Page 1


contents

closeups 5

7

31

18

history’s stories: belle grove plantation our heritage: fredericksburg flames

19

what’s in a dream?......agora downtown coffee shop

Mo Hampton teaching character

20

Senior Care: balancing tech with touch

21

wellness: lack of sleep can mimic add/adhd

austin cornette above & beyond call of duty

23

life in motion: training the fall

25

mYSTERY hOUSE STORIES OF FXBG: tom

26

art in the burg:

27

down home ball... poetryman: pavement art

in memory of austen dunn Communitas 5k walk

11

Porch talk

28

companions: have a blast @arf

29

purple paws rescue

30

fredericksburg sketches

31

“get juiced” : liz’z creative juices

22

.3

ted schubel.....voice for shop local

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

6

master gardeners....composting

8

I have a friend: flourishing friendship

9

cookstove project: african village rich with community

11

I didn’t know... a phone number could be s important

13

season’s bounty: at garden’s end

10 sip, shop & explore: arts on the vine

14

spirits: bowman’s experimental series

22 redemption on caroline st....Christian Zammas

15

porktoberfeast: food, fun & music

24 fred book fest....bigger & better than ever!

16-17

Calendar of events

Ted Schubel Podcast Voice For “Shop Local”

by Chuck Archer drove downtown. Then as she drove up to an established dog store downtown, a “Store Closing” sign was going up. Three weeks later—with no training—she was in business. Dog Krazy now has five locations. Or, that Amy Johnson at Amy’s Café in Falmouth was a K-3rd grade counselor in California before moving here. With no education jobs available she started working the front desk of a motel. When a girl at the bar got hurt, she filled in. After bartending at Spirits, Santa Fe and The Underground, she stepped out for her vision of a “Cheer’s type” establishment.

...And more! 30

Cover: “Ed King Painting the Rappahannock” By David C. Kennedy

Everyone has a story. One of the podcasts available on the B101.5 “Channel B” podcast network (www.b1015.com) is All Business. It’s a weekly conversation with small business owners around the region. “Most of our daily programs are live or recorded at our studio. All Business is different. We go to the business, for a casual 20-25 minute conversation. There’s often background noise. Dogs have come in and out of the room. We’ve talked on a dance floor, a book isle, on a deck overlooking a winery, and on a deck with a view of I-95 and giant yachts. In one case when the owner announced she’d be doing an interview—one of the employees came and sat to observe and take notes— thinking I was there interviewing FOR a job!” All Business is far more than— yawn—a business profile. The guests and setting make it energetic. For instance: Where else are you going to hear that a 14 year old Bill Beck began subscribing to Antiques magazine. (And he still has every issue). Or, that Nancy Guinn at Dog Krazy worked in the dental field until she was told she could no longer bring her dog to work. She gave her two week notice and

2

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Or, that Robert Belman always knew he’d someday wind up in retail—even when he was selling real estate. His family ran grocery stores in Stafford and the City starting in the early 1900’s. The script he uses for “Belman’s Thrift Store and More” in south Stafford is what was used for Belman’s Grocery Stores” in the decades it was open. Or, that Brian Lamb at Skin + Touch Therapy Spa on Caroline Street started out in fashion in New York City. The hours were grueling and he was looking for an Amazon proof career. Or, that artist Bill Harris is selftaught. Or, that the American Canoe Association on Sophia Street is the National Governing body for several Olympic sports. These are just some of the stories we’ve presented on All Business. Want to be our guest? Email us! Ted@newstalk1230.net. You can find the All Business podcast on Google Play, iTunes, and Stitcher, and at www.b1015.com, keyword “podcasts”. Subscribe and help make our local All Business podcast recognized nationally! Every November there’s “Small Business Saturday”. Since All Business is released every Tuesday morning…here’s an idea: Let’s make that day Small Business Tuesday!

Chuck Archer is the Operations Manager at B101 & 1230 WFVA

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

3


contents

closeups 5

7

31

18

history’s stories: belle grove plantation our heritage: fredericksburg flames

19

what’s in a dream?......agora downtown coffee shop

Mo Hampton teaching character

20

Senior Care: balancing tech with touch

21

wellness: lack of sleep can mimic add/adhd

austin cornette above & beyond call of duty

23

life in motion: training the fall

25

mYSTERY hOUSE STORIES OF FXBG: tom

26

art in the burg:

27

down home ball... poetryman: pavement art

in memory of austen dunn Communitas 5k walk

11

Porch talk

28

companions: have a blast @arf

29

purple paws rescue

30

fredericksburg sketches

31

“get juiced” : liz’z creative juices

22

.3

ted schubel.....voice for shop local

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

6

master gardeners....composting

8

I have a friend: flourishing friendship

9

cookstove project: african village rich with community

11

I didn’t know... a phone number could be s important

13

season’s bounty: at garden’s end

10 sip, shop & explore: arts on the vine

14

spirits: bowman’s experimental series

22 redemption on caroline st....Christian Zammas

15

porktoberfeast: food, fun & music

24 fred book fest....bigger & better than ever!

16-17

Calendar of events

Ted Schubel Podcast Voice For “Shop Local”

by Chuck Archer drove downtown. Then as she drove up to an established dog store downtown, a “Store Closing” sign was going up. Three weeks later—with no training—she was in business. Dog Krazy now has five locations. Or, that Amy Johnson at Amy’s Café in Falmouth was a K-3rd grade counselor in California before moving here. With no education jobs available she started working the front desk of a motel. When a girl at the bar got hurt, she filled in. After bartending at Spirits, Santa Fe and The Underground, she stepped out for her vision of a “Cheer’s type” establishment.

...And more! 30

Cover: “Ed King Painting the Rappahannock” By David C. Kennedy

Everyone has a story. One of the podcasts available on the B101.5 “Channel B” podcast network (www.b1015.com) is All Business. It’s a weekly conversation with small business owners around the region. “Most of our daily programs are live or recorded at our studio. All Business is different. We go to the business, for a casual 20-25 minute conversation. There’s often background noise. Dogs have come in and out of the room. We’ve talked on a dance floor, a book isle, on a deck overlooking a winery, and on a deck with a view of I-95 and giant yachts. In one case when the owner announced she’d be doing an interview—one of the employees came and sat to observe and take notes— thinking I was there interviewing FOR a job!” All Business is far more than— yawn—a business profile. The guests and setting make it energetic. For instance: Where else are you going to hear that a 14 year old Bill Beck began subscribing to Antiques magazine. (And he still has every issue). Or, that Nancy Guinn at Dog Krazy worked in the dental field until she was told she could no longer bring her dog to work. She gave her two week notice and

2

August 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Or, that Robert Belman always knew he’d someday wind up in retail—even when he was selling real estate. His family ran grocery stores in Stafford and the City starting in the early 1900’s. The script he uses for “Belman’s Thrift Store and More” in south Stafford is what was used for Belman’s Grocery Stores” in the decades it was open. Or, that Brian Lamb at Skin + Touch Therapy Spa on Caroline Street started out in fashion in New York City. The hours were grueling and he was looking for an Amazon proof career. Or, that artist Bill Harris is selftaught. Or, that the American Canoe Association on Sophia Street is the National Governing body for several Olympic sports. These are just some of the stories we’ve presented on All Business. Want to be our guest? Email us! Ted@newstalk1230.net. You can find the All Business podcast on Google Play, iTunes, and Stitcher, and at www.b1015.com, keyword “podcasts”. Subscribe and help make our local All Business podcast recognized nationally! Every November there’s “Small Business Saturday”. Since All Business is released every Tuesday morning…here’s an idea: Let’s make that day Small Business Tuesday!

Chuck Archer is the Operations Manager at B101 & 1230 WFVA

front porch fredericksburg

August 2018

3


Elaine Stone

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists Chuck Archer A.E. Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Collette Caprara Caitlin Daly Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe k. Jeanne frazer Rich Gaudio Joan M. Geisler Jon Gerlach Elizabeth Gilkey Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Elizabeth Hunsinger Elizabeth Jones Karl Karch David C. Kennedy Jo Loving Angie Kuzokas Wendy Migdal Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Pete Morelewicz Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Sarah Perry Amy Preske M.L. Powers Rob Rudick Casey Alan Shaw Tim Snyder Elaine Stone Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Rim Vining D’Arcy Weiss Wayne Whitley Tina Will Sonja Wise Norma Woodward

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication.

Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2018 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

September 2018

Not The Same Ol’ Stafford meet mo hampton

i love a parade

By joan geisler

by elaine stone I live on a parade route. Not a street they block off for holidays and annual parades ... An Everyday Parade… right outside my window! We moved here a year and a half ago; downtown, across from the river. Next to the river, a walking trail. My husband has always wanted to live downtown with one insistent “need”. He “needed” a garage. Knowing garages downtown are rare as hen’s teeth, I added my own “need” to the list. I teased, “If you get a garage, I get a river view.” Riverviews are “rarer than hen’s teeth”, and would never fit our budget. This silly gown-up game went on for years, acknowledging our “needs” were just wishes and dreams. One unsuspecting day, it wasn't a game, but a real opportunity which led to us moving downtown with both our sillygame-wishes fulfilled. I never dreamed it would come true! I call it my “River Cottage”. I pretend I'm on vacation, every time I pass the window. Little did we know, we moved onto a vibrant, active daily “parade route”, affectionately named. My Parade During every daylight hour, travelers are on the path across the street. When the temperatures rise, the parade swells in numbers. When the river gets above flood stage, like last week, everybody and their brother comes to see and take pictures. No worries, we are not in the floodplain. Fisherman, kayakers, tubers, sunbathers, hammock people (find two trees/string it up), picnickers, college students with books (“studying” ha), swimmers, and many more gather at water’s edge. But, they are only supplemental to the real parade. The “Real Parade” is on the path: every kind of person, contraption,

movement, and action imaginable. Walkers, joggers, runners, dancers who might be runners, bikers, skateboarders, dogs, scooters (electric and not), strollers, carriers, wagons, tricycles, walkers, dogs, canes, wheelchairs, recumbent bikes, Segways, Rollerblades, unicycles (electric and not), dogs, flag carriers, racers, phone talkers, etc.. You can't even imagine. I’ve not even mentioned the costumes, which are as plentiful, fanciful, and diverse as the movers that fill them. My parade makes me smile. A few paraders make me laugh. Some elicit a gasp. A shock or two has happened. A “what?” has been uttered. But, I find myself wanting to open the front door and cheer for the parade. Especially, those who find moving difficult: they inspire me! If I thought I wouldn't scare them to death, I would, but, I imagine the conversation … “this crazy lady, stood on her front porch this morning yelling at me. I don't know what she was screaming about.” (The river mutes everything.) I'd love to applaud or shout-out, “you go girl”, often. Maybe, even, handout trophies. Your Parade Parades happen every day wherever we are; in the store, at school, at work, in traffic, on social media, on the sidewalk, etc.. I find this crossing my mind: Every parade participant is unique, and I believe, created by God in love and with purpose. There is something beautiful in everyone. I may miss it in passing, but if I got to know them, I’d discover it. I believe, God is a diverse Creator. My “Paraders” prove this every day; no two alike. We may appear different, think

messages

Love the Cover (June 2018, “Allman’s”)….Looking forward to the read. Phyllis Whitley

Front Porch Fantastic cover of a community icon ("Allman's, June 2018). Ted Bloan Thank you so much for the article (“FLAR”, July 2018) Love Front Porch Ana Redich Fabulous community paper! Bob Smythe

Front porch fredericksburg

Hello Virginia, Your current issue (July, 2018) is full of interesting articles again. Kudos to you & your staff! I look forward to visiting Curitiga Art Cafe soon It was great to read about the Downtown Green Garden's outreach to youth. Their vision and goals are really praiseworthy. Keep cool! Tina Will

Patawomeck tribes native to the Stafford area. Stafford High School art teacher Nick Candela drafted the artwork for the new mascot and obtained support and approval from Tribal leaders and various school organizations.

differently, even have different priorities, but we all have abundant similarities; two eyes, two ears, one mouth, one nose, one heart,… etc. We share this planet, earth; same sun, moon, stars, river, etc. We aren't that different from one another. The parades in front of us serve as reminders: notice the people you share this world/community with. Let your parades help you see, make eye contact, and consider others. (We gaze in the mirror a little too much. *wink*) My parade welcomes my joining, never turns me away. It's a place where community flows; like the river; a place of beauty. Not because the river views are captivating and inspiring; but, also, because the parades’ stream is equally as intriguing, captivating, and inspiring. “Hey, I’ve gotta run, there’s my fav… the stilt walker, I think I'll pogostick alongside her today!” Catch me later, on the stoop; reading Front Porch cover- to- cover.

Elaine Stone is a Writer, Blogger, Speaker and Fredericksburg resident. Contact her and/or subscribe to her blog,https://elainestone.net . She’d love to hear from you. Virginia, Thank you so very much for including the article about my second book (July 2018, "Book Mark: Marla Wears a Halo".) Quite a few people mentioned that they read the article. Thank you again, Carol Shelton

Virginia Thanks for the great article on a great men. (“Celebrating Johnny Johnson”, July 2018) Dan Finnegan

To those of you who are new to the area, let me give you a little background about Stafford High School. The first Stafford High School opened in 1926. The school was located in what is now part of the Alvin York Bandy Administrative Complex near the Stafford County courthouse. In 1952 Stafford High School and Falmouth High School merged into one school. The combined school was located in what is now Edward E. Drew, Jr. Middle School. It was the only Stafford County high school from 1952 until 1981, when North Stafford High School was opened. In 2005, the Native American mascot controversy prompted the National Education Association to recommend schools with Native Americanbased mascots change their team names. Stafford High School’s administration considered a name change until meeting with the local Patawomeck tribe, for whom the mascot was named. Tribal leaders overwhelmingly supported retaining the team name “Indians,” but were unhappy with the mascot's historical inaccuracy. The original mascot featured a full-feathered headdress more common to the Plains Indians than to the ancestral

Another major change came in 2016 with the hiring of a new head Mondell ‘Mo’ football coach, Hampton. A strong character from Philly, he landed the less than coveted job as Stafford’s head coach. “I coached for 18 years at Brook Point,” Coach Hampton reminisces. “When we would preview the upcoming schedule, we knew that playing Stafford was an automatic win for us.” “Now that I have the head whistle, ‘It’s Not The Same Ol’ Stafford’ Not no ‘Mo’! In 2017, just the second year as head coach, Coach Mo took the team to the Virginia state semi-finals. The program’s drastic turn around started with Coach Mo’s philosophy. His #1 concern is “turning these boys into men. It starts with discipline. I was shocked how much the boys appreciated and responded to the structure that I brought to the team. I would hold them accountable for everything. Every choice the boys make is important. Starting with turning off their phones during team meetings.” I asked coach what was the catalyst to the turn around. “The talent was here”, coach began to explain. “The facilities are outstanding and we have the support of the administration. All I had to do was ask. The first thing I asked for was a few weights for the weight room. The Athletic Director, Cessy Mallory, was very accommodating.”

“My first year, 2016, our record was 3-7 but we were more successful than that looks. My staff and I had to create a culture of discipline, energy and especially getting the parents schooled up on our new culture.” With football being a physically demanding sport, every precaution is taken to ensure the safety of the boys. The parents are required to attend a c o n c u s s i o n e d u c a t i o n meeting. C o a c h Mo teaches f o o t b a l l differently. “The head is used for thinking, not for tackling. I teach them how to block and tackle with their bodies. I call it ‘Hip Blocking.”

game. “We lost 22 seniors, that hurts. Honestly, we will be less talented but I see signs that this 2018 group has stronger work ethics, stronger glue, more discipline. One boy said, “Coach, we can do it, we will just have to do it differently.”

Mo Hampton, (left) cheering team touchdown

C h a r a c t e r building is as important, if not more than, teaching them to play the game. “We have character education. Each week we will have a theme that is told through a story or video. The boys will gather into smaller groups to discuss the story or video. Throughout the week we will discuss our answers to questions and how to relate the characteristic to their everyday lives, the team, their future as fathers, and leaders in the community.” Coach Mo and the team look forward to the 2018 season and making it all the way to the state championship

Now that is an encouraging statement. Wear your blue and gold and come out and support the team on Friday nights. Check out the schedule at www.commonwealthdistrictva.org/

Joan Geisler is a Habit Coach, A Behavioral Change Specialist. Visit her New Website at www.8020healthyhabits

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

5


Elaine Stone

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists Chuck Archer A.E. Bayne Laurie Black Kevin Brown Collette Caprara Caitlin Daly Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe k. Jeanne frazer Rich Gaudio Joan M. Geisler Jon Gerlach Elizabeth Gilkey Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Elizabeth Hunsinger Elizabeth Jones Karl Karch David C. Kennedy Jo Loving Angie Kuzokas Wendy Migdal Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Pete Morelewicz Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Sarah Perry Amy Preske M.L. Powers Rob Rudick Casey Alan Shaw Tim Snyder Elaine Stone Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Rim Vining D’Arcy Weiss Wayne Whitley Tina Will Sonja Wise Norma Woodward

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication.

Writers / Artists / Photographers are welcome to request Guidelines and query the Publisher by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com Facebook: @Front Porch Fredericksburg The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2018 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

4

September 2018

Not The Same Ol’ Stafford meet mo hampton

i love a parade

By joan geisler

by elaine stone I live on a parade route. Not a street they block off for holidays and annual parades ... An Everyday Parade… right outside my window! We moved here a year and a half ago; downtown, across from the river. Next to the river, a walking trail. My husband has always wanted to live downtown with one insistent “need”. He “needed” a garage. Knowing garages downtown are rare as hen’s teeth, I added my own “need” to the list. I teased, “If you get a garage, I get a river view.” Riverviews are “rarer than hen’s teeth”, and would never fit our budget. This silly gown-up game went on for years, acknowledging our “needs” were just wishes and dreams. One unsuspecting day, it wasn't a game, but a real opportunity which led to us moving downtown with both our sillygame-wishes fulfilled. I never dreamed it would come true! I call it my “River Cottage”. I pretend I'm on vacation, every time I pass the window. Little did we know, we moved onto a vibrant, active daily “parade route”, affectionately named. My Parade During every daylight hour, travelers are on the path across the street. When the temperatures rise, the parade swells in numbers. When the river gets above flood stage, like last week, everybody and their brother comes to see and take pictures. No worries, we are not in the floodplain. Fisherman, kayakers, tubers, sunbathers, hammock people (find two trees/string it up), picnickers, college students with books (“studying” ha), swimmers, and many more gather at water’s edge. But, they are only supplemental to the real parade. The “Real Parade” is on the path: every kind of person, contraption,

movement, and action imaginable. Walkers, joggers, runners, dancers who might be runners, bikers, skateboarders, dogs, scooters (electric and not), strollers, carriers, wagons, tricycles, walkers, dogs, canes, wheelchairs, recumbent bikes, Segways, Rollerblades, unicycles (electric and not), dogs, flag carriers, racers, phone talkers, etc.. You can't even imagine. I’ve not even mentioned the costumes, which are as plentiful, fanciful, and diverse as the movers that fill them. My parade makes me smile. A few paraders make me laugh. Some elicit a gasp. A shock or two has happened. A “what?” has been uttered. But, I find myself wanting to open the front door and cheer for the parade. Especially, those who find moving difficult: they inspire me! If I thought I wouldn't scare them to death, I would, but, I imagine the conversation … “this crazy lady, stood on her front porch this morning yelling at me. I don't know what she was screaming about.” (The river mutes everything.) I'd love to applaud or shout-out, “you go girl”, often. Maybe, even, handout trophies. Your Parade Parades happen every day wherever we are; in the store, at school, at work, in traffic, on social media, on the sidewalk, etc.. I find this crossing my mind: Every parade participant is unique, and I believe, created by God in love and with purpose. There is something beautiful in everyone. I may miss it in passing, but if I got to know them, I’d discover it. I believe, God is a diverse Creator. My “Paraders” prove this every day; no two alike. We may appear different, think

messages

Love the Cover (June 2018, “Allman’s”)….Looking forward to the read. Phyllis Whitley

Front Porch Fantastic cover of a community icon ("Allman's, June 2018). Ted Bloan Thank you so much for the article (“FLAR”, July 2018) Love Front Porch Ana Redich Fabulous community paper! Bob Smythe

Front porch fredericksburg

Hello Virginia, Your current issue (July, 2018) is full of interesting articles again. Kudos to you & your staff! I look forward to visiting Curitiga Art Cafe soon It was great to read about the Downtown Green Garden's outreach to youth. Their vision and goals are really praiseworthy. Keep cool! Tina Will

Patawomeck tribes native to the Stafford area. Stafford High School art teacher Nick Candela drafted the artwork for the new mascot and obtained support and approval from Tribal leaders and various school organizations.

differently, even have different priorities, but we all have abundant similarities; two eyes, two ears, one mouth, one nose, one heart,… etc. We share this planet, earth; same sun, moon, stars, river, etc. We aren't that different from one another. The parades in front of us serve as reminders: notice the people you share this world/community with. Let your parades help you see, make eye contact, and consider others. (We gaze in the mirror a little too much. *wink*) My parade welcomes my joining, never turns me away. It's a place where community flows; like the river; a place of beauty. Not because the river views are captivating and inspiring; but, also, because the parades’ stream is equally as intriguing, captivating, and inspiring. “Hey, I’ve gotta run, there’s my fav… the stilt walker, I think I'll pogostick alongside her today!” Catch me later, on the stoop; reading Front Porch cover- to- cover.

Elaine Stone is a Writer, Blogger, Speaker and Fredericksburg resident. Contact her and/or subscribe to her blog,https://elainestone.net . She’d love to hear from you. Virginia, Thank you so very much for including the article about my second book (July 2018, "Book Mark: Marla Wears a Halo".) Quite a few people mentioned that they read the article. Thank you again, Carol Shelton

Virginia Thanks for the great article on a great men. (“Celebrating Johnny Johnson”, July 2018) Dan Finnegan

To those of you who are new to the area, let me give you a little background about Stafford High School. The first Stafford High School opened in 1926. The school was located in what is now part of the Alvin York Bandy Administrative Complex near the Stafford County courthouse. In 1952 Stafford High School and Falmouth High School merged into one school. The combined school was located in what is now Edward E. Drew, Jr. Middle School. It was the only Stafford County high school from 1952 until 1981, when North Stafford High School was opened. In 2005, the Native American mascot controversy prompted the National Education Association to recommend schools with Native Americanbased mascots change their team names. Stafford High School’s administration considered a name change until meeting with the local Patawomeck tribe, for whom the mascot was named. Tribal leaders overwhelmingly supported retaining the team name “Indians,” but were unhappy with the mascot's historical inaccuracy. The original mascot featured a full-feathered headdress more common to the Plains Indians than to the ancestral

Another major change came in 2016 with the hiring of a new head Mondell ‘Mo’ football coach, Hampton. A strong character from Philly, he landed the less than coveted job as Stafford’s head coach. “I coached for 18 years at Brook Point,” Coach Hampton reminisces. “When we would preview the upcoming schedule, we knew that playing Stafford was an automatic win for us.” “Now that I have the head whistle, ‘It’s Not The Same Ol’ Stafford’ Not no ‘Mo’! In 2017, just the second year as head coach, Coach Mo took the team to the Virginia state semi-finals. The program’s drastic turn around started with Coach Mo’s philosophy. His #1 concern is “turning these boys into men. It starts with discipline. I was shocked how much the boys appreciated and responded to the structure that I brought to the team. I would hold them accountable for everything. Every choice the boys make is important. Starting with turning off their phones during team meetings.” I asked coach what was the catalyst to the turn around. “The talent was here”, coach began to explain. “The facilities are outstanding and we have the support of the administration. All I had to do was ask. The first thing I asked for was a few weights for the weight room. The Athletic Director, Cessy Mallory, was very accommodating.”

“My first year, 2016, our record was 3-7 but we were more successful than that looks. My staff and I had to create a culture of discipline, energy and especially getting the parents schooled up on our new culture.” With football being a physically demanding sport, every precaution is taken to ensure the safety of the boys. The parents are required to attend a c o n c u s s i o n e d u c a t i o n meeting. C o a c h Mo teaches f o o t b a l l differently. “The head is used for thinking, not for tackling. I teach them how to block and tackle with their bodies. I call it ‘Hip Blocking.”

game. “We lost 22 seniors, that hurts. Honestly, we will be less talented but I see signs that this 2018 group has stronger work ethics, stronger glue, more discipline. One boy said, “Coach, we can do it, we will just have to do it differently.”

Mo Hampton, (left) cheering team touchdown

C h a r a c t e r building is as important, if not more than, teaching them to play the game. “We have character education. Each week we will have a theme that is told through a story or video. The boys will gather into smaller groups to discuss the story or video. Throughout the week we will discuss our answers to questions and how to relate the characteristic to their everyday lives, the team, their future as fathers, and leaders in the community.” Coach Mo and the team look forward to the 2018 season and making it all the way to the state championship

Now that is an encouraging statement. Wear your blue and gold and come out and support the team on Friday nights. Check out the schedule at www.commonwealthdistrictva.org/

Joan Geisler is a Habit Coach, A Behavioral Change Specialist. Visit her New Website at www.8020healthyhabits

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-4 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

5


On the Trails

How Does A Master Gardener Grow? Great Soil from Kitchen Scraps, Leaves, & Grass Clippings By Tina Will

Soil? Dirt? Which is it? “Soil is what plants grow in; dirt is what we sweep off the floor!” Oft quoted by our VCE Agent Guy Mussey, and Master Gardeners

Austin Cornette: Above & Beyond the call of duty one to another. We talked to a lot of people at the Fredericksburg Fair last month and encouraged them to consider the benefits and ease of creating a compost bin. Composting is a common theme these days, and many do keep a compost bin going. But many people do not, and really are not aware of the benefit compost brings to the soil and plants. Building great soil takes some time, but is easy to get started. The benefits to the soil and plants are enormous. Composted soil loosens and lightens the existing soil, allows better water infiltration, encourages bacteria, fungi, and worm activity, increases the Carbon:Nitrogen ratio, and allows more nutrients to be available to the plant than uncultivated clay soil. Compost can be worked gently into the soil or top

dressed around the plant. Within a season or two plants often show improvement because of the combination of effects listed above. What is it about composted soil that is so important, and why does it help plant growth so much? Doesn’t the soil have enough nutrients in it? The simple answer is yes, but these nutrients are not always entirely available to the plants as might be expected. There are both physical and chemical dynamics at work, and these dynamics are MANY times improved with the addition of well decomposed grass, leaves, ground up twigs, coffee grounds, and vegetable scraps (no oily salad remains, or meat products). Jonathan Master Gardener Stevens (photo) has been composting leaves, grass, and kitchen scraps since the 1970’s. In grad school days he became well known for his composting enthusiasm. With grace and understanding laughter he knew just what to do with a nicely wrapped ‘gift’ of carrots, lettuce, and…you get the idea: into the compost bin it went. He has had several careers, but the work around his home, garden, and compost bins has been a steady theme through it all. He is now on the board of the

Fredericksburg Food Co-O Op, gives lectures about composting and recycling, and is perfecting his three-bin compost process. He definitely enjoys harvesting great vegetables from the ‘black gold’ composted soil in his back yard. Master Gardener Kristine Stone also lectures on composting for the RBoard (Rappahannock Regional Solid Waste Management Board) in Stafford County. These lectures are free, and the next R-Board lecture on composting will be held Wednesday, September 5, 2018, 7 p.m. at the Rowser Building, 1739 Jefferson Davis Hwy., Stafford, VA 22554. Residents of Stafford and Fredericksburg City who attend are eligible to purchase a compost bin for $25. Call to register for these lectures: 540-658-5279. Their web site is r-board.org. Virginia Cooperative Extension has two publications (pubs.ext.vt.edu): Compost: What is it, and What is it to you? (Pub 452-231), and Backyard Composting (Hort-49P). Tina Will has volunteered with MGACRA for 13 years and lives near Ferry Farm in Stafford County. Photo by Tina Will

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

By Kevin Brown “He’s a great dude, for real.”; “Thank you Austin Marshall, for doing what’s right. You’ve modelled the behavior each of us should exhibit.”; “Thank you Austin, for helping keep the Fredericksburg area beautiful and trash free.”; “We need more people like him.”; “Austin, you’re the man. Thank you for doing the cleanup. Thumbs up.”; and my personal favorite, “His Momma raised him right!! Love her!!” So how did Austin react to all this unexpected praise? Well, as you might expect from a humble guy who takes time to pick up hundreds of piece of litter, Austin’s response was simply, “It’s no problem ya’ll, I just figured nobody else was gonna do it, so I might as well.”

On a sweltering day in August, Austin Cornette from Anytime Towing was driving along Cowan Boulevard when he noticed a large swath of paper strewn all over the sidewalk and road, apparently blown out of a passing vehicle. Like other busy drivers traveling along Cowan Boulevard that morning, Austin could have simply ignored the litter and kept going. But not that day. That day, Austin made the decision to stop and make a difference. He pulled his truck over on the side of the road, got out, and commenced to picking up hundreds of pieces of paper, one piece at a time, until all the litter was picked up. Now, Austin is just a regular guy who goes out and does his job every day, like the rest of us. On that hot and humid day in August, Austin didn’t expect to be

acknowledged for doing anything special. But his extraordinary actions did not go unnoticed. Fatefully, Randy Skillin and Angie Kozokas, administrators of the 22,000-member “FXBG Wall of Shame” Facebook group - primarily dedicated to shaming bad behavior, but also known to applaud good behavior – happened to be driving by and snapped a few photos and posted the story online. The post about “Austin the Good Samaritan” was shared further in the 3,000-member “On the Fredericksburg Va Trails” Facebook group, and quickly “went viral” by local standards, with over a thousand people reacting and posting comments of gratitude like:

And that folks, is the story of a true FXBG hero who takes pride in our beloved city. Ordinary citizens like Austin going above and beyond the call of duty are what makes Fredericksburg a special place. So whatever you are doing today or tomorrow or the next day, if you notice a

solvable problem in our city or surrounding region, don’t ignore it and look the other way, waiting for the next person to deal with it. As one commenter lamented, “I saw him doing that and I thought…now why didn’t I stop and do that? We all need to give more to our community and pitch in when pitching in is needed. Way to go Austin and thank you. That was an eye sore. Just sorry I didn’t participate.” Don’t pass up your opportunity to be an everyday hero. Stop and take action. Be like Austin.

Kevin Brown is the administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" & the "FXBG City Council Public Forum" Facebook Group, a downtown resident & a Military Analyst photo by Angie Kozokas

“Way to go Austin! You are a true FXBG hero!”; “What an awesome deed this guy did for the community.”;

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Dog Walking Pet Sitting Companion Play Time & Mini Furies, Too! (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “City PetSitting” 6

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802 SUZY STONE

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

7


On the Trails

How Does A Master Gardener Grow? Great Soil from Kitchen Scraps, Leaves, & Grass Clippings By Tina Will

Soil? Dirt? Which is it? “Soil is what plants grow in; dirt is what we sweep off the floor!” Oft quoted by our VCE Agent Guy Mussey, and Master Gardeners

Austin Cornette: Above & Beyond the call of duty one to another. We talked to a lot of people at the Fredericksburg Fair last month and encouraged them to consider the benefits and ease of creating a compost bin. Composting is a common theme these days, and many do keep a compost bin going. But many people do not, and really are not aware of the benefit compost brings to the soil and plants. Building great soil takes some time, but is easy to get started. The benefits to the soil and plants are enormous. Composted soil loosens and lightens the existing soil, allows better water infiltration, encourages bacteria, fungi, and worm activity, increases the Carbon:Nitrogen ratio, and allows more nutrients to be available to the plant than uncultivated clay soil. Compost can be worked gently into the soil or top

dressed around the plant. Within a season or two plants often show improvement because of the combination of effects listed above. What is it about composted soil that is so important, and why does it help plant growth so much? Doesn’t the soil have enough nutrients in it? The simple answer is yes, but these nutrients are not always entirely available to the plants as might be expected. There are both physical and chemical dynamics at work, and these dynamics are MANY times improved with the addition of well decomposed grass, leaves, ground up twigs, coffee grounds, and vegetable scraps (no oily salad remains, or meat products). Jonathan Master Gardener Stevens (photo) has been composting leaves, grass, and kitchen scraps since the 1970’s. In grad school days he became well known for his composting enthusiasm. With grace and understanding laughter he knew just what to do with a nicely wrapped ‘gift’ of carrots, lettuce, and…you get the idea: into the compost bin it went. He has had several careers, but the work around his home, garden, and compost bins has been a steady theme through it all. He is now on the board of the

Fredericksburg Food Co-O Op, gives lectures about composting and recycling, and is perfecting his three-bin compost process. He definitely enjoys harvesting great vegetables from the ‘black gold’ composted soil in his back yard. Master Gardener Kristine Stone also lectures on composting for the RBoard (Rappahannock Regional Solid Waste Management Board) in Stafford County. These lectures are free, and the next R-Board lecture on composting will be held Wednesday, September 5, 2018, 7 p.m. at the Rowser Building, 1739 Jefferson Davis Hwy., Stafford, VA 22554. Residents of Stafford and Fredericksburg City who attend are eligible to purchase a compost bin for $25. Call to register for these lectures: 540-658-5279. Their web site is r-board.org. Virginia Cooperative Extension has two publications (pubs.ext.vt.edu): Compost: What is it, and What is it to you? (Pub 452-231), and Backyard Composting (Hort-49P). Tina Will has volunteered with MGACRA for 13 years and lives near Ferry Farm in Stafford County. Photo by Tina Will

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman 12225 Amos Lane, Ste 204 Fredericksburg, VA 22407 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

By Kevin Brown “He’s a great dude, for real.”; “Thank you Austin Marshall, for doing what’s right. You’ve modelled the behavior each of us should exhibit.”; “Thank you Austin, for helping keep the Fredericksburg area beautiful and trash free.”; “We need more people like him.”; “Austin, you’re the man. Thank you for doing the cleanup. Thumbs up.”; and my personal favorite, “His Momma raised him right!! Love her!!” So how did Austin react to all this unexpected praise? Well, as you might expect from a humble guy who takes time to pick up hundreds of piece of litter, Austin’s response was simply, “It’s no problem ya’ll, I just figured nobody else was gonna do it, so I might as well.”

On a sweltering day in August, Austin Cornette from Anytime Towing was driving along Cowan Boulevard when he noticed a large swath of paper strewn all over the sidewalk and road, apparently blown out of a passing vehicle. Like other busy drivers traveling along Cowan Boulevard that morning, Austin could have simply ignored the litter and kept going. But not that day. That day, Austin made the decision to stop and make a difference. He pulled his truck over on the side of the road, got out, and commenced to picking up hundreds of pieces of paper, one piece at a time, until all the litter was picked up. Now, Austin is just a regular guy who goes out and does his job every day, like the rest of us. On that hot and humid day in August, Austin didn’t expect to be

acknowledged for doing anything special. But his extraordinary actions did not go unnoticed. Fatefully, Randy Skillin and Angie Kozokas, administrators of the 22,000-member “FXBG Wall of Shame” Facebook group - primarily dedicated to shaming bad behavior, but also known to applaud good behavior – happened to be driving by and snapped a few photos and posted the story online. The post about “Austin the Good Samaritan” was shared further in the 3,000-member “On the Fredericksburg Va Trails” Facebook group, and quickly “went viral” by local standards, with over a thousand people reacting and posting comments of gratitude like:

And that folks, is the story of a true FXBG hero who takes pride in our beloved city. Ordinary citizens like Austin going above and beyond the call of duty are what makes Fredericksburg a special place. So whatever you are doing today or tomorrow or the next day, if you notice a

solvable problem in our city or surrounding region, don’t ignore it and look the other way, waiting for the next person to deal with it. As one commenter lamented, “I saw him doing that and I thought…now why didn’t I stop and do that? We all need to give more to our community and pitch in when pitching in is needed. Way to go Austin and thank you. That was an eye sore. Just sorry I didn’t participate.” Don’t pass up your opportunity to be an everyday hero. Stop and take action. Be like Austin.

Kevin Brown is the administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" & the "FXBG City Council Public Forum" Facebook Group, a downtown resident & a Military Analyst photo by Angie Kozokas

“Way to go Austin! You are a true FXBG hero!”; “What an awesome deed this guy did for the community.”;

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let’s Make It Happen!

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Dog Walking Pet Sitting Companion Play Time & Mini Furies, Too! (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “City PetSitting” 6

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802 SUZY STONE

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

7


“I Have A Friend”

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP

Cookstove Project

Only Available At

flourishing friendship

The Copper Shop

By Laurie Black It really is as simple as giving an hour a week of your time to make a huge difference to a senior. If you know a senior who could benefit from having a weekly, friendly visit OR if you are ready to volunteer to be a friend to a senior, call the Senior Visitors Program at (540) 3712704 or visit our website at mhafred.org. Volunteer trainings are held twice a month. No special skills are required. The Senior Visitors Program is a free community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

african village rich with community

By collette caprara

371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook

Laurie Black is the Administrative Assistant for the Senior Visitors Program She can be reached at mhafaa@mhafred.org

Donate to a Cancer Organization Deville Chowdhery and her senior friend, Lin, have a flourishing friendship, nourished by good conversation, laughter, and common interests. They were introduced through the Senior Visitors Program about five months ago. They felt close from day one. Deville and Lin recently attended a Summer Picnic hosted by the Senior Visitors Program. Their smiles were warm and contagious as they visited with other seniors and volunteers. I felt drawn to them and I was eager to hear what made their friendship so special. Deville says she heard about the program by accident. She ran into a friend/neighbor who was coming home from a Senior Visitors Program Volunteer Orientation and Training. Her friend was so excited about Senior Visitors and convinced Deville that she would enjoy being a volunteer, too.

Highlighting Local People, Places & Events Since 1997 8

September 2018

Lin read about the Senior Visitors Program in the newspaper. Lin, herself, has been a volunteer in the community for many years. She was a volunteer at the hospital for 35 years and has been a Master Gardner since 1993. However, at the passing of her husband, she felt she needed a volunteer for herself. She believed the companionship offered by a Senior Visitors Program volunteer would help her cope with her loss. Deville and Lin are happy they found the Senior Visitors Program and each other. The experience has been more positive than either anticipated. They enjoy their differences and their similarities. Deville is Native American and Lin is Chinese, but they enjoy talking about their individual cultures and customs and families. Both enjoy being active, gardening, and playing mahjong. Deville says of Lin, “She’s an outgoing person and it is great to spend time together. We enjoy talking over coffee and we are very understanding of each other.” Lin agrees, “It is good to talk with Deville. She is so friendly. I enjoy the Senior Visitors Program very much. The program is just wonderful. Even an hour a week means a lot. When I am feeling better, I think I would also like to be a volunteer. Maybe Deville and I can go visit some other senior who needs a volunteer visitor.” Many of their visits are just getting together at Lin’s house and talking. Other times Deville and Lin can be found repotting a plant, watering flowers, or going out to lunch.

Front porch fredericksburg

the task involved constructing your into the hut. This clay-like substance own stove and, adding to the consisted of material from a termite challenge, building it from materials mound mixed with straw and water. All in your natural environment? the neighbors joined in for this task For one family in the Kulubbi carrying what they could into the hut-village of Uganda, the answer is “No including a line of children of all ages, problem!” This is trailed by a toddler Worldwide, nearly 3 what I witnessed whose contribution personally on a billion people prepare food for was a four-inch ball recent trip to Africa of the material. their families using an open where I attended an fire in their home, a method Inside the hut, two international worked that has resulted in nearly 4 women conference hosted by vigorously throwing million deaths each year. Global Peace the the material around Foundation. the infrastructure and patting it forcefully During my stay, I joined a couple for optimum density. In the final stage, who have been long-time friends, the structure was smoothed by hand and Mike and Rebecca Sommer, on a site pots were inserted in their respective visit of an initiative they have been openings in the stove top. implementing since 2013 in Africa The stove was complete and Collette with Kulubbi Village Chikdren and Nepal, the Cookstove Project. needed only to dry for 30 days before it The Sommers felt called to respond would begin to serve the family for years For many (or most) of us, when they learned that, worldwide, cooking involves setting the microwave nearly 3 billion people prepare food for timer or—in more industrious moments— their families using an open fire in their turning on the oven or range. But what if home, a method that has resulted in nearly 4 million deaths each year. In rural African villages, cooking in these countries is often nearly daylong activity conducted by women, often with children at their side. I saw the fires that had typically been used in the cooking huts or areas of the family shelter in which a pot was balanced on three rocks over an open fire from which smoke billowed. Smoke inhalation from these fires has caused both irreparable lung damage as well as stillbirths. The Cookstove Project utilizes a design that contains the heat and smoke, which is channeled out of the hut through a chimney pipe, making cooking more efficient and much safer, reduces the amount of wood needed for fuel by half, and allows pots of two different foods to cook at the same time. Kulubbi Woman puttting Finishing The highlight of our site-visit was Touched on New Cooktove the actual construction of a cookstove to replace one household's three-rock fire to come. Since 2013, the Cookstove pit. Remarkably, the family and neighbors Project has created safe and efficient built the stove themselves, with the stoves for more than 10,000 families in guidance of Ugandan leaders of the Uganda and Nepal. Each one is a project, director, Africano Byrarugaba testament to the care and mutual support and director for the Mukono District Jane within a community. Namisango. In an astonishing 15 minutes, Visit CookstoveProject.org & Africano created the infrastructure for www.globalpeace.org/ the cookstove, using a strip of a banana leaf and his hand as measuring tools and two pieces of the outer layer of a banana tree trunk to create a conduit to channel Collette Caprara is a local writer heat and smoke. After this structure was and artist. placed in the hut, the next task was to move a huge pile of the building material

Thank You Fredericksburg for Your Support Since 1997

Accepting New Patients Emergency Patients Welcome Participant With Most Major Insurance Plans

131 Park Hill Dr, FXBG, 22401 540-373-0602 fdadental.com

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

9


“I Have A Friend”

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP

Cookstove Project

Only Available At

flourishing friendship

The Copper Shop

By Laurie Black It really is as simple as giving an hour a week of your time to make a huge difference to a senior. If you know a senior who could benefit from having a weekly, friendly visit OR if you are ready to volunteer to be a friend to a senior, call the Senior Visitors Program at (540) 3712704 or visit our website at mhafred.org. Volunteer trainings are held twice a month. No special skills are required. The Senior Visitors Program is a free community service program of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg.

african village rich with community

By collette caprara

371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill Like Us on facebook

Laurie Black is the Administrative Assistant for the Senior Visitors Program She can be reached at mhafaa@mhafred.org

Donate to a Cancer Organization Deville Chowdhery and her senior friend, Lin, have a flourishing friendship, nourished by good conversation, laughter, and common interests. They were introduced through the Senior Visitors Program about five months ago. They felt close from day one. Deville and Lin recently attended a Summer Picnic hosted by the Senior Visitors Program. Their smiles were warm and contagious as they visited with other seniors and volunteers. I felt drawn to them and I was eager to hear what made their friendship so special. Deville says she heard about the program by accident. She ran into a friend/neighbor who was coming home from a Senior Visitors Program Volunteer Orientation and Training. Her friend was so excited about Senior Visitors and convinced Deville that she would enjoy being a volunteer, too.

Highlighting Local People, Places & Events Since 1997 8

September 2018

Lin read about the Senior Visitors Program in the newspaper. Lin, herself, has been a volunteer in the community for many years. She was a volunteer at the hospital for 35 years and has been a Master Gardner since 1993. However, at the passing of her husband, she felt she needed a volunteer for herself. She believed the companionship offered by a Senior Visitors Program volunteer would help her cope with her loss. Deville and Lin are happy they found the Senior Visitors Program and each other. The experience has been more positive than either anticipated. They enjoy their differences and their similarities. Deville is Native American and Lin is Chinese, but they enjoy talking about their individual cultures and customs and families. Both enjoy being active, gardening, and playing mahjong. Deville says of Lin, “She’s an outgoing person and it is great to spend time together. We enjoy talking over coffee and we are very understanding of each other.” Lin agrees, “It is good to talk with Deville. She is so friendly. I enjoy the Senior Visitors Program very much. The program is just wonderful. Even an hour a week means a lot. When I am feeling better, I think I would also like to be a volunteer. Maybe Deville and I can go visit some other senior who needs a volunteer visitor.” Many of their visits are just getting together at Lin’s house and talking. Other times Deville and Lin can be found repotting a plant, watering flowers, or going out to lunch.

Front porch fredericksburg

the task involved constructing your into the hut. This clay-like substance own stove and, adding to the consisted of material from a termite challenge, building it from materials mound mixed with straw and water. All in your natural environment? the neighbors joined in for this task For one family in the Kulubbi carrying what they could into the hut-village of Uganda, the answer is “No including a line of children of all ages, problem!” This is trailed by a toddler Worldwide, nearly 3 what I witnessed whose contribution personally on a billion people prepare food for was a four-inch ball recent trip to Africa of the material. their families using an open where I attended an fire in their home, a method Inside the hut, two international worked that has resulted in nearly 4 women conference hosted by vigorously throwing million deaths each year. Global Peace the the material around Foundation. the infrastructure and patting it forcefully During my stay, I joined a couple for optimum density. In the final stage, who have been long-time friends, the structure was smoothed by hand and Mike and Rebecca Sommer, on a site pots were inserted in their respective visit of an initiative they have been openings in the stove top. implementing since 2013 in Africa The stove was complete and Collette with Kulubbi Village Chikdren and Nepal, the Cookstove Project. needed only to dry for 30 days before it The Sommers felt called to respond would begin to serve the family for years For many (or most) of us, when they learned that, worldwide, cooking involves setting the microwave nearly 3 billion people prepare food for timer or—in more industrious moments— their families using an open fire in their turning on the oven or range. But what if home, a method that has resulted in nearly 4 million deaths each year. In rural African villages, cooking in these countries is often nearly daylong activity conducted by women, often with children at their side. I saw the fires that had typically been used in the cooking huts or areas of the family shelter in which a pot was balanced on three rocks over an open fire from which smoke billowed. Smoke inhalation from these fires has caused both irreparable lung damage as well as stillbirths. The Cookstove Project utilizes a design that contains the heat and smoke, which is channeled out of the hut through a chimney pipe, making cooking more efficient and much safer, reduces the amount of wood needed for fuel by half, and allows pots of two different foods to cook at the same time. Kulubbi Woman puttting Finishing The highlight of our site-visit was Touched on New Cooktove the actual construction of a cookstove to replace one household's three-rock fire to come. Since 2013, the Cookstove pit. Remarkably, the family and neighbors Project has created safe and efficient built the stove themselves, with the stoves for more than 10,000 families in guidance of Ugandan leaders of the Uganda and Nepal. Each one is a project, director, Africano Byrarugaba testament to the care and mutual support and director for the Mukono District Jane within a community. Namisango. In an astonishing 15 minutes, Visit CookstoveProject.org & Africano created the infrastructure for www.globalpeace.org/ the cookstove, using a strip of a banana leaf and his hand as measuring tools and two pieces of the outer layer of a banana tree trunk to create a conduit to channel Collette Caprara is a local writer heat and smoke. After this structure was and artist. placed in the hut, the next task was to move a huge pile of the building material

Thank You Fredericksburg for Your Support Since 1997

Accepting New Patients Emergency Patients Welcome Participant With Most Major Insurance Plans

131 Park Hill Dr, FXBG, 22401 540-373-0602 fdadental.com

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

9


Sip, Shop & Explore

The Artisan Trail of Virginia Comes to Colonial Beach IN A BIG WAY!

The Sunken Well Tavern

I Didn’t Know .... a telephone number could be so important

Arts on the Vine: A Wine & Art Crawl By d’arcy weiss

By k. Jeanne fraser beach into the art galleries of Colonial Beach, an artistic town brimming with creativity. On September 8, Jarrett Thor Fine Arts, Visions by Shirl and The Guild Gallery will showcase over 35 regional artists, art demos and a tasting by Ditchley Cider Works. Oak Crest Winery and Ingleside Vineyards are just a short 10-mile drive outside town. "I am always looking for fun day trips and weekend getaways. 'Art on the Vine' is a great way to get out of town, off the highway and onto the back roads to relax and explore." comments Patricia Walton of Virginia Beach, VA. Have you ever visited historic

Looking for a fun day-trip or weekend getaway? Check out 'Arts on the Vine' ~ a WINE & ART Crawl, Second Saturday, September 8 featuring over 30 unique locations to sip, shop and explore throughout the Northern Neck of Virginia. 'Arts on the Vine' is a j o i n t collaboration between the Chesapeake Bay Wine Trail and Northern Neck Artisan Trail GrapeVine Stain Glass by Barney Harris with the goal of b r i n g i n g Heathsville? During 'Arts on the Vine' you together the region's finest wines, arts and can try your hand at dying yarn at Rice's local points of interest. Participating trail Hotel, watch a blacksmith in action and eat locations will engage your creativity with lunch at Hughlett's Tavern. You can shop tastings, art demos, tours and trail local artists unframed works and witness specials. It is FREE to explore and wine fire dancing at Catherine Kauffman Fine tastings fees vary by location. Arts. Three amazing T h e wineries are within a 20 Northern Neck minute drive of Artisan Trail is an Heathsville, VA; Generals initiative of The Ridge Vineyards, Vault Artisans Center of Field Winery, and Hague Virginia and Winery. members of the Traveling Trail along King southeast on the George, Lancaster, Northern Neck Artisan Westmoreland, Trail you will enjoy a Northumberland, meandering drive to and Richmond Kilmarnock and White Counties. Explore Stone, VA. Meet the Arts on the Vine local artists on the trail locations and grounds of Allure Art learn about Center as they show winemaking, their latest original w a t e r c o l o r works. Make sure you paintings and don't miss their 6-foot “Friends”, Patty Richards Windsor chair tall paper mâché oyster! creating! Kilmarnock's adorable There's so much to do along the downtown and Good Luck Cellars winery Wine and Arts crawl. Take a walk from the are just minutes away!

10

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Whether you start at the shores of Colonial Beach, the murals of Montross, or the artists in White Stone… take time to sip, shop and explore. For a complete list of participating 'Arts on the Vine' trail locations and hours of operation, please visit NorthernNeckArtisanTrail.org and the Northern Neck Artisan Trail Facebook page. Be sure to visit ChesapeakeBayWineTrail.com for updates and or more information on the wine & artisan trail participants, or visit the Artisans Center of Virginia's blog: opendoortour.org.

D'Arcy Weiss, is with Artisans Center of Virginia (ACV) & can be reached at 757-572-5309 The Artisans Center of Virginia (ACV) fosters artisan-focused economic growth, develops vibrant communities, and facilitates connective visitor experiences. As an entrepreneur development organization, ACV provides services, resources and networking opportunities to growing small businesses. For more information, visit www.ArtisansCenterofVirginia.org or follow on Twitter @ACVArtisans or @VAArtisanTrails."

SEPT 8th 6 LOCATIONS

Behind the warm smile, the welcoming “Good morning,” and the beatific name, Angel, is a woman named for her drug-addicted mother’s favorite drug of choice—angel dust. Today Angel Coker is the mother of three teen-age boys and a girl in elementary school, the computer assistant at the Central Rappahannock Regional Library’s recently opened Spotsylvania Towne Centre branch, and a small business owner.

Artists Alliance at JTFA Painting Demo By Vicki Marckel Cider Tasting from Ditchley Cider Visions by Shirl Jewelry Making Demo by Betty Montoya Make your own Jewelry Chamber of Commerce Glass work by Eric Nelson Colonial Beach Artists Guild at Coldwell Banker - Art Show Dennson's Grocery (Seafood, Wine)

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well

All within walking distance Look for the Yellow Flags. Info: 804 224 7200, 301 452 1333 NorthernNeckArtisantrail.org

720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

Museum of Colonial Beach

Angel found her way to the library after 14 years as a stay-at-home Mom. “I used to take my children to the library for story time. I loved the quiet environment; working there is my dream job.” Working the circulation desk is what led her hobby—beading bracelets—to grow into a small business. “People who come into the library always see my hands so I wanted them to not look so plain. I started making bracelets to go with every outfit. One day a woman asked me where I got them. When I told her I made them, she told me about the Newcomers and Old

Friends Club fashion and arts and crafts show at Fredericksburg’s Expo Center. This fall [October 19 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.] will be my fourth year with a booth there.” Angel and daughter, Olivia, can also be found most Saturdays at the seasonal downtown Fredericksburg Farmers Market. A couple of times during the year she offers free beading classes and tips on starting a small business at the library. “I also offer a workshop at Fredericksburg’s Barbara Hicks Geslock Women’s Forum in the spring at James Madison High School where I talk about what it takes to start and run a small business, and teach a class on how to make beaded bracelets.” Angel’s life was not always so full and happy. At six her father kidnapped her and took her to Nigeria to live with him and his family. Her pleas to go home fell on deaf ears. It was nine years before Angel made it back to her family in California, and then only because she stumbled across the address of the American Embassy at the back of a ledger in her uncle’s home. She found her way to the embassy where she “was confronted by two very tall and very big Marines” who told her to go to the end of a very long line. Undaunted and determined she did as they said. Once at the door she told the woman behind the glass, “I’m an American citizen and I want to go home.” With no papers and no way to prove her

nationality it seemed her wait had been in vain. In tears, she told an embassy employee “I know my grandmother’s telephone number.” Told to sit on a bench, she watched the employee go into an office and close the door. “It seemed like hours before he came out and took me into his office where I sat on a chair by his desk. He looked at me and said, ‘I have your grandmother on the phone’ and handed it to me.” Angel is currently writing a memoir of her years in Nigeria.

“Everyone has a story. I can't see it, but I believe there is a neon sign on my forehead that reads " Talk to me" and so people do. And I listen.” ~ k.jeanne fraser

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

11


Sip, Shop & Explore

The Artisan Trail of Virginia Comes to Colonial Beach IN A BIG WAY!

The Sunken Well Tavern

I Didn’t Know .... a telephone number could be so important

Arts on the Vine: A Wine & Art Crawl By d’arcy weiss

By k. Jeanne fraser beach into the art galleries of Colonial Beach, an artistic town brimming with creativity. On September 8, Jarrett Thor Fine Arts, Visions by Shirl and The Guild Gallery will showcase over 35 regional artists, art demos and a tasting by Ditchley Cider Works. Oak Crest Winery and Ingleside Vineyards are just a short 10-mile drive outside town. "I am always looking for fun day trips and weekend getaways. 'Art on the Vine' is a great way to get out of town, off the highway and onto the back roads to relax and explore." comments Patricia Walton of Virginia Beach, VA. Have you ever visited historic

Looking for a fun day-trip or weekend getaway? Check out 'Arts on the Vine' ~ a WINE & ART Crawl, Second Saturday, September 8 featuring over 30 unique locations to sip, shop and explore throughout the Northern Neck of Virginia. 'Arts on the Vine' is a j o i n t collaboration between the Chesapeake Bay Wine Trail and Northern Neck Artisan Trail GrapeVine Stain Glass by Barney Harris with the goal of b r i n g i n g Heathsville? During 'Arts on the Vine' you together the region's finest wines, arts and can try your hand at dying yarn at Rice's local points of interest. Participating trail Hotel, watch a blacksmith in action and eat locations will engage your creativity with lunch at Hughlett's Tavern. You can shop tastings, art demos, tours and trail local artists unframed works and witness specials. It is FREE to explore and wine fire dancing at Catherine Kauffman Fine tastings fees vary by location. Arts. Three amazing T h e wineries are within a 20 Northern Neck minute drive of Artisan Trail is an Heathsville, VA; Generals initiative of The Ridge Vineyards, Vault Artisans Center of Field Winery, and Hague Virginia and Winery. members of the Traveling Trail along King southeast on the George, Lancaster, Northern Neck Artisan Westmoreland, Trail you will enjoy a Northumberland, meandering drive to and Richmond Kilmarnock and White Counties. Explore Stone, VA. Meet the Arts on the Vine local artists on the trail locations and grounds of Allure Art learn about Center as they show winemaking, their latest original w a t e r c o l o r works. Make sure you paintings and don't miss their 6-foot “Friends”, Patty Richards Windsor chair tall paper mâché oyster! creating! Kilmarnock's adorable There's so much to do along the downtown and Good Luck Cellars winery Wine and Arts crawl. Take a walk from the are just minutes away!

10

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Whether you start at the shores of Colonial Beach, the murals of Montross, or the artists in White Stone… take time to sip, shop and explore. For a complete list of participating 'Arts on the Vine' trail locations and hours of operation, please visit NorthernNeckArtisanTrail.org and the Northern Neck Artisan Trail Facebook page. Be sure to visit ChesapeakeBayWineTrail.com for updates and or more information on the wine & artisan trail participants, or visit the Artisans Center of Virginia's blog: opendoortour.org.

D'Arcy Weiss, is with Artisans Center of Virginia (ACV) & can be reached at 757-572-5309 The Artisans Center of Virginia (ACV) fosters artisan-focused economic growth, develops vibrant communities, and facilitates connective visitor experiences. As an entrepreneur development organization, ACV provides services, resources and networking opportunities to growing small businesses. For more information, visit www.ArtisansCenterofVirginia.org or follow on Twitter @ACVArtisans or @VAArtisanTrails."

SEPT 8th 6 LOCATIONS

Behind the warm smile, the welcoming “Good morning,” and the beatific name, Angel, is a woman named for her drug-addicted mother’s favorite drug of choice—angel dust. Today Angel Coker is the mother of three teen-age boys and a girl in elementary school, the computer assistant at the Central Rappahannock Regional Library’s recently opened Spotsylvania Towne Centre branch, and a small business owner.

Artists Alliance at JTFA Painting Demo By Vicki Marckel Cider Tasting from Ditchley Cider Visions by Shirl Jewelry Making Demo by Betty Montoya Make your own Jewelry Chamber of Commerce Glass work by Eric Nelson Colonial Beach Artists Guild at Coldwell Banker - Art Show Dennson's Grocery (Seafood, Wine)

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well

All within walking distance Look for the Yellow Flags. Info: 804 224 7200, 301 452 1333 NorthernNeckArtisantrail.org

720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

Museum of Colonial Beach

Angel found her way to the library after 14 years as a stay-at-home Mom. “I used to take my children to the library for story time. I loved the quiet environment; working there is my dream job.” Working the circulation desk is what led her hobby—beading bracelets—to grow into a small business. “People who come into the library always see my hands so I wanted them to not look so plain. I started making bracelets to go with every outfit. One day a woman asked me where I got them. When I told her I made them, she told me about the Newcomers and Old

Friends Club fashion and arts and crafts show at Fredericksburg’s Expo Center. This fall [October 19 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.] will be my fourth year with a booth there.” Angel and daughter, Olivia, can also be found most Saturdays at the seasonal downtown Fredericksburg Farmers Market. A couple of times during the year she offers free beading classes and tips on starting a small business at the library. “I also offer a workshop at Fredericksburg’s Barbara Hicks Geslock Women’s Forum in the spring at James Madison High School where I talk about what it takes to start and run a small business, and teach a class on how to make beaded bracelets.” Angel’s life was not always so full and happy. At six her father kidnapped her and took her to Nigeria to live with him and his family. Her pleas to go home fell on deaf ears. It was nine years before Angel made it back to her family in California, and then only because she stumbled across the address of the American Embassy at the back of a ledger in her uncle’s home. She found her way to the embassy where she “was confronted by two very tall and very big Marines” who told her to go to the end of a very long line. Undaunted and determined she did as they said. Once at the door she told the woman behind the glass, “I’m an American citizen and I want to go home.” With no papers and no way to prove her

nationality it seemed her wait had been in vain. In tears, she told an embassy employee “I know my grandmother’s telephone number.” Told to sit on a bench, she watched the employee go into an office and close the door. “It seemed like hours before he came out and took me into his office where I sat on a chair by his desk. He looked at me and said, ‘I have your grandmother on the phone’ and handed it to me.” Angel is currently writing a memoir of her years in Nigeria.

“Everyone has a story. I can't see it, but I believe there is a neon sign on my forehead that reads " Talk to me" and so people do. And I listen.” ~ k.jeanne fraser

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

11


Season’s Bounty

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

At Garden’s end

By vanessa moncure

When is summer at its end for you? Labor Day weekend? When the outdoor pools close for the season? When it’s back-to-school night? When you can finally open your windows for cool night breezes? For me, it’s September’s autumnal equinox and the end of the summer garden. This year was an especially challenging one for the outdoor gardener, be it backyard or commercial. Those few 80* days in February segued into a long, cold and rainy spring - then a prolonged dry spell just as the first tender shoots began to emerge - finally so much rain that only eight of the last thirty days were dry. Damp, sunless gardens promote bacterial and fungal diseases - our stuntedgrowth tomatoes split and dropped from the vines. Too much moisture building up inside melons caused them to split as well, unfortunately before reaching peak ripeness. Our sad, white cucumbers (a side effect of rain) were bitter and nutrientdeficient - definitely not pickle-worthy. The second plantings are just beginning to

12

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

flower - we may have a few late tomatoes, cucumbers and squash if summer’s heat holds through the month. The coolweather kale, spinach and even a few rows of peas are greening up the back garden, and we should be able to cut the fastproducing okra through the Fall. Late in our garden this summer is a bounty of lima beans on healthy green bushes - and the basil! We’ll be having a pesto party, straight from the freezer, this winter. I love having a bit of summer from our garden stashed away. Where ratatouille and gazpacho are midsummer garden supper staples, the end-of-summer garden has some tasty dishes. GARDEN STEW is a mixture of sauteed chopped onion, sliced large tender okra or whole small pods, peeled and chopped tomatoes, fresh lima beans cooked all together until tender with S&P to taste. This is a yummy dinner with cornbread on the side. STUFFED PEPPERS As the soil cools a bit, the peppers have grown and increased their yield - you can also use this stuffing for zucchini and yellow squash. If you wrap the individual peppers, they freeze well and can be thawed and cooked in the microwave as all the ingredients are pre-cooked. In a large skillet, brown one pound sweet or hot Italian sausage (or turkey or chicken) quickly over medium high heat. Discard fat. Add one tablespoon butter to the meat in skillet and one large chopped onion - saute over medium low heat until the onion is browned and softened. Stir in two tablespoons of flour, one quarter cup beef broth, one half cup tomato sauce, two cups cooked rice, one quarter cup shredded Parmesan cheese, three

tablespoons of minced fresh parsley, one teaspoon garlic powder plus S&P to taste. Mix well and set aside. Cut off the tops of four green, red or yellow peppers and clean out the seeds and pith. If needed, cut enough off the bottom of the pepper so that it will stand straight. Stuff the peppers with the mixture. Top with a mixture of shredded mozzarella and sharp cheddar cheese, then replace the tops on the peppers. Bake in 350F oven until heated through and cheese is melted, about 25 minutes. CABBAGE ROLLS I learned how to make these economical and delicious rolls from a college friend who adapted her grandmother’s original recipe - I doubt very much that Campbell’s Tomato Soup was available during the Cold War in the former Yugoslavia - but my friend added a can or two in lieu of other seasonings. Grandmother had to steam her cabbage over an open pot of boiling water - we steamed ours in the microwave. Choose a medium to large size head of cabbage with plenty of leaves. Cut out the core. Place cabbage, cored side down, over large glass pie pan filled with two cups of water. Cook on HI in microwave, checking every 5 minutes or so until you can insert a metal skewer through the tender head. Set in colander to drain as you prepare the filling. Mix together one pound of mixed pork, veal and beef (a meatloaf mix usually available in most grocery stores) along with one-half can tomato soup, one and one-half cups long grain rice (uncooked), one half cup fresh breadcrumbs,two tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, one teaspoon garlic powder, one large onion, diced, and S&P to taste. When the cabbage has cooled enough to handle, pull off the leaves and set aside any leaves too small to stuff. Place a scant handful at the thick end of the cabbage leaf, and roll toward the end, tucking in the sides as you go. Fill as many leaves as you can with the meat mixture. In a large Dutch oven, pour in two fifteen-ounce cans of diced tomatoes and one can tomato soup. Chop leftover cabbage and layer over tomatoes. Stand the cabbage rolls on end, touching. Mix one half can tomato soup with one fifteen ounce can chopped tomatoes and pour over the cabbage rolls. Cook over medium low heat about one and one half hours or until the meat mixture is cooked through (165F on meat thermometer). Enjoy cabbage rolls in a shallow bowl with the tomato sauce ladled atop. Vanessa has yummy recipes for every season.

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant 200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

13


Season’s Bounty

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

At Garden’s end

By vanessa moncure

When is summer at its end for you? Labor Day weekend? When the outdoor pools close for the season? When it’s back-to-school night? When you can finally open your windows for cool night breezes? For me, it’s September’s autumnal equinox and the end of the summer garden. This year was an especially challenging one for the outdoor gardener, be it backyard or commercial. Those few 80* days in February segued into a long, cold and rainy spring - then a prolonged dry spell just as the first tender shoots began to emerge - finally so much rain that only eight of the last thirty days were dry. Damp, sunless gardens promote bacterial and fungal diseases - our stuntedgrowth tomatoes split and dropped from the vines. Too much moisture building up inside melons caused them to split as well, unfortunately before reaching peak ripeness. Our sad, white cucumbers (a side effect of rain) were bitter and nutrientdeficient - definitely not pickle-worthy. The second plantings are just beginning to

12

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

flower - we may have a few late tomatoes, cucumbers and squash if summer’s heat holds through the month. The coolweather kale, spinach and even a few rows of peas are greening up the back garden, and we should be able to cut the fastproducing okra through the Fall. Late in our garden this summer is a bounty of lima beans on healthy green bushes - and the basil! We’ll be having a pesto party, straight from the freezer, this winter. I love having a bit of summer from our garden stashed away. Where ratatouille and gazpacho are midsummer garden supper staples, the end-of-summer garden has some tasty dishes. GARDEN STEW is a mixture of sauteed chopped onion, sliced large tender okra or whole small pods, peeled and chopped tomatoes, fresh lima beans cooked all together until tender with S&P to taste. This is a yummy dinner with cornbread on the side. STUFFED PEPPERS As the soil cools a bit, the peppers have grown and increased their yield - you can also use this stuffing for zucchini and yellow squash. If you wrap the individual peppers, they freeze well and can be thawed and cooked in the microwave as all the ingredients are pre-cooked. In a large skillet, brown one pound sweet or hot Italian sausage (or turkey or chicken) quickly over medium high heat. Discard fat. Add one tablespoon butter to the meat in skillet and one large chopped onion - saute over medium low heat until the onion is browned and softened. Stir in two tablespoons of flour, one quarter cup beef broth, one half cup tomato sauce, two cups cooked rice, one quarter cup shredded Parmesan cheese, three

tablespoons of minced fresh parsley, one teaspoon garlic powder plus S&P to taste. Mix well and set aside. Cut off the tops of four green, red or yellow peppers and clean out the seeds and pith. If needed, cut enough off the bottom of the pepper so that it will stand straight. Stuff the peppers with the mixture. Top with a mixture of shredded mozzarella and sharp cheddar cheese, then replace the tops on the peppers. Bake in 350F oven until heated through and cheese is melted, about 25 minutes. CABBAGE ROLLS I learned how to make these economical and delicious rolls from a college friend who adapted her grandmother’s original recipe - I doubt very much that Campbell’s Tomato Soup was available during the Cold War in the former Yugoslavia - but my friend added a can or two in lieu of other seasonings. Grandmother had to steam her cabbage over an open pot of boiling water - we steamed ours in the microwave. Choose a medium to large size head of cabbage with plenty of leaves. Cut out the core. Place cabbage, cored side down, over large glass pie pan filled with two cups of water. Cook on HI in microwave, checking every 5 minutes or so until you can insert a metal skewer through the tender head. Set in colander to drain as you prepare the filling. Mix together one pound of mixed pork, veal and beef (a meatloaf mix usually available in most grocery stores) along with one-half can tomato soup, one and one-half cups long grain rice (uncooked), one half cup fresh breadcrumbs,two tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, one teaspoon garlic powder, one large onion, diced, and S&P to taste. When the cabbage has cooled enough to handle, pull off the leaves and set aside any leaves too small to stuff. Place a scant handful at the thick end of the cabbage leaf, and roll toward the end, tucking in the sides as you go. Fill as many leaves as you can with the meat mixture. In a large Dutch oven, pour in two fifteen-ounce cans of diced tomatoes and one can tomato soup. Chop leftover cabbage and layer over tomatoes. Stand the cabbage rolls on end, touching. Mix one half can tomato soup with one fifteen ounce can chopped tomatoes and pour over the cabbage rolls. Cook over medium low heat about one and one half hours or until the meat mixture is cooked through (165F on meat thermometer). Enjoy cabbage rolls in a shallow bowl with the tomato sauce ladled atop. Vanessa has yummy recipes for every season.

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant 200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

13


Porktoberfeast

SpiritS bowman experimental series

Monday – Friday at 6 am Saturday – Sunday at 7 am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials

By Amy Preske

A. Smith Bowman Distillery is announcing the second release in its Experimental Series, which includes distilled spirits from a wide range of expressions, separate from its Abraham Bowman whiskey releases. This experimental release features a rum titled Virginia Rum. Virginia Rum was distilled on Sept. 7, 2017 utilizing A. Smith Bowman’s custom microstill, George, installed in early 2015. The rum was made from select black strap molasses and evaporated cane juice, and was aged in used bourbon barrels. It was then bottled at 114 proof, or what is known as “Navy Strength.” Many rums have historically been presented at this proof, which was chosen for this release as a nod to Virginia’s strong military ties.

This very limited, one-time release will only be available at the A. Smith Bowman Distillery Visitor Center. Tasting notes from Master Distiller Brian Prewitt describe this new rum as having a “Nice straw color, hints of the molasses and slight caramel notes with a hint of floral and tropical fruit in the background. The light aroma of the oak and vanilla combines with the sweet flavors and despite the strong strength, it finishes smooth and soft. Great for mixing or enjoying straight up.” Virginia Rum will be offered for sale at the A. Smith Bowman Distillery Visitor Center in Fredericksburg, VA It is very limited and is not likely to be repeated, however; new experimental spirits will be forthcoming. A. Smith Bowman Distillery, well known for making-award winning bourbons, including two of the World’s Best Bourbons, expanded its offerings to include a new line of experimental spirits in 2016. The first Experimental Release introduced the limited edition Rye Expectations Gin. The series will include a wide variety of distilled spirits, including the aforementioned gin, the newest Virginia Rum release, and will grow to include many different expressions of vodkas, brandies, gins and rums. The Experimental Series explores a wide variety of spirits delving into unique recipes, wood types, exotic fermentables, and the use of local ingredients such as grapes, apples, pears, grains, and much more. The Experimental Series bottles feature a small rectangle label on the front of each release explaining the provenance along with a hand numbered release number and bottle number. Virginia Rum is bottled in 375 mL and will be priced at $34.99. It is 114 proof. Considered a micro-distillery by today's standards, A. Smith Bowman produces an assortment of hand-crafted spirits distilled from only the finest natural ingredients and using the latest technology. Its various brands have won more than 100 awards in the past five years.

540-373-8300 www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

Become a Member

Enjoying lunch from FRFB Kids on the Go program suffered from the first of seven strokes, she was no longer able to work and it has

Elizabeth Gilkey is the Director of Development at the Fredericksburg Regional Food Bank. She lives in Spotsylvania with her husband.

Olde Towne BUTCHER

www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm

fxbgfoodcoop@gmail.com fredericksburgfoodcoop.com Front porch fredericksburg

How can you fight hunger while having a great time with your friends and family? On October 6 The Fredericksburg Regional Food Bank (FRFB) will be hosting a community event for the whole family with food, fun, and music at the Fredericksburg Agricultural Fairgrounds from 12:00 – 5:00 p.m. Just by coming you will be helping the FRFB to achieve our vision of a hunger-free community! According to Feeding America, there are over 32,000 people in our district who don’t have enough food, including 1 in 5 children. Hunger doesn’t necessarily look the way you think. Last week I spoke with Richard, who was downsized after 20 years with his company. In the last 18 months, he has sent out almost 1,000 resumes with no success. He has taken a job at a hardware store and is delivering pizzas. Richard is now one of the “working poor” whose income can’t cover his family’s monthly expenses. He is so grateful for the food he receives including meat, produce, and fresh bakery from an FRFB partner pantry. At our Kids on the Go Summer Feeding Program, I met Carol who has two children. Carol’s father has dementia and there is no money for a memory care facility. She had no choice but to quit her

job to care for him. Her children qualify been a struggle ever since. Our Food for Life Program delivers for free lunch but in the summer those extra meals put a strain on an already monthly supplemental food for tight budget. Carol’s the growing .... over 32,000 girls enjoy going to the number of people in our district Salem Church Library seniors in our where they can enjoy don’t have enough food, community like freshly prepared, Jerri who including healthy lunches 3 times struggles with 1 in 5 children a week. hunger. Jerri is a former Any of these nurse who worked hard her whole life, stories could become the story of always paid the bills on time, and even had you or someone you care about. money in savings. When she suddenly One catastrophic event can change everything. That’s where the FRFB comes in to provide emergency food assistance. We all have a role to play in fighting hunger in our community. We are so grateful to our community partners who have agreed to help with Porktoberfeast. Publix has generously agreed to sponsor the Jerri with Carey Sealy who delivers her Food event and Bllingsly, Wegmans, for Life box monthly Sullivans BBQ Catering, Good for You Farm, and Thunder 104.5 are also partnering with us to ensure the event is a success. Porktoberfeast is an easy way to support the FRFB. It is amazing that spending a Saturday eating, playing games, enjoying music, and Porktoberfeast winning prizes could make a difference in To Benefit someone’s life but that is absolutely true! Fredericksburg Regional Food Bank Your $25 ticket will be a catalyst for October 6 change in our community because it will 12n-5 5p purchase 50 meals for your neighbors in FXBG Fairgrounds need. For more information on Porktoberfeast go the FRFB’s website www.fredfood.org.

540.370.4105

A.Smith Bowman Distillery 1 Bowman Dr, Fredericksburg, VA 22408 www.asmithbowman.com

September 2018

by Elizabeth Gilkey

Porktoberfeast October 6 12n-5 5p FXBG Fairgrounds

Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg

Amy Preske is A.Smith Bowman PR & Events Manager

14

Fight Hunger & Enjoy Family Fun

Keith Lebor Proprietor

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

15


Porktoberfeast

SpiritS bowman experimental series

Monday – Friday at 6 am Saturday – Sunday at 7 am Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner $5.00 Weekly Lunch Specials

By Amy Preske

A. Smith Bowman Distillery is announcing the second release in its Experimental Series, which includes distilled spirits from a wide range of expressions, separate from its Abraham Bowman whiskey releases. This experimental release features a rum titled Virginia Rum. Virginia Rum was distilled on Sept. 7, 2017 utilizing A. Smith Bowman’s custom microstill, George, installed in early 2015. The rum was made from select black strap molasses and evaporated cane juice, and was aged in used bourbon barrels. It was then bottled at 114 proof, or what is known as “Navy Strength.” Many rums have historically been presented at this proof, which was chosen for this release as a nod to Virginia’s strong military ties.

This very limited, one-time release will only be available at the A. Smith Bowman Distillery Visitor Center. Tasting notes from Master Distiller Brian Prewitt describe this new rum as having a “Nice straw color, hints of the molasses and slight caramel notes with a hint of floral and tropical fruit in the background. The light aroma of the oak and vanilla combines with the sweet flavors and despite the strong strength, it finishes smooth and soft. Great for mixing or enjoying straight up.” Virginia Rum will be offered for sale at the A. Smith Bowman Distillery Visitor Center in Fredericksburg, VA It is very limited and is not likely to be repeated, however; new experimental spirits will be forthcoming. A. Smith Bowman Distillery, well known for making-award winning bourbons, including two of the World’s Best Bourbons, expanded its offerings to include a new line of experimental spirits in 2016. The first Experimental Release introduced the limited edition Rye Expectations Gin. The series will include a wide variety of distilled spirits, including the aforementioned gin, the newest Virginia Rum release, and will grow to include many different expressions of vodkas, brandies, gins and rums. The Experimental Series explores a wide variety of spirits delving into unique recipes, wood types, exotic fermentables, and the use of local ingredients such as grapes, apples, pears, grains, and much more. The Experimental Series bottles feature a small rectangle label on the front of each release explaining the provenance along with a hand numbered release number and bottle number. Virginia Rum is bottled in 375 mL and will be priced at $34.99. It is 114 proof. Considered a micro-distillery by today's standards, A. Smith Bowman produces an assortment of hand-crafted spirits distilled from only the finest natural ingredients and using the latest technology. Its various brands have won more than 100 awards in the past five years.

540-373-8300 www.marriott.com/fkrcy 620 Caroline St. FXBG, VA

C L THE HAPPY M The Only Thing We “Overlook” is the Rappahannock! Monday ~ Saturday: 11am ~ 9pm Sunday: 12-8pm 1017 Sophia Street

540-899-0140 (ph)

540-899-0141 (fax)

Rand Sompayrac & Richard Moncure, Proprietors

Become a Member

Enjoying lunch from FRFB Kids on the Go program suffered from the first of seven strokes, she was no longer able to work and it has

Elizabeth Gilkey is the Director of Development at the Fredericksburg Regional Food Bank. She lives in Spotsylvania with her husband.

Olde Towne BUTCHER

www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm

fxbgfoodcoop@gmail.com fredericksburgfoodcoop.com Front porch fredericksburg

How can you fight hunger while having a great time with your friends and family? On October 6 The Fredericksburg Regional Food Bank (FRFB) will be hosting a community event for the whole family with food, fun, and music at the Fredericksburg Agricultural Fairgrounds from 12:00 – 5:00 p.m. Just by coming you will be helping the FRFB to achieve our vision of a hunger-free community! According to Feeding America, there are over 32,000 people in our district who don’t have enough food, including 1 in 5 children. Hunger doesn’t necessarily look the way you think. Last week I spoke with Richard, who was downsized after 20 years with his company. In the last 18 months, he has sent out almost 1,000 resumes with no success. He has taken a job at a hardware store and is delivering pizzas. Richard is now one of the “working poor” whose income can’t cover his family’s monthly expenses. He is so grateful for the food he receives including meat, produce, and fresh bakery from an FRFB partner pantry. At our Kids on the Go Summer Feeding Program, I met Carol who has two children. Carol’s father has dementia and there is no money for a memory care facility. She had no choice but to quit her

job to care for him. Her children qualify been a struggle ever since. Our Food for Life Program delivers for free lunch but in the summer those extra meals put a strain on an already monthly supplemental food for tight budget. Carol’s the growing .... over 32,000 girls enjoy going to the number of people in our district Salem Church Library seniors in our where they can enjoy don’t have enough food, community like freshly prepared, Jerri who including healthy lunches 3 times struggles with 1 in 5 children a week. hunger. Jerri is a former Any of these nurse who worked hard her whole life, stories could become the story of always paid the bills on time, and even had you or someone you care about. money in savings. When she suddenly One catastrophic event can change everything. That’s where the FRFB comes in to provide emergency food assistance. We all have a role to play in fighting hunger in our community. We are so grateful to our community partners who have agreed to help with Porktoberfeast. Publix has generously agreed to sponsor the Jerri with Carey Sealy who delivers her Food event and Bllingsly, Wegmans, for Life box monthly Sullivans BBQ Catering, Good for You Farm, and Thunder 104.5 are also partnering with us to ensure the event is a success. Porktoberfeast is an easy way to support the FRFB. It is amazing that spending a Saturday eating, playing games, enjoying music, and Porktoberfeast winning prizes could make a difference in To Benefit someone’s life but that is absolutely true! Fredericksburg Regional Food Bank Your $25 ticket will be a catalyst for October 6 change in our community because it will 12n-5 5p purchase 50 meals for your neighbors in FXBG Fairgrounds need. For more information on Porktoberfeast go the FRFB’s website www.fredfood.org.

540.370.4105

A.Smith Bowman Distillery 1 Bowman Dr, Fredericksburg, VA 22408 www.asmithbowman.com

September 2018

by Elizabeth Gilkey

Porktoberfeast October 6 12n-5 5p FXBG Fairgrounds

Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg

Amy Preske is A.Smith Bowman PR & Events Manager

14

Fight Hunger & Enjoy Family Fun

Keith Lebor Proprietor

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

15


CALENDAR of events

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, more!

september 2018… Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month Saturday September 1:

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm Art in the Park at the Farmers Market from 9:00am to 1:00pm. Hurkamp Park,Local artists & craftspeople share their handmade goods in the park in conjunction 500 William Street, Fredericksburg. Free admission Slide FXBG start at Jepson Center...come out watch the fun!; ; Eagle Nation Day Trench Hill, fun for the kids to young to slide Bring the family to Stratford Hall to observe and learn about squirrels!. 9:30-12:30p

Sunday, September 2

Come join us for four Aikido black belt demos in our Dojo located at 6155 Hickory Ridge Rd, Spotsylvania VA, starting at 11 AM

Monday, September 3 Labor Day

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

First Friday, September 7

Happy 26th Anniversary Gemstone Creations! Come celebrate with us! 606 Caroline St. Stacy Gaglio, "Unfrozen", opening reception, 6-9, Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline St. "Passages" National Exhibit; Members Gallery, Rebecca Carpenter, FCCA, 813 Sohia St. "Finding It All" Original Photography by Sheila Jones Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline St Freeform - Fiber Works by Sally Cooney Anderson Opening Reception, 6-9p@ Artful Dimensions Gallery, 922 Caroline St. Fredericksburg Photography Club Exhibit at CRRL exhibit thru Sept 27

Wednesday, September 5

Composting How To's, Rappahannock Regional Solid Waste Management Board in Stafford County FREE. 7 p.m. at the Rowser Building, 1739 Jeffn Davis Hwy., Stafford, Residents of Stafford and Fredericksburg City who attend are eligible to purchase a compost bin for $25. register 540658-5279. Their web site is r-board.org

PONSHOP's 14th community art exhibition continues into the month of September. "Remixed 6" features original artwork using 12" vinyl record albums. Over thirty participating artists work on this unconventional canvas. Thru Sept 29, 712 Caroline ST

Sunken Well Littlepage,

Sounds of Summer Concert Series - Colonial Seafood @ Fredericksburg Area Museum / Market Square, 7-9p

Trivia

tonight

7:45pm,

720

Thursday, September 6

Museums as Viewing Machines: Work by Jeffrey Abt Opening Reception @ UMW Ridderhof Martin Gallery, 5-7p. exhibition features Abt's Wandering Gallery project and Museum series. Exhibition featuring the UMW Studio Art Faculty @duPont Gallery :Debra Balestreri, Carole Garmon, Larry Hinkle, Rosemary Jesionowski, Ashe Laughlin, Jon McMillan, Chris Musina, Jason Robinson, Jake Urbanski, Sarah Spencer White, Yonsenia White. information at www.umwgalleries.org. Thru Oct 14.

Peter Mealy & Laurie Rose Griffith Live Music @ LaPetite Auberge, 8-10pm

Saturday, September 8

Happy 26th Anniversary Gemstone Creations! Come celebrate with us! 606 Caroline St. ARTS on the VINE, A Wine & Arts Crawl. Over 30 unique trail stops along the Northern Neck of Virginia featuring Wine Tastings, Art Demos, Tours, Specials & more. For participating trail locations, events & hours visit: NorhternNeckArtisanTrail.org

Arts on the Vine in Colonial Beach: Artisan Trail visits Artisans' Alliance @ Artists' Alliance at JTFA, 100 Taylor St, Colonial Beach. 20 Top Artists Exhibit, Vicki Marckel demonstrates Old Masters Painting Techniques, Ditchley Cider provides cider tasting Zion United Methodist Church Trail Sale@ Zion United Methodist Church Trail Sale, Route 208 Carnival Extravaganza @Fred Area Museum FREE all ages learn about the history of “burg's very own carnival, Southworth's Pleasure Island. Music By Moonlight, will be celebrating it 30th Annual Concert at Hurkamp Park 7pm to 9pm. Gary Allan @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours. 7p. New force in Country Music,.

Monday, September 10

Nerd Night @ Curitiba Art Café, 919 Caroline St., 7p. Info: sandrafedowitz @ gmail.com

Tuesday, September 11

Picnic in the Park, Scott Kurt & Patrick Day, 11:301:30p, FREE in Hurkamp Park From the Heart for charity @ Redeemer Lutheran Church.5120 Harrison Rd socialize and knit/crochet for those who need comfort in times of need. No experience required.

Wednesday, September 12

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage,

Thursday, September 13

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, September 14

Night Catfishing at Motts Run Reservoir 6600 River Road. 7p-1a. information 540-786-8989 or visit www.FredParksRec.com

Saturday, September 15

Art in the Park at the Fredericksburg Farmers Market @ Hurkamp Park, 9a-1p. Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park Introduction to MOSAIC ART Workshop@ FCCA Info Cathy Ambrose Smith, 540-834-7736 The Drifters, Cornell Gunter's Coasters, and The Platters @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours Stratford Hall Wine & Oyster Festival 10a-6p. wines from VA wineries oysters from Chesapeake Bay and Tidewater oyster growers. also feature breweries from FXBG & Northern Neck! tastings of a variety of Castle Brands liquors. StratfordHall.org to purchase tickets and info Calling all lovers of local spirits! Come join us for the next The Virginia Craft Spirits Roadshow at A. Smith Bowman Distillery, 12-5p. Tickets will include all samples of artisan spirits, craft cocktails, as well as local brews! Be sure to enjoy a complimentary tour of A. Smith Bowman Distillery, offered every hour on the hour. Dave Goodrich at Curitiba Art Cafe @ Curitiba Art Café, 919 Caroline St, 8p

Sunday, September 16

Stratford Hall Wine & Oyster Festival wines from Virginia wineries and oysters from Chesapeake Bay and Tidewater oyster growers. Not a fan of wine? Also feature breweries from FXBG/ Northern Neck! tastings of Castle Brands liquors. StratfordHall.org to purchase tickets and for more information. Agroecology from Soil to Spoon: Fixing the Food System From the Ground Up @ CRRL Library 2-4p

Artists' Alliance (100 TaylorSt Colonial Beach) Opening Reception @ Artists' Alliance at JTFA. 20 Artists display new work, Abstract Paintings by Kathryn Murray featured.. 6-9p

From the Heart for charity @ Peace Lutheran Church, 5590 Kings Hwy, King George, VA. Meet to knit/crochet for those in need.

Cabin Creek @"Sounds of Summer concert series" Market Square , 7-9p

Picnic in the Park, Jason Masi & Recycling Day, 11:30-1:30p, FREE in Hurkamp Park

Tuesday, September 18

From the Heart for charity @ Wegman's 2nd Fl. Food Court, 5:50-7:30p, Knit/crochet for those in need.

Wednesday, September 19

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage,

Thursdy, September 20

The Opioid Crisis, Community Conversations, Porter Branch Library, 7-8:30p. Open dialogue w/local experts. Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, September 21

"Sounds of Summer concert series" Market Square 7-9p Don Browns Soul Experience Acoustic Onion @ LaPetite Auberge, 8-11pm

Saturday, September 22

7th Annual Art Attack Local artists taking it to the streets!Main Event 10 AM - 4 PM Block Party Concert at Sammy T's 7 PM - 10 PM Austen's Communitas 5k for Brain Aneurysm Awareness @ Old Mill Park, 9am. One in 50 people has a brain aneurysm. Join us for a walk to raise awareness and research funds for the Brain Aneurysm Foundation. The walk is in memory of Austen Dunn, a FXBG native who died from complications of a ruptured brain aneurysm ANNUAL FALL BAZAAR @ Church of The Messiah FXBG. Outdoor Open Market with over 50 Vendors, Food Trucks, Freshly Baked Items, Crafts & Gifts, Live Entertainment, Raffles, Yard Sale, and More. Fun for All Ages. 10a-3p. Parking at Riverbend H.S. and next to Home Depot off rte. 3 West

Purple Paws 2nd Chance Resuce will be at the Fredericksburg Pet Show at the Fredericksburg Expo & Conference Center. Stop by for info about dogs available to adopt and foster.

Fredericksburg Wine Festival @ River Front Park Enjoy an afternoon of wine tastings, live music, local artisans, specialty retailers, and unique food vendors. It's all right in downtown .11a-5p Bourbon & Boxwood @ Mary Washington House, fourth annual fundraising gala,

Sunday, September 23

Fredericksburg Wine Festival @ River Front Park Enjoy an afternoon of wine tastings, live music, local artisans, specialty retailers, and unique food vendors. It's all right in downtown .11a-5p Keller Williams in Concert, James Monroe H.S. 3:30-5p. Tickets Artslive artsliveva.org/event/sept23-keller-williams, email thearts@artsliveva.org, or call (540) 374-5040. The Marshall Tucker Band and The Outlaws @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours

Tuesday, September 25

Picnic in the Park, Storybook Day/DJ Gravattron, 11:30-1:30p, FREE in Hurkamp Park The Opioid Crisis, Community Conversations, Salem Church Branch Library, 7-8:30p Open dialogue w/local experts From the Heart @ Redeemer Lutheran Church.Knit & crochet to help those in need. Experience helpful, but not needed. 5120 Harrison Rd

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, September 28

The Fredericksburg Area Museum (FAM) "Sounds of Summer concert series" in historic Market Square , 7-9p Bring a lawn chair and your dancing shoes, and enjoy family-friendly music by local bands and arts & crafts for the kids, Elby Brass

Saturday, September 29

3rd Annual Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival. Old Mill Park 10 a.m- 4 p.m. Meet regional authors, browse genres, enjoy familyoriented activities and partake of some of the area's finest culinary food truck and beverage options. Join the Silver Tones, Gottaswing, and Rappahannock Aviation Outreach for this WWIIthemed dance at Stafford Regional Airport. All ages welcome! 7p WFLS Fest with Dustin Lynch @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours, one of the hottest acts in modern country music. @ 4:30 pm

Sunday, September 30

From the Heart for charity @ Peace Lutheran Church, 5590 Kings Hwy, King George, VA. Meet to knit/crochet for those in need. Experience helpful, but not necessary. Caring hearts needed.

Wednesday, September 26

Plant-Based Cooking Class @ St. George's Episcopal Church. FXBG Food Co-op & St. George's present an opportunity to learn about eating for the earth April Payne will show us how to incorporate fresh, local ingredients in our meals. Vegan potluck follows the class. 5:30-7:30p. 905 Princess Anne St

If you are reading this 254th issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 22nd year of continuous publication!

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for October 2018 issue is September 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Thursday, September 27

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more!

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

3322 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne St , FXBG 16

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

540-8 899-6 6787

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

17


CALENDAR of events

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, more!

september 2018… Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month Saturday September 1:

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 9am-2pm Art in the Park at the Farmers Market from 9:00am to 1:00pm. Hurkamp Park,Local artists & craftspeople share their handmade goods in the park in conjunction 500 William Street, Fredericksburg. Free admission Slide FXBG start at Jepson Center...come out watch the fun!; ; Eagle Nation Day Trench Hill, fun for the kids to young to slide Bring the family to Stratford Hall to observe and learn about squirrels!. 9:30-12:30p

Sunday, September 2

Come join us for four Aikido black belt demos in our Dojo located at 6155 Hickory Ridge Rd, Spotsylvania VA, starting at 11 AM

Monday, September 3 Labor Day

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

First Friday, September 7

Happy 26th Anniversary Gemstone Creations! Come celebrate with us! 606 Caroline St. Stacy Gaglio, "Unfrozen", opening reception, 6-9, Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline St. "Passages" National Exhibit; Members Gallery, Rebecca Carpenter, FCCA, 813 Sohia St. "Finding It All" Original Photography by Sheila Jones Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline St Freeform - Fiber Works by Sally Cooney Anderson Opening Reception, 6-9p@ Artful Dimensions Gallery, 922 Caroline St. Fredericksburg Photography Club Exhibit at CRRL exhibit thru Sept 27

Wednesday, September 5

Composting How To's, Rappahannock Regional Solid Waste Management Board in Stafford County FREE. 7 p.m. at the Rowser Building, 1739 Jeffn Davis Hwy., Stafford, Residents of Stafford and Fredericksburg City who attend are eligible to purchase a compost bin for $25. register 540658-5279. Their web site is r-board.org

PONSHOP's 14th community art exhibition continues into the month of September. "Remixed 6" features original artwork using 12" vinyl record albums. Over thirty participating artists work on this unconventional canvas. Thru Sept 29, 712 Caroline ST

Sunken Well Littlepage,

Sounds of Summer Concert Series - Colonial Seafood @ Fredericksburg Area Museum / Market Square, 7-9p

Trivia

tonight

7:45pm,

720

Thursday, September 6

Museums as Viewing Machines: Work by Jeffrey Abt Opening Reception @ UMW Ridderhof Martin Gallery, 5-7p. exhibition features Abt's Wandering Gallery project and Museum series. Exhibition featuring the UMW Studio Art Faculty @duPont Gallery :Debra Balestreri, Carole Garmon, Larry Hinkle, Rosemary Jesionowski, Ashe Laughlin, Jon McMillan, Chris Musina, Jason Robinson, Jake Urbanski, Sarah Spencer White, Yonsenia White. information at www.umwgalleries.org. Thru Oct 14.

Peter Mealy & Laurie Rose Griffith Live Music @ LaPetite Auberge, 8-10pm

Saturday, September 8

Happy 26th Anniversary Gemstone Creations! Come celebrate with us! 606 Caroline St. ARTS on the VINE, A Wine & Arts Crawl. Over 30 unique trail stops along the Northern Neck of Virginia featuring Wine Tastings, Art Demos, Tours, Specials & more. For participating trail locations, events & hours visit: NorhternNeckArtisanTrail.org

Arts on the Vine in Colonial Beach: Artisan Trail visits Artisans' Alliance @ Artists' Alliance at JTFA, 100 Taylor St, Colonial Beach. 20 Top Artists Exhibit, Vicki Marckel demonstrates Old Masters Painting Techniques, Ditchley Cider provides cider tasting Zion United Methodist Church Trail Sale@ Zion United Methodist Church Trail Sale, Route 208 Carnival Extravaganza @Fred Area Museum FREE all ages learn about the history of “burg's very own carnival, Southworth's Pleasure Island. Music By Moonlight, will be celebrating it 30th Annual Concert at Hurkamp Park 7pm to 9pm. Gary Allan @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours. 7p. New force in Country Music,.

Monday, September 10

Nerd Night @ Curitiba Art Café, 919 Caroline St., 7p. Info: sandrafedowitz @ gmail.com

Tuesday, September 11

Picnic in the Park, Scott Kurt & Patrick Day, 11:301:30p, FREE in Hurkamp Park From the Heart for charity @ Redeemer Lutheran Church.5120 Harrison Rd socialize and knit/crochet for those who need comfort in times of need. No experience required.

Wednesday, September 12

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage,

Thursday, September 13

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, September 14

Night Catfishing at Motts Run Reservoir 6600 River Road. 7p-1a. information 540-786-8989 or visit www.FredParksRec.com

Saturday, September 15

Art in the Park at the Fredericksburg Farmers Market @ Hurkamp Park, 9a-1p. Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park Introduction to MOSAIC ART Workshop@ FCCA Info Cathy Ambrose Smith, 540-834-7736 The Drifters, Cornell Gunter's Coasters, and The Platters @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours Stratford Hall Wine & Oyster Festival 10a-6p. wines from VA wineries oysters from Chesapeake Bay and Tidewater oyster growers. also feature breweries from FXBG & Northern Neck! tastings of a variety of Castle Brands liquors. StratfordHall.org to purchase tickets and info Calling all lovers of local spirits! Come join us for the next The Virginia Craft Spirits Roadshow at A. Smith Bowman Distillery, 12-5p. Tickets will include all samples of artisan spirits, craft cocktails, as well as local brews! Be sure to enjoy a complimentary tour of A. Smith Bowman Distillery, offered every hour on the hour. Dave Goodrich at Curitiba Art Cafe @ Curitiba Art Café, 919 Caroline St, 8p

Sunday, September 16

Stratford Hall Wine & Oyster Festival wines from Virginia wineries and oysters from Chesapeake Bay and Tidewater oyster growers. Not a fan of wine? Also feature breweries from FXBG/ Northern Neck! tastings of Castle Brands liquors. StratfordHall.org to purchase tickets and for more information. Agroecology from Soil to Spoon: Fixing the Food System From the Ground Up @ CRRL Library 2-4p

Artists' Alliance (100 TaylorSt Colonial Beach) Opening Reception @ Artists' Alliance at JTFA. 20 Artists display new work, Abstract Paintings by Kathryn Murray featured.. 6-9p

From the Heart for charity @ Peace Lutheran Church, 5590 Kings Hwy, King George, VA. Meet to knit/crochet for those in need.

Cabin Creek @"Sounds of Summer concert series" Market Square , 7-9p

Picnic in the Park, Jason Masi & Recycling Day, 11:30-1:30p, FREE in Hurkamp Park

Tuesday, September 18

From the Heart for charity @ Wegman's 2nd Fl. Food Court, 5:50-7:30p, Knit/crochet for those in need.

Wednesday, September 19

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage,

Thursdy, September 20

The Opioid Crisis, Community Conversations, Porter Branch Library, 7-8:30p. Open dialogue w/local experts. Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, September 21

"Sounds of Summer concert series" Market Square 7-9p Don Browns Soul Experience Acoustic Onion @ LaPetite Auberge, 8-11pm

Saturday, September 22

7th Annual Art Attack Local artists taking it to the streets!Main Event 10 AM - 4 PM Block Party Concert at Sammy T's 7 PM - 10 PM Austen's Communitas 5k for Brain Aneurysm Awareness @ Old Mill Park, 9am. One in 50 people has a brain aneurysm. Join us for a walk to raise awareness and research funds for the Brain Aneurysm Foundation. The walk is in memory of Austen Dunn, a FXBG native who died from complications of a ruptured brain aneurysm ANNUAL FALL BAZAAR @ Church of The Messiah FXBG. Outdoor Open Market with over 50 Vendors, Food Trucks, Freshly Baked Items, Crafts & Gifts, Live Entertainment, Raffles, Yard Sale, and More. Fun for All Ages. 10a-3p. Parking at Riverbend H.S. and next to Home Depot off rte. 3 West

Purple Paws 2nd Chance Resuce will be at the Fredericksburg Pet Show at the Fredericksburg Expo & Conference Center. Stop by for info about dogs available to adopt and foster.

Fredericksburg Wine Festival @ River Front Park Enjoy an afternoon of wine tastings, live music, local artisans, specialty retailers, and unique food vendors. It's all right in downtown .11a-5p Bourbon & Boxwood @ Mary Washington House, fourth annual fundraising gala,

Sunday, September 23

Fredericksburg Wine Festival @ River Front Park Enjoy an afternoon of wine tastings, live music, local artisans, specialty retailers, and unique food vendors. It's all right in downtown .11a-5p Keller Williams in Concert, James Monroe H.S. 3:30-5p. Tickets Artslive artsliveva.org/event/sept23-keller-williams, email thearts@artsliveva.org, or call (540) 374-5040. The Marshall Tucker Band and The Outlaws @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours

Tuesday, September 25

Picnic in the Park, Storybook Day/DJ Gravattron, 11:30-1:30p, FREE in Hurkamp Park The Opioid Crisis, Community Conversations, Salem Church Branch Library, 7-8:30p Open dialogue w/local experts From the Heart @ Redeemer Lutheran Church.Knit & crochet to help those in need. Experience helpful, but not needed. 5120 Harrison Rd

Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, September 28

The Fredericksburg Area Museum (FAM) "Sounds of Summer concert series" in historic Market Square , 7-9p Bring a lawn chair and your dancing shoes, and enjoy family-friendly music by local bands and arts & crafts for the kids, Elby Brass

Saturday, September 29

3rd Annual Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival. Old Mill Park 10 a.m- 4 p.m. Meet regional authors, browse genres, enjoy familyoriented activities and partake of some of the area's finest culinary food truck and beverage options. Join the Silver Tones, Gottaswing, and Rappahannock Aviation Outreach for this WWIIthemed dance at Stafford Regional Airport. All ages welcome! 7p WFLS Fest with Dustin Lynch @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours, one of the hottest acts in modern country music. @ 4:30 pm

Sunday, September 30

From the Heart for charity @ Peace Lutheran Church, 5590 Kings Hwy, King George, VA. Meet to knit/crochet for those in need. Experience helpful, but not necessary. Caring hearts needed.

Wednesday, September 26

Plant-Based Cooking Class @ St. George's Episcopal Church. FXBG Food Co-op & St. George's present an opportunity to learn about eating for the earth April Payne will show us how to incorporate fresh, local ingredients in our meals. Vegan potluck follows the class. 5:30-7:30p. 905 Princess Anne St

If you are reading this 254th issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 22nd year of continuous publication!

Sunken Well Trivia tonight starting at 7:45pm, 720 Littlepage, ~ Come and match wits against the finest minds in Fredericksburg! Compete for Honor, Glory, and Prizes!!

If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for October 2018 issue is September 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Thursday, September 27

Downtown Greens Garden Hours 3pm til 6:00pm Help us work the soil, pick weeds, plant saplings or bulbs, move mulch, and so much more!

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

3322 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on 540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne St , FXBG 16

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

540-8 899-6 6787

fortemusicstudios.com front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

17


history’s stories

BELLE GROVE PLANTATION By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

What’s in a Dream?

fredericksburg flames

Agora Downtown Coffee Shop

A look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

By wendy migdal

In early August Anne and I had the pleasure of spending the night at Belle Grove Plantation located on Route 301 just across the Rappahannock River from Port Royal. Our stay was a wedding gift from our friends Robbie and Bill Rome who reside in Louisiana.

The Belle Grove Plantation bed and breakfast along with the many tours and activities is under the supervision of Brett and Michelle Darnell. Brett a retired Navy Submariner and Michelle a former Marine are very impressive with their extensive knowledge of the many families that have lived at the Plantation. The Mansion is open year-round and host a variety of events from weddings, Spirits Festival, Thanksgiving Dinner and a New Year’s Dinner to name a few. The land that Belle Grove sits upon was granted in 1667, by the Governor of Virginia as a reward for the colonization of the New World. Established as a tobacco plantation with a thousand acres the estate has survived the American Revolution and the War between the States. The mansion stands today built over the original settlement around 1791, has seen many expansions and changes in the past three centuries. Belle Grove is a Virginia Landmark famous as the birthplace of the Father of the Constitution and fourth President James Madison. I find it most interesting the story of how James Madison came to be born at Belle Grove, when his family lived in Orange county on the estate of Montpelier nearly 100 miles to the West. Belle Grove had been in Madison’s mothers’ side of the family (Conway) since the latter part of the 1600’s. The home he was born in is long gone, however, the actual location of the foundation and area is known to be where the dining area is located today in the mansion. Eleanor Rose Conway Madison left her home in Montpelier and traveled to her family’s home when she was expecting the birth of James. She traveled that long distance over many rough roads as she had a fear of the Small Pox epidemic that was spreading around Montpelier in Orange County. James was born on March 16, 1851, Eleanor or “Nelly” as her family called her was twenty-one years old. Nelly and James or as he was called “Jemmy” stayed until she felt it safe to return to Montpelier. It is said that James was one of the Conway’s favorite grandchildren. The estate was owned by several different families during the last three hundred years and has survived. The Federal style of the early years was expanded with a Greek Revival style along with a river facing porch. The property did not receive any known damage during the Civil War period as it was used by the Union Army as a headquarters. Other Plantations along the river were damaged by the Union gun boats. There is an account of the Union soldiers stopping there on their way to look for John Booth as he was found hiding at the Garrett farm just a few miles across the Rappahannock River. Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee and Ambrose Burnside are said to have been visitors at Belle Grove during these years. In 1987 Belle Grove was purchased by the Haas Corporation from Austria, however, a restoration was not started until ten years later in 1997. Several million dollars in repairs and reconstruction on the large Mansion with eleven fireplaces, has resulted in in a bed and breakfast first opened in 2013, that is ranked as one of the best in Virginia. Brett and Michelle are excellent hosts and if you and the family would like a wonderful over-night or several days Southern Plantation experience, Belle Grove is the place to visit. A trip that is less than an hour from the Fredericksburg area. You may encounter Civil War soldier walking in the field or on the porch, as they have a Paranormal event scheduled in September. www.BelleGrovePlantation.com Dedicated to the memory of: Barry Jett, Craig Jones and Ronnie Payne Tuffy is Front Porch's resident FXBG historian

18

OUR HERITAGE

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Cooking over a flame, candlelight, blowing curtains, wooden buildings—it’s a wonder towns managed to survive in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries at all. Like most other American towns of its size, Fredericksburg was the victim of many fires during this time and was slow to make important changes to help prevent recurrence. Map showing area devastated by the Fredericksburg fire One of the more destructive fires in of 1807, Drawn by Bulent Atalay, as seen in the book The Fredericksburg Fire of 1807 by Edward Alvey, Jr." Fredericksburg occurred on the night of April 3, 1799. donations from Baltimore to Norfolk and It started on Charlotte Street, between distribute them to those in need. Princess Anne and Caroline streets, and Finally, the city began to take destroyed all the buildings on that block, more preventive actions, including including the office of theVirginia dividing the city into zones, appointing Herald. When the fire reached seven brick residents to patrol the streets to buildings on the east side of Caroline extinguish unsafe fires, and ensuring that Street, residents—presumably manning a enough water was kept on hand. bucket brigade—were able to control it. Nevertheless, buildings continued to be The worst fire in Fredericksburg’s constructed mostly of wood, and with history began at the home of William droughts and high winds common, many Stanard on the corner of Princess Anne more fires broke out. and Lewis Streets (later called the After a decade of fires in the “Shepherd House”) on October 19, 1807. 1820s that all started in wooden stables The family was already dealing with the and warehouses, people finally began death of Mr. Stanard, whose body lay in building even those structures out of brick repose in the parlor, when a fire broke and slate. Today, very few structures out. Quite possibly it was started by remain in the core of town that predate sparks in the chimney where food was 1830. being prepared for his funeral, although no one knows for certain. As the grieving family fled the Wendy Migdal is a freelance writer and history teacher for Spotsylvania County house, the flames spread quickly. Aided by who enjoys walking her dog in the a strong wind from the northwest and a historic district long drought, the fire soon engulfed the heart of the town. Making a bad situation even worse, many residents were not at home but watching the horse races just below town, in the location of the current National Cemetery. By the time people organized to fight the flames, the fire was a roaring blaze that had swept down the east side of Caroline Street and the west side of Sophia Street, down as far as George Street. The equipment belonging to the two fire companies was woefully inadequate, people began panicking, and before 4 hours had passed, much of the town lay in ruins. In the end, three entire blocks plus parts of two others were destroyed, including 45 homes and numerous stores and warehouses. Remarkably, no one died, but material losses were enormous. Many people were homeless and unable to save any possessions at all. Merchants lost their entire stock. A committee to aid the fire victims worked for years to collect

Local musicians like Laurie Rose Griffith and Peter Mealy perform in the o u t d o o r courtyard. Agora also features eclectic art by local artists and craftsmen. No wonder it's such When you step inside Agora Downtown Coffee Shop at 520 Caroline Street, you know there is something special about this place. It's one of the oldest buildings in Fredericksburg (1787). Here, dreams have been incubated; dreams realized. And it's still true to this day. Agora is best known as a thriving local business, combining a wonderful coffee shop, bakery, art gallery and used bookstore. Here, customers can grab a cup of coffee and a bite to eat, pick up an interesting book, and sit down to enjoy a good read. All of the books are for sale.

a popular place. Co-owner M.J. Stone explains that her father came up with the name "Agora". As a Greek word it means a community gathering place (The Agora was a public marketplace in ancient Athens). It also means "the present moment" in Portuguese. A perfect name, Agora Downtown Coffee Shop is where folks gather and experience being "in the moment". Besides serving excellent coffee, Agora has a liquor license. Popular drinks include White Russians, Irish Coffees, and the Black Mamba Mocha - a dark chocolate

mocha made with Caramel Bourbon Crème liquor. Yum! And if you're hungry, the kitchen features tasty homemade sandwiches and a wonderful array of baked goods including sweetbreads, macarons and cakes. With a passion for developing good-tasting food for people with dietary restrictions, co-owner Andi Stone, the head baker, is living her dream. The other visionary in this story is Elizabeth Lontz, who once restored 101 Fauquier Street. She dreamed of buying and renovating the old building at 520 Caroline Street, saying it reminded her of where she grew up as a little girl. Betty turned her dream into a reality. Financial help came from Virginia's Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit program and the Fredericksburg Tax Credit for Rehabilitated Property, keeping the costs manageable. In 2014, after renovation was complete, the building was sold to the current owners, and Agora opened for business in 2015. Agora sits on a continuum of history. The timber-framed, brick filled structure is built on a foundation of Rappahannock Freestone. Today, a large

By jon gerlach

plexiglass window in the front room lets you glimpse interesting details of how this building was constructed. Across the centuries the building saw various commercial and residential uses. Once the site of Elisha Dickinson's blacksmith shop, it was also a mercantile store for many years, selling groceries, hardware, furniture, household items and firearms, under proprietor Richard Johnston among others. Unlike some structures on Caroline Street, the building survived the Union artillery bombardment of December 11, 1862. A century later it was a barber shop. Happily, the barber pole conveyed with the building and can be seen in the front room today! So … what's in a dream? Vision, hard work … and success!

An attorney and retired archaeologist, Jon Gerlach chairs the Architectural Review Board in Fredericksburg. Artwork by Jon Gerlach

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

19


history’s stories

BELLE GROVE PLANTATION By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

What’s in a Dream?

fredericksburg flames

Agora Downtown Coffee Shop

A look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

By wendy migdal

In early August Anne and I had the pleasure of spending the night at Belle Grove Plantation located on Route 301 just across the Rappahannock River from Port Royal. Our stay was a wedding gift from our friends Robbie and Bill Rome who reside in Louisiana.

The Belle Grove Plantation bed and breakfast along with the many tours and activities is under the supervision of Brett and Michelle Darnell. Brett a retired Navy Submariner and Michelle a former Marine are very impressive with their extensive knowledge of the many families that have lived at the Plantation. The Mansion is open year-round and host a variety of events from weddings, Spirits Festival, Thanksgiving Dinner and a New Year’s Dinner to name a few. The land that Belle Grove sits upon was granted in 1667, by the Governor of Virginia as a reward for the colonization of the New World. Established as a tobacco plantation with a thousand acres the estate has survived the American Revolution and the War between the States. The mansion stands today built over the original settlement around 1791, has seen many expansions and changes in the past three centuries. Belle Grove is a Virginia Landmark famous as the birthplace of the Father of the Constitution and fourth President James Madison. I find it most interesting the story of how James Madison came to be born at Belle Grove, when his family lived in Orange county on the estate of Montpelier nearly 100 miles to the West. Belle Grove had been in Madison’s mothers’ side of the family (Conway) since the latter part of the 1600’s. The home he was born in is long gone, however, the actual location of the foundation and area is known to be where the dining area is located today in the mansion. Eleanor Rose Conway Madison left her home in Montpelier and traveled to her family’s home when she was expecting the birth of James. She traveled that long distance over many rough roads as she had a fear of the Small Pox epidemic that was spreading around Montpelier in Orange County. James was born on March 16, 1851, Eleanor or “Nelly” as her family called her was twenty-one years old. Nelly and James or as he was called “Jemmy” stayed until she felt it safe to return to Montpelier. It is said that James was one of the Conway’s favorite grandchildren. The estate was owned by several different families during the last three hundred years and has survived. The Federal style of the early years was expanded with a Greek Revival style along with a river facing porch. The property did not receive any known damage during the Civil War period as it was used by the Union Army as a headquarters. Other Plantations along the river were damaged by the Union gun boats. There is an account of the Union soldiers stopping there on their way to look for John Booth as he was found hiding at the Garrett farm just a few miles across the Rappahannock River. Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee and Ambrose Burnside are said to have been visitors at Belle Grove during these years. In 1987 Belle Grove was purchased by the Haas Corporation from Austria, however, a restoration was not started until ten years later in 1997. Several million dollars in repairs and reconstruction on the large Mansion with eleven fireplaces, has resulted in in a bed and breakfast first opened in 2013, that is ranked as one of the best in Virginia. Brett and Michelle are excellent hosts and if you and the family would like a wonderful over-night or several days Southern Plantation experience, Belle Grove is the place to visit. A trip that is less than an hour from the Fredericksburg area. You may encounter Civil War soldier walking in the field or on the porch, as they have a Paranormal event scheduled in September. www.BelleGrovePlantation.com Dedicated to the memory of: Barry Jett, Craig Jones and Ronnie Payne Tuffy is Front Porch's resident FXBG historian

18

OUR HERITAGE

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Cooking over a flame, candlelight, blowing curtains, wooden buildings—it’s a wonder towns managed to survive in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries at all. Like most other American towns of its size, Fredericksburg was the victim of many fires during this time and was slow to make important changes to help prevent recurrence. Map showing area devastated by the Fredericksburg fire One of the more destructive fires in of 1807, Drawn by Bulent Atalay, as seen in the book The Fredericksburg Fire of 1807 by Edward Alvey, Jr." Fredericksburg occurred on the night of April 3, 1799. donations from Baltimore to Norfolk and It started on Charlotte Street, between distribute them to those in need. Princess Anne and Caroline streets, and Finally, the city began to take destroyed all the buildings on that block, more preventive actions, including including the office of theVirginia dividing the city into zones, appointing Herald. When the fire reached seven brick residents to patrol the streets to buildings on the east side of Caroline extinguish unsafe fires, and ensuring that Street, residents—presumably manning a enough water was kept on hand. bucket brigade—were able to control it. Nevertheless, buildings continued to be The worst fire in Fredericksburg’s constructed mostly of wood, and with history began at the home of William droughts and high winds common, many Stanard on the corner of Princess Anne more fires broke out. and Lewis Streets (later called the After a decade of fires in the “Shepherd House”) on October 19, 1807. 1820s that all started in wooden stables The family was already dealing with the and warehouses, people finally began death of Mr. Stanard, whose body lay in building even those structures out of brick repose in the parlor, when a fire broke and slate. Today, very few structures out. Quite possibly it was started by remain in the core of town that predate sparks in the chimney where food was 1830. being prepared for his funeral, although no one knows for certain. As the grieving family fled the Wendy Migdal is a freelance writer and history teacher for Spotsylvania County house, the flames spread quickly. Aided by who enjoys walking her dog in the a strong wind from the northwest and a historic district long drought, the fire soon engulfed the heart of the town. Making a bad situation even worse, many residents were not at home but watching the horse races just below town, in the location of the current National Cemetery. By the time people organized to fight the flames, the fire was a roaring blaze that had swept down the east side of Caroline Street and the west side of Sophia Street, down as far as George Street. The equipment belonging to the two fire companies was woefully inadequate, people began panicking, and before 4 hours had passed, much of the town lay in ruins. In the end, three entire blocks plus parts of two others were destroyed, including 45 homes and numerous stores and warehouses. Remarkably, no one died, but material losses were enormous. Many people were homeless and unable to save any possessions at all. Merchants lost their entire stock. A committee to aid the fire victims worked for years to collect

Local musicians like Laurie Rose Griffith and Peter Mealy perform in the o u t d o o r courtyard. Agora also features eclectic art by local artists and craftsmen. No wonder it's such When you step inside Agora Downtown Coffee Shop at 520 Caroline Street, you know there is something special about this place. It's one of the oldest buildings in Fredericksburg (1787). Here, dreams have been incubated; dreams realized. And it's still true to this day. Agora is best known as a thriving local business, combining a wonderful coffee shop, bakery, art gallery and used bookstore. Here, customers can grab a cup of coffee and a bite to eat, pick up an interesting book, and sit down to enjoy a good read. All of the books are for sale.

a popular place. Co-owner M.J. Stone explains that her father came up with the name "Agora". As a Greek word it means a community gathering place (The Agora was a public marketplace in ancient Athens). It also means "the present moment" in Portuguese. A perfect name, Agora Downtown Coffee Shop is where folks gather and experience being "in the moment". Besides serving excellent coffee, Agora has a liquor license. Popular drinks include White Russians, Irish Coffees, and the Black Mamba Mocha - a dark chocolate

mocha made with Caramel Bourbon Crème liquor. Yum! And if you're hungry, the kitchen features tasty homemade sandwiches and a wonderful array of baked goods including sweetbreads, macarons and cakes. With a passion for developing good-tasting food for people with dietary restrictions, co-owner Andi Stone, the head baker, is living her dream. The other visionary in this story is Elizabeth Lontz, who once restored 101 Fauquier Street. She dreamed of buying and renovating the old building at 520 Caroline Street, saying it reminded her of where she grew up as a little girl. Betty turned her dream into a reality. Financial help came from Virginia's Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit program and the Fredericksburg Tax Credit for Rehabilitated Property, keeping the costs manageable. In 2014, after renovation was complete, the building was sold to the current owners, and Agora opened for business in 2015. Agora sits on a continuum of history. The timber-framed, brick filled structure is built on a foundation of Rappahannock Freestone. Today, a large

By jon gerlach

plexiglass window in the front room lets you glimpse interesting details of how this building was constructed. Across the centuries the building saw various commercial and residential uses. Once the site of Elisha Dickinson's blacksmith shop, it was also a mercantile store for many years, selling groceries, hardware, furniture, household items and firearms, under proprietor Richard Johnston among others. Unlike some structures on Caroline Street, the building survived the Union artillery bombardment of December 11, 1862. A century later it was a barber shop. Happily, the barber pole conveyed with the building and can be seen in the front room today! So … what's in a dream? Vision, hard work … and success!

An attorney and retired archaeologist, Jon Gerlach chairs the Architectural Review Board in Fredericksburg. Artwork by Jon Gerlach

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

19


Wellness

Senior Care balancing high tech & high touch Dog Walking Pet Sitting Companion Play Time & Mini Furies, Too!

By Karl Karch

(540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “City PetSitting”

Everywhere you turn these days, there’s talk of automation replacing people. While a machine can perform a given task, often more efficiently than we can, it lacks the uniquely human ability to cater to the needs of the individual. For example, it’s dinnertime and what your senior parent is likely craving most is to share a favorite family meal with you! Research conducted for our company revealed that lack of companionship is the biggest mealtime challenge for seniors who live alone. For most, it’s not what’s on their plate but rather who’s sitting at the table with them. Many seniors want to relive a time around the dinner table when they shared their lives with people they loved most. The most common obstacles that prevent these seniors from sharing more meals are loved ones don’t have enough time or they live too far away. And now, technology presents another looming obstacle. The age wave is rolling in with an estimated 10,000 people in the U.S. turning 65 years old daily for the next 18 years. People are living longer and roughly 90% of them want to remain living at home for a longer period of time. The growth in the eldercare industry, desire to remain home, shortage of caregivers, transient society with children not living close to parents, shortage of medical professionals, and increasing cost of home care are creating tremendous incentives for technological solutions to eldercare caregiving. To some seniors, the idea of technology and smart devices can feel like "uninvited guests" in their homes. At the same time, these advancements provide seniors greater independence and create new opportunities for connection with family, friends and caregivers. It's essential to find the right balance of high tech and high touch to improve home care. Some things remain fundamental, and person-to-person communication will continue to be one of them. Just because

20

September 2018

the technology is available, doesn’t mean it’s always going to be the best option in every situation. Today, modern dictionary definitions focus on AI being a sub-field of computer science and how machines can imitate human intelligence (being humanlike rather than becoming human). The English Oxford Living Dictionary gives this definition: “The theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks normally requiring human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages.” The operative words to me are tasks and artificial. A few current solutions are: remote monitoring systems, wearable emergency response technology, telehealth/telemonitoring (email and video conferencing with medical professionals) services, and sensors and cameras in the home. These home care “task” solutions can be vital, but none replace the human values and shared experiences that only personal oneon-one relationships can provide. I am in the relationship business and know first-hand that people still make a difference. A smiley-face emoticon is cute, but it could never replace the grin and smiling eyes of a loved one. Humans, regardless of age, want to know that there is some person who cares enough about them to help and spend time with them. Technology helps us be more efficient but not necessarily happier. There’s something real and valuable about being with someone face-to-face that technology cannot replace. Let’s hope we never forget that metal and plastic are not a substitute for that special human touch. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Lack of Sleep Can Mimic ADD/ADHD

Are You... Sick & tired of being sick & tired?

By Wayne Whitley DDS may itself be a sleep disorder. If correct, this idea could fundamentally change the way ADD/ADHD is studied and treated. Sleep problems fall into three categories: insufficient sleep, insomnia and disordered breathing. All are common among young children. Some studies estimate that their prevalence might be as high as 20 to 40 percent in young children. Karen Bonuck, a There is not much difference professor of family and social medicine at between children and adults. Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New When adults get hungry and York, is known for her work on a 2012 tired we get cranky too. Most adults have the self-control not to throw a temper study of 11,000 children published in the journal Pediatrics. It found that those tantrum…well some do. When we cram our schedules and with snoring, mouth breathing or apnea are too busy, tired, and running out of (in which a person's breathing is energy, we lose focus and get easily interrupted during sleep) were 40 percent to 100 percent more likely than those distracted. Are children any different? You do not need to be a doctor without the sleep issues to have behaviors resembling ADHD by age 7. or psychiatrist to know when "There's a lot of children are perpetually ....growing number evidence that sleep is a tired, even a little bit, they of researchers are big factor in behavior in too lose focus and get easily proposing, many kids today children," Bonuck said. distracted. Any engaged simply aren't getting the Previous studies have parent will tell you that sleep they need, leading to shown that about 75 from experience. However, many challenging behaviors that percent of people with ADHD have sleep doctors and parents are too mimic ADD/ADHD.... disturbances and that easily persuaded to label the less sleep they get the that sweet nocturnal deprived more severe the symptoms. child with Attention Deficit Disorder WHAT IF your child or a child (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity you loved could improve their behavior Disorder (ADHD). with better quality sleep? WHAT IF, as a growing number of WHAT IF their sleep was disrupted by their researchers are proposing, many kids today simply aren't getting the sleep they tongue blocking their airway, thus causing need, leading to challenging behaviors sleep apena, snoring and inhibiting sound sleep? that mimic ADD/ADHD? I have created a simple, This is a finding according to comfortable mouth piece that re-aligns researcher Sandra Kooij of the Vrije the tongue to get the tongue out of the University Medical Centre in Amsterdam. That provocative and way so the child breathes optimally while controversial theory has been gaining sleeping. WHAT IF a good sleep night after momentum in recent years, with several night after night was all your child needed studies suggesting strong links between to improve their behavior? ADD/ADHD and the length, timing and quality of sleep. Growing evidence suggests that a segment of children with ADD/ADHD are misdiagnosed and actually suffer from insufficient sleep, insomnia, obstructed breathing or another known sleep disorder. But the most paradigmchallenging idea may be that ADD/ADHD

Visit Dr. Whitley's website, www.drwaynewhitley.com 2501 Princess Anne St (540) 993-1091

Having sleep problems? Constantly clearing your throat? Hypersensitive? Panicky? Sore Neck & Back? Anxious? Depressed? Fatigued? Morning Brain Fog? Oral System Balancing –OSBcould be just what you need Visit www.drwaynewhitley.com & watch amazing video testimonies Call for a FREE consultation Dr. Wayne Whitley 540-847-1935

Donate to a Cancer Organization

ble at Availa n.com Amazo

Helping homeless children and families in City of Fredericksburg, Counties of Caroline, Stafford & Spotsylvania 540 371 0831 front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

21


Wellness

Senior Care balancing high tech & high touch Dog Walking Pet Sitting Companion Play Time & Mini Furies, Too!

By Karl Karch

(540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “City PetSitting”

Everywhere you turn these days, there’s talk of automation replacing people. While a machine can perform a given task, often more efficiently than we can, it lacks the uniquely human ability to cater to the needs of the individual. For example, it’s dinnertime and what your senior parent is likely craving most is to share a favorite family meal with you! Research conducted for our company revealed that lack of companionship is the biggest mealtime challenge for seniors who live alone. For most, it’s not what’s on their plate but rather who’s sitting at the table with them. Many seniors want to relive a time around the dinner table when they shared their lives with people they loved most. The most common obstacles that prevent these seniors from sharing more meals are loved ones don’t have enough time or they live too far away. And now, technology presents another looming obstacle. The age wave is rolling in with an estimated 10,000 people in the U.S. turning 65 years old daily for the next 18 years. People are living longer and roughly 90% of them want to remain living at home for a longer period of time. The growth in the eldercare industry, desire to remain home, shortage of caregivers, transient society with children not living close to parents, shortage of medical professionals, and increasing cost of home care are creating tremendous incentives for technological solutions to eldercare caregiving. To some seniors, the idea of technology and smart devices can feel like "uninvited guests" in their homes. At the same time, these advancements provide seniors greater independence and create new opportunities for connection with family, friends and caregivers. It's essential to find the right balance of high tech and high touch to improve home care. Some things remain fundamental, and person-to-person communication will continue to be one of them. Just because

20

September 2018

the technology is available, doesn’t mean it’s always going to be the best option in every situation. Today, modern dictionary definitions focus on AI being a sub-field of computer science and how machines can imitate human intelligence (being humanlike rather than becoming human). The English Oxford Living Dictionary gives this definition: “The theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks normally requiring human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages.” The operative words to me are tasks and artificial. A few current solutions are: remote monitoring systems, wearable emergency response technology, telehealth/telemonitoring (email and video conferencing with medical professionals) services, and sensors and cameras in the home. These home care “task” solutions can be vital, but none replace the human values and shared experiences that only personal oneon-one relationships can provide. I am in the relationship business and know first-hand that people still make a difference. A smiley-face emoticon is cute, but it could never replace the grin and smiling eyes of a loved one. Humans, regardless of age, want to know that there is some person who cares enough about them to help and spend time with them. Technology helps us be more efficient but not necessarily happier. There’s something real and valuable about being with someone face-to-face that technology cannot replace. Let’s hope we never forget that metal and plastic are not a substitute for that special human touch. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Lack of Sleep Can Mimic ADD/ADHD

Are You... Sick & tired of being sick & tired?

By Wayne Whitley DDS may itself be a sleep disorder. If correct, this idea could fundamentally change the way ADD/ADHD is studied and treated. Sleep problems fall into three categories: insufficient sleep, insomnia and disordered breathing. All are common among young children. Some studies estimate that their prevalence might be as high as 20 to 40 percent in young children. Karen Bonuck, a There is not much difference professor of family and social medicine at between children and adults. Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New When adults get hungry and York, is known for her work on a 2012 tired we get cranky too. Most adults have the self-control not to throw a temper study of 11,000 children published in the journal Pediatrics. It found that those tantrum…well some do. When we cram our schedules and with snoring, mouth breathing or apnea are too busy, tired, and running out of (in which a person's breathing is energy, we lose focus and get easily interrupted during sleep) were 40 percent to 100 percent more likely than those distracted. Are children any different? You do not need to be a doctor without the sleep issues to have behaviors resembling ADHD by age 7. or psychiatrist to know when "There's a lot of children are perpetually ....growing number evidence that sleep is a tired, even a little bit, they of researchers are big factor in behavior in too lose focus and get easily proposing, many kids today children," Bonuck said. distracted. Any engaged simply aren't getting the Previous studies have parent will tell you that sleep they need, leading to shown that about 75 from experience. However, many challenging behaviors that percent of people with ADHD have sleep doctors and parents are too mimic ADD/ADHD.... disturbances and that easily persuaded to label the less sleep they get the that sweet nocturnal deprived more severe the symptoms. child with Attention Deficit Disorder WHAT IF your child or a child (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity you loved could improve their behavior Disorder (ADHD). with better quality sleep? WHAT IF, as a growing number of WHAT IF their sleep was disrupted by their researchers are proposing, many kids today simply aren't getting the sleep they tongue blocking their airway, thus causing need, leading to challenging behaviors sleep apena, snoring and inhibiting sound sleep? that mimic ADD/ADHD? I have created a simple, This is a finding according to comfortable mouth piece that re-aligns researcher Sandra Kooij of the Vrije the tongue to get the tongue out of the University Medical Centre in Amsterdam. That provocative and way so the child breathes optimally while controversial theory has been gaining sleeping. WHAT IF a good sleep night after momentum in recent years, with several night after night was all your child needed studies suggesting strong links between to improve their behavior? ADD/ADHD and the length, timing and quality of sleep. Growing evidence suggests that a segment of children with ADD/ADHD are misdiagnosed and actually suffer from insufficient sleep, insomnia, obstructed breathing or another known sleep disorder. But the most paradigmchallenging idea may be that ADD/ADHD

Visit Dr. Whitley's website, www.drwaynewhitley.com 2501 Princess Anne St (540) 993-1091

Having sleep problems? Constantly clearing your throat? Hypersensitive? Panicky? Sore Neck & Back? Anxious? Depressed? Fatigued? Morning Brain Fog? Oral System Balancing –OSBcould be just what you need Visit www.drwaynewhitley.com & watch amazing video testimonies Call for a FREE consultation Dr. Wayne Whitley 540-847-1935

Donate to a Cancer Organization

ble at Availa n.com Amazo

Helping homeless children and families in City of Fredericksburg, Counties of Caroline, Stafford & Spotsylvania 540 371 0831 front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

21


Emancipated Patients

Life in Motion

redemption on Caroline Street

Training the fall!

By Patrick Neustatter, MD

I’m tempted to lead with some bad joke, like Christian Zammas is exchanging hard drugs for soft. But it’s true. He has gone from using hard drugs to peddling soft one(s) - caffeine. All brought about by a sort of epiphany that has motivated him to gather up people with the same failings and help them be empowered, through the Katora Institute.

Eavesdropping on His Addiction Story I heard him telling a mutual friend his story, at his shop one day, which fit the bill of something medical and something local. But more than that this is a motivational story worth bringing to the readers of Front Porch – and all those other people who are not informed enough to be readers. Christian Zammas’ story of involvement with drugs started at the tender age of 11 he told me, when I

followed up on my idea, and we sat at one of the tables outside Katora Coffee shop at 615 Caroline Street. Him with his tattoos, scraggly short beard, restless manner, smoking cigarettes and greeting, and chatting with, every passer by. It was alcohol and marijuana at first. Then a seminal moment when he was age 14 and having a panic attack at the mall (“I didn’t want to shop”) his mum gave him a Xanax. “It calmed me down completely. I was fascinated with that.” He then proceeded to “swipe them from her” and took them pretty regularly for about 3 weeks, then went in to withdrawal.

“Progress” to Hard Drugs He then moved on to pain medicines like Vicodin or Percocet, that he stole from his father who had cancer, that his dentist prescribed him, or he bought on the street for about $5 a pill.

With further “progress” he went to shooting up Heroin, or stuff called Krocodil – a synthetic morphine/heroin compound manufactured from codeine (often in Russia where codeine can be bought over the counter) and contains ?chlorocodide – hence the name. This has many impurities and caused massive necrosis of his arm around the vein, such that he nearly lost it – now he has a ferocious looking scar instead. He had a busy job cooking in a restaurant and found taking narcotics “gave me motivation” and he liked the high of shooting up that “was like being dipped in a tub of hot chocolate and sunshine.” But I was “spending every dime” he told me, and was very afraid of the intensive flue like symptoms you get with withdrawal. His life was falling apart. He went in to treatment where he was living in North Carolina, but repeatedly relapsed – one time nearly dying of an overdose. “It took three Naloxone hits to save me” – because he didn’t realize his tolerance had changed. In desperation, he followed his ex and their two kids to Fredericksburg where he was taken in by the Thurman Brisben Shelter and got hooked up with the Family Counseling Center for Recovery, where he goes and is on maintenance methadone.

Salvation for Him and Others He has met a new lady - April Sayler – and they have opened Katora Coffee. But more than that they have founded the Katora Institue of Higher Living, providing a “lifestyle education epicenter” to help people “find and nurture their own sense of purpose” running, and working on, an organic farm, with plans for a “garden-to-table” restaurant.

By Rich Gaudio PT

Christian’s is an inspiring story. I would urge you, if you need some soft drugs, give him your support by going to Katora.

Medical Footnote: As a doctor, there are features of Christian’s story that interest me. Opiates are his “drug of choice.” They quell his discomforts and make him feel good. “I can do cocaine all day long and never get addicted” he notes. It seems people have characteristics that are soothed by a certain type of drug, and these are very specific - and thus what they are likely to get addicted to. Shooting up drugs intravenously is very dangerous. There’s no going back and there’s no filter for impurities unlike snorting, swallowing or inhaling. Tolerance to opiates is massively variable. A major downside is that you become tolerant to them and need more, the more you use them. But many people die of overdose if they’ve stopped for a while, because they don’t realize their tolerance has dropped with abstinence. Prescription drugs can be a gateway to illicit drug use – causing all kinds of problems for doctors and pain patients as the DEA, the CDC and others impose draconian regulations. But often it is not genuine patients that are diverting to the illicit market. New synthetic products like Krokodil, fentanyl and car-fentanyl are very much more potent at suppressing your respiratory center – so you are far more likely to OD and die.

These days there are all kinds of training for interested persons. There is training for various sports and in the military. Many careers now require not only an initial training, but ongoing education and training leading to the accumulation of many certificates and specialties. Recreationally, people train in all sorts of ways; people train their dogs to walk leisurely around town, some practice flipping monster-truck tires and appear on American Ninja Warrior! People train to scuba dive, others train to rock climb, some even train to train others! One area in which there appears to be a dearth of good, quality training is

in the arena of falling…yes, you read correctly, falling. Now, before you move on to the next column dear reader, please be aware that I’ve seen the eye rolls and heard from all the naysayers and smart-alecs, “Gravity still works….I don’t need to train to fall, I fall all the time, without even trying….” But, as you will find below, I believe there is something to be gained by training to fall. Falling is an incredibly common (not popular, but common) activity for Americans who are 65 years old and older. According to the most recent information from the CDC, “Each year [in the US], millions of older people—those 65 and older—fall. In fact, more than one out of four older people falls each year, but less than half tell their doctor. Falling once

doubles your chances of falling again.” Over the past 10-15 years that number has held steady at 1/4 to 1/3 of the senior population. That means we have, on average, 12-16 million of those older Americans falling each year. Those 12-16 million falls result in the United States spending over $30 billion (yes, Billion…with a ‘B!’) in healthcare costs each year. These numbers continue to grow, despite the best efforts of my colleagues and other health professionals to educate the nation on fall risk and to help folks 65 and older to improve their balance and prevent falls. In the field of physical therapy, as in other health and wellness related fields, we have spent a lot of time and resource teaching folks how to get up from a fall and on how to minimize or prevent falls. Very few clinicians spend time training folks to fall. So, what is the call to action? What am I getting at? Simply this. I believe that American adults in the middle adulthood years (40-mid-60’s) should

begin to incorporate fall training into their regular exercise routines. The falls that tend to create the most damage and greatest cost are usually those that are sudden and unanticipated, so there is little time to think. Training helps us build motor memory that responds out of habit and practice…faster than we can think. If 1/3 of seniors 65 and older fall every year regardless of how well they are trained in prevention and recovery, then maybe it is time to integrate some strategies for falling and add this skill to the set?! If you are in middle adulthood or just starting your late adulthood and you are interested in integrating fall training into your exercise program, please let me know at info@fusionpta.com and we will contact you about any future class(es) we develop to address this issue!

Rich Gaudio is the PT Clinic Operator at Fusion Physical Therapy. Rich can be reached at www.facebook.com/FusionPTSpotsy/, . (540) 710-0100

Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic. Katora Coffee Shop 615 Caroline St Katora Institue of Higher Living katoracoffee.com/katorainstitute/katora-iinstitute-o of-h higherliving-k kihl/

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com 22

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

23


Emancipated Patients

Life in Motion

redemption on Caroline Street

Training the fall!

By Patrick Neustatter, MD

I’m tempted to lead with some bad joke, like Christian Zammas is exchanging hard drugs for soft. But it’s true. He has gone from using hard drugs to peddling soft one(s) - caffeine. All brought about by a sort of epiphany that has motivated him to gather up people with the same failings and help them be empowered, through the Katora Institute.

Eavesdropping on His Addiction Story I heard him telling a mutual friend his story, at his shop one day, which fit the bill of something medical and something local. But more than that this is a motivational story worth bringing to the readers of Front Porch – and all those other people who are not informed enough to be readers. Christian Zammas’ story of involvement with drugs started at the tender age of 11 he told me, when I

followed up on my idea, and we sat at one of the tables outside Katora Coffee shop at 615 Caroline Street. Him with his tattoos, scraggly short beard, restless manner, smoking cigarettes and greeting, and chatting with, every passer by. It was alcohol and marijuana at first. Then a seminal moment when he was age 14 and having a panic attack at the mall (“I didn’t want to shop”) his mum gave him a Xanax. “It calmed me down completely. I was fascinated with that.” He then proceeded to “swipe them from her” and took them pretty regularly for about 3 weeks, then went in to withdrawal.

“Progress” to Hard Drugs He then moved on to pain medicines like Vicodin or Percocet, that he stole from his father who had cancer, that his dentist prescribed him, or he bought on the street for about $5 a pill.

With further “progress” he went to shooting up Heroin, or stuff called Krocodil – a synthetic morphine/heroin compound manufactured from codeine (often in Russia where codeine can be bought over the counter) and contains ?chlorocodide – hence the name. This has many impurities and caused massive necrosis of his arm around the vein, such that he nearly lost it – now he has a ferocious looking scar instead. He had a busy job cooking in a restaurant and found taking narcotics “gave me motivation” and he liked the high of shooting up that “was like being dipped in a tub of hot chocolate and sunshine.” But I was “spending every dime” he told me, and was very afraid of the intensive flue like symptoms you get with withdrawal. His life was falling apart. He went in to treatment where he was living in North Carolina, but repeatedly relapsed – one time nearly dying of an overdose. “It took three Naloxone hits to save me” – because he didn’t realize his tolerance had changed. In desperation, he followed his ex and their two kids to Fredericksburg where he was taken in by the Thurman Brisben Shelter and got hooked up with the Family Counseling Center for Recovery, where he goes and is on maintenance methadone.

Salvation for Him and Others He has met a new lady - April Sayler – and they have opened Katora Coffee. But more than that they have founded the Katora Institue of Higher Living, providing a “lifestyle education epicenter” to help people “find and nurture their own sense of purpose” running, and working on, an organic farm, with plans for a “garden-to-table” restaurant.

By Rich Gaudio PT

Christian’s is an inspiring story. I would urge you, if you need some soft drugs, give him your support by going to Katora.

Medical Footnote: As a doctor, there are features of Christian’s story that interest me. Opiates are his “drug of choice.” They quell his discomforts and make him feel good. “I can do cocaine all day long and never get addicted” he notes. It seems people have characteristics that are soothed by a certain type of drug, and these are very specific - and thus what they are likely to get addicted to. Shooting up drugs intravenously is very dangerous. There’s no going back and there’s no filter for impurities unlike snorting, swallowing or inhaling. Tolerance to opiates is massively variable. A major downside is that you become tolerant to them and need more, the more you use them. But many people die of overdose if they’ve stopped for a while, because they don’t realize their tolerance has dropped with abstinence. Prescription drugs can be a gateway to illicit drug use – causing all kinds of problems for doctors and pain patients as the DEA, the CDC and others impose draconian regulations. But often it is not genuine patients that are diverting to the illicit market. New synthetic products like Krokodil, fentanyl and car-fentanyl are very much more potent at suppressing your respiratory center – so you are far more likely to OD and die.

These days there are all kinds of training for interested persons. There is training for various sports and in the military. Many careers now require not only an initial training, but ongoing education and training leading to the accumulation of many certificates and specialties. Recreationally, people train in all sorts of ways; people train their dogs to walk leisurely around town, some practice flipping monster-truck tires and appear on American Ninja Warrior! People train to scuba dive, others train to rock climb, some even train to train others! One area in which there appears to be a dearth of good, quality training is

in the arena of falling…yes, you read correctly, falling. Now, before you move on to the next column dear reader, please be aware that I’ve seen the eye rolls and heard from all the naysayers and smart-alecs, “Gravity still works….I don’t need to train to fall, I fall all the time, without even trying….” But, as you will find below, I believe there is something to be gained by training to fall. Falling is an incredibly common (not popular, but common) activity for Americans who are 65 years old and older. According to the most recent information from the CDC, “Each year [in the US], millions of older people—those 65 and older—fall. In fact, more than one out of four older people falls each year, but less than half tell their doctor. Falling once

doubles your chances of falling again.” Over the past 10-15 years that number has held steady at 1/4 to 1/3 of the senior population. That means we have, on average, 12-16 million of those older Americans falling each year. Those 12-16 million falls result in the United States spending over $30 billion (yes, Billion…with a ‘B!’) in healthcare costs each year. These numbers continue to grow, despite the best efforts of my colleagues and other health professionals to educate the nation on fall risk and to help folks 65 and older to improve their balance and prevent falls. In the field of physical therapy, as in other health and wellness related fields, we have spent a lot of time and resource teaching folks how to get up from a fall and on how to minimize or prevent falls. Very few clinicians spend time training folks to fall. So, what is the call to action? What am I getting at? Simply this. I believe that American adults in the middle adulthood years (40-mid-60’s) should

begin to incorporate fall training into their regular exercise routines. The falls that tend to create the most damage and greatest cost are usually those that are sudden and unanticipated, so there is little time to think. Training helps us build motor memory that responds out of habit and practice…faster than we can think. If 1/3 of seniors 65 and older fall every year regardless of how well they are trained in prevention and recovery, then maybe it is time to integrate some strategies for falling and add this skill to the set?! If you are in middle adulthood or just starting your late adulthood and you are interested in integrating fall training into your exercise program, please let me know at info@fusionpta.com and we will contact you about any future class(es) we develop to address this issue!

Rich Gaudio is the PT Clinic Operator at Fusion Physical Therapy. Rich can be reached at www.facebook.com/FusionPTSpotsy/, . (540) 710-0100

Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic. Katora Coffee Shop 615 Caroline St Katora Institue of Higher Living katoracoffee.com/katorainstitute/katora-iinstitute-o of-h higherliving-k kihl/

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com 22

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

23


Fred Book Fest

Classic In Comfort & Style

Book are Back, Bigger & Better!

of fredericksburg

Tom

By A.E. Bayne

of directors where he also serves as Secretary. Here is what he has to say:

723 Caroline St 899.8077 Daily 10-5:30 Sunday 12-5

Mark your calendars for the 3rd Annual Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival. This year’s festival will be held on Saturday, September 29th, at Old Mill Park, between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Meet regional authors, browse genres, enjoy family-oriented activities and partake of some of the area’s finest culinary food truck and beverage options. The Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival was launched three years ago by organizing partners James Noll, Amy Bayne, and Chris Jones (above). Noll had long envisioned a local festival to rival the experiences he had had while vending his own books at larger events in Gaithersburg and NOVA. Bayne, a writer and publisher of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review, introduced Noll to Jones in 2015. With his involvement in a number of freelance writing-related, editorial and media projects, Jones was excited about the opportunities a regional festival would offer. The three organized the first FiBF event in 2016. Noll says, “The Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival is an excellent way for self-published and hybrid authors to market their work to a variety of people, all of whom are voracious readers, for why else would they attend a book festival if they weren't interested in finding new worlds and voices to experience?” FiBF has expanded exponentially, seeing a few hundred attendees in 2016 grow to nearly 2,000 in 2017. With the increase in vendor interest and consumer foot traffic, the partners decided to move FiBF to the larger site at Old Mill Park for 2018. “I’m most excited this year about being at Old Mill Park,” Jones says. “It’s an open space that will draw more people and allow our authors some room to engage new readers.” Additionally, Juan More Taco food truck and Spencer Devon Brewery

24

September 2018

will join returning vendor UFO Food Truck and originating sponsor Agora Downtown Coffee Shop to keep festival attendees well-fed and hydrated. “Having new sponsors like Juan More Taco and Spencer Devon take part in this year’s Festival along side our longterm sponsors like Agora, Front Porch and Fred Parent give added dimension. It becomes a bona fide celebration of reading and lit when you combine books, beer, and food,” notes Jones. English teacher Yarixa Morales traveled from Woodbridge to attend last year’s Festival with her husband and friends. She says, “The Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival was amazing! We took two of my historian friends and they were impressed by the variety of books the Festival had that fed their hunger for everything history-related. Honestly, there were so many authors, and so many books, that there wasn’t one genre you could miss. Hands down, a great family event. Everyone should attend; I highly recommend it!” Visit the Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival website for information on authors, genres, sponsors, and day-of events. Central Rappahannock Regional Library and the Children’s Museum of Richmond will be there with family-friendly reading and exploratory activities. There are a few tables left for vendors, which can be purchased on the website through Eventbrite. www.fredbookfest.com A.E. Bayne is the publisher of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review and is an organizing partner for the Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival. Photo by Elizabeth Jones FXBG Independent Book Festival September 29th, at Old Mill Park, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m

Front porch fredericksburg

Name This House

Stories

Tom has been at attorney in Fredericksburg since 1965 and recently retired in 2014. He is Trinity Episcopal Church's representative to Micah's board

Supporting Non-Profits Since 1997

"Micah has done wonders for me personally. I'm being selfish when I say that it really has changed me as far as how I looked at homelessness and more importantly how I looked at homeless people. Before Micah, I would tend to see a homeless person and feel sorry for that person. My response to that feeling was to throw money- you know 'here's a buck'…or maybe even; 'I could go get you a donut and a cup of coffee'…without any regard to what Micah could do. Then I got involved in Micah. In looking at homelessness and the people who are subjected to it, I had a 180 degree turn-around. I suddenly just realized 'I really have been looking at this the wrong way…lets just do more than throw money at it.' When I got to Micah I was overwhelmed at what Micah does in attacking health issues (mental and physical), employment problems, aiding people in recovery from substance abuse (alcohol and drugs) and trying to get them educated. We have a lot to do because homelessness has got to be nonreoccurring. Streamlining the process of getting homeless people off the street and into a house is quite a process…that's Micah's challenge."

Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness & identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540-4794116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

win downtown gift certificate

Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

Last Month’s House: 1114 Charles Street The Winner of a gift certificate from Roxbury Farm & Garden Center is Raymond Polcha Old, With Many Secrets To Unfold Ah yes,we've met before, you were younger, as were those,who lived within your walls.. Brick walls bordering the stables, of her childhood home she said to me, her white hair a misty shadow, behind her cigarette smoke. Just by chance our lives entwined, for just a moment or two. She old, I was still young, two journeys to unfold. I look through the smoke of the years, at the Sunken Tavern next door, it so close to you and yet, it has kept its youthful laughter, you have succumbed to time. The little blonde girl,hair turned to white, I glimpsed for a moment within your walls, the little girl who rode her pony, from your sturdy steps. She still weeps for her lost love, when she was only ten, and he lived way up the hill at Idlewild. He awaits on the mansions porch on the hill, listening for the clip-clop sound, of her pony's hooves, still.

“Polishing the Edges” Oil Painting by Lynn Abbott 810 Artists: Beverley Coates, Watercolorist Penny A. Parrish, Photographer Lynn Abbott, Oil Painter Daily 10 to 6.

Artist on site Saturdays

540.371.4099

810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

25


Fred Book Fest

Classic In Comfort & Style

Book are Back, Bigger & Better!

of fredericksburg

Tom

By A.E. Bayne

of directors where he also serves as Secretary. Here is what he has to say:

723 Caroline St 899.8077 Daily 10-5:30 Sunday 12-5

Mark your calendars for the 3rd Annual Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival. This year’s festival will be held on Saturday, September 29th, at Old Mill Park, between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Meet regional authors, browse genres, enjoy family-oriented activities and partake of some of the area’s finest culinary food truck and beverage options. The Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival was launched three years ago by organizing partners James Noll, Amy Bayne, and Chris Jones (above). Noll had long envisioned a local festival to rival the experiences he had had while vending his own books at larger events in Gaithersburg and NOVA. Bayne, a writer and publisher of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review, introduced Noll to Jones in 2015. With his involvement in a number of freelance writing-related, editorial and media projects, Jones was excited about the opportunities a regional festival would offer. The three organized the first FiBF event in 2016. Noll says, “The Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival is an excellent way for self-published and hybrid authors to market their work to a variety of people, all of whom are voracious readers, for why else would they attend a book festival if they weren't interested in finding new worlds and voices to experience?” FiBF has expanded exponentially, seeing a few hundred attendees in 2016 grow to nearly 2,000 in 2017. With the increase in vendor interest and consumer foot traffic, the partners decided to move FiBF to the larger site at Old Mill Park for 2018. “I’m most excited this year about being at Old Mill Park,” Jones says. “It’s an open space that will draw more people and allow our authors some room to engage new readers.” Additionally, Juan More Taco food truck and Spencer Devon Brewery

24

September 2018

will join returning vendor UFO Food Truck and originating sponsor Agora Downtown Coffee Shop to keep festival attendees well-fed and hydrated. “Having new sponsors like Juan More Taco and Spencer Devon take part in this year’s Festival along side our longterm sponsors like Agora, Front Porch and Fred Parent give added dimension. It becomes a bona fide celebration of reading and lit when you combine books, beer, and food,” notes Jones. English teacher Yarixa Morales traveled from Woodbridge to attend last year’s Festival with her husband and friends. She says, “The Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival was amazing! We took two of my historian friends and they were impressed by the variety of books the Festival had that fed their hunger for everything history-related. Honestly, there were so many authors, and so many books, that there wasn’t one genre you could miss. Hands down, a great family event. Everyone should attend; I highly recommend it!” Visit the Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival website for information on authors, genres, sponsors, and day-of events. Central Rappahannock Regional Library and the Children’s Museum of Richmond will be there with family-friendly reading and exploratory activities. There are a few tables left for vendors, which can be purchased on the website through Eventbrite. www.fredbookfest.com A.E. Bayne is the publisher of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review and is an organizing partner for the Fredericksburg Independent Book Festival. Photo by Elizabeth Jones FXBG Independent Book Festival September 29th, at Old Mill Park, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m

Front porch fredericksburg

Name This House

Stories

Tom has been at attorney in Fredericksburg since 1965 and recently retired in 2014. He is Trinity Episcopal Church's representative to Micah's board

Supporting Non-Profits Since 1997

"Micah has done wonders for me personally. I'm being selfish when I say that it really has changed me as far as how I looked at homelessness and more importantly how I looked at homeless people. Before Micah, I would tend to see a homeless person and feel sorry for that person. My response to that feeling was to throw money- you know 'here's a buck'…or maybe even; 'I could go get you a donut and a cup of coffee'…without any regard to what Micah could do. Then I got involved in Micah. In looking at homelessness and the people who are subjected to it, I had a 180 degree turn-around. I suddenly just realized 'I really have been looking at this the wrong way…lets just do more than throw money at it.' When I got to Micah I was overwhelmed at what Micah does in attacking health issues (mental and physical), employment problems, aiding people in recovery from substance abuse (alcohol and drugs) and trying to get them educated. We have a lot to do because homelessness has got to be nonreoccurring. Streamlining the process of getting homeless people off the street and into a house is quite a process…that's Micah's challenge."

Submitted by Micah Ecumenical Ministries, a Christ-Centered Community supporting people experiencing chronic homelessness & identifying pathways to sustainable housing. Contact 540-4794116; www.dolovewalk.net; facebook

win downtown gift certificate

Identify this mystery house and you could win a gift certificate from a downtown merchant. Here’s how: Email frntprch@aol.com, Subject: mystery house, Identify house address, Your name, address, email. The poem below is a hint of the location of the mystery house. Good Luck!

Last Month’s House: 1114 Charles Street The Winner of a gift certificate from Roxbury Farm & Garden Center is Raymond Polcha Old, With Many Secrets To Unfold Ah yes,we've met before, you were younger, as were those,who lived within your walls.. Brick walls bordering the stables, of her childhood home she said to me, her white hair a misty shadow, behind her cigarette smoke. Just by chance our lives entwined, for just a moment or two. She old, I was still young, two journeys to unfold. I look through the smoke of the years, at the Sunken Tavern next door, it so close to you and yet, it has kept its youthful laughter, you have succumbed to time. The little blonde girl,hair turned to white, I glimpsed for a moment within your walls, the little girl who rode her pony, from your sturdy steps. She still weeps for her lost love, when she was only ten, and he lived way up the hill at Idlewild. He awaits on the mansions porch on the hill, listening for the clip-clop sound, of her pony's hooves, still.

“Polishing the Edges” Oil Painting by Lynn Abbott 810 Artists: Beverley Coates, Watercolorist Penny A. Parrish, Photographer Lynn Abbott, Oil Painter Daily 10 to 6.

Artist on site Saturdays

540.371.4099

810 Caroline Street, Downtown Fredericksburg front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

25


Art in the Burg “Finding It All” Original Photography by Sheila Jones Art First Gallery Art First Gallery in historic downtown Fredericksburg is delighted to present featured artist Sheila Jones in "Finding it All" where the well-known local photographer experiments with drone photography while also continuing her traditional photography. Any profit from the sale of Jones’ photography will be donated to Law Enforcement United, an organization composed of active and retired law enforcement officers and family members of officers who have died in the line of duty which supports "Concerns of Police Survivors" and "The Officers Down Memorial Page." Jones is also active in helping bring art to area youth. Finding It All Opening Reception: First Friday, September 7, 2018, 6 - 9p.m. Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline St ~Casey Shaw

“One Afternoon”, Cheryl Sutton,

Fredericksburg Photography Club Exhibit at CRRL Sept 4 - 27 Fredericksburg Photography Club will exhibit 52 photographs in the atrium of the Central Rapphannock Regional Library on Caroline Street Fredericksburg Photography Club got its start 30 years ago when small group of photographers formed the club to expand their knowledge and share their

expertise and their work with other photographers.

(600 Block thru 1000 Block) and William Street between Sophia Street and Princess Anne Street (100 block thru 300 block). New for this year's festivities, a block party concert will be held immediately following the Artist Reception, hosted by Sammy T's Restaurant at 801 Caroline Street. The adjoining portion of Hanover Street will be closed off to form a beer garden and concert stage. Fredericksburg's homegrown street brass band Elby Brass will headline from 8:30-10 PM, supported by local Americana favorites Cabin Creek from 7-8 PM. The block party is open to the public. Admission is free and all ages are welcome. ~Gabe Pons

www.fbgphotoclub.com; a Facebook page, Fredericksburg Photography Club" ~Norma Woodward

"Unfrozen" Artwork by Stacy Gaglio Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline St "Unfrozen." featuring sites and scenes from the Fredericksburg area, Stacy's acrylic paintings display a blend of her talents. Using the graphic skills she honed through her studies at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, she uses bold lines and blocks of color that capture the interplay of light and shadow on architecture, while she portrays her subjects with a unique hallmark style that conveys personality and often a touch of whimsy. Stacy will donate a portion of the proceeds from this show to Empowerhouse. The title of the "Unfrozen" exhibit connotes both the threshold to a new stage in Stacy's life as well as the way in which her artwork breathes life into buildings that are vestiges of an era of yesteryear. "My favorite subjects to draw and paint are buildings, homes, and old signage. I love things that were once beautiful and bustling but are now unused and forgotten," she said. "For me, the process of bringing a @CRRL subject back to life through art is inspiring." Those who are enchanted by Stacy's architectural paintings will be happy to know that she is currently focusing on custom house and building portraits. The exhibit will be displayed from September 3 through September 30 and visitors will have an opportunity to meet and chat with Stacy at our opening reception on "First Friday" September 7, from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm. Visit Brush Strokes Gallery at 824 Caroline

“Winter in Round Lake”, Stacy Gaglio Street, open daily from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm to see a new display by member artists including hand crafted jewelry, unique glass art, charcoal drawings, photography, and original fine art paintings in all media.

Art on the Vine @Art Alliance 100 Taylor St, Colonial Beach The Artists' Alliance (AA) at Jarrett Thor Fine Arts is participating in the Art on the Vine event, sponsored by the Northern Neck Artisan Trail, on Saturday, September 8th. Painter Vick Marckel will be at the gallery all day, demonstrating painting techniques used by the old masters including creating a grisaille, adding glaze, and altering composition design. Vicki will also be showing her portfolio of wine paintings. ~Rob Rudick

7th Annual Art Attack Sept. 22 Local artists taking it to the streets! Main Event 10 AM – 4 PM Block Party Concert at Sammy T's 7 PM – 10 PM Art Attack Fredericksburg is an annual grassroots event that gets folks out of the studio and into the city's streets. By collectively making art in public, participants get to meet fellow artists, share their creative process, and celebrate the local arts community. It's free to participate and artists of all stripes join in, spending the day painting, drawing, and sculpting on the streets of Historic Downtown Fredericksburg. “Grant’s Pier”, Vick Marckel Artists will be on their tour of duty throughout the Caroline St corridor between Amelia and Wolfe Street

THE POETRY MAN

Down Home Ball What to Wear…What to Wear…What to Where???

- By Frank Fratoe

Pavement Art Sunshine in the afternoon flashes under a cloudbank to disclose chalk-pictures artists draw on Sophia St. cordoned off one Saturday until raindrops bear down and people begin to scurry. For a storm verging slowly has finally reached town and artisans now break out thin-plastic and duct-tape to guard their workmanship as drizzle throbs harder threatening asphalt canvas. Onlookers run to shelter while a downpour ensues and art-supplies tumble quickly along the roadway overridden by a nor’easter blending diverse imagery of watercolors in the rain. Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 10 years.

By Rim Vining If being a follower of fashion is not your strong suit but letting it all hang out for an evening of food, fun, music and dancing appeals to your tastes let me suggest an opportunity you won’t want to miss. The 22 nd Annual Down Home Ball… the area’s Most Elegant Hoedown. Saturday October 6th Roxbury Home & Garden on Lafayette Blvd will once again host the best night out Fredericksburg has to offer. This annual event is a family friendly fundraiser in support of Downtown Greens… your Community Greenspace. The night kicks off at 6PM and runs until 10:00 with activities for the young and the young at heart. Food is provided through donations from local restaurants and folks in the community. Relaxing beverages of wine and craft beer are available at a cash bar and live music gets everyone out on the dance floor. Tickets are $30.00 in advance and $35.00 at the door. They are available at Roxbury Farm & Garden, Riverby Books and Liberty Town Arts. You can also purchase them on-line through www.downtowngreens.org

But what to wear? Actually the more outrageous the better from the traditional elegance of tuxedos and formals paired with cowboy boots and garden clogs to some creative combination of bib-overalls with satin & silk. Just make sure it is something you can talk in, laugh in and dance in. Ah the dancing! A fair fall evening among friends with just a snip of the waning moon. Downtown Greens is a local non-profit that maintains almost three acres at the corner of Charles and Dixon Streets in Fredericksburg. The gardens are open daylight to dusk all year long and offer a sanctuary in this growing city landscape. The space is maintained with volunteers and managed with a small but amazing staff. The programs offered for the community include a Youth Garden Club, Bee Keeping, the Herbal Arts Collective and in recent years a Youth Farm Program offering a unique farm to table experience for kids in the community. Established in 1995 Downtown Greens is very much a community endeavor. The Down Home Ball is one of the annual fundraising events that support their operating budget and outreach programs. As a non-profit they rely on private donations, grants, fundraisers and volunteer commitment to nourish and care for the gardens and to expand their programs for the community. Your support this year as a sponsor, volunteer or outrageously outfitted attendee out on the dance floor will assure Downtown Greens of another

successful year tending the gardens and the people of your city. Sponsorship and donation information is available on-line at downtowngreens.org or stop in for Garden or Office Hours; Saturdays 9-12 and Thursdays 3-6 at 206 Charles Street. Director Sarah Perry will be happy to tell you more about Downtown Greens and how you can plant yourself in the most wonderful garden in town. See you there and bring a friend!

What: 22 nd Annual Down Home Ball When: Saturday October 6 th, 6-1 10 PM Where: Roxbury Farm & Garden, 601 Lafayette Blvd - 22401 Wear: Tastefully Understated Outrageous Elegance

Rim Vining is a long-time FXBG resident & supporter of all good things in the ‘Burg

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne Street , FXBG 26

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

27


Art in the Burg “Finding It All” Original Photography by Sheila Jones Art First Gallery Art First Gallery in historic downtown Fredericksburg is delighted to present featured artist Sheila Jones in "Finding it All" where the well-known local photographer experiments with drone photography while also continuing her traditional photography. Any profit from the sale of Jones’ photography will be donated to Law Enforcement United, an organization composed of active and retired law enforcement officers and family members of officers who have died in the line of duty which supports "Concerns of Police Survivors" and "The Officers Down Memorial Page." Jones is also active in helping bring art to area youth. Finding It All Opening Reception: First Friday, September 7, 2018, 6 - 9p.m. Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline St ~Casey Shaw

“One Afternoon”, Cheryl Sutton,

Fredericksburg Photography Club Exhibit at CRRL Sept 4 - 27 Fredericksburg Photography Club will exhibit 52 photographs in the atrium of the Central Rapphannock Regional Library on Caroline Street Fredericksburg Photography Club got its start 30 years ago when small group of photographers formed the club to expand their knowledge and share their

expertise and their work with other photographers.

(600 Block thru 1000 Block) and William Street between Sophia Street and Princess Anne Street (100 block thru 300 block). New for this year's festivities, a block party concert will be held immediately following the Artist Reception, hosted by Sammy T's Restaurant at 801 Caroline Street. The adjoining portion of Hanover Street will be closed off to form a beer garden and concert stage. Fredericksburg's homegrown street brass band Elby Brass will headline from 8:30-10 PM, supported by local Americana favorites Cabin Creek from 7-8 PM. The block party is open to the public. Admission is free and all ages are welcome. ~Gabe Pons

www.fbgphotoclub.com; a Facebook page, Fredericksburg Photography Club" ~Norma Woodward

"Unfrozen" Artwork by Stacy Gaglio Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline St "Unfrozen." featuring sites and scenes from the Fredericksburg area, Stacy's acrylic paintings display a blend of her talents. Using the graphic skills she honed through her studies at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, she uses bold lines and blocks of color that capture the interplay of light and shadow on architecture, while she portrays her subjects with a unique hallmark style that conveys personality and often a touch of whimsy. Stacy will donate a portion of the proceeds from this show to Empowerhouse. The title of the "Unfrozen" exhibit connotes both the threshold to a new stage in Stacy's life as well as the way in which her artwork breathes life into buildings that are vestiges of an era of yesteryear. "My favorite subjects to draw and paint are buildings, homes, and old signage. I love things that were once beautiful and bustling but are now unused and forgotten," she said. "For me, the process of bringing a @CRRL subject back to life through art is inspiring." Those who are enchanted by Stacy's architectural paintings will be happy to know that she is currently focusing on custom house and building portraits. The exhibit will be displayed from September 3 through September 30 and visitors will have an opportunity to meet and chat with Stacy at our opening reception on "First Friday" September 7, from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm. Visit Brush Strokes Gallery at 824 Caroline

“Winter in Round Lake”, Stacy Gaglio Street, open daily from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm to see a new display by member artists including hand crafted jewelry, unique glass art, charcoal drawings, photography, and original fine art paintings in all media.

Art on the Vine @Art Alliance 100 Taylor St, Colonial Beach The Artists' Alliance (AA) at Jarrett Thor Fine Arts is participating in the Art on the Vine event, sponsored by the Northern Neck Artisan Trail, on Saturday, September 8th. Painter Vick Marckel will be at the gallery all day, demonstrating painting techniques used by the old masters including creating a grisaille, adding glaze, and altering composition design. Vicki will also be showing her portfolio of wine paintings. ~Rob Rudick

7th Annual Art Attack Sept. 22 Local artists taking it to the streets! Main Event 10 AM – 4 PM Block Party Concert at Sammy T's 7 PM – 10 PM Art Attack Fredericksburg is an annual grassroots event that gets folks out of the studio and into the city's streets. By collectively making art in public, participants get to meet fellow artists, share their creative process, and celebrate the local arts community. It's free to participate and artists of all stripes join in, spending the day painting, drawing, and sculpting on the streets of Historic Downtown Fredericksburg. “Grant’s Pier”, Vick Marckel Artists will be on their tour of duty throughout the Caroline St corridor between Amelia and Wolfe Street

THE POETRY MAN

Down Home Ball What to Wear…What to Wear…What to Where???

- By Frank Fratoe

Pavement Art Sunshine in the afternoon flashes under a cloudbank to disclose chalk-pictures artists draw on Sophia St. cordoned off one Saturday until raindrops bear down and people begin to scurry. For a storm verging slowly has finally reached town and artisans now break out thin-plastic and duct-tape to guard their workmanship as drizzle throbs harder threatening asphalt canvas. Onlookers run to shelter while a downpour ensues and art-supplies tumble quickly along the roadway overridden by a nor’easter blending diverse imagery of watercolors in the rain. Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He has written poems from the heart for Front Porch for the past 10 years.

By Rim Vining If being a follower of fashion is not your strong suit but letting it all hang out for an evening of food, fun, music and dancing appeals to your tastes let me suggest an opportunity you won’t want to miss. The 22 nd Annual Down Home Ball… the area’s Most Elegant Hoedown. Saturday October 6th Roxbury Home & Garden on Lafayette Blvd will once again host the best night out Fredericksburg has to offer. This annual event is a family friendly fundraiser in support of Downtown Greens… your Community Greenspace. The night kicks off at 6PM and runs until 10:00 with activities for the young and the young at heart. Food is provided through donations from local restaurants and folks in the community. Relaxing beverages of wine and craft beer are available at a cash bar and live music gets everyone out on the dance floor. Tickets are $30.00 in advance and $35.00 at the door. They are available at Roxbury Farm & Garden, Riverby Books and Liberty Town Arts. You can also purchase them on-line through www.downtowngreens.org

But what to wear? Actually the more outrageous the better from the traditional elegance of tuxedos and formals paired with cowboy boots and garden clogs to some creative combination of bib-overalls with satin & silk. Just make sure it is something you can talk in, laugh in and dance in. Ah the dancing! A fair fall evening among friends with just a snip of the waning moon. Downtown Greens is a local non-profit that maintains almost three acres at the corner of Charles and Dixon Streets in Fredericksburg. The gardens are open daylight to dusk all year long and offer a sanctuary in this growing city landscape. The space is maintained with volunteers and managed with a small but amazing staff. The programs offered for the community include a Youth Garden Club, Bee Keeping, the Herbal Arts Collective and in recent years a Youth Farm Program offering a unique farm to table experience for kids in the community. Established in 1995 Downtown Greens is very much a community endeavor. The Down Home Ball is one of the annual fundraising events that support their operating budget and outreach programs. As a non-profit they rely on private donations, grants, fundraisers and volunteer commitment to nourish and care for the gardens and to expand their programs for the community. Your support this year as a sponsor, volunteer or outrageously outfitted attendee out on the dance floor will assure Downtown Greens of another

successful year tending the gardens and the people of your city. Sponsorship and donation information is available on-line at downtowngreens.org or stop in for Garden or Office Hours; Saturdays 9-12 and Thursdays 3-6 at 206 Charles Street. Director Sarah Perry will be happy to tell you more about Downtown Greens and how you can plant yourself in the most wonderful garden in town. See you there and bring a friend!

What: 22 nd Annual Down Home Ball When: Saturday October 6 th, 6-1 10 PM Where: Roxbury Farm & Garden, 601 Lafayette Blvd - 22401 Wear: Tastefully Understated Outrageous Elegance

Rim Vining is a long-time FXBG resident & supporter of all good things in the ‘Burg

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

Become a Friend Advocate ~ Donate ~ Volunteer

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

540~479~4116 1013 Princess Anne Street , FXBG 26

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

27


Companions

2nd chance rescue for furry friends

have a blast at ARF

By Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy

by caitlin Daly

Do you enjoy live music, walks through historic Fredericksburg, beer and

wine, tacos, and dogs? Well then have we got some news for you! The Animal Rescue Festival is coming to you for the second year in a row on October 20th at

Purple Paws

through downtown Fredericksburg with owned and adoptable animals (Psst... want to walk a Fred SPCA dog? Let us know at registration!). At 11am, we will be back to Riverfront Park for local vendors, live music, beer and wine, and tacos from Juan More Taco! The event runs until 2pm, so be sure to bring your own chair and plenty of cash to support our local crafters and vendors! Since we are a family friendly organization, this event will have tents for the little ones to enjoy crafts and animal safety demonstrations! You can even get a really fun temporary tattoo from Jack Brown's! Fred SPCA dogs will be available all day for adoption, as well as pets from other local rescues and shelters! This event truly has something for everyone!

Are you interested in being a vendor or sponsor? Opportunities still exist! Email elevin@fredspca.org TODAY!

Caitlin Daly is the Executive Director of Fredericksburg Regional SPCA Photos by Tim Snyder from ARF 2017

Trish Widener and Layla Hall, of Fredericksburg, are the cofounders of the nonprofit Purple Paws 2 nd Chance Rescue (PP2CR), an organization established in 2016 to recruit volunteers to foster and care for abandoned dogs and those from high-kill animal shelters. The two friends met while volunteering at another rescue organization. Widener and Hall received their first rescues, Baby Girl, a pit bull, and her one surviving pup, Wilson, on February 14, 2016. While Baby Girl was too sick and old to recover and didn’t make it, Wilson would thrive because of the around-theclock care and bottle feeding that Widener and Hall administered. An even happier ending to the story for Wilson is that PP2CR was able to find a family to permanently adopt him. Widener, a staunch advocate for rescue dogs, was battling her own fight with cystic fibrosis. She passed away at 33 years old in May 2017. “Trish had a way of leaving her mark on everyone she touched, and her devotion to animals carries on through PP2CR,” said Hall, who continues PP2CR’s

mission with the support of her husband, Dale, daughter, Kaitlyn, and volunteer Shannon Decatur, who comprise the PP2CR board. They tirelessly nurse animals back to health, drive to rescue dogs in peril of being euthanized at shelters, attend adoption events and locate foster homes. Hall also has a full time job and many foster dogs of her own. Though the dogs aren’t able to thank her, their eyes convey contentment when they’re placed in nurturing foster and forever homes. With five foster families, PP2CR is in dire need of more. Hall said being a foster family for a dog is not as crazy an undertaking as people may think. The dogs adjust and become part of the family. “The need for foster families is critical, because it makes room for another dog to be saved,” she said. To date, PP2CR has been able to find forever homes for 338 dogs. The organization assists animals in distress without regard to age, breed or ease of placement. Foster volunteers receive supplies for the dogs, including food, kennels, medical costs, toys and bedding. For people who aren’t sure about fostering or adopting a pet, there’s a twoweek trial program. “All we ask from the volunteers is to provide TLC and give PP2CR firsthand knowledge of the animals’ behaviors,” Hall said. Volunteer Michele Storm devotes her time to PP2CR because of its high standards. “Fostering dogs has brought my family even closer together—it’s so rewarding,” said Storm. “Somebody has to help these animals, and you have to ‘walk the walk’. Too many animals need homes.” Individuals who want to help, but are unable to foster, can transport dogs; provide monetary donations; help at adoption events; and walk them.

Truex: A two-y year-o old Labrador mix, Truex spent the beginning of his life chained outside. After his owner surrendered him at a “kill” shelter, he wasn’t adopted and landed on the euthanasia list until a volunteer from the shelter contacted PP2CR to help. He’s currently enjoying a real home and undergoing heartworm treatment. Once his treatment is completed, he’ll be up for adoption.

Donations can also be made directly to Lee’s Hill Pet Hospital, where they’ll be allocated to PP2CR. Although the organization doesn’t have a physical shelter, Hall hopes to raise the funds for one someday. It currently operates through foster homes, online databases and adoption events. Purple Paws will be at the Pet Show at the Fredericksburg Fredericksburg Expo & Conference Center, September 22-2 23. Attendees can stop by for more information, and dogs will be available to adopt and foster. For more information about PP2CR, visit the website at www.pp2crescue.com; email pp2crescue@gmail.com; or check out Purple Paws 2nd Chance Rescue on Facebook. Lenora is presdient of Kruk-Mullanaphy Media Group & lives in Stafford County

FXBG SPCA 10819 Courthouse Road FXBG, VA 22408 (540) 898-1 1500 fburgspca.org facebook

Riverfront Park off Sophia Street in downtown Fredericksburg! The event kicks off at 9am with walker registration, coffee, and danishes! At 10am, we will start our one mile loop

28

September 2018

Animal Rescue Festival October 20, 9a-2 2p Riverfront Park off Sophia Street

Front porch fredericksburg

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

29


Companions

2nd chance rescue for furry friends

have a blast at ARF

By Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy

by caitlin Daly

Do you enjoy live music, walks through historic Fredericksburg, beer and

wine, tacos, and dogs? Well then have we got some news for you! The Animal Rescue Festival is coming to you for the second year in a row on October 20th at

Purple Paws

through downtown Fredericksburg with owned and adoptable animals (Psst... want to walk a Fred SPCA dog? Let us know at registration!). At 11am, we will be back to Riverfront Park for local vendors, live music, beer and wine, and tacos from Juan More Taco! The event runs until 2pm, so be sure to bring your own chair and plenty of cash to support our local crafters and vendors! Since we are a family friendly organization, this event will have tents for the little ones to enjoy crafts and animal safety demonstrations! You can even get a really fun temporary tattoo from Jack Brown's! Fred SPCA dogs will be available all day for adoption, as well as pets from other local rescues and shelters! This event truly has something for everyone!

Are you interested in being a vendor or sponsor? Opportunities still exist! Email elevin@fredspca.org TODAY!

Caitlin Daly is the Executive Director of Fredericksburg Regional SPCA Photos by Tim Snyder from ARF 2017

Trish Widener and Layla Hall, of Fredericksburg, are the cofounders of the nonprofit Purple Paws 2 nd Chance Rescue (PP2CR), an organization established in 2016 to recruit volunteers to foster and care for abandoned dogs and those from high-kill animal shelters. The two friends met while volunteering at another rescue organization. Widener and Hall received their first rescues, Baby Girl, a pit bull, and her one surviving pup, Wilson, on February 14, 2016. While Baby Girl was too sick and old to recover and didn’t make it, Wilson would thrive because of the around-theclock care and bottle feeding that Widener and Hall administered. An even happier ending to the story for Wilson is that PP2CR was able to find a family to permanently adopt him. Widener, a staunch advocate for rescue dogs, was battling her own fight with cystic fibrosis. She passed away at 33 years old in May 2017. “Trish had a way of leaving her mark on everyone she touched, and her devotion to animals carries on through PP2CR,” said Hall, who continues PP2CR’s

mission with the support of her husband, Dale, daughter, Kaitlyn, and volunteer Shannon Decatur, who comprise the PP2CR board. They tirelessly nurse animals back to health, drive to rescue dogs in peril of being euthanized at shelters, attend adoption events and locate foster homes. Hall also has a full time job and many foster dogs of her own. Though the dogs aren’t able to thank her, their eyes convey contentment when they’re placed in nurturing foster and forever homes. With five foster families, PP2CR is in dire need of more. Hall said being a foster family for a dog is not as crazy an undertaking as people may think. The dogs adjust and become part of the family. “The need for foster families is critical, because it makes room for another dog to be saved,” she said. To date, PP2CR has been able to find forever homes for 338 dogs. The organization assists animals in distress without regard to age, breed or ease of placement. Foster volunteers receive supplies for the dogs, including food, kennels, medical costs, toys and bedding. For people who aren’t sure about fostering or adopting a pet, there’s a twoweek trial program. “All we ask from the volunteers is to provide TLC and give PP2CR firsthand knowledge of the animals’ behaviors,” Hall said. Volunteer Michele Storm devotes her time to PP2CR because of its high standards. “Fostering dogs has brought my family even closer together—it’s so rewarding,” said Storm. “Somebody has to help these animals, and you have to ‘walk the walk’. Too many animals need homes.” Individuals who want to help, but are unable to foster, can transport dogs; provide monetary donations; help at adoption events; and walk them.

Truex: A two-y year-o old Labrador mix, Truex spent the beginning of his life chained outside. After his owner surrendered him at a “kill” shelter, he wasn’t adopted and landed on the euthanasia list until a volunteer from the shelter contacted PP2CR to help. He’s currently enjoying a real home and undergoing heartworm treatment. Once his treatment is completed, he’ll be up for adoption.

Donations can also be made directly to Lee’s Hill Pet Hospital, where they’ll be allocated to PP2CR. Although the organization doesn’t have a physical shelter, Hall hopes to raise the funds for one someday. It currently operates through foster homes, online databases and adoption events. Purple Paws will be at the Pet Show at the Fredericksburg Fredericksburg Expo & Conference Center, September 22-2 23. Attendees can stop by for more information, and dogs will be available to adopt and foster. For more information about PP2CR, visit the website at www.pp2crescue.com; email pp2crescue@gmail.com; or check out Purple Paws 2nd Chance Rescue on Facebook. Lenora is presdient of Kruk-Mullanaphy Media Group & lives in Stafford County

FXBG SPCA 10819 Courthouse Road FXBG, VA 22408 (540) 898-1 1500 fburgspca.org facebook

Riverfront Park off Sophia Street in downtown Fredericksburg! The event kicks off at 9am with walker registration, coffee, and danishes! At 10am, we will start our one mile loop

28

September 2018

Animal Rescue Festival October 20, 9a-2 2p Riverfront Park off Sophia Street

Front porch fredericksburg

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

29


In Memory of Austen Communitas 5K Walk for Brain Aneurysm Awareness

Fredericksburg Sketches

DOWNTOWNERS

A visual Celebration of our community

By Beth Hunsinger

come get juiced

By Casey Alan Shaw

by georgia Lee Strentz 606 Caroline Street, Old Town 373-7847 ~ www.gemstonecreations.org

Give a Child Something to Think About It is estimated that up to 1 in 50 people in the U.S. will develop a brain aneurysm during their lifetime. Brain aneurysms are a silent killer because they often present with no prior symptoms or symptoms that are often ignored or misdiagnosed. The statistics after a brain aneurysm ruptures are grim: of the 30,000 people that suffer a rupture each year, almost half of the victims will die, and of those surviving, only a third will recover without disabilities. While the vast majority of brain aneurysms occur in adults over 40, they can also strike children and young adults, often resulting in death. Austen Dunn, a Fredericksburg native, and a graduate of Fredericksburg Academy and the College of William and Mary, passed away suddenly from complications of a massive ruptured brain aneurysm on September 24, 2016, at the young age of 23. Until that time Austen had seemed completely healthy, and there were no outward signs that a brain aneurysm was present. Her loss has been devastating to her friends and family. The goal of Austen's Communitas 5K Walk is to raise awareness and funding

to further the study of this awful medical condition that affects so many people, and to support other families that have had similar experiences. In keeping with Austen's belief in Communitas, an idea that when people go through an experience together a special bond is created, a committee of Austen's family and friends are holding: Austen's Communitas 5k Walk September 22, 10 a.m. (9am packet pick-up) Starting and ending at Old Mill Park in Fredericksburg Registration deadline: September 7, (to guarantee a T-shirt) $25 per person, benefiting the Brain Aneurysm Foundation Register: give.bafound.org/2018AustensWalk The event will conclude with a gathering in the Old Mill Park pavilion featuring music and a food truck.

Beth Hunsinger is a member of Austen's Communitas 5k Walk Planning Committee She can be reached at .540/907-8906

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

SKETCH #46: Kenmore in Summer. As this sketch appears, hopefully the relief of some crisper September temperatures are in the air. As I’m writing this, it’s still the heat of August and this particular sketch reminds me of that summer feeling.I’ve sketched Kenmore several times. One of my favorites is a snow-covered version from this same vantage point inspired by a photograph of a former Fredericksburg-area journalist. I regard this sketch with leaf-laden trees and welcoming shade as the antithesis of that winter version. It was originally created as a retirement gift for a long-time employee at Kenmore.With all of my sketches, there’s always that magic point where I have to make myself stop drawing and begin adding the watercolor touches. As I look back on this one, I could probably have let the watercolor do a bit more of the work, but gosh, it sure is hard to stop drawing when you’ve got so many fun textures to portray! Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery and at www.caseyshaw.com.

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

30

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

And, Meet the Owner Liz Howard, As a Bonus Tucked away in the emerging part of our downtown at 915 Lafayette Blvd, near the Cobblestone Apt. development, is a treasure to be discovered, Liz'z Creative Juices. It it is so cheery and welcoming, it will improve you whole day, and the juices and foods are so good for you, you will be energized. The colors inside on the chairs and couches will make you happy, and Liz and her staff want you to be healthy! Not only can you sit in a beautiful,uplifting environment, with other really nice people, but when you look at the menu filled with healthful juices, wraps and other health enhancing offerings, it will not only "make your day," but it will also make you healthier! Liz didn't just decide to open a place to eat, she has been involved in healthy food movements for many years, and has been attending many training seminars, and certifications for years, so she would know how to prepare food properly and healthfully. To mention only a small part of Liz'z background. She moved here with her family to Stafford at age 5, and went through Stafford schools through high school, then to the University of Virginia, and started her 15 year career in environmental science. She started into the raw food movement in Oregon, and got a certification in Raw Food and Beyond,.(Liz is a moderate) She has Gluten and Dairy free certification, cleanse and detox

certification, detox certification connected with integrated oncology, has a Master's of Science Nutrition (Maryland board certified) NIP Nutritional Certified Practitioner, CNS candidate, she is a nutritionist. Liz offers many detox and nutritional programs both in and out of her shop for your optimal health. She works with physicians and many community businesses (yoga studios,etc.) and has programs to teach businesses how to creatively integrate healthy nutrition and food practices in their employees daily interaction with the company,w/ detox programs available. You can order online and she will have a detox program ready for you each day. lizzcreativejuices@gmail.com Liz offers, " Healthy Shopping Excursions" for 1 and half hrs, on certain dates. Go to lizzcreativejuices.com to see how Lizz can connect with you. Gal about Town says, "Come in try the Mexican Wrap, I loved it, also yumm , going to get a detox smoothie now each week, as I stop on my three wheel bike for a hi, to my new stop around town!!!" "Great couch at Liz'z to read our Front Porch magazine!!!!”

Liz'z Creative Juices 915 Lafayette Blvd. 540-3 371-2 2931 lizzcreativejuices.com

Georgia Strentz is our gal about town & FXBG’s biggest supporter

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

31


In Memory of Austen Communitas 5K Walk for Brain Aneurysm Awareness

Fredericksburg Sketches

DOWNTOWNERS

A visual Celebration of our community

By Beth Hunsinger

come get juiced

By Casey Alan Shaw

by georgia Lee Strentz 606 Caroline Street, Old Town 373-7847 ~ www.gemstonecreations.org

Give a Child Something to Think About It is estimated that up to 1 in 50 people in the U.S. will develop a brain aneurysm during their lifetime. Brain aneurysms are a silent killer because they often present with no prior symptoms or symptoms that are often ignored or misdiagnosed. The statistics after a brain aneurysm ruptures are grim: of the 30,000 people that suffer a rupture each year, almost half of the victims will die, and of those surviving, only a third will recover without disabilities. While the vast majority of brain aneurysms occur in adults over 40, they can also strike children and young adults, often resulting in death. Austen Dunn, a Fredericksburg native, and a graduate of Fredericksburg Academy and the College of William and Mary, passed away suddenly from complications of a massive ruptured brain aneurysm on September 24, 2016, at the young age of 23. Until that time Austen had seemed completely healthy, and there were no outward signs that a brain aneurysm was present. Her loss has been devastating to her friends and family. The goal of Austen's Communitas 5K Walk is to raise awareness and funding

to further the study of this awful medical condition that affects so many people, and to support other families that have had similar experiences. In keeping with Austen's belief in Communitas, an idea that when people go through an experience together a special bond is created, a committee of Austen's family and friends are holding: Austen's Communitas 5k Walk September 22, 10 a.m. (9am packet pick-up) Starting and ending at Old Mill Park in Fredericksburg Registration deadline: September 7, (to guarantee a T-shirt) $25 per person, benefiting the Brain Aneurysm Foundation Register: give.bafound.org/2018AustensWalk The event will conclude with a gathering in the Old Mill Park pavilion featuring music and a food truck.

Beth Hunsinger is a member of Austen's Communitas 5k Walk Planning Committee She can be reached at .540/907-8906

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

SKETCH #46: Kenmore in Summer. As this sketch appears, hopefully the relief of some crisper September temperatures are in the air. As I’m writing this, it’s still the heat of August and this particular sketch reminds me of that summer feeling.I’ve sketched Kenmore several times. One of my favorites is a snow-covered version from this same vantage point inspired by a photograph of a former Fredericksburg-area journalist. I regard this sketch with leaf-laden trees and welcoming shade as the antithesis of that winter version. It was originally created as a retirement gift for a long-time employee at Kenmore.With all of my sketches, there’s always that magic point where I have to make myself stop drawing and begin adding the watercolor touches. As I look back on this one, I could probably have let the watercolor do a bit more of the work, but gosh, it sure is hard to stop drawing when you’ve got so many fun textures to portray! Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist. He exhibits his original artwork and limited-edition prints at Art First Gallery and at www.caseyshaw.com.

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

30

September 2018

Front porch fredericksburg

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

And, Meet the Owner Liz Howard, As a Bonus Tucked away in the emerging part of our downtown at 915 Lafayette Blvd, near the Cobblestone Apt. development, is a treasure to be discovered, Liz'z Creative Juices. It it is so cheery and welcoming, it will improve you whole day, and the juices and foods are so good for you, you will be energized. The colors inside on the chairs and couches will make you happy, and Liz and her staff want you to be healthy! Not only can you sit in a beautiful,uplifting environment, with other really nice people, but when you look at the menu filled with healthful juices, wraps and other health enhancing offerings, it will not only "make your day," but it will also make you healthier! Liz didn't just decide to open a place to eat, she has been involved in healthy food movements for many years, and has been attending many training seminars, and certifications for years, so she would know how to prepare food properly and healthfully. To mention only a small part of Liz'z background. She moved here with her family to Stafford at age 5, and went through Stafford schools through high school, then to the University of Virginia, and started her 15 year career in environmental science. She started into the raw food movement in Oregon, and got a certification in Raw Food and Beyond,.(Liz is a moderate) She has Gluten and Dairy free certification, cleanse and detox

certification, detox certification connected with integrated oncology, has a Master's of Science Nutrition (Maryland board certified) NIP Nutritional Certified Practitioner, CNS candidate, she is a nutritionist. Liz offers many detox and nutritional programs both in and out of her shop for your optimal health. She works with physicians and many community businesses (yoga studios,etc.) and has programs to teach businesses how to creatively integrate healthy nutrition and food practices in their employees daily interaction with the company,w/ detox programs available. You can order online and she will have a detox program ready for you each day. lizzcreativejuices@gmail.com Liz offers, " Healthy Shopping Excursions" for 1 and half hrs, on certain dates. Go to lizzcreativejuices.com to see how Lizz can connect with you. Gal about Town says, "Come in try the Mexican Wrap, I loved it, also yumm , going to get a detox smoothie now each week, as I stop on my three wheel bike for a hi, to my new stop around town!!!" "Great couch at Liz'z to read our Front Porch magazine!!!!”

Liz'z Creative Juices 915 Lafayette Blvd. 540-3 371-2 2931 lizzcreativejuices.com

Georgia Strentz is our gal about town & FXBG’s biggest supporter

front porch fredericksburg

September 2018

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Front Porch Fredericksburg - September 2018  
Front Porch Fredericksburg - September 2018  
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