Page 1

YOUR GUIDE TO THE LOCAL GOOD LIFE

front porch T H E R E G I O N ' S free C O M M U N I T Y M A G A Z I N E

Our “Sweet 16” Issue! YEAR 16 • ISSUE 192 • JUNE 2013

Frontporchfredericksburg.com

An Artful Month

Exhibits Galore 9, 11, 24, 26

Espressed So Well

Latte Good! 12

Victoria Phillippe

Barrier Breaker 14

Growling at Grilling

Fido Beware! 20

Senior Abuse

Subtle, Sad 22

REIKI with Suzy

The Scenter of Town 23

Personal Ads

Vanities & Bumpers 29

Kyle Snyder Here & Happy 30

To D.C. or Not to D.C.

FXBG Wins? 31


contents

closeups Woman of the “Opry” ....Victoria Phillippe

14

23

Suzy Woollam ...Holistic & Alternative

30

Where in the World is... ....Kyle Snyder

14

porch talk

18

Our Heritage... the crhc collection history’s stories.: butterfield monument

20

companion care: grrr! scrap the grilling

21

autoknown better: what’s with that?

22

Senior Care: elder abuse

23

safe grilling with marinades & rubs

24

Art in the ‘burg

25

scene & heard...in the ‘burg!

26

now Open for submission art for kids abound

27

community link: sweet 16 & 61

28

my own pathg $1001.50

29

porchlight: ....advertisements for ourselves

3

Betsy Glassie: From her front porch to our hearts

30

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

31

6

Braehead Farm: agri-tourism emerges in FXBG

7

Quiet moments: Song of the Cicada

8

Embrey Mill

10

retired on the back porch AC tops Angie’s 2012 list

12

Vino: white wines of summer espressed so well: iced latte recipe

13

season’s bounty: june bugs

15

Will power:: where can’t it go?

16-17

Calendar of Events

BETSY GLASSIE From her front porch to our hearts

By rob grogan

31

in my “Front Porch Series,” an NBC Producer from DC visited my studio at Libertytown to buy a couple of paintings. I was quite happily surprised when she contacted me to see if I’d be interested in participating in a pilot video series she wanted to make entitled “Create America”, interviewing artists around the country as to why art matters.” The producer spent a day in-studio and at public places where Betsy’s art hangs: Martin Thompkins at Mary Washington Hospital; the medical office of Dr. Mark McClanahan; the office of Judge Martin Bass; all the while filming a narrative of Betsy’s art, how it’s made, where it ends up, and what impact it has on those who see it. “It will be interesting to see how the project develops,” says the artist. Last fall, Betsy enjoyed participating in Bill Harris’s 1st

not minnesota: d.c. & fxbg

...And more! 30

5

Summer of Hope

9

Plastic Fantastic

11

thru the eyes of the forrest & other exhibits

25

FPF new website...check it out! Cover art by Betsy Glassie

For June Brides And Caffeine Highs

311 William Street 540-3 371-2 2727 www.lapetiteaubergefred.com

With Love in Every Cup!

2

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Open for Lunch & Dinner Mon - Sat

When a community looks at its finest qualities, it is a very fortunate community that can claim art as one of its cornerstones; an even rarer one that can turn to its artists in time of need. Perhaps that is why such a gifted and talented artist as Betsy Glassie has overwhelmed us here at Front Porch in our time of need. I am currently undergoing treatment for a rare form of cancer known as carcinoid, which comes with it a hefty price tag for my monthly injections and my ongoing plan of care; a price tag well beyond what insurance chooses to cover. In response, my family and friends, spearheaded by Brynn Pacitti and Katie Dunn, are planning a Silent Auction for the fall to raise money for my cancer fund www.lotsahelpinghands.com/c/702831/. Betsy has generously donated her June cover painting to our Silent Auction fall fundraiser for my cancer support fund. The painting will be one of many featured auction items from talented artists, chefs, business owners and service providers in Fredericksburg. Details, as they become available, will be posted on the FP facebook page and at the website highlighted above. The painting, of Betsy’s own front porch, graces our cover and is one of a series of paintings she began in a VCU Off Campus Masters Program last Summer. Titled “Perhaps Bonnard Will Come,” the 40x30, oil on canvas, was juried into “Uniquely Fredericksburg” curated by Joe DiBello. “It’s been an interesting year,” says Betsy. “While finishing the paintings

Annual “Art Attack” with many other local artists painting on Caroline for a day of demonstrating and sharing their art-making (see photo). “Out of that experience I decided to try my hand at plein air painting, painting directly from nature rather than from photographs, joining art friends Kathleen Walsh and Wendy Atwell-V Vasey by scenic venues.” Betsy is truly enjoying the challenges, “Even though the light changes, the canvas may blow over in the wind, and one has to get used to hauling a studio on wheels. There’s nothing quite like being in the moment surrounded by beauty!” One place of beauty she attended is the farmland gardens of Olney, MD, where acres of buttercups, iris, azaleas, ponds, and rolling hills are surrounded by woodlands. “I’m looking forward to an upcoming painting trip to Maine, which will be full of scenic opportunities as well!” In tribute to LibertyTown founder Dan Finnegan, Betsy took part in the gallery’s 10th anniversary celebration June 1. She has a show scheduled with Exposure Unlimited in Lake Anna in July, a solo show in September at the DC Hill Center on Capitol Hill, and “I plan to enter the Plein Air Exhibit at LibertyTown this summer. Like fellow artists, I feel fortunate to work at what I love and share what I create.” We feel very blessed to receive such a talent as Betsy Glassie and her “front porch” painting. And we totally get the meaning of why art matters. Thank you, Betsy, with all our heart. Rob Grogan is editor of the magazine. front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

3


contents

closeups Woman of the “Opry” ....Victoria Phillippe

14

23

Suzy Woollam ...Holistic & Alternative

30

Where in the World is... ....Kyle Snyder

14

porch talk

18

Our Heritage... the crhc collection history’s stories.: butterfield monument

20

companion care: grrr! scrap the grilling

21

autoknown better: what’s with that?

22

Senior Care: elder abuse

23

safe grilling with marinades & rubs

24

Art in the ‘burg

25

scene & heard...in the ‘burg!

26

now Open for submission art for kids abound

27

community link: sweet 16 & 61

28

my own pathg $1001.50

29

porchlight: ....advertisements for ourselves

3

Betsy Glassie: From her front porch to our hearts

30

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

31

6

Braehead Farm: agri-tourism emerges in FXBG

7

Quiet moments: Song of the Cicada

8

Embrey Mill

10

retired on the back porch AC tops Angie’s 2012 list

12

Vino: white wines of summer espressed so well: iced latte recipe

13

season’s bounty: june bugs

15

Will power:: where can’t it go?

16-17

Calendar of Events

BETSY GLASSIE From her front porch to our hearts

By rob grogan

31

in my “Front Porch Series,” an NBC Producer from DC visited my studio at Libertytown to buy a couple of paintings. I was quite happily surprised when she contacted me to see if I’d be interested in participating in a pilot video series she wanted to make entitled “Create America”, interviewing artists around the country as to why art matters.” The producer spent a day in-studio and at public places where Betsy’s art hangs: Martin Thompkins at Mary Washington Hospital; the medical office of Dr. Mark McClanahan; the office of Judge Martin Bass; all the while filming a narrative of Betsy’s art, how it’s made, where it ends up, and what impact it has on those who see it. “It will be interesting to see how the project develops,” says the artist. Last fall, Betsy enjoyed participating in Bill Harris’s 1st

not minnesota: d.c. & fxbg

...And more! 30

5

Summer of Hope

9

Plastic Fantastic

11

thru the eyes of the forrest & other exhibits

25

FPF new website...check it out! Cover art by Betsy Glassie

For June Brides And Caffeine Highs

311 William Street 540-3 371-2 2727 www.lapetiteaubergefred.com

With Love in Every Cup!

2

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Open for Lunch & Dinner Mon - Sat

When a community looks at its finest qualities, it is a very fortunate community that can claim art as one of its cornerstones; an even rarer one that can turn to its artists in time of need. Perhaps that is why such a gifted and talented artist as Betsy Glassie has overwhelmed us here at Front Porch in our time of need. I am currently undergoing treatment for a rare form of cancer known as carcinoid, which comes with it a hefty price tag for my monthly injections and my ongoing plan of care; a price tag well beyond what insurance chooses to cover. In response, my family and friends, spearheaded by Brynn Pacitti and Katie Dunn, are planning a Silent Auction for the fall to raise money for my cancer fund www.lotsahelpinghands.com/c/702831/. Betsy has generously donated her June cover painting to our Silent Auction fall fundraiser for my cancer support fund. The painting will be one of many featured auction items from talented artists, chefs, business owners and service providers in Fredericksburg. Details, as they become available, will be posted on the FP facebook page and at the website highlighted above. The painting, of Betsy’s own front porch, graces our cover and is one of a series of paintings she began in a VCU Off Campus Masters Program last Summer. Titled “Perhaps Bonnard Will Come,” the 40x30, oil on canvas, was juried into “Uniquely Fredericksburg” curated by Joe DiBello. “It’s been an interesting year,” says Betsy. “While finishing the paintings

Annual “Art Attack” with many other local artists painting on Caroline for a day of demonstrating and sharing their art-making (see photo). “Out of that experience I decided to try my hand at plein air painting, painting directly from nature rather than from photographs, joining art friends Kathleen Walsh and Wendy Atwell-V Vasey by scenic venues.” Betsy is truly enjoying the challenges, “Even though the light changes, the canvas may blow over in the wind, and one has to get used to hauling a studio on wheels. There’s nothing quite like being in the moment surrounded by beauty!” One place of beauty she attended is the farmland gardens of Olney, MD, where acres of buttercups, iris, azaleas, ponds, and rolling hills are surrounded by woodlands. “I’m looking forward to an upcoming painting trip to Maine, which will be full of scenic opportunities as well!” In tribute to LibertyTown founder Dan Finnegan, Betsy took part in the gallery’s 10th anniversary celebration June 1. She has a show scheduled with Exposure Unlimited in Lake Anna in July, a solo show in September at the DC Hill Center on Capitol Hill, and “I plan to enter the Plein Air Exhibit at LibertyTown this summer. Like fellow artists, I feel fortunate to work at what I love and share what I create.” We feel very blessed to receive such a talent as Betsy Glassie and her “front porch” painting. And we totally get the meaning of why art matters. Thank you, Betsy, with all our heart. Rob Grogan is editor of the magazine. front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

3


ON THE PORCH Rob Grogan Myles Bigenwald

Editor Associate Editor

Photographer Archer Di Peppe Contributing Writers & Artists Mike Appleton Chuck Archer A.E.Bayne E.C.Barker Megan Byrnes Collette Caprara C.Ruth Cassell Lezlie Cheryl Kerri Corsano Joe deYoung Melissa Delauter Arch Di Peppe Frank Fratoe Patricia Gancie William Garnett Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks Rob Huffman Lori Izykowski Karl Karch Will Loring Stephanie Orton Lynch Jo Middleton Amy Pearce Susan Carter Morgan M.L.Powers Vanessa Moncure Amy Pearce Scott Richards Wendy Schmitz Victoria Scrimer Matt Thomas Christine Thompson Rim Vining Kathryn Willis Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co., Inc. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Phone: 540-220-1922 E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2013 Olde Towne Publishing Co., LLC All rights reserved.

Robgwrites 4

June 2013

Summer of Hope Children Hope “Bridge of Hope”Finds Them Homes

junior It’s good to be humbled now and then, to be sure that your hat always fits. And it’s good to discover someplace new and people who are new to you. In your own hometown. That was the scenario for me late last month when I stepped into the Burgess Barber Shop at 207 William – old barber pole outside, old school inside with five chairs and one barber – “Junior” – whose lollipop jar has Tootsie Roll Pops. Thank you, Junior! After 21 years here, I finally discovered an iconic neighborhood man cave nestled in goodness and right smack in front of me for all these years. I was not totally unfamiliar with it, having walked by it many times and inside it nearly every month to drop a few Front Porch copies off for Junior’s customers and extras for the good folks next door at Yamaha Music School if its doors were locked. I would say hey to Junior and leave him be to his customers, none of whom I ever recognized. But on this day, I had a different plan. I had intention, and it paid off in a grand manner of enjoyment and enlightenment for more than an hour of a sunny mid-day Tuesday. I had not had a haircut in months, thinking I would lose it to chemotherapy treatment anyway so why bother paying $30 for a cut in a busy salon with chemical fragrances swirling throughout my sinuses and stirring up some dermatitis in me. But as it turns out, chemo is not in my treatment plan and my hair was raggedly growing like a weed patch. So I decided to go to Burgess on William, three doors down from the Rec Center’s World’s Best Chili Dogs. It was the Tuesday after Memorial Day, so the Monday crowd mixed in with the Tuesday regulars and the wait was longer than normal, from

By Patrice Gancie what I could tell. Neil Sullivan got paged back to work while he was waiting his turn and there were three others ahead of me. I just chilled through the newspapers and waited. It wasn’t so long and it was relaxing in a hometown way. When my turn came up, I stepped up into Junior’s chair for my first $12 big-boy razor cut. I can’t believe it took me this long to discover the camaraderie there! Junior asked me about my cancer — he had noticed my bony, muscle-less frame and how I use a cane now. Gary Butler — one of the regulars and a lifelong Fredericksburger – reached out with well wishes and voiced his concerns. We began to chat and I learned a lot about being from here versus being a come-here! (That’s the humility thing.) Gary hinted at ways to cover up my “come-here” status (hint on just one of them: got be at least 25 years here; so four to go for me...), and a bunch of old timers told stories with enough humor to last a week. Campbell) A-Cam (Anthony popped in to say hi to all from his office across the street; he’s known the Butler family since he was a babe in arms. He reminded me that we would do our FredLive interview on my porch “whenever you are ready and strong.” The other men took that to mean that I, like Anthony, am a singer! When my haircut was over and I’d given my parting nice-to-meet-you’s, I

messages I visited Fredericksburg this past Tuesday and picked up a copy of “Front Porch.” I thoroughly enjoyed your paper and just wanted to commend you on a newsy and well-written paper. Sincerely, Rosemarie Lo Monaco Woodbridge

Thanks so much (for inviting my art to your cover). Can’t wait to see it all come together! Congratulations on your accomplishment of 16 Years of producing a wonderful magazine! Betsy Glassie

Front porch fredericksburg

asked Junior could I grab a lollipop from his jar. He told me to take two — which I did. Junior then whispered that he is praying for me. When I stepped outside, I saw Tom Byrnes do a drive-by on William, then I crossed the street to Forage to say hey to Alicia Morgan. Waiting for Alexis to pick me up at the corner by the museum garden, a panhandler vacated me from the bench after I denied him booze money but offered him leftover cheese crackers from my earlier that morning oncology appointment. When Alexis got me home, I listened to a YouTube video of Paul McCartney doing “It’s Just Another Day.” But it was quite a good day in my hometown, and we invite you to enjoy something about it inside these pages, cover to cover.

Rob, Dear Rob: On behalf of the people served by Mental Health America of Fredericksburg and its Board of Directors, we would like to express our sincere gratitude for your support of the 6th annual Walk for Mental Wellness held on May 4th at Hurkamp Park by providing a free promotional ad and two articles about individuals involved with the event… Thanks so much – loved the articles about Dennis Ahearn and Ernie Ackermann! Sincerely, Lynn DelaMer Executive Director

Just a short note to tell you how much I appreciate your response letting me know you’ve received my various submissions to Front Porch. I can rest easy knowing that I’ve done my part in helping local artists get recognition. I can’t think of another publication which consistently gives me that feedback! Thanks again! Fritzi Newton Art First Gallery

China is sending a group of children to the United States this summer for the Cradle of Hope’s “Bridge of Hope” hosting program, July 17 to August 7. Please contact me as soon as possible if you’d like to learn more and apply to host one of these children. Cradle is seeking host families on the East Coast

and Midwest (close to Chicago), but will consider families from other areas on a case by case basis. In most cases, these children’s parents are deceased, and they have been living in very poor circumstances with relatives who can’t support them. They will soon be moved to orphanages. Families have given Chinese authorities permission for children to be adopted so they can live in families who can give them love, care, and better opportunities for their future. However, birth families have the right to change their minds anytime before adoptions are completed. We at Cradle of Hope have revised our hosting guidelines to meet the special circumstances of this program: 1) Families are not required to have full, completed international home studies before children’s arrival, but must obtain police and child abuse clearances and have at least one home visit by a licensed social worker who will provide us with a site visit report. Families must also certify they meet China’s adoption eligibility criteria,

unless an exception has been granted. 2) Host families must be prepared to house the children’s Chinese escort for a few days during the program. The escort will want to get to know your family, monitor how your host child is doing, and send a report back to Chinese authorities about the hosting program. Please contact me at Cradle of Hope ASAP if you’d like to learn more about hosting one of our children this summer.

Patrice Gancie is Director, Bridge of Hope, for the Cradle of Hope Adoption Center in Washington, DC.. 301/5874400 ext. 207, www.cradlehope.org NOTE: Please contact Patrice for full brochure of participating children

Days Gone By Courtesy of the William T. Garnett Collection

Mary Washington Hospital as located on Fall Hill Avenue, the third incarnation of the facility. We have all been there but no one ever wants to go there.

Reach William T. Garnett Antiques at 540-424-2448.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

5


ON THE PORCH Rob Grogan Myles Bigenwald

Editor Associate Editor

Photographer Archer Di Peppe Contributing Writers & Artists Mike Appleton Chuck Archer A.E.Bayne E.C.Barker Megan Byrnes Collette Caprara C.Ruth Cassell Lezlie Cheryl Kerri Corsano Joe deYoung Melissa Delauter Arch Di Peppe Frank Fratoe Patricia Gancie William Garnett Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks Rob Huffman Lori Izykowski Karl Karch Will Loring Stephanie Orton Lynch Jo Middleton Amy Pearce Susan Carter Morgan M.L.Powers Vanessa Moncure Amy Pearce Scott Richards Wendy Schmitz Victoria Scrimer Matt Thomas Christine Thompson Rim Vining Kathryn Willis Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co., Inc. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Phone: 540-220-1922 E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2013 Olde Towne Publishing Co., LLC All rights reserved.

Robgwrites 4

June 2013

Summer of Hope Children Hope “Bridge of Hope”Finds Them Homes

junior It’s good to be humbled now and then, to be sure that your hat always fits. And it’s good to discover someplace new and people who are new to you. In your own hometown. That was the scenario for me late last month when I stepped into the Burgess Barber Shop at 207 William – old barber pole outside, old school inside with five chairs and one barber – “Junior” – whose lollipop jar has Tootsie Roll Pops. Thank you, Junior! After 21 years here, I finally discovered an iconic neighborhood man cave nestled in goodness and right smack in front of me for all these years. I was not totally unfamiliar with it, having walked by it many times and inside it nearly every month to drop a few Front Porch copies off for Junior’s customers and extras for the good folks next door at Yamaha Music School if its doors were locked. I would say hey to Junior and leave him be to his customers, none of whom I ever recognized. But on this day, I had a different plan. I had intention, and it paid off in a grand manner of enjoyment and enlightenment for more than an hour of a sunny mid-day Tuesday. I had not had a haircut in months, thinking I would lose it to chemotherapy treatment anyway so why bother paying $30 for a cut in a busy salon with chemical fragrances swirling throughout my sinuses and stirring up some dermatitis in me. But as it turns out, chemo is not in my treatment plan and my hair was raggedly growing like a weed patch. So I decided to go to Burgess on William, three doors down from the Rec Center’s World’s Best Chili Dogs. It was the Tuesday after Memorial Day, so the Monday crowd mixed in with the Tuesday regulars and the wait was longer than normal, from

By Patrice Gancie what I could tell. Neil Sullivan got paged back to work while he was waiting his turn and there were three others ahead of me. I just chilled through the newspapers and waited. It wasn’t so long and it was relaxing in a hometown way. When my turn came up, I stepped up into Junior’s chair for my first $12 big-boy razor cut. I can’t believe it took me this long to discover the camaraderie there! Junior asked me about my cancer — he had noticed my bony, muscle-less frame and how I use a cane now. Gary Butler — one of the regulars and a lifelong Fredericksburger – reached out with well wishes and voiced his concerns. We began to chat and I learned a lot about being from here versus being a come-here! (That’s the humility thing.) Gary hinted at ways to cover up my “come-here” status (hint on just one of them: got be at least 25 years here; so four to go for me...), and a bunch of old timers told stories with enough humor to last a week. Campbell) A-Cam (Anthony popped in to say hi to all from his office across the street; he’s known the Butler family since he was a babe in arms. He reminded me that we would do our FredLive interview on my porch “whenever you are ready and strong.” The other men took that to mean that I, like Anthony, am a singer! When my haircut was over and I’d given my parting nice-to-meet-you’s, I

messages I visited Fredericksburg this past Tuesday and picked up a copy of “Front Porch.” I thoroughly enjoyed your paper and just wanted to commend you on a newsy and well-written paper. Sincerely, Rosemarie Lo Monaco Woodbridge

Thanks so much (for inviting my art to your cover). Can’t wait to see it all come together! Congratulations on your accomplishment of 16 Years of producing a wonderful magazine! Betsy Glassie

Front porch fredericksburg

asked Junior could I grab a lollipop from his jar. He told me to take two — which I did. Junior then whispered that he is praying for me. When I stepped outside, I saw Tom Byrnes do a drive-by on William, then I crossed the street to Forage to say hey to Alicia Morgan. Waiting for Alexis to pick me up at the corner by the museum garden, a panhandler vacated me from the bench after I denied him booze money but offered him leftover cheese crackers from my earlier that morning oncology appointment. When Alexis got me home, I listened to a YouTube video of Paul McCartney doing “It’s Just Another Day.” But it was quite a good day in my hometown, and we invite you to enjoy something about it inside these pages, cover to cover.

Rob, Dear Rob: On behalf of the people served by Mental Health America of Fredericksburg and its Board of Directors, we would like to express our sincere gratitude for your support of the 6th annual Walk for Mental Wellness held on May 4th at Hurkamp Park by providing a free promotional ad and two articles about individuals involved with the event… Thanks so much – loved the articles about Dennis Ahearn and Ernie Ackermann! Sincerely, Lynn DelaMer Executive Director

Just a short note to tell you how much I appreciate your response letting me know you’ve received my various submissions to Front Porch. I can rest easy knowing that I’ve done my part in helping local artists get recognition. I can’t think of another publication which consistently gives me that feedback! Thanks again! Fritzi Newton Art First Gallery

China is sending a group of children to the United States this summer for the Cradle of Hope’s “Bridge of Hope” hosting program, July 17 to August 7. Please contact me as soon as possible if you’d like to learn more and apply to host one of these children. Cradle is seeking host families on the East Coast

and Midwest (close to Chicago), but will consider families from other areas on a case by case basis. In most cases, these children’s parents are deceased, and they have been living in very poor circumstances with relatives who can’t support them. They will soon be moved to orphanages. Families have given Chinese authorities permission for children to be adopted so they can live in families who can give them love, care, and better opportunities for their future. However, birth families have the right to change their minds anytime before adoptions are completed. We at Cradle of Hope have revised our hosting guidelines to meet the special circumstances of this program: 1) Families are not required to have full, completed international home studies before children’s arrival, but must obtain police and child abuse clearances and have at least one home visit by a licensed social worker who will provide us with a site visit report. Families must also certify they meet China’s adoption eligibility criteria,

unless an exception has been granted. 2) Host families must be prepared to house the children’s Chinese escort for a few days during the program. The escort will want to get to know your family, monitor how your host child is doing, and send a report back to Chinese authorities about the hosting program. Please contact me at Cradle of Hope ASAP if you’d like to learn more about hosting one of our children this summer.

Patrice Gancie is Director, Bridge of Hope, for the Cradle of Hope Adoption Center in Washington, DC.. 301/5874400 ext. 207, www.cradlehope.org NOTE: Please contact Patrice for full brochure of participating children

Days Gone By Courtesy of the William T. Garnett Collection

Mary Washington Hospital as located on Fall Hill Avenue, the third incarnation of the facility. We have all been there but no one ever wants to go there.

Reach William T. Garnett Antiques at 540-424-2448.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

5


BRAEHEAD FARM

Quiet Moments

Agri-Tourism emerges in fxbg

the song of the cicada By archer Dipeppe

By amy pearce taste of the farm life. The farm and market will open to the public from 10A to 6P daily in season, closing between Christmas and Easter season. The agri-market, housed in a former dairy barn painted milky white, will sell farm products including fresh fruit and vegetables, meat, eggs, cheese, milk, ice cream and honey. The food sources – Braehead, and Snead’s Farm (run by George’s brother, Emmett III — off U.S. 17 in Caroline County) will be complemented by other local farms as well.

Strawberry Fields

George and Roxanna Snead have taken over a rare family property in our fair city of Fredericksburg: a fairly large tract of land that remains agricultural. The Sneads have begun an agri-tourism business that features pick-your-own strawberries, a market with local produce, and a venue for birthday parties. “Braehead Farm” — as it is called — is on a 28-acre property in the Snead family since 1937. Off Tyler Street next to the Battlefield Industrial Park (also built on former Snead-owned land) and adjacent to a 56-acre Snead family farm land, Braehead is run by George, whose grandfather bought the property in 1937 and ran the Braehead Farm dairy operation there. Snead’s father later took over that operation, and his mother, Jane, still lives there. Roxanna adds an educational component to the mix, as she looks forward to welcoming city children and schools onto the property to give them a

July Camp: Mon. July 8—Fri. July 12 (Ages 8-13) ~ 9:30-Noon

After the acre of strawberries they planted last year was picked in April, Braehead Farm opened to the public and is developing a website, renovating barns and stables, and looking for a market manager. George Snead, who owns a custom home-building business, is overseeing the construction work.

Kid Friendly At birthday parties on the farm, children will run around, use slides and swings, ride bikes, roll around in the hay,

pet animals (goats and pigs), and eat cake in a renovated farm building. The owners The Sunken Well Tavern of in Fredericksburg will sell prepared foods during busier times at the farm. Roxanna and them – Paul Stoddard and Steve Cameli — have worked out a menu featuring deli sandwiches, salads, barbecue, and strawberry shortcake. A CSA — Community Supported Agriculture program –- similar to one that Emmett does –- may be added on in the future. Pick-your-own offerings will expand beyond strawberries, and George plans to plant grapes for wine. A small vineyard also might be added in the future. Past and future – and presently to our delight – the Snead clan remains doing what it does best -– farming for the people of their community.

Amy Pearce has been associated with Front Porch Magazine for one year now. Congrats, Miss P !

June 16th

Dad Loves BBQ Brunch Buffet Sneak Peek of Our Menu: Selection of Breakfast items including a Made to Order Omelet Station, Salads Galore, Peel & Eat Shrimp, Carved Prime Rib, BBQ Spare Ribs, Chicken & Seafood and More! Kids Corner with Fun Foods Choice of Desserts including a Chocolate Fountain! $25.95 (Kid 5-12yrs $12) Call for Reservations 620 CAROLINE STREET FREDERICKSBURG VA 22401 540.373.8300

If you are of a certain age, the sound of thousands of cicadas will remind you of the late Nineteen Fifties science fiction movies when the flying saucers show up. Conjure, if you will, that sound with the images of the local town folk screaming and running hither and yon, and you have an entire movie genre. It is the mating call of the males that we hear. They are flexing their tymbals on their abdomens as fast as they can. Like many males, they are in a hurry and have one important thing on their mind. The females are more demur. They have the more important work and lay between three and five hundred eggs that will insure their perpetuation. Here is where Kurt Vonnegut would say, “and so it goes…” The different species make different sounds that you may not be able to detect, but the females know the difference, and that is all that is

important. It has been reported in Illinois that the northern cicadas have a higher pitched song than their southern brethren. We humans spend a lot of time listening, observing, recording, and interpreting the data. Most states have websites devoted to their activities. It turns out that our North American cicadas are more closely related to Australian and Asian cicadas then to South American cicadas. How did that happen? The first reference in Western literature of the cicada was in Homer’s Iliad. The old men standing watch on the high walls of Troy’s fortification were described by the Greeks as cicadas. Cicadas show up again and again throughout ancient Greek literature. Aristotle, Socrates, and Plato all use the insect in their imagery and explanations of the human condition. In Greek mythology it was believed that cicadas were once men who were so devoted to music that they forgot to eat or drink and wasted away. Supposedly, they predated the Muses but then later the Muses rewarded their devotion to music by making them immortal. Forever after, the cicadas watched humans and reported back about man’s devotion to the Muses. The Greeks were fascinated by the cicadas because they believed they survived on air and dew alone, which was a pretty nifty and alluring construct. This belief arose from people’s observation of moisture on the twigs were the cicadas landed. The Greeks misunderstood that moisture. It most likely came from slits the female cicadas made in the young twigs so they could deposit their eggs. Still, the image of a life form that survived

on air and dew was a powerful symbol for the philosophers. Cicadas became the embodiment of the image of the eternal soul. My first recollection of cicadas was when I was about nine, and I found their exoskeletons stuck to pine trees across the street from my house. Of course, at that time my mind was not of such a pure philosophical bent. I believed that their highest and best use was to try to stick them on the neighborhood girls, who promptly returned the favor by smacking the crap out of me. It took a while for me to evolve, but I would like to thank those young girls for their help in my transformation. Hopefully, like the cicada, I left that part of myself behind. The cicadas will be gone by the middle of this month. They may remind us of the wonders of nature and the strength of the life force. Miracles are everywhere. All we have to do is look for them.

Skill Development ~ Social/communication Self Regulation/Sensory Behavior techniques ! Play skills/Floortime Total Cost: $375. $100 dep. by June 15th Remainder by June 30th. Non-refundable Heather DeCou M.Ed, LPC 2003 Idlewild Blvd.; (540) 419-2720; heather@exceptionalsupportservices.com

Dearly Wanted: Fredericksburg's Oldest Residents For Our Oral History -A Fredericksburg Treasure Front Porch is calling for Our Town's Ageless Citizens to let us know who they are so our writers can sit and hear their wonderful stories. We treasure your lives and memories.

Archer Di Peppe has a keen sense for spotting the everyday miracles in life.

WAGGIN TAILS MOBILE A completely self-sufficient mobile unit! I come to your home or place of business Your dog and I spend one-on-one time (about 45-60 min.) Then right back to you! No kennels! Very Reasonable One-Price Services: Bathing, Grooming, Eyes, Ears, Nails, Drying, Cologne Call Lorri Parrott/ Owner @ 540-842-6647. 7 days a week. Large Breeds Welcome! Servicing Spotsylvania & Fredericksburg

6

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

7


BRAEHEAD FARM

Quiet Moments

Agri-Tourism emerges in fxbg

the song of the cicada By archer Dipeppe

By amy pearce taste of the farm life. The farm and market will open to the public from 10A to 6P daily in season, closing between Christmas and Easter season. The agri-market, housed in a former dairy barn painted milky white, will sell farm products including fresh fruit and vegetables, meat, eggs, cheese, milk, ice cream and honey. The food sources – Braehead, and Snead’s Farm (run by George’s brother, Emmett III — off U.S. 17 in Caroline County) will be complemented by other local farms as well.

Strawberry Fields

George and Roxanna Snead have taken over a rare family property in our fair city of Fredericksburg: a fairly large tract of land that remains agricultural. The Sneads have begun an agri-tourism business that features pick-your-own strawberries, a market with local produce, and a venue for birthday parties. “Braehead Farm” — as it is called — is on a 28-acre property in the Snead family since 1937. Off Tyler Street next to the Battlefield Industrial Park (also built on former Snead-owned land) and adjacent to a 56-acre Snead family farm land, Braehead is run by George, whose grandfather bought the property in 1937 and ran the Braehead Farm dairy operation there. Snead’s father later took over that operation, and his mother, Jane, still lives there. Roxanna adds an educational component to the mix, as she looks forward to welcoming city children and schools onto the property to give them a

July Camp: Mon. July 8—Fri. July 12 (Ages 8-13) ~ 9:30-Noon

After the acre of strawberries they planted last year was picked in April, Braehead Farm opened to the public and is developing a website, renovating barns and stables, and looking for a market manager. George Snead, who owns a custom home-building business, is overseeing the construction work.

Kid Friendly At birthday parties on the farm, children will run around, use slides and swings, ride bikes, roll around in the hay,

pet animals (goats and pigs), and eat cake in a renovated farm building. The owners The Sunken Well Tavern of in Fredericksburg will sell prepared foods during busier times at the farm. Roxanna and them – Paul Stoddard and Steve Cameli — have worked out a menu featuring deli sandwiches, salads, barbecue, and strawberry shortcake. A CSA — Community Supported Agriculture program –- similar to one that Emmett does –- may be added on in the future. Pick-your-own offerings will expand beyond strawberries, and George plans to plant grapes for wine. A small vineyard also might be added in the future. Past and future – and presently to our delight – the Snead clan remains doing what it does best -– farming for the people of their community.

Amy Pearce has been associated with Front Porch Magazine for one year now. Congrats, Miss P !

June 16th

Dad Loves BBQ Brunch Buffet Sneak Peek of Our Menu: Selection of Breakfast items including a Made to Order Omelet Station, Salads Galore, Peel & Eat Shrimp, Carved Prime Rib, BBQ Spare Ribs, Chicken & Seafood and More! Kids Corner with Fun Foods Choice of Desserts including a Chocolate Fountain! $25.95 (Kid 5-12yrs $12) Call for Reservations 620 CAROLINE STREET FREDERICKSBURG VA 22401 540.373.8300

If you are of a certain age, the sound of thousands of cicadas will remind you of the late Nineteen Fifties science fiction movies when the flying saucers show up. Conjure, if you will, that sound with the images of the local town folk screaming and running hither and yon, and you have an entire movie genre. It is the mating call of the males that we hear. They are flexing their tymbals on their abdomens as fast as they can. Like many males, they are in a hurry and have one important thing on their mind. The females are more demur. They have the more important work and lay between three and five hundred eggs that will insure their perpetuation. Here is where Kurt Vonnegut would say, “and so it goes…” The different species make different sounds that you may not be able to detect, but the females know the difference, and that is all that is

important. It has been reported in Illinois that the northern cicadas have a higher pitched song than their southern brethren. We humans spend a lot of time listening, observing, recording, and interpreting the data. Most states have websites devoted to their activities. It turns out that our North American cicadas are more closely related to Australian and Asian cicadas then to South American cicadas. How did that happen? The first reference in Western literature of the cicada was in Homer’s Iliad. The old men standing watch on the high walls of Troy’s fortification were described by the Greeks as cicadas. Cicadas show up again and again throughout ancient Greek literature. Aristotle, Socrates, and Plato all use the insect in their imagery and explanations of the human condition. In Greek mythology it was believed that cicadas were once men who were so devoted to music that they forgot to eat or drink and wasted away. Supposedly, they predated the Muses but then later the Muses rewarded their devotion to music by making them immortal. Forever after, the cicadas watched humans and reported back about man’s devotion to the Muses. The Greeks were fascinated by the cicadas because they believed they survived on air and dew alone, which was a pretty nifty and alluring construct. This belief arose from people’s observation of moisture on the twigs were the cicadas landed. The Greeks misunderstood that moisture. It most likely came from slits the female cicadas made in the young twigs so they could deposit their eggs. Still, the image of a life form that survived

on air and dew was a powerful symbol for the philosophers. Cicadas became the embodiment of the image of the eternal soul. My first recollection of cicadas was when I was about nine, and I found their exoskeletons stuck to pine trees across the street from my house. Of course, at that time my mind was not of such a pure philosophical bent. I believed that their highest and best use was to try to stick them on the neighborhood girls, who promptly returned the favor by smacking the crap out of me. It took a while for me to evolve, but I would like to thank those young girls for their help in my transformation. Hopefully, like the cicada, I left that part of myself behind. The cicadas will be gone by the middle of this month. They may remind us of the wonders of nature and the strength of the life force. Miracles are everywhere. All we have to do is look for them.

Skill Development ~ Social/communication Self Regulation/Sensory Behavior techniques ! Play skills/Floortime Total Cost: $375. $100 dep. by June 15th Remainder by June 30th. Non-refundable Heather DeCou M.Ed, LPC 2003 Idlewild Blvd.; (540) 419-2720; heather@exceptionalsupportservices.com

Dearly Wanted: Fredericksburg's Oldest Residents For Our Oral History -A Fredericksburg Treasure Front Porch is calling for Our Town's Ageless Citizens to let us know who they are so our writers can sit and hear their wonderful stories. We treasure your lives and memories.

Archer Di Peppe has a keen sense for spotting the everyday miracles in life.

WAGGIN TAILS MOBILE A completely self-sufficient mobile unit! I come to your home or place of business Your dog and I spend one-on-one time (about 45-60 min.) Then right back to you! No kennels! Very Reasonable One-Price Services: Bathing, Grooming, Eyes, Ears, Nails, Drying, Cologne Call Lorri Parrott/ Owner @ 540-842-6647. 7 days a week. Large Breeds Welcome! Servicing Spotsylvania & Fredericksburg

6

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

7


Embrey Mill

Plastic Fantastic

Community to meld ‘green’ amenities with ‘mixed use’

it won’t match your couch

By stephanie orton lynch

By A.E.Bayne & e.c.Barker

If you live in south Stafford, your dividing line between Falmouth and northern Virginia is Courthouse Road. South of the road, you are part of Fredericksburg; north of the road, consider yourself DC. The southern tier population tends to patronize downtown Fredericksburg; northerners have barely

heard of it. The contrast can be odd and perplexing (note: individual experiences may vary!), as is the traffic. As bad as it gets south of the border, northern wheels cram the roads with greater fervor. The answer to the northern dilemma could very well be exemplified by Embrey Mill, an 831-acre new home community in north Stafford. Newland

Communities and their joint venture partner, North America Sekisui House (NASH) unveiled it, their newest masterplanned community, currently under construction. Embrey Mill will include 1,827 new homes, 285 acres of open space, public parks, civic and recreation centers, and 10 miles of trails. NASH, the U.S. business unit and full subsidiary of Sekisui House, Ltd, is Japan’s largest homebuilder and leading diversified developer; Newland Real Estate Group, LLC, whose development business is Newland Communities, is the master developer of the community and one of 30 assets the NASH-Newland partnership manages together in 11 states across the U.S. “We are excited to officially announce Embrey Mill and are dedicated to creating a family-focused, neighborhood-centric, convenient and walkable community that provides a positive lifestyle for our residents. Construction is well underway, with plans to announce the home builders in the next

several weeks,” remarked Tracy Graves, Vice President of Operations, Newland Communities. The name, Embrey Mill, is inspired by the historical nature of Stafford County, and the connection between the history of the land dating back to 1671 and the families who lived here. The Embrey family was the last to own the land and the name pays tribute to the family lineage. Construction is currently taking place, with roads in the first phase already completed. Embrey House, the community’s primary gathering place for the first phase neighborhood, is also under construction and will feature a café with outdoor patio, concierge service, swimming pool, playground, and a sports court. Self-contained and mixed-use, green in its walk-ability and reduction in vehicular traffic, Embrey Mill will live up to the legacy of its great name. Stephanie Orton Lynch is Director of Public Relations, Blue Bug Digital.

CHUCK HOFFMAN REALTOR, ABR, SFR, MBA I will provide professional help for both home buyers and sellers to accomplish your real estate objectives! TRUSTED & CANDID SERVICE FOR DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG & NEARBY COMMUNITIES Award Winning Service

www.yourFREDrealtor.com 540-370-0695 Direct 540-845-1468 Cell 540-373-0100 Office 540-370-0757 Fax choffman@cbcarriagehouse.com

520 William Street, Suite A, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 Chuck Hoffman is a licensed salesperson in the Commonwealth of Virginia

8

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

draw on my dolls. come to this?

Who knew it would

Amy: Right. Barbie is supposed to be this perfect thing; I like taking some of that perfection out. It is still a type of beautiful, but there’s something a little bit off. I like beautiful things that have some flaws. Emily: It’s not conventionally beautiful.

Prepare yourselves, Fredericksburg. E.C. Barker and A.E Bayne are excited to present their photography show, Plastic Fantastic, at Populuxe. Here’s what they (we) have to say: Amy: So, where did we get this idea? Emily: I was going for EMDR therapy (eye movement desensitization and reprocessing), and images appeared from childhood. Because of artistic limitations, I chose Barbies as my medium. What we have here are pictures from my psyche, and I would say that about yours, too. Amy: Yeah, but I didn’t come at it from the same direction. Color influenced me; I liked the Barbies because they create a metaphorical veil between the animate and inanimate. Strange thing is I don’t even like dolls. Emily: My dolls just don’t like each other! So, you developed some dark themes, like the headless Barbie. Amy: I don’t mean for them to be dark. “All American” comes from the feeling of being a woman fighting to be seen and heard. The “Lush Baby” series is about drowning your inner child, because people stifle that cry. Emily: Yeah, it’s a never-ending struggle. Amy: True and it’s emotive. I’m a cerebral person, but I let my feelings take over with this project. Have you found the Barbies to be an adequate representation, or would you explore it in a different medium? Emily: If I had all the time and money in the world I would probably hire models to do it. It’s hard to bend a Barbie to what you want her to do. When I was a kid, I’d

Amy: This project comes from somewhere deep for you. Do you think creative people have a lot of dark thoughts? Emily: I think all people have a lot of dark thoughts; they just don’t let them out because they’re upsetting. Maybe that’s the idea with something like this, to say it’s all right to recognize those feelings. We expose ourselves; for me it was bullying and rejection that inspired “Gang Activity.” Those people are adults now and probably aren’t mean today, but they were mean kids. I’ve realized I’m a weirdo, and I’m cool with that. Amy: The piece you did, “Demons,” what would you say the influence was there? Emily: The image was of a girl having a seizure, which I experienced when I was four. Doctors gave me medication to control it and I don’t have seizures anymore, but that really shaped my life. I had to think outside of the literal to create images showing something with a hold on me. Amy: Do you think that is the darkest piece you created? Emily: That might be the darkest one in appearance, but it’s hard to decide, that one or “Gang Activity.” Amy: We both bring different experiences to the photos, but I also think there is a whimsical quality. Emily: Yes, it’s dolls little kids play with; there’s a humor there. It’s like taking your Barbie and giving her a tattoo. And I created the “Bad Moms” picture because it made me laugh. There’s no biographical content there. Also, I’ve renamed it “Fire Hazard.” LOL! Amy: My hope for the show is that people find it interesting and different. Emily: I think they’ll find it that. Visit Populuxe at 107 William to see Plastic Fantastic beginning First Friday and through the month. A.E. Bayne and E.C. Barker are long-time friends, artists and collaborators who have lived in Fredericksburg for ages.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

9


Embrey Mill

Plastic Fantastic

Community to meld ‘green’ amenities with ‘mixed use’

it won’t match your couch

By stephanie orton lynch

By A.E.Bayne & e.c.Barker

If you live in south Stafford, your dividing line between Falmouth and northern Virginia is Courthouse Road. South of the road, you are part of Fredericksburg; north of the road, consider yourself DC. The southern tier population tends to patronize downtown Fredericksburg; northerners have barely

heard of it. The contrast can be odd and perplexing (note: individual experiences may vary!), as is the traffic. As bad as it gets south of the border, northern wheels cram the roads with greater fervor. The answer to the northern dilemma could very well be exemplified by Embrey Mill, an 831-acre new home community in north Stafford. Newland

Communities and their joint venture partner, North America Sekisui House (NASH) unveiled it, their newest masterplanned community, currently under construction. Embrey Mill will include 1,827 new homes, 285 acres of open space, public parks, civic and recreation centers, and 10 miles of trails. NASH, the U.S. business unit and full subsidiary of Sekisui House, Ltd, is Japan’s largest homebuilder and leading diversified developer; Newland Real Estate Group, LLC, whose development business is Newland Communities, is the master developer of the community and one of 30 assets the NASH-Newland partnership manages together in 11 states across the U.S. “We are excited to officially announce Embrey Mill and are dedicated to creating a family-focused, neighborhood-centric, convenient and walkable community that provides a positive lifestyle for our residents. Construction is well underway, with plans to announce the home builders in the next

several weeks,” remarked Tracy Graves, Vice President of Operations, Newland Communities. The name, Embrey Mill, is inspired by the historical nature of Stafford County, and the connection between the history of the land dating back to 1671 and the families who lived here. The Embrey family was the last to own the land and the name pays tribute to the family lineage. Construction is currently taking place, with roads in the first phase already completed. Embrey House, the community’s primary gathering place for the first phase neighborhood, is also under construction and will feature a café with outdoor patio, concierge service, swimming pool, playground, and a sports court. Self-contained and mixed-use, green in its walk-ability and reduction in vehicular traffic, Embrey Mill will live up to the legacy of its great name. Stephanie Orton Lynch is Director of Public Relations, Blue Bug Digital.

CHUCK HOFFMAN REALTOR, ABR, SFR, MBA I will provide professional help for both home buyers and sellers to accomplish your real estate objectives! TRUSTED & CANDID SERVICE FOR DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG & NEARBY COMMUNITIES Award Winning Service

www.yourFREDrealtor.com 540-370-0695 Direct 540-845-1468 Cell 540-373-0100 Office 540-370-0757 Fax choffman@cbcarriagehouse.com

520 William Street, Suite A, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 Chuck Hoffman is a licensed salesperson in the Commonwealth of Virginia

8

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

draw on my dolls. come to this?

Who knew it would

Amy: Right. Barbie is supposed to be this perfect thing; I like taking some of that perfection out. It is still a type of beautiful, but there’s something a little bit off. I like beautiful things that have some flaws. Emily: It’s not conventionally beautiful.

Prepare yourselves, Fredericksburg. E.C. Barker and A.E Bayne are excited to present their photography show, Plastic Fantastic, at Populuxe. Here’s what they (we) have to say: Amy: So, where did we get this idea? Emily: I was going for EMDR therapy (eye movement desensitization and reprocessing), and images appeared from childhood. Because of artistic limitations, I chose Barbies as my medium. What we have here are pictures from my psyche, and I would say that about yours, too. Amy: Yeah, but I didn’t come at it from the same direction. Color influenced me; I liked the Barbies because they create a metaphorical veil between the animate and inanimate. Strange thing is I don’t even like dolls. Emily: My dolls just don’t like each other! So, you developed some dark themes, like the headless Barbie. Amy: I don’t mean for them to be dark. “All American” comes from the feeling of being a woman fighting to be seen and heard. The “Lush Baby” series is about drowning your inner child, because people stifle that cry. Emily: Yeah, it’s a never-ending struggle. Amy: True and it’s emotive. I’m a cerebral person, but I let my feelings take over with this project. Have you found the Barbies to be an adequate representation, or would you explore it in a different medium? Emily: If I had all the time and money in the world I would probably hire models to do it. It’s hard to bend a Barbie to what you want her to do. When I was a kid, I’d

Amy: This project comes from somewhere deep for you. Do you think creative people have a lot of dark thoughts? Emily: I think all people have a lot of dark thoughts; they just don’t let them out because they’re upsetting. Maybe that’s the idea with something like this, to say it’s all right to recognize those feelings. We expose ourselves; for me it was bullying and rejection that inspired “Gang Activity.” Those people are adults now and probably aren’t mean today, but they were mean kids. I’ve realized I’m a weirdo, and I’m cool with that. Amy: The piece you did, “Demons,” what would you say the influence was there? Emily: The image was of a girl having a seizure, which I experienced when I was four. Doctors gave me medication to control it and I don’t have seizures anymore, but that really shaped my life. I had to think outside of the literal to create images showing something with a hold on me. Amy: Do you think that is the darkest piece you created? Emily: That might be the darkest one in appearance, but it’s hard to decide, that one or “Gang Activity.” Amy: We both bring different experiences to the photos, but I also think there is a whimsical quality. Emily: Yes, it’s dolls little kids play with; there’s a humor there. It’s like taking your Barbie and giving her a tattoo. And I created the “Bad Moms” picture because it made me laugh. There’s no biographical content there. Also, I’ve renamed it “Fire Hazard.” LOL! Amy: My hope for the show is that people find it interesting and different. Emily: I think they’ll find it that. Visit Populuxe at 107 William to see Plastic Fantastic beginning First Friday and through the month. A.E. Bayne and E.C. Barker are long-time friends, artists and collaborators who have lived in Fredericksburg for ages.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

9


Not Once, Not Twice, Retired & Buck Naked On The Back Porch But 3 Times... A-C Tops Angie’s 2012 List

10

June 2013

and other new exhibits

Books, naps, & soft-serve

By Mike Appleton

Appleton Campbell, a local family owned and operated plumbing, heating, air conditioning, and electrical services company based in Warrenton since 1976, received the 2012 Angie’s List Super Service Award for consistently providing excellent customer service in Heating & Air Conditioning, Plumbing, Plumbing— Drain Cleaning. This honor is awarded annually to approximately five percent of all of the companies rated on Angie’s List, the nation’s leading provider of consumer reviews on local service companies. “It’s a select group of companies rated on Angie’s List that can claim the exemplary customer service record of being a Super Service Award winner,” said Angie’s List Founder Angie Hicks. “Our standards for the Super Service Award are quite high. The fact that Appleton Campbell earned this recognition speaks volumes about its dedication providing great service to its customers,” she continued.

Through the Eye of the Forrest

by jo middleton

Angie’s List Super Service Award winners have met strict eligibility requirements, including earning a minimum number of reports, an exemplary rating from their customers, and abiding by Angie’s List operational guidelines. More than 1.5 million households use Angie’s List to find high-quality service companies and health care professionals in more than 550 categories. The ratings for service businesses are updated daily. For additional information about Appleton Campbell, please visit appletoncampbell.com

Mike Appleton is president of Appleton Campbell, based in Warrenton and serving the FXBG market.

Front porch fredericksburg

You know it is June, early Dog Days of summer, when you visit your friend over on Charles Street, and her menagerie, one Collie, two stray cats who came to stay, and one noble Siamese who deigns to join the pack, are languishing on the shady back porch, where there blows the only bit of breeze, albeit humid, in town. In January one longs for these warm days to counter the icy blasts of the arctic air mass sliding southward to freeze our pitushkins. In June the arctic idea sounds pretty fine, when the humidity clings to your skin like a cheap polyester blouse. Air conditioning makes it worse. Artificial Arctic inside makes going outside a blast from an iron ore oven. But, here’s the deal, taking the lead of the dogcat languishing menagerie, you go sit on your pillowed porch swing, with a pitcher of very icy tea (house wine of the South) a plate of Hanover County melons, and several really good books. Now you’re talking. It is this that every kid knows about summer and why it is their delight, wearing their little shorts, white tee shirts, breezy sandals, and a nice un-Michael Pollan approved glass of orange (with lots of chemicals) Kool-Aid, sitting on the porch playing Go Fish with a friend. The library features beach books, which are small and reading-light. I rather enjoy those, particularly the British mysteries. I have been trying for years to complete my IX volumes of Samuel Pepys diaries in those, as Nat King Cole sang, “lazy, hazy, days of summer.” I have carried those babies in every move I’ve made, and there have been lots since I retired, and Mr. Pepys contributed significantly to the weight and volume of my packed items. But reading-light he is not, and I drift into the land of torpid inactivity until the book falls on the porch breaking my bliss. It is at that time I realize that I have heard the siren call of Mr. Carl down there on Princess Anne Street. A chocolate soft serve in a sugar cone are soul mates with a Fredericksburg high heat and humid day. The only catch is you have to eat it rapidly as soon as the hand holding the delight (“Hello, Hand!”) appears at the Carl’s window, otherwise it becomes soft

chocolate liquid. Then back to the porch to resume the literary languish. I have tried to do my summer reading with handy, dandy e-books. Being of the manually retarded persuasion, I am forever touching the touch screen with greater enthusiasm than it allows, causing the words to increase in size to maximum, which makes about two sentences per screen, and fast pacing the text various chapters ahead. Getting the book back to where I last read is, to say the least, challenging. But, it’s about nap time. I’ll get my Pepys big old book, and prepare for z’s and a good languish out here, retired and buck naked on the back porch. Jo Middleton grabs a pile of napkins at Carl’s for every “cone chocolate” she orders.

“I suppose if we’re giving the show a title it would be “through the eye of the Forrest” (Todd’s middle, and his grandfather’s first, name) His hope is just to share his visions, and make people take a second glance. The show will be a blend of photography styles, landscapes, juxtapositions and quite a few macro’s. It will consist of 15 pieces, all framed Photography. Special orders or more information can be obtained at The Scenter of Town, across the street from kybecca.

beauty surrounding her. From the jewellike colors still radiant in a dilapidated mansion to the poetry of nascent branches of pussy willows, Newton explains that viewers time and again have used the adjective “painterly” to describe what she captures. For Bruno, photography is a spiritual endeavor. Her aim is to translate pixels into feelings and emotions. In some ways, her work might be the most abstract in ultimate meaning.

Through 3 Lenses

Art First member and FCCA Board VP Guerin Wolf’s first Solo Show is up in the Atrium at CRRL Headquarters, 1201 Caroline. All of Guerin’s works are paintings done in Oil Pastels (such as Olde Towne with Olive Oil). The artist debuted just last year and received three art awards last June. At Brush Strokes, 824 Caroline, June’s featured exhibit is “Road Trip!” by acrylic artist Peggy Wickham. Her show features paintings done on trips crosscountry by car and rail. The paintings portray the kind of scenery that catches the eye and makes an artist long for paints and canvas (Pacific Coast Hwy.).

First Todd Woollam, now three more lenses! Photography has definitely “arrived” in the Burg. Bistro Bethem’s new exhibit (June 10-August 5), “Through

Old Town With Olive Oil by Guerin Wolf Todd Woollam is not your usual suspect when it comes to art, in his case photography. The Philadelphian-turnedFredericksburger surprises you with his lens-ability: “I use photography as a means of self-expression, a way to capture the thoughts and feelings of the world I see around me. Each photograph is an expression of the fleeting nature of our lives, and the world around us.” Todd began taking photographs

as a child, and found his true enjoyment “when I could be alone in the peace and quiet of nature, capturing the images that most people would pass by without a second glance. My passion,” he says, is to find the unique, the individual, the untouched.” The Photography show will be at kybecca beginning the Monday AFTER First Friday (make that June 10) and will remain until the end of July.

3 Lenses”— featuring the images of Adam DeSio, Audrey Bruno, and Fritzi Newton — will convince you photographs hold their own against other medium. Self-professed camera junkies, DeSio, Bruno and Newton are with Art First Gallery on Caroline. DeSio works mainly in color and is equally fascinated with the natural world as well as man’s impact on his surroundings; he aspires to include hints of surrealism, isolation, and unease in his work. Newton is enamored with the

First Solo Show

For mo art, turn to page 24…

Your Place for Confirmation and First Communion Gifts My First Holy Communion sets First Communion Porcelain Rosary boxes Confirmation Prayer boxes Appropriate Charms Assortment of Crosses 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5 front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

11


Not Once, Not Twice, Retired & Buck Naked On The Back Porch But 3 Times... A-C Tops Angie’s 2012 List

10

June 2013

and other new exhibits

Books, naps, & soft-serve

By Mike Appleton

Appleton Campbell, a local family owned and operated plumbing, heating, air conditioning, and electrical services company based in Warrenton since 1976, received the 2012 Angie’s List Super Service Award for consistently providing excellent customer service in Heating & Air Conditioning, Plumbing, Plumbing— Drain Cleaning. This honor is awarded annually to approximately five percent of all of the companies rated on Angie’s List, the nation’s leading provider of consumer reviews on local service companies. “It’s a select group of companies rated on Angie’s List that can claim the exemplary customer service record of being a Super Service Award winner,” said Angie’s List Founder Angie Hicks. “Our standards for the Super Service Award are quite high. The fact that Appleton Campbell earned this recognition speaks volumes about its dedication providing great service to its customers,” she continued.

Through the Eye of the Forrest

by jo middleton

Angie’s List Super Service Award winners have met strict eligibility requirements, including earning a minimum number of reports, an exemplary rating from their customers, and abiding by Angie’s List operational guidelines. More than 1.5 million households use Angie’s List to find high-quality service companies and health care professionals in more than 550 categories. The ratings for service businesses are updated daily. For additional information about Appleton Campbell, please visit appletoncampbell.com

Mike Appleton is president of Appleton Campbell, based in Warrenton and serving the FXBG market.

Front porch fredericksburg

You know it is June, early Dog Days of summer, when you visit your friend over on Charles Street, and her menagerie, one Collie, two stray cats who came to stay, and one noble Siamese who deigns to join the pack, are languishing on the shady back porch, where there blows the only bit of breeze, albeit humid, in town. In January one longs for these warm days to counter the icy blasts of the arctic air mass sliding southward to freeze our pitushkins. In June the arctic idea sounds pretty fine, when the humidity clings to your skin like a cheap polyester blouse. Air conditioning makes it worse. Artificial Arctic inside makes going outside a blast from an iron ore oven. But, here’s the deal, taking the lead of the dogcat languishing menagerie, you go sit on your pillowed porch swing, with a pitcher of very icy tea (house wine of the South) a plate of Hanover County melons, and several really good books. Now you’re talking. It is this that every kid knows about summer and why it is their delight, wearing their little shorts, white tee shirts, breezy sandals, and a nice un-Michael Pollan approved glass of orange (with lots of chemicals) Kool-Aid, sitting on the porch playing Go Fish with a friend. The library features beach books, which are small and reading-light. I rather enjoy those, particularly the British mysteries. I have been trying for years to complete my IX volumes of Samuel Pepys diaries in those, as Nat King Cole sang, “lazy, hazy, days of summer.” I have carried those babies in every move I’ve made, and there have been lots since I retired, and Mr. Pepys contributed significantly to the weight and volume of my packed items. But reading-light he is not, and I drift into the land of torpid inactivity until the book falls on the porch breaking my bliss. It is at that time I realize that I have heard the siren call of Mr. Carl down there on Princess Anne Street. A chocolate soft serve in a sugar cone are soul mates with a Fredericksburg high heat and humid day. The only catch is you have to eat it rapidly as soon as the hand holding the delight (“Hello, Hand!”) appears at the Carl’s window, otherwise it becomes soft

chocolate liquid. Then back to the porch to resume the literary languish. I have tried to do my summer reading with handy, dandy e-books. Being of the manually retarded persuasion, I am forever touching the touch screen with greater enthusiasm than it allows, causing the words to increase in size to maximum, which makes about two sentences per screen, and fast pacing the text various chapters ahead. Getting the book back to where I last read is, to say the least, challenging. But, it’s about nap time. I’ll get my Pepys big old book, and prepare for z’s and a good languish out here, retired and buck naked on the back porch. Jo Middleton grabs a pile of napkins at Carl’s for every “cone chocolate” she orders.

“I suppose if we’re giving the show a title it would be “through the eye of the Forrest” (Todd’s middle, and his grandfather’s first, name) His hope is just to share his visions, and make people take a second glance. The show will be a blend of photography styles, landscapes, juxtapositions and quite a few macro’s. It will consist of 15 pieces, all framed Photography. Special orders or more information can be obtained at The Scenter of Town, across the street from kybecca.

beauty surrounding her. From the jewellike colors still radiant in a dilapidated mansion to the poetry of nascent branches of pussy willows, Newton explains that viewers time and again have used the adjective “painterly” to describe what she captures. For Bruno, photography is a spiritual endeavor. Her aim is to translate pixels into feelings and emotions. In some ways, her work might be the most abstract in ultimate meaning.

Through 3 Lenses

Art First member and FCCA Board VP Guerin Wolf’s first Solo Show is up in the Atrium at CRRL Headquarters, 1201 Caroline. All of Guerin’s works are paintings done in Oil Pastels (such as Olde Towne with Olive Oil). The artist debuted just last year and received three art awards last June. At Brush Strokes, 824 Caroline, June’s featured exhibit is “Road Trip!” by acrylic artist Peggy Wickham. Her show features paintings done on trips crosscountry by car and rail. The paintings portray the kind of scenery that catches the eye and makes an artist long for paints and canvas (Pacific Coast Hwy.).

First Todd Woollam, now three more lenses! Photography has definitely “arrived” in the Burg. Bistro Bethem’s new exhibit (June 10-August 5), “Through

Old Town With Olive Oil by Guerin Wolf Todd Woollam is not your usual suspect when it comes to art, in his case photography. The Philadelphian-turnedFredericksburger surprises you with his lens-ability: “I use photography as a means of self-expression, a way to capture the thoughts and feelings of the world I see around me. Each photograph is an expression of the fleeting nature of our lives, and the world around us.” Todd began taking photographs

as a child, and found his true enjoyment “when I could be alone in the peace and quiet of nature, capturing the images that most people would pass by without a second glance. My passion,” he says, is to find the unique, the individual, the untouched.” The Photography show will be at kybecca beginning the Monday AFTER First Friday (make that June 10) and will remain until the end of July.

3 Lenses”— featuring the images of Adam DeSio, Audrey Bruno, and Fritzi Newton — will convince you photographs hold their own against other medium. Self-professed camera junkies, DeSio, Bruno and Newton are with Art First Gallery on Caroline. DeSio works mainly in color and is equally fascinated with the natural world as well as man’s impact on his surroundings; he aspires to include hints of surrealism, isolation, and unease in his work. Newton is enamored with the

First Solo Show

For mo art, turn to page 24…

Your Place for Confirmation and First Communion Gifts My First Holy Communion sets First Communion Porcelain Rosary boxes Confirmation Prayer boxes Appropriate Charms Assortment of Crosses 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5 front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

11


Espressed

Vino

So Well !

white wines of summer By scott richards

We asked Kerri Corsano, barista at The Griffin Bookshop and Coffee bar on Caroline to concoct us a summertime café special to assuage our caffeine craving and soothe our sweet tooth. The result is the Iced Black Forest Latte - try it with a bagged sandwich at The Griffin! 1/2 oz. Torani Creme De Cacao Syrup 1 1/2 oz. Torani Raspberry Syrup 2 oz. Espresso5 oz. cold milk Poured over coffee ice cubes! Whipped Cream, for garnish

photo by k. Corsano

Nothing beats the heat better then an iced cold espresso drink and what better combination is there then chocolate, raspberry and espresso...omg!! Griffin’s (exclusive!) coffee ice cubes add to the experience.

The Griffin Bookshop and Coffee Bar is located at 723 Caroline; Eileen Griffin, proprietor.

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Front Porch Fredericksburg 12

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

june bugs

Olde Towne BUTCHER Don’t Forget Father’s Day! Corner of William & Charles Street Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540.370.4105

Our Barista’s Pick

For extra decadence: Drizzle 1/2 teaspoon raspberry syrup on top of whipped cream, and sprinkle chocolate shavings... Place a cherry on top!

Season’s Bounty

Even though we have had a cool spring, the promise of warmer weather is right on the corner where we are standing today – and it is hot! The rains we received lately have nicely watered the gardens that have been planted, as well as given farmers a nice soaking to start the agricultural season. But the real sign that the warm weather is here to stay is the emergence of the lighter white wines of summer, chilled to a cool 55-60 degrees F. Chardonnay, with its generally oaky and buttery taste, is traditionally thought of as the wine for warm weather. There are, however, many wines that offer a cool refreshing taste without having to experience the density often found in Chardonnay. Traminette, a gewurztraminer hybrid developed at Cornell University in upstate New York, has made big inroads in the Virginia wine industry due to its suitability to the climate. With a refreshing, spicy taste, it is perfect for those hot days of languishing on the back deck. Because of the spice one finds when drinking this wine, traminette makes an excellent pairing with light Asian cuisine, in particular Thai. The French offering of the lighter whites is particularly appealing. From the Loire River Valley, adjacent to the town of Tours, is the area of Vouvray, in which a very nice chenin blanc is made. The soil in the valley consists of limestone that has been eroded into various forms such as the more prevalent gravel and clay, mixed with sand. The winery of Barton and Guestier produces a chenin blanc that many drink no matter what the weather because of the richness of its taste and the supple yet lighter body of the wine. An upfront fruitiness, brought about by aging in stainless steel, greets the palette and is followed by a slight taste of acidity that offers just the right amount of refreshment before leaving the consumer with a moderate mineral finish. With the acidity, this wine works well as an aperitif, awakening one’s taste buds. A colleague who grew up in drinking wine in France and Germany, commented that Barton and Guestier was the best of this type of wine she had tasted. For those who like their wines well chilled, few wines can withstand the cold like a pic poul out of the Languedoc region of France. Produced by Pinet, this is a wine that cannot be chilled too much and yet, retains excellent flavor and clarity even when it has been made colder than most. As with Vouvray, this wine gives a fruity taste that is light without losing any of the character of the wine.

Sweet wines have become quite popular giving rise to drinking moscato, wine made from a grape that with an inherent sweetness that has been grossly misused in most domestic wines made with it giving a taste that is more like simple syrup than wine. The abuse of this grape becomes apparent when it is tried in the vineyard and the true nature of the fruit blossoms forth as the gentle sweetness of the grape is followed by floral overtones. The Italians have mastered the use of the muscat grape producing wines that mirror the taste found in the vineyard and accompanied by a pleasing effervescence that not only opens and excites the palette, but cleanses it as well. Bartenura produces an excellent example of Italian Moscato, which provides an excellent experience both as a pairing to an aperitif as well as by itself just for enjoyment. So, with these few suggestions, do not let yourself be caught short-handed for good wines to enjoy. Be sure to explore these wines and others at the wine establishments around the Fredericksburg area. Scott Richards owns Loch Haven Vineyards. He is a member of VA Vineyards Association, blogs at fromthevine.wordpress.com, and is a wine columnist for Front Porch and sports writer for The Caroline Progress.

The Griffin Bookshop & Coffee Bar Introducing Bag Lunches! Fresh Sandwiches Tastefully Priced Scrumptiously Delicious New & Used Books/Coffee 723 Caroline Street 540-899-8041

By vanessa moncure Snapshot on a faded Polaroid - a group of laughing children, barefoot and clustered around a large junebug, its back leg tethered to a length of string. I remember the summer sounds of chittering cicadas, the snapping blades of a hedge-trimmer, a lawn mower throwing arcs of fragrant grass. Memorial Day weekend is the unofficial usher of summer, but real summer began when school ended. Admonished by our moms to “stay out of the house!” we gathered, barefoot, down at the lake. The best part of the day was opening our paper lunch bags and comparing/trading the contents. Half a fluffernutter sandwich for a DingDong? How about bologna with mustard for peanut butter celery sticks? Fond memories all. But now the best junebugs for me are the cocktail and the bug-like crustaceans, the Chesapeake Bay blue crab. Boiled, steamed, spiced, broiled, fried, fire-roasted, stewed or pan-sauteed, crabs either soft- or hard-shelled are the essence of summer dining. I know I’d never trade a crabcake for anything in your brown bag!

SOFT SHELL SAUTÉ: Trim and clean the soft shell you can tell they are live if you see small bubbles. Dust lightly with flour and saute over medium heat in half/half mixture of butter/oil until browned, cooked. Serve with homemade tartar and buttermilk corn bread. Tartar Sauce - 1 c. mayo, ¼ c. ea. minced celery, sweet relish, onion, fresh parsley, 1 tsp. lemon juice, S&P. Buttermilk Corn Bread - Mix together dry ingredients - 1 c. ea. flour and yellow cornmeal, 3 tsp. baking powder, 1 tsp. baking soda, ½ tsp. salt; combine w/ mixed liquid ingredients - 2 well-beaten eggs, ? c. oil or melted butter, ? - ¾ c. buttermilk. Stir just until moistened, then spoon into preheated, then greased, cast iron skillet. Bake in preheated 400F oven 18-25 min. or til golden brown and firm.

STEAMED OR SPICED CRABS: Best to buy males, or jimmies, heavy for their size. Prepare a large deep pot (a canner or one you use for frying turkeys is great) with a rack in the bottom (so crabs can steam). Add equal amounts of water, vinegar and beer 3 to 4 inches up the side and bring to a boil. When boiling, layer crabs, sprinkling generously with Old Bay seasoning between each single crab layer. Cover and steam about 30 min. Drain, then pile the hot crabs on a newspaper-layered table and everyone dig in! Serve with small ramekins of melted

www.oldetownebutcher.com

butter, ketchup mixed with Old Bay, and a butter, Old Bay and Worchestershire sauce mixture. Don’t forget a mallet and small knife per person - and plenty of saltines and paper towels.

Open: 9am - 9pm Monday through Saturday 11am - 6pm Sunday Lee Russell Proprietor

CRAB CAKES: Don’t let any of the cooked crab go to waste - pick them and save the meat (or buy a pound). Watch for place of origin on the label - Maryland and Virginia are known for delicious crab - yet my local grocery store carries only imported blue crab. For one pound of crab, beat together two eggs, ½ tsp. Old Bay, white pepper, 1 tsp. Worchestershire sauce, 1 tsp. dijon mustard. Gently fold in crabmeat then add just enough mayonnaise to bind. Form into cakes, then cover with cracker meal, breadcrumbs, or Panko. Saute over medium heat in mixture of butter and canola oil until golden brown, turning once. Serve w/ tartar sauce. The crabcake must be held together just by willpower; no bread or cracker filler.

STEWED CRAB: A summer version of oyster stew. Melt 4 oz. butter in 3-qt. deep pan. Add a sprinkle of cayenne pepper, white pepper and salt. Smash a large garlic clove and saute briefly (not to brown, just to soften). Pour in 1 qt. half and half and 2 c. milk - heat to a near boil, remove garlic, then add 1 lb. picked jumbo lump crabmeat, reserving 6-8 portions of lump crabmeat. Bring to a simmer, then ladle into 6-8 shallow bowls, top with reserved crabmeat and minced chives. Serve hot.

AND A JUNE BUG COCKTAIL: The old crab houses on the Maryland shore all had tall, cold specialtyof-the-house cocktails. Try this Junebug Make a pitcher for quick refills. Use a tall, Tom Collins-style glass, fill with ice. Mix together 6 oz. Midori, 3 oz. each rum and banana liqueurs, 6-oz. container Coco Lopez, 6 oz. sweet and sour mix, and 1 qt. pineapple juice - keep refrigerated if you have any left over. Don’t crabs remind you of a bug? That’s what my grandsons think of lobsters - “big bugs that bite”.

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

(540) 371-2008

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

Vanessa Moncure evokes in us memories of her great Chez V Catering of days gone by.

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

13


Espressed

Vino

So Well !

white wines of summer By scott richards

We asked Kerri Corsano, barista at The Griffin Bookshop and Coffee bar on Caroline to concoct us a summertime café special to assuage our caffeine craving and soothe our sweet tooth. The result is the Iced Black Forest Latte - try it with a bagged sandwich at The Griffin! 1/2 oz. Torani Creme De Cacao Syrup 1 1/2 oz. Torani Raspberry Syrup 2 oz. Espresso5 oz. cold milk Poured over coffee ice cubes! Whipped Cream, for garnish

photo by k. Corsano

Nothing beats the heat better then an iced cold espresso drink and what better combination is there then chocolate, raspberry and espresso...omg!! Griffin’s (exclusive!) coffee ice cubes add to the experience.

The Griffin Bookshop and Coffee Bar is located at 723 Caroline; Eileen Griffin, proprietor.

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Front Porch Fredericksburg 12

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

june bugs

Olde Towne BUTCHER Don’t Forget Father’s Day! Corner of William & Charles Street Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540.370.4105

Our Barista’s Pick

For extra decadence: Drizzle 1/2 teaspoon raspberry syrup on top of whipped cream, and sprinkle chocolate shavings... Place a cherry on top!

Season’s Bounty

Even though we have had a cool spring, the promise of warmer weather is right on the corner where we are standing today – and it is hot! The rains we received lately have nicely watered the gardens that have been planted, as well as given farmers a nice soaking to start the agricultural season. But the real sign that the warm weather is here to stay is the emergence of the lighter white wines of summer, chilled to a cool 55-60 degrees F. Chardonnay, with its generally oaky and buttery taste, is traditionally thought of as the wine for warm weather. There are, however, many wines that offer a cool refreshing taste without having to experience the density often found in Chardonnay. Traminette, a gewurztraminer hybrid developed at Cornell University in upstate New York, has made big inroads in the Virginia wine industry due to its suitability to the climate. With a refreshing, spicy taste, it is perfect for those hot days of languishing on the back deck. Because of the spice one finds when drinking this wine, traminette makes an excellent pairing with light Asian cuisine, in particular Thai. The French offering of the lighter whites is particularly appealing. From the Loire River Valley, adjacent to the town of Tours, is the area of Vouvray, in which a very nice chenin blanc is made. The soil in the valley consists of limestone that has been eroded into various forms such as the more prevalent gravel and clay, mixed with sand. The winery of Barton and Guestier produces a chenin blanc that many drink no matter what the weather because of the richness of its taste and the supple yet lighter body of the wine. An upfront fruitiness, brought about by aging in stainless steel, greets the palette and is followed by a slight taste of acidity that offers just the right amount of refreshment before leaving the consumer with a moderate mineral finish. With the acidity, this wine works well as an aperitif, awakening one’s taste buds. A colleague who grew up in drinking wine in France and Germany, commented that Barton and Guestier was the best of this type of wine she had tasted. For those who like their wines well chilled, few wines can withstand the cold like a pic poul out of the Languedoc region of France. Produced by Pinet, this is a wine that cannot be chilled too much and yet, retains excellent flavor and clarity even when it has been made colder than most. As with Vouvray, this wine gives a fruity taste that is light without losing any of the character of the wine.

Sweet wines have become quite popular giving rise to drinking moscato, wine made from a grape that with an inherent sweetness that has been grossly misused in most domestic wines made with it giving a taste that is more like simple syrup than wine. The abuse of this grape becomes apparent when it is tried in the vineyard and the true nature of the fruit blossoms forth as the gentle sweetness of the grape is followed by floral overtones. The Italians have mastered the use of the muscat grape producing wines that mirror the taste found in the vineyard and accompanied by a pleasing effervescence that not only opens and excites the palette, but cleanses it as well. Bartenura produces an excellent example of Italian Moscato, which provides an excellent experience both as a pairing to an aperitif as well as by itself just for enjoyment. So, with these few suggestions, do not let yourself be caught short-handed for good wines to enjoy. Be sure to explore these wines and others at the wine establishments around the Fredericksburg area. Scott Richards owns Loch Haven Vineyards. He is a member of VA Vineyards Association, blogs at fromthevine.wordpress.com, and is a wine columnist for Front Porch and sports writer for The Caroline Progress.

The Griffin Bookshop & Coffee Bar Introducing Bag Lunches! Fresh Sandwiches Tastefully Priced Scrumptiously Delicious New & Used Books/Coffee 723 Caroline Street 540-899-8041

By vanessa moncure Snapshot on a faded Polaroid - a group of laughing children, barefoot and clustered around a large junebug, its back leg tethered to a length of string. I remember the summer sounds of chittering cicadas, the snapping blades of a hedge-trimmer, a lawn mower throwing arcs of fragrant grass. Memorial Day weekend is the unofficial usher of summer, but real summer began when school ended. Admonished by our moms to “stay out of the house!” we gathered, barefoot, down at the lake. The best part of the day was opening our paper lunch bags and comparing/trading the contents. Half a fluffernutter sandwich for a DingDong? How about bologna with mustard for peanut butter celery sticks? Fond memories all. But now the best junebugs for me are the cocktail and the bug-like crustaceans, the Chesapeake Bay blue crab. Boiled, steamed, spiced, broiled, fried, fire-roasted, stewed or pan-sauteed, crabs either soft- or hard-shelled are the essence of summer dining. I know I’d never trade a crabcake for anything in your brown bag!

SOFT SHELL SAUTÉ: Trim and clean the soft shell you can tell they are live if you see small bubbles. Dust lightly with flour and saute over medium heat in half/half mixture of butter/oil until browned, cooked. Serve with homemade tartar and buttermilk corn bread. Tartar Sauce - 1 c. mayo, ¼ c. ea. minced celery, sweet relish, onion, fresh parsley, 1 tsp. lemon juice, S&P. Buttermilk Corn Bread - Mix together dry ingredients - 1 c. ea. flour and yellow cornmeal, 3 tsp. baking powder, 1 tsp. baking soda, ½ tsp. salt; combine w/ mixed liquid ingredients - 2 well-beaten eggs, ? c. oil or melted butter, ? - ¾ c. buttermilk. Stir just until moistened, then spoon into preheated, then greased, cast iron skillet. Bake in preheated 400F oven 18-25 min. or til golden brown and firm.

STEAMED OR SPICED CRABS: Best to buy males, or jimmies, heavy for their size. Prepare a large deep pot (a canner or one you use for frying turkeys is great) with a rack in the bottom (so crabs can steam). Add equal amounts of water, vinegar and beer 3 to 4 inches up the side and bring to a boil. When boiling, layer crabs, sprinkling generously with Old Bay seasoning between each single crab layer. Cover and steam about 30 min. Drain, then pile the hot crabs on a newspaper-layered table and everyone dig in! Serve with small ramekins of melted

www.oldetownebutcher.com

butter, ketchup mixed with Old Bay, and a butter, Old Bay and Worchestershire sauce mixture. Don’t forget a mallet and small knife per person - and plenty of saltines and paper towels.

Open: 9am - 9pm Monday through Saturday 11am - 6pm Sunday Lee Russell Proprietor

CRAB CAKES: Don’t let any of the cooked crab go to waste - pick them and save the meat (or buy a pound). Watch for place of origin on the label - Maryland and Virginia are known for delicious crab - yet my local grocery store carries only imported blue crab. For one pound of crab, beat together two eggs, ½ tsp. Old Bay, white pepper, 1 tsp. Worchestershire sauce, 1 tsp. dijon mustard. Gently fold in crabmeat then add just enough mayonnaise to bind. Form into cakes, then cover with cracker meal, breadcrumbs, or Panko. Saute over medium heat in mixture of butter and canola oil until golden brown, turning once. Serve w/ tartar sauce. The crabcake must be held together just by willpower; no bread or cracker filler.

STEWED CRAB: A summer version of oyster stew. Melt 4 oz. butter in 3-qt. deep pan. Add a sprinkle of cayenne pepper, white pepper and salt. Smash a large garlic clove and saute briefly (not to brown, just to soften). Pour in 1 qt. half and half and 2 c. milk - heat to a near boil, remove garlic, then add 1 lb. picked jumbo lump crabmeat, reserving 6-8 portions of lump crabmeat. Bring to a simmer, then ladle into 6-8 shallow bowls, top with reserved crabmeat and minced chives. Serve hot.

AND A JUNE BUG COCKTAIL: The old crab houses on the Maryland shore all had tall, cold specialtyof-the-house cocktails. Try this Junebug Make a pitcher for quick refills. Use a tall, Tom Collins-style glass, fill with ice. Mix together 6 oz. Midori, 3 oz. each rum and banana liqueurs, 6-oz. container Coco Lopez, 6 oz. sweet and sour mix, and 1 qt. pineapple juice - keep refrigerated if you have any left over. Don’t crabs remind you of a bug? That’s what my grandsons think of lobsters - “big bugs that bite”.

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

(540) 371-2008

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

Vanessa Moncure evokes in us memories of her great Chez V Catering of days gone by.

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

13


Woman of the “Opry” Victoria Phillippe

It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

by joe deyoung

Up until the mid-1960’s, if a woman wanted a Chili Dog from The Recreation Center, she had to get a man to go inside and place her order. He would bring it out to her to eat outside or in her car; women were not allowed inside. The Recreation Center was exclusively for men, with a pool hall in the back and some would say, a Book Maker’s haunt up front near the phone booth and the wall that separated the pool hall from the bar area. Over the years, since 1940, when the building was first occupied as The Recreation Center, it has maintained a reputation for having the World’s Best Chili Dog, a reputation that still stands and is well founded. The chili recipe is secret, so don’t even ask if you can have it. If you’ve walked by and were reluctant to go inside, Victoria only asks that you don’t judge this book by its cover. Stop in, have one, and judge for yourself. Over time things evolved, gradually women were allowed to come in

Old Town Fredericksburg 14

June 2013

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

and place a take out order, then come in sit down and eat inside. However, some restrictions remained until the late 1980s. If you wanted to drink a beer and play pool, you had to leave your open beer in the bar area, you could not take it back into the pool hall. Victoria In 1989, Phillippe came to Fredericksburg and became the Co-owner of The Rec Center and soon after became its sole owner. Her goal has always been to maintain the history, the basic architecture, and the feel of the original establishment, while offering the city of Fredericksburg a place to enjoy local musicians, good food and friendly service. When you go in, step up to the bar and place your order. While you wait for one of the girls to get your order ready, take a look around the place, pay particular attention to the décor, notice the two Soap Box Derby cars, the Washington Redskins memorabilia and the sign behind the bar letting everyone know who has been banned from the establishment. What you see is essentially what people have seen since 1940, with two exceptions: Victoria has removed the wall that divided the pool hall from the bar and expanded the bar area, moving the three booths on the left side over to the wall. Come to town any First Friday and visit The Recreation Center, also known as the “The Hot Dog Opry.” You will find the place packed with music fans of all ages who came to listen, share the past and present with friends and family, and sit around the tables that look like pool balls. Victoria made them, using butcher-block rounds; hand painted and lacquered to a hard shine. You will also see Victoria serving tables, making French fries, changing out beer kegs, fixing those famous chili dogs, or working the room with all the regulars and every newcomer. What you may not notice right away, but something that speaks volumes about The Recreation Center, Fredericksburg, and this country, is that the business is owned and operated only by women these days. Thankfully, Victoria and her crew do not restrict men from entering — everyone is welcome! Joe DeYoung can eat a chilidog with the best of them. He is still working on his pool skills.

Front porch fredericksburg

Will Power Where Can’t it go? by will loring

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 E-mail: soupntaco@yahoo.com

Home of great Food & great Art! 720 Littlepage Sunkenwelltavern.com

EAT WELL DRINK WELL LIVE WELL

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~ Biological Terrain Assessment ~VoiceBio Analysis ~Aura Photography ~Body Cleanse Foot Detox We Carry Home Brewing Supplies ! Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

When it comes to craft beer, there is still a very strong sentiment among some of the older generation that anything in a can is bad. Now, if you were drinking a canned beer in the 70’s, it was probably terrible. But the technology that is utilized today makes cans a far superior option for many beers. Here are some myths (and their solutions) that have hindered the adoption of cans among some. Cans have a metallic taste. While that may have been true decades ago, the use of polymer linings ensure that the beer never touches the metal. There are even different types of polymer liners depending on the style of beer in the can. Cans can have a “skunked” taste to them. Well, as long as you’re not waiting a year to drink that Sierra Nevada Torpedo IPA, skunking isn’t a problem when in a can because no light gets in. That skunked taste comes from oxidization of the beer when it has been in contact with light for a period of time. If a beer is in a clear glass or green bottle, it’s not keeping that much light out. (Looking at you Corona and Heineken!) If it’s in a can, it means it’s not that good of a beer. False on all fronts! Here is a brief list of awesome breweries that can: Founders, The Alchemist, Sixpoint, Sierra Nevada, New Belgium, Oskar Blues, Cigar City, Surly, Hardywood Park, Wild Wolf, Center of the Universe, Lost Rhino and Devils Backbone. When New Belgium began canning its flagship Fat Tire amber ale a few years ago, many were weary to try it, only knowing it out of a brown bottle. Well, in a side-by-side comparison most chose it out of a can.

The reason being that New Belgium can conditions the beer by adding a bit of live yeast to take up space (instead of oxygen) and prevent stale flavors that can develop. Now you may have noticed that the last five breweries in the previous list were all from Virginia! Lost Rhino just had their canning line put in (Loudon County distribution for now, with expansion in the near future). The other four are using a new mobile canning company out of Richmond; Old Dominion Mobile Canning. If that wasn’t enough, The Boston Beer Co, makers of Sam Adams, just introduced their flagship Boston Lager and their popular seasonal Summer Ale in cans. Why is this such a big deal? Because in 2004 they announced that “Beer shall be offered in bottles, not cans, so that no brew is jeopardized with the taste of metal.” So, 9 years later, they have changed their minds, thanks to the many technological improvements over time. Oh, and the one million dollars they spent on designing the can. But don’t fret, there is a pretty cool upside to all of that money spent. Any craft brewer (defined as such by the Brewers Association) can now use this proprietary design for free. So, next time your standing in front of the beer cooler trying to decide which crafted liquid to consume, don’t shy away from those infinitely recyclable cans, because they may just hold your new favorite brew!

Will Loring is the resident beer nerd at Olde Towne Butcher and assistant operator of the 909 Beer Club. Cheers!

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

15


Woman of the “Opry” Victoria Phillippe

It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

by joe deyoung

Up until the mid-1960’s, if a woman wanted a Chili Dog from The Recreation Center, she had to get a man to go inside and place her order. He would bring it out to her to eat outside or in her car; women were not allowed inside. The Recreation Center was exclusively for men, with a pool hall in the back and some would say, a Book Maker’s haunt up front near the phone booth and the wall that separated the pool hall from the bar area. Over the years, since 1940, when the building was first occupied as The Recreation Center, it has maintained a reputation for having the World’s Best Chili Dog, a reputation that still stands and is well founded. The chili recipe is secret, so don’t even ask if you can have it. If you’ve walked by and were reluctant to go inside, Victoria only asks that you don’t judge this book by its cover. Stop in, have one, and judge for yourself. Over time things evolved, gradually women were allowed to come in

Old Town Fredericksburg 14

June 2013

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

and place a take out order, then come in sit down and eat inside. However, some restrictions remained until the late 1980s. If you wanted to drink a beer and play pool, you had to leave your open beer in the bar area, you could not take it back into the pool hall. Victoria In 1989, Phillippe came to Fredericksburg and became the Co-owner of The Rec Center and soon after became its sole owner. Her goal has always been to maintain the history, the basic architecture, and the feel of the original establishment, while offering the city of Fredericksburg a place to enjoy local musicians, good food and friendly service. When you go in, step up to the bar and place your order. While you wait for one of the girls to get your order ready, take a look around the place, pay particular attention to the décor, notice the two Soap Box Derby cars, the Washington Redskins memorabilia and the sign behind the bar letting everyone know who has been banned from the establishment. What you see is essentially what people have seen since 1940, with two exceptions: Victoria has removed the wall that divided the pool hall from the bar and expanded the bar area, moving the three booths on the left side over to the wall. Come to town any First Friday and visit The Recreation Center, also known as the “The Hot Dog Opry.” You will find the place packed with music fans of all ages who came to listen, share the past and present with friends and family, and sit around the tables that look like pool balls. Victoria made them, using butcher-block rounds; hand painted and lacquered to a hard shine. You will also see Victoria serving tables, making French fries, changing out beer kegs, fixing those famous chili dogs, or working the room with all the regulars and every newcomer. What you may not notice right away, but something that speaks volumes about The Recreation Center, Fredericksburg, and this country, is that the business is owned and operated only by women these days. Thankfully, Victoria and her crew do not restrict men from entering — everyone is welcome! Joe DeYoung can eat a chilidog with the best of them. He is still working on his pool skills.

Front porch fredericksburg

Will Power Where Can’t it go? by will loring

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 E-mail: soupntaco@yahoo.com

Home of great Food & great Art! 720 Littlepage Sunkenwelltavern.com

EAT WELL DRINK WELL LIVE WELL

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~ Biological Terrain Assessment ~VoiceBio Analysis ~Aura Photography ~Body Cleanse Foot Detox We Carry Home Brewing Supplies ! Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

When it comes to craft beer, there is still a very strong sentiment among some of the older generation that anything in a can is bad. Now, if you were drinking a canned beer in the 70’s, it was probably terrible. But the technology that is utilized today makes cans a far superior option for many beers. Here are some myths (and their solutions) that have hindered the adoption of cans among some. Cans have a metallic taste. While that may have been true decades ago, the use of polymer linings ensure that the beer never touches the metal. There are even different types of polymer liners depending on the style of beer in the can. Cans can have a “skunked” taste to them. Well, as long as you’re not waiting a year to drink that Sierra Nevada Torpedo IPA, skunking isn’t a problem when in a can because no light gets in. That skunked taste comes from oxidization of the beer when it has been in contact with light for a period of time. If a beer is in a clear glass or green bottle, it’s not keeping that much light out. (Looking at you Corona and Heineken!) If it’s in a can, it means it’s not that good of a beer. False on all fronts! Here is a brief list of awesome breweries that can: Founders, The Alchemist, Sixpoint, Sierra Nevada, New Belgium, Oskar Blues, Cigar City, Surly, Hardywood Park, Wild Wolf, Center of the Universe, Lost Rhino and Devils Backbone. When New Belgium began canning its flagship Fat Tire amber ale a few years ago, many were weary to try it, only knowing it out of a brown bottle. Well, in a side-by-side comparison most chose it out of a can.

The reason being that New Belgium can conditions the beer by adding a bit of live yeast to take up space (instead of oxygen) and prevent stale flavors that can develop. Now you may have noticed that the last five breweries in the previous list were all from Virginia! Lost Rhino just had their canning line put in (Loudon County distribution for now, with expansion in the near future). The other four are using a new mobile canning company out of Richmond; Old Dominion Mobile Canning. If that wasn’t enough, The Boston Beer Co, makers of Sam Adams, just introduced their flagship Boston Lager and their popular seasonal Summer Ale in cans. Why is this such a big deal? Because in 2004 they announced that “Beer shall be offered in bottles, not cans, so that no brew is jeopardized with the taste of metal.” So, 9 years later, they have changed their minds, thanks to the many technological improvements over time. Oh, and the one million dollars they spent on designing the can. But don’t fret, there is a pretty cool upside to all of that money spent. Any craft brewer (defined as such by the Brewers Association) can now use this proprietary design for free. So, next time your standing in front of the beer cooler trying to decide which crafted liquid to consume, don’t shy away from those infinitely recyclable cans, because they may just hold your new favorite brew!

Will Loring is the resident beer nerd at Olde Towne Butcher and assistant operator of the 909 Beer Club. Cheers!

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

15


june 2013… Happy Father’s Day, dads! *Some events run same day weekly or more than one day.

tuesday, june 4 *Picnic in the Park Every Tuesday @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P. Bring kiddos, lunch, blanket to enjoy free concert, children’s activities, Touch-A-Truck! No lunch? Buy from local vendors in Park! June 4, Scott Kurt; June 11, Laurie Rose Griffith & Pete Mealy; June 18, McTell Brothers; June 25, Levi Stephens Larry, Harry & Buck play Skiffle Lounge Sound at Bistro Bethem, 309 William. 8-11P. No cover. All Ages *Valya Karcher Mat Class every Tues evening 7-8P FAM&CC Breakfast with the Curator series: Local potter and founder of LibertyTown Arts Workshop, Dan Finnegan, discusses stoneware unearthed at Bell-Ellis dig site on William at Winchester

wednesday, june 5 Spotsy Loop - A 1.07 mile walking trail to promote health and fitness in Spotsylvania. 3P. Spotsy Regional Medical Center, 4600 Spotsy Pkwy, 22408. Reception featuring locally grown products directly afterward at Spotsy Farmer’s Market at SRMC. RSVP Rob Toonkel, 498-4142 or Robert.toonkel@hcahealthcare.com Thrive the Healing Center Creative Writing course! The Art of Personal Narrative 13-week creative writing course assists women on recovery or healing journeys in exploring their strengths in telling stories in their lives that have empowered them in their life journeys. 6-8P. $200. Register: 540-361-1331; 10700 Ballantraye Drive, Ste. 104

CALENDAR of events

thursday, june 6

Art Sale for The Animals at Sophia Street Studios benefits SPCA. Opening Reception 6-9P. Thru June 30 *Music every Thurs live at Kenmore Inn 8-11P. Tonight: Transmitters return. FXBG’s best! *FXBG Jazz Collective’s open jazz jam twice monthly: 1st & 3rd Thurs. Live bebop, Latin jazz, fine cocktails. Musicians, bring instruments (no large amps). fredericksburgjazzcollective.org

first friday, june 7 Art First Gallery Exhibition features works of Judith Merrill in Retrospective. Original artwork from 33 local artists. Free. 6P-9P. Up through June- 30 daily 11-5P, 824 Caroline Plastic Fantastic at Populuxe, 6-9P. Photography of E.C. Barker and A.E. Bayne *Reducing flow of local talent north on I-95 is best way to create good jobs that pay well here… Startup Weekend Fredericksburg. June 7-9, Germanna Community College, Spotsy FXBG Area Museum & CC summer long concert series, Sounds of Summer. Tonight: ilyAIMY (i love you And I Miss You) percussive acoustic rock animal from Baltimore, mixes genres from rock to folk to soul to bluegrass; flavors as varied as jazz and hip hop Christopher John Park in town directly from LA to reunite with Lowboys live at Bistro Bethem, where First Friday Music is back ! 10P-1A. No cover. All ages. Guerin Wolf’s first Solo Show up in the Atrium at CRRL Headquarters, 1201 Caroline

Kenmore Inn Executive Chef Jaquelin Hartman’s “Food That Inspires” Wine Dinner: South African Summer Wines. 7P. 1200 Princess Anne, 540-3717622, kenmoreinn.com

LibertyTown Arts Worshop: Portraits of Canny Subjects — An Exploration of Figurative and Still life Portraits, by Ronald Jackson. And New Pottery by Artist-in-Residence, Beth Sperlazza

*Spotsylvania Farmers Market at Spotsy Regional Medical Center. 3-7P, 4600 Spotsy Parkway. Every Wed through early fall

PonShop Art Studio & Gallery, 712 Caroline: check out “Remixed” - their latest community art exhibit, with DJ Climax spinning his own vinyl

*Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

Wags & Purrs Pet Aupair Service

For Special Attention All Year Round Call Alexis Grogan at 540 - 903 - 0437 Serving 22401 & 22405 16

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

England Run Library Poetry Readings each Fri. 4P. Share your favorite published poems, original work, or just come listen. Info: Lee Criscuolo, 540899-1703 ext 242

*FCCA Opening Reception 6P-9P. 373-5646. 813 Sophia. fccava.org. Wed-Mon 12-4P, Sat 11-4P. (See Ad)

*Brush Strokes Gallery Opening Reception for “Road Trip!” by acrylic artist Peggy Wickham (See Ad) *Fridays@The Last Resort. St. George’s Church Reception: 810 Weekend Gallery at 810 Caroline. 10-6 Fri & Sat.; 1-4 Sun. 371-8100 3-D Art at Artful Dimensions Gallery, 911 Charles. Barbara Posey

tuesday, june 11

*Picnic in the Park Every Tuesday @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P. Laurie Rose Griffith & Pete Mealy; June 18, McTell Brothers; June 25, Levi Stephens

Evening with an Expert series panel discussion on goals and legacy of March on Washington (March for Jobs and Freedom) and Civil Rights movement, 50 years later. Free, open to public. Mansard Gallery 7P. 1001 Princess Anne. Doors 630, limited seating. Members Only Reception follows in galleries. tjackson@famcc.org, 371-3037, ext. 140. famcc.org

Live Music @ Courtyard Marriott - Wave on Wave every First Friday

John Wiley & Friends Live at Bistro Bethem: $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials! All ages, no cover. 8-11P

saturday, june 8

wednesday, june 12

Farmer’s Market at Hurkamp Park, William @ Prince Edward. Art in the Park 9A-2P featuring Sonja Wise (sonjawise.com) and artists’ works in ceramics/pottery, graphics/printmaking, painting, jewelry, photography, drawing, metal, sculpture, fiber/leather, mixed media, wood, glass. First Sat July, Sept, Oct Kids Fishing Derby @ Motts Reservoir 9A-12N. Kids 4-16 may register free on site and join the fun. Bring fishing gear and lawn chair. Games, prizes, local food vendors, fun for whole family! VA Game Dept. “Free Fishing Weekend” - No license required!

sunday, june 9 *AM1230 WFVA “Community Link” 8-830A. Capt. Matt Satterlee—outgoing Salvation Army Captain. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net *Kenmore Inn, 1200 Princess Anne, 3717622/•kenmoreinn.com: Elegant Sun. Brunch, 1130A-230P *Courtyard Marriott: Every Sunday Brunch 9A-2P *Jams: Colonial Tavern: Jazz 7P; *Sunken Well Tavern: Bluegrass 7P

monday, june 10 The Photography show at kybecca until end of July: “Through the eye of the Forrest” – Todd Woollam Opening Reception 6-9P for Fritzi Newton, Adam DeSio, Audrey Bruno: Through 3 Lenses, through Aug 5 at Bistro Bethem, 309 William

Health Drive Team free blood pressure checks and calculating BMI today and July 17. www.thefarmersmarket.co for info, or 540/8454267 Music at Hurkamp Park: Bring blanket or lawn chair, enjoy free sounds of the Fredericksburg Concert Band

thursday, june 13 *17th Annual National Hermit Week, June 13-20; Celebrated annually, it is for anyone anywhere. Event motto is “Don’t be a loner alone.”

friday, june 14 Flag Day Family Tubing: Cool off while floating down Rappahannock on family/friends trip! Drift downstream, enjoy beautiful summer then shoot rapids at First Drop. Prepare to get wet; wear river shoes that stay on your feet (that means no flip flops!). Minimum age 6 years. 12N-4P. $20 FXBG Area Museum & CC’s Sounds of Summer. Tonight: Air Force Blue Aces, Pop/Rock

saturday, june 15 *Free Vegetarian Cooking class every 3rd Sat. 2330P. Meditation 4-5P. Porter Library FCCA Art Guild of VA meets third Sat 10-Noon. $15/year

Big Band music, wine tasting in European courtyard. Evening of fun for great cause! Reservations: 804-224-8687 or Ingleside Winery on Facebook. Admission includes music, wine tasting, souvenir glass. Optional dinner available by advance reservation, or bring your own picnic. Reservations strongly recommended for music, required for dinner. Tix: $30/advance, $35/door (music only). Dinner: $15/advance rez only Civil War Canoe Paddle: Local historian Greg Mertz leads trip through history of Civil War from river’s perspective. As you paddle, you will stop at several sites along the way to learn about significant Civil War events. Bring a bag lunch to eat on river. Min. age 8 years. 9A-4P. $40

sunday, june 16

friday, june`21 Summer Solstice

*Colonial Beach Blues Festival: 6P. Andy Poxon Band, Moonshine Society, Anthony “Swamp Dog” Clark; Sat, June 22 @ Noon: Big Money Band, Retro Deluxe, Franc Robert, Jumpin’Jupiter, The Night Kings, Cathy Ponton King, Bobby Messano; the fabulous Illusions by Vick; Sun, June 23 @ Noon: Blues Flash, Piedmont Blues Plus, Scott Ramminger & his CrawStickers, Michael Tash & Bad Influence, The Nighthawks. Colonial Beach Blues Society, benefits Organization for Autism Research. High Tides on the Potomac, CB FXBG Area Museum & CC’s Sounds of Summer. Tonight: Mid-Atlantic Wind Symphony, Classical 3rd Fri, 830A business ladies’ free networking “TIPS”. Ellen Baptist, 548-0652

Father’s Day Editor Rob’s birthday: # 61. Dylan says this can be easily done; just head on over to highway 61… Joint Pain Seminar 11A-12N. Old Dominion Osteopathic Medicine, 2525 Cowan Blvd. Seminar by Dr. Jason A. Sneed *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Rob Grogan celebrates “community” and 16 years on the Front Porch! (See “Community Link” column, page 27). Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net “Dad Loves BBQ” — Brunch Buffet at Courtyard Marriott (See Ad)

tuesday, june 18 *Whiskey Django Foxtrot - Live at Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine, cocktail specials. All ages. No cover. 8-11P *Picnic in the Park Every Tues @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P. Today: McTell Brothers; June 25, Levi Stephens

wednesday, june 19 Beach Party at Dixon Pool! 8P-10P. $2 fee

thursday, june 20 2nd Annual Bowling Green Sunset Art Walk, 5P-8P. (Rain date, June 21)

Dangerous Kitchen: Live music. Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine, cocktail specials. All ages. No cover. 811P

thursday, june 27 Mary Washington Healthcare’s annual Update to the Community. 530P-730P. John F. Fick, III, Conference Center. 1301 Sam Perry Blvd *Fredericksburg Photography Show @ Dorothy Hart Community Center: June 27/28, 4P-7P; June 29, 10A-4P; June 30, 12N-4P. Local talent. Photographs for sale. FXBG Parks & Recreation, 408 Canal. fredericksburgva.gov; 540-372-1086

friday, june 28 *FXBG Area Museum & CC’s Sounds of Summer. Tonight: Skiffle Lounge Sound (Larry Hinkle, Harry Wilson, John Buck) w/ vibraphone, ukulele, bass. Old-time Americana w/ strong modern jazz consciousness

saturday, june 22

*FCCA Art Bug, July 8-12 (age 7-13) Sign up by today. 373-5646-813, Sophia. fccava.org

Take me out to the ballgame: Jack Hyland, Chip Remy, and Rob Grogan take in the Nats v Rockies in DC at 12:05P; joined by Wayne Lesonic and John Pacitti

saturday, june 29

Family Trip: National Zoo. 8A-330P. Meet at Dorothy Hart Center and jump on bus for day trip to National Zoo in DC! $30 residents/$35 nonresidents FXBG Area Museum & CC Summer Cleanout and Patio Sale 8A-2P in historic Market Square

sunday, june 23 *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. City of Fredericksburg — statewide business awards. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net *Featured at FCCA: Rita & Rae Rose show their ‘twins’ creative process, 4P. Regional Juried ExhibitJon: McMillan, juror. Sculpture Exhibit by Marc Robarge. Mosaic Class June 29-30; Art Bug, July 8-12 (age 7-13) Sign up by June 28. 3735646-813, Sophia. fccava.org

tuesday, june 25 *Picnic in the Park Every Tuesday @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P. Today: Levi Stephens

*FCCA Mosaic Class ends today. Sophia. fccava.org

sunday, june 30 *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. S.E.R.V.E. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net Patriotic/Choral Program; National Christian Choir concert at Spotswood Baptist. 6P. 4009 Lafayette. No tix needed. Info: nationalchristianchoir.org *Register now for Tue, July 16, when FXBG’s 1st Fine Dining Club joins LB’s Foodies for dining at Kybecca. Executive Chef Wade Truong customizes Five-Course Dinner w/ wine pairing. Learn more about food and wine and developing one’s palate. Cost per plate: $65. Registration deadline: July 6. 840-4372 If you are reading this 192nd issue of FP, thank an advertiser as we celebrate the completion of our 16 th year! If you are an advertiser, list your event. Deadline for July’s Start of Year 17 issue is June 20. To submit events, follow this link: http://frontporchfredericksburg.com/how-ttosubmit-o online/

~ Peggy Wickham Art ~ Companionship Meal Preparation Medication Reminders Laundry

Light Housekeeping Shopping/Errands Personal Care Flexible Hours

Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

540.899.1422 Each HomeInstead Franchise Office is Independently Owned & Operated

1754 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Peggy Wickham Art “FEATURED ARTIST at Brush Strokes in June 2191 Sebastian Road Fredericksburg, VA 22405 540-446-5639

373-564-6813,

Front Porch on

homeinstead.com front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

17


june 2013… Happy Father’s Day, dads! *Some events run same day weekly or more than one day.

tuesday, june 4 *Picnic in the Park Every Tuesday @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P. Bring kiddos, lunch, blanket to enjoy free concert, children’s activities, Touch-A-Truck! No lunch? Buy from local vendors in Park! June 4, Scott Kurt; June 11, Laurie Rose Griffith & Pete Mealy; June 18, McTell Brothers; June 25, Levi Stephens Larry, Harry & Buck play Skiffle Lounge Sound at Bistro Bethem, 309 William. 8-11P. No cover. All Ages *Valya Karcher Mat Class every Tues evening 7-8P FAM&CC Breakfast with the Curator series: Local potter and founder of LibertyTown Arts Workshop, Dan Finnegan, discusses stoneware unearthed at Bell-Ellis dig site on William at Winchester

wednesday, june 5 Spotsy Loop - A 1.07 mile walking trail to promote health and fitness in Spotsylvania. 3P. Spotsy Regional Medical Center, 4600 Spotsy Pkwy, 22408. Reception featuring locally grown products directly afterward at Spotsy Farmer’s Market at SRMC. RSVP Rob Toonkel, 498-4142 or Robert.toonkel@hcahealthcare.com Thrive the Healing Center Creative Writing course! The Art of Personal Narrative 13-week creative writing course assists women on recovery or healing journeys in exploring their strengths in telling stories in their lives that have empowered them in their life journeys. 6-8P. $200. Register: 540-361-1331; 10700 Ballantraye Drive, Ste. 104

CALENDAR of events

thursday, june 6

Art Sale for The Animals at Sophia Street Studios benefits SPCA. Opening Reception 6-9P. Thru June 30 *Music every Thurs live at Kenmore Inn 8-11P. Tonight: Transmitters return. FXBG’s best! *FXBG Jazz Collective’s open jazz jam twice monthly: 1st & 3rd Thurs. Live bebop, Latin jazz, fine cocktails. Musicians, bring instruments (no large amps). fredericksburgjazzcollective.org

first friday, june 7 Art First Gallery Exhibition features works of Judith Merrill in Retrospective. Original artwork from 33 local artists. Free. 6P-9P. Up through June- 30 daily 11-5P, 824 Caroline Plastic Fantastic at Populuxe, 6-9P. Photography of E.C. Barker and A.E. Bayne *Reducing flow of local talent north on I-95 is best way to create good jobs that pay well here… Startup Weekend Fredericksburg. June 7-9, Germanna Community College, Spotsy FXBG Area Museum & CC summer long concert series, Sounds of Summer. Tonight: ilyAIMY (i love you And I Miss You) percussive acoustic rock animal from Baltimore, mixes genres from rock to folk to soul to bluegrass; flavors as varied as jazz and hip hop Christopher John Park in town directly from LA to reunite with Lowboys live at Bistro Bethem, where First Friday Music is back ! 10P-1A. No cover. All ages. Guerin Wolf’s first Solo Show up in the Atrium at CRRL Headquarters, 1201 Caroline

Kenmore Inn Executive Chef Jaquelin Hartman’s “Food That Inspires” Wine Dinner: South African Summer Wines. 7P. 1200 Princess Anne, 540-3717622, kenmoreinn.com

LibertyTown Arts Worshop: Portraits of Canny Subjects — An Exploration of Figurative and Still life Portraits, by Ronald Jackson. And New Pottery by Artist-in-Residence, Beth Sperlazza

*Spotsylvania Farmers Market at Spotsy Regional Medical Center. 3-7P, 4600 Spotsy Parkway. Every Wed through early fall

PonShop Art Studio & Gallery, 712 Caroline: check out “Remixed” - their latest community art exhibit, with DJ Climax spinning his own vinyl

*Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

Wags & Purrs Pet Aupair Service

For Special Attention All Year Round Call Alexis Grogan at 540 - 903 - 0437 Serving 22401 & 22405 16

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

England Run Library Poetry Readings each Fri. 4P. Share your favorite published poems, original work, or just come listen. Info: Lee Criscuolo, 540899-1703 ext 242

*FCCA Opening Reception 6P-9P. 373-5646. 813 Sophia. fccava.org. Wed-Mon 12-4P, Sat 11-4P. (See Ad)

*Brush Strokes Gallery Opening Reception for “Road Trip!” by acrylic artist Peggy Wickham (See Ad) *Fridays@The Last Resort. St. George’s Church Reception: 810 Weekend Gallery at 810 Caroline. 10-6 Fri & Sat.; 1-4 Sun. 371-8100 3-D Art at Artful Dimensions Gallery, 911 Charles. Barbara Posey

tuesday, june 11

*Picnic in the Park Every Tuesday @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P. Laurie Rose Griffith & Pete Mealy; June 18, McTell Brothers; June 25, Levi Stephens

Evening with an Expert series panel discussion on goals and legacy of March on Washington (March for Jobs and Freedom) and Civil Rights movement, 50 years later. Free, open to public. Mansard Gallery 7P. 1001 Princess Anne. Doors 630, limited seating. Members Only Reception follows in galleries. tjackson@famcc.org, 371-3037, ext. 140. famcc.org

Live Music @ Courtyard Marriott - Wave on Wave every First Friday

John Wiley & Friends Live at Bistro Bethem: $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials! All ages, no cover. 8-11P

saturday, june 8

wednesday, june 12

Farmer’s Market at Hurkamp Park, William @ Prince Edward. Art in the Park 9A-2P featuring Sonja Wise (sonjawise.com) and artists’ works in ceramics/pottery, graphics/printmaking, painting, jewelry, photography, drawing, metal, sculpture, fiber/leather, mixed media, wood, glass. First Sat July, Sept, Oct Kids Fishing Derby @ Motts Reservoir 9A-12N. Kids 4-16 may register free on site and join the fun. Bring fishing gear and lawn chair. Games, prizes, local food vendors, fun for whole family! VA Game Dept. “Free Fishing Weekend” - No license required!

sunday, june 9 *AM1230 WFVA “Community Link” 8-830A. Capt. Matt Satterlee—outgoing Salvation Army Captain. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net *Kenmore Inn, 1200 Princess Anne, 3717622/•kenmoreinn.com: Elegant Sun. Brunch, 1130A-230P *Courtyard Marriott: Every Sunday Brunch 9A-2P *Jams: Colonial Tavern: Jazz 7P; *Sunken Well Tavern: Bluegrass 7P

monday, june 10 The Photography show at kybecca until end of July: “Through the eye of the Forrest” – Todd Woollam Opening Reception 6-9P for Fritzi Newton, Adam DeSio, Audrey Bruno: Through 3 Lenses, through Aug 5 at Bistro Bethem, 309 William

Health Drive Team free blood pressure checks and calculating BMI today and July 17. www.thefarmersmarket.co for info, or 540/8454267 Music at Hurkamp Park: Bring blanket or lawn chair, enjoy free sounds of the Fredericksburg Concert Band

thursday, june 13 *17th Annual National Hermit Week, June 13-20; Celebrated annually, it is for anyone anywhere. Event motto is “Don’t be a loner alone.”

friday, june 14 Flag Day Family Tubing: Cool off while floating down Rappahannock on family/friends trip! Drift downstream, enjoy beautiful summer then shoot rapids at First Drop. Prepare to get wet; wear river shoes that stay on your feet (that means no flip flops!). Minimum age 6 years. 12N-4P. $20 FXBG Area Museum & CC’s Sounds of Summer. Tonight: Air Force Blue Aces, Pop/Rock

saturday, june 15 *Free Vegetarian Cooking class every 3rd Sat. 2330P. Meditation 4-5P. Porter Library FCCA Art Guild of VA meets third Sat 10-Noon. $15/year

Big Band music, wine tasting in European courtyard. Evening of fun for great cause! Reservations: 804-224-8687 or Ingleside Winery on Facebook. Admission includes music, wine tasting, souvenir glass. Optional dinner available by advance reservation, or bring your own picnic. Reservations strongly recommended for music, required for dinner. Tix: $30/advance, $35/door (music only). Dinner: $15/advance rez only Civil War Canoe Paddle: Local historian Greg Mertz leads trip through history of Civil War from river’s perspective. As you paddle, you will stop at several sites along the way to learn about significant Civil War events. Bring a bag lunch to eat on river. Min. age 8 years. 9A-4P. $40

sunday, june 16

friday, june`21 Summer Solstice

*Colonial Beach Blues Festival: 6P. Andy Poxon Band, Moonshine Society, Anthony “Swamp Dog” Clark; Sat, June 22 @ Noon: Big Money Band, Retro Deluxe, Franc Robert, Jumpin’Jupiter, The Night Kings, Cathy Ponton King, Bobby Messano; the fabulous Illusions by Vick; Sun, June 23 @ Noon: Blues Flash, Piedmont Blues Plus, Scott Ramminger & his CrawStickers, Michael Tash & Bad Influence, The Nighthawks. Colonial Beach Blues Society, benefits Organization for Autism Research. High Tides on the Potomac, CB FXBG Area Museum & CC’s Sounds of Summer. Tonight: Mid-Atlantic Wind Symphony, Classical 3rd Fri, 830A business ladies’ free networking “TIPS”. Ellen Baptist, 548-0652

Father’s Day Editor Rob’s birthday: # 61. Dylan says this can be easily done; just head on over to highway 61… Joint Pain Seminar 11A-12N. Old Dominion Osteopathic Medicine, 2525 Cowan Blvd. Seminar by Dr. Jason A. Sneed *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Rob Grogan celebrates “community” and 16 years on the Front Porch! (See “Community Link” column, page 27). Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net “Dad Loves BBQ” — Brunch Buffet at Courtyard Marriott (See Ad)

tuesday, june 18 *Whiskey Django Foxtrot - Live at Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine, cocktail specials. All ages. No cover. 8-11P *Picnic in the Park Every Tues @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P. Today: McTell Brothers; June 25, Levi Stephens

wednesday, june 19 Beach Party at Dixon Pool! 8P-10P. $2 fee

thursday, june 20 2nd Annual Bowling Green Sunset Art Walk, 5P-8P. (Rain date, June 21)

Dangerous Kitchen: Live music. Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine, cocktail specials. All ages. No cover. 811P

thursday, june 27 Mary Washington Healthcare’s annual Update to the Community. 530P-730P. John F. Fick, III, Conference Center. 1301 Sam Perry Blvd *Fredericksburg Photography Show @ Dorothy Hart Community Center: June 27/28, 4P-7P; June 29, 10A-4P; June 30, 12N-4P. Local talent. Photographs for sale. FXBG Parks & Recreation, 408 Canal. fredericksburgva.gov; 540-372-1086

friday, june 28 *FXBG Area Museum & CC’s Sounds of Summer. Tonight: Skiffle Lounge Sound (Larry Hinkle, Harry Wilson, John Buck) w/ vibraphone, ukulele, bass. Old-time Americana w/ strong modern jazz consciousness

saturday, june 22

*FCCA Art Bug, July 8-12 (age 7-13) Sign up by today. 373-5646-813, Sophia. fccava.org

Take me out to the ballgame: Jack Hyland, Chip Remy, and Rob Grogan take in the Nats v Rockies in DC at 12:05P; joined by Wayne Lesonic and John Pacitti

saturday, june 29

Family Trip: National Zoo. 8A-330P. Meet at Dorothy Hart Center and jump on bus for day trip to National Zoo in DC! $30 residents/$35 nonresidents FXBG Area Museum & CC Summer Cleanout and Patio Sale 8A-2P in historic Market Square

sunday, june 23 *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. City of Fredericksburg — statewide business awards. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net *Featured at FCCA: Rita & Rae Rose show their ‘twins’ creative process, 4P. Regional Juried ExhibitJon: McMillan, juror. Sculpture Exhibit by Marc Robarge. Mosaic Class June 29-30; Art Bug, July 8-12 (age 7-13) Sign up by June 28. 3735646-813, Sophia. fccava.org

tuesday, june 25 *Picnic in the Park Every Tuesday @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P. Today: Levi Stephens

*FCCA Mosaic Class ends today. Sophia. fccava.org

sunday, june 30 *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. S.E.R.V.E. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net Patriotic/Choral Program; National Christian Choir concert at Spotswood Baptist. 6P. 4009 Lafayette. No tix needed. Info: nationalchristianchoir.org *Register now for Tue, July 16, when FXBG’s 1st Fine Dining Club joins LB’s Foodies for dining at Kybecca. Executive Chef Wade Truong customizes Five-Course Dinner w/ wine pairing. Learn more about food and wine and developing one’s palate. Cost per plate: $65. Registration deadline: July 6. 840-4372 If you are reading this 192nd issue of FP, thank an advertiser as we celebrate the completion of our 16 th year! If you are an advertiser, list your event. Deadline for July’s Start of Year 17 issue is June 20. To submit events, follow this link: http://frontporchfredericksburg.com/how-ttosubmit-o online/

~ Peggy Wickham Art ~ Companionship Meal Preparation Medication Reminders Laundry

Light Housekeeping Shopping/Errands Personal Care Flexible Hours

Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

540.899.1422 Each HomeInstead Franchise Office is Independently Owned & Operated

1754 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Peggy Wickham Art “FEATURED ARTIST at Brush Strokes in June 2191 Sebastian Road Fredericksburg, VA 22405 540-446-5639

373-564-6813,

Front Porch on

homeinstead.com front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

17


history’s stories

OUR HERITAGE

Taps By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

I, along with thousands of Fredericksburg and surrounding county residents, travel along Lafayette Boulevard on a daily basis passing by the National Park Service and the National Cemetery with its beautiful B u t t e r f i e l d monument. Like many of the monuments in the area they help recall its history, however, this one particular monument at the national Cemetery has a unique story. There are a very few who know that “taps,” this plaintive bugle call, was composed by General Daniel Butterfield in July 1862 because of his dislike of the Army bugle calls. It was during the Peninsular Campaign that Butterfield decided that the customary “taps,” or as some referred to it, “lights out” bugle call, was too cold and formal and needed to be changed. He summoned his brigade bugler and whistled a tune that he had composed. He instructed the bugler to work on his version and use it as “taps” from then on in place of the regular Army version for his brigade. Other buglers heard the new tune and it spread through the Army and was made official years later in 1891 after it had been widely used at funerals. Taps goes back into military history being derived from “taptoo” an old drum signal that was combined with bugles. Daniel Butterfield used his own funds to have the large granite monument built in Fredericksburg in memory of the Fifth Army Corps that he commanded during the battle in 1862. In 1899, the Fredericksburg Town Council invited the Army of the Potomac to hold its convention in Fredericksburg, the first such reunion on southern soil by Union troops. The group accepted the offer of the Town, and Butterfield decided to lay the cornerstone for the monument at the same time. Due to extreme illness, Butterfield was unable to lay the cornerstone. On Memorial Day 1900, President McKinley along with Virginia Governor Tyler dedicated the monument. Local Judge John Goolrick said “We worship the same shrine of liberty; there is only one flag now it is our flag and yours.” Daniel Butterfield died at his New York home on July 17, 1901 having never seen his completed monument. This past Memorial Day, this haunting tune he made famous was heard all over our country in memory of every deceased American veteran of military service.

Tuffy Hicks is our in-house history professor.

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

a father in falmouth A brief biography of Robert Dunbar written by Jerrilynn Eby of Stafford County reports that Mr. Dunbar (c. 1745-1831) was a Scots merchant who settled in Falmouth. In 1797, he married Elizabeth Gregory Thornton (c. 1764-1851), the daughter of Francis Thornton (17371794) and Ann Thompson of Fall Hill. Dunbar inherited an interest in Thornton’s toll bridge across the Rappahannock and operated it until his death. He also kept a mercantile store in Falmouth in partnership Alexander with Vass (died c. 1809). Robert was also involved with one of the s a n d s t o n e quarries on Aquia Creek that supplied stone for the building of the U.S. Capitol and the President’s House in Washington. In 1802, Robert purchased James Hunter’s old forges and mills on the Rappahannock. By 1807, he owned four large commercial mills on the river and was heavily involved in flour milling that dominated Falmouth during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Financially ruined by Jefferson’s shipping embargo of 1807, he bankrupted. His real estate was sold and on Christmas Day, 1822 his personal effects were auctioned. Robert’s son, William Dunbar, was an attorney who practiced in Falmouth for a time. The

Superior Court of Chancery for the Richmond District named him receiver for his father’s estate.

PS — Quiz: Did you know there had been a toll bridge across the Rappahannock? Flour milling dominated Falmouth during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Falmouth now?

What

dominates

Based on what you’ve read of Robert Dunbar here, what do you think he would do on Father’s Day were he here in m o d e r n Fredericksburg?

The Central Rappahannock Heritage Center on Barton Street is open to the public for scholarly research.

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center 18

June 2013

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

19


history’s stories

OUR HERITAGE

Taps By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

I, along with thousands of Fredericksburg and surrounding county residents, travel along Lafayette Boulevard on a daily basis passing by the National Park Service and the National Cemetery with its beautiful B u t t e r f i e l d monument. Like many of the monuments in the area they help recall its history, however, this one particular monument at the national Cemetery has a unique story. There are a very few who know that “taps,” this plaintive bugle call, was composed by General Daniel Butterfield in July 1862 because of his dislike of the Army bugle calls. It was during the Peninsular Campaign that Butterfield decided that the customary “taps,” or as some referred to it, “lights out” bugle call, was too cold and formal and needed to be changed. He summoned his brigade bugler and whistled a tune that he had composed. He instructed the bugler to work on his version and use it as “taps” from then on in place of the regular Army version for his brigade. Other buglers heard the new tune and it spread through the Army and was made official years later in 1891 after it had been widely used at funerals. Taps goes back into military history being derived from “taptoo” an old drum signal that was combined with bugles. Daniel Butterfield used his own funds to have the large granite monument built in Fredericksburg in memory of the Fifth Army Corps that he commanded during the battle in 1862. In 1899, the Fredericksburg Town Council invited the Army of the Potomac to hold its convention in Fredericksburg, the first such reunion on southern soil by Union troops. The group accepted the offer of the Town, and Butterfield decided to lay the cornerstone for the monument at the same time. Due to extreme illness, Butterfield was unable to lay the cornerstone. On Memorial Day 1900, President McKinley along with Virginia Governor Tyler dedicated the monument. Local Judge John Goolrick said “We worship the same shrine of liberty; there is only one flag now it is our flag and yours.” Daniel Butterfield died at his New York home on July 17, 1901 having never seen his completed monument. This past Memorial Day, this haunting tune he made famous was heard all over our country in memory of every deceased American veteran of military service.

Tuffy Hicks is our in-house history professor.

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

a father in falmouth A brief biography of Robert Dunbar written by Jerrilynn Eby of Stafford County reports that Mr. Dunbar (c. 1745-1831) was a Scots merchant who settled in Falmouth. In 1797, he married Elizabeth Gregory Thornton (c. 1764-1851), the daughter of Francis Thornton (17371794) and Ann Thompson of Fall Hill. Dunbar inherited an interest in Thornton’s toll bridge across the Rappahannock and operated it until his death. He also kept a mercantile store in Falmouth in partnership Alexander with Vass (died c. 1809). Robert was also involved with one of the s a n d s t o n e quarries on Aquia Creek that supplied stone for the building of the U.S. Capitol and the President’s House in Washington. In 1802, Robert purchased James Hunter’s old forges and mills on the Rappahannock. By 1807, he owned four large commercial mills on the river and was heavily involved in flour milling that dominated Falmouth during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Financially ruined by Jefferson’s shipping embargo of 1807, he bankrupted. His real estate was sold and on Christmas Day, 1822 his personal effects were auctioned. Robert’s son, William Dunbar, was an attorney who practiced in Falmouth for a time. The

Superior Court of Chancery for the Richmond District named him receiver for his father’s estate.

PS — Quiz: Did you know there had been a toll bridge across the Rappahannock? Flour milling dominated Falmouth during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Falmouth now?

What

dominates

Based on what you’ve read of Robert Dunbar here, what do you think he would do on Father’s Day were he here in m o d e r n Fredericksburg?

The Central Rappahannock Heritage Center on Barton Street is open to the public for scholarly research.

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center 18

June 2013

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

19


Companion Care

Full Service Hospital featuring:

grrr! scrap the grilling! Grooming Salon Canine Boarding in Our Indoor/Outdoor Runs Dog Training & Behavioral Consults with certified dog trainer Feline Boarding in Our Spacious Multi-room Condos

by melissa delauter, DVM

Serving you & your companion animals for 16 years Stacy L. Horner, DVM; Gary B. Dunn, DVM; Melanie Bell, DVM; Sandi L. Pepper, DVM; Melissa A. DeLauter, DVM ; Arlene Evans, DVM; Jennnifer Skarbek, DVM

540/374-0462 The time for parties and picnics with friends and family! Soon the air will fill with the lovely aroma of your favorite foods cooking on the grill! And what about our beloved four-legged friends, of course we want them to share in our summer time feasts. We have all been fooled by those big eyes just staring into ours waiting for that little crumb to fall to the ground. Although they may look cute begging for that last little scrap of food, I caution you on feeding it to them! We see many pets at White Oak Animal Hospital for gastrointestinal upset. Whether they got into the trash themselves or we just couldn’t resist the temptation, the fact remains that most of our foods are just to rich for their tummies. Some pets present for a mild case of GI upset due to a change in their normal diet. They just couldn’t handle that fresh off the grill burger or chicken smothered in a delicious marinade. If your pet has a mild case of dietary indiscretion, they will likely present with minimal signs like nausea, eating less than usual, and/or mild lethargy. However, some pets visit their veterinarian because they are vomiting and having diarrhea. While most of the pets respond to antibiotics and antinausea medications due to the dietary indiscretion, some may have a more serious (potentially life-threatening) condition like pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas).

20

June 2013

Pancreatitis is very common after a pet has been fed a high fatty meal (aka table scraps full of fat). The most common signs of pancreatitis are vomiting and diarrhea (which can be bloody), abdominal pain, complete loss of appetite, and weakness. We can diagnosis this condition based on their clinical signs and blood work. If your pet has severe pancreatitis, then they should be hospitalized and administered fluids, pain medications, anti-vomiting medications and antibiotics. Most pets respond well to treatment and are back at home to enjoy the summer time fun with their owners in a few days. There are a handful of pets that have a more critical condition of pancreatitis and need to be referred to an internal medicine specialist for further treatment. And many of our pets can become repeat offenders and have many episodes of pancreatitis with just the smallest change in their diet. Although you may want to please your best four-legged friend with a feast of the smallest scraps from the summer treats, remember that sometimes the best treat for them is nothing at all!

www.woahvets.com

10 Walsh Lane

AutoKnown Better what’s with that? By Rim Vining June Bugs Me (pretty sure I’ve said that before). I made my suggestions about how Madison Avenue could be raking in the cash on Father’s Day promotions last year, yet Kay Jewelers doesn’t have a spiffy Edwardian tiepin that says, “I love you Daddy” and no one says, “Ooh, she went the Jared’s!” What’s with that? June is neither fish nor fowl: still have two weeks of school and you don’t take a vacation until July or August, but the pools are open. There’s also “summer” stuff happening like the Soap Box Derby, the AACA Car Show on Caroline Street and I am sure you can get a deal on a pontoon boat most anywhere. June is warmish but summer? Really? There’s probably a reason summer doesn’t actually start until the month is threefourths gone. It seems to be for school budget negotiations. What’s with that? “They” take that month that is considered part of summer, make us listen to area school boards and governing bodies throughout the United States, and certainly in our neck of the woods, jockey for position as to whether they should fund what is required and necessary to educate the next generation (who by the way is charged with taking care of us in our golden years) or stand their ground on their beliefs that schools are a burden on us all. “They” say times are tough and schools are wasteful. Administrators, curriculum coordinators, guidance counselors and support staff aren’t required. If it isn’t directly for teachers – we won’t fund it. What’s with that? They are probably right. I am sure we could just send teachers into a building and since they are all Mary Poppins and practically perfect they will all get along, sort out any problems, keep the heat and A/C running, cut the grass, shovel the snow and make necessary

repairs to the building. And of course they will keep us in total legal compliance with the mandated laws concerning the special needs population while coming up with creative and educational meals to cook for their students and then making everything spit-spot before they go home. They don’t need tech support and e-mail doesn’t actually have to work since none of the students or their parents use technology in their daily lives, and we all know the busses will just fix themselves – drive themselves - and arrive magically right on time - turning back into pumpkins at precisely 4:45 every day. What’s with that? Come on guys…. a budget is a budget. You hired the best (doesn’t matter what field) and you asked for their professional opinion on what it will cost to give them the best product possible. So they tell you and your response is… yeah, but you don’t really need that much. What’s with that? I restore cars and there is always a budget but there is also level of quality you can’t fall below. You can’t give a car fresh paint and re-do all the chrome but skip the brakes and tires and call it “restored.” You get that a lot. Why does it cost so much? What do you mean it takes $60,000.00 to re-do a Mustang – plus the price of the car? What’s with that? Well, it’s a lot like education. What part do you leave undone or cheapen down to nothing and still call it a quality education? You can build a wonderful building and fill it with teachers but without good brakes and tires you can’t take it out on the road. Write to Kay & Jared’s for next year. autoknown@aol.com

ROXBURY F

ARM

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

& GARDEN CENTER

Since 1929

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Wild Bird Feeders/ Bird Baths Organic Gardening Products Home Brewer & Vintner Supplies American Made Tools

Front Porch Fredericksburg

online: www.save7lives.org in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

Rim Vining is a July kind of guy.

Come Play With Us This Summer Key Board Classes ~ Ages 3 to Adult Music Theatre Camp ~ Ages 7 & Up Schedule Posted on Website

Dr. Melissa DeLauter practices veterinary medicine at White Oak Animal Hospital.

Front porch fredericksburg

540-371-4526

207 William Street

www.ymsfred.com

Certified Experienced Staff YAMAHA MUSIC SCHOOL OF FREDERICKBURG Located in Downtown Fredericksburg for Over 40 Years front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

21


Companion Care

Full Service Hospital featuring:

grrr! scrap the grilling! Grooming Salon Canine Boarding in Our Indoor/Outdoor Runs Dog Training & Behavioral Consults with certified dog trainer Feline Boarding in Our Spacious Multi-room Condos

by melissa delauter, DVM

Serving you & your companion animals for 16 years Stacy L. Horner, DVM; Gary B. Dunn, DVM; Melanie Bell, DVM; Sandi L. Pepper, DVM; Melissa A. DeLauter, DVM ; Arlene Evans, DVM; Jennnifer Skarbek, DVM

540/374-0462 The time for parties and picnics with friends and family! Soon the air will fill with the lovely aroma of your favorite foods cooking on the grill! And what about our beloved four-legged friends, of course we want them to share in our summer time feasts. We have all been fooled by those big eyes just staring into ours waiting for that little crumb to fall to the ground. Although they may look cute begging for that last little scrap of food, I caution you on feeding it to them! We see many pets at White Oak Animal Hospital for gastrointestinal upset. Whether they got into the trash themselves or we just couldn’t resist the temptation, the fact remains that most of our foods are just to rich for their tummies. Some pets present for a mild case of GI upset due to a change in their normal diet. They just couldn’t handle that fresh off the grill burger or chicken smothered in a delicious marinade. If your pet has a mild case of dietary indiscretion, they will likely present with minimal signs like nausea, eating less than usual, and/or mild lethargy. However, some pets visit their veterinarian because they are vomiting and having diarrhea. While most of the pets respond to antibiotics and antinausea medications due to the dietary indiscretion, some may have a more serious (potentially life-threatening) condition like pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas).

20

June 2013

Pancreatitis is very common after a pet has been fed a high fatty meal (aka table scraps full of fat). The most common signs of pancreatitis are vomiting and diarrhea (which can be bloody), abdominal pain, complete loss of appetite, and weakness. We can diagnosis this condition based on their clinical signs and blood work. If your pet has severe pancreatitis, then they should be hospitalized and administered fluids, pain medications, anti-vomiting medications and antibiotics. Most pets respond well to treatment and are back at home to enjoy the summer time fun with their owners in a few days. There are a handful of pets that have a more critical condition of pancreatitis and need to be referred to an internal medicine specialist for further treatment. And many of our pets can become repeat offenders and have many episodes of pancreatitis with just the smallest change in their diet. Although you may want to please your best four-legged friend with a feast of the smallest scraps from the summer treats, remember that sometimes the best treat for them is nothing at all!

www.woahvets.com

10 Walsh Lane

AutoKnown Better what’s with that? By Rim Vining June Bugs Me (pretty sure I’ve said that before). I made my suggestions about how Madison Avenue could be raking in the cash on Father’s Day promotions last year, yet Kay Jewelers doesn’t have a spiffy Edwardian tiepin that says, “I love you Daddy” and no one says, “Ooh, she went the Jared’s!” What’s with that? June is neither fish nor fowl: still have two weeks of school and you don’t take a vacation until July or August, but the pools are open. There’s also “summer” stuff happening like the Soap Box Derby, the AACA Car Show on Caroline Street and I am sure you can get a deal on a pontoon boat most anywhere. June is warmish but summer? Really? There’s probably a reason summer doesn’t actually start until the month is threefourths gone. It seems to be for school budget negotiations. What’s with that? “They” take that month that is considered part of summer, make us listen to area school boards and governing bodies throughout the United States, and certainly in our neck of the woods, jockey for position as to whether they should fund what is required and necessary to educate the next generation (who by the way is charged with taking care of us in our golden years) or stand their ground on their beliefs that schools are a burden on us all. “They” say times are tough and schools are wasteful. Administrators, curriculum coordinators, guidance counselors and support staff aren’t required. If it isn’t directly for teachers – we won’t fund it. What’s with that? They are probably right. I am sure we could just send teachers into a building and since they are all Mary Poppins and practically perfect they will all get along, sort out any problems, keep the heat and A/C running, cut the grass, shovel the snow and make necessary

repairs to the building. And of course they will keep us in total legal compliance with the mandated laws concerning the special needs population while coming up with creative and educational meals to cook for their students and then making everything spit-spot before they go home. They don’t need tech support and e-mail doesn’t actually have to work since none of the students or their parents use technology in their daily lives, and we all know the busses will just fix themselves – drive themselves - and arrive magically right on time - turning back into pumpkins at precisely 4:45 every day. What’s with that? Come on guys…. a budget is a budget. You hired the best (doesn’t matter what field) and you asked for their professional opinion on what it will cost to give them the best product possible. So they tell you and your response is… yeah, but you don’t really need that much. What’s with that? I restore cars and there is always a budget but there is also level of quality you can’t fall below. You can’t give a car fresh paint and re-do all the chrome but skip the brakes and tires and call it “restored.” You get that a lot. Why does it cost so much? What do you mean it takes $60,000.00 to re-do a Mustang – plus the price of the car? What’s with that? Well, it’s a lot like education. What part do you leave undone or cheapen down to nothing and still call it a quality education? You can build a wonderful building and fill it with teachers but without good brakes and tires you can’t take it out on the road. Write to Kay & Jared’s for next year. autoknown@aol.com

ROXBURY F

ARM

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

& GARDEN CENTER

Since 1929

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Wild Bird Feeders/ Bird Baths Organic Gardening Products Home Brewer & Vintner Supplies American Made Tools

Front Porch Fredericksburg

online: www.save7lives.org in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

Rim Vining is a July kind of guy.

Come Play With Us This Summer Key Board Classes ~ Ages 3 to Adult Music Theatre Camp ~ Ages 7 & Up Schedule Posted on Website

Dr. Melissa DeLauter practices veterinary medicine at White Oak Animal Hospital.

Front porch fredericksburg

540-371-4526

207 William Street

www.ymsfred.com

Certified Experienced Staff YAMAHA MUSIC SCHOOL OF FREDERICKBURG Located in Downtown Fredericksburg for Over 40 Years front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

21


Senior Care elder abuse By Karl Karch To raise awareness and promote a better understanding of abuse and neglect, the period from mid-May through mid-June is designated Elder Abuse Awareness Month with June 15 designated as World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. In fiscal 2012, Virginia Adult Protective Services (APS) received 19,990 reports of adult abuse, neglect, or exploitation - an increase of 11.4% over 2011. Of these, 16,473 were investigated and 9,610 were substantiated. Unfortunately, the problem is actually much worse. National studies estimate that less than 20% of elder abuse is reported, and a May 2011 New York State report found that less than 5% were reported. Various types of elder abuse include: Physical – intentional infliction of physical pain or injury. Mental/Psychological – intentional infliction of mental anguish by verbal assault, threat, intimidation, humiliation, or other means. Sexual – unwanted sexual activity. Neglect – failure by those responsible to provide food, shelter, health care, or protection for a vulnerable elder. Self-n neglect – failure to provide one’s self with the necessities of life in a way that puts the person’s health, safety, or wellbeing at risk. Financial exploitation – illegal use of an adult’s resources or property for another individual’s profit or advantage. Physical and financial abuses are what most people first think about when abuse is mentioned. However, the Virginia APS 2012 report stated that 54% were self-neglect, followed by 21% involving neglect. The others were financial (9%), physical (7%), mental (6%), other exploitation (2%), and sexual (1%). Let’s take a closer look at selfneglect. What are some of the signs? Not eating to the point of malnourishment.

Wearing clothes that are filthy, torn, or not suited for the weather. Living in filthy, unsanitary, or hazardous conditions like hoarding. Not getting needed medical care or taking medicines. Skin rashes or bed sores. Inadequate supervision, especially as it relates to cognitive impairment. While self-neglect is a serious problem, solutions are not always clear. On the one hand, we don’t want to let any abuse go unreported. But, if the person is mentally competent and chooses not to properly care for himself, he has a right to make bad choices and refuse help. So what should you do if you suspect neglect? If the situation is serious, call APS. They will maintain confidentiality, investigate, and do everything possible to ensure the person’s safety and well-being. However, if the situation is not extreme, talk to the person about your concern and offer support. Human interaction is important. The self-neglect cases we’ve encountered generally involved social isolation. By simply providing companionship and engaging our clients in activities, they had a reason to change. For example, our agency received a call from the hospital to provide transitional care for a patient being discharged with a broken leg. We discovered that she was a hoarder and her apartment was so cluttered it caused her to fall and break her leg. She was unable to bathe properly because the bathroom was so cluttered. Several of our staff de-cluttered her apartment, filled two dumpsters, and provided much needed companionship and homecare services. We also re-connected her with her estranged daughter. As a result, she had positive things to look forward to and keep herself and her apartment clean. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services. go to .homeinstead.com/FredericksburgVA

Soaking various cuts of meat in a marinade is good for adding flavor as well as helping to tenderize the meat. A proper marinade should contain an acidic ingredient such as vinegar or wine, oil such as olive oil, and seasonings such as herbs and spices. Citrus fruit juices may be used in place of the vinegar or wine to provide the acidic ingredient that is necessary to soften the tissues of the meat. There are several important points to remember when using a marinade: The marinade should totally cover the meat in order for it to work effectively. When using tender cuts of beef, a soaking time of 2 hours or less is all that is required because the marinade is used basically to flavor the meat. Tougher cuts of beef should be soaked in the marinade for at least several hours or overnight in order to tenderize the meat as well as flavor it. Always marinate meat in the refrigerator. Since the marinade contains an acidic ingredient, reactive containers such as metal bowls should not be used. It is best to use containers such as glass or plastic bowls or plastic bags that can be sealed. Marinades containing tomato or sugar should be used towards the end of grilling or broiling, since they tend to burn food. Marinades containing oil or butter tend to cause flare-ups when meat is grilled. When meat has been marinated for a long period of time it will shorten the cooking time. Twelve hours of marinating will reduce the cooking time by 30 to 35%.

Reuse: Marinade should not be reused for any other purpose because of the bacteria that may be present from having been in contact with raw meat. The only way marinade can be reused is to boil it thoroughly for use as a basting liquid or as part of a sauce for the meat.

Energy ~ Spirit ~ Intuition ~ Essences

Nestled under the shade trees on Charles Street, directly across from the James Monroe Museum is the shop of Suzy Woollam, aptly named The Scenter of Town. Suzy is a Certified Aroma therapist and Reiki Master/ Instructor. The products that are available in her store include essential oils, herbs and supplements, gemstones and crystals. The services that she offers include Aromatherapeutic massage, Reiki Treatments, Reflexology, Gemstone Healing and personalized blending. If you are not familiar with holistic alternatives, some definitions might be useful. Aromatherapy and the use of essential oils have been recorded as far back as the 1st century, but the word was first coined somewhere around 1907. The methods of applying the oils include aerial diffusion (environmental fragrance),

direct inhalation for respiratory issues and topical applications for massage, baths, compresses and therapeutic skin care. Though there is debate as to the scientific evidence, it is generally accepted as a viable alternative to treatment for a variety of ailments, both physical and mental. Reiki is a hands-on energy healing technique that originated in Japan as a spiritual practice. There are two main branches of Reiki, traditional and Western and practices vary widely in application. Western practices use a palm or hands-on technique to transfer universal energy, which promotes self healing and equilibrium. Reflexology is a practice that uses the application of pressure to points located on the feet, hands or ears to activate the energy centers of the body. There is some historical reference as far back as 2450 B.C. on walls in an Egyptian tomb that depict men massaging feet and hands. The premise is that the feet and hands are especially sensitive, and the entire body is mapped into “reflexes.” Suzy stated that her interest in holistic therapy derived from a time in her life when she was dealing with emotional turmoil and depression. She became interested in finding natural methods to help deal with these issues. In the present age of “just take a pill,” these types of treatments can be a viable alternative. She began with Aromatherapy in 1990, and discovered a source of healing in the Essential Oils connected to this practice.

Things used in the past by our elders, like lavender and aloe, are again taking a forefront in healing practices. As she delved into the practice of Aromatherapy, she also became interested in other methods to help people find relief for many physical and mental ailments. She is a Reiki Master and instructor, the highest level one can achieve. She is a Clinical Hypnotherapist, and received her Doctor of Naturopathy from Trinity College of Natural Health. With healthcare again taking a forefront in the national and local arena, these methods are alternatives that cannot be ignored. Suzy has a bursting desire to help people. In the brief time we spent together, I felt in touch with someone who has reached her potential in so many ways. Her outlook on her professional modality says it all: “I am an approved continuing education provider for NCBTMB. There are so many therapists in our community who need C’s for their practice; I want them to know they can do it locally on a schedule that is easy for them. We’ve all got to help each other!” Suzy’s website www.thescenteroftown.com explains many of the available services and practices. Her Aromatherapy Bar has a scent for every need. In this age of being connected, she is also on Facebook and Twitter. Suzy does a lot of one-on-one sessions to determine the type of practice that could assist people in healing. Just give her a call (540-372-4145) to set up an appointment, or stop in at 907 Charles for a little chat.

Mary Lynn Powers writes frequently for Front Porch.

` Gentle, Individualized Chiropractic Care ` Cranio-Sacral Balancing (Sacro

Enhance the Body’s Natural Healing Abilities. Kandra Orr, MS, EEMCP, is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine and Raindrop (Essential Oils) Practitioner.

online: www.save7lives.org

Please Call for an Appointment (540) 840 - 5369 kandraorr.com

in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Front porch fredericksburg

By mary lynn powers

SPECIALIZING IN:

Use the Body’s Energy Systems to Create and Maintain Balance and Well-Being.

June 2013

Suzy Woollam: holistic & alternative medicine

Healthcare For the Whole Person

Natural Essential Energies LLC

22

Wellness

Safe Grilling with Marinades & Rubs

Occipital Technique - SOT) ` Addressing Your Total Health Needs with Natural, Holistic Treatment Methods ` Detoxification/Weight Loss Nutritional Programs

Your Hot Yoga Studio 540-659-0777 staffordhouseofyoga.com

Dr. Christine Thompson

971 Garrisonville Rd Stafford

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

23


Senior Care elder abuse By Karl Karch To raise awareness and promote a better understanding of abuse and neglect, the period from mid-May through mid-June is designated Elder Abuse Awareness Month with June 15 designated as World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. In fiscal 2012, Virginia Adult Protective Services (APS) received 19,990 reports of adult abuse, neglect, or exploitation - an increase of 11.4% over 2011. Of these, 16,473 were investigated and 9,610 were substantiated. Unfortunately, the problem is actually much worse. National studies estimate that less than 20% of elder abuse is reported, and a May 2011 New York State report found that less than 5% were reported. Various types of elder abuse include: Physical – intentional infliction of physical pain or injury. Mental/Psychological – intentional infliction of mental anguish by verbal assault, threat, intimidation, humiliation, or other means. Sexual – unwanted sexual activity. Neglect – failure by those responsible to provide food, shelter, health care, or protection for a vulnerable elder. Self-n neglect – failure to provide one’s self with the necessities of life in a way that puts the person’s health, safety, or wellbeing at risk. Financial exploitation – illegal use of an adult’s resources or property for another individual’s profit or advantage. Physical and financial abuses are what most people first think about when abuse is mentioned. However, the Virginia APS 2012 report stated that 54% were self-neglect, followed by 21% involving neglect. The others were financial (9%), physical (7%), mental (6%), other exploitation (2%), and sexual (1%). Let’s take a closer look at selfneglect. What are some of the signs? Not eating to the point of malnourishment.

Wearing clothes that are filthy, torn, or not suited for the weather. Living in filthy, unsanitary, or hazardous conditions like hoarding. Not getting needed medical care or taking medicines. Skin rashes or bed sores. Inadequate supervision, especially as it relates to cognitive impairment. While self-neglect is a serious problem, solutions are not always clear. On the one hand, we don’t want to let any abuse go unreported. But, if the person is mentally competent and chooses not to properly care for himself, he has a right to make bad choices and refuse help. So what should you do if you suspect neglect? If the situation is serious, call APS. They will maintain confidentiality, investigate, and do everything possible to ensure the person’s safety and well-being. However, if the situation is not extreme, talk to the person about your concern and offer support. Human interaction is important. The self-neglect cases we’ve encountered generally involved social isolation. By simply providing companionship and engaging our clients in activities, they had a reason to change. For example, our agency received a call from the hospital to provide transitional care for a patient being discharged with a broken leg. We discovered that she was a hoarder and her apartment was so cluttered it caused her to fall and break her leg. She was unable to bathe properly because the bathroom was so cluttered. Several of our staff de-cluttered her apartment, filled two dumpsters, and provided much needed companionship and homecare services. We also re-connected her with her estranged daughter. As a result, she had positive things to look forward to and keep herself and her apartment clean. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services. go to .homeinstead.com/FredericksburgVA

Soaking various cuts of meat in a marinade is good for adding flavor as well as helping to tenderize the meat. A proper marinade should contain an acidic ingredient such as vinegar or wine, oil such as olive oil, and seasonings such as herbs and spices. Citrus fruit juices may be used in place of the vinegar or wine to provide the acidic ingredient that is necessary to soften the tissues of the meat. There are several important points to remember when using a marinade: The marinade should totally cover the meat in order for it to work effectively. When using tender cuts of beef, a soaking time of 2 hours or less is all that is required because the marinade is used basically to flavor the meat. Tougher cuts of beef should be soaked in the marinade for at least several hours or overnight in order to tenderize the meat as well as flavor it. Always marinate meat in the refrigerator. Since the marinade contains an acidic ingredient, reactive containers such as metal bowls should not be used. It is best to use containers such as glass or plastic bowls or plastic bags that can be sealed. Marinades containing tomato or sugar should be used towards the end of grilling or broiling, since they tend to burn food. Marinades containing oil or butter tend to cause flare-ups when meat is grilled. When meat has been marinated for a long period of time it will shorten the cooking time. Twelve hours of marinating will reduce the cooking time by 30 to 35%.

Reuse: Marinade should not be reused for any other purpose because of the bacteria that may be present from having been in contact with raw meat. The only way marinade can be reused is to boil it thoroughly for use as a basting liquid or as part of a sauce for the meat.

Energy ~ Spirit ~ Intuition ~ Essences

Nestled under the shade trees on Charles Street, directly across from the James Monroe Museum is the shop of Suzy Woollam, aptly named The Scenter of Town. Suzy is a Certified Aroma therapist and Reiki Master/ Instructor. The products that are available in her store include essential oils, herbs and supplements, gemstones and crystals. The services that she offers include Aromatherapeutic massage, Reiki Treatments, Reflexology, Gemstone Healing and personalized blending. If you are not familiar with holistic alternatives, some definitions might be useful. Aromatherapy and the use of essential oils have been recorded as far back as the 1st century, but the word was first coined somewhere around 1907. The methods of applying the oils include aerial diffusion (environmental fragrance),

direct inhalation for respiratory issues and topical applications for massage, baths, compresses and therapeutic skin care. Though there is debate as to the scientific evidence, it is generally accepted as a viable alternative to treatment for a variety of ailments, both physical and mental. Reiki is a hands-on energy healing technique that originated in Japan as a spiritual practice. There are two main branches of Reiki, traditional and Western and practices vary widely in application. Western practices use a palm or hands-on technique to transfer universal energy, which promotes self healing and equilibrium. Reflexology is a practice that uses the application of pressure to points located on the feet, hands or ears to activate the energy centers of the body. There is some historical reference as far back as 2450 B.C. on walls in an Egyptian tomb that depict men massaging feet and hands. The premise is that the feet and hands are especially sensitive, and the entire body is mapped into “reflexes.” Suzy stated that her interest in holistic therapy derived from a time in her life when she was dealing with emotional turmoil and depression. She became interested in finding natural methods to help deal with these issues. In the present age of “just take a pill,” these types of treatments can be a viable alternative. She began with Aromatherapy in 1990, and discovered a source of healing in the Essential Oils connected to this practice.

Things used in the past by our elders, like lavender and aloe, are again taking a forefront in healing practices. As she delved into the practice of Aromatherapy, she also became interested in other methods to help people find relief for many physical and mental ailments. She is a Reiki Master and instructor, the highest level one can achieve. She is a Clinical Hypnotherapist, and received her Doctor of Naturopathy from Trinity College of Natural Health. With healthcare again taking a forefront in the national and local arena, these methods are alternatives that cannot be ignored. Suzy has a bursting desire to help people. In the brief time we spent together, I felt in touch with someone who has reached her potential in so many ways. Her outlook on her professional modality says it all: “I am an approved continuing education provider for NCBTMB. There are so many therapists in our community who need C’s for their practice; I want them to know they can do it locally on a schedule that is easy for them. We’ve all got to help each other!” Suzy’s website www.thescenteroftown.com explains many of the available services and practices. Her Aromatherapy Bar has a scent for every need. In this age of being connected, she is also on Facebook and Twitter. Suzy does a lot of one-on-one sessions to determine the type of practice that could assist people in healing. Just give her a call (540-372-4145) to set up an appointment, or stop in at 907 Charles for a little chat.

Mary Lynn Powers writes frequently for Front Porch.

` Gentle, Individualized Chiropractic Care ` Cranio-Sacral Balancing (Sacro

Enhance the Body’s Natural Healing Abilities. Kandra Orr, MS, EEMCP, is a Certified Eden Energy Medicine and Raindrop (Essential Oils) Practitioner.

online: www.save7lives.org

Please Call for an Appointment (540) 840 - 5369 kandraorr.com

in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Front porch fredericksburg

By mary lynn powers

SPECIALIZING IN:

Use the Body’s Energy Systems to Create and Maintain Balance and Well-Being.

June 2013

Suzy Woollam: holistic & alternative medicine

Healthcare For the Whole Person

Natural Essential Energies LLC

22

Wellness

Safe Grilling with Marinades & Rubs

Occipital Technique - SOT) ` Addressing Your Total Health Needs with Natural, Holistic Treatment Methods ` Detoxification/Weight Loss Nutritional Programs

Your Hot Yoga Studio 540-659-0777 staffordhouseofyoga.com

Dr. Christine Thompson

971 Garrisonville Rd Stafford

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

23


Art In The ‘Burg

Betsy Glassie STUDIO: LIBERTYTOWN 916 LIBERTY ST. FREDERICKSBURG, VA

Escaping Cicadas & Waxing Nostalgic By Lezlie Cheryl TGIS! (Thank God It’s Summer!) I hate bugs, always have. They’re the dark side of summer. It’s safe to say I’m phobic about them, not hard to imagine why if you grew up in Florida dodging bat-like waterbugs (a.k.a. giant flying cockroaches). But I actually like hearing the cicadas “talking” to each other every morning and seeing them flying around – from the safety of my apartment window, that is. If they start swarming when you’re out and about, just take refuge in one of the many galleries downtown and escape into the serenity of some really good art.

work of art in itself. You can find a great assortment of cool vintage stuff from clothes to vinyl records to Polaroid cameras at Horseshoes & Hand Grenades Vintage Boutique. Set your inner artist free at 1009 Princess Anne Street. Find something that speaks to you, make it yours, give it new life, add a modern twist and create your own one-of-a-kind wearable art. www.facebook.com/horseshoesvintage Round out your day with a visit to PonShop Art Studio & Gallery at 712 Caroline Street and check out their latest community art exhibit - “Remixed” – featuring works by over 35 local and regional artists. “Remixed” is an exceptional collection where each artist expresses his or her own creative vision on the non-traditional medium of vinyl record albums. A great recycling choice for a crate of old albums that would otherwise have ended up at the dump, artist and owner Gabriel Pons has been re-purposing albums for years and was inspired to host an exhibit inviting other artists to do the same. “ Dragon” by Barbara Posey “Remixed” opens First At 911 Charles Street, local artist Friday, June 7th with DJ Climax spinning Barbara Posey’s exhibit at Artful his own vinyl for your audio Dimensions Gallery offers a look at the entertainment.www.ponshopstudio.com world from her unique perspective. Personally, I cherish my old “Story” is a display of three-dimensional vinyls and hold onto even those that some felt artworks, each piece suggesting its might consider embarrassing, e.g. Andy own narrative from the characters she’s Gibb’s “Shadow Dancing.” Well I happen created needle-felting and wet-felting with to also own a few threads from a sweaty wool, silk and other fibers. towel Mr. Gibb threw to the hordes of Posey says, “Needle-felting is a screaming prepubescent girls at a concert, very forgiving medium... with a rich circa 1978. In the madness of that universe of possibilities, from hats and moment, said precious towel was suddenly boots to fully sculpted animal or human in shreds, its remnants carefully divided figures, from simple geometric designs to amongst my little circle of shrieking richly colored wall art as detailed as oil lunatics. I came across those threads in a paintings, from caricatures to classically recent move and was amused to see them modeled figures. It is a very short step to so safely preserved along with my vintage wet-felting, perhaps the most ancient Andy Gibb concert brochure. technique of creating cloth that human beings ever came up with. Combining the two techniques is more fun than should be legal.” Lezlie Cheryl is publicity chair for the FCCA, and patron of artists everywhere. Posey’s “Story” conjures a sense Contact her at lezliecheryl@gmail.com. of nostalgia as her felt characters bring tales to life. Meet the artist at the opening reception on Friday, June 7th from 6pm9pm. www.artfuldimensionsgallery.com If you’re like me, you consider pretty much anything vintage to be a

24

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

by megan byrnes

BETSYGLASSIE.COM

Cruz, Meg Dumlao, and Kate Miceli. Future’s so bright, you gotta wear shades!

BGLASSIE@AOL.COM

The Historic Half! Locals Brian Downing and Jack Morrison both ran as did requisite famous person Sean Astin. Patrick Fernandez, L.t. j.g. from Alexandria, won the race with the 4th fastest time in the history of the half. Fernandez said, “I was a little nervous about Hospital Hill…but it really wasn’t as bad as I thought” to which I say: I get exhausted just driving up Hospital Hill.

540-899-6556

We have 100’s of JewelPops in Stock with more arriving all the time! Pop in & take a look.

Scene: 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847 www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesday 10-6:30

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Seen:

Aaron

Spicer

eating

cicadas, roasted and fried up (for real); Alex Capshaw-T Taylor (above) living it up in Dubai; Sherri Eskam (below) enjoying happy hour at Cancun Margarita Grill; Gina Limbrick at Hyperion Espresso; Cissy Nelson reading the Front Porch on her front porch; Steve Barry at Bonefish Grill.

Congratulations to the supertalented Green Boys – they celebrated the release of their 2nd album, “Oh Delia” at the Camel in Richmond last month. The boys- Ryan Green, Sean Green, Zack Miller and Michael Emmons- have been hard at work on this album for months and even raised money on Kickstarter to get the album out on CD. Mikaela Terese (below) and friends Emily Schuller and Rebecca Lynn were there for their first listen of the new songs.

An unidentified man in

gorilla suit on Princess Anne Street. He wouldn’t give his name (shocker) and said he was only wearing the suit because he lost a bet (shocker, again).

Seen:

Christie Doherty and

Jenny Dupuis at the Taylor Swift show at the Verizon Center with their daughters in tow. Yes, this means I was at a Taylor Swift show and no, I didn’t have anyone under the age of 15 with me to validate my presence.

Seen:

Creighton Bell, son of

Stephanie and Hal, graduated V-Tech in engineering, just like his NASA dad. Congrats Creighton! (below)

Seen:

Maura Wilson Schnieder

found a flash interactive storytelling installation on lower Charles Street; the boards encouraged passers-by to anonymously declare the one thing they’d like to do before they die. Dreams ranged from “learn to drive’ to “watch my granddaughters get married.” Cute! Yet another class of seniors graduated UMW last month; their day was a gorgeous one (even though it threatened ran all morning); congrats to those seniors familiar to the Scene

and Heard: Cristina Martinez, Monique Dela

Congratulations Happy May birthday

to

Eric EZ Herring, Brad Hedrick, Tim Bray, Ashleigh Chevalier, Jake “Mr. Meatball” Morgan, Mike Craig, Larry “big deal” Tomayko, and Will Mackintosh.

to high

school seniors Zoe Tapp and Amanda Waggoner (above) – the two were each awarded a “Christine D. Hartigan Forte Music Scholarship” for 2013; Zoe is a vocal music student and Amanda is a piano student, both at Forte Music Studios…

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

25


Art In The ‘Burg

Betsy Glassie STUDIO: LIBERTYTOWN 916 LIBERTY ST. FREDERICKSBURG, VA

Escaping Cicadas & Waxing Nostalgic By Lezlie Cheryl TGIS! (Thank God It’s Summer!) I hate bugs, always have. They’re the dark side of summer. It’s safe to say I’m phobic about them, not hard to imagine why if you grew up in Florida dodging bat-like waterbugs (a.k.a. giant flying cockroaches). But I actually like hearing the cicadas “talking” to each other every morning and seeing them flying around – from the safety of my apartment window, that is. If they start swarming when you’re out and about, just take refuge in one of the many galleries downtown and escape into the serenity of some really good art.

work of art in itself. You can find a great assortment of cool vintage stuff from clothes to vinyl records to Polaroid cameras at Horseshoes & Hand Grenades Vintage Boutique. Set your inner artist free at 1009 Princess Anne Street. Find something that speaks to you, make it yours, give it new life, add a modern twist and create your own one-of-a-kind wearable art. www.facebook.com/horseshoesvintage Round out your day with a visit to PonShop Art Studio & Gallery at 712 Caroline Street and check out their latest community art exhibit - “Remixed” – featuring works by over 35 local and regional artists. “Remixed” is an exceptional collection where each artist expresses his or her own creative vision on the non-traditional medium of vinyl record albums. A great recycling choice for a crate of old albums that would otherwise have ended up at the dump, artist and owner Gabriel Pons has been re-purposing albums for years and was inspired to host an exhibit inviting other artists to do the same. “ Dragon” by Barbara Posey “Remixed” opens First At 911 Charles Street, local artist Friday, June 7th with DJ Climax spinning Barbara Posey’s exhibit at Artful his own vinyl for your audio Dimensions Gallery offers a look at the entertainment.www.ponshopstudio.com world from her unique perspective. Personally, I cherish my old “Story” is a display of three-dimensional vinyls and hold onto even those that some felt artworks, each piece suggesting its might consider embarrassing, e.g. Andy own narrative from the characters she’s Gibb’s “Shadow Dancing.” Well I happen created needle-felting and wet-felting with to also own a few threads from a sweaty wool, silk and other fibers. towel Mr. Gibb threw to the hordes of Posey says, “Needle-felting is a screaming prepubescent girls at a concert, very forgiving medium... with a rich circa 1978. In the madness of that universe of possibilities, from hats and moment, said precious towel was suddenly boots to fully sculpted animal or human in shreds, its remnants carefully divided figures, from simple geometric designs to amongst my little circle of shrieking richly colored wall art as detailed as oil lunatics. I came across those threads in a paintings, from caricatures to classically recent move and was amused to see them modeled figures. It is a very short step to so safely preserved along with my vintage wet-felting, perhaps the most ancient Andy Gibb concert brochure. technique of creating cloth that human beings ever came up with. Combining the two techniques is more fun than should be legal.” Lezlie Cheryl is publicity chair for the FCCA, and patron of artists everywhere. Posey’s “Story” conjures a sense Contact her at lezliecheryl@gmail.com. of nostalgia as her felt characters bring tales to life. Meet the artist at the opening reception on Friday, June 7th from 6pm9pm. www.artfuldimensionsgallery.com If you’re like me, you consider pretty much anything vintage to be a

24

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

by megan byrnes

BETSYGLASSIE.COM

Cruz, Meg Dumlao, and Kate Miceli. Future’s so bright, you gotta wear shades!

BGLASSIE@AOL.COM

The Historic Half! Locals Brian Downing and Jack Morrison both ran as did requisite famous person Sean Astin. Patrick Fernandez, L.t. j.g. from Alexandria, won the race with the 4th fastest time in the history of the half. Fernandez said, “I was a little nervous about Hospital Hill…but it really wasn’t as bad as I thought” to which I say: I get exhausted just driving up Hospital Hill.

540-899-6556

We have 100’s of JewelPops in Stock with more arriving all the time! Pop in & take a look.

Scene: 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847 www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesday 10-6:30

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

Seen:

Aaron

Spicer

eating

cicadas, roasted and fried up (for real); Alex Capshaw-T Taylor (above) living it up in Dubai; Sherri Eskam (below) enjoying happy hour at Cancun Margarita Grill; Gina Limbrick at Hyperion Espresso; Cissy Nelson reading the Front Porch on her front porch; Steve Barry at Bonefish Grill.

Congratulations to the supertalented Green Boys – they celebrated the release of their 2nd album, “Oh Delia” at the Camel in Richmond last month. The boys- Ryan Green, Sean Green, Zack Miller and Michael Emmons- have been hard at work on this album for months and even raised money on Kickstarter to get the album out on CD. Mikaela Terese (below) and friends Emily Schuller and Rebecca Lynn were there for their first listen of the new songs.

An unidentified man in

gorilla suit on Princess Anne Street. He wouldn’t give his name (shocker) and said he was only wearing the suit because he lost a bet (shocker, again).

Seen:

Christie Doherty and

Jenny Dupuis at the Taylor Swift show at the Verizon Center with their daughters in tow. Yes, this means I was at a Taylor Swift show and no, I didn’t have anyone under the age of 15 with me to validate my presence.

Seen:

Creighton Bell, son of

Stephanie and Hal, graduated V-Tech in engineering, just like his NASA dad. Congrats Creighton! (below)

Seen:

Maura Wilson Schnieder

found a flash interactive storytelling installation on lower Charles Street; the boards encouraged passers-by to anonymously declare the one thing they’d like to do before they die. Dreams ranged from “learn to drive’ to “watch my granddaughters get married.” Cute! Yet another class of seniors graduated UMW last month; their day was a gorgeous one (even though it threatened ran all morning); congrats to those seniors familiar to the Scene

and Heard: Cristina Martinez, Monique Dela

Congratulations Happy May birthday

to

Eric EZ Herring, Brad Hedrick, Tim Bray, Ashleigh Chevalier, Jake “Mr. Meatball” Morgan, Mike Craig, Larry “big deal” Tomayko, and Will Mackintosh.

to high

school seniors Zoe Tapp and Amanda Waggoner (above) – the two were each awarded a “Christine D. Hartigan Forte Music Scholarship” for 2013; Zoe is a vocal music student and Amanda is a piano student, both at Forte Music Studios…

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

25


Now Open For Submissions

COMMUNITY LINK

P. Rose Gallery

Courtesy of WFVA and Front Porch

words a writer longs to hear

sweet 16 ...and 61

By susan carter morgan Writers write for many reasons, among them to be read. Though there are more literary journals around the world than you can name, the Fredericksburg area will soon have another vehicle for area writers to share their work. Writing Around Town is a fledgling online journal sponsored by the Downtown Writing Studio and is now open for submissions. Ok, perhaps this is a little selfserving. After all, the studio is mine. I am creating a physical space at LibertyTown Arts Workshop for emerging writers to connect. But our goals are bigger than that. We want to establish a magazine that shares a range of styles and literary genres. We have many strong writers in the region, and we’re hoping to be a journal that includes those publishing for the first time as well as established writers. “Every community should have a kick-ass literary magazine,” said local author Steve Watkins. “I’m thrilled to see that Susan Carter Morgan is the one

taking the reins on this one. She has deep roots in the community as a teacher and journalist. It’s great to see her giving Fredericksburg this much-needed literary voice.” Submissions are open until the end of July. We would love to see some Fredericksburg-related themes: a memory of eating at Goolrick’s, a first trip to the train station, a Saturday afternoon stroll on the new path along the river. But don’t limit yourself. Visit the submissions tab on the website for guidelines. We will feature the best writing in each issue, but we will also publish as many pieces as possible. Not all writing will be accepted for publication as we need to balance topics, styles, and genres. But, no risk, no reward, right? Take a look at the first few lines of local writer Elizabeth Seaver’s gorgeous poem. She is one of our first contributors: Cells, kissed by time and strung together,make a brilliant, fragile necklace,tear drops on a spider’sceaseless weaving. One moment, hanging

on one moment, lashedto one moment. “Our area is so rich in history and the art community so vibrant that we know there are writers out there who just need a little nudge. We hope you take this opportunity to indulge your creative urges,” said co-editor Wendy Gayle. As we move forward, we hope to create an annual magazine, a hard copy, of the best of the best. But that’s up to you. First we need your submissions. Ready? Flip open your laptops, sharpen your pencils (or however you write) and dive in. We are looking for writing that is innovative or traditional and engages us in a fresh way. We will not accept previously published work, but simultaneous submissions are allowed. For more information, visit the website: fredericksburgwriters.com Susan Carter Morgan is proprietor of the Downtown Writing Studio.

by sara mattingly

Hours By Appointment 371-8 8499 709 Caroline Street

www.prosegallery.com

From Whimsy to Wonder to Wow: Arts for Kids Abound this Summer By Kathryn Willis Dance, Music, Painting, Drawing, Theatre, Crafts — no matter what the flavor, the arts help children explore their world, and discover a lot about themselves along the way. This summer, the Fredericksburg region offers a bounty of choices to ignite the imagination of young people, from pre-school through high school. along-tthe-rriver.org A visit to arts-a guides those seeking arts experiences for children through dozens of creative opportunities throughout the region. There, a quick click on Kids Summer Camps and Classes will yield a list of

dozens of arts events, from early arts exploration to advanced workshops. No matter the choice, the arts are good for children. Research consistently shows that children who participate in the arts score higher on achievement tests; what’s more, the more arts classes, the higher the scores. In addition, arts students participate more in community service, and report less boredom in school. Improved socialization skills, task completion, motivation to achieve, and ability to think critically are also linked to participation in the arts.

The Arts & Cultural Council’s arts-a along-tthe-rriver.org, an online arts and events service, supports the arts in the central Rappahannock region, and encourages arts participation. As a part of its mission, the Arts Council sponsors this online arts directory as a free service. Further, visitors to the site can add their own page to promote arts opportunities and events if they are not listed. Children and adults alike will discover a wild diversity of arts opportunities available throughout the region. Kathryn Willis is Executive Director of Arts Along The River, 540-903-3186.

THE POETRY MAN - BY FRANK FRATOE You make everything all right. – Phoebe Snow

On this transparent evening Jupiter, Venus, and Mercury have risen closely in the sky to form a planetary triangle with no clouds to block them.

Now a triple bewitching hour brings fragrance to the night from lilac, cherry, wildrose when a man and woman loving inhale the scent of moonlight. Frank Fratoe lives and writes in Fredericksburg.

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

540-891-9911

Triple Motif

A whippoorwill’s three notes churr and echo out a garden that fills the ascending air with intonation of blossoms where leafage has just begun.

26

Advanced Dental Care of Fredericksburg

$79

In July 1997, when Rob Grogan’s wife Virginia began to publish Front Porch, literally from a dream, it launched what has become a mainstay of local good news in the Fredericksburg area; a consistent monthly (192 consecutive months and counting) content of what one reader, Jim Corry of Boston, described as “monthly love letters to Fredericksburg.” The Grogans had adopted their daughter, Alexis Mary, the spring before the start of the magazine and had decided to build a home-based business that would tap into their talents while allowing them to raise Alexis together at home. With Virginia’s background in marketing and Rob’s as a writer, it was natural. Their love for community and goodness made the content choice a breeze. But first, there was that dream: While considering a number of business ideas, Virginia awoke one morning from a dreamy night’s sleep with the magazine outlined in her head. “She had literally dreamed of it,” boasts Rob. The rest, as they say, is history, a mostly positive history that includes 16 years of community. “No wonder that the 21 years that Virginia and I have lived here mark the longest time that either one of us has lived in one place.” Fredericksburg, he says, “is the lovely definition of what a community should be.” By a “mostly positive” history, we defer to the past 12 months for the fly in the ointment. Last June, Rob suffered severe abdominal pain that led to a recent diagnosis of carcinoid cancer, a rare disease that fortunately grows very slowly. The past twelve months have been difficult, yet also inspiring for the Grogans. “You realize the greatness of goodness, of family and friends and community. You feel what really matters.

You aspire to remain positive and never give up,” says Rob, who acknowledges the stressful impact of illness on his caregiving family and friends. “I am blessed to have them.” He feels for those who have no one to turn to in a time of need, and sings high praise for the Fredericksburg community, “not only for how it has responded to me, but how it represents quality of living and manifests itself as a model for what a community should value the most – its people.” Listen in at 8 a.m. on Father’s Day (and Rob’s 61 st birthday) — Sunday, June 16th — on NewsTalk 1230 WFVA to hear the story of Front Porch Magazine. With host Ted Schubel on Community Link. Get to an AM radio or listen live to the program at newstalk1230.net

Sara Mattingly is a contributor to Front Porch.

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Front Porch Fredericksburg

$650

New Patient Special Includes Exam, X-Rays and Cleaning

Per Arch Full AcrylicDenture or Partial

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 7/1/13 A $239.00 Value

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 7/1/13 A $1100.00 Value

Because we care for you! 10524 Spotsylvania Ave. Ste #104 Fredericksburg, VA front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

27


Now Open For Submissions

COMMUNITY LINK

P. Rose Gallery

Courtesy of WFVA and Front Porch

words a writer longs to hear

sweet 16 ...and 61

By susan carter morgan Writers write for many reasons, among them to be read. Though there are more literary journals around the world than you can name, the Fredericksburg area will soon have another vehicle for area writers to share their work. Writing Around Town is a fledgling online journal sponsored by the Downtown Writing Studio and is now open for submissions. Ok, perhaps this is a little selfserving. After all, the studio is mine. I am creating a physical space at LibertyTown Arts Workshop for emerging writers to connect. But our goals are bigger than that. We want to establish a magazine that shares a range of styles and literary genres. We have many strong writers in the region, and we’re hoping to be a journal that includes those publishing for the first time as well as established writers. “Every community should have a kick-ass literary magazine,” said local author Steve Watkins. “I’m thrilled to see that Susan Carter Morgan is the one

taking the reins on this one. She has deep roots in the community as a teacher and journalist. It’s great to see her giving Fredericksburg this much-needed literary voice.” Submissions are open until the end of July. We would love to see some Fredericksburg-related themes: a memory of eating at Goolrick’s, a first trip to the train station, a Saturday afternoon stroll on the new path along the river. But don’t limit yourself. Visit the submissions tab on the website for guidelines. We will feature the best writing in each issue, but we will also publish as many pieces as possible. Not all writing will be accepted for publication as we need to balance topics, styles, and genres. But, no risk, no reward, right? Take a look at the first few lines of local writer Elizabeth Seaver’s gorgeous poem. She is one of our first contributors: Cells, kissed by time and strung together,make a brilliant, fragile necklace,tear drops on a spider’sceaseless weaving. One moment, hanging

on one moment, lashedto one moment. “Our area is so rich in history and the art community so vibrant that we know there are writers out there who just need a little nudge. We hope you take this opportunity to indulge your creative urges,” said co-editor Wendy Gayle. As we move forward, we hope to create an annual magazine, a hard copy, of the best of the best. But that’s up to you. First we need your submissions. Ready? Flip open your laptops, sharpen your pencils (or however you write) and dive in. We are looking for writing that is innovative or traditional and engages us in a fresh way. We will not accept previously published work, but simultaneous submissions are allowed. For more information, visit the website: fredericksburgwriters.com Susan Carter Morgan is proprietor of the Downtown Writing Studio.

by sara mattingly

Hours By Appointment 371-8 8499 709 Caroline Street

www.prosegallery.com

From Whimsy to Wonder to Wow: Arts for Kids Abound this Summer By Kathryn Willis Dance, Music, Painting, Drawing, Theatre, Crafts — no matter what the flavor, the arts help children explore their world, and discover a lot about themselves along the way. This summer, the Fredericksburg region offers a bounty of choices to ignite the imagination of young people, from pre-school through high school. along-tthe-rriver.org A visit to arts-a guides those seeking arts experiences for children through dozens of creative opportunities throughout the region. There, a quick click on Kids Summer Camps and Classes will yield a list of

dozens of arts events, from early arts exploration to advanced workshops. No matter the choice, the arts are good for children. Research consistently shows that children who participate in the arts score higher on achievement tests; what’s more, the more arts classes, the higher the scores. In addition, arts students participate more in community service, and report less boredom in school. Improved socialization skills, task completion, motivation to achieve, and ability to think critically are also linked to participation in the arts.

The Arts & Cultural Council’s arts-a along-tthe-rriver.org, an online arts and events service, supports the arts in the central Rappahannock region, and encourages arts participation. As a part of its mission, the Arts Council sponsors this online arts directory as a free service. Further, visitors to the site can add their own page to promote arts opportunities and events if they are not listed. Children and adults alike will discover a wild diversity of arts opportunities available throughout the region. Kathryn Willis is Executive Director of Arts Along The River, 540-903-3186.

THE POETRY MAN - BY FRANK FRATOE You make everything all right. – Phoebe Snow

On this transparent evening Jupiter, Venus, and Mercury have risen closely in the sky to form a planetary triangle with no clouds to block them.

Now a triple bewitching hour brings fragrance to the night from lilac, cherry, wildrose when a man and woman loving inhale the scent of moonlight. Frank Fratoe lives and writes in Fredericksburg.

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

540-891-9911

Triple Motif

A whippoorwill’s three notes churr and echo out a garden that fills the ascending air with intonation of blossoms where leafage has just begun.

26

Advanced Dental Care of Fredericksburg

$79

In July 1997, when Rob Grogan’s wife Virginia began to publish Front Porch, literally from a dream, it launched what has become a mainstay of local good news in the Fredericksburg area; a consistent monthly (192 consecutive months and counting) content of what one reader, Jim Corry of Boston, described as “monthly love letters to Fredericksburg.” The Grogans had adopted their daughter, Alexis Mary, the spring before the start of the magazine and had decided to build a home-based business that would tap into their talents while allowing them to raise Alexis together at home. With Virginia’s background in marketing and Rob’s as a writer, it was natural. Their love for community and goodness made the content choice a breeze. But first, there was that dream: While considering a number of business ideas, Virginia awoke one morning from a dreamy night’s sleep with the magazine outlined in her head. “She had literally dreamed of it,” boasts Rob. The rest, as they say, is history, a mostly positive history that includes 16 years of community. “No wonder that the 21 years that Virginia and I have lived here mark the longest time that either one of us has lived in one place.” Fredericksburg, he says, “is the lovely definition of what a community should be.” By a “mostly positive” history, we defer to the past 12 months for the fly in the ointment. Last June, Rob suffered severe abdominal pain that led to a recent diagnosis of carcinoid cancer, a rare disease that fortunately grows very slowly. The past twelve months have been difficult, yet also inspiring for the Grogans. “You realize the greatness of goodness, of family and friends and community. You feel what really matters.

You aspire to remain positive and never give up,” says Rob, who acknowledges the stressful impact of illness on his caregiving family and friends. “I am blessed to have them.” He feels for those who have no one to turn to in a time of need, and sings high praise for the Fredericksburg community, “not only for how it has responded to me, but how it represents quality of living and manifests itself as a model for what a community should value the most – its people.” Listen in at 8 a.m. on Father’s Day (and Rob’s 61 st birthday) — Sunday, June 16th — on NewsTalk 1230 WFVA to hear the story of Front Porch Magazine. With host Ted Schubel on Community Link. Get to an AM radio or listen live to the program at newstalk1230.net

Sara Mattingly is a contributor to Front Porch.

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Front Porch Fredericksburg

$650

New Patient Special Includes Exam, X-Rays and Cleaning

Per Arch Full AcrylicDenture or Partial

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 7/1/13 A $239.00 Value

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 7/1/13 A $1100.00 Value

Because we care for you! 10524 Spotsylvania Ave. Ste #104 Fredericksburg, VA front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

27


$1001.50 Centennial Broadcasting OK for Tornado Victims

(L-R R) Dee Daniels, Chris Centore (from B101.5’s Chris and Dee In the Morning), Lynn Morgan, CEO/Director of Just A Hand, Shanna Cyphert, Sec/Treas, Just A Hand, Buzzy)

Wal-Mart location in Fredericksburg, B101.5 and NewsTalk 1230 WFVA listeners donated over 15,000 relief items and $1176.16 in cash. Just A Hand donated their entire spring and summer inventory of children’s clothing totaling nearly 5,000 pieces. Centennial’s $1001.50 donation was used to purchase children’s items such as playpens, baby formula, baby wipes, towels, pillows, and other day-to-day essential items needed by victims in Oklahoma. Supplies and cash collected during this relief drive were transported and delivered to The Memorial Road Church of Christ in Edmond, OK on Sunday afternoon courtesy of Alsop Trucking in Fredericksburg. The church is actively helping those affected by the disaster and will handle the distribution of donated items. “We at Centennial Broadcasting believe we have an obligation to use our radio stations to be of real service to our communities and our listeners. Our Fredericksburg listeners wanted to help the tornado victims of Moore, OK, so we helped make that possible,” said Centennial Broadcasting President/CEO, Allen Shaw. “I am so proud of our company, our Fredericksburg advertising partners, and more importantly, our listeners,” said

28

June 2013

everything in its place By c. ruth cassell

by Chuck Archer

Over the Memorial Day weekend, Centennial Broadcasting donated $1001.50 in support of Operation: Help Moore, a one-day Oklahoma tornado relief supply drive hosted by Centennial’s Fredericksburg, Virginia, radio outlets, B101.5 and NewsTalk 1230 WFVA, and the non-profit organization, Just A Hand. During a six-hour broadcast Saturday, May 25th, at the Southpoint

My Own Path

Tom Hamilton, Market Manager of B101.5 and NewsTalk 1230 WFVA. “It was amazing to watch so many in our community take time over a holiday to help those who reside 1300 miles away.” Shanna Cyphert, Secretary/Treasurer and lead organizer for Just A Hand said, “The outpouring of support from the Fredericksburg area has been overwhelming and has restored my faith in humanity. It is so exciting to be able to watch this little charity extend its assistance from Fredericksburg all the way out to Oklahoma. We never imagined being able to make this big of an impact.” Several local businesses and individuals were recognized for their support and donations: Southpoint (Fredericksburg) Wal-Mart; Shawn Alsop, Alsop Trucking Company; Jim Powell, Powell’s Furniture; Strength and Honor Motorcycle Club; Fredericksburg Area Chick-Fil-A; Papa John’s Pizza; Spotsylvania Sheriff’s Office; Stafford Peacekeepers Quilt Guild; Southpoint Quality Dental; Neibauer Dental. Centennial Broadcasting, based in Clemmons, North Carolina, owns and operates B101.5 and NewsTalk 1230 WFVA in Fredericksburg, Virginia, four radio stations and a cable television station in Winchester, and WLNI-FM in Lynchburg. Just A Hand is a 501(C)3 nonprofit corporation based in Spotsylvania, Virginia. Founded by CEO/Director Lynn Morgan in 2009, their mission statement is “Give of yourself and teach others to give. No matter how small the gesture, if you ease the burdens of another, you create a better place for us all.” Chuck Archer works at WBQB B101.5 and NewsTalk 1230 WFVA.

Front porch fredericksburg

Peppercorns rattle as I push past a fresh packet of red chili peppers. We always kept those on hand to finish the dhal. Red Chili peppers, garlic cloves, white cumin seeds dropped in scorching hot olive oil and dumped on top of the simmering pot of chickpeas. Our kitchen wafted with sautéed onions and oil thick in the air. An Indian dinner meant an afternoon spent together, gathering ingredients and creating rich delicacies. My hand wraps around the cobalt blue jars — one full of garam masala; the other full of chili powder. A gift from my older sister, these glass canisters are some of the only matching items in this burgeoning cabinet. She once draped her entire kitchen, in the crowded two bedroom apartment she shared with her husband, in cobalt blue. She’s always been one for making a room look coordinated. I’ve always been one for making a room feel full. Maybe she could use the canisters now. Now that he walked out on her, leaving her to decide what was real and what was not. Perhaps I should just throw them away, walk away from them in a practice of leaving things behind that aren’t useful anymore. A practice I should try. I certainly don’t need the stale garam masala and chili powder that I packed up with the rest of my kitchen, the rest of my house, and moved 200 miles back to where I came from after my own husband and I decided to quit pretending we weren’t hurting each other so the other would quit. Back in the cabinet, a speckled line shows where tiny fingers dip in unnaturally bright condiments. Brushing aside sprinkles and dinosaur-shaped candies, I locate what I’ve been seeking. I’ll make tandoori chicken tonight. I still use the spices, the kick, to create memorable meals. The man, who brought me into another world and

Porch Light

For Sale Now at Amazon.com

Stories that shine a light on life

advertisements for ourselves By rob huffman want people to know about us and our family.

another world into me, took a lot away but added a little too. A little spice, a little kick. Of all the things he chose to leave behind, the one thing he took the day he officially left was food. Food was the thing that brought life into our home and with it often judgment and anger at our differences or my inadequacies. Sweet, salty, bitter. When we split up, we also divided the stash of Shan mix boxes. Half, half. I still have at least half of my half. I remember how to cook with it to create meals that linger in the air and the memory. I clutch the box, replacing peppercorns and sea salt, cobalt blue canisters of stale spices, and the halfempty jar of edible jewels back in their carefully chosen spots. A balance necessary to keep it all in its place. C Ruth Cassell lives in Roanoke but often visits us in Fredericksburg.

Larry Keel Hackensack Boys Big Daddy Love Elby Brass Tickets available at Sunken Well Tavern or www.heardintheburg.com June 8th at the Fredericksburg Fair Grounds VIP tickets available only at Sunken Well Tavern Info at heardintheburg.com or call 5403700911 Percentage of proceeds go to Community Outreach

Modern billboards are doggone dangerous for compulsive readers. Consider the scrolling, highway emergency boards so common on interstate highways. Personally, I would rather read literature instead of “enormous crash 15 miles ahead.” Some Dickens maybe! “It was the best of times... the age of wisdom... of foolishness... the season of light... the spring of hope.” Great prose could mellow out road-ragers while improving the America’s cultural level. Unfortunately, contemporary road signs serve mostly mundane purposes — where to eat, sleep, relieve ourselves and get gas. There are occasional respites for the driving logophile such as vanity plates. Sometimes clever, but just as often maddening, scrabblesque renderings in 7 letters or less that attempt to impart some fact, belief, or attitude concerning the car’s owner. Some are thankfully lucid (GR8KIDS, LVMYWIF); others make me want to beat the owner with-a-tire-iron (LV2QMRG?!?). Such plates are perplexing, placing me in a quandary between a certainty that the writer is in fact moronic and completely lacking in any ability to encode meaning via alphanumeric symbols and a second shadowy, but no less potent fear that I, the reader, am the deficient one. If vanity plates are a highway’s poetry, then bumper stickers must be its nonfiction. Not aspirational strivings intended to promote a dream (SXYGRL, 2GOOD4U) - but simple, declarative communications of who we, for better or worse, are. Stickers announce what we

College and university d e c a l s abound. It’s the highway version of flashing one of those gaudy class rings for all to envy. The number of s c h o o l s attended is important: some cars are covered with school stickers. How could one person or even one family have studied at so many institutions? Are they displaying every school they ever applied to? Campuses only visited? Public schools - elementary, middle, and high – are proudly proclaimed as well. Ditto nursery and day-care centers. “My son had his first dry day at DaDa Day Care.” Further, for all our purported independent-mindedness and self-reliance, we Americans are serious joiners, too. And, by golly, we want everyone to know to which organizations we belong: Masons, Little League, Boy/Girl Scouts, PTO, Amway, NRA, Women Against This, Men For That. Further, if anyone’s child has been recognized for anything whatsoever such as perfect attendance, good grades, sports participation, most days detention free - well, rest assured, there is a bumper sticker for that, too. The “my son/daughter is an honor roll student at” sticker has spawned counterculture stickers whereby the honor rollee’s parents are informed by the parents of less academically-accomplished progeny that their offspring can beat the (scatological reference) out of their honor roll student. Charming, huh? Maybe it’s better this way: the ancient playground rivalry between the bookish kid and the bully has been effectively banished, reduced to bloodless sniping: sticks and stones may break my bones, but bumper stickers will never hurt me. Considerations of pugnacity lead quite naturally to how drivers express

their political leanings. Affixing a bumper sticker to your car is like throwing down a gauntlet in our highly-politicized culture. Am I the only one knowing full well this illustrates a less than attractive feature in me who at least partially judges the driver of another car based on that driver’s bumper-stuck political self-disclosure? Attractive or not, I most certainly experience a strong sense of camaraderie when passing a vehicle displaying my candidate/office holder, and suffer a bilious jolt of disdain when passing a supporter of the other party. Which is to say, just how far have I come from the playground? After all, maybe life is just a highway. And as long as we ride it, I suppose we might as well let everybody know who we are.

Author: J Robert Du Bois Edited by Rob Grogan

Rob Huffman is an FP HUMOR GUY.

Give a Child Something to Think About Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

29


$1001.50 Centennial Broadcasting OK for Tornado Victims

(L-R R) Dee Daniels, Chris Centore (from B101.5’s Chris and Dee In the Morning), Lynn Morgan, CEO/Director of Just A Hand, Shanna Cyphert, Sec/Treas, Just A Hand, Buzzy)

Wal-Mart location in Fredericksburg, B101.5 and NewsTalk 1230 WFVA listeners donated over 15,000 relief items and $1176.16 in cash. Just A Hand donated their entire spring and summer inventory of children’s clothing totaling nearly 5,000 pieces. Centennial’s $1001.50 donation was used to purchase children’s items such as playpens, baby formula, baby wipes, towels, pillows, and other day-to-day essential items needed by victims in Oklahoma. Supplies and cash collected during this relief drive were transported and delivered to The Memorial Road Church of Christ in Edmond, OK on Sunday afternoon courtesy of Alsop Trucking in Fredericksburg. The church is actively helping those affected by the disaster and will handle the distribution of donated items. “We at Centennial Broadcasting believe we have an obligation to use our radio stations to be of real service to our communities and our listeners. Our Fredericksburg listeners wanted to help the tornado victims of Moore, OK, so we helped make that possible,” said Centennial Broadcasting President/CEO, Allen Shaw. “I am so proud of our company, our Fredericksburg advertising partners, and more importantly, our listeners,” said

28

June 2013

everything in its place By c. ruth cassell

by Chuck Archer

Over the Memorial Day weekend, Centennial Broadcasting donated $1001.50 in support of Operation: Help Moore, a one-day Oklahoma tornado relief supply drive hosted by Centennial’s Fredericksburg, Virginia, radio outlets, B101.5 and NewsTalk 1230 WFVA, and the non-profit organization, Just A Hand. During a six-hour broadcast Saturday, May 25th, at the Southpoint

My Own Path

Tom Hamilton, Market Manager of B101.5 and NewsTalk 1230 WFVA. “It was amazing to watch so many in our community take time over a holiday to help those who reside 1300 miles away.” Shanna Cyphert, Secretary/Treasurer and lead organizer for Just A Hand said, “The outpouring of support from the Fredericksburg area has been overwhelming and has restored my faith in humanity. It is so exciting to be able to watch this little charity extend its assistance from Fredericksburg all the way out to Oklahoma. We never imagined being able to make this big of an impact.” Several local businesses and individuals were recognized for their support and donations: Southpoint (Fredericksburg) Wal-Mart; Shawn Alsop, Alsop Trucking Company; Jim Powell, Powell’s Furniture; Strength and Honor Motorcycle Club; Fredericksburg Area Chick-Fil-A; Papa John’s Pizza; Spotsylvania Sheriff’s Office; Stafford Peacekeepers Quilt Guild; Southpoint Quality Dental; Neibauer Dental. Centennial Broadcasting, based in Clemmons, North Carolina, owns and operates B101.5 and NewsTalk 1230 WFVA in Fredericksburg, Virginia, four radio stations and a cable television station in Winchester, and WLNI-FM in Lynchburg. Just A Hand is a 501(C)3 nonprofit corporation based in Spotsylvania, Virginia. Founded by CEO/Director Lynn Morgan in 2009, their mission statement is “Give of yourself and teach others to give. No matter how small the gesture, if you ease the burdens of another, you create a better place for us all.” Chuck Archer works at WBQB B101.5 and NewsTalk 1230 WFVA.

Front porch fredericksburg

Peppercorns rattle as I push past a fresh packet of red chili peppers. We always kept those on hand to finish the dhal. Red Chili peppers, garlic cloves, white cumin seeds dropped in scorching hot olive oil and dumped on top of the simmering pot of chickpeas. Our kitchen wafted with sautéed onions and oil thick in the air. An Indian dinner meant an afternoon spent together, gathering ingredients and creating rich delicacies. My hand wraps around the cobalt blue jars — one full of garam masala; the other full of chili powder. A gift from my older sister, these glass canisters are some of the only matching items in this burgeoning cabinet. She once draped her entire kitchen, in the crowded two bedroom apartment she shared with her husband, in cobalt blue. She’s always been one for making a room look coordinated. I’ve always been one for making a room feel full. Maybe she could use the canisters now. Now that he walked out on her, leaving her to decide what was real and what was not. Perhaps I should just throw them away, walk away from them in a practice of leaving things behind that aren’t useful anymore. A practice I should try. I certainly don’t need the stale garam masala and chili powder that I packed up with the rest of my kitchen, the rest of my house, and moved 200 miles back to where I came from after my own husband and I decided to quit pretending we weren’t hurting each other so the other would quit. Back in the cabinet, a speckled line shows where tiny fingers dip in unnaturally bright condiments. Brushing aside sprinkles and dinosaur-shaped candies, I locate what I’ve been seeking. I’ll make tandoori chicken tonight. I still use the spices, the kick, to create memorable meals. The man, who brought me into another world and

Porch Light

For Sale Now at Amazon.com

Stories that shine a light on life

advertisements for ourselves By rob huffman want people to know about us and our family.

another world into me, took a lot away but added a little too. A little spice, a little kick. Of all the things he chose to leave behind, the one thing he took the day he officially left was food. Food was the thing that brought life into our home and with it often judgment and anger at our differences or my inadequacies. Sweet, salty, bitter. When we split up, we also divided the stash of Shan mix boxes. Half, half. I still have at least half of my half. I remember how to cook with it to create meals that linger in the air and the memory. I clutch the box, replacing peppercorns and sea salt, cobalt blue canisters of stale spices, and the halfempty jar of edible jewels back in their carefully chosen spots. A balance necessary to keep it all in its place. C Ruth Cassell lives in Roanoke but often visits us in Fredericksburg.

Larry Keel Hackensack Boys Big Daddy Love Elby Brass Tickets available at Sunken Well Tavern or www.heardintheburg.com June 8th at the Fredericksburg Fair Grounds VIP tickets available only at Sunken Well Tavern Info at heardintheburg.com or call 5403700911 Percentage of proceeds go to Community Outreach

Modern billboards are doggone dangerous for compulsive readers. Consider the scrolling, highway emergency boards so common on interstate highways. Personally, I would rather read literature instead of “enormous crash 15 miles ahead.” Some Dickens maybe! “It was the best of times... the age of wisdom... of foolishness... the season of light... the spring of hope.” Great prose could mellow out road-ragers while improving the America’s cultural level. Unfortunately, contemporary road signs serve mostly mundane purposes — where to eat, sleep, relieve ourselves and get gas. There are occasional respites for the driving logophile such as vanity plates. Sometimes clever, but just as often maddening, scrabblesque renderings in 7 letters or less that attempt to impart some fact, belief, or attitude concerning the car’s owner. Some are thankfully lucid (GR8KIDS, LVMYWIF); others make me want to beat the owner with-a-tire-iron (LV2QMRG?!?). Such plates are perplexing, placing me in a quandary between a certainty that the writer is in fact moronic and completely lacking in any ability to encode meaning via alphanumeric symbols and a second shadowy, but no less potent fear that I, the reader, am the deficient one. If vanity plates are a highway’s poetry, then bumper stickers must be its nonfiction. Not aspirational strivings intended to promote a dream (SXYGRL, 2GOOD4U) - but simple, declarative communications of who we, for better or worse, are. Stickers announce what we

College and university d e c a l s abound. It’s the highway version of flashing one of those gaudy class rings for all to envy. The number of s c h o o l s attended is important: some cars are covered with school stickers. How could one person or even one family have studied at so many institutions? Are they displaying every school they ever applied to? Campuses only visited? Public schools - elementary, middle, and high – are proudly proclaimed as well. Ditto nursery and day-care centers. “My son had his first dry day at DaDa Day Care.” Further, for all our purported independent-mindedness and self-reliance, we Americans are serious joiners, too. And, by golly, we want everyone to know to which organizations we belong: Masons, Little League, Boy/Girl Scouts, PTO, Amway, NRA, Women Against This, Men For That. Further, if anyone’s child has been recognized for anything whatsoever such as perfect attendance, good grades, sports participation, most days detention free - well, rest assured, there is a bumper sticker for that, too. The “my son/daughter is an honor roll student at” sticker has spawned counterculture stickers whereby the honor rollee’s parents are informed by the parents of less academically-accomplished progeny that their offspring can beat the (scatological reference) out of their honor roll student. Charming, huh? Maybe it’s better this way: the ancient playground rivalry between the bookish kid and the bully has been effectively banished, reduced to bloodless sniping: sticks and stones may break my bones, but bumper stickers will never hurt me. Considerations of pugnacity lead quite naturally to how drivers express

their political leanings. Affixing a bumper sticker to your car is like throwing down a gauntlet in our highly-politicized culture. Am I the only one knowing full well this illustrates a less than attractive feature in me who at least partially judges the driver of another car based on that driver’s bumper-stuck political self-disclosure? Attractive or not, I most certainly experience a strong sense of camaraderie when passing a vehicle displaying my candidate/office holder, and suffer a bilious jolt of disdain when passing a supporter of the other party. Which is to say, just how far have I come from the playground? After all, maybe life is just a highway. And as long as we ride it, I suppose we might as well let everybody know who we are.

Author: J Robert Du Bois Edited by Rob Grogan

Rob Huffman is an FP HUMOR GUY.

Give a Child Something to Think About Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

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June 2013

29


n g .M. i gn 0 P i S 1:0 k o rd, o B 23 ne u J

The Kitchen At Whittingham 1019 Caroline St. 540-374-0443

30

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Where in the World is Kyle ? Here and Happy! By Lori Izykowski Maybe you’ve asked yourself, “Where in the Fred world is Kyle Snyder?” Well, our dear FP editor knows, and thought it a good enough story to share with you here. I stopped by to see Kyle earlier this week, and we sat in comfy chairs and caught up. For those who know Kyle, it will come as no surprise that he greeted me with a big smile and a bigger hug. But what is most noticeable is his demeanor…one of calmness, purpose, and happiness. And sitting prominently on the table next to us was one source for all that: a book containing student papers submitted for a writing contest, and within that tome is Kyle’s honorable mention paper on Primal Leadership. He was absolutely beaming when he shared it with me. It seems Kyle was once told he couldn’t write…indeed, that he shouldn’t write…not even a Facebook status. Now he is a published author. But I am getting ahead of myself. Changes were already afoot in Kyle’s life when he decided to return to school in the summer of 2012. An executive chef for the past almost five years, Kyle was selling his shares in the restaurant and moving on. At around the same time, he heard from the University of Mary Washington that they would be phasing out the Bachelor of Professional Studies (BPS) program he had previously been enrolled in before his immersion into the restaurant business. If he wanted to complete the program, the time was now. The timing was right: his daughter was now older and more self-sufficient, he had free time, he had funding from the sale of his interest in the restaurant and the support of a loving relationship, and he was eager. Now a graduate with a BPS from UMW, graduating on May 11, he is an extremely happy degree holder. Kyle is effusive in his praise of UMW: “It was a very positive experience. The professors and staff are genuinely interested and invested in the success of their students. Any time of day, whenever I sent an email or had a question, the response was almost immediate.” In addition, Kyle is a proud member of the Omicron-Psi Honor Society, an organization for nontraditional students that not only demands outstanding academic performance (3.9 or better) but also involvement in three different associations (professional and community), complete with letters of recommendation. He met all the criteria

Not Minnesota DC & FXBG By Victoria Scrimer

by carrying a 4.0 GPA and being a member of: The Rappahannock Rotary, The Friends of the Rappahannock, and The Distinguished Marksman Association. To top it all off, Kyle was voted the “Outstanding Student” for the Bachelors of Professional Studies Program by the professors of the program. At the graduation, he made himself the last student to cross in front of President Hurley. In Big Happy Kyle fashion, and wearing his Rotary Pin, he gave the University President a high five, a big hug, and then produced a “THANK YOU, WRITING CENTER” banner that he proudly displayed upside down (but quickly corrected). Needless to say, Kyle is extremely proud of his accomplishments. But what’s next? Well, for starters, he’s full-on involved with the “number one health and wellness platform in North America today”, Visalus (vi.com). He is an independent promoter for the company’s 90 Day Challenge, and is passionate about the program and the company’s mission of providing clients with the tools to achieve healthy living (Kyle has lost 45 pounds since January.) He is also researching green initiatives: he has turned his front yard into a lush vegetable garden to eat organically and reduce emissions that would be produced by cutting the grass, he is researching solar power and how it could be incorporated to reduce dependence on fossil fuels, and he looking to build a “green” house somewhere here in Fredericksburg to show how to it can be done. Finally, Kyle is going to be giving cooking lessons to small groups to share what he has learned about creating in his words, “Simple Food - Done Well” which is also the title of the cook book he is writing. So in a nutshell, Kyle is alive and kicking and, in his own words, “fabulously happy”. Well done, Kyle, well done. Lori Izykowski is a Front Porch writer and friend.

I always wanted to be Mary Tyler Moore. There was something alluring to me about the life of the determined, if naïve, gal making her way in the big city. As a little girl I actually practiced throwing my hat in the air, imagining a whole busy world honking and carrying on around me. Over the years I realized I am more of a Rhoda than a Mary and that is OK. I also ended up going to college and living in Fredericksburg for a while which is a far cry from the bustling urban center of Minneapolis. And although it is geographically close to DC, Fredericksburg often seems a solar system away. There is so much to keep a body in Fredericksburg. Every time I thought I would spend a Saturday in the city I would get invited to dinner and music at Bistro Bethem or to share flaming volcano bowls at Fortune Gourmet with friends. When I felt like enjoying the outdoors I could kayak on the Rappahannock River and look for civil war bullets in the silt at the river’s edge. When I lived in Fredericksburg I wanted for nothing. I had friends, good food, beautiful outdoor spaces, smart conversations, music, ample parking and a yard. How could I be Mary, or even poor Rhoda for that matter, if I had a yard? Mary made negotiating for a studio apartment, dealing with a chauvinistic drunk boss, and sleeping on a pull out couch every night seem glamorous or at least fun. Now I live in DC. There are certain things that are as I always imagined them. There is

anonymity in cities that is comforting and exciting at the same time. If you are unrecognized you could do anything or nothing. I have access to museums. I have my choice of farmers markets. I play softball steps away from the Washington monument. I walk to baseball games. I meet people who are different from me. I have hundreds of choices for food every day. I ride my bike everywhere I go. I get off of work and am seven minutes from my home. There is a guy who dresses like the tin man and performs outside my office on Thursdays. It is an incredibly good life. There are also the expected realities that are less than romantic like zero closet space. I live in a subterranean apartment for twice as much as the entire house I rented in Fredericksburg. I sometimes pay $12 for a beer. I wait for the bus. I get robbed. I occasionally go entire days without seeing a person I recognize. These things are not really great unless you have a scriptwriter and a laugh track. In cities all of the buildings are closer. I can hear my neighbors argue about pita bread. My face is crammed in someone’s armpit on the bus almost daily, but the people are somehow further apart. There has been a precipitous decline in invitations to backyard barbeques and people dropping off flower bulbs since I moved to the city. The volcano bowls are not nearly as good but twice as expensive and I have yet to find better cream cheese and olive sandwiches than those at Goolrich’s. When I decide to get coffee I reflect with fondness on the quiet, sunshiny Hyperion I left behind then dive head first into the stressful elbow jabbing brawl that is Starbucks in Chinatown. And sometimes when I’m waiting for two hours to get into fellow UMW almni, Erik BrunerYang’s ramen joint in my neighborhood I am reminded of the lazy lines wrapping around the block for Carl’s. When I was living in Fredericksburg I would sometimes think sadly that this is not what Mary would be doing not realizing that Fredericksburg is the kind of place where Mary probably came from and that Mary didn’t need Minneapolis to be Mary.

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

Every Child Deserves A Family

301-587-4400 Cradle of Hope Adoption Center

ARCHER DI PEPPE CAGA

CERTIFIED APPRAISER

Insurance Riders Estate Settlements Divorce Cases Damage Claims Oral or Written Appraisals SPECIALIZING IN ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

Certified Appraiser Certified Appraiser’s Guild of America

adipeppe@aol.com

(540) 373-9636

Victoria Scrimer lives in DC, where she is Program Development & Outreach Officer at Greenpeace.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

31


n g .M. i gn 0 P i S 1:0 k o rd, o B 23 ne u J

The Kitchen At Whittingham 1019 Caroline St. 540-374-0443

30

June 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Where in the World is Kyle ? Here and Happy! By Lori Izykowski Maybe you’ve asked yourself, “Where in the Fred world is Kyle Snyder?” Well, our dear FP editor knows, and thought it a good enough story to share with you here. I stopped by to see Kyle earlier this week, and we sat in comfy chairs and caught up. For those who know Kyle, it will come as no surprise that he greeted me with a big smile and a bigger hug. But what is most noticeable is his demeanor…one of calmness, purpose, and happiness. And sitting prominently on the table next to us was one source for all that: a book containing student papers submitted for a writing contest, and within that tome is Kyle’s honorable mention paper on Primal Leadership. He was absolutely beaming when he shared it with me. It seems Kyle was once told he couldn’t write…indeed, that he shouldn’t write…not even a Facebook status. Now he is a published author. But I am getting ahead of myself. Changes were already afoot in Kyle’s life when he decided to return to school in the summer of 2012. An executive chef for the past almost five years, Kyle was selling his shares in the restaurant and moving on. At around the same time, he heard from the University of Mary Washington that they would be phasing out the Bachelor of Professional Studies (BPS) program he had previously been enrolled in before his immersion into the restaurant business. If he wanted to complete the program, the time was now. The timing was right: his daughter was now older and more self-sufficient, he had free time, he had funding from the sale of his interest in the restaurant and the support of a loving relationship, and he was eager. Now a graduate with a BPS from UMW, graduating on May 11, he is an extremely happy degree holder. Kyle is effusive in his praise of UMW: “It was a very positive experience. The professors and staff are genuinely interested and invested in the success of their students. Any time of day, whenever I sent an email or had a question, the response was almost immediate.” In addition, Kyle is a proud member of the Omicron-Psi Honor Society, an organization for nontraditional students that not only demands outstanding academic performance (3.9 or better) but also involvement in three different associations (professional and community), complete with letters of recommendation. He met all the criteria

Not Minnesota DC & FXBG By Victoria Scrimer

by carrying a 4.0 GPA and being a member of: The Rappahannock Rotary, The Friends of the Rappahannock, and The Distinguished Marksman Association. To top it all off, Kyle was voted the “Outstanding Student” for the Bachelors of Professional Studies Program by the professors of the program. At the graduation, he made himself the last student to cross in front of President Hurley. In Big Happy Kyle fashion, and wearing his Rotary Pin, he gave the University President a high five, a big hug, and then produced a “THANK YOU, WRITING CENTER” banner that he proudly displayed upside down (but quickly corrected). Needless to say, Kyle is extremely proud of his accomplishments. But what’s next? Well, for starters, he’s full-on involved with the “number one health and wellness platform in North America today”, Visalus (vi.com). He is an independent promoter for the company’s 90 Day Challenge, and is passionate about the program and the company’s mission of providing clients with the tools to achieve healthy living (Kyle has lost 45 pounds since January.) He is also researching green initiatives: he has turned his front yard into a lush vegetable garden to eat organically and reduce emissions that would be produced by cutting the grass, he is researching solar power and how it could be incorporated to reduce dependence on fossil fuels, and he looking to build a “green” house somewhere here in Fredericksburg to show how to it can be done. Finally, Kyle is going to be giving cooking lessons to small groups to share what he has learned about creating in his words, “Simple Food - Done Well” which is also the title of the cook book he is writing. So in a nutshell, Kyle is alive and kicking and, in his own words, “fabulously happy”. Well done, Kyle, well done. Lori Izykowski is a Front Porch writer and friend.

I always wanted to be Mary Tyler Moore. There was something alluring to me about the life of the determined, if naïve, gal making her way in the big city. As a little girl I actually practiced throwing my hat in the air, imagining a whole busy world honking and carrying on around me. Over the years I realized I am more of a Rhoda than a Mary and that is OK. I also ended up going to college and living in Fredericksburg for a while which is a far cry from the bustling urban center of Minneapolis. And although it is geographically close to DC, Fredericksburg often seems a solar system away. There is so much to keep a body in Fredericksburg. Every time I thought I would spend a Saturday in the city I would get invited to dinner and music at Bistro Bethem or to share flaming volcano bowls at Fortune Gourmet with friends. When I felt like enjoying the outdoors I could kayak on the Rappahannock River and look for civil war bullets in the silt at the river’s edge. When I lived in Fredericksburg I wanted for nothing. I had friends, good food, beautiful outdoor spaces, smart conversations, music, ample parking and a yard. How could I be Mary, or even poor Rhoda for that matter, if I had a yard? Mary made negotiating for a studio apartment, dealing with a chauvinistic drunk boss, and sleeping on a pull out couch every night seem glamorous or at least fun. Now I live in DC. There are certain things that are as I always imagined them. There is

anonymity in cities that is comforting and exciting at the same time. If you are unrecognized you could do anything or nothing. I have access to museums. I have my choice of farmers markets. I play softball steps away from the Washington monument. I walk to baseball games. I meet people who are different from me. I have hundreds of choices for food every day. I ride my bike everywhere I go. I get off of work and am seven minutes from my home. There is a guy who dresses like the tin man and performs outside my office on Thursdays. It is an incredibly good life. There are also the expected realities that are less than romantic like zero closet space. I live in a subterranean apartment for twice as much as the entire house I rented in Fredericksburg. I sometimes pay $12 for a beer. I wait for the bus. I get robbed. I occasionally go entire days without seeing a person I recognize. These things are not really great unless you have a scriptwriter and a laugh track. In cities all of the buildings are closer. I can hear my neighbors argue about pita bread. My face is crammed in someone’s armpit on the bus almost daily, but the people are somehow further apart. There has been a precipitous decline in invitations to backyard barbeques and people dropping off flower bulbs since I moved to the city. The volcano bowls are not nearly as good but twice as expensive and I have yet to find better cream cheese and olive sandwiches than those at Goolrich’s. When I decide to get coffee I reflect with fondness on the quiet, sunshiny Hyperion I left behind then dive head first into the stressful elbow jabbing brawl that is Starbucks in Chinatown. And sometimes when I’m waiting for two hours to get into fellow UMW almni, Erik BrunerYang’s ramen joint in my neighborhood I am reminded of the lazy lines wrapping around the block for Carl’s. When I was living in Fredericksburg I would sometimes think sadly that this is not what Mary would be doing not realizing that Fredericksburg is the kind of place where Mary probably came from and that Mary didn’t need Minneapolis to be Mary.

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

Every Child Deserves A Family

301-587-4400 Cradle of Hope Adoption Center

ARCHER DI PEPPE CAGA

CERTIFIED APPRAISER

Insurance Riders Estate Settlements Divorce Cases Damage Claims Oral or Written Appraisals SPECIALIZING IN ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

Certified Appraiser Certified Appraiser’s Guild of America

adipeppe@aol.com

(540) 373-9636

Victoria Scrimer lives in DC, where she is Program Development & Outreach Officer at Greenpeace.

front porch fredericksburg

June 2013

31


June 2013 - Front Porch Fredericksburg  

"Sweet 16" Issue, celebrating 16 years of local good news. About the cover: Betsy Glassie has donated her June cover painting to our Silent...

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