with answers to all the important elements to consider: Vegetable Gardening in Containers (Pub 426-3 336) and Container and Raised Bed Gardening (Pub 426-0 020).

Tina Will has volunteered with MGACRA for 13 years and lives near Ferry Farm in Stafford County. Photos by Waverly Brown and Tina Will

Raised bed gardening is similar to container gardening, and to quote Master Gardener Glenn Valdez (above right), it is “a new old idea.” He has built both raised boxes and framed floorless boxes. He grows his vegetables, fruits, and flowers in a soil mix of leaf compost, vermiculite, prepared garden soil, and a small amount of regular fertilizer. Most of his boxes are not raised high off the ground, instead they are on the ground itself. He has loosened the soil below these boxes to improve drainage and allow roots to grow down as far as they need to. Tomatoes, green peppers, melon, Brussel sprouts, garlic, kale, spinach, and many varieties of flowers are growing with enthusiasm. The

I’ve been hearing a lot of stories this year about our experienced local kayakers rescuing stranded tubers/paddlers on the Rappahannock River. I asked one of those kayakers, USMC veteran Dave Shook, to share a few eye-opening episodes to enlighten the public and help promote river safety. “27 May 18: Multiples rescues today. First, I assisted two adults without life jackets make their way down along the river bank to First Drop (adjacent to Riverside Dr). That would have been bad enough, but they had a small raft with a young child wearing only swimmies. “As I paddled up towards the entrance to Back Side (of Hunter’s Island), I passed by four recreational boaters that looked like they were trouble in the making. I paddled straight through Back Side rather than stopping and playing, figuring that there might be a rescue needed when I came out. Sure enough, as I exited Back Side there was one guy with his boat sunk in the water,

and he was trying to manhandle it at the beginning of Second Ledge on river left. I watched him float down river for a little bit, but he was obviously getting tired and also trying to stand up any chance he got, so I paddled down and had him grab my stern and I ferried him over to the river left shore. “When I ferried back over to the river right channel, I came across another recreational boater standing on the rock that's just above Cowan's Wave (adjacent to Ficklen Island), looking warily at Cowan's Wave and the wave train just below it, and Washing Machine down below that. Again, no life jacket. And I could see that he was shivering. I caught the eddy below the rock, and after making sure that he had the strength to do so, got him to get in the water and hold my stern and I ferried him over to the beach on river right just below Cowan's wave. A productive afternoon.

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

29 Jun 18: Russell Kosch, Bobby Hume, and I paddled yesterday and ended up rescuing Timothy and Zoe. Luckily we were hanging out downstream from BFR (Big Friggin’ Rock) and saw them hanging on their recreational kayaks that were full of water and just above the surface. We got them to shore on river left, back into their kayaks, and shepherded them down to Wendy Klinke’s favorite put-in for beginners, the grassy knoll on river right alongside Fall Hill Ave. “These are just a few episodes of too many to tell here. Our group of experienced local paddlers do what they can to help others who need assistance and/or rescue on the river. I personally have been involved in four or five rescues this year. I wouldn’t be surprised if the total isn’t over a hundred in a given year. Some of these are very simple where the person just needs to be coached a bit to give them the confidence to extract themselves from their predicament and make their way to shore. Other times it is more serious, and if I or another kayaker doesn’t come along when we do, the person(s) might attempt something that could have a tragic result. For instance, their situation might be stable but rather than wait for help, they decide to swim or walk through a section of swift moving water and get swept into a strainer, get their foot entrapped, or get carried downstream in cold water and succumb to hypothermia or drown. “Boaters and stand-up paddleboarders should always wear a personal flotation device (PFD) and helmet on rivers with rapids. Far more rocks are just beneath the surface than are exposed. A person can easily be knocked unconscious if their head strikes a rock. A PFD will keep them at the surface until they are rescued. An inner tube is not a PFD!

“Inexperienced boaters should never paddle the Rappahannock when its level is above 3.5 feet. This is the level that corresponds to where green meets yellow on the tri-color gauge that one can see on the left shore of the river when standing on the Heritage Trail alongside Fall Hill Avenue. Recreational sit-in kayaks are never appropriate for paddling in rapids. Once they fill with water, they become more hindrance than help. The river was at 4.2 feet on 27 May and 3.7 feet on 29 June. You can check the current level before leaving your residence by checking the USGS gauge at the following link: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?016 68000” Great thanks to Dave and our experienced kayakers for selflessly rescuing others while out there on the Rappahannock river. Kayak training sessions are available at the Virginia Outdoor Center (540-371-5085), River Rock Outfitter (540-372-8708), and Team River Runners (for Veterans) (229-5078787).

Kevin Brown is the administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" & the "FXBG City Council Public Forum" Facebook Groups, a downtown resident & a Military Analyst More than 80 people have drowned in the Rappahannock River since 1972. Visitors to the river should be aware of strong currents, underwater debris such as trees and rocks and sharp changes in water level. Wear life preservers, shoes & helmets if kayaking, boating or tubing

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Dog Walking Pet Sitting Companion Play Time & Mini Furies, Too! (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “City PetSitting” 6

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802 SUZY STONE

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

7


On the Trails

How Does A Master Gardener Grow? Container and Raised Bed Gardens By Tina Will

Versatile, Practical, and Productive Do you have visions of growing your own vegetables and fruits…but ‘oh the work’…and ‘oh that tough clay soil!’ There are solutions to these problems, and two of our Master Gardeners are reaping a harvest this summer. Both container and raised bed gardens have been successfully promoted in recent years because many people enjoy the rewards of vegetable gardening and find it easier to establish a good gardening soil without digging through heavy clay. Years of traditional gardening gave way to a different method when Master Gardener Waverly Brown saw an idea she hadn’t considered: growing vegetables in containers. She was intrigued and realized that perhaps she could continue to enjoy raising vegetables with less work. She made a careful evaluation of

what would be involved and r e c o m m e n d s starting with one or two containers in order to get to know what will work for the different things being grown. There are many factors to consider: What type of container, how to provide drainage, and what mix of soil components are all questions that need the right answer. Plain garden soil is too dense for container plantings. Purchase a commercial planting mix or make your own soil from equal parts compost, a fine textured mulch, and vermiculite or perlite to lighten the soil and retain moisture. She uses large containers and has conveniently located them on the wide brick ledge by the door.

Rescues on the Rappahannock By Kevin Brown

result is a rich harvest of vegetables and fruits. If you’ve never tasted a homegrown potato, you really are missing their authentic flavor. He enjoys all the effort and grows enough to share with others. Few of us find it easy to garden in this area’s mostly clay soil, but it’s no use complaining about the soil any longer. Ready-made gardening soils solve the clay soil challenge, and all types of boxes and containers are available and provide plenty of good choices. It’s not too late; start the cool weather crops in mid to late August. Spinach, kale, parsley, and several others can be grown in Autumn and root crops improve as temperatures get cooler. Planning your garden is important. Virginia Cooperative Extension has two publications (pubs.ext.vt.edu) with answers to all the important elements to consider: Vegetable Gardening in Containers (Pub 426-3 336) and Container and Raised Bed Gardening (Pub 426-0 020).

Tina Will has volunteered with MGACRA for 13 years and lives near Ferry Farm in Stafford County. Photos by Waverly Brown and Tina Will

Raised bed gardening is similar to container gardening, and to quote Master Gardener Glenn Valdez (above right), it is “a new old idea.” He has built both raised boxes and framed floorless boxes. He grows his vegetables, fruits, and flowers in a soil mix of leaf compost, vermiculite, prepared garden soil, and a small amount of regular fertilizer. Most of his boxes are not raised high off the ground, instead they are on the ground itself. He has loosened the soil below these boxes to improve drainage and allow roots to grow down as far as they need to. Tomatoes, green peppers, melon, Brussel sprouts, garlic, kale, spinach, and many varieties of flowers are growing with enthusiasm. The

I’ve been hearing a lot of stories this year about our experienced local kayakers rescuing stranded tubers/paddlers on the Rappahannock River. I asked one of those kayakers, USMC veteran Dave Shook, to share a few eye-opening episodes to enlighten the public and help promote river safety. “27 May 18: Multiples rescues today. First, I assisted two adults without life jackets make their way down along the river bank to First Drop (adjacent to Riverside Dr). That would have been bad enough, but they had a small raft with a young child wearing only swimmies. “As I paddled up towards the entrance to Back Side (of Hunter’s Island), I passed by four recreational boaters that looked like they were trouble in the making. I paddled straight through Back Side rather than stopping and playing, figuring that there might be a rescue needed when I came out. Sure enough, as I exited Back Side there was one guy with his boat sunk in the water,

and he was trying to manhandle it at the beginning of Second Ledge on river left. I watched him float down river for a little bit, but he was obviously getting tired and also trying to stand up any chance he got, so I paddled down and had him grab my stern and I ferried him over to the river left shore. “When I ferried back over to the river right channel, I came across another recreational boater standing on the rock that's just above Cowan's Wave (adjacent to Ficklen Island), looking warily at Cowan's Wave and the wave train just below it, and Washing Machine down below that. Again, no life jacket. And I could see that he was shivering. I caught the eddy below the rock, and after making sure that he had the strength to do so, got him to get in the water and hold my stern and I ferried him over to the beach on river right just below Cowan's wave. A productive afternoon.

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

29 Jun 18: Russell Kosch, Bobby Hume, and I paddled yesterday and ended up rescuing Timothy and Zoe. Luckily we were hanging out downstream from BFR (Big Friggin’ Rock) and saw them hanging on their recreational kayaks that were full of water and just above the surface. We got them to shore on river left, back into their kayaks, and shepherded them down to Wendy Klinke’s favorite put-in for beginners, the grassy knoll on river right alongside Fall Hill Ave. “These are just a few episodes of too many to tell here. Our group of experienced local paddlers do what they can to help others who need assistance and/or rescue on the river. I personally have been involved in four or five rescues this year. I wouldn’t be surprised if the total isn’t over a hundred in a given year. Some of these are very simple where the person just needs to be coached a bit to give them the confidence to extract themselves from their predicament and make their way to shore. Other times it is more serious, and if I or another kayaker doesn’t come along when we do, the person(s) might attempt something that could have a tragic result. For instance, their situation might be stable but rather than wait for help, they decide to swim or walk through a section of swift moving water and get swept into a strainer, get their foot entrapped, or get carried downstream in cold water and succumb to hypothermia or drown. “Boaters and stand-up paddleboarders should always wear a personal flotation device (PFD) and helmet on rivers with rapids. Far more rocks are just beneath the surface than are exposed. A person can easily be knocked unconscious if their head strikes a rock. A PFD will keep them at the surface until they are rescued. An inner tube is not a PFD!

“Inexperienced boaters should never paddle the Rappahannock when its level is above 3.5 feet. This is the level that corresponds to where green meets yellow on the tri-color gauge that one can see on the left shore of the river when standing on the Heritage Trail alongside Fall Hill Avenue. Recreational sit-in kayaks are never appropriate for paddling in rapids. Once they fill with water, they become more hindrance than help. The river was at 4.2 feet on 27 May and 3.7 feet on 29 June. You can check the current level before leaving your residence by checking the USGS gauge at the following link: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?016 68000” Great thanks to Dave and our experienced kayakers for selflessly rescuing others while out there on the Rappahannock river. Kayak training sessions are available at the Virginia Outdoor Center (540-371-5085), River Rock Outfitter (540-372-8708), and Team River Runners (for Veterans) (229-5078787).

Kevin Brown is the administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" & the "FXBG City Council Public Forum" Facebook Groups, a downtown resident & a Military Analyst More than 80 people have drowned in the Rappahannock River since 1972. Visitors to the river should be aware of strong currents, underwater debris such as trees and rocks and sharp changes in water level. Wear life preservers, shoes & helmets if kayaking, boating or tubing

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Dog Walking Pet Sitting Companion Play Time & Mini Furies, Too! (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “City PetSitting” 6

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802 SUZY STONE

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

7


“I Have A Friend”

FXBG PorchFest

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop

reasons to celebrate By Laurie Black

By Lynda Baer

371-4455 1707R Princess Anne you’re likely getting involved with a caring group of people when you become a volunteer for an organization like the Senior Visitors Program. Overall, the longevity of the Senior Visitors Program volunteers and their time dedicated to members of our community in inspiring. One hour a week is a small sacrifice to make to have a significant and lasting impact on members of the community.”

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook

If you know a senior who could benefit from having a weekly, friendly visit OR if you are ready to volunteer to be a friend to a senior, call the Senior Visitors Program at (540) 371-2 2704 or visit our website at mhafred.org.

Laurie Black is the Administrative Assistant for the Senior Visitors Program She can be reached at mhafaa@mhafred.org There are plenty of reasons to celebrate in July for Todd Rump and his friend, Darnell. Darnell celebrates his birthday, and it is three years ago in July that Todd and Darnell became friends through the Senior Visitors Program. Darnell heard about the Senior Visitors Program from another senior in his apartment complex. With no friends or family in the Fredericksburg area, Darnell saw the Senior Visitors Program as an opportunity to get out in the community and enjoy other people. Two weeks after joining the program, Darnell was introduced to Todd. “Todd is wonderful,” says Darnell. “He is a friend, almost like a brother. In fact, I can call him my second brother. We talk on many topics and sometimes agree to disagree. Anything I need, he makes an effort to help me. The thing I appreciate the most is that he takes time to be there for me.” Todd and Darnell get together once a week. They usually go out to lunch and run errands. Darnell explains, “Todd leaves it up to me. He says, “Where would you like to go today?”” Todd says, “One of our more memorable visits was a trip to the movies to see “Race”, a movie about Jessie Owen’s life and gold medal victories in the 1936 Olympics. Darnell mentioned that he enjoyed going to the movie theater and it was nice to be able to take him there to see a movie on the big screen.”

8

August 2018

Todd explains that the Senior Visitors Program drew him in because “I thought the Senior Visitors Program would allow me to have an impact in the community while balancing my limited available free time. I also think seniors are often overlooked in the community and this is a small, but impactful way to show them people are thinking about them.” Todd says of Darnell, “I consider him a friend and I look forward to seeing him. I enjoy talking to Darnell about sports and the news and hearing his perspective about them. Darnell is probably the most technologically savvy resident in his complex and often is helping out neighbors with issues they may be having with their electronic devices. He has also lent a helping hand to a neighbor that returned from physical therapy to help them acclimate back to their home.” When asked, how he and Todd would celebrate his birthday this year, Darnell suggests, “Oh, we’ll probably go out to eat. Maybe we’ll go to the same Indian food restaurant we went to last year. They have a fun atmosphere and good food.” It seems that more than just a birthday, Todd and Darnell will be able to celebrate being friends. Darnell laughs, “I’m going to keep him! He’s not going anywhere.” Todd is certainly dedicated to the program. Todd even recruited his wife, Sarah, to become a volunteer. “There has not been much that has surprised me about the Senior Visitors Program since

Front porch fredericksburg

Donate to a Cancer Organization

Ready for more FREE summer music events for the family? Then, join other music lovers at the Fredericksburg PorchFest on Marye Street on August 18th. The first PorchFest was held in Ithaca, New York, in 2007. Since then there are over 115 annual PorchFests across the US and Canada. Fredericksburg PorchFest is another community arts event sponsored by The Arts and Cultural Council of the Rappahannock (ACCR) to showcase the rich artistic offerings in our region. Where will Fredericksburg PorchFest be held? On August 18th from 10 am to 4 pm, porches in the 800 and 900 block of Marye Street will be alive with several types of music. Up to twelve bands will perform for about an hour on different porches on a rotational schedule throughout the day. A few of the already committed musical groups are Laurie Rose Griffith and Pete Mealy; Beltway Brass; Spanglish; the Fredericksburg Jazz Collective; Sue Henderson and Ray

Laurie Rose Griffith & Peter Mealy Dempsey; and Lady Fingers.

What can we bring? T

Where should we park?

This is a family event, so we want everyone to be safe. Marye Street will be closed so that attendees can bring folding chairs to sit comfortably and safely in the street to enjoy the music. Children also will be able to blow bubbles and to use sidewalk chalk in the street to create their own artwork. While NO coolers or alcoholic beverages are permitted, bottled water will be available for free as well as local food trucks such as the Sweet Sno/We Grillin’ & Chillin’ Food Truck. For the comfort of attendees, portable toilets will be on site.

ACCR sincerely appreciates the willingness of the University of Mary Washington to permit Fredericksburg PorchFest to use the parking lot at the corner of William and Sunken Road for this August 18th community event. Other parking is available along Hanover Street and Kenmore Avenue as well as in the lot across from the old Free Lance-Star building on William Street. This event is made possible by a grant from The Community Fund of The Community Foundation of the Rappahannock River Region. If you would like to place an advertisement in the printed Fredericksburg PorchFest program event and on our website, visit www.fredericksburgporchfest.org for more information.

Want to help?

Thank You Fredericksburg for Your Support Since 1997

Volunteers are the heart of any event such as PorchFest. ACCR would love to have more volunteers to help move the equipment of musicians, hand out bottles of water, sit at the barricades and move them if necessary, to hand out schedules, to empty trash, and to clean-up from 4-5 pm. T-shirts will be available for volunteers. Contact us at the Fredericksburg PorchFest website or email info@fredericksburgporchfest.org to volunteer!

First Annual Fredericksburg PorchFest August 18, 10 am to 4 pm. Mayre Street, 800-9 900 Block

Lynda Baer is the Chairman of Fredericksburg PorchFest

Accepting New Patients Emergency Patients Welcome Participant With Most Major Insurance Plans 131 Park Hill Dr, FXBG, 22401 540-373-0602 fdadental.com

August 18, Mayre St 800-900 Block front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

9


“I Have A Friend”

FXBG PorchFest

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop

reasons to celebrate By Laurie Black

By Lynda Baer

371-4455 1707R Princess Anne you’re likely getting involved with a caring group of people when you become a volunteer for an organization like the Senior Visitors Program. Overall, the longevity of the Senior Visitors Program volunteers and their time dedicated to members of our community in inspiring. One hour a week is a small sacrifice to make to have a significant and lasting impact on members of the community.”

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook

If you know a senior who could benefit from having a weekly, friendly visit OR if you are ready to volunteer to be a friend to a senior, call the Senior Visitors Program at (540) 371-2 2704 or visit our website at mhafred.org.

Laurie Black is the Administrative Assistant for the Senior Visitors Program She can be reached at mhafaa@mhafred.org There are plenty of reasons to celebrate in July for Todd Rump and his friend, Darnell. Darnell celebrates his birthday, and it is three years ago in July that Todd and Darnell became friends through the Senior Visitors Program. Darnell heard about the Senior Visitors Program from another senior in his apartment complex. With no friends or family in the Fredericksburg area, Darnell saw the Senior Visitors Program as an opportunity to get out in the community and enjoy other people. Two weeks after joining the program, Darnell was introduced to Todd. “Todd is wonderful,” says Darnell. “He is a friend, almost like a brother. In fact, I can call him my second brother. We talk on many topics and sometimes agree to disagree. Anything I need, he makes an effort to help me. The thing I appreciate the most is that he takes time to be there for me.” Todd and Darnell get together once a week. They usually go out to lunch and run errands. Darnell explains, “Todd leaves it up to me. He says, “Where would you like to go today?”” Todd says, “One of our more memorable visits was a trip to the movies to see “Race”, a movie about Jessie Owen’s life and gold medal victories in the 1936 Olympics. Darnell mentioned that he enjoyed going to the movie theater and it was nice to be able to take him there to see a movie on the big screen.”

8

August 2018

Todd explains that the Senior Visitors Program drew him in because “I thought the Senior Visitors Program would allow me to have an impact in the community while balancing my limited available free time. I also think seniors are often overlooked in the community and this is a small, but impactful way to show them people are thinking about them.” Todd says of Darnell, “I consider him a friend and I look forward to seeing him. I enjoy talking to Darnell about sports and the news and hearing his perspective about them. Darnell is probably the most technologically savvy resident in his complex and often is helping out neighbors with issues they may be having with their electronic devices. He has also lent a helping hand to a neighbor that returned from physical therapy to help them acclimate back to their home.” When asked, how he and Todd would celebrate his birthday this year, Darnell suggests, “Oh, we’ll probably go out to eat. Maybe we’ll go to the same Indian food restaurant we went to last year. They have a fun atmosphere and good food.” It seems that more than just a birthday, Todd and Darnell will be able to celebrate being friends. Darnell laughs, “I’m going to keep him! He’s not going anywhere.” Todd is certainly dedicated to the program. Todd even recruited his wife, Sarah, to become a volunteer. “There has not been much that has surprised me about the Senior Visitors Program since

Front porch fredericksburg

Donate to a Cancer Organization

Ready for more FREE summer music events for the family? Then, join other music lovers at the Fredericksburg PorchFest on Marye Street on August 18th. The first PorchFest was held in Ithaca, New York, in 2007. Since then there are over 115 annual PorchFests across the US and Canada. Fredericksburg PorchFest is another community arts event sponsored by The Arts and Cultural Council of the Rappahannock (ACCR) to showcase the rich artistic offerings in our region. Where will Fredericksburg PorchFest be held? On August 18th from 10 am to 4 pm, porches in the 800 and 900 block of Marye Street will be alive with several types of music. Up to twelve bands will perform for about an hour on different porches on a rotational schedule throughout the day. A few of the already committed musical groups are Laurie Rose Griffith and Pete Mealy; Beltway Brass; Spanglish; the Fredericksburg Jazz Collective; Sue Henderson and Ray

Laurie Rose Griffith & Peter Mealy Dempsey; and Lady Fingers.

What can we bring? T

Where should we park?

This is a family event, so we want everyone to be safe. Marye Street will be closed so that attendees can bring folding chairs to sit comfortably and safely in the street to enjoy the music. Children also will be able to blow bubbles and to use sidewalk chalk in the street to create their own artwork. While NO coolers or alcoholic beverages are permitted, bottled water will be available for free as well as local food trucks such as the Sweet Sno/We Grillin’ & Chillin’ Food Truck. For the comfort of attendees, portable toilets will be on site.

ACCR sincerely appreciates the willingness of the University of Mary Washington to permit Fredericksburg PorchFest to use the parking lot at the corner of William and Sunken Road for this August 18th community event. Other parking is available along Hanover Street and Kenmore Avenue as well as in the lot across from the old Free Lance-Star building on William Street. This event is made possible by a grant from The Community Fund of The Community Foundation of the Rappahannock River Region. If you would like to place an advertisement in the printed Fredericksburg PorchFest program event and on our website, visit www.fredericksburgporchfest.org for more information.

Want to help?

Thank You Fredericksburg for Your Support Since 1997

Volunteers are the heart of any event such as PorchFest. ACCR would love to have more volunteers to help move the equipment of musicians, hand out bottles of water, sit at the barricades and move them if necessary, to hand out schedules, to empty trash, and to clean-up from 4-5 pm. T-shirts will be available for volunteers. Contact us at the Fredericksburg PorchFest website or email info@fredericksburgporchfest.org to volunteer!

First Annual Fredericksburg PorchFest August 18, 10 am to 4 pm. Mayre Street, 800-9 900 Block

Lynda Baer is the Chairman of Fredericksburg PorchFest

Accepting New Patients Emergency Patients Welcome Participant With Most Major Insurance Plans 131 Park Hill Dr, FXBG, 22401 540-373-0602 fdadental.com

August 18, Mayre St 800-900 Block front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

9


Bikes, Trikes & Kids

The Sunken Well Tavern

chef blake cycles for kids

I Didn’t Know .... The story behind the man behind the bar By k. Jeanne fraser

By aby bethem Blake Bethem wanted a goal outside of the kitchen, and his popular Vivify restaurant. He learned about Chef's Cycle through social media. It's message speaks to him as it supports the No Kid Hungry. organization (nokidhungry.com) Staggering statistics show 1 in 6 children are hungry. "I have three boys, and I see how they eat. To succeed in school and day- to- day high activities, I'm thankful they have enough food to eat. As a chef this organization spoke to me, because cooking for others is what I do- No Kid Hungry helps provide things like free breakfast in school, meals in the Summer, support in teaching how to make a healthy budget meal. Feeding kids is something I can understand- and I wanted the challenge with this event. Riding 100 miles a day for 3 days will test my limits, more then I have in a very long time physically and mentally." Chef's Cycle has only existed for about three years. It's a fundraising endurance event featuring award winning chef's 'fighting hunger outside the kitchen.' 'Chefs Cycle has engaged culinary talents who want to push their limits by completing a three day, 300 mile ride while raising funds and awareness in support of No Kid Hungry. There are two national rides- one in California, and one in Charlottesville, VA in September. Blake is training for September. The goal is to raise $7500. Blake is not one to ask for money from anyone "I like to see a direct result when asking for money, for every $1 raised it helps translate to 10 healthy meals directly going to children who need it. I have not trained for anything like this before, and I feel good knowing the hard training will be for a good cause. The hardest challenge has been finding the time for the long rides outside of working, I think as people see me out there and learn what I'm doing it will help draw attention to this organization.

" The money raised from this event does trickle down to our region. According to Star article, published on the Free Lance-S June 12th, Cathy Jett- "No Kid Hungry Virginia funds the grants for providing $5000 to Fredericksburg directly for Summer meals, they help fund 21 organizations in Virginia and organizes the texting and weekly update services to send information for the Summer meals." Strangeways Brewery, Fredericksburg has been kind enough to work with us for hosting an event on Sunday, August 12th. We plan to have 10 grown-ups racing on tricycles, a live band, beer and pulled pork barbecue picnic fare provided by Chef Blake himself. It should be a fun family friendly event. Every dollar of proceeds goes directly to Blake's Chefs Cycle ride. "I am so proud of him, it has been a great goal for him to strive for. Blake is very humble and for anyone that knows him- he does not like to ask for help in the form of money or otherwise, I'm hopeful the community comes together to commend his accomplishment and help in supporting this cause. Blake has been a chef in restaurants in Fredericksburg for over 20 years. It's our turn to give back and support his mission. Besides won't it be fun to see grown up's on trikes?!" (Aby says)

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well

Chef Blke’s Trike Race Strangeways Brewery August 12, 2-6 6pm

Aby Bethem is Blake’s wife & business partner. They own Vivify Burger & Lounge, downtown

To donate directly to Blake's sitejoin.nokidhungry.org/goto/CC18_blakebet hem To buy tickets to the Bikes & Trikes event on August 12th, please use the QR code (see ad pg 2) or visit us at Vivify Burger & Lounge. You can follow his training pictures and progress on Instagram- vivifyburger or bethemandsons

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

10

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

.If first impressions are lasting impressions, Dan Gatto, bartender at Harry’s Ale House in the Harrison Crossing Shopping Center has a lock on excellence. And don’t take that comment to mean just a skin- deep impression. From an always neat and perfectly trimmed beard to the meticulous environment on the working side of the bar, Dan exudes professionalism. Go beyond what you can see and there’s a whole lot more to this guy. As a career Air Force officer, Dan’s father moved his family around the globe settling on Fredericksburg 14 years ago after he retired. Dan said, “Learning how to get along in different cultures and making new friends every few years was a good education in being successful in life. I didn’t set out to be a bartender; it just sort of happened after I filled in at the club house in Lake of the Woods. Being a military brat helped.” Dan likens his role of bartender as the combination of a diplomat, a juggler with many plates on a stick, and a chess match wherein the players have to look ahead and anticipate moves.

For the last seven years, Dan and a group of high school friends from around the country have met for a weekend in Illinois to play video games. Not unusual until he mentions that they are all in their 40’s! Not one to seek the spotlight, Dan revealed that “My friend stumbled upon a video game marathon years ago while surfing the ‘net. It looked like a cool way to get together with friends and do good at the same time.” Boys will be boys, but this group plays to benefit Doctors Without Borders. “This year we achieved a group best of almost $4,000 in one weekend.” The guys raise funds from donations from their followers who tune in to the marathon on a Twitch TV streaming channel. While in the beginning, they only streamed once annually, they now meet online during the week to do art streams, as well as gaming streams. www.retrorama.net While tending bar, Dan has been attending Germanna Community College where he received his associate’s degree in computer science. “It took me 11 years to finish a two-year degree program, and I wouldn’t have done it without the encouragement of Professor Gerald Miller. He kept me going even when I had to take years off for treatment for cancer and kept in touch even when I wasn't enrolled.” As someone who earns his living serving alcohol, Dan is not unaware of the irony of a drunk driver who hit and critically injured him and remains cognizant of his need to be aware of the alcohol intake of the guests he serves. He talked about the TIPS program that bartenders in Fredericksburg [and elsewhere] take to reduce the number of alcohol-impaired drivers on the road. (see www.gettips.com for more information on the Training for Intervention Procedures). “Successfully completing the program is a requirement to work at Harry’s.” (For those who don’t know, Harry’s has been instrumental in securing thousands of dollars for local organizations through its Monday Night Charity Dinners). Asked what he likes about Fredericksburg, Dan quickly responded with “the people. Fredericksburg is not a big city, but feels like one because there’s a lot to do, a variety of places to eat and have fun with friends, there’s a deep sense of history, and it’s alive and evolving.” The one thing he doesn’t like is the loss of the Fredericksburg Ice Rink. “My friends and I played hockey there for nine years. Now we have to go to Dale City; an easy drive up 95, but right around the corner was much better.”

Wearing his game-p playing suit while traveling means no delays with TSA. “I think they think someone dressed like this couldn’t possibly be trying to sneak contraband on board an airline.”

Everyone has a story. I can't see it, but I believe there is a neon sign on my forehead that reads " Talk to me" and so people do. And I listen. ~ K.jeanne fraser

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

11


Bikes, Trikes & Kids

The Sunken Well Tavern

chef blake cycles for kids

I Didn’t Know .... The story behind the man behind the bar By k. Jeanne fraser

By aby bethem Blake Bethem wanted a goal outside of the kitchen, and his popular Vivify restaurant. He learned about Chef's Cycle through social media. It's message speaks to him as it supports the No Kid Hungry. organization (nokidhungry.com) Staggering statistics show 1 in 6 children are hungry. "I have three boys, and I see how they eat. To succeed in school and day- to- day high activities, I'm thankful they have enough food to eat. As a chef this organization spoke to me, because cooking for others is what I do- No Kid Hungry helps provide things like free breakfast in school, meals in the Summer, support in teaching how to make a healthy budget meal. Feeding kids is something I can understand- and I wanted the challenge with this event. Riding 100 miles a day for 3 days will test my limits, more then I have in a very long time physically and mentally." Chef's Cycle has only existed for about three years. It's a fundraising endurance event featuring award winning chef's 'fighting hunger outside the kitchen.' 'Chefs Cycle has engaged culinary talents who want to push their limits by completing a three day, 300 mile ride while raising funds and awareness in support of No Kid Hungry. There are two national rides- one in California, and one in Charlottesville, VA in September. Blake is training for September. The goal is to raise $7500. Blake is not one to ask for money from anyone "I like to see a direct result when asking for money, for every $1 raised it helps translate to 10 healthy meals directly going to children who need it. I have not trained for anything like this before, and I feel good knowing the hard training will be for a good cause. The hardest challenge has been finding the time for the long rides outside of working, I think as people see me out there and learn what I'm doing it will help draw attention to this organization.

" The money raised from this event does trickle down to our region. According to Star article, published on the Free Lance-S June 12th, Cathy Jett- "No Kid Hungry Virginia funds the grants for providing $5000 to Fredericksburg directly for Summer meals, they help fund 21 organizations in Virginia and organizes the texting and weekly update services to send information for the Summer meals." Strangeways Brewery, Fredericksburg has been kind enough to work with us for hosting an event on Sunday, August 12th. We plan to have 10 grown-ups racing on tricycles, a live band, beer and pulled pork barbecue picnic fare provided by Chef Blake himself. It should be a fun family friendly event. Every dollar of proceeds goes directly to Blake's Chefs Cycle ride. "I am so proud of him, it has been a great goal for him to strive for. Blake is very humble and for anyone that knows him- he does not like to ask for help in the form of money or otherwise, I'm hopeful the community comes together to commend his accomplishment and help in supporting this cause. Blake has been a chef in restaurants in Fredericksburg for over 20 years. It's our turn to give back and support his mission. Besides won't it be fun to see grown up's on trikes?!" (Aby says)

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well

Chef Blke’s Trike Race Strangeways Brewery August 12, 2-6 6pm

Aby Bethem is Blake’s wife & business partner. They own Vivify Burger & Lounge, downtown

To donate directly to Blake's sitejoin.nokidhungry.org/goto/CC18_blakebet hem To buy tickets to the Bikes & Trikes event on August 12th, please use the QR code (see ad pg 2) or visit us at Vivify Burger & Lounge. You can follow his training pictures and progress on Instagram- vivifyburger or bethemandsons

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

10

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

.If first impressions are lasting impressions, Dan Gatto, bartender at Harry’s Ale House in the Harrison Crossing Shopping Center has a lock on excellence. And don’t take that comment to mean just a skin- deep impression. From an always neat and perfectly trimmed beard to the meticulous environment on the working side of the bar, Dan exudes professionalism. Go beyond what you can see and there’s a whole lot more to this guy. As a career Air Force officer, Dan’s father moved his family around the globe settling on Fredericksburg 14 years ago after he retired. Dan said, “Learning how to get along in different cultures and making new friends every few years was a good education in being successful in life. I didn’t set out to be a bartender; it just sort of happened after I filled in at the club house in Lake of the Woods. Being a military brat helped.” Dan likens his role of bartender as the combination of a diplomat, a juggler with many plates on a stick, and a chess match wherein the players have to look ahead and anticipate moves.

For the last seven years, Dan and a group of high school friends from around the country have met for a weekend in Illinois to play video games. Not unusual until he mentions that they are all in their 40’s! Not one to seek the spotlight, Dan revealed that “My friend stumbled upon a video game marathon years ago while surfing the ‘net. It looked like a cool way to get together with friends and do good at the same time.” Boys will be boys, but this group plays to benefit Doctors Without Borders. “This year we achieved a group best of almost $4,000 in one weekend.” The guys raise funds from donations from their followers who tune in to the marathon on a Twitch TV streaming channel. While in the beginning, they only streamed once annually, they now meet online during the week to do art streams, as well as gaming streams. www.retrorama.net While tending bar, Dan has been attending Germanna Community College where he received his associate’s degree in computer science. “It took me 11 years to finish a two-year degree program, and I wouldn’t have done it without the encouragement of Professor Gerald Miller. He kept me going even when I had to take years off for treatment for cancer and kept in touch even when I wasn't enrolled.” As someone who earns his living serving alcohol, Dan is not unaware of the irony of a drunk driver who hit and critically injured him and remains cognizant of his need to be aware of the alcohol intake of the guests he serves. He talked about the TIPS program that bartenders in Fredericksburg [and elsewhere] take to reduce the number of alcohol-impaired drivers on the road. (see www.gettips.com for more information on the Training for Intervention Procedures). “Successfully completing the program is a requirement to work at Harry’s.” (For those who don’t know, Harry’s has been instrumental in securing thousands of dollars for local organizations through its Monday Night Charity Dinners). Asked what he likes about Fredericksburg, Dan quickly responded with “the people. Fredericksburg is not a big city, but feels like one because there’s a lot to do, a variety of places to eat and have fun with friends, there’s a deep sense of history, and it’s alive and evolving.” The one thing he doesn’t like is the loss of the Fredericksburg Ice Rink. “My friends and I played hockey there for nine years. Now we have to go to Dale City; an easy drive up 95, but right around the corner was much better.”

Wearing his game-p playing suit while traveling means no delays with TSA. “I think they think someone dressed like this couldn’t possibly be trying to sneak contraband on board an airline.”

Everyone has a story. I can't see it, but I believe there is a neon sign on my forehead that reads " Talk to me" and so people do. And I listen. ~ K.jeanne fraser

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

11


cocktails favorite summer drinks WatermelonTequila Cocktail

Cool off during this warm summer month try these a cool and refreshing summer cocktails. Great for grilling in the back yard, throwing a summer party or just chilling out. Try a few of our favorites

Southern Spiked Sweet Tea 6 c. sweet tea 1 bottle white wine 1 pt. berries sliced peaches Fresh mint 1 Fill a pitcher with 6 cups sweet tea and a bottle of white wine (Moscato, or other sweet or semi sweet wine). 2 Add berries (we used raspberries) and peaches. 3 Let chill for a few hours (or even better, overnight!). 4 Garnish with fresh mint (optional). For extra presentation points, serve in Mason jars with tea bags tied around the lids with twine.

Chardonnay Ice Tea 1.5 ounces Chardonnay 1 ounce gin 1 ounce chamomile tea ¾ ounce lime juice ½ ounce honey 1.5 cups ice lime twist for garnish 1. Brew eight ounces of tea for 45 seconds to extract sufficient flavor and allow to cool. 2 Reserve one ounce and discard the rest - unless you plan to make more than one cocktail. 3 Combine tea and honey in shaker and stir to thin the honey, then add the remaining ingredients and shake with ice 4 Strain into serving glass over fresh ice. Garnish with a lime twist and enjoy! Yields: 1 Cocktail

12

August 2018

1/4 cup water 1/4 cup granulated sugar 8 cups diced seedless watermelon (1 pound) 1/4 cup fresh lime juice 1 3/4 cups blueberries 3/4 cup lightly packed fresh mint leaves, plus 8 sprigs for garnish 1 1/4 cups silver tequila Ice 1 In a small saucepan, bring the water to a simmer with the sugar and stir over moderate heat until the sugar is dissolved, about 1 minute; let the sugar syrup cool. 2 In a blender, puree the watermelon until smooth. Set a fine-mesh strainer over a bowl and strain the watermelon juice, pressing gently on the solids to extract as much juice as possible. Discard the pulp. 3 In a large pitcher, combine the sugar syrup with the lime juice, blueberries and mint leaves. Using a wooden spoon, lightly muddle the blueberries and mint. Add the watermelon juice and tequila. Refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours. 4 Pour the cocktail into tall icefilled glasses. Garnish with the mint sprigs and serve.

Tabernacle Crush This light and refreshing cocktail is as reminiscent of the American South 1/2 large peach, sliced 6 small basil leaves, plus more for garnish 1/2 ounce fresh lemon juice 1 1/2 ounces gin 1 ounce Lillet 1/2 ounce simple syrup Ice Club soda In a tall glass, muddle the peach with the 6 basil leaves and the lemon juice. Add the gin, Lillet and simple syrup. Add ice cubes and top with club soda. Garnish with basil.

Season’s Bounty

Summer cold meal in bowls By vanessa moncure minced fresh parsley. To one cup prepared ranch dressing, mix in one-half cup pureed avocado and one tablespoon lemon juice, along with one-quarter teaspoon each cracked black pepper, red pepper flakes and granulated garlic. Stir until well-combined. If too thick to pour, thin with a bit of buttermilk and divide between the bowls.

August is here - usually hot, humid yet rain-parched days segueing one into another. Temperatures hovering in the ‘90s even at suppertime, and it’s another day where you just don’t feel like cooking. Sound familiar? Well, don’t just grab another bag of salad mix at the store and call it a day - head instead to the farmer’s market (or maybe your backyard or community garden) to pick up a seasonal veggie base for summer cold bowls. Meals in a bowl have been trending for the past few years - well, actually forever - or as long as man has needed to combine or contain his foods. Oriental rice bowls, like Korean bibimbap (rice and vegetables) have done much to popularize the concept of bowls of grains or noodles, vegetables and protein coming together for a healthy and filling meal. Easy cleanup, too! I admit I do find some recipes hilarious - particularly the ones of “deconstructed” meals served bowl-wise. Really? Chopping and carefully layering “chef salad” ingredients still make it a chef salad, albeit chopped - I’ve hardly been

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Recipes contributed by FPF readers

Front porch fredericksburg

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

Front Porch Fredericksburg

able to pick up a food column this summer without reading a breathless account of this “new” way of eating. Well, if you’ve ever grazed over a salad bar, you’re already a summer cold bowl member. Now, just bring it home. And PS - If you have a spiralizer, it's great for summer veggies! CUBAN BLACK BEAN BOWL Prepare one package of yellow rice as directed, then chill. Divide between four deep bowls. Top each with about two ounces chopped dry Spanish chorizo sausage (this is already precooked Mexican or Cuban sausage generally is raw and must be cooked, but can be used as well). Drain and rinse one fifteen-ounce can of black beans and divide between the bowls. Top each with one tablespoon finely chopped red onion (or more to taste), one-half cup chopped fresh tomato, onethird cup each julienne of jicama and carrots, one-half chopped avocado, then top with minced fresh cilantro and green onions, minced hot pepper too if desired. To one cup prepared Italian salad dressing, add two teaspoonfuls cumin, one-half teaspoon turmeric and one teaspoon oregano leaves. Shake, then divide between the bowls and serve with a crusty loaf of bread on the side. CHICKEN SALAD Prepare enough wild rice to yield four cups, using chicken broth instead of water. Chill wild rice and divide between four bowls. Add four ounces of grilled and chopped chicken breast to each bowl then layer on one-half cup thinly sliced celery, one-quarter cup chopped sweet red pepper, two ounces of chopped gouda or feta cheese, one-half cup chopped fresh tomato, one-quarter cup chopped green onion, a handful of matchstick carrots and

SOBA SHRIMP AND VEGETABLES Cook one eight-ounce package soba noodles, chill and set aside, dividing between four deep bowls. Either cook, peel and devein two pounds of fresh 26-30 shrimp or defrost one and one-half pounds prepared and precooked shrimp. Pat completely dry with a paper towel. Whisk together three tablespoons each rice wine vinegar, sesame oil, soy sauce and teriyaki sauce; two tablespoons light brown sugar, one-half teaspoon granulated garlic and one tablespoon Sriracha chili sauce. Pour over shrimp and stir until they are well-coated. In two tablespoons of canola oil over mediumhigh heat, saute two cups snow peas, one and one-half cup matchstick carrots and one-half cup finely chopped red onion three to four minutes or until the vegetables have begun to soften - remove from heat and divide between the four bowls - divide the shrimp and sauce between the bowls then top with minced cilantro and plenty of chopped fresh Virginia peanuts. KALE GOBBLE Chop four cups kale into bite-size pieces - mix together with one half teaspoon salt and set aside for fifteen minutes or so until the kale begins to soften and wilt a bit. Divide between two deep bowls, top each with one half cup chopped cooked turkey, one half cup peeled and chopped apple, one half cup thinly sliced celery, one tablespoon chopped red onion, two tablespoons Craisins and one quarter cup chopped English walnuts. Add to one half cup mayonnaise one tablespoon each lemon juice and sugar - dollop half on each salad, then top each with one teaspoon lemon zest. If you own a spiralizer - you can start this bowl with spiralized sweet potatoes saute a pound in a bit of canola oil over medium high heat until the potatoes are browned and crunchy. Start or end your bowl with the sweet potatoes, very lightly salted.

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant 200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 Vanessa has yummy recipes for every season.

soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

13


cocktails favorite summer drinks WatermelonTequila Cocktail

Cool off during this warm summer month try these a cool and refreshing summer cocktails. Great for grilling in the back yard, throwing a summer party or just chilling out. Try a few of our favorites

Southern Spiked Sweet Tea 6 c. sweet tea 1 bottle white wine 1 pt. berries sliced peaches Fresh mint 1 Fill a pitcher with 6 cups sweet tea and a bottle of white wine (Moscato, or other sweet or semi sweet wine). 2 Add berries (we used raspberries) and peaches. 3 Let chill for a few hours (or even better, overnight!). 4 Garnish with fresh mint (optional). For extra presentation points, serve in Mason jars with tea bags tied around the lids with twine.

Chardonnay Ice Tea 1.5 ounces Chardonnay 1 ounce gin 1 ounce chamomile tea ¾ ounce lime juice ½ ounce honey 1.5 cups ice lime twist for garnish 1. Brew eight ounces of tea for 45 seconds to extract sufficient flavor and allow to cool. 2 Reserve one ounce and discard the rest - unless you plan to make more than one cocktail. 3 Combine tea and honey in shaker and stir to thin the honey, then add the remaining ingredients and shake with ice 4 Strain into serving glass over fresh ice. Garnish with a lime twist and enjoy! Yields: 1 Cocktail

12

August 2018

1/4 cup water 1/4 cup granulated sugar 8 cups diced seedless watermelon (1 pound) 1/4 cup fresh lime juice 1 3/4 cups blueberries 3/4 cup lightly packed fresh mint leaves, plus 8 sprigs for garnish 1 1/4 cups silver tequila Ice 1 In a small saucepan, bring the water to a simmer with the sugar and stir over moderate heat until the sugar is dissolved, about 1 minute; let the sugar syrup cool. 2 In a blender, puree the watermelon until smooth. Set a fine-mesh strainer over a bowl and strain the watermelon juice, pressing gently on the solids to extract as much juice as possible. Discard the pulp. 3 In a large pitcher, combine the sugar syrup with the lime juice, blueberries and mint leaves. Using a wooden spoon, lightly muddle the blueberries and mint. Add the watermelon juice and tequila. Refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours. 4 Pour the cocktail into tall icefilled glasses. Garnish with the mint sprigs and serve.

Tabernacle Crush This light and refreshing cocktail is as reminiscent of the American South 1/2 large peach, sliced 6 small basil leaves, plus more for garnish 1/2 ounce fresh lemon juice 1 1/2 ounces gin 1 ounce Lillet 1/2 ounce simple syrup Ice Club soda In a tall glass, muddle the peach with the 6 basil leaves and the lemon juice. Add the gin, Lillet and simple syrup. Add ice cubes and top with club soda. Garnish with basil.

Season’s Bounty

Summer cold meal in bowls By vanessa moncure minced fresh parsley. To one cup prepared ranch dressing, mix in one-half cup pureed avocado and one tablespoon lemon juice, along with one-quarter teaspoon each cracked black pepper, red pepper flakes and granulated garlic. Stir until well-combined. If too thick to pour, thin with a bit of buttermilk and divide between the bowls.

August is here - usually hot, humid yet rain-parched days segueing one into another. Temperatures hovering in the ‘90s even at suppertime, and it’s another day where you just don’t feel like cooking. Sound familiar? Well, don’t just grab another bag of salad mix at the store and call it a day - head instead to the farmer’s market (or maybe your backyard or community garden) to pick up a seasonal veggie base for summer cold bowls. Meals in a bowl have been trending for the past few years - well, actually forever - or as long as man has needed to combine or contain his foods. Oriental rice bowls, like Korean bibimbap (rice and vegetables) have done much to popularize the concept of bowls of grains or noodles, vegetables and protein coming together for a healthy and filling meal. Easy cleanup, too! I admit I do find some recipes hilarious - particularly the ones of “deconstructed” meals served bowl-wise. Really? Chopping and carefully layering “chef salad” ingredients still make it a chef salad, albeit chopped - I’ve hardly been

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Recipes contributed by FPF readers

Front porch fredericksburg

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

Front Porch Fredericksburg

able to pick up a food column this summer without reading a breathless account of this “new” way of eating. Well, if you’ve ever grazed over a salad bar, you’re already a summer cold bowl member. Now, just bring it home. And PS - If you have a spiralizer, it's great for summer veggies! CUBAN BLACK BEAN BOWL Prepare one package of yellow rice as directed, then chill. Divide between four deep bowls. Top each with about two ounces chopped dry Spanish chorizo sausage (this is already precooked Mexican or Cuban sausage generally is raw and must be cooked, but can be used as well). Drain and rinse one fifteen-ounce can of black beans and divide between the bowls. Top each with one tablespoon finely chopped red onion (or more to taste), one-half cup chopped fresh tomato, onethird cup each julienne of jicama and carrots, one-half chopped avocado, then top with minced fresh cilantro and green onions, minced hot pepper too if desired. To one cup prepared Italian salad dressing, add two teaspoonfuls cumin, one-half teaspoon turmeric and one teaspoon oregano leaves. Shake, then divide between the bowls and serve with a crusty loaf of bread on the side. CHICKEN SALAD Prepare enough wild rice to yield four cups, using chicken broth instead of water. Chill wild rice and divide between four bowls. Add four ounces of grilled and chopped chicken breast to each bowl then layer on one-half cup thinly sliced celery, one-quarter cup chopped sweet red pepper, two ounces of chopped gouda or feta cheese, one-half cup chopped fresh tomato, one-quarter cup chopped green onion, a handful of matchstick carrots and

SOBA SHRIMP AND VEGETABLES Cook one eight-ounce package soba noodles, chill and set aside, dividing between four deep bowls. Either cook, peel and devein two pounds of fresh 26-30 shrimp or defrost one and one-half pounds prepared and precooked shrimp. Pat completely dry with a paper towel. Whisk together three tablespoons each rice wine vinegar, sesame oil, soy sauce and teriyaki sauce; two tablespoons light brown sugar, one-half teaspoon granulated garlic and one tablespoon Sriracha chili sauce. Pour over shrimp and stir until they are well-coated. In two tablespoons of canola oil over mediumhigh heat, saute two cups snow peas, one and one-half cup matchstick carrots and one-half cup finely chopped red onion three to four minutes or until the vegetables have begun to soften - remove from heat and divide between the four bowls - divide the shrimp and sauce between the bowls then top with minced cilantro and plenty of chopped fresh Virginia peanuts. KALE GOBBLE Chop four cups kale into bite-size pieces - mix together with one half teaspoon salt and set aside for fifteen minutes or so until the kale begins to soften and wilt a bit. Divide between two deep bowls, top each with one half cup chopped cooked turkey, one half cup peeled and chopped apple, one half cup thinly sliced celery, one tablespoon chopped red onion, two tablespoons Craisins and one quarter cup chopped English walnuts. Add to one half cup mayonnaise one tablespoon each lemon juice and sugar - dollop half on each salad, then top each with one teaspoon lemon zest. If you own a spiralizer - you can start this bowl with spiralized sweet potatoes saute a pound in a bit of canola oil over medium high heat until the potatoes are browned and crunchy. Start or end your bowl with the sweet potatoes, very lightly salted.

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant 200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 Vanessa has yummy recipes for every season.

soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

13


Cooking With Kyle

Trapper Young Afternoon Drive Home Companion

Corn & Tomato Salad

by Chuck Archer

by james kyle snyder

A couple months ago, I asked all the B-Jocks to provide a bio for our website. I had some fun with the questions I would ask them and many of the answers were quite surprising. Here are a few of the answers I received back from Trapper: Where did you grow up? Troy, Pa What is your family dynamic? I’m married with one son one daughter, a dog and a cat....just lacking the white picket fence.

What is "Simple Food Done Well" and why is it so important? I am going to use this article to give a quick perspective for both. Importance first. I have fond memories of this time of year: Penetrating thoughts of eating baby carrots right out of the garden, shucking a fresh ear of corn and gnawing the sweet milk out of the kernels, and peeling the thin skin off of new potatoes with my finger to enjoy the young spud's unique taste remind me of how healthy and vibrant life can be. Five years ago, I found myself tired, 6'6" tall, and 299 pounds. At a BMI of 34.5 I was the face of obesity. How did that happen? I was a Marine Corps Drill instructor; I was a swim instructor; I WAS healthy. Like many of us, I allowed life and its activities, all the noise that distracts us from the important things, to take control and made excuses for why I was the way I was: Too busy, cooking is too hard or too expensive to name a few. We have turned into a nation of "a pill for every ill." Many doctors are not nutritionists. I needed to allow the words from the father of medicine, Hippocrates, " Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" guide my actions. I needed to get back to my roots my grandmother had instilled. Once I was ale to look in the mirror and take responsibility saying, "Kyle, you are obese" was I able to take the initial step toward recovery. Simple healthy food is part of that recovery. I was not alone. I have lost 45 pounds since then; more pounds to go. At a health and wellness seminar in Florida, I heard Blake Mallen state the following statistics: 70% of Americans are

14

August 2018

obese or overweight, 30% of our children are overweight with 17% being obese, childhood obesity has tripled in the last 30 years, for the first time ever, there are more obese people in the world than suffer from malnutrition. 2.8 million obese and overweight deaths occur every year, obesity impacts every organ system in the body and is considered more damaging than smoking or drinking. The AMA has designated obesity as a disease. Fear not. There is a solution within our own grasp. So what is Simple Food Done Well? In a nutshell, it is being conscious of what we eat and making sure that it is fresh, clean, healthy, and most importantly tasty! Here is one of my favorite recipes that is cheap, delicious, easy, and exemplifies the concept. Corn & Tomato Salad Shuck six ears of corn, wrap them in moist paper towels and place them in the microwave for five minutes. While the corn is cooking, dice 2 large beefsteak (or any "meaty" tomato). Make a dressing of 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1/4 teaspoon apple cider vinegar and a dash of salt and pepper Cut the kernels off the stalk while still hot. In a large bowl, gently mix the corn and tomatoes. Slowly drizzle the dressing into the salad while folding the mixture together. Voila! Simple, healthy, and delicious!

Kyle Snyder appeals to your palate and your other senses when it comes to good, simple, healthy eating.

Front porch fredericksburg

Over Two Decades…And Counting! There is truth in the “WKRP In Cincinnati” lyrics. I got kinda’ tired packing and unpacking. Town to town, and up and down the dial.

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

Those of us in the radio industry know all too well that you’re most likely going to be a nomad. Moving to where the job takes you. Not knowing how long your current on-air gig will last. I have worked several markets including Huntington, WV; Bluefield, WV; Savannah, GA; Washington, DC; and now I’m fortunate enough to be in my 12th year at B101.5 in Fredericksburg. 12 years in one radio job is almost unheard of. 22 years is nearly miraculous! My friend and colleague, Trapper Young, has been driving folks home afternoons on B101.5 for over two decades. He came to Fredericksburg from Pennsylvania as a young radio disc jockey and charted a course that would make him a fixture on B101.5 and currently the longest tenured DJ in the Fredericksburg radio market.

What are your favorite sports teams? Minnesota Vikings....before you ask my Dad got me hooked back in the purple people eater days What are your hobbies? According to my wife, I have too many and they are too expensive.

What is your favorite book? The 5 People You Meet In Heaven by Mitch Albom

Favorite quote? "Some feel the rain, others just get wet."

What is your favorite vacation spot? Virginia Beach.

You might be surprised to know...? I was a little entrepreneur at the age of 10 and saved up my allowance to buy a pair of pinball machines I installed in my Dad's auction house.

If you can only choose one…Wine…Whiskey…Beer…Liquor or Water? Beer

Favorite Crayola Crayon Color? Yellow If you could choose your last meal…what would it be? Surf and Turf can't go wrong with a juicy medium rare steak and some lobster! What is your favorite candy? Kit Kat If you auditioned on American Idol, what song would you sing? Seeing how our singing abilities are similar I would go with the William Hung song "She Bangs".

You can hear “The Drive Home With Trapper Young” every Monday through Friday from 3pm-7 7pm on B101.5.

Chuck Archer is the Operations Manager at B101 & 1230 WFVA

Favorite WKRP In Cincinnati moment? "As God as my witness, I thought turkeys could fly."

Describe an interesting listener experience. One story I've told more than a few times is the listener recognizing me and wanting to chat in the bathroom at the urinal...it ended with a nice to meet you but not a handshake :) As a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? I realize as I get older that maybe I should have set my sights higher ?? but I'm one of the lucky ones that gets paid to do what they've always wanted to do. What is your favorite ice cream flavor? Chocolate What is your favorite movie? The Big Lebowski

Become a Member

Open Monday – Friday at 6am Open Saturday – Sunday at 7am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials fxbgfoodcoop@gmail.com fredericksburgfoodcoop.com

540-373-8300 www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

15


Cooking With Kyle

Trapper Young Afternoon Drive Home Companion

Corn & Tomato Salad

by Chuck Archer

by james kyle snyder

A couple months ago, I asked all the B-Jocks to provide a bio for our website. I had some fun with the questions I would ask them and many of the answers were quite surprising. Here are a few of the answers I received back from Trapper: Where did you grow up? Troy, Pa What is your family dynamic? I’m married with one son one daughter, a dog and a cat....just lacking the white picket fence.

What is "Simple Food Done Well" and why is it so important? I am going to use this article to give a quick perspective for both. Importance first. I have fond memories of this time of year: Penetrating thoughts of eating baby carrots right out of the garden, shucking a fresh ear of corn and gnawing the sweet milk out of the kernels, and peeling the thin skin off of new potatoes with my finger to enjoy the young spud's unique taste remind me of how healthy and vibrant life can be. Five years ago, I found myself tired, 6'6" tall, and 299 pounds. At a BMI of 34.5 I was the face of obesity. How did that happen? I was a Marine Corps Drill instructor; I was a swim instructor; I WAS healthy. Like many of us, I allowed life and its activities, all the noise that distracts us from the important things, to take control and made excuses for why I was the way I was: Too busy, cooking is too hard or too expensive to name a few. We have turned into a nation of "a pill for every ill." Many doctors are not nutritionists. I needed to allow the words from the father of medicine, Hippocrates, " Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" guide my actions. I needed to get back to my roots my grandmother had instilled. Once I was ale to look in the mirror and take responsibility saying, "Kyle, you are obese" was I able to take the initial step toward recovery. Simple healthy food is part of that recovery. I was not alone. I have lost 45 pounds since then; more pounds to go. At a health and wellness seminar in Florida, I heard Blake Mallen state the following statistics: 70% of Americans are

14

August 2018

obese or overweight, 30% of our children are overweight with 17% being obese, childhood obesity has tripled in the last 30 years, for the first time ever, there are more obese people in the world than suffer from malnutrition. 2.8 million obese and overweight deaths occur every year, obesity impacts every organ system in the body and is considered more damaging than smoking or drinking. The AMA has designated obesity as a disease. Fear not. There is a solution within our own grasp. So what is Simple Food Done Well? In a nutshell, it is being conscious of what we eat and making sure that it is fresh, clean, healthy, and most importantly tasty! Here is one of my favorite recipes that is cheap, delicious, easy, and exemplifies the concept. Corn & Tomato Salad Shuck six ears of corn, wrap them in moist paper towels and place them in the microwave for five minutes. While the corn is cooking, dice 2 large beefsteak (or any "meaty" tomato). Make a dressing of 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1/4 teaspoon apple cider vinegar and a dash of salt and pepper Cut the kernels off the stalk while still hot. In a large bowl, gently mix the corn and tomatoes. Slowly drizzle the dressing into the salad while folding the mixture together. Voila! Simple, healthy, and delicious!

Kyle Snyder appeals to your palate and your other senses when it comes to good, simple, healthy eating.

Front porch fredericksburg

Over Two Decades…And Counting! There is truth in the “WKRP In Cincinnati” lyrics. I got kinda’ tired packing and unpacking. Town to town, and up and down the dial.

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

Those of us in the radio industry know all too well that you’re most likely going to be a nomad. Moving to where the job takes you. Not knowing how long your current on-air gig will last. I have worked several markets including Huntington, WV; Bluefield, WV; Savannah, GA; Washington, DC; and now I’m fortunate enough to be in my 12th year at B101.5 in Fredericksburg. 12 years in one radio job is almost unheard of. 22 years is nearly miraculous! My friend and colleague, Trapper Young, has been driving folks home afternoons on B101.5 for over two decades. He came to Fredericksburg from Pennsylvania as a young radio disc jockey and charted a course that would make him a fixture on B101.5 and currently the longest tenured DJ in the Fredericksburg radio market.

What are your favorite sports teams? Minnesota Vikings....before you ask my Dad got me hooked back in the purple people eater days What are your hobbies? According to my wife, I have too many and they are too expensive.

What is your favorite book? The 5 People You Meet In Heaven by Mitch Albom

Favorite quote? "Some feel the rain, others just get wet."

What is your favorite vacation spot? Virginia Beach.

You might be surprised to know...? I was a little entrepreneur at the age of 10 and saved up my allowance to buy a pair of pinball machines I installed in my Dad's auction house.

If you can only choose one…Wine…Whiskey…Beer…Liquor or Water? Beer

Favorite Crayola Crayon Color? Yellow If you could choose your last meal…what would it be? Surf and Turf can't go wrong with a juicy medium rare steak and some lobster! What is your favorite candy? Kit Kat If you auditioned on American Idol, what song would you sing? Seeing how our singing abilities are similar I would go with the William Hung song "She Bangs".

You can hear “The Drive Home With Trapper Young” every Monday through Friday from 3pm-7 7pm on B101.5.

Chuck Archer is the Operations Manager at B101 & 1230 WFVA

Favorite WKRP In Cincinnati moment? "As God as my witness, I thought turkeys could fly."

Describe an interesting listener experience. One story I've told more than a few times is the listener recognizing me and wanting to chat in the bathroom at the urinal...it ended with a nice to meet you but not a handshake :) As a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? I realize as I get older that maybe I should have set my sights higher ?? but I'm one of the lucky ones that gets paid to do what they've always wanted to do. What is your favorite ice cream flavor? Chocolate What is your favorite movie? The Big Lebowski

Become a Member

Open Monday – Friday at 6am Open Saturday – Sunday at 7am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials fxbgfoodcoop@gmail.com fredericksburgfoodcoop.com

540-373-8300 www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

15


CALENDAR of events

august 2018… Get ready for school & enjoy summer's final events! FXBG Resataurant Week continues thru August 5th FXBG Fair continues thru Aug 5

Wednesday, August 1

Spotsylvania Farmers Market at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, 2-6pm Discover the bounty of the fresh, local vegetables, fruits, meats, seafood, eggs, cheeses, breads, and plants at the Spotsylvania Farmers Market Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Thursday, August 2

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more! Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Sounds of Summer concert series Market Square "44 Diesal" 7-9p Bring a lawn chair enjoy familyfriendly music & arts & crafts for the kids… "Big Daddy Shakes, Rock Music Fridays @ Legume, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St

Sunken Well Trivia tonight 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in FXBG

Saturday, August 4

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 9-12noon. Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more! Spotsy Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm

Talent & Model Search at 2pm. M&S Studio Info: 540-785-6772. mandsstudio.com

Brush Strokes Gallery, Liana Pivirotto "Under the Sea", 824 Caroline St FCCA All-Media Regioal Exhibit. Members Galery: Addision Likins & Peggy Wickham.813 Sophia St. "Remixed 6" vinyl-themed show, PONSHOP, 712 Caroline St opening reception, 6-9p "Simple Pleasures", Sharon Osmon dazzling jewelry ensemble, Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline St opening reception, 6-9p

Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night battle the bartenders or sit at the bar & join their team!. 1319 Pr.Anne St

Elizabeth "Skeeter" Scheid, "Woodlands" @Artful Dimensions, 922 Caroline St, opening , 6-9p,

Beach Boys@ Celebrate VA After Hours, 7p

History at Sunset, Hartwood Church Inside and Out. Frank O'Reilly & John Hennessy. visit historic Church which witnessed battle, troops, and whose congregation struggled to survive amidst war. 25 Hartwood Road, 22406. Bring a lawn chair. , 7pm

Tuesday, August 7

Wednesday, August 8

Free Community Event - Food, Free Dance, Acting & Music Classes, door prizes, more@ M&S Studio.

International Beer Day

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm Hazel Run

"What the Cookery" Two Act Musical, presented by Caroline Theatre, 7p 7278 Ladysmith Rd, Ruther Glen, VA 22546 mcarolinetheatre.org

Open Mic with Larry Hinkle every Thursday at Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour 4-6p

First Friday, August 3

Monday, August 6

Art in the Park @ Hurkamp Park. Local artists and craftspeople share their handmade goods 9-2pm "C.B. WY" , Rhythic Rock Music @ Legume, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St 6 Bears & A Goat Brewing Company biggest event to date Freedom Fest seven VA breweries, local musicians, food trucks, vendors & lawn games.

Spotsylvania Farmers Market Spotsy Regional Med Center, 2-6pm

Thursday, August 9

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more! Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic with Larry Hinkle Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour -4-6p

Friday, August 10

"Mr Smith" @ Fred Area Museum "Sounds of Summer concert series" 7-9p Bring a lawn chair enjoy family-friendly music & Kid arts & crafts … History at Sunset: Distinguished Gallantry: will explore the Slaughter Pen Farm, emphasis on those who received the Medal of Honor Meet at 11190 Tidewater Trail, Fredericksburg, 22408. 7pm The Artists' Alliance (AA) a full complement of artists for Colonial Beach's Second FridayArt Walk. 100 Taylor St., Suite 101, in Colonial Beach.

"What the Cookery" Two Act Musical, presented by Caroline Theatre, 7p 7278 Ladysmith Rd, Ruther Glen, VA 22546. carolinetheatre.org

"Vamos" Latin Indie Rock Music @ Legume, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St

Sunday, August 5

Night Catfishing @ Motts Run Reservoir, 7p.

Darbytown Artist opening reception @ Universalist Fellowship, 11:30- !PM "What the Cookery" Two Act Musical, presented by Caroline Theatre, 2 p 7278 Ladysmith Rd, Ruther Glen, VA 22546. Info: carolinetheatre.org

Saturday, August 11

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 9-12noon. Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more!

Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm

Thursday, August 16

"The Acoustic Onion" Beatles Music @ Legume, 810p, 715 Caroline St

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm FAM Second Sat - Find your Crest! Adults and children of all ages are welcome to learn about the history and significance about family crests, while exploring Fredericksburg's very own. Artists Alliance open house Artisan Trail Network's Meet Artist Steve Griffin 1-3pm to discuss his work. 100 Taylor St, Suite 101, Colonial Beach Landscape Series: The Summer Forest @ Stratford Hall, 9:30- contact Jon Bachman, 804-493-1972 orjbachman@stratfordhall.org.

Downtown Greens Garden 3 til 6pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant, etc, Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic with Larry Hinkle Highmark Brewery, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour -4-6p

Friday, August 17

Spotsy Art Festival @ Historic Spotsylvania Court House, 10a-5p. 200+ artists and artisans f

"The Dangerous Kitchen" @FAM "Sounds of Summer concert series" Market Square , 7-9p Bring a lawn chairenjoy family-friendly music by local bands and arts & crafts for the kids…

Tracy Lawrence & Joe Diffie @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours,7p

"Haylee Hill, Soul & R&B Music @ Legume, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St

Sunday, August 12

Live Theatre! Elephant Man , Fred's Theater, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor. 7:30p

Chef Blake's Cycle Trike Race, Strangeways Brewery, 350 Landsdowne Rd, 2-6p. Benefits "No Kid Hungry"

Monday, August 13

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm , Elby Brass Nerd Night @ Curitiba Art Café, 919 Caroline St., 7p. Speakers on exciting subjects.... It's something unusual, something scientific or just a passion Info: sandrafedowitz @ gmail.com

Tuesday, August 14

Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night Battle the bartenders..join the team!. 1419 Pr.Anne St

Wednesday, August 15

"Under the Big Top", FREE 7-8:30pm, Hurkamp Park. Evening of fun circus tunes with the FXBG Community Concert Band. Spotsylvania Farmers Market Spotsy Medical Center, 2-6pm Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, match wits against the finest minds in FXBG

~

"Karen Jonas" @LaPetite, 8-10p, 311 William St.

Sunday, August 19

"The Acoustic Onion" @LaPetite, 8-10p, William St.

311

Saturday, August 18

"PorchFest", Music street fest 800-900 Block of Mayre St, 10a-4p.Up to 12 bands perform on different porches throughout the day. Downtown Greens Garden Hours 9-12noon. Help us work the soil, Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm o Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm Art in the Park Hurkamp Park. Local artists and craftspeople share their handmade goods 9-2pm "Chaquis Maliq, Soul, Blues & Folk Music @ Legume, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St Live Theatre! Elephant Man , Fred's Theater, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor. 7:30p

Fredericksburg Food Co-op presents Toward a Zero Waste Lifestyle, CRRL FXBG Branch, 3-5p Live Theatre! Elephant Man , Fred's Theater, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor. 3p

Monday, August 20

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm Southern Exposure

Tuesday, August 21

Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night .battle the bartenders or sit at the bar & join team!.

Wednesday, August 22

Spotsylvania Farmers Market SpotsyMedCenter, 2-6pm Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~

Live Theatre! Elephant Man , Fred's Theater, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor. 7:30p

Sunday, August 26

Live Theatre! Elephant Man , Fred's Theater, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor. 3p

Monday, August 27

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm Semilla Cultural

Tuesday, August 28

Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night .

Wednesday, August 29

Spotsylvania Farmers Market SpotsyMedCenter, 2-6pm Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage

Thursday, August 23

Downtown Greens Garden 3 6pm Help us work the soil Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic with Larry Hinkle Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour -4-6p

Friday, August 24

"The Acoustic Onion" Sounds of Summer concert series" 7-9p … "John Wiley Trio MusicLegume,8-11p, 715 Caroline Live Theatre! Elephant Man , Fred's Theater, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor. 7:30p Night Catfishing at Motts Run Reservoir

Thursday, August 30

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3-6pm Help us work the soil Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic Larry Hinkle Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour -4-6p

Friday, August 31

"Karen Jonas""Sounds of Summer concert series Market Square , 7-9p … "Jahnel Daliya", Folk & Rock Music @ Legume, 810p, 715 Caroline St "Wave on Wave", @LaPetite, 8-10p, 311 William St.

Saturday, August 25

Downtown Greens Garden 9-12noon. H Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm Father and Daughter Tea @ CRRL FXBG Branch, 2-4p..

If you are reading this 253rd issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 22nd year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for September 2018 issue is August 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

3302 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne St , FXBG 16

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

540-8 899-6 6787

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

17


CALENDAR of events

august 2018… Get ready for school & enjoy summer's final events! FXBG Resataurant Week continues thru August 5th FXBG Fair continues thru Aug 5

Wednesday, August 1

Spotsylvania Farmers Market at SRMC @ Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, 2-6pm Discover the bounty of the fresh, local vegetables, fruits, meats, seafood, eggs, cheeses, breads, and plants at the Spotsylvania Farmers Market Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

Thursday, August 2

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more! Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Sounds of Summer concert series Market Square "44 Diesal" 7-9p Bring a lawn chair enjoy familyfriendly music & arts & crafts for the kids… "Big Daddy Shakes, Rock Music Fridays @ Legume, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St

Sunken Well Trivia tonight 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in FXBG

Saturday, August 4

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 9-12noon. Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more! Spotsy Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm

Talent & Model Search at 2pm. M&S Studio Info: 540-785-6772. mandsstudio.com

Brush Strokes Gallery, Liana Pivirotto "Under the Sea", 824 Caroline St FCCA All-Media Regioal Exhibit. Members Galery: Addision Likins & Peggy Wickham.813 Sophia St. "Remixed 6" vinyl-themed show, PONSHOP, 712 Caroline St opening reception, 6-9p "Simple Pleasures", Sharon Osmon dazzling jewelry ensemble, Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline St opening reception, 6-9p

Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night battle the bartenders or sit at the bar & join their team!. 1319 Pr.Anne St

Elizabeth "Skeeter" Scheid, "Woodlands" @Artful Dimensions, 922 Caroline St, opening , 6-9p,

Beach Boys@ Celebrate VA After Hours, 7p

History at Sunset, Hartwood Church Inside and Out. Frank O'Reilly & John Hennessy. visit historic Church which witnessed battle, troops, and whose congregation struggled to survive amidst war. 25 Hartwood Road, 22406. Bring a lawn chair. , 7pm

Tuesday, August 7

Wednesday, August 8

Free Community Event - Food, Free Dance, Acting & Music Classes, door prizes, more@ M&S Studio.

International Beer Day

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm Hazel Run

"What the Cookery" Two Act Musical, presented by Caroline Theatre, 7p 7278 Ladysmith Rd, Ruther Glen, VA 22546 mcarolinetheatre.org

Open Mic with Larry Hinkle every Thursday at Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour 4-6p

First Friday, August 3

Monday, August 6

Art in the Park @ Hurkamp Park. Local artists and craftspeople share their handmade goods 9-2pm "C.B. WY" , Rhythic Rock Music @ Legume, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St 6 Bears & A Goat Brewing Company biggest event to date Freedom Fest seven VA breweries, local musicians, food trucks, vendors & lawn games.

Spotsylvania Farmers Market Spotsy Regional Med Center, 2-6pm

Thursday, August 9

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more! Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic with Larry Hinkle Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour -4-6p

Friday, August 10

"Mr Smith" @ Fred Area Museum "Sounds of Summer concert series" 7-9p Bring a lawn chair enjoy family-friendly music & Kid arts & crafts … History at Sunset: Distinguished Gallantry: will explore the Slaughter Pen Farm, emphasis on those who received the Medal of Honor Meet at 11190 Tidewater Trail, Fredericksburg, 22408. 7pm The Artists' Alliance (AA) a full complement of artists for Colonial Beach's Second FridayArt Walk. 100 Taylor St., Suite 101, in Colonial Beach.

"What the Cookery" Two Act Musical, presented by Caroline Theatre, 7p 7278 Ladysmith Rd, Ruther Glen, VA 22546. carolinetheatre.org

"Vamos" Latin Indie Rock Music @ Legume, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St

Sunday, August 5

Night Catfishing @ Motts Run Reservoir, 7p.

Darbytown Artist opening reception @ Universalist Fellowship, 11:30- !PM "What the Cookery" Two Act Musical, presented by Caroline Theatre, 2 p 7278 Ladysmith Rd, Ruther Glen, VA 22546. Info: carolinetheatre.org

Saturday, August 11

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 9-12noon. Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more!

Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm

Thursday, August 16

"The Acoustic Onion" Beatles Music @ Legume, 810p, 715 Caroline St

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm FAM Second Sat - Find your Crest! Adults and children of all ages are welcome to learn about the history and significance about family crests, while exploring Fredericksburg's very own. Artists Alliance open house Artisan Trail Network's Meet Artist Steve Griffin 1-3pm to discuss his work. 100 Taylor St, Suite 101, Colonial Beach Landscape Series: The Summer Forest @ Stratford Hall, 9:30- contact Jon Bachman, 804-493-1972 orjbachman@stratfordhall.org.

Downtown Greens Garden 3 til 6pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant, etc, Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic with Larry Hinkle Highmark Brewery, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour -4-6p

Friday, August 17

Spotsy Art Festival @ Historic Spotsylvania Court House, 10a-5p. 200+ artists and artisans f

"The Dangerous Kitchen" @FAM "Sounds of Summer concert series" Market Square , 7-9p Bring a lawn chairenjoy family-friendly music by local bands and arts & crafts for the kids…

Tracy Lawrence & Joe Diffie @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours,7p

"Haylee Hill, Soul & R&B Music @ Legume, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St

Sunday, August 12

Live Theatre! Elephant Man , Fred's Theater, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor. 7:30p

Chef Blake's Cycle Trike Race, Strangeways Brewery, 350 Landsdowne Rd, 2-6p. Benefits "No Kid Hungry"

Monday, August 13

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm , Elby Brass Nerd Night @ Curitiba Art Café, 919 Caroline St., 7p. Speakers on exciting subjects.... It's something unusual, something scientific or just a passion Info: sandrafedowitz @ gmail.com

Tuesday, August 14

Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night Battle the bartenders..join the team!. 1419 Pr.Anne St

Wednesday, August 15

"Under the Big Top", FREE 7-8:30pm, Hurkamp Park. Evening of fun circus tunes with the FXBG Community Concert Band. Spotsylvania Farmers Market Spotsy Medical Center, 2-6pm Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, match wits against the finest minds in FXBG

~

"Karen Jonas" @LaPetite, 8-10p, 311 William St.

Sunday, August 19

"The Acoustic Onion" @LaPetite, 8-10p, William St.

311

Saturday, August 18

"PorchFest", Music street fest 800-900 Block of Mayre St, 10a-4p.Up to 12 bands perform on different porches throughout the day. Downtown Greens Garden Hours 9-12noon. Help us work the soil, Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm o Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm Art in the Park Hurkamp Park. Local artists and craftspeople share their handmade goods 9-2pm "Chaquis Maliq, Soul, Blues & Folk Music @ Legume, 8-10p, 715 Caroline St Live Theatre! Elephant Man , Fred's Theater, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor. 7:30p

Fredericksburg Food Co-op presents Toward a Zero Waste Lifestyle, CRRL FXBG Branch, 3-5p Live Theatre! Elephant Man , Fred's Theater, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor. 3p

Monday, August 20

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm Southern Exposure

Tuesday, August 21

Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night .battle the bartenders or sit at the bar & join team!.

Wednesday, August 22

Spotsylvania Farmers Market SpotsyMedCenter, 2-6pm Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~

Live Theatre! Elephant Man , Fred's Theater, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor. 7:30p

Sunday, August 26

Live Theatre! Elephant Man , Fred's Theater, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor. 3p

Monday, August 27

Music on the Steps.Summer Concert Series at Hdqrtrs Library 7-8pm Semilla Cultural

Tuesday, August 28

Red Dragon Brewery Beer & Trivia night .

Wednesday, August 29

Spotsylvania Farmers Market SpotsyMedCenter, 2-6pm Sunken Well Trivia 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage

Thursday, August 23

Downtown Greens Garden 3 6pm Help us work the soil Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic with Larry Hinkle Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour -4-6p

Friday, August 24

"The Acoustic Onion" Sounds of Summer concert series" 7-9p … "John Wiley Trio MusicLegume,8-11p, 715 Caroline Live Theatre! Elephant Man , Fred's Theater, 810 Caroline St, 4th Floor. 7:30p Night Catfishing at Motts Run Reservoir

Thursday, August 30

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3-6pm Help us work the soil Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. Open Mic Larry Hinkle Highmark Brewery!, 390 Kings HWY, Happy hour -4-6p

Friday, August 31

"Karen Jonas""Sounds of Summer concert series Market Square , 7-9p … "Jahnel Daliya", Folk & Rock Music @ Legume, 810p, 715 Caroline St "Wave on Wave", @LaPetite, 8-10p, 311 William St.

Saturday, August 25

Downtown Greens Garden 9-12noon. H Spotsylvania Farmers Market @ Commuter Lot at Route 3 West and Gordon Road, 8a -1pm Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm Father and Daughter Tea @ CRRL FXBG Branch, 2-4p..

If you are reading this 253rd issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 22nd year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for September 2018 issue is August 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

3302 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne St , FXBG 16

August 2018

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540-8 899-6 6787

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

17


history’s stories

GENERAL LEWIS LITTLEPAGE By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

A look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

When you enter Fredericksburg, it is like opening a history book. The streets of the city remind you of just how historic the city is. As I was driving on Littlepage Street, I began to think of Lewis Littlepage who had such a short life of only thirty-nine years. In that short period of time he distinguished himself as a diplomat scholar and soldier.

60 years of enhancing fxbg

The Littlepage family settled in Virginia in 1663 and established a large plantation on four thousand acres in Hanover County, called South Wales. Lewis’ father James Littlepage married Betty Lewis (not related to Washington in laws) of the Spotsylvania Bel-Air plantation. James Littlepage was well respected and a member of the House of Burgesses in 1764. He died in 1766 when Lewis was four years old, after having serious financial problems. The plantation of South Wales was sold to pay off the debts of James Littlepage’s estate.

Lewis was twelve when his mother remarried, Lewis Holladay who was 18 years younger than Betty. Young Lewis was sent off to Louisa to live with Betty’s younger brother for reasons unknown. Lewis had many problems living in Louisa and ran away from home several times before he ended up as a student at William and Mary College. While at William and Mary he would meet up with his half-brother Carter Littlepage a close friend of Patrick Henry. He received a scholarship that allowed him to continue his education until the Revolutionary War came to Williamsburg in May of 1779, many young men from William and Mary including Lewis were volunteers who joined the Continental Army to fight the British. Lewis who had just turned 16 decided during this time too leave college. He was offered a job with John Jay of New York, who had just been appointed Minister to the Court of Spain. Lewis accepted the position. After many months of travel, he arrived in Spain, where he immediately found himself in conflict with John Jay over many issues. During this time, he made a lifelong friendship with Henry Brockhoist Livingston, John Jay’s Brother-in-law who like John Jay would also become a Supreme Court Justice. Lewis’s debts from money borrowed from John Jay continued to rise and Jay’s demands for payment finally ended with Lewis’s challenge of a duel to Jay. John Jay refused to duel Littlepage which resulted in the end of their relationship. Lewis returned to the United States still deeply in debt, however, he would be called upon for the next six years to return to Poland to assist the last King of Poland Stanislas Augustus Poinatowski who trusted the young American. Lewis would serve as the King’s envoy to the Russian Court to negotiate a treaty between Russia and Poland. He along with John Paul Jones another famous American, worked together in the Russian Court. Though always in need of money Lewis Littlepage sent General Lafayette’s wife, Adrienne funds for her release from prison during the French Revolution. This action showed his compassion for others. Lewis Littlepage would spend over six years roaming the courts of Europe to settle the disputes with the monarchs of Spain, Poland and Russia earning him fame and fortune. Stanislas Augustus bestowed upon him the last Knight of the Order. Lewis finally returned to Fredericksburg in October 1801 and settled in Spotsylvania County with enough earned wealth to take on the role of a country gentleman. This was short lived as Lewis was ill until his death on January 19, 1802, 9 months after his return from Europe. His final request was that all his papers be destroyed except his Order of Knighthood and decorations. Lewis Littlepage who was a Mason in Fredericksburg Lodge #4 AF & AM is buried in the Fredericksburg Masonic Cemetery next to the James Monroe law office. Littlepage Street is named in honor of Lewis Littlepage. Dedicated in Memory Of: Eddie Steckler, Jimmy Lam, Carolyn Oates, & Bill Scaife, Tuffy is Front Porch's resident FXBG historian

18

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

What’s in a Riverbank?

OUR HERITAGE

The Pump House By jon gerlach

By sharon Null The Fredericksburg Council of Garden Clubs is a non-profit organization that was founded in 1958 to act as a clearinghouse for local garden clubs by distributing information, coordinating activities, and scheduling and overseeing garden events. Six clubs originally established the council; three of these clubs (Ann Page, Rappahannock Valley, and Town & County) were part of establishing the council and are still members today. Throughout the years, different clubs have been members of the council and currently Chancellor, Fawn Lake, Lake Anna, and Sunlight clubs have joined three of the founding clubs to carry out council’s mission. During its 60-year existence, the council has been involved in numerous diverse activities from granting scholarships to trimming Fredericksburg landmarks during the Christmas season.

Arbor Day 2006 – Maggie McCormack & Carter Frackelton plant a tree in honor of Decca Frackelton

In the 1960s, after a failed campaign to save park land from the construction of a parking lot and a fire department, the council worked to enrich what is now known as Hurkamp Park by contributing the fountain, landscaping the park, and purchasing a star for the Christmas tree. The council also allocated funds to improve the landscaping at the Religious Freedom Monument, Alum Spring’s Park, the Visitor’s Center, and Bradford Park. Sears granted the council $300 to “dress up” Hugh Mercer Apothecary Shop and the council refurbished furniture, painted the upstairs rooms, and sewed curtains to the delight of many tourists. In 1975, garden council members began decorating monuments and buildings during the Christmas season. This yuletide tradition continues as local museums, cemetery gates, and even a tavern are beribboned and festooned with natural wreaths, swags, and arrangements. Also in the 1970s, the council began organizing and arranging the reception for April’s Arbor Day celebration; Arbor Day honors local citizens who have contributed to “greening” the community. On many occasions, such as the Chamber of Congress dinner, George Washington’s birthday festival, and Virginia Mental Health convention, garden council members create flower arrangements to enhance the festivities. Members also decorate and deliver small Christmas trees to hospital patients to boost their spirits. The council has sponsored numerous flower shows,

parades, judging clinics, and even a Sidney King art show. In the past, local students received scholarships for Nature Camp in Vesuvius, VA; today’s scholarships enable local children to attend Fredericksburg Parks, Recreation and Events camps. Several local and national magazines have featured the council’s many contributions to the community.

Tucked in the riverbank at 301 Sophia Street, just next to City Dock, sits a curious industrial artifact of the 20th Century called the "Pump House". Built of reinforced concrete walls up to five feet thick, the two story tower overlooks the Rappahannock River and a continuous traffic of kayakers, canoeists and stand-up paddlers. Next door is the RF&P Railroad Bridge, iconic in its own right. While the railroad bridge symbolizes Fredericksburg's connection to metropolitan areas up and down the East Coast, the Pump House speaks to the history of our local economy. During the Great Depression, the Fredericksburg region's economy was kept afloat largely by the Sylvania Company. About 2 miles from the Pump House, the company's sprawling plant manufactured cellophane that was used in a range of

products from food containers to cigarette packs. Located in what is now Bowman Center, the complex employed up to two thousand workers who earned living wages that supported families and small businesses throughout the region.

the massive 42-foot flood just five years later which inundated the commercial district along Caroline Street, the Sylvania Company's need for a reliable water source became acute. Built in 1947, the Pump House was designed to extract river water and pump it through two miles of

thirty years, closing down in 1978. Spotsylvania County acquired the property, and in 1997 it was sold to former Mayor Bill Beck and his wife Susan Beck. Longtime owners of Beck's Antiques and Books at 708 Caroline Street, Bill and Susan have carefully restored the Pump House. Since then, the Pump House has hosted three weddings and two funerals, including the writer's (wedding, that is). The Pump House is a testament to regional economic cooperation between Spotsylvania County and the City of Fredericksburg; a monument to the history and resilience of local enterprise, and a jewel of historic preservation. Given its solid construction, the Pump House may well outlast many other buildings in Fredericksburg as future generations come and go. So … what's in a riverbank? Here, creative solutions to regional challenges.

To produce cellophane, copious amounts of water were required to continuously cool the machinery. This is where the Pump House enters our story. Following the 39-foot flood of 1937, and

pipes to the cellophane plant in Spotsylvania County. With a capacity of 30,000 gallons of water per minute, the Pump House served as a pumping station for some

An attorney and retired archaeologist, Jon Gerlach chairs the Architectural Review Board in Fredericksburg. "Pump House" painting by Jon Gerlach, 1947 photo of Pump House construation courtesy of Bill & Susan Beck

Central Rappahannock The Heritage Center archives and preserves historical documents and photographs pertaining to the history and people from the counties of Caroline, Stafford, King George, Spotsylvania, and Fredericksburg. The Heritage Center holds a collection of Garden Council documents dating back to the beginning, including photographs, brochures, newspaper clippings, invitations, letters, the council’s bylaws, membership information, and meeting minutes. .Sharon Null is an active Heritage Center volunteer & garden club member.

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890 front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

19


history’s stories

GENERAL LEWIS LITTLEPAGE By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

A look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

When you enter Fredericksburg, it is like opening a history book. The streets of the city remind you of just how historic the city is. As I was driving on Littlepage Street, I began to think of Lewis Littlepage who had such a short life of only thirty-nine years. In that short period of time he distinguished himself as a diplomat scholar and soldier.

60 years of enhancing fxbg

The Littlepage family settled in Virginia in 1663 and established a large plantation on four thousand acres in Hanover County, called South Wales. Lewis’ father James Littlepage married Betty Lewis (not related to Washington in laws) of the Spotsylvania Bel-Air plantation. James Littlepage was well respected and a member of the House of Burgesses in 1764. He died in 1766 when Lewis was four years old, after having serious financial problems. The plantation of South Wales was sold to pay off the debts of James Littlepage’s estate.

Lewis was twelve when his mother remarried, Lewis Holladay who was 18 years younger than Betty. Young Lewis was sent off to Louisa to live with Betty’s younger brother for reasons unknown. Lewis had many problems living in Louisa and ran away from home several times before he ended up as a student at William and Mary College. While at William and Mary he would meet up with his half-brother Carter Littlepage a close friend of Patrick Henry. He received a scholarship that allowed him to continue his education until the Revolutionary War came to Williamsburg in May of 1779, many young men from William and Mary including Lewis were volunteers who joined the Continental Army to fight the British. Lewis who had just turned 16 decided during this time too leave college. He was offered a job with John Jay of New York, who had just been appointed Minister to the Court of Spain. Lewis accepted the position. After many months of travel, he arrived in Spain, where he immediately found himself in conflict with John Jay over many issues. During this time, he made a lifelong friendship with Henry Brockhoist Livingston, John Jay’s Brother-in-law who like John Jay would also become a Supreme Court Justice. Lewis’s debts from money borrowed from John Jay continued to rise and Jay’s demands for payment finally ended with Lewis’s challenge of a duel to Jay. John Jay refused to duel Littlepage which resulted in the end of their relationship. Lewis returned to the United States still deeply in debt, however, he would be called upon for the next six years to return to Poland to assist the last King of Poland Stanislas Augustus Poinatowski who trusted the young American. Lewis would serve as the King’s envoy to the Russian Court to negotiate a treaty between Russia and Poland. He along with John Paul Jones another famous American, worked together in the Russian Court. Though always in need of money Lewis Littlepage sent General Lafayette’s wife, Adrienne funds for her release from prison during the French Revolution. This action showed his compassion for others. Lewis Littlepage would spend over six years roaming the courts of Europe to settle the disputes with the monarchs of Spain, Poland and Russia earning him fame and fortune. Stanislas Augustus bestowed upon him the last Knight of the Order. Lewis finally returned to Fredericksburg in October 1801 and settled in Spotsylvania County with enough earned wealth to take on the role of a country gentleman. This was short lived as Lewis was ill until his death on January 19, 1802, 9 months after his return from Europe. His final request was that all his papers be destroyed except his Order of Knighthood and decorations. Lewis Littlepage who was a Mason in Fredericksburg Lodge #4 AF & AM is buried in the Fredericksburg Masonic Cemetery next to the James Monroe law office. Littlepage Street is named in honor of Lewis Littlepage. Dedicated in Memory Of: Eddie Steckler, Jimmy Lam, Carolyn Oates, & Bill Scaife, Tuffy is Front Porch's resident FXBG historian

18

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

What’s in a Riverbank?

OUR HERITAGE

The Pump House By jon gerlach

By sharon Null The Fredericksburg Council of Garden Clubs is a non-profit organization that was founded in 1958 to act as a clearinghouse for local garden clubs by distributing information, coordinating activities, and scheduling and overseeing garden events. Six clubs originally established the council; three of these clubs (Ann Page, Rappahannock Valley, and Town & County) were part of establishing the council and are still members today. Throughout the years, different clubs have been members of the council and currently Chancellor, Fawn Lake, Lake Anna, and Sunlight clubs have joined three of the founding clubs to carry out council’s mission. During its 60-year existence, the council has been involved in numerous diverse activities from granting scholarships to trimming Fredericksburg landmarks during the Christmas season.

Arbor Day 2006 – Maggie McCormack & Carter Frackelton plant a tree in honor of Decca Frackelton

In the 1960s, after a failed campaign to save park land from the construction of a parking lot and a fire department, the council worked to enrich what is now known as Hurkamp Park by contributing the fountain, landscaping the park, and purchasing a star for the Christmas tree. The council also allocated funds to improve the landscaping at the Religious Freedom Monument, Alum Spring’s Park, the Visitor’s Center, and Bradford Park. Sears granted the council $300 to “dress up” Hugh Mercer Apothecary Shop and the council refurbished furniture, painted the upstairs rooms, and sewed curtains to the delight of many tourists. In 1975, garden council members began decorating monuments and buildings during the Christmas season. This yuletide tradition continues as local museums, cemetery gates, and even a tavern are beribboned and festooned with natural wreaths, swags, and arrangements. Also in the 1970s, the council began organizing and arranging the reception for April’s Arbor Day celebration; Arbor Day honors local citizens who have contributed to “greening” the community. On many occasions, such as the Chamber of Congress dinner, George Washington’s birthday festival, and Virginia Mental Health convention, garden council members create flower arrangements to enhance the festivities. Members also decorate and deliver small Christmas trees to hospital patients to boost their spirits. The council has sponsored numerous flower shows,

parades, judging clinics, and even a Sidney King art show. In the past, local students received scholarships for Nature Camp in Vesuvius, VA; today’s scholarships enable local children to attend Fredericksburg Parks, Recreation and Events camps. Several local and national magazines have featured the council’s many contributions to the community.

Tucked in the riverbank at 301 Sophia Street, just next to City Dock, sits a curious industrial artifact of the 20th Century called the "Pump House". Built of reinforced concrete walls up to five feet thick, the two story tower overlooks the Rappahannock River and a continuous traffic of kayakers, canoeists and stand-up paddlers. Next door is the RF&P Railroad Bridge, iconic in its own right. While the railroad bridge symbolizes Fredericksburg's connection to metropolitan areas up and down the East Coast, the Pump House speaks to the history of our local economy. During the Great Depression, the Fredericksburg region's economy was kept afloat largely by the Sylvania Company. About 2 miles from the Pump House, the company's sprawling plant manufactured cellophane that was used in a range of

products from food containers to cigarette packs. Located in what is now Bowman Center, the complex employed up to two thousand workers who earned living wages that supported families and small businesses throughout the region.

the massive 42-foot flood just five years later which inundated the commercial district along Caroline Street, the Sylvania Company's need for a reliable water source became acute. Built in 1947, the Pump House was designed to extract river water and pump it through two miles of

thirty years, closing down in 1978. Spotsylvania County acquired the property, and in 1997 it was sold to former Mayor Bill Beck and his wife Susan Beck. Longtime owners of Beck's Antiques and Books at 708 Caroline Street, Bill and Susan have carefully restored the Pump House. Since then, the Pump House has hosted three weddings and two funerals, including the writer's (wedding, that is). The Pump House is a testament to regional economic cooperation between Spotsylvania County and the City of Fredericksburg; a monument to the history and resilience of local enterprise, and a jewel of historic preservation. Given its solid construction, the Pump House may well outlast many other buildings in Fredericksburg as future generations come and go. So … what's in a riverbank? Here, creative solutions to regional challenges.

To produce cellophane, copious amounts of water were required to continuously cool the machinery. This is where the Pump House enters our story. Following the 39-foot flood of 1937, and

pipes to the cellophane plant in Spotsylvania County. With a capacity of 30,000 gallons of water per minute, the Pump House served as a pumping station for some

An attorney and retired archaeologist, Jon Gerlach chairs the Architectural Review Board in Fredericksburg. "Pump House" painting by Jon Gerlach, 1947 photo of Pump House construation courtesy of Bill & Susan Beck

Central Rappahannock The Heritage Center archives and preserves historical documents and photographs pertaining to the history and people from the counties of Caroline, Stafford, King George, Spotsylvania, and Fredericksburg. The Heritage Center holds a collection of Garden Council documents dating back to the beginning, including photographs, brochures, newspaper clippings, invitations, letters, the council’s bylaws, membership information, and meeting minutes. .Sharon Null is an active Heritage Center volunteer & garden club member.

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890 front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

19


Senior Care

It’s All Energy

in sickness & in health

relieve pain Dog Walking Pet Sitting Companion Play Time & Mini Furies, Too!

By Karl Karch

by christina ferber

(540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “City PetSitting”

“Mine forever more. Will you still need me, Will you still feed me, When I’m sixty-four?” (The Beatles, When I’m 64). Now, 75-80 is more like 64 back then. Those of us who made the marriage vow “in sickness and in health” never envisioned this could mean caring longterm for a spouse with dementia and/or one or more chronic or disabling conditions. Becoming a spousal caregiver can occur suddenly and without warning, or evolve slowly over time. Regardless, this “labor of love” is often a life changing event that can be very demanding, stressful, and detrimental to spouses’ health, many of whom are also likely to have medical issues of their own. Medical advances, shorter hospital stays, limited discharge planning, expansion of home care technology, and the desire to remain home have placed increased cost and care burdens on families for longer periods of time. The Journal of American Medical Association reported that if you are a spousal caregiver between the ages of 66 and 96, and are experiencing ongoing mental or emotional strain resulting from caregiving duties, there is a 63% increased risk of dying compared to those in the same age group who are not caring for a spouse. Spouses are often so busy caring for their loved ones they tend to ignore their own emotional, physical, and spiritual health. Caregiving spouses sacrifice their activities (e.g., exercise, sports, gardening, part-time jobs, etc.), begin to feel very isolated from friends, and feel deprived of wants and needs. This leads to fatigue and feelings of hopelessness which ultimately can lead to burnout. It is important to know and recognize the symptoms of burnout and how best to cope. A few signs that caregiving is becoming too risky are: missing your own doctor appointments;

20

August 2018

not eating properly; giving up exercise; losing sleep; giving up socializing with friends; feeling resentful toward spouse; loss of energy; feeling sad or hopeless. Through all the stresses and hardships encountered during the caregiving journey, it is natural to feel some degree of negativity and hopelessness. However, for their own health and well-being, it is important to suppress negativity and look for the good things in life. That’s easier said than done, so here are a few tips: (1) Make a list of the things to be grateful for each day. (2) Speak kindly to yourself. (3) Lean on positive people. Join a support group. (4) Find happiness through a healthy diet and exercise. (5) Remember you are doing your best. (6) Laugh. It lowers stress, relaxes muscles, and improves mood. (7) Keep it simple and don’t set unrealistic goals. (8) Take time for yourself. By staying positive, you can become more optimistic and grateful for the small positive things in life. The website www.caregiverstress.com is a great resource to learn more about issues related to caregiving. A spousal caregiver did not apply for the job and still has a life of their own. So, it is important to make conscious decisions to take charge of their own life and make choices that create a balance between caring for their spouse and caring for themselves. The best way to be an effective and loving spouse and caregiver is for them to take care of their own health and learn to say “no”, ask for help, and take time for their own respite care. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Are You...

We've all been there- you start to feel some type of pain come on and you reach for the Advil or Tylenol to relieve it before it gets too bad. That option usually works, but why not try a more natural approach before you pop that next pill? Eden Energy Medicine (EEM) is an integrative modality that offers natural techniques to relieve pain by balancing the energy in your body. Try one or all of these exercises and see if that pain goes away. Breathing out the Pain is based on the idea that the breath moves energy and is a very simple technique that can relieve pain. While focusing on the pain and with your mouth closed, breathe in through your nose. I like to imagine the in-breath traveling to the pain site and collecting the pain. Then, breathe out through your mouth and imagine blowing out the pain. Do this several times, slowing down your breathing with each breath. Stretching or Tapping on and around the pain site can loosen congested energy and make space for energy to

move, which in turn can alleviate pain. These techniques work best with sore muscles or areas of inflammation. Please, do not do these exercises over or around an open wound. To use stretching for pain relief, simply stretch an inch or two beyond the site of the pain. To tap, use your fingers or even a hairbrush with plastic bristles to tap over the area of pain for as long as it feels good or until the pain decreases (about a minute or so). Figure Eights represent one of the optimal way that energy should movein a crossover pattern. The more your energy crosses over, the healthier your body, so it makes sense that making figure eights over the site of any pain should help it heal faster. Simply draw large or small figure eights over the area of pain either above the pain site or directly on the skin. Pain Siphoning is best done with a partner, but I have had success doing this technique on myself as well. Place your left hand over the area of pain with your right hand down and away from your body. Imagine the pain being pulled out of the body, traveling through your left hand and out through your right hand. Do this for a few minutes or until you feel the pain has subsided. Essentially, you are 'siphoning' out the pain using your hands. You may also need to shake your right hand if you feel energy getting stuck. Next, place your right hand over the area you have been working with and raise your left hand up. Imagine healing energy coming through your left hand, into your right hand and into the painful area. This may sound like an odd exercise, but I can attest that it does work. Finish with drawing figure eights over the area. These techniques are taken from the book, Energy Medicine, by Donna Eden as well as training materials from her classes. If these exercises don't help the pain or if it worsens, please consult a qualified health care professional. For all types of pain, including dispersed or chronic pain, you can lessen the impact by keeping your energetic systems balanced with the Daily Energy Routine. You can view this routine at www.itsallenergywellness.com along with other techniques that help maintain balance in your body so that you can achieve and maintain great health and well-being.

Christina Ferber is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner. You can find out more at www.itsallenergywellness.com

Sick & tired of being sick & tired? Having sleep problems? Constantly clearing your throat? Hypersensitive? Panicky? Sore Neck & Back? Anxious? Depressed? Fatigued? Morning Brain Fog? Oral System Balancing –OSBcould be just what you need Visit www.drwaynewhitley.com & watch amazing video testimonies Call for a FREE consultation Dr. Wayne Whitley 540-847-1935

Bring a little sunshine to a senior’s life! Too many seniors feel lonely and isolated.

Donate to a Cancer Organization

YOU can make a difference by volunteering to visit a senior in the Fredericksburg area. Volunteer training is provided & no special skills are required. The Senior Visitors Program is a FREE community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

Helping homeless children and families in City of Fredericksburg, Counties of Caroline, Stafford & Spotsylvania 540 371 0831

Visit mhafred.org or call 540-371-2704

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

21


Senior Care

It’s All Energy

in sickness & in health

relieve pain Dog Walking Pet Sitting Companion Play Time & Mini Furies, Too!

By Karl Karch

by christina ferber

(540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “City PetSitting”

“Mine forever more. Will you still need me, Will you still feed me, When I’m sixty-four?” (The Beatles, When I’m 64). Now, 75-80 is more like 64 back then. Those of us who made the marriage vow “in sickness and in health” never envisioned this could mean caring longterm for a spouse with dementia and/or one or more chronic or disabling conditions. Becoming a spousal caregiver can occur suddenly and without warning, or evolve slowly over time. Regardless, this “labor of love” is often a life changing event that can be very demanding, stressful, and detrimental to spouses’ health, many of whom are also likely to have medical issues of their own. Medical advances, shorter hospital stays, limited discharge planning, expansion of home care technology, and the desire to remain home have placed increased cost and care burdens on families for longer periods of time. The Journal of American Medical Association reported that if you are a spousal caregiver between the ages of 66 and 96, and are experiencing ongoing mental or emotional strain resulting from caregiving duties, there is a 63% increased risk of dying compared to those in the same age group who are not caring for a spouse. Spouses are often so busy caring for their loved ones they tend to ignore their own emotional, physical, and spiritual health. Caregiving spouses sacrifice their activities (e.g., exercise, sports, gardening, part-time jobs, etc.), begin to feel very isolated from friends, and feel deprived of wants and needs. This leads to fatigue and feelings of hopelessness which ultimately can lead to burnout. It is important to know and recognize the symptoms of burnout and how best to cope. A few signs that caregiving is becoming too risky are: missing your own doctor appointments;

20

August 2018

not eating properly; giving up exercise; losing sleep; giving up socializing with friends; feeling resentful toward spouse; loss of energy; feeling sad or hopeless. Through all the stresses and hardships encountered during the caregiving journey, it is natural to feel some degree of negativity and hopelessness. However, for their own health and well-being, it is important to suppress negativity and look for the good things in life. That’s easier said than done, so here are a few tips: (1) Make a list of the things to be grateful for each day. (2) Speak kindly to yourself. (3) Lean on positive people. Join a support group. (4) Find happiness through a healthy diet and exercise. (5) Remember you are doing your best. (6) Laugh. It lowers stress, relaxes muscles, and improves mood. (7) Keep it simple and don’t set unrealistic goals. (8) Take time for yourself. By staying positive, you can become more optimistic and grateful for the small positive things in life. The website www.caregiverstress.com is a great resource to learn more about issues related to caregiving. A spousal caregiver did not apply for the job and still has a life of their own. So, it is important to make conscious decisions to take charge of their own life and make choices that create a balance between caring for their spouse and caring for themselves. The best way to be an effective and loving spouse and caregiver is for them to take care of their own health and learn to say “no”, ask for help, and take time for their own respite care. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Are You...

We've all been there- you start to feel some type of pain come on and you reach for the Advil or Tylenol to relieve it before it gets too bad. That option usually works, but why not try a more natural approach before you pop that next pill? Eden Energy Medicine (EEM) is an integrative modality that offers natural techniques to relieve pain by balancing the energy in your body. Try one or all of these exercises and see if that pain goes away. Breathing out the Pain is based on the idea that the breath moves energy and is a very simple technique that can relieve pain. While focusing on the pain and with your mouth closed, breathe in through your nose. I like to imagine the in-breath traveling to the pain site and collecting the pain. Then, breathe out through your mouth and imagine blowing out the pain. Do this several times, slowing down your breathing with each breath. Stretching or Tapping on and around the pain site can loosen congested energy and make space for energy to

move, which in turn can alleviate pain. These techniques work best with sore muscles or areas of inflammation. Please, do not do these exercises over or around an open wound. To use stretching for pain relief, simply stretch an inch or two beyond the site of the pain. To tap, use your fingers or even a hairbrush with plastic bristles to tap over the area of pain for as long as it feels good or until the pain decreases (about a minute or so). Figure Eights represent one of the optimal way that energy should movein a crossover pattern. The more your energy crosses over, the healthier your body, so it makes sense that making figure eights over the site of any pain should help it heal faster. Simply draw large or small figure eights over the area of pain either above the pain site or directly on the skin. Pain Siphoning is best done with a partner, but I have had success doing this technique on myself as well. Place your left hand over the area of pain with your right hand down and away from your body. Imagine the pain being pulled out of the body, traveling through your left hand and out through your right hand. Do this for a few minutes or until you feel the pain has subsided. Essentially, you are 'siphoning' out the pain using your hands. You may also need to shake your right hand if you feel energy getting stuck. Next, place your right hand over the area you have been working with and raise your left hand up. Imagine healing energy coming through your left hand, into your right hand and into the painful area. This may sound like an odd exercise, but I can attest that it does work. Finish with drawing figure eights over the area. These techniques are taken from the book, Energy Medicine, by Donna Eden as well as training materials from her classes. If these exercises don't help the pain or if it worsens, please consult a qualified health care professional. For all types of pain, including dispersed or chronic pain, you can lessen the impact by keeping your energetic systems balanced with the Daily Energy Routine. You can view this routine at www.itsallenergywellness.com along with other techniques that help maintain balance in your body so that you can achieve and maintain great health and well-being.

Christina Ferber is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine Practitioner. You can find out more at www.itsallenergywellness.com

Sick & tired of being sick & tired? Having sleep problems? Constantly clearing your throat? Hypersensitive? Panicky? Sore Neck & Back? Anxious? Depressed? Fatigued? Morning Brain Fog? Oral System Balancing –OSBcould be just what you need Visit www.drwaynewhitley.com & watch amazing video testimonies Call for a FREE consultation Dr. Wayne Whitley 540-847-1935

Bring a little sunshine to a senior’s life! Too many seniors feel lonely and isolated.

Donate to a Cancer Organization

YOU can make a difference by volunteering to visit a senior in the Fredericksburg area. Volunteer training is provided & no special skills are required. The Senior Visitors Program is a FREE community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

Helping homeless children and families in City of Fredericksburg, Counties of Caroline, Stafford & Spotsylvania 540 371 0831

Visit mhafred.org or call 540-371-2704

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

21


Emancipated Patients

#FunFacts .... about August

benefits of play By Patrick Neustatter, MD

It might be the long summer break when kids are freed from the tyranny of school - but in the heart of Fredericksburg, a raucous bunch of them are furthering their education - although they are likely unaware of it. I have just come from an exploratory visit to the chaos and noise of the Fredericksburg branch of the Children's Museum of Richmond (CMoR), at 1275 Jefferson Davis Highway, at Park and Shop. Whether they were checking customers out at the grocery store; drawing in the art section; pulling teeth in the dentists office; or reading in the book nook, all the kids seemed to be having fun.

A Fun Education Daughter Tegan, who was once one of those raucous children, has recently completed a research project on the benefits of play, as part of a doctorate in psychology. She notes play is important, building resilience, confidence, empathy and other skills likely to enhance education in general. Play is, by definition, purposeless, enjoyable, voluntary activity that promotes improvisation, communication, exploration, dexterity and imagination. Kids who don't play, the WHO reports, are at increased risk of disability, unemployment, substance abuse, homelessness, ADHD, anxiety and incarceration. As one of the informative the wall displays at the CMoR notes, "research shows that experience with new kinds of activity can generate growth in the brain within only a few hours."

Risk and Failure Talking to a group of mothers sitting around, shooting the breeze at the Fredericksburg branch, they told me that "so long as we don't hear screaming" they are comfortable that their kids are safe. "We can do this (sit and chat). We don't have to hover" they told me. Safety is, of course, a crucial issue. But "helicopter parents" are liable to stultify the benefits of play.

22

August 2018

Maybe because I went to a crazy "doas-you-like" school in England, but all too often I see parents so worried about the "what-if's" that they won't let their children do anything but the most restrictive play. " U s u a l l y beneficial play can't be achieved without taking some risks" notes Rebecca Weingarten, an education consultant and specialist in New York City. As part of risk taking, kids also need to learn risk of failure, she says. An article in Psychology Today notes parents often go out of their way to protect kids from hurt feelings and failure. But in our "every child gets a trophy" society "being overprotective can actually increase their anxiety" - which is now being seen in college age kids. It's important to teach your kids about danger by teaching them to safely use a knife/climb a tree/swim/approach animals/set off fireworks. But don't prevent them from taking any risk. And share a little risk taking with them - with them not for them says Weingarten. "We need to promote constructive failure," she says. "Kids can't be afraid to face the normal repercussions associated with taking risks."

Play in Adults When I went with my kids to the Richmond CMoR, I remember thinking "we need this for adults" (we're all just big kids really). Play is recognized as important for adults too, though it's a little different. It includes "art, books, movies, music, comedy, flirting and daydreaming" says Stuart Brown, MD, founder of the National Institute for Play. And people seem to be playful in different ways; overtly goofing around; a general lighthearted demeanor; playing with thoughts and ideas; or being whimsical and interested/amused by strange and unusual things. It is reported that being playful makes us attractive to the opposite sex, and in a survey, men said a sense of humor made a woman more attractive - so ham it up ladies. Several counties are going to a new school schedule and all too soon, kids will be back in school (in early August). Take them to CMoR or one of many other places they can play while they can. Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic.

Front porch fredericksburg

Compiled By Joan Geisler Here are a few fun facts that happened in history in the month of August. August 1 1957 The USA & Canada formed the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Due to a wrong number Sears ad misprint, a child called to check on where Santa was that evening (Dec 24) NORAD has been tracking Santa every Christmas Eve, since its inception. August 2 1776 The official signing of the United States Declaration of Independence took place Matthew Thornton from New Hampshire signed it on November 4, 1776 1990 Iraq invadesKuwait August 3 1492 Christopher Columbus set sail from Palos de la Frontera, Spain 1936 Jesse Owens won the 100 meter dash, beating ‘the world’s fastest man’ Ralph Metcalfe at the Berlin Olympics August 4 1916 USA purchased the Virgin Islands 1944 WWII, Gestapo captured Anne Frank, her family and others, in Holland 1964 Three young civil rights workers, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, were found murdered and buried in an earthen dam outside Philadelphia, Mississippi. August 5 1884 Statue of Liberty cornerstone laid 1962 Actress Marilyn Monroe, was found dead in her home, August 6 1945 United States dropped an Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima, Japan August 7 1782 “Order of the Purple Heart’ is created by President George Washington 1959 Lincoln Memorial design on the US penny went into circulation. It replaced the ‘wheat’ design, minted until 2008. August 8 1908 Wilbur Wright made his first flight at a racecourse at Le Mans, France. 1974 President Richard Nixon nationwide TV address resigned from the office of the POTUS, effective noon the next day. August 9 1942 Mahatma Gandhi was arrested in Bombay by British forces, launching the Quit India Movement. 1944 Nagasaki, Japan was decimated when an atomic bomb, Fat Man, was dropped by the United States B-29 Bockscar. August 10 1821 Missouri 24th to the Union (24th) August 11 1966 Beatles begin their last U.S. tour August 12 1851 Isaac Singer is granted a patent (8#294) for his sewing machine August 13 1889 Patent Coin operated telephone w 1910 Florence Nightingale died in London August 14 1925 Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act.

1945 Japan surrenders to Allies 1975 Rocky Horror Picture Show opens, the longest-running release in film history August 15 1935 Entertainer Will Rogers & pilot Wiley Post killed after their aircraft developed engine problems during takeoff 1939 Wizard of Oz premiered at Grauman’s Chinese Theater. August 16 1948 Baseball great Babe Ruth died 1977 Singer Elvis Presley died at his home, "Graceland," in Memphis, at the age of 42 August 17 1961 Construction started on Berlin Wall August 18 1587 Virginia Dare, the first child born in America, was born in Virginia August 19 1910 Indianapolis Speedway first race August 20 1897 British doctor Sir Ronald Ross, discovers the link between mosquitos and the transmission of malaria August 21 1959 Hawaii becomes the 50th state 1911 Mona Lisa stolen from the Louvre August 22 1901 Cadillac Motor Company is founded. August 23 1850 1st US National Women's Rights Convention in Worcester, Massachusetts 1966 First picture of earth from the moon is taken by Lunar Orbiter 1. August 24 1814 Washington, D.C. was captured by British troops under General Robert Ross, during the War of 1812 1892 Edison filed patent for motion picture camera, the first of its kind August 25 1932 Amelia Earhart complets her transcontinental flight. August 26 1920 U. S. Congress passes the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote. August 27 1859 Petroleum was discovered in Titusville, PA leading to the worlds’ first commercially successful oil well. August 28 1963 Martin Luther King Jr. makes his “I Have a Dream” speech. August 29 1964 Disney’s Mary Poppins released 1966 Beatles concluded 4th American tour with their last public concert at Candlestick Park , San Francisco, 2005 Katrina hits land August 30 1993 The Late Show with David Letterman premieres on CBS August 31 1997 Lady Diana, Princess of Wales and her companion Dodi Al Fayed died tragically in a car crash in Paris, France

Ditch the Itch

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy

with borax By Suzy Woollam

Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

ble at Availa n.com Amazo

When the summer heat starts to get to you (and your pets), things can turn itchy (and let’s be honest..pretty smelly) very quickly. But what if I told you there was a one-stop-shop for all of the above, and you probably already have it in your house? My Summer go-to miracle? Borax. Borax, also known as Sodium borate, is a naturally occurring mineral found around the world, In the US, it is most commonly mined in Boron, California, and is sold as 20 Mule Team in the laundry aisle. As a type of a salt, Borax has a highly alkaline solution with a pH of about 9. This allows for the “softening” of water, and gives Borax its wonderful cleaning properties. Many of us know it as a detergent booster for the laundry, but most people are surprised to hear that Borax is also used extensively in the cosmetic industry as a natural emulsifier. Borax contains the mineral Boron, which is known for its antiseptic, antifungal and antiviral properties. And don’t confuse

Borax with Boric Acid. While they contain many of the same chemical constituents, they are very different. I first started using Borax “Liquid Soap” over 20 years ago following information from Dr. Hulda Clark’s Book “The Cure For All Cancers”. Dr. Clark believed that Borax was the traditional pioneer’s soap, was antibacterial, a water softener, and an excellent solvent for grease. She recommended it for not only washing your clothes and dishes, but your hair and body as well. Over the years, I have offered up her recipe to folks for everything from hair loss to poison ivy. I have always found it to provide quick relief to itchy skin, and many of my pet parents have come to swear by it. Other than keeping my laundry safer and cleaner, and removing odors, one of my greatest uses of Borax is as an itch stopper. It’s so easy to make, and safe and effective for both you and your pets.

Itchy Summer Skin Sray (for the 2 and 4 footed) 8 oz STRONG Chamomile tea (2 teabags steeped in 8 oz boiling water until room temp) or Distilled Water 1 T Borax Powder Distilled Water 1. Place tea bags in a quart mason jar, and cover with boiling water. Allow to steep until room temperature. (or simply add distilled water). Add borax powder, cover, shake, and allow to sit until dissolved. (if there is powder left after 5-10 minutes, no worries, just strain before placing in spray bottle. 2. Fill spray bottle with ½ chamomile/borax mixture and ½ distilled water.Spray as needed. Allow to air dry. This spray is excellent for dry, itchy summer skin or insect bites, and is great for itchy dogs. No need to rinse, and can be used several times a day if needed. As an added bonus, if you omit the tea, it can be used as a fabric/rug/clothing/shoe odor remover as well! Give it a try, your skin will thank you! See Suzy at The Scenter of Town on Charles Street for more fun, easy and natural recipes

Joan Geisler is a Behavioral Change Specialist. www.8020healthyhabits front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

23


Emancipated Patients

#FunFacts .... about August

benefits of play By Patrick Neustatter, MD

It might be the long summer break when kids are freed from the tyranny of school - but in the heart of Fredericksburg, a raucous bunch of them are furthering their education - although they are likely unaware of it. I have just come from an exploratory visit to the chaos and noise of the Fredericksburg branch of the Children's Museum of Richmond (CMoR), at 1275 Jefferson Davis Highway, at Park and Shop. Whether they were checking customers out at the grocery store; drawing in the art section; pulling teeth in the dentists office; or reading in the book nook, all the kids seemed to be having fun.

A Fun Education Daughter Tegan, who was once one of those raucous children, has recently completed a research project on the benefits of play, as part of a doctorate in psychology. She notes play is important, building resilience, confidence, empathy and other skills likely to enhance education in general. Play is, by definition, purposeless, enjoyable, voluntary activity that promotes improvisation, communication, exploration, dexterity and imagination. Kids who don't play, the WHO reports, are at increased risk of disability, unemployment, substance abuse, homelessness, ADHD, anxiety and incarceration. As one of the informative the wall displays at the CMoR notes, "research shows that experience with new kinds of activity can generate growth in the brain within only a few hours."

Risk and Failure Talking to a group of mothers sitting around, shooting the breeze at the Fredericksburg branch, they told me that "so long as we don't hear screaming" they are comfortable that their kids are safe. "We can do this (sit and chat). We don't have to hover" they told me. Safety is, of course, a crucial issue. But "helicopter parents" are liable to stultify the benefits of play.

22

August 2018

Maybe because I went to a crazy "doas-you-like" school in England, but all too often I see parents so worried about the "what-if's" that they won't let their children do anything but the most restrictive play. " U s u a l l y beneficial play can't be achieved without taking some risks" notes Rebecca Weingarten, an education consultant and specialist in New York City. As part of risk taking, kids also need to learn risk of failure, she says. An article in Psychology Today notes parents often go out of their way to protect kids from hurt feelings and failure. But in our "every child gets a trophy" society "being overprotective can actually increase their anxiety" - which is now being seen in college age kids. It's important to teach your kids about danger by teaching them to safely use a knife/climb a tree/swim/approach animals/set off fireworks. But don't prevent them from taking any risk. And share a little risk taking with them - with them not for them says Weingarten. "We need to promote constructive failure," she says. "Kids can't be afraid to face the normal repercussions associated with taking risks."

Play in Adults When I went with my kids to the Richmond CMoR, I remember thinking "we need this for adults" (we're all just big kids really). Play is recognized as important for adults too, though it's a little different. It includes "art, books, movies, music, comedy, flirting and daydreaming" says Stuart Brown, MD, founder of the National Institute for Play. And people seem to be playful in different ways; overtly goofing around; a general lighthearted demeanor; playing with thoughts and ideas; or being whimsical and interested/amused by strange and unusual things. It is reported that being playful makes us attractive to the opposite sex, and in a survey, men said a sense of humor made a woman more attractive - so ham it up ladies. Several counties are going to a new school schedule and all too soon, kids will be back in school (in early August). Take them to CMoR or one of many other places they can play while they can. Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic.

Front porch fredericksburg

Compiled By Joan Geisler Here are a few fun facts that happened in history in the month of August. August 1 1957 The USA & Canada formed the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Due to a wrong number Sears ad misprint, a child called to check on where Santa was that evening (Dec 24) NORAD has been tracking Santa every Christmas Eve, since its inception. August 2 1776 The official signing of the United States Declaration of Independence took place Matthew Thornton from New Hampshire signed it on November 4, 1776 1990 Iraq invadesKuwait August 3 1492 Christopher Columbus set sail from Palos de la Frontera, Spain 1936 Jesse Owens won the 100 meter dash, beating ‘the world’s fastest man’ Ralph Metcalfe at the Berlin Olympics August 4 1916 USA purchased the Virgin Islands 1944 WWII, Gestapo captured Anne Frank, her family and others, in Holland 1964 Three young civil rights workers, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, were found murdered and buried in an earthen dam outside Philadelphia, Mississippi. August 5 1884 Statue of Liberty cornerstone laid 1962 Actress Marilyn Monroe, was found dead in her home, August 6 1945 United States dropped an Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima, Japan August 7 1782 “Order of the Purple Heart’ is created by President George Washington 1959 Lincoln Memorial design on the US penny went into circulation. It replaced the ‘wheat’ design, minted until 2008. August 8 1908 Wilbur Wright made his first flight at a racecourse at Le Mans, France. 1974 President Richard Nixon nationwide TV address resigned from the office of the POTUS, effective noon the next day. August 9 1942 Mahatma Gandhi was arrested in Bombay by British forces, launching the Quit India Movement. 1944 Nagasaki, Japan was decimated when an atomic bomb, Fat Man, was dropped by the United States B-29 Bockscar. August 10 1821 Missouri 24th to the Union (24th) August 11 1966 Beatles begin their last U.S. tour August 12 1851 Isaac Singer is granted a patent (8#294) for his sewing machine August 13 1889 Patent Coin operated telephone w 1910 Florence Nightingale died in London August 14 1925 Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act.

1945 Japan surrenders to Allies 1975 Rocky Horror Picture Show opens, the longest-running release in film history August 15 1935 Entertainer Will Rogers & pilot Wiley Post killed after their aircraft developed engine problems during takeoff 1939 Wizard of Oz premiered at Grauman’s Chinese Theater. August 16 1948 Baseball great Babe Ruth died 1977 Singer Elvis Presley died at his home, "Graceland," in Memphis, at the age of 42 August 17 1961 Construction started on Berlin Wall August 18 1587 Virginia Dare, the first child born in America, was born in Virginia August 19 1910 Indianapolis Speedway first race August 20 1897 British doctor Sir Ronald Ross, discovers the link between mosquitos and the transmission of malaria August 21 1959 Hawaii becomes the 50th state 1911 Mona Lisa stolen from the Louvre August 22 1901 Cadillac Motor Company is founded. August 23 1850 1st US National Women's Rights Convention in Worcester, Massachusetts 1966 First picture of earth from the moon is taken by Lunar Orbiter 1. August 24 1814 Washington, D.C. was captured by British troops under General Robert Ross, during the War of 1812 1892 Edison filed patent for motion picture camera, the first of its kind August 25 1932 Amelia Earhart complets her transcontinental flight. August 26 1920 U. S. Congress passes the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote. August 27 1859 Petroleum was discovered in Titusville, PA leading to the worlds’ first commercially successful oil well. August 28 1963 Martin Luther King Jr. makes his “I Have a Dream” speech. August 29 1964 Disney’s Mary Poppins released 1966 Beatles concluded 4th American tour with their last public concert at Candlestick Park , San Francisco, 2005 Katrina hits land August 30 1993 The Late Show with David Letterman premieres on CBS August 31 1997 Lady Diana, Princess of Wales and her companion Dodi Al Fayed died tragically in a car crash in Paris, France

Ditch the Itch

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy

with borax By Suzy Woollam

Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com

ble at Availa n.com Amazo

When the summer heat starts to get to you (and your pets), things can turn itchy (and let’s be honest..pretty smelly) very quickly. But what if I told you there was a one-stop-shop for all of the above, and you probably already have it in your house? My Summer go-to miracle? Borax. Borax, also known as Sodium borate, is a naturally occurring mineral found around the world, In the US, it is most commonly mined in Boron, California, and is sold as 20 Mule Team in the laundry aisle. As a type of a salt, Borax has a highly alkaline solution with a pH of about 9. This allows for the “softening” of water, and gives Borax its wonderful cleaning properties. Many of us know it as a detergent booster for the laundry, but most people are surprised to hear that Borax is also used extensively in the cosmetic industry as a natural emulsifier. Borax contains the mineral Boron, which is known for its antiseptic, antifungal and antiviral properties. And don’t confuse

Borax with Boric Acid. While they contain many of the same chemical constituents, they are very different. I first started using Borax “Liquid Soap” over 20 years ago following information from Dr. Hulda Clark’s Book “The Cure For All Cancers”. Dr. Clark believed that Borax was the traditional pioneer’s soap, was antibacterial, a water softener, and an excellent solvent for grease. She recommended it for not only washing your clothes and dishes, but your hair and body as well. Over the years, I have offered up her recipe to folks for everything from hair loss to poison ivy. I have always found it to provide quick relief to itchy skin, and many of my pet parents have come to swear by it. Other than keeping my laundry safer and cleaner, and removing odors, one of my greatest uses of Borax is as an itch stopper. It’s so easy to make, and safe and effective for both you and your pets.

Itchy Summer Skin Sray (for the 2 and 4 footed) 8 oz STRONG Chamomile tea (2 teabags steeped in 8 oz boiling water until room temp) or Distilled Water 1 T Borax Powder Distilled Water 1. Place tea bags in a quart mason jar, and cover with boiling water. Allow to steep until room temperature. (or simply add distilled water). Add borax powder, cover, shake, and allow to sit until dissolved. (if there is powder left after 5-10 minutes, no worries, just strain before placing in spray bottle. 2. Fill spray bottle with ½ chamomile/borax mixture and ½ distilled water.Spray as needed. Allow to air dry. This spray is excellent for dry, itchy summer skin or insect bites, and is great for itchy dogs. No need to rinse, and can be used several times a day if needed. As an added bonus, if you omit the tea, it can be used as a fabric/rug/clothing/shoe odor remover as well! Give it a try, your skin will thank you! See Suzy at The Scenter of Town on Charles Street for more fun, easy and natural recipes

Joan Geisler is a Behavioral Change Specialist. www.8020healthyhabits front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

23


Music By Moonlight

Stories

Celebrating 30 years of music

Edwin

of fredericksburg

By Debbie H. Bliss

In September 1986 Anne Crowe Essig and four other women, Valerie Rivera, Mary Wilson, Barbara Muir and Cessie Howell, met on Salvation Army premises to plan and organize a Women's Auxiliary. They received their official charter in November 1986. This Women's Auxiliary was organized to promote the purposes of The Salvation Army. Its activities include many fund-raising projects and one of these projects, Music By Moonlight, will be celebrating it 30th Annual Concert at Hurkamp Park on Saturday, September 8, 2018, from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm. This event originally began as a daylong event called "Day in the Park" at Hurkamp Park, but the group soon realized a day long event was a little overwhelming. In 1988 Music By Moonlight was born when Ann, approached one of her husband's friends, Dr. Lloyd "Jeppie" Moss, about Fredericksburg Big Band doing a fundraiser and Music By Moonlight was born. 100% proceeds raised at the concert and through direct mailings go towards sending economically disadvantaged children to The Salvation

Army's Camp Happyland in Richardsville, VA. The children, ages 6 -12, experience biking, rock climbing, obstacle courses, ball parks, swimming pool, lake, cabins, Bible study, an amphitheater and music conservatory all on 647 beautiful acres. Many of these kids would never have exposure to these activities without the scholarships provided by Salvation Army's Women's Auxiliary Music By Moonlight. This summer over 100 area children were able to attend camp because of the generosity of the Fredericksburg community. This year's Music By Moonlight is growing and is proud to have Fredericksburg Parks, Recreation and Events as a co-sponsor. And, the Fredericksburg Big Band, who has been performing at the annual concert since its inception, will again be donating their time to keep Ann Essig's dream alive. Their music will have you smiling and wishing for a larger dance floor. Whether it is music from the 40' and 50's made famous by such artists as Glen Miller, Benny Goodman or Count Basie, or more recent songs like Barry Manilow's Copacabana, they have something for all ages to enjoy. And, if you are wanting to brush up on some Swing moves Strictly Ballroom of Fredericksburg will also be performing and enticing you to get those dancing shoes on. The concert is free to the public and you can bring your lawn chair, a blanket to sit on, grab one of the beautiful benches in the park or come and dance to the music. Or maybe you would like to reserve a table, for a fee, that places you

Name This House

under twinkling lights at a linen cover table with cookies and sparkling cider. There is something for everyone and all ages, including a craft table for the little ones, a silent auction, cookies and baked goods for sale and food vendors if you haven't had dinner or just want a snack. Come and help Ann Essig's dream stay alive and give the children of our community new dreams to dream! Contact Debbie Bliss at 540-2730971 or 1973.bliss.debbie@gmail.com or Lee Moyer 703-314-7744 or lee@electonicdesigns.com for more information.

Debbie H. Bliss is co-chair Salvation Army Women's Auxiliary, Music By Moonlight

Music By Moonlight, 30th Annual Concert Hurkamp Park, FREE Saturday, September 8, 7 to 9 pm.

Edwin, 57, has been homeless in Fredericksburg twice since 2009. He is currently stably housed and manages Micah's Furniture Warehouse, which helps people who are starting over gather essential items to make their houses home. Edwin grew up in Alexandria, as an only child. He graduated from Fort Hunt High School and immediately went to work as a cashier at a local gas station. In eight months, he worked himself up to manager and later moved on to other jobs in construction, retail and warehouse industry. One of those jobs eventually led him to Fredericksburg. He was married at one time. Although the five-year relationship ended in divorce, he most recently learned that he has a daughter, 34, and two grandchildren that he never knew about. He will meet them for the very first time this fall. He also has a 37-year old son from another relationship. Due to a series of "bad choices," Edwin lost his income, material belongings and place to live. He stayed in a motel initially, but when that went away as well he followed a tip to the doors of Micah Ministries. "I felt scared and useless," he said. "I thought that no one would want anything to do with me because I didn't fit anywhere."

Having previously led a successful life and admittedly looking down on those who struggled, Edwin was surprised to find an immediate support system in others who lived on the street. "I got the acceptance from other homeless people that you'd never get from people who live in grand homes. It really opened my eyes," he said. He describes homelessness as a challenge, wrapped in a rhythmic groove of monotony-get up, come to Micah, have breakfast, get a shower, go to the park, visit the library and try to stay out of sight, out of mind. "Its hard to get out of that groove," he said. "You can end up feeling even more useless and wanting to be around people even less." Being asked to help with various tasks in the community, in the churches and at Micah, he said, helped break his cycle, build his worth and set him on a more positive path. "I was at one time very prideful, arrogant person," Edwin said. "I used to look down on people that I love to serve today. Now I embrace those cats." Edwin says his work at Micah's warehouse has not only been a source of income and a means to pay the bills, it is a ministry that blesses both him and others. "It's the best and most blessed job I have ever had in my life," he said. "I get to listen to my clients stories and cry with them and then help them shop and start the road to recovery." With Edwin's leadership, items are picked up and delivered from the furniture warehouse every week to people who are starting over. If you would like to volunteer yourself or church group on a weekly, monthly or as needed basis, email volunteer@dolovewalk.net. Donations or needs for furniture/household items can be submitted through Micah's website www.micahfredericksburg.org. Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness & identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540-4794116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

win downtown gift certificate

Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

Last Month’s House: Formerly “Caretakers Lodge” Now “Park Residence” on the National Battlefield Park The Winner of a gift certificate from Roxbury Farm & Garden Center is Soan V. Nguyen Old, Proud, Beautiful, I Wonder Who You Are You take my breath away sitting as you do, on the corner for nearly 300 years and more. Who envisioned your windows doors and porches. that welcome the tired and hungry? Did you greet the small woman each day, who lived next door to you, whose son was the father of our country? I see your bones exposed for all to see, I scream out, leave her be. Stay strong my dear, we need your strength,your old eyes, to guide us to the past. In this way through you,my beloved, we learn to hold on, to what makes our country great!

“Polishing the Edges” Oil Painting by Lynn Abbott 810 Artists: Beverley Coates, Watercolorist Penny A. Parrish, Photographer Lynn Abbott, Oil Painter Daily 10 to 6.

Artist on site Saturdays

540.371.4099

810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg 24

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

25


Music By Moonlight

Stories

Celebrating 30 years of music

Edwin

of fredericksburg

By Debbie H. Bliss

In September 1986 Anne Crowe Essig and four other women, Valerie Rivera, Mary Wilson, Barbara Muir and Cessie Howell, met on Salvation Army premises to plan and organize a Women's Auxiliary. They received their official charter in November 1986. This Women's Auxiliary was organized to promote the purposes of The Salvation Army. Its activities include many fund-raising projects and one of these projects, Music By Moonlight, will be celebrating it 30th Annual Concert at Hurkamp Park on Saturday, September 8, 2018, from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm. This event originally began as a daylong event called "Day in the Park" at Hurkamp Park, but the group soon realized a day long event was a little overwhelming. In 1988 Music By Moonlight was born when Ann, approached one of her husband's friends, Dr. Lloyd "Jeppie" Moss, about Fredericksburg Big Band doing a fundraiser and Music By Moonlight was born. 100% proceeds raised at the concert and through direct mailings go towards sending economically disadvantaged children to The Salvation

Army's Camp Happyland in Richardsville, VA. The children, ages 6 -12, experience biking, rock climbing, obstacle courses, ball parks, swimming pool, lake, cabins, Bible study, an amphitheater and music conservatory all on 647 beautiful acres. Many of these kids would never have exposure to these activities without the scholarships provided by Salvation Army's Women's Auxiliary Music By Moonlight. This summer over 100 area children were able to attend camp because of the generosity of the Fredericksburg community. This year's Music By Moonlight is growing and is proud to have Fredericksburg Parks, Recreation and Events as a co-sponsor. And, the Fredericksburg Big Band, who has been performing at the annual concert since its inception, will again be donating their time to keep Ann Essig's dream alive. Their music will have you smiling and wishing for a larger dance floor. Whether it is music from the 40' and 50's made famous by such artists as Glen Miller, Benny Goodman or Count Basie, or more recent songs like Barry Manilow's Copacabana, they have something for all ages to enjoy. And, if you are wanting to brush up on some Swing moves Strictly Ballroom of Fredericksburg will also be performing and enticing you to get those dancing shoes on. The concert is free to the public and you can bring your lawn chair, a blanket to sit on, grab one of the beautiful benches in the park or come and dance to the music. Or maybe you would like to reserve a table, for a fee, that places you

Name This House

under twinkling lights at a linen cover table with cookies and sparkling cider. There is something for everyone and all ages, including a craft table for the little ones, a silent auction, cookies and baked goods for sale and food vendors if you haven't had dinner or just want a snack. Come and help Ann Essig's dream stay alive and give the children of our community new dreams to dream! Contact Debbie Bliss at 540-2730971 or 1973.bliss.debbie@gmail.com or Lee Moyer 703-314-7744 or lee@electonicdesigns.com for more information.

Debbie H. Bliss is co-chair Salvation Army Women's Auxiliary, Music By Moonlight

Music By Moonlight, 30th Annual Concert Hurkamp Park, FREE Saturday, September 8, 7 to 9 pm.

Edwin, 57, has been homeless in Fredericksburg twice since 2009. He is currently stably housed and manages Micah's Furniture Warehouse, which helps people who are starting over gather essential items to make their houses home. Edwin grew up in Alexandria, as an only child. He graduated from Fort Hunt High School and immediately went to work as a cashier at a local gas station. In eight months, he worked himself up to manager and later moved on to other jobs in construction, retail and warehouse industry. One of those jobs eventually led him to Fredericksburg. He was married at one time. Although the five-year relationship ended in divorce, he most recently learned that he has a daughter, 34, and two grandchildren that he never knew about. He will meet them for the very first time this fall. He also has a 37-year old son from another relationship. Due to a series of "bad choices," Edwin lost his income, material belongings and place to live. He stayed in a motel initially, but when that went away as well he followed a tip to the doors of Micah Ministries. "I felt scared and useless," he said. "I thought that no one would want anything to do with me because I didn't fit anywhere."

Having previously led a successful life and admittedly looking down on those who struggled, Edwin was surprised to find an immediate support system in others who lived on the street. "I got the acceptance from other homeless people that you'd never get from people who live in grand homes. It really opened my eyes," he said. He describes homelessness as a challenge, wrapped in a rhythmic groove of monotony-get up, come to Micah, have breakfast, get a shower, go to the park, visit the library and try to stay out of sight, out of mind. "Its hard to get out of that groove," he said. "You can end up feeling even more useless and wanting to be around people even less." Being asked to help with various tasks in the community, in the churches and at Micah, he said, helped break his cycle, build his worth and set him on a more positive path. "I was at one time very prideful, arrogant person," Edwin said. "I used to look down on people that I love to serve today. Now I embrace those cats." Edwin says his work at Micah's warehouse has not only been a source of income and a means to pay the bills, it is a ministry that blesses both him and others. "It's the best and most blessed job I have ever had in my life," he said. "I get to listen to my clients stories and cry with them and then help them shop and start the road to recovery." With Edwin's leadership, items are picked up and delivered from the furniture warehouse every week to people who are starting over. If you would like to volunteer yourself or church group on a weekly, monthly or as needed basis, email volunteer@dolovewalk.net. Donations or needs for furniture/household items can be submitted through Micah's website www.micahfredericksburg.org. Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness & identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540-4794116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

win downtown gift certificate

Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

Last Month’s House: Formerly “Caretakers Lodge” Now “Park Residence” on the National Battlefield Park The Winner of a gift certificate from Roxbury Farm & Garden Center is Soan V. Nguyen Old, Proud, Beautiful, I Wonder Who You Are You take my breath away sitting as you do, on the corner for nearly 300 years and more. Who envisioned your windows doors and porches. that welcome the tired and hungry? Did you greet the small woman each day, who lived next door to you, whose son was the father of our country? I see your bones exposed for all to see, I scream out, leave her be. Stay strong my dear, we need your strength,your old eyes, to guide us to the past. In this way through you,my beloved, we learn to hold on, to what makes our country great!

“Polishing the Edges” Oil Painting by Lynn Abbott 810 Artists: Beverley Coates, Watercolorist Penny A. Parrish, Photographer Lynn Abbott, Oil Painter Daily 10 to 6.

Artist on site Saturdays

540.371.4099

810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg 24

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

25


Art in the Burg

Eleven Artists THE POETRY MAN

Remixed, Refreshed, & The Sea “Remixed 6”

“Simple Pleasures” Art First Gallery in historic downtown Fredericksburg is delighted to present the first solo show of Sharon FXBG-area artist Osmon. (above) “Simple Pleasures” is a dazzling ensemble of Osmon’s richly textured jewelry and beadwork. Osmon uses glass seed beads, Czech crystal, natural stone, pearls and metal to create original pieces based on historic and original patterns. ”I started experimenting with trying to not follow any specific pattern or paradigm, but rather let the creativity and work flow freely from me,” says Osmon in describing her most recent process, “The result is that I made more organic and relaxing pieces that reflect my individuality and spirit.” Osmon studied fine arts at Northern Virginia Community College, but it wasn’t until she was out one day with her daughter who noticed a bead shop and pointed it out to her. “I was interested in making prayer beads and my curiosity overcame me and I decided to check it out,” Osmon says, “The minute I walked into the store, I was overwhelmed by all the color options and style choices and immediately fell in love with the medium and it changed my life!” ~Casey Allen “Simple Pleasure” Opening Reception: 1st Friday, Aug 3 6 to 9 p.m. Exhibit thru September 2, Art First Gallery 824 Caroline Street Art displayed by more than twenty local artists

“Under the Sea”

PONSHOP Studio and Gallery is pleased to announce "Remixed 6" features original artwork using 12" vinyl record albums.Exhibit includes over thirty participating artists work on this unconventional canvas. This is the sixth year of the "Remixed" vinyl-themed show Over thirty albums to be adorned by over twenty artists. This community art show has proven to be a great addition to the gallery's exhibition schedule, involving artists of all backgrounds and also boasting affordable artworks for the home or office ranging from $25-$150. Curated by gallery owners Scarlett and Gabriel Pons. ~Maddie Huddle “Remixed 6” PONSHOP, 712 Caroline St Opening Reception: 1st Friday, August 3 (6-9 9pm) Exhibition Dates: August 3- September 29

T h r o u g h o u t Brush Strokes August, Gallery will feature a collection of one-of-a-kind earrings and necklaces in the "Under the Sea" exhibit created by artist Liana Pivirotto (jewelry above). Inspired by summers at the shore, the hand-crafted jewelry incorporates fresh-water pearls and shells in stunning jewelry. Each creation will be a treasured piece that may elicit personal memories of times spent by the soothing and inspiring ocean. ~ Norma Woodward “Under the Sea” Opening Reception, 1st Friday meet and chat with Liana 6 to pm. Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline

An Alternative We sit in our cars and homes and see nothing beyond apathy, we hear nothing but ourselves asking that payoffs come soon, we touch nothing real except the gloss of electronic life. Let us resolve to break free and watch suns glow at night, hear joy in a playful chorus where children romp together and touch the hands of those we value and love around us.

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 10 years.

“Refresh, Renew, Revive”

The Artists' Alliance (AA) will present a full complement of artists for Colonial Beach's Second Friday Art Walk, on August 10. Our traditional media (e.g. painting and photography) have been supplemented with basketry, jewelry, and pottery. The Art Walk reception will run from 6-9pm. Painter Steve Griffin is the featured artist. The gallery is located at 100 Taylor St., Suite 101, in Colonial Beach.

~Rob Rudick

By Patricia Smith

- By Frank Fratoe

Come, open a gateway now shut to opulence filling the mind.

Backdoor Gallery presents Elena Broach (right) new body of work with an ocean theme. "Refresh, Renew, Revive" are paintings inspired by scenes from the seashore in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and the Florida Gulf. Elena has been an artist in the area for the past 8 years, having exhibited at FCCA, Libertytown Art, and Art First “Refresh” opening reception, First Friday, Aug.3 Backdoor Gallery 819 Caroline St

Glimpse of Darbytown Art Studio

Eleven artists from the Darbytown Art Studio will exhibit their work at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Fredericksburg from August 5 thru October 1. Opening reception is on August 5 from 11:30 AM - 1 PM. The reception is free and open to the public. Jeannie Ellis (above) is the owner of Darbytown Art Studio, located at 241 Charles Street in Fredericksburg. She began using the space as her studio two years ago, but she soon realized she wanted the company of other artists. Word spread, and now eleven artists share

“Evening Symphony”, Elena Broach

the space to display and create their work. She did not know any of the artists before they asked to join the studio, but now she feels like there is a real community. "There is still space for two or three artists", she says. We make enough money to pay the rent and cover utilities, but we don't take money from artist sales, and we don't want to charge “Outer Banks”, Mary Woolls artists more than Tube". She began making small copper necessary to cover costs. Each artist has a earrings, and now her hammered copper key to come and go as they like, and each sculptures are often very large. She also is responsible for their own business. This receives many commissions for dog arrangement gives the artists maximum portraits. flexibility, and fosters community without These artists celebrate the the responsibility of maintaining business diversity of their backgrounds in art, the hours, or working at a desk. When they individuality of their styles, and the wide are in, they hang a large 'Open' sign by the range of media with which they work. door. Since last October, they foster Along with Cara and Jeannie, other community by participating in First Van participating artists include: Fridays, and their studio is part of the Anderson, alcohol ink and resin and Trolley Tour. acrylic pours; Cliff Satterthwaite, oil and The artists use a broad range of watercolor paintings; Jane Cariker, media in their work, and have developed watercolors and acrylics; Sasha Leigh, unique styles. Cara Hines, for example, encaustic over photographs; Tronja, uses encaustic (wax painting) on panels. acrylics and mixed media; Jerome Golden, She also uses a broad range of mixed acrylics; Janet Robbins, mixed media; media, from pen and ink, charcoal, oil Ruthie Robbins, mixed media; Mary pastels, soft pastels, pencil, acrylics, spray Woolls, (above right) oil painting. paint, and non-traditional media like latex paint and found objects. Sometimes her work is completely abstract, but her Patricia Smith is a member of the Visual Arts Committee at UUFF, and an artist. installations can probe ethical questions. A current exhibit she has in Texas displays Darbytown Art Studio is located at 241 hundreds of pairs of her Grandmother's Charles Street, Downtown shoes, implicitly questioning our Hours Vary. Contacted via Facebook. consumer culture. The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Jeannie Ellis is a self-taught artist, Fredericksburg 25 Chalice Circle, FXBG, jokingly stating she was "trained by You-

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne Street , FXBG 26

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

27


Art in the Burg

Eleven Artists THE POETRY MAN

Remixed, Refreshed, & The Sea “Remixed 6”

“Simple Pleasures” Art First Gallery in historic downtown Fredericksburg is delighted to present the first solo show of Sharon FXBG-area artist Osmon. (above) “Simple Pleasures” is a dazzling ensemble of Osmon’s richly textured jewelry and beadwork. Osmon uses glass seed beads, Czech crystal, natural stone, pearls and metal to create original pieces based on historic and original patterns. ”I started experimenting with trying to not follow any specific pattern or paradigm, but rather let the creativity and work flow freely from me,” says Osmon in describing her most recent process, “The result is that I made more organic and relaxing pieces that reflect my individuality and spirit.” Osmon studied fine arts at Northern Virginia Community College, but it wasn’t until she was out one day with her daughter who noticed a bead shop and pointed it out to her. “I was interested in making prayer beads and my curiosity overcame me and I decided to check it out,” Osmon says, “The minute I walked into the store, I was overwhelmed by all the color options and style choices and immediately fell in love with the medium and it changed my life!” ~Casey Allen “Simple Pleasure” Opening Reception: 1st Friday, Aug 3 6 to 9 p.m. Exhibit thru September 2, Art First Gallery 824 Caroline Street Art displayed by more than twenty local artists

“Under the Sea”

PONSHOP Studio and Gallery is pleased to announce "Remixed 6" features original artwork using 12" vinyl record albums.Exhibit includes over thirty participating artists work on this unconventional canvas. This is the sixth year of the "Remixed" vinyl-themed show Over thirty albums to be adorned by over twenty artists. This community art show has proven to be a great addition to the gallery's exhibition schedule, involving artists of all backgrounds and also boasting affordable artworks for the home or office ranging from $25-$150. Curated by gallery owners Scarlett and Gabriel Pons. ~Maddie Huddle “Remixed 6” PONSHOP, 712 Caroline St Opening Reception: 1st Friday, August 3 (6-9 9pm) Exhibition Dates: August 3- September 29

T h r o u g h o u t Brush Strokes August, Gallery will feature a collection of one-of-a-kind earrings and necklaces in the "Under the Sea" exhibit created by artist Liana Pivirotto (jewelry above). Inspired by summers at the shore, the hand-crafted jewelry incorporates fresh-water pearls and shells in stunning jewelry. Each creation will be a treasured piece that may elicit personal memories of times spent by the soothing and inspiring ocean. ~ Norma Woodward “Under the Sea” Opening Reception, 1st Friday meet and chat with Liana 6 to pm. Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline

An Alternative We sit in our cars and homes and see nothing beyond apathy, we hear nothing but ourselves asking that payoffs come soon, we touch nothing real except the gloss of electronic life. Let us resolve to break free and watch suns glow at night, hear joy in a playful chorus where children romp together and touch the hands of those we value and love around us.

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 10 years.

“Refresh, Renew, Revive”

The Artists' Alliance (AA) will present a full complement of artists for Colonial Beach's Second Friday Art Walk, on August 10. Our traditional media (e.g. painting and photography) have been supplemented with basketry, jewelry, and pottery. The Art Walk reception will run from 6-9pm. Painter Steve Griffin is the featured artist. The gallery is located at 100 Taylor St., Suite 101, in Colonial Beach.

~Rob Rudick

By Patricia Smith

- By Frank Fratoe

Come, open a gateway now shut to opulence filling the mind.

Backdoor Gallery presents Elena Broach (right) new body of work with an ocean theme. "Refresh, Renew, Revive" are paintings inspired by scenes from the seashore in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and the Florida Gulf. Elena has been an artist in the area for the past 8 years, having exhibited at FCCA, Libertytown Art, and Art First “Refresh” opening reception, First Friday, Aug.3 Backdoor Gallery 819 Caroline St

Glimpse of Darbytown Art Studio

Eleven artists from the Darbytown Art Studio will exhibit their work at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Fredericksburg from August 5 thru October 1. Opening reception is on August 5 from 11:30 AM - 1 PM. The reception is free and open to the public. Jeannie Ellis (above) is the owner of Darbytown Art Studio, located at 241 Charles Street in Fredericksburg. She began using the space as her studio two years ago, but she soon realized she wanted the company of other artists. Word spread, and now eleven artists share

“Evening Symphony”, Elena Broach

the space to display and create their work. She did not know any of the artists before they asked to join the studio, but now she feels like there is a real community. "There is still space for two or three artists", she says. We make enough money to pay the rent and cover utilities, but we don't take money from artist sales, and we don't want to charge “Outer Banks”, Mary Woolls artists more than Tube". She began making small copper necessary to cover costs. Each artist has a earrings, and now her hammered copper key to come and go as they like, and each sculptures are often very large. She also is responsible for their own business. This receives many commissions for dog arrangement gives the artists maximum portraits. flexibility, and fosters community without These artists celebrate the the responsibility of maintaining business diversity of their backgrounds in art, the hours, or working at a desk. When they individuality of their styles, and the wide are in, they hang a large 'Open' sign by the range of media with which they work. door. Since last October, they foster Along with Cara and Jeannie, other community by participating in First Van participating artists include: Fridays, and their studio is part of the Anderson, alcohol ink and resin and Trolley Tour. acrylic pours; Cliff Satterthwaite, oil and The artists use a broad range of watercolor paintings; Jane Cariker, media in their work, and have developed watercolors and acrylics; Sasha Leigh, unique styles. Cara Hines, for example, encaustic over photographs; Tronja, uses encaustic (wax painting) on panels. acrylics and mixed media; Jerome Golden, She also uses a broad range of mixed acrylics; Janet Robbins, mixed media; media, from pen and ink, charcoal, oil Ruthie Robbins, mixed media; Mary pastels, soft pastels, pencil, acrylics, spray Woolls, (above right) oil painting. paint, and non-traditional media like latex paint and found objects. Sometimes her work is completely abstract, but her Patricia Smith is a member of the Visual Arts Committee at UUFF, and an artist. installations can probe ethical questions. A current exhibit she has in Texas displays Darbytown Art Studio is located at 241 hundreds of pairs of her Grandmother's Charles Street, Downtown shoes, implicitly questioning our Hours Vary. Contacted via Facebook. consumer culture. The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Jeannie Ellis is a self-taught artist, Fredericksburg 25 Chalice Circle, FXBG, jokingly stating she was "trained by You-

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne Street , FXBG 26

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

27


Companions

Everything Greens Garden Sprouts

compassionate care camp

By Sarah Perry

by Allie Names

This summer the Fredericksburg SPCA is providing a summer camp called the Compassionate Care Camp. This camp provides children with basic animal care knowledge and educates them on the different programs we run. There are currently two week long sessions left, one for elementary school students and one for middle school students. The camp runs from 9am to 12pm Monday through Friday for a full week. Each day the children have the opportunity to learn something new about our animal shelter. A lot of children come to the camp in hopes of playing with animals the whole time, which they get to do, but it is also important that they see other aspects of the shelter as well. The first day as we go through the rules for their safety, we explain what a high stress environment the shelter can be for animals. Many of the cats and dogs we

which can be a really hard adjustment for most animals. As a way of helping these stressed out animals, the kids read 15 minutes each day to the cats. Although reading to cats may not seem like a big deal, it can lower the stress hormones in our cats almost immediately and get them used to being around kids. Other activities include making cat toys, dog toys, learning how to train dogs and tie dying shirts! We also include one volunteer task each day so that the children see how important our volunteers are to the organization as a whole. Our campers even learned how to provide one of our special needs puppies with the physical therapy he receives each day. Not only is this camp beneficial for the children of our community, but also they provide comfort and compassion to the animals we have here in the building.

FXBG SPCA 10819 Courthouse Road FXBG, VA 22408 (540) 898-1 1500 fburgspca.org facebook

Photos by Siobhan Young, Social Media Specialist at Fredericksburg SPCA

receive have lived in homes and were recently moved away from their owners,

28

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Head Start Collaboration One of the newest additions to the Downtown Greens’ program offerings is a collaboration with our neighboring Fredericksburg Head Start. After a shiny new renovation of the Former Walker Grant School on Gunnery Road, and the addition of a fantastic outdoor learning area with raised garden beds (constructed by Friends of the Rappahannock), the outdoor learning area was missing one thing--a gardening program! In comes Downtown Greens and newest team member Linda Kuenstler (pictured). Together they created a weekly class that met with each of the six Head Start classes at the Fredericksburg campus as well as two at the King George campus. In the spirit of Head Start, this was very much a “hands-on” program. Children started by adding compost to the garden in early spring. For some, this was a first experience digging in a garden. During one of the half-hour classes that I happened to sit in on, the line of 3-year olds filed out of the building and into the garden area with smiles and excitement mounting. Their first activity was always to take a walk around the space to note all the things that had changed since the previous week—what had grown, appeared, disappeared, ... Linda did a fabulous job pointing out everything from the fact that there was water in the bird bath that morning to the pink shoulders peeking out of the soil where radish seeds were planted several weeks ago, to the friendly ladybug who protects plants from certain pests. The class then was seated on the benches and Linda held up a can. “What is this?” A resounding shout of “CORN!” followed. From there the discussion went on to describe how corn starts out as a seed that grows into plants! Seeds were passed around, a familiar-looking corn cob was mysteriously revealed from under its green husk and soft silks, and the 4-inch tall baby corn plants were gently petted by each of the children before getting tucked into the garden beds to grow. All of the Head Start classes were also participating in the Doctor Yum Project’s Preschool Food Adventure, an interactive curriculum designed to introduce preschoolers to the joy of eating fruits and vegetables. The garden program was a ‘natural’ addition to the Dr. Yum initiative. When possible, lessons were coordinated with school lunch menu items. Linda explains: “Sweet potato fries were on the menu so we had fresh sweet potatoes as part of the lesson. Kids

discovered those fries began as plants with leaves, and special roots...Those fries did not grow themselves in the freezer section of the grocery store!” We received a grant to cover the entire 2-month pilot project from Rappahannock Electric Cooperative’s Power of Change initiative. The Power of Change receives its funding from REC members who volunteer to have their electric bill rounded-up to the next highest whole dollar. Visit www.thepowerofchange.org for more info on the program or to sign up. Our goal for the upcoming school year is to continue and expand the program to include the fall and winter growing seasons which will triple the budget necessary for the project. We feel it is so important to foster an appreciation for both food, and the process necessary to grow it, within our youth. We have found that, besides the “hard skills” of growing, cooking--and eating!--food, our garden programs also inspire creativity, patience, and thoughtfulness in our youth; but these kids will not have these opportunities without the support of our amazing community. We take great pride in not having to rely exclusively on grants or donations from companies, and in knowing that each seed we plant, each meal we prepare, each child that is inspired to love nature a little more is tied to an individual--a person--in our community. If you are able to help fund this expansion, please consider donating to Downtown Greens either by check sent to 206 Charles Street, Fredericksburg, 22401 or online at www.downtowngreens.org. Sarah Perry is the Executive Director of Downtown Greens.

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

29


Companions

Everything Greens Garden Sprouts

compassionate care camp

By Sarah Perry

by Allie Names

This summer the Fredericksburg SPCA is providing a summer camp called the Compassionate Care Camp. This camp provides children with basic animal care knowledge and educates them on the different programs we run. There are currently two week long sessions left, one for elementary school students and one for middle school students. The camp runs from 9am to 12pm Monday through Friday for a full week. Each day the children have the opportunity to learn something new about our animal shelter. A lot of children come to the camp in hopes of playing with animals the whole time, which they get to do, but it is also important that they see other aspects of the shelter as well. The first day as we go through the rules for their safety, we explain what a high stress environment the shelter can be for animals. Many of the cats and dogs we

which can be a really hard adjustment for most animals. As a way of helping these stressed out animals, the kids read 15 minutes each day to the cats. Although reading to cats may not seem like a big deal, it can lower the stress hormones in our cats almost immediately and get them used to being around kids. Other activities include making cat toys, dog toys, learning how to train dogs and tie dying shirts! We also include one volunteer task each day so that the children see how important our volunteers are to the organization as a whole. Our campers even learned how to provide one of our special needs puppies with the physical therapy he receives each day. Not only is this camp beneficial for the children of our community, but also they provide comfort and compassion to the animals we have here in the building.

FXBG SPCA 10819 Courthouse Road FXBG, VA 22408 (540) 898-1 1500 fburgspca.org facebook

Photos by Siobhan Young, Social Media Specialist at Fredericksburg SPCA

receive have lived in homes and were recently moved away from their owners,

28

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Head Start Collaboration One of the newest additions to the Downtown Greens’ program offerings is a collaboration with our neighboring Fredericksburg Head Start. After a shiny new renovation of the Former Walker Grant School on Gunnery Road, and the addition of a fantastic outdoor learning area with raised garden beds (constructed by Friends of the Rappahannock), the outdoor learning area was missing one thing--a gardening program! In comes Downtown Greens and newest team member Linda Kuenstler (pictured). Together they created a weekly class that met with each of the six Head Start classes at the Fredericksburg campus as well as two at the King George campus. In the spirit of Head Start, this was very much a “hands-on” program. Children started by adding compost to the garden in early spring. For some, this was a first experience digging in a garden. During one of the half-hour classes that I happened to sit in on, the line of 3-year olds filed out of the building and into the garden area with smiles and excitement mounting. Their first activity was always to take a walk around the space to note all the things that had changed since the previous week—what had grown, appeared, disappeared, ... Linda did a fabulous job pointing out everything from the fact that there was water in the bird bath that morning to the pink shoulders peeking out of the soil where radish seeds were planted several weeks ago, to the friendly ladybug who protects plants from certain pests. The class then was seated on the benches and Linda held up a can. “What is this?” A resounding shout of “CORN!” followed. From there the discussion went on to describe how corn starts out as a seed that grows into plants! Seeds were passed around, a familiar-looking corn cob was mysteriously revealed from under its green husk and soft silks, and the 4-inch tall baby corn plants were gently petted by each of the children before getting tucked into the garden beds to grow. All of the Head Start classes were also participating in the Doctor Yum Project’s Preschool Food Adventure, an interactive curriculum designed to introduce preschoolers to the joy of eating fruits and vegetables. The garden program was a ‘natural’ addition to the Dr. Yum initiative. When possible, lessons were coordinated with school lunch menu items. Linda explains: “Sweet potato fries were on the menu so we had fresh sweet potatoes as part of the lesson. Kids

discovered those fries began as plants with leaves, and special roots...Those fries did not grow themselves in the freezer section of the grocery store!” We received a grant to cover the entire 2-month pilot project from Rappahannock Electric Cooperative’s Power of Change initiative. The Power of Change receives its funding from REC members who volunteer to have their electric bill rounded-up to the next highest whole dollar. Visit www.thepowerofchange.org for more info on the program or to sign up. Our goal for the upcoming school year is to continue and expand the program to include the fall and winter growing seasons which will triple the budget necessary for the project. We feel it is so important to foster an appreciation for both food, and the process necessary to grow it, within our youth. We have found that, besides the “hard skills” of growing, cooking--and eating!--food, our garden programs also inspire creativity, patience, and thoughtfulness in our youth; but these kids will not have these opportunities without the support of our amazing community. We take great pride in not having to rely exclusively on grants or donations from companies, and in knowing that each seed we plant, each meal we prepare, each child that is inspired to love nature a little more is tied to an individual--a person--in our community. If you are able to help fund this expansion, please consider donating to Downtown Greens either by check sent to 206 Charles Street, Fredericksburg, 22401 or online at www.downtowngreens.org. Sarah Perry is the Executive Director of Downtown Greens.

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

29


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg

By Casey Alan Shaw

www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Give a Child Something to Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties 810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

“Behind the Big Red Barn” I'm honored to fill in for Casey Shaw with this month's sketch. One of the things that urban sketchers often do is seek out the hidden areas of our towns that visitors and even locals seldom see-or if they do, they usually ignore them. The subject of this sketch was hidden behind the big red barn on Sophia Street that was recently torn down. This apartment building was a challenge to draw because there was so much so see. I tend to draw directly with ink then fill in with watercolors and this one was no exception. Drawing with ink (no preliminary pencil sketch) makes me slow down and look at things a lot more carefully because you can't erase mistakes. Mistakes still happen but it's a sketch so they don't usually matter too much to me. In fact, I always enjoy seeing the artist's hand in a drawing, mistakes and all. As a nod to the big red barn, I included the shadow of that building even though it was already gone. The shadows are always changing so I usually just decide where they will be when I start the sketch, then it doesn't matter when they move. Hope you enjoy this one! Cheers, Paula Raudenbush

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

30

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Kindness of Strangers

Our Mayberry in FXBG

By Jo Loving by georgia Lee Strentz

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Read for Free Today at fredericksburgwriters.com

From My Porch

A visual Celebration of our community

373-7847

M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

DOWNTOWNERS

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

Even if you don't need a plant, fertilizer, or bird seed, but need a feel good day, still go downtown to Roxbury Farm & Garden Center, 601 Lafayette Blvd, just a short block down from the train station on Lafayette. Go in the main building and find "Andy's Chair." Look up on the wall, the chair sits below the pictures which go back to 1929. No matter what your problem, it can be fixed by Andy's Chair. Andy is of cource, Andy Lynn. If he is outside helping some other needy Fredericksburger, be sure to talk to one of the friendly staff, like Brian, Jeff, Judy or Sharon. Remember though "the heavy" stuff goes to Andy! Like the day a woman came in wearing her pj's, yelling that there were 150 snakes in the hallway of her house. Or the man who came in and started dipping his head into the indoor pond, eating the fish, much to Judy's horror. There was also the mystery of, where did Andy's car go,which was missing for a month ,last seen by front door of main building, then just as mysteriously returned. The main buildings are old, old, warehouses that were once a lumberyard, run by Mr. Young, (see history chair wall) and it also was a thriving wood stove store (remember Blaze King?) When they heated the store with Blaze King stoves, they cooked beans on the stoves all day, free to their customers all winter, no stove purchase required. The grain tower, when Roxbury was located on Kenmore Ave., moved more grain than any other business in the area, until the wooden structure burned down. Farmers drive sometimes 60 miles into Fredericksburg to do business with Roxbury. The FMC plant was an economic backbone of employment in Fredericksburg for many years. Andy remembers (we won't mention age here) all the wonderful dignified customers who worked there. Roxbury has met the needs of our community for generations of families. Speaking of time flying by (Andy's age being one) Andy revealed, he came to Fredericksburg in the 70's, (No way is he that old!) When his mom and Dad, Sunny Lynn and Henry, were Managing Roxbury Mills, he was attending Mary Washington College, while working part-time for fun money at Roxbury. Mills.

Unexpected kindness is the most powerful, least costly, and most underrated agent of human change. ~ Bob Kerrey

Roxbury Mills was established in 1929, and they carry everything the home gardener, professional landscaper or home horticulturist needs. They carry over 10,00 items in stock. Roxbury is a Growise Center and a member of the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Center As an avid gardener and huge fan of Roxbury Mills, I buy everything for the yard I need there, no question,best everything you need,and then there is the greenhouse with beautiful gardening type gifts, beautiful pots, indoor plants, gorgeous, find nowhere else plants for indoors and out. Everyone at Roxbury says this is a "feel good" type of business,as plants make people happy! Roxbury Mills is one of my stops while on my three wheel bike treks, (Hyperion being another!) as my big basket on the back handily holds bird seed and misc., can't do without items! Check out the gorgeous tile mural on the side of Roxbury (Multicultural OutReach Effort) I'll be looking for you in "Andy's Chair!" Say Georgia sent you from Front Porch magazine.

Georgia Strentz is our gal about town & FXBG’s biggest supporter

Recently, I embarked on a journey; just me, and two of my grandchildren; not-quite-a-year-old Clara, and 4-1/2-year-old Finnegan. It was the first time I had traveled by air with small children by myself since my own children were young. They are now in their 30’s. Since then, a great deal has happened. I’m a frequent traveler and consider myself to be well-versed in the rules. In the post9/11 world, with TSA and the like, I’ve learned to navigate with relative ease. The TSA Pre-check line is a Godsend to travelers, and I have enjoyed going through airport security since I have achieved that distinction. Clara, Finnegan, and I made it quickly through security when we left New Orleans, bound for Tacoma. Clara rode in her stroller to the gate in style, smiling at everyone she met. Finnegan proudly wore his backpack. Since we were early, I thought we would take advantage of the extra time to go to the family restroom and change Clara’s wet diaper before we boarded. Unfortunately, there was a line. I checked the ladies room, for which there also was a line. So, I did what any experienced ninja-diaper-changer would do – I lowered Clara’s seat, and, quick as a flash, changed her diaper just outside the restroom. A lady who was standing nearby said, “Wow, that was fast! You must’ve done this before!” I replied, with a smile, “A time or two.” We carried on to the gate and waited for a bit, then we were permitted to pre-board, because of the children. This was fun! It was the evening of July 4. I thought it would be entertaining for Finnegan to see the fireworks from the air, so I had booked the window seat for him. Clara, as a lap baby, and I, were in the middle seat. It was a full flight. A sweet young woman was in the aisle seat next to us. All was well with the world! Clara is an agreeable baby, and Finnegan was excited. The plane took off. Before we reached cruising altitude, Clara began crying. “Here, Clara, have a bottle,” I said, offering it to her. She brushed my hand away. Hmmm…maybe a pacifier would work. No dice. Squeezie pack? Nope. Diaper ok? Yes. Meanwhile, Finnegan was asking “when will they serve supper, GaGa?” “When the seatbelt light goes out, the flight attendants will bring

something. Here, have some SmartWater – it makes you Smart,” I said, with a smile, juggling the crying Clara. “Really, GaGa,” said Finnegan. “Yes, drink some and you’ll see!” I returned my attention to Clara, whose crying had reached a new pitch. Who knew a baby this size could belt out a tune at this volume? The disembodied voice of the pilot came over the speaker, “Folks, we are into a little weather, so the seatbelt light will remain on until it is safe for you to move around. Please stay seated.” Oh, no! Clara! What to do? I tried jiggling with her, I tried changing her position, I tried toys, keys, whatever I had at my disposal. She was not having any of it. This went on for about two hours. The seatbelt light was finally out. By now, my neighbor had joined in, trying to help soothe Clara. I learned that she had worked with her mother in a daycare for years. She asked if it would help if she stood up in the aisle with Clara. “Would you?” I asked, “You don’t mind?” She replied, with a sweet, angelic smile, “Of course not, I’m good with babies.” And she was! Clara calmed, and our wonderful seatmate returned her to me. Now, Clara would take her bottle. She dropped off to sleep. Finnegan received his kid’s meal, and for the rest of the flight, he and I had an animated conversation about airplanes, giraffes, penguins, and, as we descended, he exclaimed, animatedly, about the many fireworks we could see from the air. Clara slept for the other half of the trip, waking just as the plane landed. My seatmate, Jessica, received a broad smile from Clara. It was time to disembark. It went smoothly. As we were waiting for the stroller at the end of the jetway, I caught a glimpse of my reflection in the window. My hair, it seems, had taken on a life of its own, standing on end. In the years when my children were young, this would have bothered me. Now, I was just glad to have made it this far with any hair at all. The children were happy, I was happy, and, as we bid adieu to Jessica, she said, “It was a pleasure meeting you all. Thank you for letting me help.” I told her that I would be eternally grateful to her, and to the others on the plane, who had endured the first two hours without complaint. They smiled at me and my little band of children as they left, not a scowl or grumble among them. My faith in humanity had been restored, and the remainder of our journey was better, having received the kindness of a stranger, and the forbearance of an entire plane of them. Jo Loving is on the porch, back home now, reflecting on the beauty of unexpected kindness, on the love and joy of grandchildren

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

31


Fredericksburg Sketches 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg

By Casey Alan Shaw

www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Give a Child Something to Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties 810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

“Behind the Big Red Barn” I'm honored to fill in for Casey Shaw with this month's sketch. One of the things that urban sketchers often do is seek out the hidden areas of our towns that visitors and even locals seldom see-or if they do, they usually ignore them. The subject of this sketch was hidden behind the big red barn on Sophia Street that was recently torn down. This apartment building was a challenge to draw because there was so much so see. I tend to draw directly with ink then fill in with watercolors and this one was no exception. Drawing with ink (no preliminary pencil sketch) makes me slow down and look at things a lot more carefully because you can't erase mistakes. Mistakes still happen but it's a sketch so they don't usually matter too much to me. In fact, I always enjoy seeing the artist's hand in a drawing, mistakes and all. As a nod to the big red barn, I included the shadow of that building even though it was already gone. The shadows are always changing so I usually just decide where they will be when I start the sketch, then it doesn't matter when they move. Hope you enjoy this one! Cheers, Paula Raudenbush

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

30

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Kindness of Strangers

Our Mayberry in FXBG

By Jo Loving by georgia Lee Strentz

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Read for Free Today at fredericksburgwriters.com

From My Porch

A visual Celebration of our community

373-7847

M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

DOWNTOWNERS

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

Even if you don't need a plant, fertilizer, or bird seed, but need a feel good day, still go downtown to Roxbury Farm & Garden Center, 601 Lafayette Blvd, just a short block down from the train station on Lafayette. Go in the main building and find "Andy's Chair." Look up on the wall, the chair sits below the pictures which go back to 1929. No matter what your problem, it can be fixed by Andy's Chair. Andy is of cource, Andy Lynn. If he is outside helping some other needy Fredericksburger, be sure to talk to one of the friendly staff, like Brian, Jeff, Judy or Sharon. Remember though "the heavy" stuff goes to Andy! Like the day a woman came in wearing her pj's, yelling that there were 150 snakes in the hallway of her house. Or the man who came in and started dipping his head into the indoor pond, eating the fish, much to Judy's horror. There was also the mystery of, where did Andy's car go,which was missing for a month ,last seen by front door of main building, then just as mysteriously returned. The main buildings are old, old, warehouses that were once a lumberyard, run by Mr. Young, (see history chair wall) and it also was a thriving wood stove store (remember Blaze King?) When they heated the store with Blaze King stoves, they cooked beans on the stoves all day, free to their customers all winter, no stove purchase required. The grain tower, when Roxbury was located on Kenmore Ave., moved more grain than any other business in the area, until the wooden structure burned down. Farmers drive sometimes 60 miles into Fredericksburg to do business with Roxbury. The FMC plant was an economic backbone of employment in Fredericksburg for many years. Andy remembers (we won't mention age here) all the wonderful dignified customers who worked there. Roxbury has met the needs of our community for generations of families. Speaking of time flying by (Andy's age being one) Andy revealed, he came to Fredericksburg in the 70's, (No way is he that old!) When his mom and Dad, Sunny Lynn and Henry, were Managing Roxbury Mills, he was attending Mary Washington College, while working part-time for fun money at Roxbury. Mills.

Unexpected kindness is the most powerful, least costly, and most underrated agent of human change. ~ Bob Kerrey

Roxbury Mills was established in 1929, and they carry everything the home gardener, professional landscaper or home horticulturist needs. They carry over 10,00 items in stock. Roxbury is a Growise Center and a member of the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Center As an avid gardener and huge fan of Roxbury Mills, I buy everything for the yard I need there, no question,best everything you need,and then there is the greenhouse with beautiful gardening type gifts, beautiful pots, indoor plants, gorgeous, find nowhere else plants for indoors and out. Everyone at Roxbury says this is a "feel good" type of business,as plants make people happy! Roxbury Mills is one of my stops while on my three wheel bike treks, (Hyperion being another!) as my big basket on the back handily holds bird seed and misc., can't do without items! Check out the gorgeous tile mural on the side of Roxbury (Multicultural OutReach Effort) I'll be looking for you in "Andy's Chair!" Say Georgia sent you from Front Porch magazine.

Georgia Strentz is our gal about town & FXBG’s biggest supporter

Recently, I embarked on a journey; just me, and two of my grandchildren; not-quite-a-year-old Clara, and 4-1/2-year-old Finnegan. It was the first time I had traveled by air with small children by myself since my own children were young. They are now in their 30’s. Since then, a great deal has happened. I’m a frequent traveler and consider myself to be well-versed in the rules. In the post9/11 world, with TSA and the like, I’ve learned to navigate with relative ease. The TSA Pre-check line is a Godsend to travelers, and I have enjoyed going through airport security since I have achieved that distinction. Clara, Finnegan, and I made it quickly through security when we left New Orleans, bound for Tacoma. Clara rode in her stroller to the gate in style, smiling at everyone she met. Finnegan proudly wore his backpack. Since we were early, I thought we would take advantage of the extra time to go to the family restroom and change Clara’s wet diaper before we boarded. Unfortunately, there was a line. I checked the ladies room, for which there also was a line. So, I did what any experienced ninja-diaper-changer would do – I lowered Clara’s seat, and, quick as a flash, changed her diaper just outside the restroom. A lady who was standing nearby said, “Wow, that was fast! You must’ve done this before!” I replied, with a smile, “A time or two.” We carried on to the gate and waited for a bit, then we were permitted to pre-board, because of the children. This was fun! It was the evening of July 4. I thought it would be entertaining for Finnegan to see the fireworks from the air, so I had booked the window seat for him. Clara, as a lap baby, and I, were in the middle seat. It was a full flight. A sweet young woman was in the aisle seat next to us. All was well with the world! Clara is an agreeable baby, and Finnegan was excited. The plane took off. Before we reached cruising altitude, Clara began crying. “Here, Clara, have a bottle,” I said, offering it to her. She brushed my hand away. Hmmm…maybe a pacifier would work. No dice. Squeezie pack? Nope. Diaper ok? Yes. Meanwhile, Finnegan was asking “when will they serve supper, GaGa?” “When the seatbelt light goes out, the flight attendants will bring

something. Here, have some SmartWater – it makes you Smart,” I said, with a smile, juggling the crying Clara. “Really, GaGa,” said Finnegan. “Yes, drink some and you’ll see!” I returned my attention to Clara, whose crying had reached a new pitch. Who knew a baby this size could belt out a tune at this volume? The disembodied voice of the pilot came over the speaker, “Folks, we are into a little weather, so the seatbelt light will remain on until it is safe for you to move around. Please stay seated.” Oh, no! Clara! What to do? I tried jiggling with her, I tried changing her position, I tried toys, keys, whatever I had at my disposal. She was not having any of it. This went on for about two hours. The seatbelt light was finally out. By now, my neighbor had joined in, trying to help soothe Clara. I learned that she had worked with her mother in a daycare for years. She asked if it would help if she stood up in the aisle with Clara. “Would you?” I asked, “You don’t mind?” She replied, with a sweet, angelic smile, “Of course not, I’m good with babies.” And she was! Clara calmed, and our wonderful seatmate returned her to me. Now, Clara would take her bottle. She dropped off to sleep. Finnegan received his kid’s meal, and for the rest of the flight, he and I had an animated conversation about airplanes, giraffes, penguins, and, as we descended, he exclaimed, animatedly, about the many fireworks we could see from the air. Clara slept for the other half of the trip, waking just as the plane landed. My seatmate, Jessica, received a broad smile from Clara. It was time to disembark. It went smoothly. As we were waiting for the stroller at the end of the jetway, I caught a glimpse of my reflection in the window. My hair, it seems, had taken on a life of its own, standing on end. In the years when my children were young, this would have bothered me. Now, I was just glad to have made it this far with any hair at all. The children were happy, I was happy, and, as we bid adieu to Jessica, she said, “It was a pleasure meeting you all. Thank you for letting me help.” I told her that I would be eternally grateful to her, and to the others on the plane, who had endured the first two hours without complaint. They smiled at me and my little band of children as they left, not a scowl or grumble among them. My faith in humanity had been restored, and the remainder of our journey was better, having received the kindness of a stranger, and the forbearance of an entire plane of them. Jo Loving is on the porch, back home now, reflecting on the beauty of unexpected kindness, on the love and joy of grandchildren

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

31


Profile for Virginia Grogan

Front Porch Fredericksburg - August 2018  

Front Porch Fredericksburg - August 2018  

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