Page 1

YOUR GUIDE TO THE LOCAL GOOD LIFE

front porch T H E R E G I O N ' S free C O M M U N I T Y M A G A Z I N E

L o c a l G o o d N e w s S i n c e 1 9 97 YEAR 19 • ISSUE 219 • OCTOBER 2015

Frontporchfredericksburg.com


contents

closeups 9

11

28

18

Our Heritage: not forgotten history’s stories.: hope foundry

19

everything old is new again!: re-run Shoppe

20

companions: grumpy cat

21

mind your mind supplemental safety

Manarc ...Deborah Franks

22

Senior Care: make your wishes known

23

wellness: low down on carnivores & herbivores emancipated patients: rational end of life care

Mike Cotter ...Volunteer extraordinaire

24

Art in the burg: bonnie halford, “Beyond the Sea” Barbara Kenny returns

25

stories of fredericksburg

26

the cooling shed @ St. george’s

27

renew: magic pill

28

roanoke’s turn

29

porchlight: out

30

fredericksburg sketches oysters for life

31

poetryman: ecology lesson from my porch

David Kennedy ...A different Angle

9

porch talk 4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

5

Oktoberfest...12th annual fest returns

6

found in fred...great things in fXBG

7

downtown buzz: scarecrows & charlie Brown

8

startup weekend....making ideas reality

10

va organizing turns 20

12

vino: Livingston’s Hartwood Winery

13

season’s bounty: savory fall

14

Cooking with Kyle

15 16-17

food co-op for FXBG

Hauntingly Rich in Flavor!

YEAR LEGACY

Sammy T’s By scott richards family since then. In July, 2008, Dr. Emory's wife, Sibby, died, followed by his death, in August, 2008. The Emory's son, Sam, Jr. passed away April, 2010, at which time the property was passed on to four family members, three of which reside in Florida and one in North Carolina. The restaurant's saving grace since then has been general manager, Jimmy Crisp, who was instructed by the family not to change a thing, but keep Sammy T's running as usual. Crisp is not your typical

25

...And more!

cork & table...a cafe with panache

Calendar of events

34

11

26

new beginnings for victims of domestic abuse

27

“double divas” in “burg for breast cancer event

31

october not a halloween show @ art mart

Cover Photo By David Kennedy

For the past thirty four years, storefronts and businesses have come and gone on Caroline Street in Fredericksburg, but there remains one business that has been consistent throughout that time: Sammy T's at 801 Caroline Street. This iconic Fredericksburg landmark started on Valentine's Day, 1981 and has continued to give generations of residents of the area as well as college students and visitors the same excellent service and food since that time. Since its construction in 1805, the building housing Sammy T's has included a number of different businesses including an auction house, a residence, a post office, and an auto supply store. In the 30's, Dugan's, a restaurant opened there and remained until 1980, when it was purchased by Dr. Samuel T. Emory, a geography professor at the University of Mary Washington. Dr. Emory started Sammy T's and it has remained in the

restaurant manager. A laid back, quiet man, it is evident he is working in something he loves. Crisp remains the general manager to this day, doing what he has done best for the past seventeen years: managing one of Fredericksburg's most beloved restaurants. Starting out in residential construction with his brother, Crisp, who was acquainted with both Samuel and Sibby, was asked to take over managing the business. He stated it was very fast

paced with quite a learning curve, and involved working a lot of nights. "I love the people and the business. There are adults who come here who first came as children. I see some of the same tourists coming in year after year," he said. When asked why he remained as manager for so long, Crisp remarked, "I wouldn't want to do anything else." The major factor that has kept the doors open at Sammy T's, according to Crisp, was the restaurant has been consistent in its approach for all these years. It was noted that very little has actually changed in the operating procedures since Emory first opened the doors. In 1981, a vegan and vegetarian menu was introduced because there was no restaurant of note in the area that provided a menu similar. Crisp said that many of the original recipes are still being used and there are some employees whose years of tenure go into double digits. The theme of consistency has paid dividends as Sammy T's has won numerous awards ranging from Best Veggie Restaurant to Best Veggie Menu. They have been named the Third Best Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurant in the State of Virginia by Virginia Living Magazine. Most patrons, according to Crisp, come back and bring friends, delighting in a menu that meets the culinary needs of a totally diverse population. The favorites, as seen by Crisp, are: From The Vegetarian Menu: Camper's Special (above)- grilled bean & grain burger mixture wrapped in a grilled flour tortilla with sautéed onions, green peppers, tomatoes, mushrooms, Chi Chi and topped with

melted mozzarella and cheddar cheese, served with a side of Lemon Tahini. $12.00 From The Vegan Menu: Felafel- a mid-eastern dish made with chick peas, wheat germ, onion, garlic and spices deep fried and served in a pita with fresh mixed greens, cucumbers, red onion and our Lemon Tahini sauce. $9.00 From The Standards Menu: Gourmet Hamburger - seven ounces of lean, ground, seasoned beef grilled to your specifications on a multigrain roll with lettuce, tomato and red onion. $8.25 With cheese - $8.50, With cheese and bacon - $9.25 Now, after thirty four years, a chill has gone through the Downtown Fredericksburg community with the news that Sammy T's is up for sale. Understandably, the four family owners are finding it difficult to operate the restaurant from a long distance. Crisp commented that there are several serious buyers looking, and they all agree on one thing: Sammy T's must remain as it has been for thirty four years. Crisp stated that whatever the outcome of the sale, he hopes he can still remain as the general manager. "This restaurant has been around for thirty four years and I hope it is around for at least thirty four more," remarked Crisp. Crisp's remarks reflect the sentiment of all those who have supported Sammy T's since 1981. It remains a legacy not only to the Emory family, but to the historic district of downtown Fredericksburg as well.

Scott Richards is owner of Loch Haven Vineyards, and a free lance writer bgmeadowswine@yahoo.com

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Lavishly Presented. Jewell Wolterman 1320 Central Park Blvd, Ste 200, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com 2

October 2015

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

October 2015 2015

3


contents

closeups 9

11

28

18

Our Heritage: not forgotten history’s stories.: hope foundry

19

everything old is new again!: re-run Shoppe

20

companions: grumpy cat

21

mind your mind supplemental safety

Manarc ...Deborah Franks

22

Senior Care: make your wishes known

23

wellness: low down on carnivores & herbivores emancipated patients: rational end of life care

Mike Cotter ...Volunteer extraordinaire

24

Art in the burg: bonnie halford, “Beyond the Sea” Barbara Kenny returns

25

stories of fredericksburg

26

the cooling shed @ St. george’s

27

renew: magic pill

28

roanoke’s turn

29

porchlight: out

30

fredericksburg sketches oysters for life

31

poetryman: ecology lesson from my porch

David Kennedy ...A different Angle

9

porch talk 4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

5

Oktoberfest...12th annual fest returns

6

found in fred...great things in fXBG

7

downtown buzz: scarecrows & charlie Brown

8

startup weekend....making ideas reality

10

va organizing turns 20

12

vino: Livingston’s Hartwood Winery

13

season’s bounty: savory fall

14

Cooking with Kyle

15 16-17

food co-op for FXBG

Hauntingly Rich in Flavor!

YEAR LEGACY

Sammy T’s By scott richards family since then. In July, 2008, Dr. Emory's wife, Sibby, died, followed by his death, in August, 2008. The Emory's son, Sam, Jr. passed away April, 2010, at which time the property was passed on to four family members, three of which reside in Florida and one in North Carolina. The restaurant's saving grace since then has been general manager, Jimmy Crisp, who was instructed by the family not to change a thing, but keep Sammy T's running as usual. Crisp is not your typical

25

...And more!

cork & table...a cafe with panache

Calendar of events

34

11

26

new beginnings for victims of domestic abuse

27

“double divas” in “burg for breast cancer event

31

october not a halloween show @ art mart

Cover Photo By David Kennedy

For the past thirty four years, storefronts and businesses have come and gone on Caroline Street in Fredericksburg, but there remains one business that has been consistent throughout that time: Sammy T's at 801 Caroline Street. This iconic Fredericksburg landmark started on Valentine's Day, 1981 and has continued to give generations of residents of the area as well as college students and visitors the same excellent service and food since that time. Since its construction in 1805, the building housing Sammy T's has included a number of different businesses including an auction house, a residence, a post office, and an auto supply store. In the 30's, Dugan's, a restaurant opened there and remained until 1980, when it was purchased by Dr. Samuel T. Emory, a geography professor at the University of Mary Washington. Dr. Emory started Sammy T's and it has remained in the

restaurant manager. A laid back, quiet man, it is evident he is working in something he loves. Crisp remains the general manager to this day, doing what he has done best for the past seventeen years: managing one of Fredericksburg's most beloved restaurants. Starting out in residential construction with his brother, Crisp, who was acquainted with both Samuel and Sibby, was asked to take over managing the business. He stated it was very fast

paced with quite a learning curve, and involved working a lot of nights. "I love the people and the business. There are adults who come here who first came as children. I see some of the same tourists coming in year after year," he said. When asked why he remained as manager for so long, Crisp remarked, "I wouldn't want to do anything else." The major factor that has kept the doors open at Sammy T's, according to Crisp, was the restaurant has been consistent in its approach for all these years. It was noted that very little has actually changed in the operating procedures since Emory first opened the doors. In 1981, a vegan and vegetarian menu was introduced because there was no restaurant of note in the area that provided a menu similar. Crisp said that many of the original recipes are still being used and there are some employees whose years of tenure go into double digits. The theme of consistency has paid dividends as Sammy T's has won numerous awards ranging from Best Veggie Restaurant to Best Veggie Menu. They have been named the Third Best Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurant in the State of Virginia by Virginia Living Magazine. Most patrons, according to Crisp, come back and bring friends, delighting in a menu that meets the culinary needs of a totally diverse population. The favorites, as seen by Crisp, are: From The Vegetarian Menu: Camper's Special (above)- grilled bean & grain burger mixture wrapped in a grilled flour tortilla with sautéed onions, green peppers, tomatoes, mushrooms, Chi Chi and topped with

melted mozzarella and cheddar cheese, served with a side of Lemon Tahini. $12.00 From The Vegan Menu: Felafel- a mid-eastern dish made with chick peas, wheat germ, onion, garlic and spices deep fried and served in a pita with fresh mixed greens, cucumbers, red onion and our Lemon Tahini sauce. $9.00 From The Standards Menu: Gourmet Hamburger - seven ounces of lean, ground, seasoned beef grilled to your specifications on a multigrain roll with lettuce, tomato and red onion. $8.25 With cheese - $8.50, With cheese and bacon - $9.25 Now, after thirty four years, a chill has gone through the Downtown Fredericksburg community with the news that Sammy T's is up for sale. Understandably, the four family owners are finding it difficult to operate the restaurant from a long distance. Crisp commented that there are several serious buyers looking, and they all agree on one thing: Sammy T's must remain as it has been for thirty four years. Crisp stated that whatever the outcome of the sale, he hopes he can still remain as the general manager. "This restaurant has been around for thirty four years and I hope it is around for at least thirty four more," remarked Crisp. Crisp's remarks reflect the sentiment of all those who have supported Sammy T's since 1981. It remains a legacy not only to the Emory family, but to the historic district of downtown Fredericksburg as well.

Scott Richards is owner of Loch Haven Vineyards, and a free lance writer bgmeadowswine@yahoo.com

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Lavishly Presented. Jewell Wolterman 1320 Central Park Blvd, Ste 200, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com 2

October 2015

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

October 2015 2015

3


Dawn Whitmore

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists Kathy Anderson Nancy Bauer A.E.Bayne Collette Caprara C.Ruth Cassell-Huynh Mac Church Dan Czajka Barbara Deal Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe Joan M. Geisler Ann Glave Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Rob Huffman Emily Hollinsworth Rick Jefferies Karl Karch Jo Loving Bob Martin Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Ryan Poe M.L.Powers John Reitenberg Scott Richards Casey Alan Shaw Meg Sneed Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Rim Vining Woodie Walker Dawn Whitmore Justin Young

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2015 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

community

October 2015

Brings Taste of Fall Fun, in More Ways Than One By emily hollinsworth

BY dawn whitmore Dictionary.com defines community as a social group of any size whose members reside in a specific locality, share government, and often have common cultural and historical heritage. This is a good beginning characterization of Fredericksburg. Each month in Front Porch, we see all these aspects of community. However, to me there is more to community than a sterile definition. Our community exceeds this definition because the people of our city have conscientiously have decided to be ‘third mile’ citizens of FXBG. The ‘third mile’ was originally introduced to me back in 2010, in a Craig Groeschel book entitled; “Christian Atheist” and I have tweaked the concept a little. Want to know how Groeschel defines the ‘third mile’ go and check out the book. For FXBG’ers being a ‘first line’ or ‘second line’ citizen of their beloved community, just will not do. In a nutshell, the ‘first and second’ line citizens in a community want the amenities and wonderfulness of their area but don’t want it to cost them anything. Don’t ask them to volunteer or give. It just isn’t their thing. I am thankful FXBG’s citizens are willing to volunteer, give of themselves, to include both, time and money to create the wonderful place we call home. It is not an exception, but a natural thing, to see our community pull together to better the lives of our neighbors. Such as, Fairy Godmother, NewsTalk 1230 and numerous others making the wish of an 18-year-old cancer patient come true. Their generosity made a trip to the Rocky Mountains a reality. It is about our neighbors raising over $820,000 for local nonprofits in 2015 during The Community Give. “Third Mile” citizens live a life of community not competition. This is done in small groups all around FXBG each month, both in person and online. Tuesday’s Together, a part of the Rising

Tide Society, meets on the first Tuesday of each month to foster, grow and thrive in the spirit of Community over Competition. The group includes creative entrepreneurs, small business CEO’s and Weekend Warriors who meet to discuss topics relevant to small business owners. Let’s not forget FXBG Exchange, who according their website is building a startup community…with a mission to establish a thriving entrepreneurial ecosystem. The FXBG Arts Culture understands being ‘third mile’ citizens. Any new, beginning, or seasoned artist can walk into Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts and feel right at home. Fredericksburg Arts’ strives each month to promote the arts of Fredericksburg while promoting unity within all the local arts. The Fredericksburg Christian Art Festival during the month of October will raise money for Micah Ministries, who concentrate on helping those facing chronic homelessness in our area. Yet, this is only the beginning. Why? Because ‘third mile’ citizens care about one another on a different level. It becomes more than businesses interacting. There is a morphing from business as usual to living life with friends and loved ones. It becomes more than Joe DiBella’s exhibit, “Breath That Fades Away” being a ‘culmination of a distinguished teaching career’ at the University of Mary Washington; to Joe, our friend who is retiring and longing to see his exhibit to tell him how special friendship can be. We further see in this edition of Front Porch, how Deborah Franks, CEO of Manarc: Borne the Battle desires to touch the lives of those serving our country. Being ‘third mile” means having boots worn by a soldier lost in battle in your store’s front window, which are not for sale. They are to be a reminder of the sacrifices being made by families every day who serve our country. As Franks tells us,

messages

Virginia,

Hi Virginia: Thank you so much for the coverage of our exhibit! You made my day! As always you never stop to amaze me! You are awesome! Blessings! Merian C. Stevens I love seeing the Pitaiyo Ad in Front Porch! I love reading Front Porch! Alex Kelly-Maartens

4

Oktoberfest

Front porch fredericksburg

Thank you so much for the publicity you gave my joint show, "Abstract Expressions" at Brush Strokes Gallery this month. I truly appreciate it! Nancy Williams Love It! ("Bill Harris Paints Monumental Urban Garden at Downtown Greens", Sept. 2015). Love all of Front Porch stories. Sue Davies

“It is about more than being successful and making money, it is about giving.” My point is FXBG is an obvious ‘third mile’ community. Yes, the businesses in our area must have commerce where money is made; because lets face it…there are bills to be paid. We all know what happens when bills aren’t paid. Plus, we have some stores, such as Griffin’s Bookshop, which have finished their race, after years of faithful service the owner’s have retired. These closed shops will be greatly missed. However, I propose, these places are missed because they were woven into a community of ‘third mile’ citizens. Each person is more than a storeowner, volunteer, or artist but an integral part of an ‘entrepreneurial ecosystem’ (to borrow FXBG Exchange’s word) and most importantly, our friends. Having the opportunity to show my photography in FXBG and write for Front Porch knowing you all ‘read it cover to cover’ is one of the many blessings of living in this ‘third mile’ community.

Little says the advent of October in downtown Fredericksburg like crisp weather, Bavarian pretzels the size of your face, Hirschjäger Dancers in full attire lining the 800-900 blocks of Caroline Street, the traditional 1.0 liter Capital Ale House stein and the energetic, familyfriendly atmosphere that can only come from the city’s Oktoberfest. Oktoberfest, a downtown tradition sponsored by Capital Ale House entering its 12th year, will start on Oct. 3, with the first tapping of the keg taking place at 11:30 a.m. The event has a $3 cover charge, which gets residents access to live music and more than 100 Virginia Craft and German Imported beers. The festival drew 7,000 last year, according to Linzy Brown, marketing manager at Capital Ale House. With Capital Ale House reopening after two month, Brown is expecting the number of people to rise this year. The proceeds from Oktoberfest will go to Fredericksburg Main Street

Initiatives, a nonprofit that began in 2013 that brings area businesses together to preserve downtown Fredericksburg’s history and resources. Ann Glave, executive director of Fredericksburg Main Street, will tap the first keg on Oct. 3. Fredericksburg’s Oktoberfest will be dishing out more varieties of beer than ever. While Capital Ale House will have a full stock of imported German beer, it also sets local and state breweries and craft beers on center stage. “Expect to see a lot of local breweries represented in addition to the traditional German breweries,” Brown said. While some aspects of the celebration are for the over-21 crowd, there are plenty of events that families and children can enjoy. Children can bounce on giant inflatables, get their faces painted and get their own balloon animals at Kinderplatz, an area specifically designed for children and families. Live music and performances

include the Happy Dutchmen and the Ja Ja Jas from New York, who specialize in polka music. Returning Hirschjäger Dancers will provide traditional German dancing, entertainment and a glimpse into the energy and spirit of German culture. Capital Ale House will have a full menu of can’t-miss and mouthwatering German cuisine, including giant Bavarian pretzels, bratwurst, knackwurst, currywurst, and sauerbraten, a German pot roast topped with gingersnap gravy and potato dumplings. Capital Ale House will also have traditional German sides, including German potato salad, red cabbage, spaetzel, a type of dumpling, and sauerkraut. VIP table reservations are available on Capital Ale House’s web site, and the reservations provide one appetizer for every two guests, one t-shirt per guest, and beer tickets among other benefits. Capital Ale House will reopen with a new menu and new interior with a local touch. The 100-year-old framework within

the building was refurbished into rustic, farmhouse-style tables that are located in the downstairs cellar. The tables were built by Fraser Wood Elements, a shop specializing in handcrafted wood on 820 Caroline St. Downtown Fredericksburg marks Oktoberfest with an energetic and generous celebration meant to bring the community together and to enjoy the mix of local and international culture. 12th Annual Oktoberfest Saturday October 3rd 800 & 900 blocks of Caroline Street 11:30 am to 10:00 pm with the restaurant operating until 1:30 am Family Friendly: giant inflatables, Kinderplatz balloons, face-p painting, & live music

Emily Hollinsworth is a UMW student.

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

Dawn Whitmore is a photographer & writer. She lives in Spotsylvania We at Trolley Tours of Fredericksburg thank you for putting "Herman" the conductor on the Sept. cover. He stood beside the Fredericksburg Visitor Center for 20 years greetig visitors & locals to downtown. Heidi Bass Thanks Front Porch for the write up in September's issue. ("Art Attack Returns for 4th Annual Event" Art Attack Fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

October 2015 2015

5


Dawn Whitmore

ON THE PORCH Guest Porch Editorial

Contributing Writers & Artists Kathy Anderson Nancy Bauer A.E.Bayne Collette Caprara C.Ruth Cassell-Huynh Mac Church Dan Czajka Barbara Deal Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe Joan M. Geisler Ann Glave Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Rob Huffman Emily Hollinsworth Rick Jefferies Karl Karch Jo Loving Bob Martin Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Ryan Poe M.L.Powers John Reitenberg Scott Richards Casey Alan Shaw Meg Sneed Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Rim Vining Woodie Walker Dawn Whitmore Justin Young

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2015 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

community

October 2015

Brings Taste of Fall Fun, in More Ways Than One By emily hollinsworth

BY dawn whitmore Dictionary.com defines community as a social group of any size whose members reside in a specific locality, share government, and often have common cultural and historical heritage. This is a good beginning characterization of Fredericksburg. Each month in Front Porch, we see all these aspects of community. However, to me there is more to community than a sterile definition. Our community exceeds this definition because the people of our city have conscientiously have decided to be ‘third mile’ citizens of FXBG. The ‘third mile’ was originally introduced to me back in 2010, in a Craig Groeschel book entitled; “Christian Atheist” and I have tweaked the concept a little. Want to know how Groeschel defines the ‘third mile’ go and check out the book. For FXBG’ers being a ‘first line’ or ‘second line’ citizen of their beloved community, just will not do. In a nutshell, the ‘first and second’ line citizens in a community want the amenities and wonderfulness of their area but don’t want it to cost them anything. Don’t ask them to volunteer or give. It just isn’t their thing. I am thankful FXBG’s citizens are willing to volunteer, give of themselves, to include both, time and money to create the wonderful place we call home. It is not an exception, but a natural thing, to see our community pull together to better the lives of our neighbors. Such as, Fairy Godmother, NewsTalk 1230 and numerous others making the wish of an 18-year-old cancer patient come true. Their generosity made a trip to the Rocky Mountains a reality. It is about our neighbors raising over $820,000 for local nonprofits in 2015 during The Community Give. “Third Mile” citizens live a life of community not competition. This is done in small groups all around FXBG each month, both in person and online. Tuesday’s Together, a part of the Rising

Tide Society, meets on the first Tuesday of each month to foster, grow and thrive in the spirit of Community over Competition. The group includes creative entrepreneurs, small business CEO’s and Weekend Warriors who meet to discuss topics relevant to small business owners. Let’s not forget FXBG Exchange, who according their website is building a startup community…with a mission to establish a thriving entrepreneurial ecosystem. The FXBG Arts Culture understands being ‘third mile’ citizens. Any new, beginning, or seasoned artist can walk into Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts and feel right at home. Fredericksburg Arts’ strives each month to promote the arts of Fredericksburg while promoting unity within all the local arts. The Fredericksburg Christian Art Festival during the month of October will raise money for Micah Ministries, who concentrate on helping those facing chronic homelessness in our area. Yet, this is only the beginning. Why? Because ‘third mile’ citizens care about one another on a different level. It becomes more than businesses interacting. There is a morphing from business as usual to living life with friends and loved ones. It becomes more than Joe DiBella’s exhibit, “Breath That Fades Away” being a ‘culmination of a distinguished teaching career’ at the University of Mary Washington; to Joe, our friend who is retiring and longing to see his exhibit to tell him how special friendship can be. We further see in this edition of Front Porch, how Deborah Franks, CEO of Manarc: Borne the Battle desires to touch the lives of those serving our country. Being ‘third mile” means having boots worn by a soldier lost in battle in your store’s front window, which are not for sale. They are to be a reminder of the sacrifices being made by families every day who serve our country. As Franks tells us,

messages

Virginia,

Hi Virginia: Thank you so much for the coverage of our exhibit! You made my day! As always you never stop to amaze me! You are awesome! Blessings! Merian C. Stevens I love seeing the Pitaiyo Ad in Front Porch! I love reading Front Porch! Alex Kelly-Maartens

4

Oktoberfest

Front porch fredericksburg

Thank you so much for the publicity you gave my joint show, "Abstract Expressions" at Brush Strokes Gallery this month. I truly appreciate it! Nancy Williams Love It! ("Bill Harris Paints Monumental Urban Garden at Downtown Greens", Sept. 2015). Love all of Front Porch stories. Sue Davies

“It is about more than being successful and making money, it is about giving.” My point is FXBG is an obvious ‘third mile’ community. Yes, the businesses in our area must have commerce where money is made; because lets face it…there are bills to be paid. We all know what happens when bills aren’t paid. Plus, we have some stores, such as Griffin’s Bookshop, which have finished their race, after years of faithful service the owner’s have retired. These closed shops will be greatly missed. However, I propose, these places are missed because they were woven into a community of ‘third mile’ citizens. Each person is more than a storeowner, volunteer, or artist but an integral part of an ‘entrepreneurial ecosystem’ (to borrow FXBG Exchange’s word) and most importantly, our friends. Having the opportunity to show my photography in FXBG and write for Front Porch knowing you all ‘read it cover to cover’ is one of the many blessings of living in this ‘third mile’ community.

Little says the advent of October in downtown Fredericksburg like crisp weather, Bavarian pretzels the size of your face, Hirschjäger Dancers in full attire lining the 800-900 blocks of Caroline Street, the traditional 1.0 liter Capital Ale House stein and the energetic, familyfriendly atmosphere that can only come from the city’s Oktoberfest. Oktoberfest, a downtown tradition sponsored by Capital Ale House entering its 12th year, will start on Oct. 3, with the first tapping of the keg taking place at 11:30 a.m. The event has a $3 cover charge, which gets residents access to live music and more than 100 Virginia Craft and German Imported beers. The festival drew 7,000 last year, according to Linzy Brown, marketing manager at Capital Ale House. With Capital Ale House reopening after two month, Brown is expecting the number of people to rise this year. The proceeds from Oktoberfest will go to Fredericksburg Main Street

Initiatives, a nonprofit that began in 2013 that brings area businesses together to preserve downtown Fredericksburg’s history and resources. Ann Glave, executive director of Fredericksburg Main Street, will tap the first keg on Oct. 3. Fredericksburg’s Oktoberfest will be dishing out more varieties of beer than ever. While Capital Ale House will have a full stock of imported German beer, it also sets local and state breweries and craft beers on center stage. “Expect to see a lot of local breweries represented in addition to the traditional German breweries,” Brown said. While some aspects of the celebration are for the over-21 crowd, there are plenty of events that families and children can enjoy. Children can bounce on giant inflatables, get their faces painted and get their own balloon animals at Kinderplatz, an area specifically designed for children and families. Live music and performances

include the Happy Dutchmen and the Ja Ja Jas from New York, who specialize in polka music. Returning Hirschjäger Dancers will provide traditional German dancing, entertainment and a glimpse into the energy and spirit of German culture. Capital Ale House will have a full menu of can’t-miss and mouthwatering German cuisine, including giant Bavarian pretzels, bratwurst, knackwurst, currywurst, and sauerbraten, a German pot roast topped with gingersnap gravy and potato dumplings. Capital Ale House will also have traditional German sides, including German potato salad, red cabbage, spaetzel, a type of dumpling, and sauerkraut. VIP table reservations are available on Capital Ale House’s web site, and the reservations provide one appetizer for every two guests, one t-shirt per guest, and beer tickets among other benefits. Capital Ale House will reopen with a new menu and new interior with a local touch. The 100-year-old framework within

the building was refurbished into rustic, farmhouse-style tables that are located in the downstairs cellar. The tables were built by Fraser Wood Elements, a shop specializing in handcrafted wood on 820 Caroline St. Downtown Fredericksburg marks Oktoberfest with an energetic and generous celebration meant to bring the community together and to enjoy the mix of local and international culture. 12th Annual Oktoberfest Saturday October 3rd 800 & 900 blocks of Caroline Street 11:30 am to 10:00 pm with the restaurant operating until 1:30 am Family Friendly: giant inflatables, Kinderplatz balloons, face-p painting, & live music

Emily Hollinsworth is a UMW student.

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

Dawn Whitmore is a photographer & writer. She lives in Spotsylvania We at Trolley Tours of Fredericksburg thank you for putting "Herman" the conductor on the Sept. cover. He stood beside the Fredericksburg Visitor Center for 20 years greetig visitors & locals to downtown. Heidi Bass Thanks Front Porch for the write up in September's issue. ("Art Attack Returns for 4th Annual Event" Art Attack Fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

October 2015 2015

5


Found -in-

Downtown Buzz

FRED

things found in and around fxbg scarecrows & charlie brown come to town

By rick jeffries Fiber, a national juried exhibition celebrating everything fiber.” Found in Fred recently celebrated their official grand opening and ribbon cutting on September 4th and were delighted to host Mayor Mary Katherine Greenlaw, members of city council, Scarlett Pons and Ann Glave of FXBG Mainstreet, Susan Larson and many more!

Found in Fred is a local downtown business that offers businesses looking to bring exposure and awareness to existing downtown businesses or new start-up businesses that are looking to pop-up a merchandised and marketed display of their products or artwork. When you arrive at 1004 Caroline St. downtown you will find yourself in a store that features a wide variety of items from bronze artwork to NERF guns and pottery. With a niche for Fredericksburg-made products, art and gifts you can get a taste of your favorite downtown stores while also finding some new ones as well. Some of the new and exciting things you will find at Found in Fred this month include: NERF, Furbies, Vintage and More… M.C. Vintage is a local start-up business that made its name primarily on eBay and Amazon, but are happy to call Found in Fred home. From the backdrops of a garage earlier this year, packaging and shipping hundreds of items all across the U.S., Daniel O’Bryan and Nathan Ecker, the owners and founders of M.C. Vintage are excited to bring our childhood memories back right here in downtown Fredericksburg.

Unique wine-iinspired gifts including Tiki Torches, Bottle Votive Lanterns, Bird / Hummingbird Feeders, Wind Chimes, Wall Sconces and Chalkboard Bottles. All of these amazing new products are locally designed and hand-made from the guys over at Bottles Uncorked and have been a bestseller in the Found in Fred store. Be sure to stop by and get a head start on your fall decor and possibly and even earlier start on that never ending christmas gift list for family and friends.

October 2015

Chris Austin, one of the founders of Found in Fred also shared that he is

and at the Visitor Center or downloaded from www.fredericksburgmainstreet.org.

A Large Selection Available

200 William Street Downtown ,Fredericksburg 540.373.4421 Mon-Fri: 9:30-6 Sat: 9:30-5 CrownJewelersFredericksburg.com

With the arrival of Fall, visitors to downtown Fredericksburg can anticipate a variety of fun-filled activities. A harbinger of the season will be the arrival of scarecrows—lots of them. By October 10 more than 40 figures will be situated throughout the downtown area. Their creators will be aiming for a variety of effects, ranging from charming to funny to downright creepy. You can vote for your favorite scarecrow through the end of the day on October 31, and winners will be announced the next day. Ballots can be found at many of the scarecrow locations

Dreaming of Owning Downtown? Let’s Make it Happen!

LibertyTown Arts will be rotating both 2-dimensional and 3dimensional artists from their workshop and studio which currently is home to 50+ local artists. LibertyTown Arts is currently showcasing works and pieces from Sarah Lapp, Kathleen Walsh, Dan Finnegan and Gayla Lee. According to D.D. and Kenneth Lecky, owners of LibertyTown, they are also “excited to rotate in some of their pieces from

Beautiful All-B Bronze Fine Art from the very talented and well known Wegner Brothers (Stewart and Steven). Features include art and decor from their “Crab Series”, “Tree Frogs”, and other ocean-themed pieces as well. Wegner Metal Arts once had a storefront on Caroline Street, and according to Stewart Wegner, one of their owners and founders, “[They] are excited to have their work back on Caroline Street”. Their foundry where all of these beautiful pieces are hand-crafted with passion is located at 520 Wolfe Street.

6

Found in Fred’s current vendors: Products Artwork Bottles Uncorked Re-purposed Wine Bottles Lord & Lilly's (Now Located at 611 Caroline St.) - Christian Gifts and Decor M.C. Vintage Vintage and Collectibles Good Turn Earth - Living Soil Cards by Shirley - Greeting and Seasonal Cards Wegner Metal Arts - Bronze Art LibertyTown Arts - Artwork Christina Bendo - Pottery Frau Design - Upcycled Guitar Jewelry Tubular Gear - Upcycled Dog Products Andy McQuillen - Canvas Work

By Ann Glave

Front porch fredericksburg

John Coker of the Rappahannock Fredericksburg Rotary Club presented the scarecrow idea to Fredericksburg Main Street Inc. after a trip to California. The idea quickly grew to include additional partners— Fredericksburg Parent & Family Magazine and the City’s police department. Such initiatives are a great way to inspire a variety of different businesses and organizations to get involved with the downtown. For example, the Central Regional Rappahannock Library, Caroline’s Realty, Union Bank & Trust, and VA Partners Bank are joining in on the fun along with restaurants and retail shops. The second activity is a free movie night. On October 24, weather permitting, It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown! will open at 6:30 p.m. at Hurkamp park. That Halloween classic will

Front Porch Fredericksburg

Highlighting Local People, Places & Events Since 1997 excited to break ground on the new renovations at Kybecca, another staple and iconic restaurant in the heart of historic downtown Fredericksburg. Austin also stated that he is looking forward to coordinating furniture repair and restoration classes to the community in October. Be sure to check out Found in Fred the next time you head downtown and get a little taste of what Fredericksburg has to offer!

be followed by the original 1931 version of Frankenstein. These autumn festivities will conclude on Halloween, October 31, at Riverfront Park where families can participate in a variety of entertaining activities from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Stop by to receive a map that will help you in your quest to find “Treats on the Streets.” Many local businesses will be participating, offering Treats to our smaller costumed visitors to downtown. All of these activities resulted from cooperation between the City’s police department, Fredericksburg Parent & Family Magazine, the Rappahannock Fredericksburg Rotary Club, and Fredericksburg VA Main Street Inc. There’s something new in Market Square Alley—something green. Seven arborvitae trees have been placed along one wall of the Market Square Alley. The Design Committee of Fredericksburg VA Main Street, Tree Fredericksburg and the Fredericksburg Area Association of Realtors provided funds and volunteers to make this happen. Thank you to Fredericksburg’s Economic Development Authority for providing the funds to Tree Fredericksburg with an EDA JumpStart! grant. This is the first of upcoming things happening in Market Square. Stay tuned! Save the dates: Holiday Open House Weekend is November 14 and 15. Santa Strolls are back with a new twist, a Santa tracker app. This year you will be able to follow Santa’s whereabouts in real time. Shop Small, an American Express campaign designed to support independent local businesses, is scheduled for Saturday, November 28th. Well

ARM

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

540.847.0630 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

Stay tuned to Fredericksburg VA Main Street by signing up to receive the newsletter at www.fredericksburgmainstreet.org and like us on Facebook at Fredericksburg Downtown and Fredericksburg VA Main Street Inc. More than just merchants! Main Street is more than just a retail and restaurant association. The overall goal for a strong vibrant Downtown resonates with many different groups. If you want to get involved with Fredericksburg VA Main Street on a board or a committee level, please reach out to: Ann Glave info@fredericksburgmainstreet.org, Scarlett Pons, President spons@ponshopstudio.com Or Lisa Durham, Volunteer Director volunteer@fredericksburgmainstreet.org.

Ann Glave is the Executive Director of Fredericksburg Main Street

received last year, the Early Bird Riser promotion will be on again from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. with red carpets, balloons, free coffee and pastries.

ROXBURY F

SUZY STONE

Welcome these newest additions Stone to Fredericksburg’s downtown: Creek ReDesigns (709 Caroline Street), Bella Giornata Events & Design (907 Caroline Street, suite G), Charlie & Grace Market Café (1002 Sophia Street), Lady Legacy (723 Caroline Street), Annie’s Dog Spa (1004B Caroline Street), Found in Fred (1004 Caroline Street) and Learning Loft (212 George St).

& GARDEN CENTER

Since 1929

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

We have all your gardening needs! Come Shop With Us

Rick Jeffries is a serial entrepreneur, a founder of Found in Fred, blog and food enthusiast and proud owner of his Siberian Husky puppy. (@RickJeffries on Twitter) Each Office Is Independently Owned & Operated

front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

7


Found -in-

Downtown Buzz

FRED

things found in and around fxbg scarecrows & charlie brown come to town

By rick jeffries Fiber, a national juried exhibition celebrating everything fiber.” Found in Fred recently celebrated their official grand opening and ribbon cutting on September 4th and were delighted to host Mayor Mary Katherine Greenlaw, members of city council, Scarlett Pons and Ann Glave of FXBG Mainstreet, Susan Larson and many more!

Found in Fred is a local downtown business that offers businesses looking to bring exposure and awareness to existing downtown businesses or new start-up businesses that are looking to pop-up a merchandised and marketed display of their products or artwork. When you arrive at 1004 Caroline St. downtown you will find yourself in a store that features a wide variety of items from bronze artwork to NERF guns and pottery. With a niche for Fredericksburg-made products, art and gifts you can get a taste of your favorite downtown stores while also finding some new ones as well. Some of the new and exciting things you will find at Found in Fred this month include: NERF, Furbies, Vintage and More… M.C. Vintage is a local start-up business that made its name primarily on eBay and Amazon, but are happy to call Found in Fred home. From the backdrops of a garage earlier this year, packaging and shipping hundreds of items all across the U.S., Daniel O’Bryan and Nathan Ecker, the owners and founders of M.C. Vintage are excited to bring our childhood memories back right here in downtown Fredericksburg.

Unique wine-iinspired gifts including Tiki Torches, Bottle Votive Lanterns, Bird / Hummingbird Feeders, Wind Chimes, Wall Sconces and Chalkboard Bottles. All of these amazing new products are locally designed and hand-made from the guys over at Bottles Uncorked and have been a bestseller in the Found in Fred store. Be sure to stop by and get a head start on your fall decor and possibly and even earlier start on that never ending christmas gift list for family and friends.

October 2015

Chris Austin, one of the founders of Found in Fred also shared that he is

and at the Visitor Center or downloaded from www.fredericksburgmainstreet.org.

A Large Selection Available

200 William Street Downtown ,Fredericksburg 540.373.4421 Mon-Fri: 9:30-6 Sat: 9:30-5 CrownJewelersFredericksburg.com

With the arrival of Fall, visitors to downtown Fredericksburg can anticipate a variety of fun-filled activities. A harbinger of the season will be the arrival of scarecrows—lots of them. By October 10 more than 40 figures will be situated throughout the downtown area. Their creators will be aiming for a variety of effects, ranging from charming to funny to downright creepy. You can vote for your favorite scarecrow through the end of the day on October 31, and winners will be announced the next day. Ballots can be found at many of the scarecrow locations

Dreaming of Owning Downtown? Let’s Make it Happen!

LibertyTown Arts will be rotating both 2-dimensional and 3dimensional artists from their workshop and studio which currently is home to 50+ local artists. LibertyTown Arts is currently showcasing works and pieces from Sarah Lapp, Kathleen Walsh, Dan Finnegan and Gayla Lee. According to D.D. and Kenneth Lecky, owners of LibertyTown, they are also “excited to rotate in some of their pieces from

Beautiful All-B Bronze Fine Art from the very talented and well known Wegner Brothers (Stewart and Steven). Features include art and decor from their “Crab Series”, “Tree Frogs”, and other ocean-themed pieces as well. Wegner Metal Arts once had a storefront on Caroline Street, and according to Stewart Wegner, one of their owners and founders, “[They] are excited to have their work back on Caroline Street”. Their foundry where all of these beautiful pieces are hand-crafted with passion is located at 520 Wolfe Street.

6

Found in Fred’s current vendors: Products Artwork Bottles Uncorked Re-purposed Wine Bottles Lord & Lilly's (Now Located at 611 Caroline St.) - Christian Gifts and Decor M.C. Vintage Vintage and Collectibles Good Turn Earth - Living Soil Cards by Shirley - Greeting and Seasonal Cards Wegner Metal Arts - Bronze Art LibertyTown Arts - Artwork Christina Bendo - Pottery Frau Design - Upcycled Guitar Jewelry Tubular Gear - Upcycled Dog Products Andy McQuillen - Canvas Work

By Ann Glave

Front porch fredericksburg

John Coker of the Rappahannock Fredericksburg Rotary Club presented the scarecrow idea to Fredericksburg Main Street Inc. after a trip to California. The idea quickly grew to include additional partners— Fredericksburg Parent & Family Magazine and the City’s police department. Such initiatives are a great way to inspire a variety of different businesses and organizations to get involved with the downtown. For example, the Central Regional Rappahannock Library, Caroline’s Realty, Union Bank & Trust, and VA Partners Bank are joining in on the fun along with restaurants and retail shops. The second activity is a free movie night. On October 24, weather permitting, It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown! will open at 6:30 p.m. at Hurkamp park. That Halloween classic will

Front Porch Fredericksburg

Highlighting Local People, Places & Events Since 1997 excited to break ground on the new renovations at Kybecca, another staple and iconic restaurant in the heart of historic downtown Fredericksburg. Austin also stated that he is looking forward to coordinating furniture repair and restoration classes to the community in October. Be sure to check out Found in Fred the next time you head downtown and get a little taste of what Fredericksburg has to offer!

be followed by the original 1931 version of Frankenstein. These autumn festivities will conclude on Halloween, October 31, at Riverfront Park where families can participate in a variety of entertaining activities from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Stop by to receive a map that will help you in your quest to find “Treats on the Streets.” Many local businesses will be participating, offering Treats to our smaller costumed visitors to downtown. All of these activities resulted from cooperation between the City’s police department, Fredericksburg Parent & Family Magazine, the Rappahannock Fredericksburg Rotary Club, and Fredericksburg VA Main Street Inc. There’s something new in Market Square Alley—something green. Seven arborvitae trees have been placed along one wall of the Market Square Alley. The Design Committee of Fredericksburg VA Main Street, Tree Fredericksburg and the Fredericksburg Area Association of Realtors provided funds and volunteers to make this happen. Thank you to Fredericksburg’s Economic Development Authority for providing the funds to Tree Fredericksburg with an EDA JumpStart! grant. This is the first of upcoming things happening in Market Square. Stay tuned! Save the dates: Holiday Open House Weekend is November 14 and 15. Santa Strolls are back with a new twist, a Santa tracker app. This year you will be able to follow Santa’s whereabouts in real time. Shop Small, an American Express campaign designed to support independent local businesses, is scheduled for Saturday, November 28th. Well

ARM

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

540.847.0630 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com

Stay tuned to Fredericksburg VA Main Street by signing up to receive the newsletter at www.fredericksburgmainstreet.org and like us on Facebook at Fredericksburg Downtown and Fredericksburg VA Main Street Inc. More than just merchants! Main Street is more than just a retail and restaurant association. The overall goal for a strong vibrant Downtown resonates with many different groups. If you want to get involved with Fredericksburg VA Main Street on a board or a committee level, please reach out to: Ann Glave info@fredericksburgmainstreet.org, Scarlett Pons, President spons@ponshopstudio.com Or Lisa Durham, Volunteer Director volunteer@fredericksburgmainstreet.org.

Ann Glave is the Executive Director of Fredericksburg Main Street

received last year, the Early Bird Riser promotion will be on again from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. with red carpets, balloons, free coffee and pastries.

ROXBURY F

SUZY STONE

Welcome these newest additions Stone to Fredericksburg’s downtown: Creek ReDesigns (709 Caroline Street), Bella Giornata Events & Design (907 Caroline Street, suite G), Charlie & Grace Market Café (1002 Sophia Street), Lady Legacy (723 Caroline Street), Annie’s Dog Spa (1004B Caroline Street), Found in Fred (1004 Caroline Street) and Learning Loft (212 George St).

& GARDEN CENTER

Since 1929

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

We have all your gardening needs! Come Shop With Us

Rick Jeffries is a serial entrepreneur, a founder of Found in Fred, blog and food enthusiast and proud owner of his Siberian Husky puppy. (@RickJeffries on Twitter) Each Office Is Independently Owned & Operated

front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

7


STARTUP WEEKEND

David Kennedy

make your idea a reality

A different angle

By christina ferber Do you have an idea that you think could change the world or at the very least make you millions? Luckily, your chance has arrived in the form of Fredericksburg’s upcoming Startup Weekend, held at Germanna Community College from November 13-15. Startup Weekend is the chance to take ideas and make them into real business realities. In the span of 54 hours, ideas will be pitched and then formed into minimum viable products. Many past participants from Startup Weekends have gone onto form their own businesses. Sprelly, a gourmet nut and butter company, Plants Map, a social cataloging app for gardeners, and Good Turn Earth Company, a business that produces gourmet soil conditioner, were all ideas pitched at previous weekends. “I wouldn't have a business today if it hadn't been for Startup Weekend. I had no idea what was involved in starting a business, and the contacts and personalized help that we received during that time was invaluable,” says Sarah

Perry, co-owner of Good Turn Earth Company. Participants begin the weekend with a social time and dinner before gearing up to start their pitches. Each individual has one minute to talk about their idea, the problem it solves, and what types of expertise they most need to move forward. Teams then organically form around the top pitches. Then the weekend really begins, and even if a team doesn’t form around you there is still value in sticking around and joining another team. “It’s a chance to try out an idea and think like a business person,” says Andrew Curtis, who is heading up the weekend. “It’s also a great opportunity to collaborate with others and get help from experts in different fields.” As teams work throughout the weekend, coaches are available to help. From backgrounds that range from technology and design to marketing and accounting, there is always help around the corner.

By emily hollingsworth Photographer David C. Kennedy Gets New Perspectives with Digital Photography

“Everyone you need to know to help start and promote a business is there to provide assistance to you, and help make your idea grow,” says Perry. At the final pitch on Sunday, teams present the business they have created to judges and investors. Prizes are then awarded to the top teams. November’s Startup Weekend is part of a global event and one of the focuses of the weekend is to get veterans involved in the world of entrepreneurship. Veterans are able to register for free as well. You can also observe the event during the pitch fire and final pitch portions of the weekend. Pitch fires start at 7 pm on Friday, and final pitches start on Sunday at 5 pm.

“Startup Weekend is an opportunity like no other,” says Curtis. For more information and to register visit www.up.co/communities/usa/fredericksbu rg/ or on Twitter @SWFXBG #swfxbg Christina Ferber is a teacher, writer and mom who writes about local entrepreneurs each month in Front Porch The 10By10 winning team of 2014 at Start-Up Weekend Fredericksburg (L to R) Ben Muldrow, Elizabeth Colon, Josh Walton (green shirt), Christa Huntley (founder) and Sam Jones. Photo copyright Bob Martin.

Snead’s Farm

Support Local Green Space & Local Farmers 10 mi. S.E. of downtown on right side of Rt. 17 540/371-9328

A fall message from Ellen Snead Here at Snead’s Farm, Keeper and I are retiring from some things. We will still be custodians and "Keepers" of Snead’s Farm and help to keep it beautiful, clean, and child and dog-friendly. But we are handing over the task of scheduling events at our farm to Debbie Nance, who will help make sure your field trip, birthday party, wedding, reunion or other fall event is fun and memorable. Visit our website at SneadsFarm.com to contact her for weddings, parties and all fall events. Speaking of fall outings, what are good, healthy, and inexpensive things to do as a family with your children, and even your dogs? Snead’s Farm is what I like to think of as a technology-free zone, where you can come take a self-guided stroll around our property, see our baby calf, llamas, horses, dogs, chickens and other animals, play in the playhouse, ride the trikes, swing, get lost in our sunflower and “Out of My Gourd” mazes and otherwise enjoy this peaceful place we like to call home. Join us for our Farm Fall Festival, or for Pumpkin-P Picking now through November 1, 9am - 5pm. We hope you’ll join us for this special season on the farm. Visit sneadsfarm.com for more information on all of our events and offerings.

Ellen

8

October 2015

Front porch fredericksburg

David C. Kennedy likes to go to the bridge at the Fredericksburg train station on occasion to take photos. According to Kennedy, the bridge is a popular site for photographers, and he tries to go different times of the year. The season will be different, the lighting different. The mood of the landscape changes, the texture of the rocks and tracks shift. A well-known landmark transforms every time with a snap of his camera. And Kennedy is always looking for a new shot. Kennedy moved to Fredericksburg a year and a half ago after living in Crofton, Maryland among other states. According to Kennedy, he took photos in high school, but he could not pursue photography fully until he went to school at The Art Institute in Pittsburgh, where he received a degree in Visual Communication. His passion then was drawing. Kennedy said he was inspired by illustrator Brad Holland. It was when a teacher praised his photography, allowing him to work in the darkroom after hours, that Kennedy decided to make photography a career. “It’s funny how I thought photography would be a side [thing,] it is all I do now,” Kennedy said. In 2001, Kennedy was hired by The Washington Post as an artist in the Creative Services Department. For more than 13 years, Kennedy worked in graphic

design and photographed various places in D.C., including restaurants and sales award events at the Washington Post facility. The growing popularity of digital photography gave Kennedy the freedom to execute shots he had not thought possible. After leaving the Washington Post last year and becoming a freelance event photographer and an associate photographer for Hartwood Photography, Kennedy continues to explore digital photography. He has a digital Nikon D750 and uses Adobe Photoshop and InDesign for his graphic and photography, including his work in photo restoration. Kennedy has also started returning to his first love of illustrating, with a new twist. Kennedy takes landscape photos and install them in Photoshop. He then uses Photoshop’s brush tools to paint over the photos digitally, letting the two disciplines, art and photography, meld together.

The class would end up going to places that did not have interesting subject matters. The teacher’s goal, according to Kennedy, was for the class to create a new perspective from something ordinary. “Photographers can bring life into any subject matter,” Kennedy said, on what he learned from the trips. “That was a revelation for me.”

Using a new and growing art form, digital photography, Kennedy continues to bring life into his shots, creating something new. Check out David’s portfolio at : dkphotography.photoshelter.com. Emily Hollinsworth is a UMW student NOTE: Dave is this month’s cover photographer

According to Kennedy, he does not try to pass his photos as paintings or vice versa, but photoshop programs lets him combine two of his passions in a field he says he has barely scratched the surface. “Art and photography complement each other,” Kennedy said. “Keeps me on my toes constantly.” His goal to continuously try new things in photography started when his photography teacher in the Art Institute of Pittsburgh would take his class on what his teacher called “photo safaris.”

Custom & Semi-Custom Cabinets Custom Laminate, Granite & Silestone Showroom at Leedstown, Virginia www.cabinetworks.org Phone: 804.224.1812 Fax: 804.224.1803 Email: pete@cabinetworks.org front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

9


STARTUP WEEKEND

David Kennedy

make your idea a reality

A different angle

By christina ferber Do you have an idea that you think could change the world or at the very least make you millions? Luckily, your chance has arrived in the form of Fredericksburg’s upcoming Startup Weekend, held at Germanna Community College from November 13-15. Startup Weekend is the chance to take ideas and make them into real business realities. In the span of 54 hours, ideas will be pitched and then formed into minimum viable products. Many past participants from Startup Weekends have gone onto form their own businesses. Sprelly, a gourmet nut and butter company, Plants Map, a social cataloging app for gardeners, and Good Turn Earth Company, a business that produces gourmet soil conditioner, were all ideas pitched at previous weekends. “I wouldn't have a business today if it hadn't been for Startup Weekend. I had no idea what was involved in starting a business, and the contacts and personalized help that we received during that time was invaluable,” says Sarah

Perry, co-owner of Good Turn Earth Company. Participants begin the weekend with a social time and dinner before gearing up to start their pitches. Each individual has one minute to talk about their idea, the problem it solves, and what types of expertise they most need to move forward. Teams then organically form around the top pitches. Then the weekend really begins, and even if a team doesn’t form around you there is still value in sticking around and joining another team. “It’s a chance to try out an idea and think like a business person,” says Andrew Curtis, who is heading up the weekend. “It’s also a great opportunity to collaborate with others and get help from experts in different fields.” As teams work throughout the weekend, coaches are available to help. From backgrounds that range from technology and design to marketing and accounting, there is always help around the corner.

By emily hollingsworth Photographer David C. Kennedy Gets New Perspectives with Digital Photography

“Everyone you need to know to help start and promote a business is there to provide assistance to you, and help make your idea grow,” says Perry. At the final pitch on Sunday, teams present the business they have created to judges and investors. Prizes are then awarded to the top teams. November’s Startup Weekend is part of a global event and one of the focuses of the weekend is to get veterans involved in the world of entrepreneurship. Veterans are able to register for free as well. You can also observe the event during the pitch fire and final pitch portions of the weekend. Pitch fires start at 7 pm on Friday, and final pitches start on Sunday at 5 pm.

“Startup Weekend is an opportunity like no other,” says Curtis. For more information and to register visit www.up.co/communities/usa/fredericksbu rg/ or on Twitter @SWFXBG #swfxbg Christina Ferber is a teacher, writer and mom who writes about local entrepreneurs each month in Front Porch The 10By10 winning team of 2014 at Start-Up Weekend Fredericksburg (L to R) Ben Muldrow, Elizabeth Colon, Josh Walton (green shirt), Christa Huntley (founder) and Sam Jones. Photo copyright Bob Martin.

Snead’s Farm

Support Local Green Space & Local Farmers 10 mi. S.E. of downtown on right side of Rt. 17 540/371-9328

A fall message from Ellen Snead Here at Snead’s Farm, Keeper and I are retiring from some things. We will still be custodians and "Keepers" of Snead’s Farm and help to keep it beautiful, clean, and child and dog-friendly. But we are handing over the task of scheduling events at our farm to Debbie Nance, who will help make sure your field trip, birthday party, wedding, reunion or other fall event is fun and memorable. Visit our website at SneadsFarm.com to contact her for weddings, parties and all fall events. Speaking of fall outings, what are good, healthy, and inexpensive things to do as a family with your children, and even your dogs? Snead’s Farm is what I like to think of as a technology-free zone, where you can come take a self-guided stroll around our property, see our baby calf, llamas, horses, dogs, chickens and other animals, play in the playhouse, ride the trikes, swing, get lost in our sunflower and “Out of My Gourd” mazes and otherwise enjoy this peaceful place we like to call home. Join us for our Farm Fall Festival, or for Pumpkin-P Picking now through November 1, 9am - 5pm. We hope you’ll join us for this special season on the farm. Visit sneadsfarm.com for more information on all of our events and offerings.

Ellen

8

October 2015

Front porch fredericksburg

David C. Kennedy likes to go to the bridge at the Fredericksburg train station on occasion to take photos. According to Kennedy, the bridge is a popular site for photographers, and he tries to go different times of the year. The season will be different, the lighting different. The mood of the landscape changes, the texture of the rocks and tracks shift. A well-known landmark transforms every time with a snap of his camera. And Kennedy is always looking for a new shot. Kennedy moved to Fredericksburg a year and a half ago after living in Crofton, Maryland among other states. According to Kennedy, he took photos in high school, but he could not pursue photography fully until he went to school at The Art Institute in Pittsburgh, where he received a degree in Visual Communication. His passion then was drawing. Kennedy said he was inspired by illustrator Brad Holland. It was when a teacher praised his photography, allowing him to work in the darkroom after hours, that Kennedy decided to make photography a career. “It’s funny how I thought photography would be a side [thing,] it is all I do now,” Kennedy said. In 2001, Kennedy was hired by The Washington Post as an artist in the Creative Services Department. For more than 13 years, Kennedy worked in graphic

design and photographed various places in D.C., including restaurants and sales award events at the Washington Post facility. The growing popularity of digital photography gave Kennedy the freedom to execute shots he had not thought possible. After leaving the Washington Post last year and becoming a freelance event photographer and an associate photographer for Hartwood Photography, Kennedy continues to explore digital photography. He has a digital Nikon D750 and uses Adobe Photoshop and InDesign for his graphic and photography, including his work in photo restoration. Kennedy has also started returning to his first love of illustrating, with a new twist. Kennedy takes landscape photos and install them in Photoshop. He then uses Photoshop’s brush tools to paint over the photos digitally, letting the two disciplines, art and photography, meld together.

The class would end up going to places that did not have interesting subject matters. The teacher’s goal, according to Kennedy, was for the class to create a new perspective from something ordinary. “Photographers can bring life into any subject matter,” Kennedy said, on what he learned from the trips. “That was a revelation for me.”

Using a new and growing art form, digital photography, Kennedy continues to bring life into his shots, creating something new. Check out David’s portfolio at : dkphotography.photoshelter.com. Emily Hollinsworth is a UMW student NOTE: Dave is this month’s cover photographer

According to Kennedy, he does not try to pass his photos as paintings or vice versa, but photoshop programs lets him combine two of his passions in a field he says he has barely scratched the surface. “Art and photography complement each other,” Kennedy said. “Keeps me on my toes constantly.” His goal to continuously try new things in photography started when his photography teacher in the Art Institute of Pittsburgh would take his class on what his teacher called “photo safaris.”

Custom & Semi-Custom Cabinets Custom Laminate, Granite & Silestone Showroom at Leedstown, Virginia www.cabinetworks.org Phone: 804.224.1812 Fax: 804.224.1803 Email: pete@cabinetworks.org front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

9


MANARC

VA. ORGANIZING turns 2o

bourne the battle

by a.e.bayne

By Dawn Whitmore

Members of VA. Organizing in front of a new mural, depicting African American historical figures, at the Spotsylvania County Board of Supervisor's chamber Virginia Organizing, a statewide grassroots organization devoted to empowering people in local communities to address issues that affect the quality of their lives, is celebrating its th 20 anniversary this year. Since 1995, Virginia Organizing has encouraged the participation of marginalized peoples in the democratic process, building relationships between diverse groups of individuals to assist them in joining their fellow citizens in healthy, democratic exchange. Member Duane Edwards says the foremost importance of Virginia Organizing is that it connects people with their elected officials. He says, “People go out and vote, but they don’t know the process of how to contact their elected officials once the vote is done, or they feel they don’t have the time to do it. Even something as simple as getting a pothole fixed on your street can be difficult when you don’t know how to do it. There’s a process that allows us to get those potholes fixed, but a lot of people just sit in front of their house complaining to their neighbors about the pothole. That’s one thing I’ve been able to pass on to other people, how to contact the officials who can make changes.” Edwards also notes that Virginia Organizing mobilizes people to tell their stories to the politicians who represent them. He explains, “A lot of organizations take the stories to the politicians for the people, but Virginia Organizing gives you back your voice. Edwards relates a time when Fredericksburg Area Organizer, Addie Alexander, offered him time to speak his mind: “I was planning to work at a Restoration of Rights workshop recently and Addie asked me if I wanted to attend the upcoming meeting. I thought I was just going to sit in and listen, but she said, ‘Duane Edwards has something he wants

10

October 2015

to say.’ That was new to me, because I had an opportunity to tell my story in my own voice. It was empowering.” Member Dakota Ziegler has been impressed with the equalizing effects that community building has had on the groups with whom he’s worked. He says it can sometime be as simple as sitting down with people and asking them what’s going on in their lives to find out what can be done to help. He explains, “Suddenly, we don’t feel so disconnected anymore, and we see that we’re all striving for this larger sense of community. Virginia Organizing has bridged some of those separations between different members of the community and has helped us to recognize that we can all help each other and bring something different to the table.” Ziegler has witnessed some positive changes in his time with Virginia Organizing, but he says grassroots work can be “a slow-moving type of organism.” He sees one of the most significant impacts of the work they do to be the restoration of a sense of self-worth in all members. He says, “Self-worth is so much greater when we recognize that we matter and we are important. Some people have been taught directly and indirectly that perhaps they do not matter; thoughtful listening and learning how to enact change together restores self-worth.” Edwards muses, “Virginia’s my home; my family lives here. Any time you have a community that is more knowledgeable in the democratic process, the whole community is better. Virginia Organizing has taught me ways to make my home better.” Look for Building Power, Changing Lives: The Story of Virginia Organizing, a book published to commemorate the organization’s first 20 years, on sale in October 2015.

Front porch fredericksburg

Manarc, located on William Street celebrated their one-year anniversary this year. The thrift shop, located at 107 William Street, is a quick walk from the public parking lot on Sophia Street. However, even if you must park and walk for blocks, Deborah Franks (photo) and her staff are worth it! The concept of Manarc, on the surface, is a simple one: a thrift store who donates a portion of their profits to veteran organizations. Yet, once you spend time with Deborah Franks, the CEO of Manarc, it quickly becomes evident; the thrift shop can only be described as the proverbial ‘tip of the iceberg.’ Frank’s love and dedication for veterans and her community are indisputable and genuine. Franks is a Spotsylvania native and Navy brat, whose Father served in the Korean War. Franks, a Spotsylvania native, spent 8 ½ years as Director of Home Instead; she felt a definite lack of care for our veterans. Franks response to the

dilemma would be resigning from Home Instead and creating a business plan. A business plan, which would include a thrift shop to assist local veteran organizations, Manarc: Borne the Battle opened on Caroline Street on August 29th, 2014. The subsequent move to William Street from the Caroline Street location would happen during the winter months, not the most opportune time to relocate but a necessary one…the community Manarc loves and supports stepped up to the challenge. “The store would be packed up and moved in two weeks and the new location set up in two days,” explains Franks, “thanks to our local veterans and community.” Moving a new non-profit business

is scary, especially, during one of the retail industry’s notorious slowest months of the year, January. “January would become a wonderful month for the thrift store,” Franks states, “because we were the only place downtown open when it snowed, we were selling furniture in January.” Manarc furthers the building of community by partnering with a local business each month. The concept is not overly complicated or earth shattering but the benefits definitely can be. The partnering business and Manarc decide on an event, September’s event, the Mug Club included Spencer Devon Brewing and Liberty Town Arts with a portion of proceeds benefitting Veterans Moving Forward. Veterans Moving Forward, Semper Fi and a local VFW Peer-tto-P Peer support group are the current local

veteran groups Manarc is blessing with their profits. Manarc doesn’t believe in exorbitant overhead. Two part-time employees run the store and Franks can be found there often. During this first year, Franks could be found at the store seven days a week. During this next year, she plans to have a rare day off. With her vision for Manarc, it will definitely be a rare day off. She has no aspirations for franchising but does have a future vision of 5 Manarc thrift stores, with a home base in Fredericksburg. “It is not about being successful but about giving,” states Franks, “however, it will always be important to stay local.” Oh yeah, one last thing in case you wondering…. Manarc is an acronym: Marines Air Force Navy ArmyReserves Coast Guard. And, Inscription under boots: reads “...from a father hero. We thank him for his service for our freedom”. Dawn Whitmore is a landscape photographer and writer who lives in Spotsylvania.

front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

11


MANARC

VA. ORGANIZING turns 2o

bourne the battle

by a.e.bayne

By Dawn Whitmore

Members of VA. Organizing in front of a new mural, depicting African American historical figures, at the Spotsylvania County Board of Supervisor's chamber Virginia Organizing, a statewide grassroots organization devoted to empowering people in local communities to address issues that affect the quality of their lives, is celebrating its th 20 anniversary this year. Since 1995, Virginia Organizing has encouraged the participation of marginalized peoples in the democratic process, building relationships between diverse groups of individuals to assist them in joining their fellow citizens in healthy, democratic exchange. Member Duane Edwards says the foremost importance of Virginia Organizing is that it connects people with their elected officials. He says, “People go out and vote, but they don’t know the process of how to contact their elected officials once the vote is done, or they feel they don’t have the time to do it. Even something as simple as getting a pothole fixed on your street can be difficult when you don’t know how to do it. There’s a process that allows us to get those potholes fixed, but a lot of people just sit in front of their house complaining to their neighbors about the pothole. That’s one thing I’ve been able to pass on to other people, how to contact the officials who can make changes.” Edwards also notes that Virginia Organizing mobilizes people to tell their stories to the politicians who represent them. He explains, “A lot of organizations take the stories to the politicians for the people, but Virginia Organizing gives you back your voice. Edwards relates a time when Fredericksburg Area Organizer, Addie Alexander, offered him time to speak his mind: “I was planning to work at a Restoration of Rights workshop recently and Addie asked me if I wanted to attend the upcoming meeting. I thought I was just going to sit in and listen, but she said, ‘Duane Edwards has something he wants

10

October 2015

to say.’ That was new to me, because I had an opportunity to tell my story in my own voice. It was empowering.” Member Dakota Ziegler has been impressed with the equalizing effects that community building has had on the groups with whom he’s worked. He says it can sometime be as simple as sitting down with people and asking them what’s going on in their lives to find out what can be done to help. He explains, “Suddenly, we don’t feel so disconnected anymore, and we see that we’re all striving for this larger sense of community. Virginia Organizing has bridged some of those separations between different members of the community and has helped us to recognize that we can all help each other and bring something different to the table.” Ziegler has witnessed some positive changes in his time with Virginia Organizing, but he says grassroots work can be “a slow-moving type of organism.” He sees one of the most significant impacts of the work they do to be the restoration of a sense of self-worth in all members. He says, “Self-worth is so much greater when we recognize that we matter and we are important. Some people have been taught directly and indirectly that perhaps they do not matter; thoughtful listening and learning how to enact change together restores self-worth.” Edwards muses, “Virginia’s my home; my family lives here. Any time you have a community that is more knowledgeable in the democratic process, the whole community is better. Virginia Organizing has taught me ways to make my home better.” Look for Building Power, Changing Lives: The Story of Virginia Organizing, a book published to commemorate the organization’s first 20 years, on sale in October 2015.

Front porch fredericksburg

Manarc, located on William Street celebrated their one-year anniversary this year. The thrift shop, located at 107 William Street, is a quick walk from the public parking lot on Sophia Street. However, even if you must park and walk for blocks, Deborah Franks (photo) and her staff are worth it! The concept of Manarc, on the surface, is a simple one: a thrift store who donates a portion of their profits to veteran organizations. Yet, once you spend time with Deborah Franks, the CEO of Manarc, it quickly becomes evident; the thrift shop can only be described as the proverbial ‘tip of the iceberg.’ Frank’s love and dedication for veterans and her community are indisputable and genuine. Franks is a Spotsylvania native and Navy brat, whose Father served in the Korean War. Franks, a Spotsylvania native, spent 8 ½ years as Director of Home Instead; she felt a definite lack of care for our veterans. Franks response to the

dilemma would be resigning from Home Instead and creating a business plan. A business plan, which would include a thrift shop to assist local veteran organizations, Manarc: Borne the Battle opened on Caroline Street on August 29th, 2014. The subsequent move to William Street from the Caroline Street location would happen during the winter months, not the most opportune time to relocate but a necessary one…the community Manarc loves and supports stepped up to the challenge. “The store would be packed up and moved in two weeks and the new location set up in two days,” explains Franks, “thanks to our local veterans and community.” Moving a new non-profit business

is scary, especially, during one of the retail industry’s notorious slowest months of the year, January. “January would become a wonderful month for the thrift store,” Franks states, “because we were the only place downtown open when it snowed, we were selling furniture in January.” Manarc furthers the building of community by partnering with a local business each month. The concept is not overly complicated or earth shattering but the benefits definitely can be. The partnering business and Manarc decide on an event, September’s event, the Mug Club included Spencer Devon Brewing and Liberty Town Arts with a portion of proceeds benefitting Veterans Moving Forward. Veterans Moving Forward, Semper Fi and a local VFW Peer-tto-P Peer support group are the current local

veteran groups Manarc is blessing with their profits. Manarc doesn’t believe in exorbitant overhead. Two part-time employees run the store and Franks can be found there often. During this first year, Franks could be found at the store seven days a week. During this next year, she plans to have a rare day off. With her vision for Manarc, it will definitely be a rare day off. She has no aspirations for franchising but does have a future vision of 5 Manarc thrift stores, with a home base in Fredericksburg. “It is not about being successful but about giving,” states Franks, “however, it will always be important to stay local.” Oh yeah, one last thing in case you wondering…. Manarc is an acronym: Marines Air Force Navy ArmyReserves Coast Guard. And, Inscription under boots: reads “...from a father hero. We thank him for his service for our freedom”. Dawn Whitmore is a landscape photographer and writer who lives in Spotsylvania.

front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

11


Vino hartwood winery The Renowned Northern Italian Restaurant once in Stafford on Garrisonville Rd moves to downtown Fredericksburg’s “Historic Chimney’s Building” on Caroline Street adding Internationality to their Cuisine

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

12

October 2015

Open 7 days a week Monday to Saturday 11 am to 10pm International Sunday Brunch 9am to 3pm Dinner from 3pm to 9pm Private Dining Rooms for Your Holiday parties or any occasion!!! 623 Caroline Street Fredericksburg VA 22401 Tel (540) 368-1 1107 Fax (540) 368-1 1108

Front porch fredericksburg

By scott richards The wine industry in Virginia has exploded in recent years with the number of vineyards and wineries increasing. It has been said the Old Dominion wine producers are in an experimental stage as new varieties of grapes are coming into the state, adding to what is already here, and in some cases, replacing those that have not done well. The most rare asset to this burgeoning industry are mentors. Not just those with degrees in viticulture and oenology, but those who have been around for a long time and are willing to take in the new people starting out. Jim In Stafford County, Livingston (pictured with wife, Beverly) is a mentor who has been a father to many who have had the idea of being vintners. The success of Livingston's Hartwood Winery speaks of the work that he has put into what he loves, and a place of learning for the people who have taken the time to listen and work with him, gleaning from the years of experience he possesses. Growing up in Carter County, Tennessee, Livingston's mother was a master cook and herbologist who gathered plants from the surrounding forest. At the dinner table, there was always moonshine to drink, which at that time was legal if used for personal consumption. "I believe my talent at wine making came from my mother," stated he said, "She used to make the moonshine, also." Educated as a librarian, Livingston started making wine in college. To accommodate childhood polio, he was given a dorm room with a tub, in which he made a wine that he provided for faculty and administration. Several events involving high level administrators featured his bathtub wine. His education in wine was not in a classroom, however. Livingston's mentor was the winemaker at Ingleside, Dr. Jacques Recht, who graduated from Bordeaux University and was the final protege of the famed oenologist Emile Peynaud. Dr. Recht noted Livingston's talent for working with wine, and took him under wing. "Jacques used to work us hard, " he commented, "Not just in the field, but in the lab as well, teaching us to blend wines." In addition to studying under Dr. Recht, Livingston traveled from Prince William County where he worked in the public schools as a librarian, to Burnley Vineyards in Barboursville, Virginia, learning to do everything that needed to be done in a winery. Jim Law at the time

was offering courses on viticulture and oenology, and of course, Livingston was there. With the help and advice of Lucy Morton, Hartwood Winery was started as a commercial winery in 1981 and then as a farm winery in 1989. Now one of the landmarks in the Fredericksburg region, Hartwood Winery participates in the Grapes and Grains Trail which includes tours of four wineries, three breweries and a distillery, spread throughout Stafford and Spotsylvania counties and the City of Fredericksburg. It was noted that Hartwood will have a Harvest Festival, October 31, from 11-5, featuring hayrides, games, live music, tours, food and more family related activities. Livingston stated that the wine industry in Virginia is changing with the larger wineries starting up and turning vineyards into wedding chapels and event centers to support themselves. The smaller wineries make a quality wine but are often overshadowed by the larger ones with their concerts and other happenings. To date, Hartwood Winery is active in assisting smaller wineries get past the learning curve involved in startup, offering advice and giving hands on experience. Jim Livingston has been a part of the wine industry in Virginia for almost forty years and has seen a lot of changes. There are some constants: his expertise and love of wine, and his heart towards those who want to learn. Hartwood Winery wines reflect Livingston's life's work. Two of them that should be tasted when visiting: Hartwood Station White - A blend of Chardonel and Rkatsitelli. The Chardonel adds a hint of apples, pears and perfuming. Rkatsitelli, a wine made from a grape originating in the Georgian Republic of Russia, gives a spiciness that enhances the wine experience. This wine pairs well with fish, fowl, or pork and is also delightful by itself. The 2012 Tannat - This deep red French varietal offers a beautiful complexity and balanced tannins resulting from twenty four months of aging in oak barrels. This is a good wine to age.

Season’s Bounty Savory Fall

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105

By vanessa moncure October’s farm market stands are filling up with bushels of apples, baskets of mums and Crayola orange pumpkins - the very last of summer’s tomatoes, bush beans, eggplants, peppers and okra have been replaced by early beets and greens. My garden is being prepped for overwintering, pulling out the last vines and leaves of the past summer bounty, tilling and working in compost and chicken litter to enrich the soil. This year’s tomato and basil crop just seemed to go on and on - we’ve eaten more than our share of caprese salad, roasted tomatoes with chiffonade of basil, gazpacho, fresh salsa, marinara with basil sauce, tomato and basil frittata…...and especially pesto. When I open a can of tomatoes in the winter, I can taste summer in every bite - as I can with the garlicky-cheesy licorice-y flavor of basil pesto. Unlike my other herbs, I freeze basil rather than drying it - strip the leaves from the stem, rinse well and let air-dry, then place whole leaves in quart freezer bags. After they freeze, remove the bag from the freezer and open slightly, then crumble the leaves through the bag with your hands. Seal tightly again and store until ready to use - measure in recipes as for fresh herbs - dried herbs have a much more concentrated flavor, so use 3-4 parts fresh to one part dried herbs. This method works well for parsley leaves, too - I always keep a bag of fresh frozen parsley for cooking and garnishing - the freeze-dried parsley sold in the spice aisle tastes just like green confetti. Pesto is not confined to only basil, as pesto is the term for any food made by pounding. Variations using arugula, spinach, roasted tomatoes and olives or even mushrooms have been popularized. I like freezing many herbs as pesto and although many pesto recipes call for pine nuts - I’m not a fan, I think they taste soapy - I think basil freezes better without nuts anyway. PESTO MONKEY BREAD or BREADSTICKS Pesto: In a food processor fitted with a steel blade (or mortar and pestle or VERY finely chopped by hand) blend 2 cloves of garlic with 1 c. packed basil leaves. Stir in ½ c. each grated romano cheese and grated parmesan cheese along with a pinch of salt. While machine is on, slowly drizzle in ½ c. olive oil. (and okay, if you love pine nuts, add in ½ c. chopped nuts). Set aside, covered, while making the bread. Dough: Stir ½ tsp. sugar and 1 pkg. active dry yeast into ¼ c. warm water and let work for five minutes. This is also a good way to proof your yeast if you’re unsure it is still active. In a large bowl, measure 2 c. bread flour, ½ tsp. salt.

Make a well in the center and add the yeast mixture, ½ of the basil mixture and 1 c. warm water. Gradually add 1 additional cup of flour as you work the dough. Turn out onto a floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, adding a bit more flour as necessary. Turn dough into oiled bowl, oil the top of dough and let stand, covered, until doubled, about one hour. Punch dough down and roll into about 16 balls, arranging around the bottom of a greased 10” tube pan. Cover and let rise about 30 minutes, bake in preheated 375F oven for 35-40 minutes. Let partially cool in pan, then turn out onto rack. Serve on platter, placing a small bowl filled with the remaining pesto in the center of bread. For breadsticks, just form the dough into 8” long rolls, let rise and bake at 375F for about half the time. Use the remaining pesto as a dipping sauce. PESTO CREAM SHRIMP LINGUINI Any time I combine pasta with seafood, I think of my Dad and his love of “oyster spaghetti” at Pasquale Manale’s in New Orleans. Begin preparing ½ lb. linguini. In a saute pan, melt 2 T. butter and 1 T. olive oil over medium high heat, cook ½ c. diced onion until softened - stir in ¾ lb. shelled and deveined 21-25 count Gulf shrimp (better flavor than farmed) and saute briefly, just til cooked through, about 2 minutes. Remove shrimp and onions and stir in ¾ c. heavy cream, ¼ c. basil pesto and 2 tsp. creole flavoring. Bring to boil, reducing cream to almost half. Return shrimp to pan along with ¼ c. pasta cooking liquid and 1 T. butter. Stir in linguine, lifting and stirring until sauce is well mixed with pasta. Remove pan from heat and stir in 2 T. fresh parsley and ¼ c. grated Parmesan cheese. Serve immediately. HERBED PORK TENDERLOIN For each pork tenderloin, use 2 T. of pesto sauce for marinade. Rub over pork, place in glass baking dish, cover and leave for 30 minutes. Grill about 3 minutes per side, or until internal temperature is at least 145F. Meanwhile, roast Red Bliss potatoes, cut into about 1 ½” cubes and tossed with scant amount olive oil, at 425F until browned and tender. Remove from oven and toss with pesto sauce, adding 1 T. at a time until well-covered - add S&P to taste. Serve with the pork, along with sliced tomatoes.

Vanessa Moncure brings us great recipes, with her special touches, each month in FP

www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

(540) 371-2008

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family

Open Daily 11am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline at the corner of Caroline & George Streets Master Card ~ Visa ~ Discover front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

13


Vino hartwood winery The Renowned Northern Italian Restaurant once in Stafford on Garrisonville Rd moves to downtown Fredericksburg’s “Historic Chimney’s Building” on Caroline Street adding Internationality to their Cuisine

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

12

October 2015

Open 7 days a week Monday to Saturday 11 am to 10pm International Sunday Brunch 9am to 3pm Dinner from 3pm to 9pm Private Dining Rooms for Your Holiday parties or any occasion!!! 623 Caroline Street Fredericksburg VA 22401 Tel (540) 368-1 1107 Fax (540) 368-1 1108

Front porch fredericksburg

By scott richards The wine industry in Virginia has exploded in recent years with the number of vineyards and wineries increasing. It has been said the Old Dominion wine producers are in an experimental stage as new varieties of grapes are coming into the state, adding to what is already here, and in some cases, replacing those that have not done well. The most rare asset to this burgeoning industry are mentors. Not just those with degrees in viticulture and oenology, but those who have been around for a long time and are willing to take in the new people starting out. Jim In Stafford County, Livingston (pictured with wife, Beverly) is a mentor who has been a father to many who have had the idea of being vintners. The success of Livingston's Hartwood Winery speaks of the work that he has put into what he loves, and a place of learning for the people who have taken the time to listen and work with him, gleaning from the years of experience he possesses. Growing up in Carter County, Tennessee, Livingston's mother was a master cook and herbologist who gathered plants from the surrounding forest. At the dinner table, there was always moonshine to drink, which at that time was legal if used for personal consumption. "I believe my talent at wine making came from my mother," stated he said, "She used to make the moonshine, also." Educated as a librarian, Livingston started making wine in college. To accommodate childhood polio, he was given a dorm room with a tub, in which he made a wine that he provided for faculty and administration. Several events involving high level administrators featured his bathtub wine. His education in wine was not in a classroom, however. Livingston's mentor was the winemaker at Ingleside, Dr. Jacques Recht, who graduated from Bordeaux University and was the final protege of the famed oenologist Emile Peynaud. Dr. Recht noted Livingston's talent for working with wine, and took him under wing. "Jacques used to work us hard, " he commented, "Not just in the field, but in the lab as well, teaching us to blend wines." In addition to studying under Dr. Recht, Livingston traveled from Prince William County where he worked in the public schools as a librarian, to Burnley Vineyards in Barboursville, Virginia, learning to do everything that needed to be done in a winery. Jim Law at the time

was offering courses on viticulture and oenology, and of course, Livingston was there. With the help and advice of Lucy Morton, Hartwood Winery was started as a commercial winery in 1981 and then as a farm winery in 1989. Now one of the landmarks in the Fredericksburg region, Hartwood Winery participates in the Grapes and Grains Trail which includes tours of four wineries, three breweries and a distillery, spread throughout Stafford and Spotsylvania counties and the City of Fredericksburg. It was noted that Hartwood will have a Harvest Festival, October 31, from 11-5, featuring hayrides, games, live music, tours, food and more family related activities. Livingston stated that the wine industry in Virginia is changing with the larger wineries starting up and turning vineyards into wedding chapels and event centers to support themselves. The smaller wineries make a quality wine but are often overshadowed by the larger ones with their concerts and other happenings. To date, Hartwood Winery is active in assisting smaller wineries get past the learning curve involved in startup, offering advice and giving hands on experience. Jim Livingston has been a part of the wine industry in Virginia for almost forty years and has seen a lot of changes. There are some constants: his expertise and love of wine, and his heart towards those who want to learn. Hartwood Winery wines reflect Livingston's life's work. Two of them that should be tasted when visiting: Hartwood Station White - A blend of Chardonel and Rkatsitelli. The Chardonel adds a hint of apples, pears and perfuming. Rkatsitelli, a wine made from a grape originating in the Georgian Republic of Russia, gives a spiciness that enhances the wine experience. This wine pairs well with fish, fowl, or pork and is also delightful by itself. The 2012 Tannat - This deep red French varietal offers a beautiful complexity and balanced tannins resulting from twenty four months of aging in oak barrels. This is a good wine to age.

Season’s Bounty Savory Fall

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105

By vanessa moncure October’s farm market stands are filling up with bushels of apples, baskets of mums and Crayola orange pumpkins - the very last of summer’s tomatoes, bush beans, eggplants, peppers and okra have been replaced by early beets and greens. My garden is being prepped for overwintering, pulling out the last vines and leaves of the past summer bounty, tilling and working in compost and chicken litter to enrich the soil. This year’s tomato and basil crop just seemed to go on and on - we’ve eaten more than our share of caprese salad, roasted tomatoes with chiffonade of basil, gazpacho, fresh salsa, marinara with basil sauce, tomato and basil frittata…...and especially pesto. When I open a can of tomatoes in the winter, I can taste summer in every bite - as I can with the garlicky-cheesy licorice-y flavor of basil pesto. Unlike my other herbs, I freeze basil rather than drying it - strip the leaves from the stem, rinse well and let air-dry, then place whole leaves in quart freezer bags. After they freeze, remove the bag from the freezer and open slightly, then crumble the leaves through the bag with your hands. Seal tightly again and store until ready to use - measure in recipes as for fresh herbs - dried herbs have a much more concentrated flavor, so use 3-4 parts fresh to one part dried herbs. This method works well for parsley leaves, too - I always keep a bag of fresh frozen parsley for cooking and garnishing - the freeze-dried parsley sold in the spice aisle tastes just like green confetti. Pesto is not confined to only basil, as pesto is the term for any food made by pounding. Variations using arugula, spinach, roasted tomatoes and olives or even mushrooms have been popularized. I like freezing many herbs as pesto and although many pesto recipes call for pine nuts - I’m not a fan, I think they taste soapy - I think basil freezes better without nuts anyway. PESTO MONKEY BREAD or BREADSTICKS Pesto: In a food processor fitted with a steel blade (or mortar and pestle or VERY finely chopped by hand) blend 2 cloves of garlic with 1 c. packed basil leaves. Stir in ½ c. each grated romano cheese and grated parmesan cheese along with a pinch of salt. While machine is on, slowly drizzle in ½ c. olive oil. (and okay, if you love pine nuts, add in ½ c. chopped nuts). Set aside, covered, while making the bread. Dough: Stir ½ tsp. sugar and 1 pkg. active dry yeast into ¼ c. warm water and let work for five minutes. This is also a good way to proof your yeast if you’re unsure it is still active. In a large bowl, measure 2 c. bread flour, ½ tsp. salt.

Make a well in the center and add the yeast mixture, ½ of the basil mixture and 1 c. warm water. Gradually add 1 additional cup of flour as you work the dough. Turn out onto a floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, adding a bit more flour as necessary. Turn dough into oiled bowl, oil the top of dough and let stand, covered, until doubled, about one hour. Punch dough down and roll into about 16 balls, arranging around the bottom of a greased 10” tube pan. Cover and let rise about 30 minutes, bake in preheated 375F oven for 35-40 minutes. Let partially cool in pan, then turn out onto rack. Serve on platter, placing a small bowl filled with the remaining pesto in the center of bread. For breadsticks, just form the dough into 8” long rolls, let rise and bake at 375F for about half the time. Use the remaining pesto as a dipping sauce. PESTO CREAM SHRIMP LINGUINI Any time I combine pasta with seafood, I think of my Dad and his love of “oyster spaghetti” at Pasquale Manale’s in New Orleans. Begin preparing ½ lb. linguini. In a saute pan, melt 2 T. butter and 1 T. olive oil over medium high heat, cook ½ c. diced onion until softened - stir in ¾ lb. shelled and deveined 21-25 count Gulf shrimp (better flavor than farmed) and saute briefly, just til cooked through, about 2 minutes. Remove shrimp and onions and stir in ¾ c. heavy cream, ¼ c. basil pesto and 2 tsp. creole flavoring. Bring to boil, reducing cream to almost half. Return shrimp to pan along with ¼ c. pasta cooking liquid and 1 T. butter. Stir in linguine, lifting and stirring until sauce is well mixed with pasta. Remove pan from heat and stir in 2 T. fresh parsley and ¼ c. grated Parmesan cheese. Serve immediately. HERBED PORK TENDERLOIN For each pork tenderloin, use 2 T. of pesto sauce for marinade. Rub over pork, place in glass baking dish, cover and leave for 30 minutes. Grill about 3 minutes per side, or until internal temperature is at least 145F. Meanwhile, roast Red Bliss potatoes, cut into about 1 ½” cubes and tossed with scant amount olive oil, at 425F until browned and tender. Remove from oven and toss with pesto sauce, adding 1 T. at a time until well-covered - add S&P to taste. Serve with the pork, along with sliced tomatoes.

Vanessa Moncure brings us great recipes, with her special touches, each month in FP

www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

(540) 371-2008

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family

Open Daily 11am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline at the corner of Caroline & George Streets Master Card ~ Visa ~ Discover front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

13


Cooking With Kyle Simple, easy, delicious by james kyle snyder

As we prepare our bodies for the next round of culinary indulgence – “the holidays” following a summer of great vacation food, it is a good time to turn our attention to a healthier fare. Simple adjustments now, can make a huge difference in avoiding the holiday weight gain (reported to be 7-10 lbs by the NY Times). Mitzi introduced me to a salmon cake recipe from Food & Wine that we adapted to call our own. Food articles (hello!) can be a perfect place to come up with a base for new food ideas. This one hits the mark....Salmon Sliders Make the sauce first so it can chill. In a food pro, blend until still chunky: ½ cup yogurt with 3 TBS horseradish, 3 TBS capers, the zest of one lemon, and a pinch of S&P. Refrigerate for later. Next, finely chop 3 celery ribs and one small, sweet onion. Cut 1 lb of skin off wild salmon filet into ¼ by ¼. Check this out … “Wild Atlantic salmon" (an endangered species and not commercially available) or “Wild caught Atlantic Salmon” are almost always farmed raised in huge nets. No Bueno - In a bowl combine the onions, celery, and salmon. Beat one egg and incorporate into the mixture. Add about ½ cup of panko bread crumbs. You want the formed patties to be firm, not soggy or dry. First is bread choice. We are huge fans of potato rolls for sliders. We found a package of “12 sliced potato rolls” that fit our preference perfectly! Getting the ratio of patty-to-bread-to sauce is the next step. Too much salmon and you miss the bread and sauce. Too much bread and it tastes like a nondescript potato roll. Too much sauce and everything else disappears. We toasted the roll and lightly covered each side with the delicious horseradish-

14

October 2015

caper sauce. After three attempts we came up with a mixture weight of .17 lbs-ish. At this weight each side cooked for 2 minutes to get the grill marks and cook all the way through without overcooking the salmon. Delicious! We cranked up the assembly line and prepared another 2.5 pounds of salmon and the associated mixture. Measure out .17-ish pounds of the mixtures and form them into very similar shapes using a mold. This does a couple things. First, it ensures even cook times because of consistency. Second, we think the sliders look cool with the squared edge of the mold. How ever you do it, have fun! Mitzi and I ate as we cooked (2 made a meal), listening to Etta James radio on Pandora, ending up with over 40 perfect little sliders. While we cleaned, we combined them into pre-cooked 2 patty packages for the freezer. Now we have them as sliders or as a crumble over greens for a salad. In the same time it would take (1.5 hours) to make a single meal, eat, and clean, we had fun making 20 healthy alternative meals that can be: grabbed frozen for lunch on the way out the door, or nuked for a minute for a “hungry now” alternative to chips and crackers. Most of cooking is planning. Mitzi and I plan on not having a ton of time, daily, to cook. We plan our cooking sessions to support our lifestyle, health, and eating needs. If you want to learn or participate in a cooking session, just contact us through the front porch. All are welcome. Thanks for the continued support and comments. Till next month, be well, and keep it simple, easy, and delicious! Kyle brings us delicious, simple & healthy meals each month in this space.

Front porch fredericksburg

CORK & TABLE a Cafe with panache By mary lynn powers Jim Fallon, owner of Cork and Table at 909 Caroline wasn’t kidding when he said he wanted to become an integral part of the downtown community. Just two months after opening last April, he joined the group of restauranteurs participating in the Annual Sandwich Invitational. Though he didn’t win, Jim said he had a great time getting to meet all the friendly chefs and cooks involved in the day. He presented an organic chicken breast served on a baguette with bacon, local tomatoes, and topped with a Romesco sauce, and as a special drink his Strawberry Meyer Lemon Fizz. (Yum!). His menu is described as modern American cuisine with French influences. He strives to use as much local products as possible. He explained that most people like a tomato on their sandwiches, but you are not going to find fresh tomatoes in the winter. Nevertheless, Jim has found an abundance of summer produce, and is looking forward to a Butternut Squash Puree and other local fall specialties in the next few weeks. He is building relationships with some of the local farmers that are growing organic, but also is using what is available to get a thoughtful dish on the table. This relationship building is also how he addresses his wine menu. For imported wines, he has built relationships with the importers, and for local and California wines, he has met and knows many of the winemakers. The wine list is varied, with reds from the Russian River Valley to whites from Italy to some homegrown Virginia selections. Jim is a trained sommelier, and during our conversation gave me a mini lesson on some of the winemaker’s practices. He enjoys this part of the business, sharing his expertise and talking with guests. His ideas are to serve wine and food that complement each other. The dinner menu has an optional fixed price menu for a three course dinner with wine pairings. There are separate entrees and appetizers if the price fix does not suit your fancy. Some of the current dishes look amazing, and if you go to the website, you can get a good idea of what is available. I can say from first had experience, the picture of the flatbread sandwich does not do it justice. I ordered the half portion of a chicken pesto combination with a balsamic vinaigrette from the lunch menu, and it was out of this world. I tried a cup of crab corn chowder which was also wonderful.

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

The Soup & Taco, Etc.

by A. E. Bayne

Fredericksburg, VA

Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 E-mail: soupntaco@yahoo.com

Mary Lynn Powers is a frequent contributor to Front Porch who really enjoys covering the vibrant restaurant scene in the “burg

AFood Co-Op for FXBG

813 Caroline St.

Serving Traditional

Cork and Table is offering special wine dinners periodically. The one in September was five courses, and would satisfy the choosiest of gourmets. Items like Smoked Trout Salad with a TarragonCaper Dressing and Roast Lamb with Red Potato-Artichoke Hash as the main entree were just a couple of the courses. The wines were perfectly paired to enhance the meals, and you don’t even have to make any decisions. Sounds like a plan to me! Jim graduated from The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY in 1993, and trained with many chefs in New York and DC. He owned a cafe in Warsaw, but decided Fredericksburg was the right fit for his restaurant concept. It’s exciting to watch all this food stuff happen in town, and I can’t wait to experience some of his creations. Check out the website CorkandTable.com and his Facebook page to see the current happenings and hours. Bon Appetit!

Fruitful Opportunities

The Sunken Well Tavern

720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911 Eat Well Drink Well Live Well

Fredericksburg has steadily attracted a variety of grocery opportunities for area consumers, including those which offer alternatives to large chain grocery stores. Small regional and ethnic markets along the Route 3 corridor, Relay Foods, area CSAs, the Saturday Farmer’s Market, as well as the Olde Towne Butcher and Kickshaw’s Market, are now providing shoppers with options and resources for a wide range of diets and food preferences. Soon, another option can be added to the gastronomical smorgasbord; a group of dedicated locals is working toward opening a member owned and operated natural food co-op in Fredericksburg. Founder Valerie Setzer explains the group’s evolution: "Having been a member of three food cooperatives in other locations, I developed an appreciation for the "member-owned" philosophy and the provision of locallysourced, natural, organic, and high quality foods and products that emphasize the value of eating a more plant-based diet. A small group of interested persons that share this vision stepped up and expressed a desire to be a part of the planning team to make this happen. We meet weekly and continue to make great strides toward achieving our vision." Member Angie Noll recounts similar experiences and has high hopes for the co-op, “I participated in a preschool cooperative when my children were younger and found the experience invaluable. The connections I made and the opportunity to work with a committed group in order to create something beneficial for so many others taught me the value of community and cooperation. I see the food co-op as a similar experience. Being part of something that can help so many people in our community, something that can make healthy food more affordable to people, is very exciting.” Member Gloria Lloyd says she believes a food co-op will offer a physical space to provide support for healthy living in the Fredericksburg area. “This will be accomplished through the products we sell and the classes taught on nutrition and cooking." Member Rich Larochelle says, “Last year, my wife and I moved to Fredericksburg after more than 30 years of living in Northern Virginia where, sadly, there are no food co-ops. When I learned that there was interest in starting a food co-op here, it just seemed like a logical fit for Fredericksburg given this community's

civic spirit, the presence of UMW, a growing healthcare industry that includes a focus on nutrition and the progressive population that respects the environment and enjoys the river and outdoor activities.” Member Laurel Major says, “When we build relationships with local farmers and producers who are using organic or sustainable practices, we build resilience for our community by supporting the people who grow our food, we decrease our dependence on products produced faraway, and we support practices which are beneficial for the Earth. That sounds good to me!” Setzer adds, “Having worked for 40 years for consumer-owned cooperatives, I have seen firsthand the enormous value that co-ops bring to their communities. Co-ops are more than a place to shop for a good or service; they are part of the fabric of their communities.” Larochelle describes co-ops as being different from other kinds of businesses because they are owned by the people they serve, and their focus is not on maximizing profit, but on providing maximum benefits to member-owners and to the community. With a one-time equity investment of $200 per household, members will enjoy “broad and deep community support based on unique product offerings, commitment to the best environmental practices, and a positive impact on the lives of members and non-members.” Larochelle says hopefully,” I have no doubt that this new food co-op initiative can further enhance this wonderful place we call home. Of course, the success of this effort will depend on whether residents step up and become coop member-owners. I think they will.” A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist, and co-editor of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review. She has lived in Fredericksburg for the past seventeen years and is a frequent contributor to Front Porch Magazine.

front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

15


Cooking With Kyle Simple, easy, delicious by james kyle snyder

As we prepare our bodies for the next round of culinary indulgence – “the holidays” following a summer of great vacation food, it is a good time to turn our attention to a healthier fare. Simple adjustments now, can make a huge difference in avoiding the holiday weight gain (reported to be 7-10 lbs by the NY Times). Mitzi introduced me to a salmon cake recipe from Food & Wine that we adapted to call our own. Food articles (hello!) can be a perfect place to come up with a base for new food ideas. This one hits the mark....Salmon Sliders Make the sauce first so it can chill. In a food pro, blend until still chunky: ½ cup yogurt with 3 TBS horseradish, 3 TBS capers, the zest of one lemon, and a pinch of S&P. Refrigerate for later. Next, finely chop 3 celery ribs and one small, sweet onion. Cut 1 lb of skin off wild salmon filet into ¼ by ¼. Check this out … “Wild Atlantic salmon" (an endangered species and not commercially available) or “Wild caught Atlantic Salmon” are almost always farmed raised in huge nets. No Bueno - In a bowl combine the onions, celery, and salmon. Beat one egg and incorporate into the mixture. Add about ½ cup of panko bread crumbs. You want the formed patties to be firm, not soggy or dry. First is bread choice. We are huge fans of potato rolls for sliders. We found a package of “12 sliced potato rolls” that fit our preference perfectly! Getting the ratio of patty-to-bread-to sauce is the next step. Too much salmon and you miss the bread and sauce. Too much bread and it tastes like a nondescript potato roll. Too much sauce and everything else disappears. We toasted the roll and lightly covered each side with the delicious horseradish-

14

October 2015

caper sauce. After three attempts we came up with a mixture weight of .17 lbs-ish. At this weight each side cooked for 2 minutes to get the grill marks and cook all the way through without overcooking the salmon. Delicious! We cranked up the assembly line and prepared another 2.5 pounds of salmon and the associated mixture. Measure out .17-ish pounds of the mixtures and form them into very similar shapes using a mold. This does a couple things. First, it ensures even cook times because of consistency. Second, we think the sliders look cool with the squared edge of the mold. How ever you do it, have fun! Mitzi and I ate as we cooked (2 made a meal), listening to Etta James radio on Pandora, ending up with over 40 perfect little sliders. While we cleaned, we combined them into pre-cooked 2 patty packages for the freezer. Now we have them as sliders or as a crumble over greens for a salad. In the same time it would take (1.5 hours) to make a single meal, eat, and clean, we had fun making 20 healthy alternative meals that can be: grabbed frozen for lunch on the way out the door, or nuked for a minute for a “hungry now” alternative to chips and crackers. Most of cooking is planning. Mitzi and I plan on not having a ton of time, daily, to cook. We plan our cooking sessions to support our lifestyle, health, and eating needs. If you want to learn or participate in a cooking session, just contact us through the front porch. All are welcome. Thanks for the continued support and comments. Till next month, be well, and keep it simple, easy, and delicious! Kyle brings us delicious, simple & healthy meals each month in this space.

Front porch fredericksburg

CORK & TABLE a Cafe with panache By mary lynn powers Jim Fallon, owner of Cork and Table at 909 Caroline wasn’t kidding when he said he wanted to become an integral part of the downtown community. Just two months after opening last April, he joined the group of restauranteurs participating in the Annual Sandwich Invitational. Though he didn’t win, Jim said he had a great time getting to meet all the friendly chefs and cooks involved in the day. He presented an organic chicken breast served on a baguette with bacon, local tomatoes, and topped with a Romesco sauce, and as a special drink his Strawberry Meyer Lemon Fizz. (Yum!). His menu is described as modern American cuisine with French influences. He strives to use as much local products as possible. He explained that most people like a tomato on their sandwiches, but you are not going to find fresh tomatoes in the winter. Nevertheless, Jim has found an abundance of summer produce, and is looking forward to a Butternut Squash Puree and other local fall specialties in the next few weeks. He is building relationships with some of the local farmers that are growing organic, but also is using what is available to get a thoughtful dish on the table. This relationship building is also how he addresses his wine menu. For imported wines, he has built relationships with the importers, and for local and California wines, he has met and knows many of the winemakers. The wine list is varied, with reds from the Russian River Valley to whites from Italy to some homegrown Virginia selections. Jim is a trained sommelier, and during our conversation gave me a mini lesson on some of the winemaker’s practices. He enjoys this part of the business, sharing his expertise and talking with guests. His ideas are to serve wine and food that complement each other. The dinner menu has an optional fixed price menu for a three course dinner with wine pairings. There are separate entrees and appetizers if the price fix does not suit your fancy. Some of the current dishes look amazing, and if you go to the website, you can get a good idea of what is available. I can say from first had experience, the picture of the flatbread sandwich does not do it justice. I ordered the half portion of a chicken pesto combination with a balsamic vinaigrette from the lunch menu, and it was out of this world. I tried a cup of crab corn chowder which was also wonderful.

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

The Soup & Taco, Etc.

by A. E. Bayne

Fredericksburg, VA

Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 E-mail: soupntaco@yahoo.com

Mary Lynn Powers is a frequent contributor to Front Porch who really enjoys covering the vibrant restaurant scene in the “burg

AFood Co-Op for FXBG

813 Caroline St.

Serving Traditional

Cork and Table is offering special wine dinners periodically. The one in September was five courses, and would satisfy the choosiest of gourmets. Items like Smoked Trout Salad with a TarragonCaper Dressing and Roast Lamb with Red Potato-Artichoke Hash as the main entree were just a couple of the courses. The wines were perfectly paired to enhance the meals, and you don’t even have to make any decisions. Sounds like a plan to me! Jim graduated from The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY in 1993, and trained with many chefs in New York and DC. He owned a cafe in Warsaw, but decided Fredericksburg was the right fit for his restaurant concept. It’s exciting to watch all this food stuff happen in town, and I can’t wait to experience some of his creations. Check out the website CorkandTable.com and his Facebook page to see the current happenings and hours. Bon Appetit!

Fruitful Opportunities

The Sunken Well Tavern

720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911 Eat Well Drink Well Live Well

Fredericksburg has steadily attracted a variety of grocery opportunities for area consumers, including those which offer alternatives to large chain grocery stores. Small regional and ethnic markets along the Route 3 corridor, Relay Foods, area CSAs, the Saturday Farmer’s Market, as well as the Olde Towne Butcher and Kickshaw’s Market, are now providing shoppers with options and resources for a wide range of diets and food preferences. Soon, another option can be added to the gastronomical smorgasbord; a group of dedicated locals is working toward opening a member owned and operated natural food co-op in Fredericksburg. Founder Valerie Setzer explains the group’s evolution: "Having been a member of three food cooperatives in other locations, I developed an appreciation for the "member-owned" philosophy and the provision of locallysourced, natural, organic, and high quality foods and products that emphasize the value of eating a more plant-based diet. A small group of interested persons that share this vision stepped up and expressed a desire to be a part of the planning team to make this happen. We meet weekly and continue to make great strides toward achieving our vision." Member Angie Noll recounts similar experiences and has high hopes for the co-op, “I participated in a preschool cooperative when my children were younger and found the experience invaluable. The connections I made and the opportunity to work with a committed group in order to create something beneficial for so many others taught me the value of community and cooperation. I see the food co-op as a similar experience. Being part of something that can help so many people in our community, something that can make healthy food more affordable to people, is very exciting.” Member Gloria Lloyd says she believes a food co-op will offer a physical space to provide support for healthy living in the Fredericksburg area. “This will be accomplished through the products we sell and the classes taught on nutrition and cooking." Member Rich Larochelle says, “Last year, my wife and I moved to Fredericksburg after more than 30 years of living in Northern Virginia where, sadly, there are no food co-ops. When I learned that there was interest in starting a food co-op here, it just seemed like a logical fit for Fredericksburg given this community's

civic spirit, the presence of UMW, a growing healthcare industry that includes a focus on nutrition and the progressive population that respects the environment and enjoys the river and outdoor activities.” Member Laurel Major says, “When we build relationships with local farmers and producers who are using organic or sustainable practices, we build resilience for our community by supporting the people who grow our food, we decrease our dependence on products produced faraway, and we support practices which are beneficial for the Earth. That sounds good to me!” Setzer adds, “Having worked for 40 years for consumer-owned cooperatives, I have seen firsthand the enormous value that co-ops bring to their communities. Co-ops are more than a place to shop for a good or service; they are part of the fabric of their communities.” Larochelle describes co-ops as being different from other kinds of businesses because they are owned by the people they serve, and their focus is not on maximizing profit, but on providing maximum benefits to member-owners and to the community. With a one-time equity investment of $200 per household, members will enjoy “broad and deep community support based on unique product offerings, commitment to the best environmental practices, and a positive impact on the lives of members and non-members.” Larochelle says hopefully,” I have no doubt that this new food co-op initiative can further enhance this wonderful place we call home. Of course, the success of this effort will depend on whether residents step up and become coop member-owners. I think they will.” A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist, and co-editor of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review. She has lived in Fredericksburg for the past seventeen years and is a frequent contributor to Front Porch Magazine.

front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

15


CALENDAR of events

october 2015…Autumn harvest, Autumn color, Autumn air...Ah, Autumn! Thursday, October 1

Pete & Laurie Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. “Through the Woods,” Melissa Trlizzi, at Artful Dimensions Gallery. thru November 1. creates the atmosphere of a walk in the autumn woods, populated by all sorts of whimsical critters sculpted from polymer clay. Think frogs and toads, owls, bugs, mice, etc. It’s going to be a lot of fun!

First Friday, October 2

7th Annual Empower House Golf Tournament, 11:30-6pm. Pendelton Golf Club First Friday at Water Street Studio. Please join us for "Beyond the Giving Tree", a show by Mirinda Reynolds and Carol Coffman. Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline St. October Show features Bonnie Halford "Beyond the Sea". Opening Reception, 6-9pm. Show thru Oct 31. FCCA October Artists, Carol Baker and Joseph Maddox, opening reception 6-9pm. 813 Sophia St. Studio A Oct, 1011 A Princess Anne St.. Featured Artist, Beth Croghan, nature inspired oil paintings. Opening Reception 6-9pm. Show thru Oct 31. Art First Gallery proudly presents local artist Sally Rhone-Kubarek As she premieres artwork from her new children’s book, “MINDELMO”. Opening Reception 6-9p.m. Exhibit on view through Sun., Nov. 1, daily 11. to 5 p.m. Dia De Los Avivados group show opening reception. Join us for refreshments and music during our First Friday opening reception for Art Mart's October show Dia de los Avivados. artmartfxbg.com “Point of Entry”: The Artwork of Maddie Huddle @ PONSHOP Studio and Gallery. Featuring a selection of oil paintings, her work transforms the ordinary into the unusual and invites viewers to reevaluate their perceptions of fine art. Maddie is a local artist and recent graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University's Communication Arts department. Opening reception 6-9. exhibit runs through Oct 31.

This October, in partnership with the Fredericksburg Spinners and Weavers Guild, LibertyTown Arts Workshop presents “Fiber”, an exhibition celebrating everything fiber. 810 Weekend Gallery (810 Caroline Street) 6 pm - 8:30 pm. features watercolors by Beverley Coates, photography by Penny A Parrish and acrylics by Lynn Abbott Music by Wave on Wave, Courtyard Marriott 69pm

Saturday, October 3

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7am-2pm Capital Ale House “Oktoberfest”, Caroline St .The celebration will take place in the street! will continue in the street until 10pm with restaurant service continuing until 1:30am. Families are welcome, a parent or guardian must accompany anyone under the age of 21. Surrounding streets will be closed off for live musical performances, German dance groups and family-friendly Kinderplatz: a kids space with giant inflatables, face-painting, balloon animals and more. 25th Annual Fredericksburg Area Wine Festival at Celebrate Virginia 11am-5pm

in bloom, and otherwise enjoy yourself on our family farm. On weekends and Columbus Day, we will run hayrides at no extra charge, and you can purchase food from Sunken Well Tavern and Appalachian Kettle Corn.

Light Jazz @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. Light jazz and Latin piano guitar Featuring Chris Phil Andy & Harry. No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

2nd Annual "Got Your Back Dog" Dog Walk @ Curtis Park 9am This year's theme:rockin the 50's.Come dressed for the era, dogs included! Check out the best dressed 50's dog costume! A fun day with a silent auction, raffles, clowns, music by DJ Ron, classic cars. Service team dogs from Paws for People will be there.

Totally Lonsesome Trio Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Sunday, October 4

Barbara Kenny at UUFF Art Gallery @ UUFF Art Gallery Painter Barbara Kenny kicks off the inaugural show of the UUFF Art Gallery. The show runs thru November. Check out her dynamic oils. Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival (see Oct 3 listing for details) Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Monday, October 5

Rare public opening of St. James’ House, 1300 Charles St. through Oct 10. WashingtonHeritageMuseums.org

Tuesday, October 6

“Art in the Park”, Hurkamp Park 9-1pm In conjunction with the Fredericksburg Farmer's Market, Art in the Park is an amazing showcase of local artists and their talents

Swamp Trash Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 7-11pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Braehead Farm, located in the City of Fredericksburg, is having its FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL! EVERY WEEKEND AND COLUMBUS DAY, from 9 am-6pm. Join in for hayrides through the decorated forest and around the farm! Corn maze and sunflower walk! Pumpkin decorating! A visit with, "The Great Pumpkin" in the pumpkin patch!

Pamper Me Pink Salons in Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania, and King George are supporting the fight against breast cancer with the Greater Fredericksburg Habit for Humanity's Women Build Team. Wear pink to your salon appointment on "Women Build Wednesdays" in October. A portion of proceeds from your visit will support the Mary Washington Hospital Foundation's Breast Cancer Fund. The fund directly helps neighbors, family, and friends in our community struggling with breast cancer.

Fall Festival at Sneads Farm explore our entire farm, feed the chickens, see llamas, horses and our resident calf, swing in the hay barn, navigate the "Out of My Gourd" natural maze and our giant 4acre sunflower maze, play by the stream, see our sheep on a newly constructed "sheep walk," take pictures in the sunflower fields, which will be back

Wednesday, October 7

Trivia Night w/quizmaster Josh Cameli @Sunken Well Tavern. 7:30pm. Get there early to get a seat! 720 Littlepage St.

Thursday, October 8

Tuesday, October 13

Jeff Miller, Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 7-11pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, October 14

Saturday, October 10

Trivia Night w/quizmaster Josh Cameli @Sunken Well Tavern. 7:30pm. Get there early to get a seat! 720 Littlepage St.

Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Light Jazz @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. Light jazz and Latin piano guitar No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7am-2pm

Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details) Living History event at Ellwood Manor. Civil War Medical and Military programs will be presented on the lawn Fall Fairy Festival @ Old Mill Park 12:30-4pm Calling all Fairies, Princesses, Knight's, Trolls, Gnomes, Elves and magical creatures to join us festival is a fundraiser for the Fairy Godmother Project which assist families with children suffering from cancer. family oriented event lot of kid friendly activities. unicorn, carriage rides, dragon races, and two contests. Make your very own Fairy House and enter it into our competition! Now &Then Doll & Toy Show and Sale, 11309 Tidewater Trail Fredericksburg Elks Lodge #875 ( On RT.2 & Rt. 17, just south of Fairgrounds)

Sunday, October 11

Thursday, October 15

Jeff Miller Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Light Jazz @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. Light jazz and Latin piano guitar Featuring Chris Phil Andy & Harry. No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, October 22

Skin & Bone Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Saturday, October 24

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7am-2pm Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details) Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

“Art in the Park”, Hurkamp Park 9-1pm 9-1pm. an amazing showcase of local artists

A Course in Miracles movie premiere at Unity of Fredericksburg 7pm. NY Times Best Selling Author James Twyman Holds nationwide premiere of A Chorus in Miracles In celebration of the 50 year anniversary of A Course in Miracles Because of the profound nature of the work scribed by Helen Schucman beginning in 1965, A Chorus in Miracles is a must see film for long-time A Course in Miracles students, those newly embarking on their own transformational journey and any person with an interest in spirituality and how it changes our lives.

Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Sunday, October 25

Saturday, October 17

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7am-2pm Above the Darkness Suicide Prevention & Awareness Walk & Concert @ Spotsylvania Courthouse Village 10:00 am - 4:00 pm Amy Jones amy.suicideprevention@gmail.com or MHAF 540371-2704 or email mhafred@mhafred.org

Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Sunday, October 18

Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details) Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Jon Wiley & Bruce Middle Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Tuesday, October 27

Monday, October 12

Tuesday, October 20

Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Columbus Day

Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details) Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Colonial Seafood, Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 7-11pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, October 21

Trivia Night w/quizmaster Josh Cameli @Sunken Well Tavern. 7:30pm. Get there early to get a seat! 720 Littlepage St.

Laurie Rose Griffith & Peter Mealy, Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 7-11pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, October 28

Trivia Night w/quizmaster Josh Cameli @Sunken Well Tavern. 7:30pm. Get there early to get a seat! 720 Littlepage St.

Light Jazz @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. Light jazz and Latin piano guitar Featuring Chris Phil Andy & Harry. No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, October 29

Bobby Thompson Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, October 30

Fredericksburg Songwriters' Showcase, a monthly concert series featuring original acoustic music, presents Davis Bradley Duo, Gina DeLuca, Jim Heald, and Tres Seaver, 8 p.m., in the Picker's Supply Concert Hall, above 902 Caroline Street, Fredericksburg, VA (enter through the alley round back). $. www.burgsongs.org

Saturday, October 31

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7am-2pm Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details) Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details) Music & Spirits Concert Series, Bowman Center, Things That Go Funk in the Night with Anthony Campbell & The Third Stream Giants! 7:30-10pm Dress the funk up! Come in costume for a chance to win door prizes, including, T-shirts and tickets to upcoming shows! Free soda and water to designated drivers. Olde Towne Carriage "Witch, Ghosts, Theives & Mayhem", Fredericksburg, America's Most Historic City, is also considered to be one of the most haunted cities in the country. So join us to see if you can find any undead on one of our Ghost Tours through historic downtown Fredericksburg. .oldetownecarriages.com. $. 8pm

If you are reading this 219 th issue of FP, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 19 th year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for Novmber issue is October 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service Companionship Meal Preparation Medication Reminders Laundry

Light Housekeeping Shopping/Errands Personal Care Flexible Hours

Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

540-8 899-6 6787 16

October 2015

fortemusicstudios.com Front porch fredericksburg

540.899.1422 Each HomeInstead Franchise Office is Independently Owned & Operated

2639 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service”

Front Porch on

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October 2015

17


CALENDAR of events

october 2015…Autumn harvest, Autumn color, Autumn air...Ah, Autumn! Thursday, October 1

Pete & Laurie Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar. “Through the Woods,” Melissa Trlizzi, at Artful Dimensions Gallery. thru November 1. creates the atmosphere of a walk in the autumn woods, populated by all sorts of whimsical critters sculpted from polymer clay. Think frogs and toads, owls, bugs, mice, etc. It’s going to be a lot of fun!

First Friday, October 2

7th Annual Empower House Golf Tournament, 11:30-6pm. Pendelton Golf Club First Friday at Water Street Studio. Please join us for "Beyond the Giving Tree", a show by Mirinda Reynolds and Carol Coffman. Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline St. October Show features Bonnie Halford "Beyond the Sea". Opening Reception, 6-9pm. Show thru Oct 31. FCCA October Artists, Carol Baker and Joseph Maddox, opening reception 6-9pm. 813 Sophia St. Studio A Oct, 1011 A Princess Anne St.. Featured Artist, Beth Croghan, nature inspired oil paintings. Opening Reception 6-9pm. Show thru Oct 31. Art First Gallery proudly presents local artist Sally Rhone-Kubarek As she premieres artwork from her new children’s book, “MINDELMO”. Opening Reception 6-9p.m. Exhibit on view through Sun., Nov. 1, daily 11. to 5 p.m. Dia De Los Avivados group show opening reception. Join us for refreshments and music during our First Friday opening reception for Art Mart's October show Dia de los Avivados. artmartfxbg.com “Point of Entry”: The Artwork of Maddie Huddle @ PONSHOP Studio and Gallery. Featuring a selection of oil paintings, her work transforms the ordinary into the unusual and invites viewers to reevaluate their perceptions of fine art. Maddie is a local artist and recent graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University's Communication Arts department. Opening reception 6-9. exhibit runs through Oct 31.

This October, in partnership with the Fredericksburg Spinners and Weavers Guild, LibertyTown Arts Workshop presents “Fiber”, an exhibition celebrating everything fiber. 810 Weekend Gallery (810 Caroline Street) 6 pm - 8:30 pm. features watercolors by Beverley Coates, photography by Penny A Parrish and acrylics by Lynn Abbott Music by Wave on Wave, Courtyard Marriott 69pm

Saturday, October 3

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7am-2pm Capital Ale House “Oktoberfest”, Caroline St .The celebration will take place in the street! will continue in the street until 10pm with restaurant service continuing until 1:30am. Families are welcome, a parent or guardian must accompany anyone under the age of 21. Surrounding streets will be closed off for live musical performances, German dance groups and family-friendly Kinderplatz: a kids space with giant inflatables, face-painting, balloon animals and more. 25th Annual Fredericksburg Area Wine Festival at Celebrate Virginia 11am-5pm

in bloom, and otherwise enjoy yourself on our family farm. On weekends and Columbus Day, we will run hayrides at no extra charge, and you can purchase food from Sunken Well Tavern and Appalachian Kettle Corn.

Light Jazz @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. Light jazz and Latin piano guitar Featuring Chris Phil Andy & Harry. No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

2nd Annual "Got Your Back Dog" Dog Walk @ Curtis Park 9am This year's theme:rockin the 50's.Come dressed for the era, dogs included! Check out the best dressed 50's dog costume! A fun day with a silent auction, raffles, clowns, music by DJ Ron, classic cars. Service team dogs from Paws for People will be there.

Totally Lonsesome Trio Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Sunday, October 4

Barbara Kenny at UUFF Art Gallery @ UUFF Art Gallery Painter Barbara Kenny kicks off the inaugural show of the UUFF Art Gallery. The show runs thru November. Check out her dynamic oils. Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival (see Oct 3 listing for details) Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Monday, October 5

Rare public opening of St. James’ House, 1300 Charles St. through Oct 10. WashingtonHeritageMuseums.org

Tuesday, October 6

“Art in the Park”, Hurkamp Park 9-1pm In conjunction with the Fredericksburg Farmer's Market, Art in the Park is an amazing showcase of local artists and their talents

Swamp Trash Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 7-11pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Braehead Farm, located in the City of Fredericksburg, is having its FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL! EVERY WEEKEND AND COLUMBUS DAY, from 9 am-6pm. Join in for hayrides through the decorated forest and around the farm! Corn maze and sunflower walk! Pumpkin decorating! A visit with, "The Great Pumpkin" in the pumpkin patch!

Pamper Me Pink Salons in Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania, and King George are supporting the fight against breast cancer with the Greater Fredericksburg Habit for Humanity's Women Build Team. Wear pink to your salon appointment on "Women Build Wednesdays" in October. A portion of proceeds from your visit will support the Mary Washington Hospital Foundation's Breast Cancer Fund. The fund directly helps neighbors, family, and friends in our community struggling with breast cancer.

Fall Festival at Sneads Farm explore our entire farm, feed the chickens, see llamas, horses and our resident calf, swing in the hay barn, navigate the "Out of My Gourd" natural maze and our giant 4acre sunflower maze, play by the stream, see our sheep on a newly constructed "sheep walk," take pictures in the sunflower fields, which will be back

Wednesday, October 7

Trivia Night w/quizmaster Josh Cameli @Sunken Well Tavern. 7:30pm. Get there early to get a seat! 720 Littlepage St.

Thursday, October 8

Tuesday, October 13

Jeff Miller, Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 7-11pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, October 14

Saturday, October 10

Trivia Night w/quizmaster Josh Cameli @Sunken Well Tavern. 7:30pm. Get there early to get a seat! 720 Littlepage St.

Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Light Jazz @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. Light jazz and Latin piano guitar No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7am-2pm

Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details) Living History event at Ellwood Manor. Civil War Medical and Military programs will be presented on the lawn Fall Fairy Festival @ Old Mill Park 12:30-4pm Calling all Fairies, Princesses, Knight's, Trolls, Gnomes, Elves and magical creatures to join us festival is a fundraiser for the Fairy Godmother Project which assist families with children suffering from cancer. family oriented event lot of kid friendly activities. unicorn, carriage rides, dragon races, and two contests. Make your very own Fairy House and enter it into our competition! Now &Then Doll & Toy Show and Sale, 11309 Tidewater Trail Fredericksburg Elks Lodge #875 ( On RT.2 & Rt. 17, just south of Fairgrounds)

Sunday, October 11

Thursday, October 15

Jeff Miller Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Light Jazz @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. Light jazz and Latin piano guitar Featuring Chris Phil Andy & Harry. No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, October 22

Skin & Bone Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Saturday, October 24

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7am-2pm Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details) Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

“Art in the Park”, Hurkamp Park 9-1pm 9-1pm. an amazing showcase of local artists

A Course in Miracles movie premiere at Unity of Fredericksburg 7pm. NY Times Best Selling Author James Twyman Holds nationwide premiere of A Chorus in Miracles In celebration of the 50 year anniversary of A Course in Miracles Because of the profound nature of the work scribed by Helen Schucman beginning in 1965, A Chorus in Miracles is a must see film for long-time A Course in Miracles students, those newly embarking on their own transformational journey and any person with an interest in spirituality and how it changes our lives.

Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Sunday, October 25

Saturday, October 17

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7am-2pm Above the Darkness Suicide Prevention & Awareness Walk & Concert @ Spotsylvania Courthouse Village 10:00 am - 4:00 pm Amy Jones amy.suicideprevention@gmail.com or MHAF 540371-2704 or email mhafred@mhafred.org

Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Sunday, October 18

Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details) Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Jon Wiley & Bruce Middle Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Tuesday, October 27

Monday, October 12

Tuesday, October 20

Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Columbus Day

Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details) Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details)

Colonial Seafood, Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 7-11pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, October 21

Trivia Night w/quizmaster Josh Cameli @Sunken Well Tavern. 7:30pm. Get there early to get a seat! 720 Littlepage St.

Laurie Rose Griffith & Peter Mealy, Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 7-11pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, October 28

Trivia Night w/quizmaster Josh Cameli @Sunken Well Tavern. 7:30pm. Get there early to get a seat! 720 Littlepage St.

Light Jazz @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. Light jazz and Latin piano guitar Featuring Chris Phil Andy & Harry. No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, October 29

Bobby Thompson Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar.

Friday, October 30

Fredericksburg Songwriters' Showcase, a monthly concert series featuring original acoustic music, presents Davis Bradley Duo, Gina DeLuca, Jim Heald, and Tres Seaver, 8 p.m., in the Picker's Supply Concert Hall, above 902 Caroline Street, Fredericksburg, VA (enter through the alley round back). $. www.burgsongs.org

Saturday, October 31

Farmers Market, Hurkamp Park, 7am-2pm Braehead Farm Fall Harvest Festival see Oct 3 listing for details) Sneads Farm Fall Festival see Oct 3 listing for details) Music & Spirits Concert Series, Bowman Center, Things That Go Funk in the Night with Anthony Campbell & The Third Stream Giants! 7:30-10pm Dress the funk up! Come in costume for a chance to win door prizes, including, T-shirts and tickets to upcoming shows! Free soda and water to designated drivers. Olde Towne Carriage "Witch, Ghosts, Theives & Mayhem", Fredericksburg, America's Most Historic City, is also considered to be one of the most haunted cities in the country. So join us to see if you can find any undead on one of our Ghost Tours through historic downtown Fredericksburg. .oldetownecarriages.com. $. 8pm

If you are reading this 219 th issue of FP, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 19 th year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for Novmber issue is October 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service Companionship Meal Preparation Medication Reminders Laundry

Light Housekeeping Shopping/Errands Personal Care Flexible Hours

Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

540-8 899-6 6787 16

October 2015

fortemusicstudios.com Front porch fredericksburg

540.899.1422 Each HomeInstead Franchise Office is Independently Owned & Operated

2639 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service”

Front Porch on

homeinstead.com front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

17


history’s stories

HOPE FOUNDRY By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

I recently received a call from my longtime friend Carey Leitch President of CARICO Steel Fabrication Company located in the Fredericksburg Industrial Park. The Leitch family has been in the area for several generations and involved in local business and politics. Alma Leitch was a well beloved Commissioner of the Revenue in the City for over thirty years. Carey who has a collection of local historical artifacts invited me to take a short trip with him to the Quantico Marine Base to view what he described as a “one known” Fredericksburg item. It was a warm morning in August when we started our drive up the Interstate to meet with some government officials that would show us the artifact discovered. We were greeted by two men that were employed by the Forestry Division. They advised us that we would see what they had discovered when they started a logging operation in a dense forest area only two hundred yards from the main road. We left our trucks and had not gone fifty yards when I said “WOW”, as a large steam engine appeared with belt pulleys over six foot high.. The first thing that caught my eye was BOWERING FREDERICKSBURG VIRGINIA in large letters embossed in the steel rails that supported the ten ton engine. The condition of the engine is remarkable since it has been in the elements since 1880’s.

Benjamin Bowering was hired by John Scott around 1849 as a manager of all operations of the Hope Foundry. The building was located on the corner of Princess Anne and Charlotte Streets, which is now the site of the Fredericksburg Court House. Noel Harrison in his book Fredericksburg Civil War Sites describes the building as having a skylight that was 10 by 70 feet and with a capacity for melting iron in a single casting of over 10 tons. The Foundry advertised that it made steam engines, boilers, stamp mills, mining and mill machinery along with plows and plow castings. With the advent of the Civil War the Foundry manufactured munitions and worked on cannon for the Southern Confederacy. This was interrupted when the Union Army took over the Town in the April 1862. The Union operated the Foundry for several months and even built a rail spur down Princess Anne Street that connected to the RF&P. In August 1862 the Union abandoned the Foundry. It was not reopened until after the war. After the war the foundry operated under several names Bowering’s Foundry, Scott’s Foundry, Southern Foundry, Progress Engine and Machine Works. The Steam Engine that we discovered on the Quantico site actually was purchased by George Washington Row of Spotsylvania County in the 1880’s for his saw mill operation. Pat Sullivan a local expert on the history of Spotsylvania and he is the Great Grandson of G. W. E. Row. Pat says that the county Row’s leave the e off their name unlike the Fredericksburg Rowe’s. Some think that the e was added after the Civil War when many family names were changed. Pat has a wonderful web site on the history of Spotsylvania and many of the early families. George Washington Row died in April 1883 at the age of 39. His untimely death resulted in a large sale of his estate, which Benjamin Bowering assisted, as he was sole owner of the Bowering Foundry. The Steam Engine at the mill did not sell and it is believed that a fire destroyed the mill and that is why the Steam Engine is still there today. This is the only one known survivor of all the steam engines produced by Hope Foundry. Fredericksburg was far enough north to be on the leading edge of the Industrial Revolution. Benjamin Bowering along with his brother Andrew who was famous as he played music at Stonewall Jacksons funeral and is said to have blew the last recall for the Army of Northern Virginia at Lee’s surrender, placed his bugle on a tree limb and walked back to Fredericksburg. Today they rest in the Confederate Cemetery on Washington Avenue. My wish is that the Fredericksburg Steam Engine will someday be a monument too local industry HERE. Dedicated to Frances Belman Haddock , Betty Everly and Mary Catlett

18

October 2015

Front porch fredericksburg

OUR HERITAGE

Everything Old is New Again!

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

not forgotten

By john reifenberg Sumac. It may be pronounced shoe make, (as found in our Oral Histories collection), shoe mack, (as from my youth), or sue mack, it’s all about the same little tree. The different pronunciations are dependent upon the region of your upbringing and when that took place. However one may relate to sound of the word, one thing is clear. This small tree played a large role in the lives of many people throughout the Fredericksburg region. Found in our Clip Files collection is an article written by Patricia Kent in 1993. Besides being a reporter at the time, she is also one of the founding members of the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center. She noted in a Free Lance-Star piece the emergence of the sumac business in Fredericksburg, beginning in the nineteenth century. The extract of the plant, rendered mostly from the leaves, was utilized as a tanning agent for leathers and for the setting of colors in fabric. The dyeing and dressing of leather was enormously important, as good leather was in great demand. Clothiers, other manufacturers, farmers, etc., all sought quality leather for its versatility and great resiliency. John G. Hurkamp, among his other enterprises, dealt in leather goods, both in the processing and selling of needed items. He received his leather education in Europe, where he was exposed to the best source of the extract of the time. This superior form of sumac extract came from Sicily. As reported by Kent, Hurkamp began his business near Fredericksburg in 1856, building a tanning plant near the city. At some point he became dissatisfied with having to rely on the imported Sicilian extract, and being aware that sumac grew all through the immediate area, set out to make his own potion. Experimentation led to success, and by 1860 he had what was considered a quality product, rivalling the best from Europe. He became both a consumer and

exporter of his creation. Competition from others soon followed. A short search through the archives turned up an original letter written by Robert Soutter, dated 1868. It is addressed to “My dearest Nephew”, one of the local Knox clan and states, “By our news papers I see that the Sumac business, in Virginia, now looms large. How prospers yours??” A note written in 1914 on R. T. Knox & Bro. letterhead posts the inscription; “Manufacturers Of Sumac Extract” and then, “Established In Fredericksburg, Va. In 1866…” From the date is apparent that both Hurkamp and the Knox family competed for the availability of quality sumac extract, but it is unclear if Knox purchased Hurkamp extract or developed his own. More research revealed interesting notes and sub-plots, but in essence, the Knox trade would extend into the next century, while somewhere along the path, Hurkamp’s did not. The momentum and direct line of the story picks up in 1907, when in another FLS story from our archives, Robert T. Knox and brother James are featured in an article entitled Sumac Extract . The first line of the piece reads, “The manufacture of sumac extract is one of the principal industries of Fredericksburg…” But by March, 1913 the Knox brothers had decided to move the business and settled on a site in Milford, VA. Reporting the move was another Free Lance-Star article in May of the same year. There is much more to the story of the small tree that loomed large here, but procrastination has claimed another victim. The Central Rappahannock Heritage Center protects thousands of documents and many other archives. We carry an enormous variety of subjects and sources and everyone is invited to come in for a trip back through time. John Reifenberg is a CRHC volunteer

Re-Run Shoppe : 40 years downtown By a.e.bayne

If you find yourself meandering through town on a bright autumn day, you will eventually come to the 1000 block and will be drawn in by the inviting front Run Shoppe. Opened in widow of the Re-R the late 1970s by Carol Riley, the shop changed hands in the mid ‘80s to current owner Valorie Wegner (photo above). It’s served the Fredericksburg community for close to 40 years. Wegner says she enjoys the partnerships she’s made with her consigners over the years. With over 7,000 consigners currently using their system, Re-Run Shoppe offers a wide variety of styles and brands to their customers. Featuring children’s and women’s clothing, shoes, designer

handbags and jewelry, ReRun Shoppe considers consignments between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The shop specializes in stocking seasonal clothing and takes both designer and off-therack labels, but they steer clear of inexpensive items fearing the quality won’t be worth the resale. They look for gently used clothing that is no older than two to three years for style purposes. Consigners earn 50% of the total sale on their clothing. Wegner credits her exceptional staff – Sandra Freeman, manager, and Tina Pilkerton, sales – for creating a space where customers and consigners return again and again. She says, “I’ve had people move away and come back 8 or 10 years later and say, ‘You’re still here! It’s so good to see you.’ We have people who have consigned with us and they have kids who are bringing their kids in now. We really are like a family.” Her consigners return to tell Wegner that Re-Run Shoppe has the most competitive prices in the region. She says, “Normally, the other shops will give you pennies on the dollar. We’ve had consigners try out other places who are appalled when they see how other shops work. One woman almost fell out when she heard what they were going to give her for her consignments, so she brought all her stuff back to us. In the end, people are curious, but most return when they see that difference.”

In addition to consigning clothes, the Re-Run Shoppe assists the community through clothing donations. Wenger says they donate around 15 bags to Virginia Rescue every week, and many consigners will tell her to donate the clothes that the shop cannot use. Consigners can pick up donation slips for tax season afterwards. She adds, “We’ll help families when we get phone calls, like if someone’s home has burned down. We’ve donated to Back-toSchool Days, and we’re always trying to reach out to those in need.” Wegner credits her relationships with her neighbors as being another draw to remaining a downtown institution. She says, “Downtown has a lot to offer. The construction has probably been a deterrent over the past year, but I see things starting to turn around with all the new stores and restaurants. We have great neighbors. Whittingham’s has been here a long time, and I’ve been at that same location forever. We all get along so well, it makes it easier to stay here.”

And that inviting shop window? That’s Sandra Freeman’s handiwork most of the time. Wegner says they try to update the window weekly to show off their newest items. “Sandra’s really talented and loves doing the design work.” You can visit the Re-Run Shoppe daily at 1017 Caroline Street in downtown Fredericksburg, Monday through Saturday, between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.. You’re bound to find something you can’t live without.

A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist, and co-editor of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review. She has lived in Fredericksburg for the past seventeen years and is a frequent contributor to Front Porch Magazine.

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Fredericksburg front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

19


history’s stories

HOPE FOUNDRY By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

I recently received a call from my longtime friend Carey Leitch President of CARICO Steel Fabrication Company located in the Fredericksburg Industrial Park. The Leitch family has been in the area for several generations and involved in local business and politics. Alma Leitch was a well beloved Commissioner of the Revenue in the City for over thirty years. Carey who has a collection of local historical artifacts invited me to take a short trip with him to the Quantico Marine Base to view what he described as a “one known” Fredericksburg item. It was a warm morning in August when we started our drive up the Interstate to meet with some government officials that would show us the artifact discovered. We were greeted by two men that were employed by the Forestry Division. They advised us that we would see what they had discovered when they started a logging operation in a dense forest area only two hundred yards from the main road. We left our trucks and had not gone fifty yards when I said “WOW”, as a large steam engine appeared with belt pulleys over six foot high.. The first thing that caught my eye was BOWERING FREDERICKSBURG VIRGINIA in large letters embossed in the steel rails that supported the ten ton engine. The condition of the engine is remarkable since it has been in the elements since 1880’s.

Benjamin Bowering was hired by John Scott around 1849 as a manager of all operations of the Hope Foundry. The building was located on the corner of Princess Anne and Charlotte Streets, which is now the site of the Fredericksburg Court House. Noel Harrison in his book Fredericksburg Civil War Sites describes the building as having a skylight that was 10 by 70 feet and with a capacity for melting iron in a single casting of over 10 tons. The Foundry advertised that it made steam engines, boilers, stamp mills, mining and mill machinery along with plows and plow castings. With the advent of the Civil War the Foundry manufactured munitions and worked on cannon for the Southern Confederacy. This was interrupted when the Union Army took over the Town in the April 1862. The Union operated the Foundry for several months and even built a rail spur down Princess Anne Street that connected to the RF&P. In August 1862 the Union abandoned the Foundry. It was not reopened until after the war. After the war the foundry operated under several names Bowering’s Foundry, Scott’s Foundry, Southern Foundry, Progress Engine and Machine Works. The Steam Engine that we discovered on the Quantico site actually was purchased by George Washington Row of Spotsylvania County in the 1880’s for his saw mill operation. Pat Sullivan a local expert on the history of Spotsylvania and he is the Great Grandson of G. W. E. Row. Pat says that the county Row’s leave the e off their name unlike the Fredericksburg Rowe’s. Some think that the e was added after the Civil War when many family names were changed. Pat has a wonderful web site on the history of Spotsylvania and many of the early families. George Washington Row died in April 1883 at the age of 39. His untimely death resulted in a large sale of his estate, which Benjamin Bowering assisted, as he was sole owner of the Bowering Foundry. The Steam Engine at the mill did not sell and it is believed that a fire destroyed the mill and that is why the Steam Engine is still there today. This is the only one known survivor of all the steam engines produced by Hope Foundry. Fredericksburg was far enough north to be on the leading edge of the Industrial Revolution. Benjamin Bowering along with his brother Andrew who was famous as he played music at Stonewall Jacksons funeral and is said to have blew the last recall for the Army of Northern Virginia at Lee’s surrender, placed his bugle on a tree limb and walked back to Fredericksburg. Today they rest in the Confederate Cemetery on Washington Avenue. My wish is that the Fredericksburg Steam Engine will someday be a monument too local industry HERE. Dedicated to Frances Belman Haddock , Betty Everly and Mary Catlett

18

October 2015

Front porch fredericksburg

OUR HERITAGE

Everything Old is New Again!

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

not forgotten

By john reifenberg Sumac. It may be pronounced shoe make, (as found in our Oral Histories collection), shoe mack, (as from my youth), or sue mack, it’s all about the same little tree. The different pronunciations are dependent upon the region of your upbringing and when that took place. However one may relate to sound of the word, one thing is clear. This small tree played a large role in the lives of many people throughout the Fredericksburg region. Found in our Clip Files collection is an article written by Patricia Kent in 1993. Besides being a reporter at the time, she is also one of the founding members of the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center. She noted in a Free Lance-Star piece the emergence of the sumac business in Fredericksburg, beginning in the nineteenth century. The extract of the plant, rendered mostly from the leaves, was utilized as a tanning agent for leathers and for the setting of colors in fabric. The dyeing and dressing of leather was enormously important, as good leather was in great demand. Clothiers, other manufacturers, farmers, etc., all sought quality leather for its versatility and great resiliency. John G. Hurkamp, among his other enterprises, dealt in leather goods, both in the processing and selling of needed items. He received his leather education in Europe, where he was exposed to the best source of the extract of the time. This superior form of sumac extract came from Sicily. As reported by Kent, Hurkamp began his business near Fredericksburg in 1856, building a tanning plant near the city. At some point he became dissatisfied with having to rely on the imported Sicilian extract, and being aware that sumac grew all through the immediate area, set out to make his own potion. Experimentation led to success, and by 1860 he had what was considered a quality product, rivalling the best from Europe. He became both a consumer and

exporter of his creation. Competition from others soon followed. A short search through the archives turned up an original letter written by Robert Soutter, dated 1868. It is addressed to “My dearest Nephew”, one of the local Knox clan and states, “By our news papers I see that the Sumac business, in Virginia, now looms large. How prospers yours??” A note written in 1914 on R. T. Knox & Bro. letterhead posts the inscription; “Manufacturers Of Sumac Extract” and then, “Established In Fredericksburg, Va. In 1866…” From the date is apparent that both Hurkamp and the Knox family competed for the availability of quality sumac extract, but it is unclear if Knox purchased Hurkamp extract or developed his own. More research revealed interesting notes and sub-plots, but in essence, the Knox trade would extend into the next century, while somewhere along the path, Hurkamp’s did not. The momentum and direct line of the story picks up in 1907, when in another FLS story from our archives, Robert T. Knox and brother James are featured in an article entitled Sumac Extract . The first line of the piece reads, “The manufacture of sumac extract is one of the principal industries of Fredericksburg…” But by March, 1913 the Knox brothers had decided to move the business and settled on a site in Milford, VA. Reporting the move was another Free Lance-Star article in May of the same year. There is much more to the story of the small tree that loomed large here, but procrastination has claimed another victim. The Central Rappahannock Heritage Center protects thousands of documents and many other archives. We carry an enormous variety of subjects and sources and everyone is invited to come in for a trip back through time. John Reifenberg is a CRHC volunteer

Re-Run Shoppe : 40 years downtown By a.e.bayne

If you find yourself meandering through town on a bright autumn day, you will eventually come to the 1000 block and will be drawn in by the inviting front Run Shoppe. Opened in widow of the Re-R the late 1970s by Carol Riley, the shop changed hands in the mid ‘80s to current owner Valorie Wegner (photo above). It’s served the Fredericksburg community for close to 40 years. Wegner says she enjoys the partnerships she’s made with her consigners over the years. With over 7,000 consigners currently using their system, Re-Run Shoppe offers a wide variety of styles and brands to their customers. Featuring children’s and women’s clothing, shoes, designer

handbags and jewelry, ReRun Shoppe considers consignments between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The shop specializes in stocking seasonal clothing and takes both designer and off-therack labels, but they steer clear of inexpensive items fearing the quality won’t be worth the resale. They look for gently used clothing that is no older than two to three years for style purposes. Consigners earn 50% of the total sale on their clothing. Wegner credits her exceptional staff – Sandra Freeman, manager, and Tina Pilkerton, sales – for creating a space where customers and consigners return again and again. She says, “I’ve had people move away and come back 8 or 10 years later and say, ‘You’re still here! It’s so good to see you.’ We have people who have consigned with us and they have kids who are bringing their kids in now. We really are like a family.” Her consigners return to tell Wegner that Re-Run Shoppe has the most competitive prices in the region. She says, “Normally, the other shops will give you pennies on the dollar. We’ve had consigners try out other places who are appalled when they see how other shops work. One woman almost fell out when she heard what they were going to give her for her consignments, so she brought all her stuff back to us. In the end, people are curious, but most return when they see that difference.”

In addition to consigning clothes, the Re-Run Shoppe assists the community through clothing donations. Wenger says they donate around 15 bags to Virginia Rescue every week, and many consigners will tell her to donate the clothes that the shop cannot use. Consigners can pick up donation slips for tax season afterwards. She adds, “We’ll help families when we get phone calls, like if someone’s home has burned down. We’ve donated to Back-toSchool Days, and we’re always trying to reach out to those in need.” Wegner credits her relationships with her neighbors as being another draw to remaining a downtown institution. She says, “Downtown has a lot to offer. The construction has probably been a deterrent over the past year, but I see things starting to turn around with all the new stores and restaurants. We have great neighbors. Whittingham’s has been here a long time, and I’ve been at that same location forever. We all get along so well, it makes it easier to stay here.”

And that inviting shop window? That’s Sandra Freeman’s handiwork most of the time. Wegner says they try to update the window weekly to show off their newest items. “Sandra’s really talented and loves doing the design work.” You can visit the Re-Run Shoppe daily at 1017 Caroline Street in downtown Fredericksburg, Monday through Saturday, between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.. You’re bound to find something you can’t live without.

A.E. Bayne is a writer, artist, and co-editor of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review. She has lived in Fredericksburg for the past seventeen years and is a frequent contributor to Front Porch Magazine.

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Fredericksburg front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

19


Companions

ANIMAL RITES, USA Pet Cremation Service

Supplement Safety anything we put in our bodies....

grumpy cat abnormality of the bone and cartilage, which results in lack of bone growth and deformities. Osteorefers to the b o n e . Chondrorefers to cartilage. Dysplasiarefers to the abnormal growth. There is a breed called Scottish the Fold that is always going to be predisposed to osteochondrodysplasia, which is caused by the autosomal dominant gene. which means one parent must have this gene for the disorder to be passed down to the offspring. Another form of dwarfism called Achondroplasia, which is a lack of bone growth caused by a mutation of the fibroblast growth facet or receptor gene in the original dwarf cat. This is the Munchkin... we all love the munchkin with its normal face, body and short legs... can't get much cuter than that! The International Cat Association gave recognition to the Munchkin as a sole breed in 1994 as well as a Persian-Munchkin hybrid, look them up they're adorable. There are a few other breeds that are under study right now to be recognized as their own "dwarf" breed like the Skookum and Bambino. If you still want a dwarf cat but your allergic to the

fur, get a bambino they're hairless. Their are a few health issues that come with having a dwarf cat as adorable as they are, the vet bills can be very high. Due to its small stature, they suffer from hip and joint issues, congenital defects, digestive problems as well as some spine issues. Spin issues do not seem to be major in the Munchkin breed. If you are looking for a Munchkin or any type of dwarf cat you can look online or ask your local shelter where some are being sold. When you are looking for your new furry cat, or any pet for that matter, do your research and fine the one that best fits with your family's life style and location. If you ever need someone to care for your pets while you are away please send me an email, or give me a call .Lexig0892@gmail.com, (540) 903-0437 Lexi’s Pet Sitting Service.

When it’s time to say “Good-bye”

Private, Individual Cremation Personal Pick Up & Delivery Respect for all “Best Friends” Serving the Area since 2003 Visit Us at Our Website: www.animalritesusa.com Call Us At: 540-361-7487

Full Service Hospital featuring: Grooming Salon Canine & Feline Boarding Dog Training with Play Time Alternative Therapies: Therapy Laser: Helps with Pain Relief, Decreases Inflammation & Enhances Healing Chiropractic Adjustments: Provides Comfort & Restores Motion & Function to many patients

Stacy L. Horner-Dunn, DVM Gary B. Dunn, DVM Melanie M. Bell, DVM Sandi L. Pepper, DVM Melissa A. DeLauter, DVM Jennifer V. Skarbek, DVM Sheree M. Corbin, DVM

540/374-0462 www.woahvets.com 20

October 2015

Control Yourself

By meg sneed

By alexis grogan

We all know that adorable face that we see all over the web, the grumpy face with the funny words. Her internet name is grumpy cat. Grumpy Cat is a female, but her real name is “Tartar Sauce” and she is actually not grumpy at all. The grumpy look is due to an underbite. Grumpy is not an actual breed of cat but, don't we wish she was? I want one but that's ok I'll stick with my feline friend. Grumpy cat was born to normal cat parents and has a brother named Pokey, now your probably wondering, if she was born to normal parents why doesn't she look normal? That is due to a gene in one of her parents which causes feline dwarfism , her parents look normal, but that doesn't always mean the offspring will be. Feline dwarfism is just about the same as human dwarfism, their are two types. Osteochondrodysplasia, which is a growth and developmental

Mind Your Mind

Front porch fredericksburg

. Vitamin supplements. Herbal remedies. Essential Oils and Homeopathic solutions. If you haven’t taken some of these yourself, chances are you know someone who does. They’ve become increasingly popular in town over the last 3-5 years, and much easier to find as a result. You can get them at the pharmacy, the grocery store, or even from your neighbor. Google has dozens of results for home-grown blogs detailing “natural” remedies for almost any ailment or remedy you can think of. And some of them even work. Don’t get me wrong. I am not opposed to natural remedies by any means. I spent the first 29 years of my life taking increasingly stronger medicines to control my asthma and allergies until I finally maxed out on the dosage of three of the strongest prescriptions available at the same time. I’ve spent the last 3 years finding the best combination of diet, exercise, homeopathies, vitamins, herbs, and even essential oils to allow me to control my asthma and allergies without the need for even a single prescription maintenance medication. So I absolutely believe that natural or alternative remedies can have an amazing effect on our bodies. Frankly, anything we put in or on our bodies will have an effect – that is, after all, why we use it. That effect, however, is not always the one we expected. While natural remedies do not often come with the laundry list of potential side effects that we more commonly associate with prescription or even over-the-counter medications, that does not mean that they do not have any. Just as with a prescription medication, different people react differently to natural remedies dependent upon their own physiology, environment, and any other natural, OTC, or prescription remedies they are using. Which is why I cringe every time I witness a casual conversation where one well-intentioned person encourages their

friend, co-worker, or acquaintance to take X, Y, or Z remedy for their ailment. It’s a natural impulse, one I’m certainly guilty of myself as well, to want to offer up the same advice about a commonly available remedy that made a world of difference for yourself. The problem is that this advice is almost always given without any knowledge of the other person’s health history or even any true knowledge of the natural remedy aside from its intended effect as stated on the front of the package. Anything you put in your body will have an effect – good, bad, or indifferent. It will have an effect. Magnesium, a common vitamin supplement, can induce nausea or vomiting, or even affect your heart rate. The effects of homeopathic remedies can be greatly reduced by regular use of mint – an ingredient found in many essential oil blends as well as your toothpaste. And there is always the potential for interactions with prescription medications; according to an article by American Family Physician, Ginseng, a popular herb to boost energy among other things, can have an adverse interaction with Warfarin, a prescription blood thinner. If you want to take natural supplements to improve your health (and I really do recommend them!) please don’t rely upon Google or your neighbor/homebusiness supplement sales person. We have a wealth of holistic physicians (Dr. Clifton Sheetz, Dr. Jason Sneed, or Dr. Yvonne Villarreal), Naturopaths (Barbara Bergquist with The Natural Path and Suzy Woollam with The Scenter of Town), and other practitioners (Julie Dameron with the Center for Advanced Wellness), who can all advise from a holistic perspective to implement a more natural course of treatment safely and effectively. Meg is the practice manager at Old Dominion Osteopathic Medicine, a mom of 3kids, and an ardent lover of all foods local, natural, and un-messed-with.

By Barbara Deal “ C A L M DOWN!!!” you find yourself yelling “ I can’t take it anymore” “shut up!” “it’s too much!”…gotta get outta here”; “S/he or they are driving me crazy”. Instead, look at these feelings through the lens of control. Think of a thermostat on the wall of your house or gauge on your car. You can regulate emotional temperature (wild, out of control). “Emotional regulation” means balancing, titrating, shifting focus. This does not mean shutting down, being cold, or numb . No rejection,. See what’s there. Feelings are powerful, happy, blue, ancy, envy, hate wary,. So, to begin. Check your own pulse first. Is your heart beating? Check. Ok. Are you breathing? Check. Check again. Probably your breath is audible maybe panting with rage.. First, EXHALE. Largely. “just breathe” means take in a big breath. This Is not helpful. Blow out really, really slowly. Longer than your inhale. Twice as long . watch your body breathing. Especially exhaling. Do this a long time, at least 3 minutes Turn outward instead of inside Think of your 5 senses: hearing, seeing, touching, tasting, smelling. Research shows regulating that alert state (fight/flight/freeze) is possible. Unhook yourself from that spiraling emotion. Eyes closed is best, but eyes open will work. Sounds Music on? Turn it off. If it is off, turn it on. Ditto television. Select soothing sounds such as music composed by music therapists. Sight Lights on? Turn them off. Off? Turn them on. Darkness is generally believed to have a soothing effect.

However, that is NOT SO with some having experienced trauma in the dark. There are wonderful DVDs of music with woodland scenes, the ocean, artwork of impressionists, visually and audibly calming. Tactile Sense your body position. Note your body’s posture, the sensation of sitting/standing. What is your body touching? Don’t move. Just watch, kindly. What Is your shoulder leaning against? are your hands and fingers wiggling or still? Especially, where are your feet ? Put your feet on the floor. This is grounding, a mindful reminder. Heard of progressive relaxation”. It’s kinda the same. This ,you can do anywhere, in gridlock, an argument, at work, with children, lost , trapped. Say to yourself “feet on the floor”. Remove yourself from that inward focus (unregulated) to where you are, physically, your body. Smells research shows aromatherapy is restful.That spontaneous odor that evokes that treasured memory of grandma’s biscuits. Same idea. OK, you say, “When do I get to EXPRESS MY FEELINGS ?”. Nowadays, I say this only to help with assertiveness. When overwhelmed, unregulated, we do not need to vent feelings. Saying it, thinking about it, over and over, intensifies.. Instead, we should ”stifle” as Archie used to say to his wife Edith. HE of course was the one who should have been stifling. We want to ‘unhook” from that world. Focus off feelings. Pay attention to external things, the cold wet grass, the smell and touch of the wind, blinking into the sun, that screeching, motorcycle. Oops, well, not so much the roar of the motorcycle. You get my point. Barbara Deal MA, LCSW is a psychotherapist at Mental Health Resources who has been working locally for over 30 years with people with stress, life problems, and other suffering. Drawing by Barbara Deal.

Front Porch Fredericksburg

Supporting Preservation Since 1997

10 Walsh Lane front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

21


Companions

ANIMAL RITES, USA Pet Cremation Service

Supplement Safety anything we put in our bodies....

grumpy cat abnormality of the bone and cartilage, which results in lack of bone growth and deformities. Osteorefers to the b o n e . Chondrorefers to cartilage. Dysplasiarefers to the abnormal growth. There is a breed called Scottish the Fold that is always going to be predisposed to osteochondrodysplasia, which is caused by the autosomal dominant gene. which means one parent must have this gene for the disorder to be passed down to the offspring. Another form of dwarfism called Achondroplasia, which is a lack of bone growth caused by a mutation of the fibroblast growth facet or receptor gene in the original dwarf cat. This is the Munchkin... we all love the munchkin with its normal face, body and short legs... can't get much cuter than that! The International Cat Association gave recognition to the Munchkin as a sole breed in 1994 as well as a Persian-Munchkin hybrid, look them up they're adorable. There are a few other breeds that are under study right now to be recognized as their own "dwarf" breed like the Skookum and Bambino. If you still want a dwarf cat but your allergic to the

fur, get a bambino they're hairless. Their are a few health issues that come with having a dwarf cat as adorable as they are, the vet bills can be very high. Due to its small stature, they suffer from hip and joint issues, congenital defects, digestive problems as well as some spine issues. Spin issues do not seem to be major in the Munchkin breed. If you are looking for a Munchkin or any type of dwarf cat you can look online or ask your local shelter where some are being sold. When you are looking for your new furry cat, or any pet for that matter, do your research and fine the one that best fits with your family's life style and location. If you ever need someone to care for your pets while you are away please send me an email, or give me a call .Lexig0892@gmail.com, (540) 903-0437 Lexi’s Pet Sitting Service.

When it’s time to say “Good-bye”

Private, Individual Cremation Personal Pick Up & Delivery Respect for all “Best Friends” Serving the Area since 2003 Visit Us at Our Website: www.animalritesusa.com Call Us At: 540-361-7487

Full Service Hospital featuring: Grooming Salon Canine & Feline Boarding Dog Training with Play Time Alternative Therapies: Therapy Laser: Helps with Pain Relief, Decreases Inflammation & Enhances Healing Chiropractic Adjustments: Provides Comfort & Restores Motion & Function to many patients

Stacy L. Horner-Dunn, DVM Gary B. Dunn, DVM Melanie M. Bell, DVM Sandi L. Pepper, DVM Melissa A. DeLauter, DVM Jennifer V. Skarbek, DVM Sheree M. Corbin, DVM

540/374-0462 www.woahvets.com 20

October 2015

Control Yourself

By meg sneed

By alexis grogan

We all know that adorable face that we see all over the web, the grumpy face with the funny words. Her internet name is grumpy cat. Grumpy Cat is a female, but her real name is “Tartar Sauce” and she is actually not grumpy at all. The grumpy look is due to an underbite. Grumpy is not an actual breed of cat but, don't we wish she was? I want one but that's ok I'll stick with my feline friend. Grumpy cat was born to normal cat parents and has a brother named Pokey, now your probably wondering, if she was born to normal parents why doesn't she look normal? That is due to a gene in one of her parents which causes feline dwarfism , her parents look normal, but that doesn't always mean the offspring will be. Feline dwarfism is just about the same as human dwarfism, their are two types. Osteochondrodysplasia, which is a growth and developmental

Mind Your Mind

Front porch fredericksburg

. Vitamin supplements. Herbal remedies. Essential Oils and Homeopathic solutions. If you haven’t taken some of these yourself, chances are you know someone who does. They’ve become increasingly popular in town over the last 3-5 years, and much easier to find as a result. You can get them at the pharmacy, the grocery store, or even from your neighbor. Google has dozens of results for home-grown blogs detailing “natural” remedies for almost any ailment or remedy you can think of. And some of them even work. Don’t get me wrong. I am not opposed to natural remedies by any means. I spent the first 29 years of my life taking increasingly stronger medicines to control my asthma and allergies until I finally maxed out on the dosage of three of the strongest prescriptions available at the same time. I’ve spent the last 3 years finding the best combination of diet, exercise, homeopathies, vitamins, herbs, and even essential oils to allow me to control my asthma and allergies without the need for even a single prescription maintenance medication. So I absolutely believe that natural or alternative remedies can have an amazing effect on our bodies. Frankly, anything we put in or on our bodies will have an effect – that is, after all, why we use it. That effect, however, is not always the one we expected. While natural remedies do not often come with the laundry list of potential side effects that we more commonly associate with prescription or even over-the-counter medications, that does not mean that they do not have any. Just as with a prescription medication, different people react differently to natural remedies dependent upon their own physiology, environment, and any other natural, OTC, or prescription remedies they are using. Which is why I cringe every time I witness a casual conversation where one well-intentioned person encourages their

friend, co-worker, or acquaintance to take X, Y, or Z remedy for their ailment. It’s a natural impulse, one I’m certainly guilty of myself as well, to want to offer up the same advice about a commonly available remedy that made a world of difference for yourself. The problem is that this advice is almost always given without any knowledge of the other person’s health history or even any true knowledge of the natural remedy aside from its intended effect as stated on the front of the package. Anything you put in your body will have an effect – good, bad, or indifferent. It will have an effect. Magnesium, a common vitamin supplement, can induce nausea or vomiting, or even affect your heart rate. The effects of homeopathic remedies can be greatly reduced by regular use of mint – an ingredient found in many essential oil blends as well as your toothpaste. And there is always the potential for interactions with prescription medications; according to an article by American Family Physician, Ginseng, a popular herb to boost energy among other things, can have an adverse interaction with Warfarin, a prescription blood thinner. If you want to take natural supplements to improve your health (and I really do recommend them!) please don’t rely upon Google or your neighbor/homebusiness supplement sales person. We have a wealth of holistic physicians (Dr. Clifton Sheetz, Dr. Jason Sneed, or Dr. Yvonne Villarreal), Naturopaths (Barbara Bergquist with The Natural Path and Suzy Woollam with The Scenter of Town), and other practitioners (Julie Dameron with the Center for Advanced Wellness), who can all advise from a holistic perspective to implement a more natural course of treatment safely and effectively. Meg is the practice manager at Old Dominion Osteopathic Medicine, a mom of 3kids, and an ardent lover of all foods local, natural, and un-messed-with.

By Barbara Deal “ C A L M DOWN!!!” you find yourself yelling “ I can’t take it anymore” “shut up!” “it’s too much!”…gotta get outta here”; “S/he or they are driving me crazy”. Instead, look at these feelings through the lens of control. Think of a thermostat on the wall of your house or gauge on your car. You can regulate emotional temperature (wild, out of control). “Emotional regulation” means balancing, titrating, shifting focus. This does not mean shutting down, being cold, or numb . No rejection,. See what’s there. Feelings are powerful, happy, blue, ancy, envy, hate wary,. So, to begin. Check your own pulse first. Is your heart beating? Check. Ok. Are you breathing? Check. Check again. Probably your breath is audible maybe panting with rage.. First, EXHALE. Largely. “just breathe” means take in a big breath. This Is not helpful. Blow out really, really slowly. Longer than your inhale. Twice as long . watch your body breathing. Especially exhaling. Do this a long time, at least 3 minutes Turn outward instead of inside Think of your 5 senses: hearing, seeing, touching, tasting, smelling. Research shows regulating that alert state (fight/flight/freeze) is possible. Unhook yourself from that spiraling emotion. Eyes closed is best, but eyes open will work. Sounds Music on? Turn it off. If it is off, turn it on. Ditto television. Select soothing sounds such as music composed by music therapists. Sight Lights on? Turn them off. Off? Turn them on. Darkness is generally believed to have a soothing effect.

However, that is NOT SO with some having experienced trauma in the dark. There are wonderful DVDs of music with woodland scenes, the ocean, artwork of impressionists, visually and audibly calming. Tactile Sense your body position. Note your body’s posture, the sensation of sitting/standing. What is your body touching? Don’t move. Just watch, kindly. What Is your shoulder leaning against? are your hands and fingers wiggling or still? Especially, where are your feet ? Put your feet on the floor. This is grounding, a mindful reminder. Heard of progressive relaxation”. It’s kinda the same. This ,you can do anywhere, in gridlock, an argument, at work, with children, lost , trapped. Say to yourself “feet on the floor”. Remove yourself from that inward focus (unregulated) to where you are, physically, your body. Smells research shows aromatherapy is restful.That spontaneous odor that evokes that treasured memory of grandma’s biscuits. Same idea. OK, you say, “When do I get to EXPRESS MY FEELINGS ?”. Nowadays, I say this only to help with assertiveness. When overwhelmed, unregulated, we do not need to vent feelings. Saying it, thinking about it, over and over, intensifies.. Instead, we should ”stifle” as Archie used to say to his wife Edith. HE of course was the one who should have been stifling. We want to ‘unhook” from that world. Focus off feelings. Pay attention to external things, the cold wet grass, the smell and touch of the wind, blinking into the sun, that screeching, motorcycle. Oops, well, not so much the roar of the motorcycle. You get my point. Barbara Deal MA, LCSW is a psychotherapist at Mental Health Resources who has been working locally for over 30 years with people with stress, life problems, and other suffering. Drawing by Barbara Deal.

Front Porch Fredericksburg

Supporting Preservation Since 1997

10 Walsh Lane front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

21


Senior Care make your wishes known By Karl Karch

I used to say there are two things we can’t avoid in life: taxes and death. Well, many people aren’t paying taxes, so that leaves only death. We all know we will die, we just don’t talk about it. We may have a misguided fear that if you talk about or plan for eventual death, it must be imminent. It’s now six years since I wrote my Advance Medical Directive (AMD) using the standard Virginia form prior to surgery. I gave very little thought to what I wanted, and assumed the form was clear because it was written by experts. Besides, I had other forms to complete and just wanted to get finished. Sound familiar? Thankfully, this article prompted me to update it. So why do people delay writing their end-of-life documents? Several reasons: people always think they have time; people never think “bad” things will happen; and people do not want to think about their own death. But, if something happens where we are unable to make our own decisions, we need this document. Generally, there are two key parts to an AMD: Living Will, and Health Care Power of Attorney. The Living Will portion states your wishes about lifesustaining medical treatment if you are terminally ill, permanently unconscious, or in the end-stage of a fatal illness. This last highlighted part is important because a living will does not take effect if there is hope for recovery. The Health Care Power of Attorney (POA) portion is where you appoint someone to make your medical decisions anytime you cannot. Because the Health Care POA is so powerful and there are several types of POAs, it is important to consult with an attorney prior to making this designation. One of the problems with an AMD is that it may not be readily available

22

October 2015

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

when needed. Good News Virginians! Virginia maintains an Advance Directive Registry where you can file your health care documents on a secure website that key people can access. To learn more, go Another to :www.VirginiaRegistry.org. problem with the standard AMD is that you are deciding now what you want in the future, and the instructions describe an extreme and very clear-cut hypothetical scenario. However, many real-life situations are not that clear-cut. Will your wishes change if you have a terminal diagnosis at 43, 63 or 93? How certain is your diagnosis? How great is your pain? How sharp is your mind? Do you want more time for final goodbyes? Have advances in medical treatments and pain control changed your views? So, why have an AMD? To me, there are three key reasons: (1) It gets you thinking more clearly about your end-of-life preferences; (2) Family members may not be able to remove life sustaining treatment without one; (3) Perhaps the most important reason to me is sharing your wishes with your family. This document is an excellent conversation starter. Roberta and I chose a less legalistic approach suggested by Kenny F. Hegland and Robert B. Fleming in their 2010 book “New Times, New Challenges: Law and Advice for Savvy Seniors and Their Families”. We each wrote a letter expressing our end-of-life desires, values, and beliefs rather than specific scenarios and life sustaining medical treatments. We then wrote a Health Care Power of Attorney document including what powers we give the POA. Next on the list is to review these with our children at our next family gathering.

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Emancipated Patients rational end of life care by patrick neustatter, MD

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Ceili Leahy was “stunned” by the response and help she got from The Fairy Godmother Project and the radio program that publicized her terminal leukemia. I, in turn, am stunned by the apparent composure and maturity of her Star, decision, reported in The Free Lance-S to forgo any further chemotherapy because she wants her “last days to be vivid” she says. And “I wasn’t going to get that if I continued with treatment” Ceili, is an eighteen year old JM graduate, diagnosed with a form of bone cancer (Ewing’s sarcoma) age 16, which has evolved to leukemia. She has had three rounds of chemotherapy, which made her fell “terrible” but without much benefit the report says. She has now opted for no more. When to Stop Deciding when to stop “definitive” care (treatment that you hope will cure you) and turn to “palliative care” (where all important social, psychological and spiritual needs are addressed as much as medical needs) is one of the most agonizing issues I have seen patients wrestle with. It is an unfortunately common scenario that someone with cancer opts for – or is talked in to – getting round after round of chemotherapy, radiation or surgery. Or debilitated, demented, elderly patients with any kind of illness get on the never ending “do-everything hurdygurdy.” So the end of their life is spent in some intensive care unit, tethered to a host of machines, and so out of it they never get the closure that they and their family so badly need. Part of the problem is doctor’s reluctance to talk about death or confront reality. Studies show doctors are wildly unrealistic/optimistic about prognosis. New York Times writer Jane Brody, in her wonderful book Jane Brody’s Guide to the Great Beyond, talks about a friend who was able to get affairs of her

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~Quantitative Fluid Analysis ~VoiceBio Analysis ~ionSpa Foot Detox ~Zyto Bioscan Compass Natural Products for Health & Wellness Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

personal business in order; spend quality time with friends and family and work through “some serious issues that had caused a rift between her and her daughter.” “Had her physician hemmed and hawed and failed to tell her just how serious her disease was,” had overestimated her life expectancy, notes Brody, “she might have lived the remaining months with the fantasy that she might beat this cancer” and never have gotten to do important stuff like reconcile with her daughter. Some Essential Steps Two specific tasks we all should think about – whether we think we are close to death or not – are: Have “the conversation,” and make an advanced directive. “The Conversation” is a an activity encouraged by a national campaign, The Conversation Project (www.theconversationproject.org) where they urge everyone to “gather round the kitchen table” and discuss what they would want in the way of end-of-life care. An advanced directive is putting those wishes down on paper in a legally binding document – ideally in very specific terms (many “living wills” or advanced directives are not detailed enough to give your medical care team adequate direction). Often part of this process is appointing a healthcare power of attorney to make medical decisions for you if you are incapable. Another move that often gets deferred, or never done, often because it is seen as giving up, “throwing in the towel” is to call in those experts in palliative care, hospice. Calling the shots in your own end-of-life care is the ultimate in medical emancipation in my opinion – and, at the risk of a little self promotion, Getting the Right Death is one of the chapters in my self help medical book being published this month – Managing Your Doctor – The Smart Patient’s Guide to Effective Affordable Healthcare. This may all seem a little morbid, but sweeping it under the rug is not the way to deal. As bioethics research organization The Hastings Center puts it, “Death is an inevitable aspect of the human condition. Dying badly is not.” Normally you think of teenagers as airheads and doozies that need to be brought into line. But it sounds like Ceili Leahy has wisdom beyond her years. Maybe someone we can learn from.

Wellness Carnivores & Herbivores By christine h.thompson, D.C. The debate has been raging long over whether to be a meat-eater, a vegetarian, a vegan, an ovo-vegetarian, etc. All devotees have passionate arguments and data supporting their stance. So who is right? Unfortunately the answer is not that simple. There are many factors involved. If we look at sustainability and feeding the evergrowing and ever hungry world population, the plant-eaters have it. It is much more sustainable and affordable from the standpoint of water usage and food needed to feed livestock if we go to a plant-based diet. On the other hand, lifestyle must be factored in. In the industrialized world we lead lives that are busy and centered on work and leisure activities. We do not spend much time on basic needs such as obtaining food, water and shelter. We want our food to be readily available, fast and varied. These needs do not lend themselves to a plant-based, locally and seasonally derived diet that requires growing, harvesting, preparing, cooking and storing. The blood-ttype diet uses your blood type to determine whether you should be primarily a meat or veggie eater. This diet may work for some, however using ancestral heritage to determine present day diet doesn’t hold up when we take epigenetics into consideration. We know our environment (and our parents and grandparents environment) changes genetics and physiology. The Paleo Diet, calling for a diet similar to Paleolithic times, has its failings too, since the food available to us today barely resembles the food available in that era, with very few exceptions. The way to determine what diet is best for you is to try each one for a period of time and see how you feel. For many people the answer becomes apparent fairly quickly. They feel miserable with one diet and terrific with

another. You need to stick with one alternative for a period of 3 to 4 months to fully evaluate. There will be a period of adaptation to any change in eating that your digestive tract (and the rest of your body) must go through. When trying out the carnivore option, I suggest using digestive enzymes (especially the pancreatic enzymes), since your stomach may not be working at optimum level due to stress or poor eating habits. Poorly digested meat will cause all sorts of digestive problems. I also strongly suggest you only eat organic, naturally fed meat (or wild game). Unfortunately pesticides and hormones will be concentrated in the fat of animal meat. vore When trying out the veggie-v option, it is essential to eat vegetables!! I find many vegetarians substitute grains for protein. These pasta-tarians are trying to maintain their busy lifestyle while filling their hunger and energy needs with grains such as breads, pastas, chips and sweets. This leads to a nutritionally deficient diet. Vegetarianism means substituting vegetables for protein. You have to eat A LOT of vegetables, and often, in order to get your daily energy and protein requirements. With dedication you can do it! The bottom line is you need to eat a diet that works for you based on your unique health requirements and lifestyle choices. Of course, I am talking about a HEALTHY diet. I think even vegans would admit that there is a BIG difference between eating animals that have been raised without antibiotics and hormones and fed their natural diet, compared to eating conventionally grown livestock being fed genetically modified corn and routinely given growth hormones and preventive antibiotics. We are fortunate in this area to have local farms with organic produce as well as grass-finished, humanely treated cattle and free-range chickens. Check them out!

Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Diector of the Moss Free Clinic. Contact him at pneustatter@aol.com front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

23


Senior Care make your wishes known By Karl Karch

I used to say there are two things we can’t avoid in life: taxes and death. Well, many people aren’t paying taxes, so that leaves only death. We all know we will die, we just don’t talk about it. We may have a misguided fear that if you talk about or plan for eventual death, it must be imminent. It’s now six years since I wrote my Advance Medical Directive (AMD) using the standard Virginia form prior to surgery. I gave very little thought to what I wanted, and assumed the form was clear because it was written by experts. Besides, I had other forms to complete and just wanted to get finished. Sound familiar? Thankfully, this article prompted me to update it. So why do people delay writing their end-of-life documents? Several reasons: people always think they have time; people never think “bad” things will happen; and people do not want to think about their own death. But, if something happens where we are unable to make our own decisions, we need this document. Generally, there are two key parts to an AMD: Living Will, and Health Care Power of Attorney. The Living Will portion states your wishes about lifesustaining medical treatment if you are terminally ill, permanently unconscious, or in the end-stage of a fatal illness. This last highlighted part is important because a living will does not take effect if there is hope for recovery. The Health Care Power of Attorney (POA) portion is where you appoint someone to make your medical decisions anytime you cannot. Because the Health Care POA is so powerful and there are several types of POAs, it is important to consult with an attorney prior to making this designation. One of the problems with an AMD is that it may not be readily available

22

October 2015

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

when needed. Good News Virginians! Virginia maintains an Advance Directive Registry where you can file your health care documents on a secure website that key people can access. To learn more, go Another to :www.VirginiaRegistry.org. problem with the standard AMD is that you are deciding now what you want in the future, and the instructions describe an extreme and very clear-cut hypothetical scenario. However, many real-life situations are not that clear-cut. Will your wishes change if you have a terminal diagnosis at 43, 63 or 93? How certain is your diagnosis? How great is your pain? How sharp is your mind? Do you want more time for final goodbyes? Have advances in medical treatments and pain control changed your views? So, why have an AMD? To me, there are three key reasons: (1) It gets you thinking more clearly about your end-of-life preferences; (2) Family members may not be able to remove life sustaining treatment without one; (3) Perhaps the most important reason to me is sharing your wishes with your family. This document is an excellent conversation starter. Roberta and I chose a less legalistic approach suggested by Kenny F. Hegland and Robert B. Fleming in their 2010 book “New Times, New Challenges: Law and Advice for Savvy Seniors and Their Families”. We each wrote a letter expressing our end-of-life desires, values, and beliefs rather than specific scenarios and life sustaining medical treatments. We then wrote a Health Care Power of Attorney document including what powers we give the POA. Next on the list is to review these with our children at our next family gathering.

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Emancipated Patients rational end of life care by patrick neustatter, MD

Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

Ceili Leahy was “stunned” by the response and help she got from The Fairy Godmother Project and the radio program that publicized her terminal leukemia. I, in turn, am stunned by the apparent composure and maturity of her Star, decision, reported in The Free Lance-S to forgo any further chemotherapy because she wants her “last days to be vivid” she says. And “I wasn’t going to get that if I continued with treatment” Ceili, is an eighteen year old JM graduate, diagnosed with a form of bone cancer (Ewing’s sarcoma) age 16, which has evolved to leukemia. She has had three rounds of chemotherapy, which made her fell “terrible” but without much benefit the report says. She has now opted for no more. When to Stop Deciding when to stop “definitive” care (treatment that you hope will cure you) and turn to “palliative care” (where all important social, psychological and spiritual needs are addressed as much as medical needs) is one of the most agonizing issues I have seen patients wrestle with. It is an unfortunately common scenario that someone with cancer opts for – or is talked in to – getting round after round of chemotherapy, radiation or surgery. Or debilitated, demented, elderly patients with any kind of illness get on the never ending “do-everything hurdygurdy.” So the end of their life is spent in some intensive care unit, tethered to a host of machines, and so out of it they never get the closure that they and their family so badly need. Part of the problem is doctor’s reluctance to talk about death or confront reality. Studies show doctors are wildly unrealistic/optimistic about prognosis. New York Times writer Jane Brody, in her wonderful book Jane Brody’s Guide to the Great Beyond, talks about a friend who was able to get affairs of her

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~Quantitative Fluid Analysis ~VoiceBio Analysis ~ionSpa Foot Detox ~Zyto Bioscan Compass Natural Products for Health & Wellness Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

personal business in order; spend quality time with friends and family and work through “some serious issues that had caused a rift between her and her daughter.” “Had her physician hemmed and hawed and failed to tell her just how serious her disease was,” had overestimated her life expectancy, notes Brody, “she might have lived the remaining months with the fantasy that she might beat this cancer” and never have gotten to do important stuff like reconcile with her daughter. Some Essential Steps Two specific tasks we all should think about – whether we think we are close to death or not – are: Have “the conversation,” and make an advanced directive. “The Conversation” is a an activity encouraged by a national campaign, The Conversation Project (www.theconversationproject.org) where they urge everyone to “gather round the kitchen table” and discuss what they would want in the way of end-of-life care. An advanced directive is putting those wishes down on paper in a legally binding document – ideally in very specific terms (many “living wills” or advanced directives are not detailed enough to give your medical care team adequate direction). Often part of this process is appointing a healthcare power of attorney to make medical decisions for you if you are incapable. Another move that often gets deferred, or never done, often because it is seen as giving up, “throwing in the towel” is to call in those experts in palliative care, hospice. Calling the shots in your own end-of-life care is the ultimate in medical emancipation in my opinion – and, at the risk of a little self promotion, Getting the Right Death is one of the chapters in my self help medical book being published this month – Managing Your Doctor – The Smart Patient’s Guide to Effective Affordable Healthcare. This may all seem a little morbid, but sweeping it under the rug is not the way to deal. As bioethics research organization The Hastings Center puts it, “Death is an inevitable aspect of the human condition. Dying badly is not.” Normally you think of teenagers as airheads and doozies that need to be brought into line. But it sounds like Ceili Leahy has wisdom beyond her years. Maybe someone we can learn from.

Wellness Carnivores & Herbivores By christine h.thompson, D.C. The debate has been raging long over whether to be a meat-eater, a vegetarian, a vegan, an ovo-vegetarian, etc. All devotees have passionate arguments and data supporting their stance. So who is right? Unfortunately the answer is not that simple. There are many factors involved. If we look at sustainability and feeding the evergrowing and ever hungry world population, the plant-eaters have it. It is much more sustainable and affordable from the standpoint of water usage and food needed to feed livestock if we go to a plant-based diet. On the other hand, lifestyle must be factored in. In the industrialized world we lead lives that are busy and centered on work and leisure activities. We do not spend much time on basic needs such as obtaining food, water and shelter. We want our food to be readily available, fast and varied. These needs do not lend themselves to a plant-based, locally and seasonally derived diet that requires growing, harvesting, preparing, cooking and storing. The blood-ttype diet uses your blood type to determine whether you should be primarily a meat or veggie eater. This diet may work for some, however using ancestral heritage to determine present day diet doesn’t hold up when we take epigenetics into consideration. We know our environment (and our parents and grandparents environment) changes genetics and physiology. The Paleo Diet, calling for a diet similar to Paleolithic times, has its failings too, since the food available to us today barely resembles the food available in that era, with very few exceptions. The way to determine what diet is best for you is to try each one for a period of time and see how you feel. For many people the answer becomes apparent fairly quickly. They feel miserable with one diet and terrific with

another. You need to stick with one alternative for a period of 3 to 4 months to fully evaluate. There will be a period of adaptation to any change in eating that your digestive tract (and the rest of your body) must go through. When trying out the carnivore option, I suggest using digestive enzymes (especially the pancreatic enzymes), since your stomach may not be working at optimum level due to stress or poor eating habits. Poorly digested meat will cause all sorts of digestive problems. I also strongly suggest you only eat organic, naturally fed meat (or wild game). Unfortunately pesticides and hormones will be concentrated in the fat of animal meat. vore When trying out the veggie-v option, it is essential to eat vegetables!! I find many vegetarians substitute grains for protein. These pasta-tarians are trying to maintain their busy lifestyle while filling their hunger and energy needs with grains such as breads, pastas, chips and sweets. This leads to a nutritionally deficient diet. Vegetarianism means substituting vegetables for protein. You have to eat A LOT of vegetables, and often, in order to get your daily energy and protein requirements. With dedication you can do it! The bottom line is you need to eat a diet that works for you based on your unique health requirements and lifestyle choices. Of course, I am talking about a HEALTHY diet. I think even vegans would admit that there is a BIG difference between eating animals that have been raised without antibiotics and hormones and fed their natural diet, compared to eating conventionally grown livestock being fed genetically modified corn and routinely given growth hormones and preventive antibiotics. We are fortunate in this area to have local farms with organic produce as well as grass-finished, humanely treated cattle and free-range chickens. Check them out!

Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Diector of the Moss Free Clinic. Contact him at pneustatter@aol.com front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

23


Art in the Burg Barbara Kenny returns to FXBG

by a.e.bayne

Join the UUFF Art Gallery in welcoming visiting artist Barbara Kenny for its inaugural reception and show on Sunday, October 4, 2015, from noon until 2:30 p.m. Kenny brings over 30 new oil paintings to Fredericksburg infused with her signature flashes of color and abstract sensibilities. Kenny paints in the moment and is guided by instinct. She says that inspiration can come from anywhere, from splashes of light on the leaves in the forest, to sprays of color in a field of flowers: “For instance, the other day a woman we know at our church had posted on Facebook a snapshot of all the things

Lem

ona

de

Mon-Sat: 10a-6p; Sun: 1-5p 810 Caroline Sr. #104 ~ 540.899.3714 www.juspopn.com

24

October 2015

of fredericksburg

Bonnie Halford, “Beyond the Sea”

By collette caprara

“ Sunflowers II”, Barbara Kenny

ors Flav ting 0 3 oun &C

Stories

she purchased at the local farmer’s market. She had fruits and vegetables with a few sunflowers, and I was totally struck by that. It’s the kind of thing I would have gone right into it. Suddenly just, ‘Oh, look at that. I want to paint that in a semi-abstract sort of way to utilize these colors and shapes.’ It’s that instantaneous.” When asked what drives her work, Kenny says she doesn’t really have a name for it. Inspiration? Muse? Voices from outer space? Whatever its name, she says, “It always seems that something outside myself is telling me what to do. I’ve heard this many times over the years from different artists. They don’t know what to call it. I do know that if I try to override it, my painting inevitably doesn’t turn out the way I want it. It’s very specific and a strong feeling from both within and outside myself.” Kenny prefers working in oils and describes her relationship with them akin to a close friendship. “It’s a wonderful relationship. I am there in that painting. I’m walking in that forest. I’m at that seashore; in that sky. Whatever it is, it’s like we’ve become one. It’s funny because once I’m done painting, and Tibby and I come back together for dinner in the evening, she’ll ask me about my day. It’s very hard to describe. I’ve been off in another place where I can’t take her at all. There’s no way that she or anyone else can see it. It’s just a wonderful place to be.” In a world that is consistently faster paced each day, Kenny says the act of viewing art can be a catharsis. She explains, “I’ve had people say that viewing art becomes a peaceful place to be, perhaps some of the same sensation as I have when I’m painting. For those who can stop to look at the paintings - when everything is so instant and so fast and so plastic - it takes them back to a simpler time. People who have purchased my paintings have told me they are an important part of their day – sort of an anti-technology, anti-rat race place to be. A man bought two paintings at my last show and said, ‘It’s like you’re capturing something that is going away, something we’re not going to continue to see,’ and I agree with him.” Kenny’s show will hang at the Unitarian Univiarsalist Fellowship Art Gallery at 25 Chalice Circle, Fredericksburg, VA 22405 through November 2015. It will open with the reception on October 4th, and interested parties may view or purchase art thereafter by calling (540) 287-7230.

Front porch fredericksburg

Though she would probably too humble and self-effacing to admit it, Brush Strokes Gallery's October featured artist Bonnie Halford provides a spark of cocreation and collaboration wherever she goes. That hallmark was evident in 2004 when Halford first suggested to others in Johnny Johnson's painting workshop that they launch a new venue to exhibit their work. Shortly thereafter, she took the leap of signing on the lease on a building. Her vision came a reality as a dozen other artists came on board to create the Brush Strokes Gallery. Since that day more than ten years ago, Brush Strokes has provided an exhibition venue for hundreds of artist, some of whom have even gone on to start additional galleries in Fredericksburg. The same collaborative dynamic that marked the gallery's launched is embodied in Halford's artwork, in which the medium itself, as well as the viewers, become co-creators of the finished work. In her paintings, Halford uses a unique type paper that Johnson first introduced her to-yupo-which has the uncanny quality of resisting rather than absorbing the paint. After thoroughly wetting the surface, Bonnie pours on drippings of watercolors or acrylics and lets the colors merge, collide, mix, and expand: At times, she tips the paper from side to side to augment the fusion. When the composition is at a stage where it presents prospects of various subjects, Halford lets the paint dry and later returns to absorb up some areas and embellish others with a dry brush. "I may see an eye in the painting and work from that point to create a face," Bonnie explains. She says that her paintings often surprise her-by the colors that are created from the merging of the two or three hues she poured, by the subject matter that suggests itself, and even by the emotions it conveys. Folks who know Bonnie often enjoy searching for hidden objects she has incorporated in her paintings, but they sometimes surprisingly "find" subjects she did not even realize were in the design. In her October exhibit at BSG, Through October 25, dubbed "Beyond the Sea," Bonnie turns to another favorite theme-the calming blues and greens of the ocean. "I have always gone to the ocean, especially in times when I was facing a personal challenge. It is so calming and embracing, even in the sound of its waves," she said. She hopes that viewers of her paintings this month will experience the

by ryan poe I met up with Megan Byrnes on one of those beautiful days that makes you look forward to Fall without reminding you that Winter is coming. A few weeks earlier when she asked me to continue her legacy as writer of the Scene & Heard section of the Front Porch, I was hesitant. I knew I could never emulate her playful tone or match her ability to stay in-the-know. As we walked to the park I told her how I was struggling to find my voice for the column.

same effect by her depiction of fish and the creation that lies under and near the sea. "Water really is the primordial, lifegiving element and I think all people feel a connection with it," she said., Although Halford cherishes the ocean for its constancy, she is awed by its many transformations. "Its movement is constantly changing. Its waves might be playful when it's gently splashing but can also seem almost menacing as it roars before a storm," she said, "But most of all, I am struck by its immensity. It makes you feel like you are a little speck in the universe." That may be the reason Bonnie thinks of these lyrics as the perfect theme song for her October exhibit: "I hope you still feel small when you stand beside the ocean, Whenever one door closes I hope one more opens, Promise me that you'll give faith a fighting chance, And when you get the choice to sit it out or dance. I hope you dance....I hope you dance."

“I think an element of humor is always good,” she advised, “If you were funny… which you’re not, so...”

vawineinmypocket.com

And to think that Megan used to intimidate me; with her snarkiness and confident sense of style. She buys and sells vintage clothing so we chatted a bit about her observations on fashion trends. “Brightly printed 70’s and 60’s floral dresses and skirts, embroidered tunics, when I started those were the things I couldn’t keep on the shelf and now Normcore is the thing. So everyone is buying basics; jeans, simple striped tops, and things like that. In a weird way, having a uniform is the trend right now.” This is good news for me. My closet is full of blues and grays with a splash of brown to keep things interesting. “There’s a company that just started a bespoke shirtmaking line and you literally get like fifteen measurements taken and you can buy yourself a week’s worth of shirts and you wear them all the time. I mean you pick the print and everything but there’s not a lot of variety. People like having a uniform now.” I didn’t feel it was worth mentioning that is how I buy my shirts. We sat on a park bench, me in my uniform and Megan in some outfit that was just right for that particular day. I brought up my vision for the column again and Megan offered some feedback.

get more comfortable, you’re going to figure out the kinds of questions to ask people to get them to tell you something. But it’s only going to have importance because it’s important to that person and you’re going to give it importance. But that’s where you have to interact with other people.” Megan knows that I am afraid of other people. “The person at the Rec Center for instance, I can only imagine the stories that they have. So you have to figure out the right questions to ask and then you’ll probably get some crazy good story out of it. And it doesn’t have to be like some big important story, it can just be anything that’s interesting.” We’ll see, Megan. We’ll see.

Ryan Poe is a father, husband, son, and brother living in Fredericksburg. He will be bringing “snippets” of real Burg folks each month in FP. photo by ryan poe.

“You’re telling a very short story. It’s a snippet. It’s like a story of someone’s story. It’s a part of someone’s story and so it can be very specific, and small even, but the way you write it can make it important. So it doesn’t have to be broad, which I think is kind of nice. And as you front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

25


Art in the Burg Barbara Kenny returns to FXBG

by a.e.bayne

Join the UUFF Art Gallery in welcoming visiting artist Barbara Kenny for its inaugural reception and show on Sunday, October 4, 2015, from noon until 2:30 p.m. Kenny brings over 30 new oil paintings to Fredericksburg infused with her signature flashes of color and abstract sensibilities. Kenny paints in the moment and is guided by instinct. She says that inspiration can come from anywhere, from splashes of light on the leaves in the forest, to sprays of color in a field of flowers: “For instance, the other day a woman we know at our church had posted on Facebook a snapshot of all the things

Lem

ona

de

Mon-Sat: 10a-6p; Sun: 1-5p 810 Caroline Sr. #104 ~ 540.899.3714 www.juspopn.com

24

October 2015

of fredericksburg

Bonnie Halford, “Beyond the Sea”

By collette caprara

“ Sunflowers II”, Barbara Kenny

ors Flav ting 0 3 oun &C

Stories

she purchased at the local farmer’s market. She had fruits and vegetables with a few sunflowers, and I was totally struck by that. It’s the kind of thing I would have gone right into it. Suddenly just, ‘Oh, look at that. I want to paint that in a semi-abstract sort of way to utilize these colors and shapes.’ It’s that instantaneous.” When asked what drives her work, Kenny says she doesn’t really have a name for it. Inspiration? Muse? Voices from outer space? Whatever its name, she says, “It always seems that something outside myself is telling me what to do. I’ve heard this many times over the years from different artists. They don’t know what to call it. I do know that if I try to override it, my painting inevitably doesn’t turn out the way I want it. It’s very specific and a strong feeling from both within and outside myself.” Kenny prefers working in oils and describes her relationship with them akin to a close friendship. “It’s a wonderful relationship. I am there in that painting. I’m walking in that forest. I’m at that seashore; in that sky. Whatever it is, it’s like we’ve become one. It’s funny because once I’m done painting, and Tibby and I come back together for dinner in the evening, she’ll ask me about my day. It’s very hard to describe. I’ve been off in another place where I can’t take her at all. There’s no way that she or anyone else can see it. It’s just a wonderful place to be.” In a world that is consistently faster paced each day, Kenny says the act of viewing art can be a catharsis. She explains, “I’ve had people say that viewing art becomes a peaceful place to be, perhaps some of the same sensation as I have when I’m painting. For those who can stop to look at the paintings - when everything is so instant and so fast and so plastic - it takes them back to a simpler time. People who have purchased my paintings have told me they are an important part of their day – sort of an anti-technology, anti-rat race place to be. A man bought two paintings at my last show and said, ‘It’s like you’re capturing something that is going away, something we’re not going to continue to see,’ and I agree with him.” Kenny’s show will hang at the Unitarian Univiarsalist Fellowship Art Gallery at 25 Chalice Circle, Fredericksburg, VA 22405 through November 2015. It will open with the reception on October 4th, and interested parties may view or purchase art thereafter by calling (540) 287-7230.

Front porch fredericksburg

Though she would probably too humble and self-effacing to admit it, Brush Strokes Gallery's October featured artist Bonnie Halford provides a spark of cocreation and collaboration wherever she goes. That hallmark was evident in 2004 when Halford first suggested to others in Johnny Johnson's painting workshop that they launch a new venue to exhibit their work. Shortly thereafter, she took the leap of signing on the lease on a building. Her vision came a reality as a dozen other artists came on board to create the Brush Strokes Gallery. Since that day more than ten years ago, Brush Strokes has provided an exhibition venue for hundreds of artist, some of whom have even gone on to start additional galleries in Fredericksburg. The same collaborative dynamic that marked the gallery's launched is embodied in Halford's artwork, in which the medium itself, as well as the viewers, become co-creators of the finished work. In her paintings, Halford uses a unique type paper that Johnson first introduced her to-yupo-which has the uncanny quality of resisting rather than absorbing the paint. After thoroughly wetting the surface, Bonnie pours on drippings of watercolors or acrylics and lets the colors merge, collide, mix, and expand: At times, she tips the paper from side to side to augment the fusion. When the composition is at a stage where it presents prospects of various subjects, Halford lets the paint dry and later returns to absorb up some areas and embellish others with a dry brush. "I may see an eye in the painting and work from that point to create a face," Bonnie explains. She says that her paintings often surprise her-by the colors that are created from the merging of the two or three hues she poured, by the subject matter that suggests itself, and even by the emotions it conveys. Folks who know Bonnie often enjoy searching for hidden objects she has incorporated in her paintings, but they sometimes surprisingly "find" subjects she did not even realize were in the design. In her October exhibit at BSG, Through October 25, dubbed "Beyond the Sea," Bonnie turns to another favorite theme-the calming blues and greens of the ocean. "I have always gone to the ocean, especially in times when I was facing a personal challenge. It is so calming and embracing, even in the sound of its waves," she said. She hopes that viewers of her paintings this month will experience the

by ryan poe I met up with Megan Byrnes on one of those beautiful days that makes you look forward to Fall without reminding you that Winter is coming. A few weeks earlier when she asked me to continue her legacy as writer of the Scene & Heard section of the Front Porch, I was hesitant. I knew I could never emulate her playful tone or match her ability to stay in-the-know. As we walked to the park I told her how I was struggling to find my voice for the column.

same effect by her depiction of fish and the creation that lies under and near the sea. "Water really is the primordial, lifegiving element and I think all people feel a connection with it," she said., Although Halford cherishes the ocean for its constancy, she is awed by its many transformations. "Its movement is constantly changing. Its waves might be playful when it's gently splashing but can also seem almost menacing as it roars before a storm," she said, "But most of all, I am struck by its immensity. It makes you feel like you are a little speck in the universe." That may be the reason Bonnie thinks of these lyrics as the perfect theme song for her October exhibit: "I hope you still feel small when you stand beside the ocean, Whenever one door closes I hope one more opens, Promise me that you'll give faith a fighting chance, And when you get the choice to sit it out or dance. I hope you dance....I hope you dance."

“I think an element of humor is always good,” she advised, “If you were funny… which you’re not, so...”

vawineinmypocket.com

And to think that Megan used to intimidate me; with her snarkiness and confident sense of style. She buys and sells vintage clothing so we chatted a bit about her observations on fashion trends. “Brightly printed 70’s and 60’s floral dresses and skirts, embroidered tunics, when I started those were the things I couldn’t keep on the shelf and now Normcore is the thing. So everyone is buying basics; jeans, simple striped tops, and things like that. In a weird way, having a uniform is the trend right now.” This is good news for me. My closet is full of blues and grays with a splash of brown to keep things interesting. “There’s a company that just started a bespoke shirtmaking line and you literally get like fifteen measurements taken and you can buy yourself a week’s worth of shirts and you wear them all the time. I mean you pick the print and everything but there’s not a lot of variety. People like having a uniform now.” I didn’t feel it was worth mentioning that is how I buy my shirts. We sat on a park bench, me in my uniform and Megan in some outfit that was just right for that particular day. I brought up my vision for the column again and Megan offered some feedback.

get more comfortable, you’re going to figure out the kinds of questions to ask people to get them to tell you something. But it’s only going to have importance because it’s important to that person and you’re going to give it importance. But that’s where you have to interact with other people.” Megan knows that I am afraid of other people. “The person at the Rec Center for instance, I can only imagine the stories that they have. So you have to figure out the right questions to ask and then you’ll probably get some crazy good story out of it. And it doesn’t have to be like some big important story, it can just be anything that’s interesting.” We’ll see, Megan. We’ll see.

Ryan Poe is a father, husband, son, and brother living in Fredericksburg. He will be bringing “snippets” of real Burg folks each month in FP. photo by ryan poe.

“You’re telling a very short story. It’s a snippet. It’s like a story of someone’s story. It’s a part of someone’s story and so it can be very specific, and small even, but the way you write it can make it important. So it doesn’t have to be broad, which I think is kind of nice. And as you front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

25


New Beginnings For victims of domestic abuse By kathy anderson Empowerhouse opened the first headquarters, a home, where 3 bedrooms Fredericksburg community area shelter in served hundreds of families as they cycled 1978. In 1977, Local officers, social through the area’s only domestic violence workers, and other compassionate and shelter. caring people aspired to aid their In 1996, the organization, then neighbors in distress suffering an known as RCDV, opened a public outreach unimaginable horror: women and children center in a Fredericksburg rental. Two attacked, brutalized, humiliated, and often existing shelter building offices converted held captive - in their own homes. to increase bedrooms. This Haven Horrified by this suffering over and over continues to shelter our areas’ domestic and incapable of offering an end to the violence survivors and their children. We injustice or safe passage or any now, however, exceed its capacity of 20 meaningful relief, early volunteers women and children routinely. For many organized safe houses in their years, as Empowerhouse grew own homes - escape from in 2009 by adding One in four women unbearable and sometimes assistance with in her lifetime will deadly home life. Front line permanent housing (and experience severe physical workers were grateful for the transition to a new organized assistance and a violence at the hands of life filled with dignity, an intimate hand off, getting local respect, safety and hope), partner....facts are clear, and 2013-2014 adding families out to safety. Today, in the U.S., two sheltering homes in a larger local shelter is one in four women in her needed to give victims of the city expanding to lifetime will experience accommodate numbers domestic violence severe physical violence at and varied situations, it meaningful escape and the hands of an intimate became crystal clear that protection for their partner. Back then, the the need was children. numbers were not known, overwhelming. While but the facts were clear, a local women were being judged, shelter was needed to give victims of “If it is that bad, why don’t they just domestic violence meaningful escape, leave?” Empowerhouse experienced the agency over their own lives, and behind the scenes reality- they were protection for their children. leaving with increasing frequency. The Rappahannock Council on Empowerhouse shelter houses were full Domestic Violence, now Empowerhouse, for 5 years. By 2011, the Empowerhouse opened a shelter in Fredericksburg in goal to expand shelter gained momentum, 1979, and called it The Haven. Operating and by 2014 Empowerhouse purchased a out of a rental, bedrooms were outfitted; building over three times its current size coffee was brewed; volunteers greeted and to renovate, furnish, and relocate. settled families; emergency, legal, and The amazing and courageous emotional needs were top priority and volunteers inspired many new ones many people and organizations rallied to making it possible for Empowerhouse to support these early efforts. fulfill its vision to create a diverse network In 1988, with rents increasing of community members working together and the declining home’s condition, to promote safe relationships, homes, and courageous volunteers- Founders- bought communities. We are community thanks property in Stafford, designed, and built a to each person who carries the torch from Virginia Grogan to the United Way, from center owned and operated by this Doris Buffett to the Community nonprofit organization formed in 1978. Foundation, from the Founders to local Quickly the center outgrew its government. Each person who attended the Empowerhouse 40 hour volunteer training, baked a pie, threw a pot (Empty Bowl!), helped an event, bought a ticket, donated large and small, or collected change, has changed our community for the better. Together we have saved so many lives that they in turn have reclaimed and rebuilt, with a little, or a lot of help, as much as they have needed, no more, and hopefully, no less. Kathy Anderson is executive director of Empowerhouse. Please consider helping build and open our new shelter through a donation –empowerhouseva.org. For information and/or help, the 24 hour hotline is 540-373-9373.

26

October 2015

Front porch fredericksburg

The Cooling Shed “The Table” adds Food storage area By Mary Lynn Powers I have written about St. George’s community dinners before, and made mention of The Table, that is open on Tuesday mornings and evenings. During these sessions, food and sundries are available to individuals who may be having difficulty making ends meet. There is an emphasis on fresh produce at this food pantry. Funding for The Table comes from grants and private donations from St. George’s members and other individuals. In-kind donations are provided by a number of local businesses. The Table operates as a 501(c) (3) organization, thus enabling donors to take a tax exemption for their contributions. Originally, The Table operated only on Tuesday mornings, but a grant allowed for an evening session to help serve people unable to attend in the morning. With all expansions, new dilemmas arise. In the case of The Table, they began to get so much produce, that storage became a problem. Linda Carter and Chris, who are two of the dedicated ringleaders, began to dream of a storage area, similar to a restaurant walk-in. The initial stumbling block was where they could put it, somewhere close to the hall where all these activities take place. Secondly, a stand alone structure that is refrigerated can be an expensive venture. But, where there’s a will, there’s a way. So many people became involved in the creation of the shed. Not the least of these is Tom, (pictured) who is always around, willing to take on any job. He proudly showed me the finished structure, and Chris let me know that he actually helped “raise the roof” on the building. At the side of St George’s Episcopal Church is the entrance to the hall, where they hold The Table as well as meetings, seminars and the various dinners they sponsor. There is a small rod iron fence that encloses the entrance area, and somehow in the corner, they have managed to erect a shed that matches the building, and just fits in this area. Chris said there were

Renew

“Double Divas”

by Joan M. Geisler

In FXBG for Breast Cancer Fund

closest thing to a magic pill We all know there is no magic pill when it comes to fitness. However, it is not rocket science either. It is simple math; EAT LESS, MOVE MORE. In my life I have gained and lost nearly 200 lbs with 4 babies. After my 3rd

building contractors, skilled craftsmen, and handy individuals who pitched in to help. This came together with a several grants, and the work of many others who saw this as a worthy cause. All in all, it took almost a year to make this a dream come true. The shed is full to the brim right now with donated produce. Chris calls it a produce magnet. Crates of tomatoes, cucumbers, and peppers, fill the space, ready for Tuesday morning when people line up as early as 5:30 a.m. to attend The Table. Summer in Virginia can be a culinary delight, but come winter, the pickings get a little slim. They will fill the shed somehow, though, I have no doubt. This growing movement to help each other can only be a sign that the good outweighs the bad. In a time when we question the existence of true goodness in the world, we need only look at accomplishments like this, and realize many are fighting the good fight.

Mary Lynn Powers is a wife, mother, grandmother, writer and a member of St George’s.

child, I lost 48 lbs in under 6 months. I can still fit into my wedding dress after 26 blissful years of marriage. Here are the 16 simple tips that helped me get there. 1) Drink water! Drink half your body weight in ounces every day. 2) Live the 80%-2 20% lifestyle. 80% clean, whole foods; 20% not so clean foods. 3) Read ingredients. If you cannot pronounce it, don’t eat it. 4) Do not eat anything that comes through a window. No explanation needed. 5) Do not eat anything larger than your fist at one time. Your body can only metabolism a certain amount, the rest is stored as fat. 6) Eat small, eat often. 7) Limit or eliminate grains that have gluten. It causes digestive disturbances. 8) Eliminate sugar! 4 grams = 1 teaspoon. That healthy energy bar might have 4 teaspoons of sugar. Anything ending in an ‘ose’ is sugar. 9) Do not eat hydrogenated vegetable oil.

It is trans fat and it wreaks havoc. If a food comes in a box, it likely has it. 10) Do not eat fat free foods. Chemicals and sugars are added. 11) Eat nutritious dense foods. Eat dark color vegetables and fruits. Iceberg lettuce is completely devoid of nutrition. 12) Eliminate prepackaged foods. Frozen dinners, processed deli meats are loaded with sodium and chemicals. 13) Retrain your taste buds to enjoy whole foods. Oil and vinegar instead of ranch dressing, hummus or plain yogurt instead of mayo. 14) Eliminate sodas and alcohol. They are empty calories. 14) Do not eat after 7pm. 15) Eat like a diabetic. Learn what foods are low glycemic and eat plenty of them. They keep your blood sugars stable. 16) Exercise minimum 3 days a week for one hour. Commit to an all out sweat-fest 3 times a week. Strength training is needed to build muscles and maintain bone density and aerobic activity to keep our heart and lungs strong and pliable. When we begin to take control of our diet and exercise and live a healthy lifestyle then should an illness come our way, we can confidently say that we did all we could to thwart it.

The local chapter of Women's Council of the Realtors' annual fundraising drive will be held on Saturday, October 10th at The Hyatt Place in Eagle Village. The Women's Council has selected the Mary Washington Healthcare Breast Cancer Fund as their choice of charity to receive their donation this year. What better way to raise money than to have the two lovable ladies from the lifetime show, "Double Divas" (think women's version of duck Molly Hopkins and dynasty), Cynthia Decker come to Fredericksburg to help raise money for breast cancer? The Double Divas will be hosting bra fittings from 10am-6pm which will be followed by a cocktail party from 6:30pm-930pm. This year's fundraising event, with a portion of the proceeds to benefit the Mary Washington Healthcare Breast Cancer fund, was the brainchild of local affiliate, Mac Church, whose personal friendship with Molly and Cynthia, brought the Divas to town. "We wanted to do something interactive, and fun that would support our local community, and since October is National Breast Cancer awareness month, what better way to raise funds than to have a bra fitting," Church said. "We want the money to stay local and found that the Mary Washington Breast Cancer Fund uses its donations to help local women who suffer from breast cancer,” he added. In addition to the bra fittings, a cocktail event, dubbed "The Totally BRAsome Cocktail Party Fundraiser", will be held immediately after with local musician Shannon Peterson providing the entertainment. Several Breast Cancer survivors will be on hand as well as Mr. Whit Yelverton, Corporate Director for Oncology Services at Mary Washington Healthcare, will be speaking. Tickets for the cocktail event are $25 and include a complimentary drink, hors oeuvres, live music, silent and live

auctions. Tickets for the cocktail event are encouraged to be purchased in advance on line at www.eventbrite.com/e/totallybrawesome-fundraising-cocktail-partyauction-and-vendor-fair-tickets18395303849 The bra fittings are scheduled by the half hour and reservations should be made on line. Ticket prices are $75, with $25 going towards the charity and the other $50 towards the purchase of a custom bra as well as a Free ticket to the Cocktail event. Tickets may be purchased on line at www.eventbrite.com/e/the-doubledivas-virginia-fit-event-tickets18024636172 For more information contact: macchurch68@verizon.net or LDesena@statitle.com

The Women's Council of Realtors are a network of successful REALTORS®, advancing women as professionals and leaders in business, the industry and their communities. The WCR’s past fundraisers have included Empowerhouse, and Habitat for Humanity’s Women Build

Frontporchfredericksburg.com FB@FrontPorch Magazine front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

27


New Beginnings For victims of domestic abuse By kathy anderson Empowerhouse opened the first headquarters, a home, where 3 bedrooms Fredericksburg community area shelter in served hundreds of families as they cycled 1978. In 1977, Local officers, social through the area’s only domestic violence workers, and other compassionate and shelter. caring people aspired to aid their In 1996, the organization, then neighbors in distress suffering an known as RCDV, opened a public outreach unimaginable horror: women and children center in a Fredericksburg rental. Two attacked, brutalized, humiliated, and often existing shelter building offices converted held captive - in their own homes. to increase bedrooms. This Haven Horrified by this suffering over and over continues to shelter our areas’ domestic and incapable of offering an end to the violence survivors and their children. We injustice or safe passage or any now, however, exceed its capacity of 20 meaningful relief, early volunteers women and children routinely. For many organized safe houses in their years, as Empowerhouse grew own homes - escape from in 2009 by adding One in four women unbearable and sometimes assistance with in her lifetime will deadly home life. Front line permanent housing (and experience severe physical workers were grateful for the transition to a new organized assistance and a violence at the hands of life filled with dignity, an intimate hand off, getting local respect, safety and hope), partner....facts are clear, and 2013-2014 adding families out to safety. Today, in the U.S., two sheltering homes in a larger local shelter is one in four women in her needed to give victims of the city expanding to lifetime will experience accommodate numbers domestic violence severe physical violence at and varied situations, it meaningful escape and the hands of an intimate became crystal clear that protection for their partner. Back then, the the need was children. numbers were not known, overwhelming. While but the facts were clear, a local women were being judged, shelter was needed to give victims of “If it is that bad, why don’t they just domestic violence meaningful escape, leave?” Empowerhouse experienced the agency over their own lives, and behind the scenes reality- they were protection for their children. leaving with increasing frequency. The Rappahannock Council on Empowerhouse shelter houses were full Domestic Violence, now Empowerhouse, for 5 years. By 2011, the Empowerhouse opened a shelter in Fredericksburg in goal to expand shelter gained momentum, 1979, and called it The Haven. Operating and by 2014 Empowerhouse purchased a out of a rental, bedrooms were outfitted; building over three times its current size coffee was brewed; volunteers greeted and to renovate, furnish, and relocate. settled families; emergency, legal, and The amazing and courageous emotional needs were top priority and volunteers inspired many new ones many people and organizations rallied to making it possible for Empowerhouse to support these early efforts. fulfill its vision to create a diverse network In 1988, with rents increasing of community members working together and the declining home’s condition, to promote safe relationships, homes, and courageous volunteers- Founders- bought communities. We are community thanks property in Stafford, designed, and built a to each person who carries the torch from Virginia Grogan to the United Way, from center owned and operated by this Doris Buffett to the Community nonprofit organization formed in 1978. Foundation, from the Founders to local Quickly the center outgrew its government. Each person who attended the Empowerhouse 40 hour volunteer training, baked a pie, threw a pot (Empty Bowl!), helped an event, bought a ticket, donated large and small, or collected change, has changed our community for the better. Together we have saved so many lives that they in turn have reclaimed and rebuilt, with a little, or a lot of help, as much as they have needed, no more, and hopefully, no less. Kathy Anderson is executive director of Empowerhouse. Please consider helping build and open our new shelter through a donation –empowerhouseva.org. For information and/or help, the 24 hour hotline is 540-373-9373.

26

October 2015

Front porch fredericksburg

The Cooling Shed “The Table” adds Food storage area By Mary Lynn Powers I have written about St. George’s community dinners before, and made mention of The Table, that is open on Tuesday mornings and evenings. During these sessions, food and sundries are available to individuals who may be having difficulty making ends meet. There is an emphasis on fresh produce at this food pantry. Funding for The Table comes from grants and private donations from St. George’s members and other individuals. In-kind donations are provided by a number of local businesses. The Table operates as a 501(c) (3) organization, thus enabling donors to take a tax exemption for their contributions. Originally, The Table operated only on Tuesday mornings, but a grant allowed for an evening session to help serve people unable to attend in the morning. With all expansions, new dilemmas arise. In the case of The Table, they began to get so much produce, that storage became a problem. Linda Carter and Chris, who are two of the dedicated ringleaders, began to dream of a storage area, similar to a restaurant walk-in. The initial stumbling block was where they could put it, somewhere close to the hall where all these activities take place. Secondly, a stand alone structure that is refrigerated can be an expensive venture. But, where there’s a will, there’s a way. So many people became involved in the creation of the shed. Not the least of these is Tom, (pictured) who is always around, willing to take on any job. He proudly showed me the finished structure, and Chris let me know that he actually helped “raise the roof” on the building. At the side of St George’s Episcopal Church is the entrance to the hall, where they hold The Table as well as meetings, seminars and the various dinners they sponsor. There is a small rod iron fence that encloses the entrance area, and somehow in the corner, they have managed to erect a shed that matches the building, and just fits in this area. Chris said there were

Renew

“Double Divas”

by Joan M. Geisler

In FXBG for Breast Cancer Fund

closest thing to a magic pill We all know there is no magic pill when it comes to fitness. However, it is not rocket science either. It is simple math; EAT LESS, MOVE MORE. In my life I have gained and lost nearly 200 lbs with 4 babies. After my 3rd

building contractors, skilled craftsmen, and handy individuals who pitched in to help. This came together with a several grants, and the work of many others who saw this as a worthy cause. All in all, it took almost a year to make this a dream come true. The shed is full to the brim right now with donated produce. Chris calls it a produce magnet. Crates of tomatoes, cucumbers, and peppers, fill the space, ready for Tuesday morning when people line up as early as 5:30 a.m. to attend The Table. Summer in Virginia can be a culinary delight, but come winter, the pickings get a little slim. They will fill the shed somehow, though, I have no doubt. This growing movement to help each other can only be a sign that the good outweighs the bad. In a time when we question the existence of true goodness in the world, we need only look at accomplishments like this, and realize many are fighting the good fight.

Mary Lynn Powers is a wife, mother, grandmother, writer and a member of St George’s.

child, I lost 48 lbs in under 6 months. I can still fit into my wedding dress after 26 blissful years of marriage. Here are the 16 simple tips that helped me get there. 1) Drink water! Drink half your body weight in ounces every day. 2) Live the 80%-2 20% lifestyle. 80% clean, whole foods; 20% not so clean foods. 3) Read ingredients. If you cannot pronounce it, don’t eat it. 4) Do not eat anything that comes through a window. No explanation needed. 5) Do not eat anything larger than your fist at one time. Your body can only metabolism a certain amount, the rest is stored as fat. 6) Eat small, eat often. 7) Limit or eliminate grains that have gluten. It causes digestive disturbances. 8) Eliminate sugar! 4 grams = 1 teaspoon. That healthy energy bar might have 4 teaspoons of sugar. Anything ending in an ‘ose’ is sugar. 9) Do not eat hydrogenated vegetable oil.

It is trans fat and it wreaks havoc. If a food comes in a box, it likely has it. 10) Do not eat fat free foods. Chemicals and sugars are added. 11) Eat nutritious dense foods. Eat dark color vegetables and fruits. Iceberg lettuce is completely devoid of nutrition. 12) Eliminate prepackaged foods. Frozen dinners, processed deli meats are loaded with sodium and chemicals. 13) Retrain your taste buds to enjoy whole foods. Oil and vinegar instead of ranch dressing, hummus or plain yogurt instead of mayo. 14) Eliminate sodas and alcohol. They are empty calories. 14) Do not eat after 7pm. 15) Eat like a diabetic. Learn what foods are low glycemic and eat plenty of them. They keep your blood sugars stable. 16) Exercise minimum 3 days a week for one hour. Commit to an all out sweat-fest 3 times a week. Strength training is needed to build muscles and maintain bone density and aerobic activity to keep our heart and lungs strong and pliable. When we begin to take control of our diet and exercise and live a healthy lifestyle then should an illness come our way, we can confidently say that we did all we could to thwart it.

The local chapter of Women's Council of the Realtors' annual fundraising drive will be held on Saturday, October 10th at The Hyatt Place in Eagle Village. The Women's Council has selected the Mary Washington Healthcare Breast Cancer Fund as their choice of charity to receive their donation this year. What better way to raise money than to have the two lovable ladies from the lifetime show, "Double Divas" (think women's version of duck Molly Hopkins and dynasty), Cynthia Decker come to Fredericksburg to help raise money for breast cancer? The Double Divas will be hosting bra fittings from 10am-6pm which will be followed by a cocktail party from 6:30pm-930pm. This year's fundraising event, with a portion of the proceeds to benefit the Mary Washington Healthcare Breast Cancer fund, was the brainchild of local affiliate, Mac Church, whose personal friendship with Molly and Cynthia, brought the Divas to town. "We wanted to do something interactive, and fun that would support our local community, and since October is National Breast Cancer awareness month, what better way to raise funds than to have a bra fitting," Church said. "We want the money to stay local and found that the Mary Washington Breast Cancer Fund uses its donations to help local women who suffer from breast cancer,” he added. In addition to the bra fittings, a cocktail event, dubbed "The Totally BRAsome Cocktail Party Fundraiser", will be held immediately after with local musician Shannon Peterson providing the entertainment. Several Breast Cancer survivors will be on hand as well as Mr. Whit Yelverton, Corporate Director for Oncology Services at Mary Washington Healthcare, will be speaking. Tickets for the cocktail event are $25 and include a complimentary drink, hors oeuvres, live music, silent and live

auctions. Tickets for the cocktail event are encouraged to be purchased in advance on line at www.eventbrite.com/e/totallybrawesome-fundraising-cocktail-partyauction-and-vendor-fair-tickets18395303849 The bra fittings are scheduled by the half hour and reservations should be made on line. Ticket prices are $75, with $25 going towards the charity and the other $50 towards the purchase of a custom bra as well as a Free ticket to the Cocktail event. Tickets may be purchased on line at www.eventbrite.com/e/the-doubledivas-virginia-fit-event-tickets18024636172 For more information contact: macchurch68@verizon.net or LDesena@statitle.com

The Women's Council of Realtors are a network of successful REALTORS®, advancing women as professionals and leaders in business, the industry and their communities. The WCR’s past fundraisers have included Empowerhouse, and Habitat for Humanity’s Women Build

Frontporchfredericksburg.com FB@FrontPorch Magazine front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

27


FXBG’ERS mike cotter

a nation looks for answers

by georgia Strentz It is always so pleasurable, walking down William Street, passing the friendly faces and hellos, glancing over at our tiny Hurkamp Park. This beautiful little park is loaded with activities, the farmer's market, music, groups of moms with their children napping on blankets, in strollers. On path Lydia's, where I always find what I need for gifts, then La Petite, where there is nothing on the menu that isn't delicious. I am feeling the positive glow of being downtown in our "Homeplace." As I walk past the beautiful new semi-completed townhome development and see the construction of two other new developments taking shape, it speaks of the fact that our fabulous downtown has been discovered. Keeping the charm, small town character and friendliness, will be a challenge to not only those on city council who oversee the developments, but to us who love our town, who live here, the Fredericksburgers who make up the basic character of our "Homeplace." My goal is to head to Hyperion, one of our great downtown coffee houses and meet Mike Cotter, our October Volunteer. I am so delighted Mike agreed to be interviewed, as I have not seen him for some time. The years melted away as we met, with his same intelligent, fit, athletic looks and his welcoming smile and hug. Mike was a fantastically warm, connected P.E. coach/teacher, later administrator in Spotsylvania, widely adored by his students, respected by parents. Mike did not leave his active involvement at the school door. The family participated in their community and their church, Fredericksburg United Methodist Church. Mike's dad (who was Director of the F.B.I. Training Academy at Quantico) and mom and sister Trish, lived here and were very involved in helping others as a family. This attitude has been passed down to this generation with Meghann who started Micah Ministries. Mike and

out

We were that town. It was our

Diane acted as unpaid staff for Micah for years, helping those who have little or no help, those who are homeless, often helpless, depressed. Those homeless and ill, have no home, help or hope. Micah, which is supported by the Churches of Fredericksburg with Mike, Diane and other volunteers, are there to help figure it out and start them on a hopeful path. As we talked, Martin Luther King's, "I Have a Dream," kept coming to mind. Mike has been involved his entire adult life helping, guiding, caring, giving. He takes mission trips with his church, works with teen summer camps, works with the hospitality center at church, also is the Character Coach at Riverbend High School. He has steadfastly worked with one client through Micah Ministeries for 9 years. When I ask Mike what keeps him on this path, he said several things,"follow your heart; look at people in need as a creative opportunity; there is gratification just from helping someone; life is an opportunity to love others." Now I know why, "I Have a Dream," by Martin Luther King, came to mind, as I talked with this outstanding citizen of our community.Thanks Mike for being in our "Homeplace," with your gifts of love and peace to share.

AhearnEstateLaw.com October 2015

Stories that shine a light on life

By C. Ruth Cassell-Huynh

Georgia Strentz is retired and enjoying life in her hometown of Fredericksburg.

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate

28

Porch Light

Roanoke’s Turn

540/371-9890

Front porch fredericksburg

call on them when I needed to get the turn. word out about a program or event. I had Our turn for murderous gun stood in Vicki Gardner’s place across from violence to define our town in the minds Alison’s microphone and in front of of people across the world. Our turn for Adam’s camera a half dozen times, being vigils, impromptu memorials and interviewed on WDBJ7 Mornin’. collective tears. Our turn for trolls to turn I work for a mental health on us with conspiracy theories and counseling agency doing marketing and political jabs before we even buried the development. I believe mental health care dead. is the place to start treating people with What a hideous thing to say. Our issues like anger management and delusive turn. fear before their rage and hatred boil over It’s happened so many times. It to infect society. I believe we can make a feels like it could happen anywhere. And it difference, but people have to identify does. Even in my picturesque mountain mental health as a priority and it must be town of Roanoke, where a giant hilltop treated as an important assessment and star shines all day and all night, and we treatment tool for overall health if there call our morning news anchors and is any progress to be made in early reporters friends. intervention and prevention. In the early morning hours of I’m also married to an Army vet August 26, a disgruntled who is a proud personal employee of Roanoke TV gun owner. I believe he ...mental health care is the station WDBJ7 silently takes this responsibility place to start approached a live news seriously and has a right Alison treating people with issues to own, carry and use his broadcast by Parker and Adam Ward like anger management and guns. While I realize gun delusive fear before their and opened fire. Vester control won’t stop every Flanagan took his own life rage and hatred boil over person with intent to kill later that day but not (and people kill with to infect society before the whole world tools other than guns), I gained access to his morbid first person believe this is just one more issue that view of the shootings through social scatters us to our respective corners to media posts and shares. point hateful fearful fingers at each other. His motivations remain elusive. If we’re willing to hide behind Anger. Fear. A misplaced sense of being a our screens, silently watching a killer at victim his whole life. He identified his work. If we blame the “other side”—of the actions as reprisal for the previous mass political aisle, the spiritual spectrum, the killing incident that gripped our nation— racial divide, or any other hyperbolic the slaughter of nine in an historic black difference—for our unhappiness. If we church in Charleston, SC by a self- allow people with unchecked mental illness identified white supremacist. access to guns and insolent ideas to fuel To me, the killing of Alison and their dissent. If we wait for a tragedy to Adam on live television and the wave of discuss solutions for mental health care or reaction on Twitter and Facebook gun control and then still do nothing. If evidences what is becoming America’s we’re constantly moving from one hashtag identity. A place where people get crisis to the next. If we don’t allow the attached to their own hatred and fear, and deaths of Alison and Adam and so many let it define and isolate them. other innocents to sober our hearts and I thought the massacre of school bring us together on one thing— children at Sandy Hook Elementary was as anything—that may actually heal us as a depraved as anyone could be. Now I know nation. there is no bottom to this pit. Alison and Then… Adam’s murderer gave the world a first We can just sit and wait to see person viewpoint of his depravity. whose turn is next… And we watched. In the days following the Ruth Cassell-Huynh is a former murders, many people said “I made the journalist who lives in Roanoke and felt mistake of watching the video.” These are the devastation of the WDBJ7 murders, sensible, sensitive well-meaning people but also witnessed the strength of a community and the solidarity of who still sought out the video-game-style reporters and journalists from across cell phone footage of two friends of mine the country. She remains hopeful we can being targeted and killed while doing their find solutions, but deeply concerned jobs. we're still not ready to look. I called Alison and Adam friends, as did so many in our town. I knew I could

By rob huffman

Give a Child Something to Think About Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

On April 5, 1971 in their home opener, the Washington Senators crushed the Oakland Athletics 8 - 0, knocking the A's young and relatively unknown starter, Vida Blue, out of the game in the second inning. Alas, the Senators went on to win only 62 more games that season, while Vida Blue ended with 24 wins (against only 8 losses) and captured both the American League's Cy Young and Most Valuable Player awards. As so often happens in sports - maybe especially so with Washington teams - the Senators got to be both Cinderella (opening day) and her ugly stepsisters (96 losses that season) in the same season. Elation followed by deflation is just what being a fan entails. But all long time Washington fans know this. Along with two of my best friends, I was in the crowd for that jubilant opener, oiled baseball glove already on my hand, ready in case any foul balls came streaking my way. My dad had picked us up at school that morning to take us to that game. But how transitory joy can be. As Housman put it, "Lucks a Chance, but trouble's sure." And so, at the end of the 1971 season which featured a few scattered and remarkable highs, but much more frequent lows, the team disappeared vanished - sold by their hated owner Bob Short (today's antipathy for Redskins owner Dan Snyder doesn't even come close) and resurfacing in Texas as the Rangers. My dad and I were in attendance for the Senators' finale - season and franchise - on September 30th, too. That last game was a sad and tawdry affair - aggrieved and grieving fans stormed the field to rip up bases and other souvenirs causing the Senators forfeit their final game to the New York Yankees. (And the Senators were winning, too!) The RFK swan song could have been dignified - a kind of somber wake - but it wasn't It was less bon voyage, than storm the Bastille. Sure, the Senators were generally a losing team, but they were our losing team, in the same way that that ne'er-dowell uncle of yours is still family. I guess I've been thinking about baseball a lot this summer since I'm so far away from it. In Germany, baseball is never televised. I even had to miss the All-Star Game, a childhood marker of midsummer. There are plenty of sports on TV here, of course - Formula 1 racing,

a perpertual succession of soccer games, even some riveting late night dart matches. Just no baseball. I've loved the game since I was a kid. I credit my dad with stoking my interest. Dad helped coach my Little League teams, he tirelessly caught my twelve-year-old "fastballs" in the backyard - wildly flung balls that would bounce and strike his unprotected shins - and he even took us on a family vacation to Cooperstown, New York so I could tour the Baseball Hall of Fame. . It's not that I haven't tried to cultivate other (compensatory) sports interests here in the old world. Last summer's World Cup soccer matches were truly exciting and it was thrilling to be in the ultimate victor's home country (although, naturally, I was rooting for the U.S. team). And since Tour de France "highlights" (skinny guys pedalling furiously) are on TV every day I try to get excited about this event, too. But bike racing? Really? Maybe if the guys would pop the occasional wheelie or something. ( Although things did get a little more interesting when the eventual winner, Chris Froome of England, had a cup of urine flung at him by a disgruntled fan. Now that felt more familiar, like something that would happen in the NBA. Tant pis!) But still, and always, I feel the gravitational pull of our national pasttime. Last week the whole family was at aKinderfest in Mainz. It featured countless booths and exhibitions and games of skill for children to try. There was a bobsled that my son and I rode (me clumsily pushing it and then inelegantly jumping in), a bow and arrow range, climbing walls, etc. And then, amid all those "foreign" amusements and games, there it was: a batting cage! I never expected to see one here in Germany. And it was popular that aftertoon, too. Little German kids lined up to take their swings at balls launched towards them from a pitching machine. I don't know how long I stood there watching. But I do know that every time a kid made contact, so did I.

Rob Huffman loves baseball and books and being outdoors and remains hopeful that smartphones and social media are fads that won't last. This column is dedicated to the memory of Rob Grogan, who would was an avid baseball fan.

front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

29


FXBG’ERS mike cotter

a nation looks for answers

by georgia Strentz It is always so pleasurable, walking down William Street, passing the friendly faces and hellos, glancing over at our tiny Hurkamp Park. This beautiful little park is loaded with activities, the farmer's market, music, groups of moms with their children napping on blankets, in strollers. On path Lydia's, where I always find what I need for gifts, then La Petite, where there is nothing on the menu that isn't delicious. I am feeling the positive glow of being downtown in our "Homeplace." As I walk past the beautiful new semi-completed townhome development and see the construction of two other new developments taking shape, it speaks of the fact that our fabulous downtown has been discovered. Keeping the charm, small town character and friendliness, will be a challenge to not only those on city council who oversee the developments, but to us who love our town, who live here, the Fredericksburgers who make up the basic character of our "Homeplace." My goal is to head to Hyperion, one of our great downtown coffee houses and meet Mike Cotter, our October Volunteer. I am so delighted Mike agreed to be interviewed, as I have not seen him for some time. The years melted away as we met, with his same intelligent, fit, athletic looks and his welcoming smile and hug. Mike was a fantastically warm, connected P.E. coach/teacher, later administrator in Spotsylvania, widely adored by his students, respected by parents. Mike did not leave his active involvement at the school door. The family participated in their community and their church, Fredericksburg United Methodist Church. Mike's dad (who was Director of the F.B.I. Training Academy at Quantico) and mom and sister Trish, lived here and were very involved in helping others as a family. This attitude has been passed down to this generation with Meghann who started Micah Ministries. Mike and

out

We were that town. It was our

Diane acted as unpaid staff for Micah for years, helping those who have little or no help, those who are homeless, often helpless, depressed. Those homeless and ill, have no home, help or hope. Micah, which is supported by the Churches of Fredericksburg with Mike, Diane and other volunteers, are there to help figure it out and start them on a hopeful path. As we talked, Martin Luther King's, "I Have a Dream," kept coming to mind. Mike has been involved his entire adult life helping, guiding, caring, giving. He takes mission trips with his church, works with teen summer camps, works with the hospitality center at church, also is the Character Coach at Riverbend High School. He has steadfastly worked with one client through Micah Ministeries for 9 years. When I ask Mike what keeps him on this path, he said several things,"follow your heart; look at people in need as a creative opportunity; there is gratification just from helping someone; life is an opportunity to love others." Now I know why, "I Have a Dream," by Martin Luther King, came to mind, as I talked with this outstanding citizen of our community.Thanks Mike for being in our "Homeplace," with your gifts of love and peace to share.

AhearnEstateLaw.com October 2015

Stories that shine a light on life

By C. Ruth Cassell-Huynh

Georgia Strentz is retired and enjoying life in her hometown of Fredericksburg.

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate

28

Porch Light

Roanoke’s Turn

540/371-9890

Front porch fredericksburg

call on them when I needed to get the turn. word out about a program or event. I had Our turn for murderous gun stood in Vicki Gardner’s place across from violence to define our town in the minds Alison’s microphone and in front of of people across the world. Our turn for Adam’s camera a half dozen times, being vigils, impromptu memorials and interviewed on WDBJ7 Mornin’. collective tears. Our turn for trolls to turn I work for a mental health on us with conspiracy theories and counseling agency doing marketing and political jabs before we even buried the development. I believe mental health care dead. is the place to start treating people with What a hideous thing to say. Our issues like anger management and delusive turn. fear before their rage and hatred boil over It’s happened so many times. It to infect society. I believe we can make a feels like it could happen anywhere. And it difference, but people have to identify does. Even in my picturesque mountain mental health as a priority and it must be town of Roanoke, where a giant hilltop treated as an important assessment and star shines all day and all night, and we treatment tool for overall health if there call our morning news anchors and is any progress to be made in early reporters friends. intervention and prevention. In the early morning hours of I’m also married to an Army vet August 26, a disgruntled who is a proud personal employee of Roanoke TV gun owner. I believe he ...mental health care is the station WDBJ7 silently takes this responsibility place to start approached a live news seriously and has a right Alison treating people with issues to own, carry and use his broadcast by Parker and Adam Ward like anger management and guns. While I realize gun delusive fear before their and opened fire. Vester control won’t stop every Flanagan took his own life rage and hatred boil over person with intent to kill later that day but not (and people kill with to infect society before the whole world tools other than guns), I gained access to his morbid first person believe this is just one more issue that view of the shootings through social scatters us to our respective corners to media posts and shares. point hateful fearful fingers at each other. His motivations remain elusive. If we’re willing to hide behind Anger. Fear. A misplaced sense of being a our screens, silently watching a killer at victim his whole life. He identified his work. If we blame the “other side”—of the actions as reprisal for the previous mass political aisle, the spiritual spectrum, the killing incident that gripped our nation— racial divide, or any other hyperbolic the slaughter of nine in an historic black difference—for our unhappiness. If we church in Charleston, SC by a self- allow people with unchecked mental illness identified white supremacist. access to guns and insolent ideas to fuel To me, the killing of Alison and their dissent. If we wait for a tragedy to Adam on live television and the wave of discuss solutions for mental health care or reaction on Twitter and Facebook gun control and then still do nothing. If evidences what is becoming America’s we’re constantly moving from one hashtag identity. A place where people get crisis to the next. If we don’t allow the attached to their own hatred and fear, and deaths of Alison and Adam and so many let it define and isolate them. other innocents to sober our hearts and I thought the massacre of school bring us together on one thing— children at Sandy Hook Elementary was as anything—that may actually heal us as a depraved as anyone could be. Now I know nation. there is no bottom to this pit. Alison and Then… Adam’s murderer gave the world a first We can just sit and wait to see person viewpoint of his depravity. whose turn is next… And we watched. In the days following the Ruth Cassell-Huynh is a former murders, many people said “I made the journalist who lives in Roanoke and felt mistake of watching the video.” These are the devastation of the WDBJ7 murders, sensible, sensitive well-meaning people but also witnessed the strength of a community and the solidarity of who still sought out the video-game-style reporters and journalists from across cell phone footage of two friends of mine the country. She remains hopeful we can being targeted and killed while doing their find solutions, but deeply concerned jobs. we're still not ready to look. I called Alison and Adam friends, as did so many in our town. I knew I could

By rob huffman

Give a Child Something to Think About Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

On April 5, 1971 in their home opener, the Washington Senators crushed the Oakland Athletics 8 - 0, knocking the A's young and relatively unknown starter, Vida Blue, out of the game in the second inning. Alas, the Senators went on to win only 62 more games that season, while Vida Blue ended with 24 wins (against only 8 losses) and captured both the American League's Cy Young and Most Valuable Player awards. As so often happens in sports - maybe especially so with Washington teams - the Senators got to be both Cinderella (opening day) and her ugly stepsisters (96 losses that season) in the same season. Elation followed by deflation is just what being a fan entails. But all long time Washington fans know this. Along with two of my best friends, I was in the crowd for that jubilant opener, oiled baseball glove already on my hand, ready in case any foul balls came streaking my way. My dad had picked us up at school that morning to take us to that game. But how transitory joy can be. As Housman put it, "Lucks a Chance, but trouble's sure." And so, at the end of the 1971 season which featured a few scattered and remarkable highs, but much more frequent lows, the team disappeared vanished - sold by their hated owner Bob Short (today's antipathy for Redskins owner Dan Snyder doesn't even come close) and resurfacing in Texas as the Rangers. My dad and I were in attendance for the Senators' finale - season and franchise - on September 30th, too. That last game was a sad and tawdry affair - aggrieved and grieving fans stormed the field to rip up bases and other souvenirs causing the Senators forfeit their final game to the New York Yankees. (And the Senators were winning, too!) The RFK swan song could have been dignified - a kind of somber wake - but it wasn't It was less bon voyage, than storm the Bastille. Sure, the Senators were generally a losing team, but they were our losing team, in the same way that that ne'er-dowell uncle of yours is still family. I guess I've been thinking about baseball a lot this summer since I'm so far away from it. In Germany, baseball is never televised. I even had to miss the All-Star Game, a childhood marker of midsummer. There are plenty of sports on TV here, of course - Formula 1 racing,

a perpertual succession of soccer games, even some riveting late night dart matches. Just no baseball. I've loved the game since I was a kid. I credit my dad with stoking my interest. Dad helped coach my Little League teams, he tirelessly caught my twelve-year-old "fastballs" in the backyard - wildly flung balls that would bounce and strike his unprotected shins - and he even took us on a family vacation to Cooperstown, New York so I could tour the Baseball Hall of Fame. . It's not that I haven't tried to cultivate other (compensatory) sports interests here in the old world. Last summer's World Cup soccer matches were truly exciting and it was thrilling to be in the ultimate victor's home country (although, naturally, I was rooting for the U.S. team). And since Tour de France "highlights" (skinny guys pedalling furiously) are on TV every day I try to get excited about this event, too. But bike racing? Really? Maybe if the guys would pop the occasional wheelie or something. ( Although things did get a little more interesting when the eventual winner, Chris Froome of England, had a cup of urine flung at him by a disgruntled fan. Now that felt more familiar, like something that would happen in the NBA. Tant pis!) But still, and always, I feel the gravitational pull of our national pasttime. Last week the whole family was at aKinderfest in Mainz. It featured countless booths and exhibitions and games of skill for children to try. There was a bobsled that my son and I rode (me clumsily pushing it and then inelegantly jumping in), a bow and arrow range, climbing walls, etc. And then, amid all those "foreign" amusements and games, there it was: a batting cage! I never expected to see one here in Germany. And it was popular that aftertoon, too. Little German kids lined up to take their swings at balls launched towards them from a pitching machine. I don't know how long I stood there watching. But I do know that every time a kid made contact, so did I.

Rob Huffman loves baseball and books and being outdoors and remains hopeful that smartphones and social media are fads that won't last. This column is dedicated to the memory of Rob Grogan, who would was an avid baseball fan.

front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

29


Oysters for Life

Fredericksburg Sketches A visual Celebration of our community

VA. oysters making comeback

By Casey Alan Shaw

Trunk Show October 8-10 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847 www.gemstonecreations.org

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged 30

October 2015

not a halloween show at art mart By justin young

By woodie walker

Fresh Virginia oysters will highlight a conservation celebration in Topping to introduce foodies and environmentally-concerned folks to a unique program called Oysters For Life, which is created by the partnership of Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR) and

From My Porch

October:

the Oyster Company of Virginia (OCVA). Tolar Nolley is the founder of OCVA and he lives, breathes, and eats Crassostrea Virginica, the East Coast’s natural oyster. He’ll be talking to attendees about the latest information regarding conservation efforts along the Rappahannock River and the comeback of the Virginia oyster. On Nov. 14, Saturday, attendees of From the Rappahannock, For the Rappahannock will enjoy fresh oysters, wine, and beer, plus live acoustic music in a beautiful setting along the river. FOR is a non-profit, grassroots advocacy group that works to protect the Rappahannock from its source in the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay. FOR works closely with OCVA in a cooperative program called Oysters For Life. “Oysters For Life gives its members a chance to help save the Bay, its fragile ecosystem, and the wildlife that depends on it,” said Nolley. “Additionally, you’ll be supporting local watermen and helping to bring back the Virginia oyster.” For a $175 sponsorship, members receive two dozen fresh oysters delivered to their door for 10 years. For $275, they’ll receive their two dozen oysters annually for life. By sponsoring, members support the health of the river, the watermen and their families, and they can share their oysters with friends and family. Sponsors often buy the Oysters For Life package as a gift to be delivered during the holidays. “It’s truly a gift that keeps on giving,” said Nolley. The Nov. 14 celebration of oysters and conservation runs from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the OCVA conference center in Topping, not far from the mouth of the Rappahannock. Only 100 tickets are available for this Nov. 14th event at $30 for a single or $50 per pair. There will be steamed and raw oysters on the menu and lots of opportunities to talk about FOR and the Oysters For Life program. Tickets can be purchased online at www.riverfriends.org or by calling (540) 373-3448 ext. 117.

Woodie Walker is Community Conservationist for Friends of the Rappahannock

Front porch fredericksburg

SKETCH #12: View from Chatham Bridge. Fall is my favorite time of year in Fredericksburg. Every sense gets engaged. Nature's colors change brilliantly. Your skin wakes up to the long-awaited touch of brisk breezes. The food even smells better.This view of our iconic railroad bridge started as a sketch, much like previous sketches I've shared with you. But after I finished the drawing, the strong underlying shapes made this one feel like it would make a better painting. I've long been a huge fan of vintage travel poster illustrations from the 1920s and 30s. And why should all those posters be centered on New York or Paris? I decided Fredericksburg deserved it's own tourist poster treatment since that's what I would like to hang in my house. Good enough reason, right? So I set out to convert the "painterly" treatment to a more "designerly" treatment which meant I spent just as much or more time taking away elements and simplifying as I did refining. It's a shame the riverboat was not able to make it up the river this summer, but I was gratified to see how the number of kayakers and paddle-boarders continues to increase. Another tidbit: This work originally began life as a "summer" sketch. But during the process, my wife insisted it would look much better with autumn foliage. And she was right (which, of course, she usually is). Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist. He exhibits his original artwork at Art First Gallery and limited-edition prints at Art First, Goolricks, and The Made in Virginia Store. See more of his work at www.caseyshaw.com.

Dia De Los Avivados is a concept born out of Art Mart’s curator Nina Angelini’s personal project, Modern Memento Mori, a multimedia body of work that explores humanity through the common thread of death and grief

THE POETRY MAN - By Frank Fratoe

Ecology Lesson Do not conserve a tree just to inhale aroma or enjoy florescence; but graft it within and reproduce vigor held inside your being. O admire the red-oak for all its strength and a thousand seeds; or praise crepe-myrtle that endures the heat of an endless summer. Each one vents oxygen our lungs must have in order to flourish; and each cleanses air of the carbon dioxide poisonous to survival. They share the Source which bears us along in storm and drought; without wings or legs they move across earth to bring us life again.

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He wrote this poem as a tribute to the artists of Fredericksburg

through the eyes of the artist. The theme of the show is Day of the Dead. While working on this series she gained a more personal understanding of Dia de los Muertos, day of the dead, and wanted to give other artist an opportunity to connect their work to the public in a deeper level as well. October was chosen instead of August (the pre colombian Mexico’s month when the souls of the dead are thought to come down to earth for repose) to inform more about the common misconception that Dia de los Muertos is a Latin American Halloween. Dia de los Muertos is a Latino holiday with roots that predate colonization. The traditional belief and customs most associated with day of the dead such as calavera make up come directly from native Mexican practices which were later mingled with Catholicism and spread throughout America during the conquistas. For young latinos that find themselves in the US it means something else: Identity. “ First it is about you and who you are, every country practices this differently. There is also the faith factor, I personally am not religious at all, but I every year since my nephew passed away I build an altar for him. This day, for me, is about my connection with the dead, my family and community of the living”, explains Angelini. With works varying from painting and photography, to indoor murals and a giant Altar installation to honor Mexican painter Frida Khalo artists Nina Angelini, Justin Young, David Hernandez, Michelle Pierson and Mika Zinc plan to each share their Dia de los Muertos experience with the audience and open a dialogue that will help many appreciate and understand our practices and culture. What is different this first friday? Nina, whom is also a self taught baker and personal chef is preparing a small pan Latino sampling of some of the food typical to Dia De Los Muertos in different countries throughout America Latina. What? First Friday Opening Reception for Dia de los Avivados group show. When? October 2nd, 69pm Where? Art Mart 1405 Princess Anne St.

Justin Young is co-owner of Art Mart

The color, scent & sights of the season By Jo Loving Every particular in nature, a leaf, a drop, a crystal, a moment of time is related to the whole, and partakes of the perfection of the whole. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson Do you realize how fortunate you are to live in this area? Fredericksburg is a wonderful place, and its beauty, charm, history, and vibe is hard to beat. We are now in my favorite season. While September signals the beginning of cooler weather, the closing of the summer, and the start of school, it is October that is the most splendiferous month of the year. October is when the trees put on a show. Their leaves wave to you with purple, yellow, orange, and red hands. They look happy to see you. The wooded areas give up the musky Virginia earthy scent that distinguishes the area from others. The Rappahannock beckons to you to canoe or kayak to view the leaves from its waters. Imagine floating, just floating, listening to the quiet, being a part of nature, viewing the show… Living in Fredericksburg, you are a short drive from the Blue Ridge Parkway, where you can see for miles and miles – all of the beautiful shades of autumn. If you enjoy hiking, camping, and the outdoors, this is the perfect season. Get out. Enjoy it. Be a part of nature. It restores your soul, clears your mind, and lifts your spirits. A short walk or a long hike can make your daily stresses fade. Listen to the birds. If you walk into the woods, you can hear the leaves rustling in the wind, the babbling of the waters of a river or creek, and feel the

loamy earth beneath you. Sniff the air – you’ll smell the earth, the last of the honeysuckle, and, if you’re lucky enough to be near pines or cedars, you’ll smell the early scent of December in the air. Have you walked a beach in autumn? If not, try it. Drive to the Northern Neck, get out, and walk the beaches. It’s truly beautiful and peaceful. Open yourself to the experience. Sit on the sand and just watch the waves come and go, and if you are there on a sunny day with choppy waters, your view will be of millions of diamonds. Look up, are there clouds? Become a child again. Lie down and see what the shapes of the clouds form. A Giraffe? An Angel? A Lamb? Just lose yourself for a bit. It’s restorative. Nature offers so much to us, and we need to take time to appreciate its bounty. Stop what you’re doing and plan a day, a weekend, a week – just get out and enjoy the gifts of the area. You will be glad that you did – I’ve never heard anyone express regret over their “time out” in nature.

Jo Loving is out enjoying the nature in Florida right now. She misses October in Fredericksburg, her canoe and camping trips along the Rappahannock, her jaunts to the woods, and the peaceful feeling of the clean, crisp air. Do her a favor, will you? Just take one walk in the woods, and whisper a Thank You to Mother Earth.

Every Child Deserves A Family

Learn about our adoption opportunities Domestic & International

301-587-4400 Cradle of Hope Adoption Center front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

31


Oysters for Life

Fredericksburg Sketches A visual Celebration of our community

VA. oysters making comeback

By Casey Alan Shaw

Trunk Show October 8-10 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847 www.gemstonecreations.org

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged 30

October 2015

not a halloween show at art mart By justin young

By woodie walker

Fresh Virginia oysters will highlight a conservation celebration in Topping to introduce foodies and environmentally-concerned folks to a unique program called Oysters For Life, which is created by the partnership of Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR) and

From My Porch

October:

the Oyster Company of Virginia (OCVA). Tolar Nolley is the founder of OCVA and he lives, breathes, and eats Crassostrea Virginica, the East Coast’s natural oyster. He’ll be talking to attendees about the latest information regarding conservation efforts along the Rappahannock River and the comeback of the Virginia oyster. On Nov. 14, Saturday, attendees of From the Rappahannock, For the Rappahannock will enjoy fresh oysters, wine, and beer, plus live acoustic music in a beautiful setting along the river. FOR is a non-profit, grassroots advocacy group that works to protect the Rappahannock from its source in the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay. FOR works closely with OCVA in a cooperative program called Oysters For Life. “Oysters For Life gives its members a chance to help save the Bay, its fragile ecosystem, and the wildlife that depends on it,” said Nolley. “Additionally, you’ll be supporting local watermen and helping to bring back the Virginia oyster.” For a $175 sponsorship, members receive two dozen fresh oysters delivered to their door for 10 years. For $275, they’ll receive their two dozen oysters annually for life. By sponsoring, members support the health of the river, the watermen and their families, and they can share their oysters with friends and family. Sponsors often buy the Oysters For Life package as a gift to be delivered during the holidays. “It’s truly a gift that keeps on giving,” said Nolley. The Nov. 14 celebration of oysters and conservation runs from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the OCVA conference center in Topping, not far from the mouth of the Rappahannock. Only 100 tickets are available for this Nov. 14th event at $30 for a single or $50 per pair. There will be steamed and raw oysters on the menu and lots of opportunities to talk about FOR and the Oysters For Life program. Tickets can be purchased online at www.riverfriends.org or by calling (540) 373-3448 ext. 117.

Woodie Walker is Community Conservationist for Friends of the Rappahannock

Front porch fredericksburg

SKETCH #12: View from Chatham Bridge. Fall is my favorite time of year in Fredericksburg. Every sense gets engaged. Nature's colors change brilliantly. Your skin wakes up to the long-awaited touch of brisk breezes. The food even smells better.This view of our iconic railroad bridge started as a sketch, much like previous sketches I've shared with you. But after I finished the drawing, the strong underlying shapes made this one feel like it would make a better painting. I've long been a huge fan of vintage travel poster illustrations from the 1920s and 30s. And why should all those posters be centered on New York or Paris? I decided Fredericksburg deserved it's own tourist poster treatment since that's what I would like to hang in my house. Good enough reason, right? So I set out to convert the "painterly" treatment to a more "designerly" treatment which meant I spent just as much or more time taking away elements and simplifying as I did refining. It's a shame the riverboat was not able to make it up the river this summer, but I was gratified to see how the number of kayakers and paddle-boarders continues to increase. Another tidbit: This work originally began life as a "summer" sketch. But during the process, my wife insisted it would look much better with autumn foliage. And she was right (which, of course, she usually is). Casey Alan Shaw is a local artist. He exhibits his original artwork at Art First Gallery and limited-edition prints at Art First, Goolricks, and The Made in Virginia Store. See more of his work at www.caseyshaw.com.

Dia De Los Avivados is a concept born out of Art Mart’s curator Nina Angelini’s personal project, Modern Memento Mori, a multimedia body of work that explores humanity through the common thread of death and grief

THE POETRY MAN - By Frank Fratoe

Ecology Lesson Do not conserve a tree just to inhale aroma or enjoy florescence; but graft it within and reproduce vigor held inside your being. O admire the red-oak for all its strength and a thousand seeds; or praise crepe-myrtle that endures the heat of an endless summer. Each one vents oxygen our lungs must have in order to flourish; and each cleanses air of the carbon dioxide poisonous to survival. They share the Source which bears us along in storm and drought; without wings or legs they move across earth to bring us life again.

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He wrote this poem as a tribute to the artists of Fredericksburg

through the eyes of the artist. The theme of the show is Day of the Dead. While working on this series she gained a more personal understanding of Dia de los Muertos, day of the dead, and wanted to give other artist an opportunity to connect their work to the public in a deeper level as well. October was chosen instead of August (the pre colombian Mexico’s month when the souls of the dead are thought to come down to earth for repose) to inform more about the common misconception that Dia de los Muertos is a Latin American Halloween. Dia de los Muertos is a Latino holiday with roots that predate colonization. The traditional belief and customs most associated with day of the dead such as calavera make up come directly from native Mexican practices which were later mingled with Catholicism and spread throughout America during the conquistas. For young latinos that find themselves in the US it means something else: Identity. “ First it is about you and who you are, every country practices this differently. There is also the faith factor, I personally am not religious at all, but I every year since my nephew passed away I build an altar for him. This day, for me, is about my connection with the dead, my family and community of the living”, explains Angelini. With works varying from painting and photography, to indoor murals and a giant Altar installation to honor Mexican painter Frida Khalo artists Nina Angelini, Justin Young, David Hernandez, Michelle Pierson and Mika Zinc plan to each share their Dia de los Muertos experience with the audience and open a dialogue that will help many appreciate and understand our practices and culture. What is different this first friday? Nina, whom is also a self taught baker and personal chef is preparing a small pan Latino sampling of some of the food typical to Dia De Los Muertos in different countries throughout America Latina. What? First Friday Opening Reception for Dia de los Avivados group show. When? October 2nd, 69pm Where? Art Mart 1405 Princess Anne St.

Justin Young is co-owner of Art Mart

The color, scent & sights of the season By Jo Loving Every particular in nature, a leaf, a drop, a crystal, a moment of time is related to the whole, and partakes of the perfection of the whole. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson Do you realize how fortunate you are to live in this area? Fredericksburg is a wonderful place, and its beauty, charm, history, and vibe is hard to beat. We are now in my favorite season. While September signals the beginning of cooler weather, the closing of the summer, and the start of school, it is October that is the most splendiferous month of the year. October is when the trees put on a show. Their leaves wave to you with purple, yellow, orange, and red hands. They look happy to see you. The wooded areas give up the musky Virginia earthy scent that distinguishes the area from others. The Rappahannock beckons to you to canoe or kayak to view the leaves from its waters. Imagine floating, just floating, listening to the quiet, being a part of nature, viewing the show… Living in Fredericksburg, you are a short drive from the Blue Ridge Parkway, where you can see for miles and miles – all of the beautiful shades of autumn. If you enjoy hiking, camping, and the outdoors, this is the perfect season. Get out. Enjoy it. Be a part of nature. It restores your soul, clears your mind, and lifts your spirits. A short walk or a long hike can make your daily stresses fade. Listen to the birds. If you walk into the woods, you can hear the leaves rustling in the wind, the babbling of the waters of a river or creek, and feel the

loamy earth beneath you. Sniff the air – you’ll smell the earth, the last of the honeysuckle, and, if you’re lucky enough to be near pines or cedars, you’ll smell the early scent of December in the air. Have you walked a beach in autumn? If not, try it. Drive to the Northern Neck, get out, and walk the beaches. It’s truly beautiful and peaceful. Open yourself to the experience. Sit on the sand and just watch the waves come and go, and if you are there on a sunny day with choppy waters, your view will be of millions of diamonds. Look up, are there clouds? Become a child again. Lie down and see what the shapes of the clouds form. A Giraffe? An Angel? A Lamb? Just lose yourself for a bit. It’s restorative. Nature offers so much to us, and we need to take time to appreciate its bounty. Stop what you’re doing and plan a day, a weekend, a week – just get out and enjoy the gifts of the area. You will be glad that you did – I’ve never heard anyone express regret over their “time out” in nature.

Jo Loving is out enjoying the nature in Florida right now. She misses October in Fredericksburg, her canoe and camping trips along the Rappahannock, her jaunts to the woods, and the peaceful feeling of the clean, crisp air. Do her a favor, will you? Just take one walk in the woods, and whisper a Thank You to Mother Earth.

Every Child Deserves A Family

Learn about our adoption opportunities Domestic & International

301-587-4400 Cradle of Hope Adoption Center front porch fredericksburg

October 2015

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Front Porch Fredericksburg - October 2015  
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