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ISSUE 183, JULY 2019

community news, issues, arts, people, events


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The Fringe JULY 2019

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contents

A capsule of Auckland society; Cunning critters seek winter warmth in your home............................................... 4 Wheeling through life................................................................... 5 Yoga fundraiser for the homeless................................................. 6 Thousands to benefit from lifesaving equipment........................ 7 Art and about with Naomi McCleary......................................... 8-9

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Bandstanding: John Boone......................................................... 10 Freaky Meat release new EP...................................................... 11 Places to go: Events listing................................................. 12 – 13 Feature: travel.................................................................... 14 – 15 At the libraries............................................................................ 16 Feature: education............................................................. 16 – 18

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Don’t buy into waste.................................................................. 19 Naturally West: the grey warbler and the shining cuckoo......... 20 Walk west with Michael Andrew; Weather by the moon................................................................ 21 Live @ the lounge...................................................................... 22 Advertisers’ Directory................................................................. 23

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On our cover:

Specifically made for Rongorongo, an exhibition at Arataki Visitor Centre by Charlotte Graham, this work uses wax, sealing wax, West Auckland floral petals, bitumen and cowrie shells to reference the strong relationship between Te Kawerau a Māki and our West Coast environment.

WIN

a copy of Whispers the Wind

The Fringe has a copy of Whispers the Wind: Soldiers at Peace in Waikumete Cemetery to give away. Produced by Friends of Waikumete and compiled by Dame Barbara Harvey and Gayle Marshall, Whispers the Wind covers the lives of many who served in long past wars before being buried at Waikumete. It also encapsulates many aspects of society of the time. For more see page 4. To go in the draw to win this special book write your name, address and phone number on the back of an envelope, along with the name of the researcher and post it to: Fringe Whispers Competition, PO Box 60-469, Titirangi, Auckland 0642 to reach us by July 19, or you can email your answer and contact details to info@fringemedia.co.nz (with Whispers Competition in the subject line).

Every issue of The Fringe (and the Titirangi Tatler before it) since April 2011 is on-line at www.fringemedia.co.nz. Like us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ FringeWest) to hear when each issue is available and get other updates. please support our advertisers – they support us

www.fringemedia.co.nz 21,000 copies delivered free to letter boxes, post boxes, libraries and selected outlets throughout Titirangi, Glen Eden, Green Bay, New Lynn, Kelston, Konini, Wood Bay, French Bay, South Titirangi, Waima, Woodlands Park, Laingholm, Parau, Cornwallis, Huia and Oratia.

Published by: Fringe Media Ltd, PO Box 60-469, Titirangi, Auckland 0642

Editor: Bevis England 817 8024, 027 494 0700 bevis@fringemedia.co.nz

Advertising:

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Features: Moira Kennedy 021 723 153 moira@fringemedia.co.nz

Writers and contributors: Jade Reidy, David Thiele, Naomi McCleary, Susannah Bridges, Fiona Drummond and Michael Andrew.

Advertising deadline for August 2019: July 19 The Fringe JULY 2019

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our place

A capsule of Auckland society It’s been close to three years coming served in the mid-1800s, Sister Louisa to fruition but a determined team Campbell MacLeod, the first woman from Friends of Waikumete (FOW) buried in the soldiers’ cemetery, the have seen their efforts rewarded with first sheriff of Auckland and a range the publication of the book Whispers of high ranking military personnel the Wind -– Soldiers at Peace in and ordinary men who’d served their Waikumete Cemetery (1881 – 1918). country. Compiled by FOW vice-chair, Dame Chapters cover victims of sickness Barbara Harvey and co-chair Gayle and disease, the fate of Pacific Marshall, the book was researched Islanders in war zones who couldn’t by Lisa Truttman and edited by David cope with the climate, language and Blocksidge. It backgrounds the lives the appalling conditions of the disaster of many men (and one woman) who that was the Western Front, accidental served in wars in times of long ago deaths and suicides. and cleverly encapsulates society of Friends of Waikumete ‘s Dame Barbara Harvey (left) with Gayle “There’s the tragedy of the the time. Its publication was made Marshall. (Background art by Gillan Rawnsley.) premature deaths when so many died possible with funding support from the Waitakere Ranges Local Board. so young,” says Barbara. “Back then people were old at 60 and so FOW was formed in 1995 with the aim of promoting the unique many were miserable because of their (war) experiences. The legacy of historical and horticultural features of Waikumete Cemetery, all that is horrific – suicide was prevalent and wife-beating and other established in 1886 and covering 108 hectares in Glen Eden. The new social issues were common.” book says the cemetery has been “the last resting place for veterans Cemetery sexton, Sheree Stout, says it’s great that FOW have taken of the wars of the British Empire from the very first year of burial. the time to create such “an amazing and valuable book.” Sheree writes Some had stayed in this country after their discharge from the armed poetry to relax and one of her works features in Whispers the Wind, forces in the New Zealand Wars period, others simply arrived here later along with another written by Gayle who also created the title. seeking a better life.” “I was walking at dusk in the cemetery one evening, the wild flowers The book tells the stories of those who became heroes, and doesn’t were beautiful, the wind was blowing, and it felt that all the people at overlook criminals whose careers ran the gamut from petty crime to rest there were whispering. It seemed a fitting title,” Gayle says. murder. Among many others, it features the tales of Fencibles who had Continued on page 6 >>

Cunning critters seek winter warmth in your home If you’re hearing chittering and chattering coming from above your ceiling, there’s a reasonable chance a family of possums have found a nice warm place to winter over at your place. Titirangi’s ‘Possum Lady’ June Henderson has been hunting the nocturnal pests for a decade, running an office she calls Possum Headquarters from home. She says we need to get trapping now. “Just don’t wait,” she says. “With the cold weather, these creatures are seeking out warm places and roofs, lofts and garden sheds are perfect places for them to take up residence. They can squeeze through the smallest holes.” June has always been happy to talk, share her knowledge, and provide traps to those who want to take matters in hand to help get rid of the pests. Auckland Council provides subsidised Timms traps and June says she’s sold more than 30 in the past couple of weeks. “People are taking the possum threat seriously. We’re more aware FRINGEADLTD.pdf 1 15/11/16 16:33 of them and the damage they cause but getting rid of them is an

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uphill job. Newcomers to the country, especially those from Asia, have become interested and many have become very good trappers.” Possums have become the country’s most damaging animal pest, destroying native forest and wrecking suburban gardens. They have voracious appetites and have been known to clear the crops in vege patches, and strip the buds from rose bushes overnight. “They don’t hibernate over winter but they do snuggle up, preparing to have their babies in spring. Of course they still come out to see what’s on offer, usually after sunset. At the moment, they’re after lemons, oranges and apples. “They continue to be destructive through winter and let’s not forget the health issues that go with them peeing and pooing in walls or ceilings.” Traps are available for $40 from June at ‘Possum Headquarters’ in Titirangi. Phone 817 8315. – Moira Kennedy

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people

Wheeling through life Sharon Davies reckons she’s always had a lot to say so it was probably only a matter of time before friends and associates talked her into writing her life story, Little and Loud, the story of a local woman living her life at full speed – in a wheelchair. Launched in September last year, the book has sold so well that a reprint is underway and due out any time now. Affectionately known as Shaz, she says the main message in her book is to put aside perceptions and limitations ablebodied people may put on those who might look or present as being different. Shaz was born with spina bifida in 1963, a Sharon (Shaz) Davies: ‘My wheels are my time when little was access to the world, to freedom.’ known of the condition and doctors believed those with it had limited life expectancy. She was brought up at Wilson Home on Auckland’s North Shore until she was 16 and it was there she made good friends and began to understand she had a good dose of feistiness in her genes. She also learnt that no matter your circumstances, you can get on with life. Or not. She got on with it, understanding that to get around this world in a wheelchair, you have to plan things very carefully and so began her route to independence. It wasn’t always easy but with support from Wilson Home staff and her own ‘bolshieness’ she learnt how to living a full and active life – determined to experience the world fully, to extend opportunities and question the limitations other physical environments might place on her. She got her driver’s license when she was 17, and has driven ever since although in recent times has become a fan and regular user of trains. “My wheels are my access to the world, to freedom. I have absolutely no choice in the matter when it comes to getting around.” Shaz has had an active working life starting in administration in a recreation centre in the 1980s before moving to the then Social Welfare Department. She stayed there five years before taking on

a role at CCS Auckland, (then known as Crippled Children’s Society) for the next 15 years. From there she worked at Unitec in Student Services providing support including counselling, career counselling, chaplaincy and disability support services. As Shaz lived in Swanson a friend suggested she stand for the Waitākere Community Board in 2004 and she was elected for a three-year term, earning her stripes for community activities. From there Shaz went to various roles within Waitākere City Council and later, with the creation of the Super City, to Auckland Council. Shaz is well known and highly regarded for her community work (for which she received the QSM in 2013), volunteering with a vast range of environmental and community organisations and holding governance roles with Ecomatters Environment Trust, Glen Eden Restoration Trust, Safer West Community Trust, Ranui Community Centre, Swanson Railway Station Trust, Violence Free Communities and the Whau Coastal Walkway Trust. She also works as personal assistant to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board. Shaz says 2013 was possibly her biggest year. She turned 50, paid off her mortgage, was awarded the QSM and took part in the Be. Leadership programme which advances a more accessible society and a dynamic community of leaders who are passionate about accessibility. And if that wasn’t enough for one year, she took a group of close friends to Hawaii to celebrate her achievements. “People think if you’re limited in some way, you’re going to stay home and wallow in self pity, or do your knitting. That’s never been my way,” Shaz says. “People tell me I’m an inspiration but I don’t do that very well. However, my friends tell me that’s the way a lot of people see me so I have to suck it up. “It’s just the way it is so I just keep on sucking it up.” Shaz self-published her book and promotes it via Facebook, (Little and Loud: My Life Story) and is quick to celebrate friends and associates, especially wordsmith friend Andrew Melville, for their support and input. – Moira Kennedy

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The Fringe JULY 2019

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our place

Yoga fundraiser for the homeless With Auckland’s growing population of rough sleepers facing another cold winter outdoors, Yoga West is holding an event to raise funds for Auckland City Mission. Yoga for the Homeless will consist of an afternoon of yoga, meditation and refreshments. Adults of all levels are invited to join in and donate an amount of their choosing. Event organiser and yoga teacher Shaz Babapour decided on the fundraiser after Auckland City Mission told her that donations were particularly low this year. “I thought it would be great to help the City Mission and fundraise towards food and other things for rough sleepers,” she says. “Every time I’m walking around Auckland and I see Haidee Stairmand and Shaz someone living on the streets I want to do something but I’ve Babapour from Yoga West. never known how to properly help. It just breaks my heart, especially now that it’s winter. I feel that rough sleepers are misunderstood. If we could listen to their stories we would be able to understand their situation and what led them to living on the streets.” According to Auckland Council, the number of people classified as “homeless” in Auckland is 20,296. The number of people literally living without shelter day-to-day is 771. Yoga West studio manager Haidee Stairmand said there is a huge need to support these people. “I’ve seen the problem grow in the 20 years I’ve lived in Auckland,” she says. “We’re using our space, and our networking capabilities, to support Auckland City Mission and the great work they’re doing.” In order to maximise the contribution to the City Mission, Yoga West will match whatever amount is raised at the event. However, if people are not able to attend they can donate to the City Mission directly or to Yoga West anytime and their gift will be passed on. Yoga for the Homeless is on August 4 at 12:30pm at Yoga West’s studio, 6/506 South Titirangi Road, Titirangi. It will include an hour-long vinyasa class taught by Shaz and a session of yoga nidra meditation taught by Haidee. “I think that locals will really put their hearts behind it and support it,” says Haidee. For more information, call Haidee on 021 635 962 or visit www.yogawest.co.nz. – Michael Andrew

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The Gift of Giving Back

Volunteers donate 40,000 hours to Hospice West Auckland each year, ensuring it can continue to deliver the best possible care to end-of-life patients and their families and whānau in the West. Whether it’s lending a hand in any of the six second-hand stores, providing patients and their families with transport to writing life reviews and helping out at fundraising events, the gift of your time ensures community teams remain in patient’s homes or at Hospice House, providing care at no cost to those who need it. If you want to get involved, pop along to Hospice’s Volunteer Open Day at Hospice House, 52 Beach Road, Te Atatu Peninsula on Friday July 12, 10am-6pm, or contact volunteer services co-ordinator Verity on 027 702 3648 to learn more about the opportunities that are available. >> A

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The Fringe JULY 2019

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capsule of Auckland society continued from page 4

“Waikumete is not just a park and a burial space. The book’s like a time capsule that covers so many aspects of Auckland society back then. It’s a living space too with people coming to visit their loved ones and forbears, others walking their dogs, young mums with babies in prams, people learning to drive,” Sheree says. “This is a modest book, not a smart coffee table book but something more useful,” says Barbara. “We hope people will walk around the cemetery with it, using the maps in it as a guide to locating those written about.” When asked if there’s a follow-up to come, Barbara responded with a smile: “Could I say ‘over my dead body’?” Whispers the Wind is for sale at $25. Email: friendsofwaikumete@ outlook.co.nz. – Moira Kennedy

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our place

Thousands to benefit from lifesaving equipment Thousands of West Aucklanders are set to The Trusts is to install 26 portable AEDs at benefit from a new initiative which will West Auckland sporting and event venues, as significantly increase the number of publicly well as at The Trusts’ retail stores and hospitality available Automated External Defibrillators venues. (AEDs) around the region. “Research shows that there are a number of A defibrillator delivers an electric shock directly areas in West Auckland with a high incidence to a patient’s heart to help it return to a regular of cardiac arrest and yet there are no publicly rhythm. Applying CPR or chest compressions available AEDs within close proximity. Our along with rapid defibrillation to a patient in objective is to provide significantly more cardiac arrest, can increase their chances of coverage during medical emergencies,” says survival by up to 40%. But for every minute Simon. “We have engaged St John to provide without CPR or defibrillation, a patient’s chance first aid training for our staff and we will have of survival falls by 10-15%. the AEDs installed outside each of our venues, Ministry of Health data has found one Kiwi making them accessible to any member of the dies every 90 minutes from some form of heart public.” disease and while World Health Organisation Two members of The Trusts team, Stacey Simon says the AEDs have a combined retail guidelines suggest the ideal distance from an (left) and Kristina with one of the new AEDs. value of more than $100,000. The Trusts has AED is a three-minute walk, it has not been easy to get large numbers worked with St John in the past, with Million Dollar Mission grants installed across New Zealand, especially outside urban centres and in being used to help upgrade local ambulance stations and provide a lower socio-economic areas. new health shuttle. According to new research, five people a day are treated for Out The new AEDs can be found at West Liquor outlets in Kelston, Glen of Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) in New Zealand, with only 12% Eden, New Lynn, New Lynn West, Blockhouse Bay and Green Bay, at discharged from hospital and alive after 30 days. The study also found Titirangi Village Wine Store, at Workshop Bar in Kelston and Bricklane a significantly higher incidence of OHCA among Maori and Pasifika as Restaurant in New Lynn and at many other Trusts outlets around West well as males and those aged over 65, while data from St John suggests Auckland. people living in the most deprived areas have a lower survival rate than those in the least deprived areas. Got something to say? Do you have a great story idea? Know someone interesting we should talk to? The Trusts chief executive Simon Wickham says West Auckland has the country’s third highest rate of OHCA and yet access to a local AED Let The Fringe know by emailing info@fringemedia.co.nz during an emergency is poor.

Council action welcomed Waitākere Ranges Local Board is fully supportive of the measures recently announced by Council to control chickens and rats in Titirangi Village. While Auckland Council has limited powers to control chickens, rats and nonnative species under both bylaws and the biosecurity act, it will be increasing rodent control activity in local parks and facilities in the short term and is working on options for local roads. Longer term, it has commissioned a report on chicken control options and this is to be discussed by the board in July. Council is also investigating the support it can give to business owners and private residents, including through placing traps on private property. However, Titirangi residents do have an important role to play in managing the chicken and rat population: while the council has authority to act in its parks and open spaces, it remains the responsibility of homeowners and businesses to manage pests on their land. The increase in vermin numbers isn’t entirely unexpected, as winter is the season when we typically see a spike in rodent

infestations as they seek out food and shelter. This year’s super mast has increased the issue beyond normal levels. Council is encouraging residents not to feed or encourage chickens as this is exacerbating the problem and encouraging rodent activity. The board fully understands, and shares, the frustration of the Titirangi community, but we are encouraged by the steps being taken by the council. We have been actively looking for solutions to this issue for some time and understand that this will have to be a collective effort in order to bring the problem under control. In the short term the increased rodent control activity on council land is a positive step and we look forward to further options being brought to the board in July. Greg Presland, Chairperson Waitakere Ranges Local Board

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art & about with naomi mccleary

Reflecting Back and Looking Forward

Saturday 9 & Sunday 10 November 10am–4pm

CALL TO ARTISTS REGISTER TO BE INVOLVED Open Studios Waitākere 2019 is a weekend opportunity for artists resident in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area to open their studios to the public. This iconic event attracts visitors from across the region, with a brochure and tour map ensuring the best promotion of the studios and artists involved. To request a registration form email openstudioswaitakere@gmail.com phone 021 149 6707 or register online www.openstudioswaitakere.co.nz. Registrations close Friday 30 August. Funded and supported by

A celebration of the life and legacy of Colin McCahon will unfold across the country in August, and throughout the following year. The centenary of his birth creates a point of focus for widening awareness, understanding and appreciation of his status as arguably our most significant 20th century artist, and one whose work transcends his time and continues to speak to us of who we are and where we are. Locally, the action will take place over the weekend of August 17 and 18 with a McCahon 100 Open Home Weekend at the McCahon House Museum. Activities on offer include curated walking tours around French Bay where visitors can experience the same landscape McCahon walked and painted. Visitors can also enjoy the newly upgraded visitor displays at McCahon House, 67 Otitori Bay Road. The House will be open from 9am to 5pm on both days. Inside the house a selection of paintings made by McCahon during the time he and his family lived in French Bay will be on display for the centenary weekend only. This is an unprecedented chance to see original McCahons, reflecting the local landscape, in situ. A new venture, McCahon’s Auckland, will be piloted over this weekend. At this time the bush and the harbour were of prime importance as subjects – so was the whole magnificent spread of Auckland seen from Titirangi Road on the endless journeys into town...’ – Colin McCahon, A Survey, 1972. After the McCahon family’s arrival in 1953, Colin would walk the steep, winding gravel road from his French Bay house to a remote Titirangi bus stop and ride the long commute to his job at the Auckland Art Gallery. The journey, along with the Titirangi environment, had a significant impact on his painting, directly inspiring the series Towards Auckland as well as a large number of works depicting the Manukau Harbour, French Bay and the kauri forest surrounding his house. McCahon’s Auckland is a contemporary version of that trip; guided free bus trips linking Auckland Art Gallery’s McCahon collections with the McCahon French Bay site. It includes guided walking tours of the area which so inspired McCahon with a side serving of current environmental issues around kauri dieback and efforts to curtail its spread. Bookings are essential for both the bus trip and the guided walks. To book a place, or for all enquiries, email to mccahon@mccahonhouse.org.nz

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Well known and lively local artist Heathermeg Sampson is spreading some of her creative energy on her latest mission to bring an extra splash of art to Titirangi Village. In tandem with The Base café, Heathermeg has turned its walls into a gallery for other locals artists to display their works. “There are more than 140 artists locally and I want to give them all a voice,” she says. “Many of our iconic artists are Heathermeg Sampson hawking their work on the street and with one of artist they need somewhere to develop their Gillian Rawnsley’s works at The Base. profiles. This is their opportunity.” Heathermeg says she wants the café walls to be a community gallery with a fast-paced turnover of exhibitors and she’s not trying to compete with the nearby Upstairs Gallery in Lopdell House or Te Uru, both only a minute’s walk along Titirangi Road. “If they have an overflow situation, with more work than they can hang on their walls, I’ll give them space. It will be good for all of us. Art, food and coffee are such a good combination.” – Moira Kennedy.

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The Fringe JULY 2019

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art & about with naomi mccleary

Save the date for the 24th Going West Writers Festival, September 6 – 15. New this year will be a Festival Hub, running for the full 10 days in the Lopdell House Theatre, with a curated programme of free events and a space to drop in, hang out and be with like-minded aficionados of the spoken and written word. That may encompass learning a waiata, playing speed scrabble, attending a reading or a workshop, watching a new play in rehearsal or seeing a New Zealand film – and the programme is still growing! Going West’s history has been to bring an established New Zealand theatre production to the West each year. Now they are in the exciting era of supporting and commissioning new productions; this year with a one-man show called Ghost Trees, which will play at Arataki Visitor Centre and a new children’s’ play, set in West Auckland, to be directed by Te Pou Theatre at the Corban Estate Arts Centre. Follow the story of the Going West Writers Festival at www. goingwestfest.co.nz

Artist of the Month: Thinking Outside the Square

Tom Koene is a craftsman tiler. He fits most perfectly the description of an artisan; a word with a long and honourable history. He was born in the Netherlands and learned his craft doing restoration work in Amsterdam, using traditional methods and styles. Tom has lived in New Zealand since 1982. An invitation to do the tiling on the gecko that lies beside Khyber Pass Rd, under the motorway, began his Kiwi career. Some of his work is traditional but most is entirely and idiosyncratically Tom Koene. Nevertheless, he is

clearly influenced by Friederich Hundertwasser, an eccentric Austrian artist who also came to live in New Zealand and who designed the famous toilet block in Kawakawa. I met Friederich ‘back in the day’ and can vouch for the eccentricity – but also for his far-sighted environmental awareness and his funding of millions of trees planted in the north. Currently there is a Hundertwasser gallery/museum under construction in Whangarei, highly controversial and anticipated to become a tourist attraction. I’m always suspicious of projects that have tourism has a guiding raison d’etre. Tom’s designs are playful and finely detailed, built with tiles created and glazed in New Zealand, sometimes highlighted by one-offs with colour or textural imperfections from the production process. Each work may include pieces of pottery and stones, all skilfully integrated into free-flowing abstract forms or stylised flowers and koru. Every project is site specific; bathrooms, kitchens, indoor and outdoor patios and walls, paths, steps, pool areas, arches, barbecues, birdbaths, benches, murals, and so on. One thing is sure; each Tom Koene work is unique to its site and the fruit of the collaborative whims of both client and artisan. Insta@tom_organic_tiling

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bandstanding: music in the west with susannah bridges

John Boone: positive change through creative interaction

WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN IN THE WEST...

Drummer, saxophonist, vocalist, lyricist, theatre performer, writer, producer, educator … how does one describe John Boone? With a background in both music and theatre, the multi-talented Oratia resident has recently developed a new production – and he’s taking it to Auckland’s Herald Theatre later this month. John fell in love with music when he was 13. He’s been involved in bands and playing live since he was 18, and at 30 became a full time musician. He’s currently a member of five-piece band Skylark. “I sing and play sax for Skylark, as well as write the lyrics with Tim our guitarist. Skylark was formed two years ago and so far we have played several gigs at festivals and various venues around Auckland.” Skylark plan to record soon – but in the meantime John’s got his hands full with Jungle Jambo. It all began in 2003 on a trip to South Africa, where John fell in love with the power of African rhythms. “On my return to New Zealand I started the company Rhythm Interactive, doing interactive drum shows for corporate events and schools.” He then launched a new production in 2010 with a show called Drumania which ran for three years. “Jungle Jambo is the kids version of this performance with many more bells and whistles. It is the biggest and most creative project I have been involved in to date. It has been in the making since 2008, when we started doing drum shows for schools,” he says. “We came up with a junior, middle and senior school performance, each geared to the target age group. The feedback we received from the kids and teachers was incredible so we started to figure out what resonated and worked. The idea was born to produce a theatre show for kids, one that is interactive, educational and lots of fun.” And so Jungle Jambo was born. “The story is about a little monkey named Jambo who takes on the challenge to gather a tribe, and to teach his music to the tribe to save the jungle from a railway which is being built. Once the tribe’s (the audience’s) music is more powerful than the machines cutting down the trees, work on the railway will stop,” says John. “We want to inspire people, especially our young people, in a world which is becoming more and more challenging. What makes this show unique is that each member of the ‘tribe’ is given an African styled hand drum to play along with the performance. Two hundred drums will be available.

“We’re also donating $1 per ticket sold to the Orangutan Foundation as part of the theme: ‘Together we can make a change’.” John is fully immersed in the lead up to Jambo’s debut. The show is being produced in partnership with art designer Arnav Taode. “When Arnav became involved the picture changed from doing a theatre show to a full theatre production,” says John. “We’re in the final stages of putting it all together. This is our first run of Jungle Jambo so people need to experience its magic to share their experience with others. “For me this is going to be incredibly exciting to see how much we can do to bring positive change to our world through producing creative interactive stage shows. The best feeling of all is when you realise that you are connecting with people and bringing inspiration to your audiences. At the end of a previous show a woman approached me and said that our show had touched her. She was going to resign from her job and follow her passion and dream to become a painter. I could see the happiness in her eyes through her tears,” John says. Inspired by drummer Stuart Copeland, John says he also looked up to people like Freddie Mercury and David Lee Roth. “I was a massive Rolling Stones fan and used to practice Mick Jagger’s moves. As I got older I realised you have to use your own voice and persona to extract that performer out of yourself, but it’s always great to be inspired and to learn from others. As far as our theatre productions go, I draw much inspiration out of shows like Cirque du Soleil and Stomp.” Inspiration also comes from the beach and the bush. “It’s important for me to live in Auckland as most of my shows are in Auckland, but when the opportunity came up to live in Oratia I didn’t hesitate. Oratia is just far enough out of the CBD to make you feel you’re in the country. I love the Waitākeres and being in the bush and close to the beaches. I do enjoy going out and seeing live shows, comedy and film festival films but I’m also a home person: I love cooking and having people over for dinner, wines and great conversation.” Jungle Jambo is playing daily at the Herald Theatre, Aotea Centre, Auckland from Tuesday, July 16 to Saturday, July 20. Show time is 2:30pm and it runs for 75 minutes. Suited for kids aged 5 to 12. Tickets from https://www.aucklandlive.co.nz/show/jungle-jambo www.junglejambo.com

Proudly Supporting our Local Community The merged practices of Thomas & Co Lawyers Ltd and Titirangi Law Centre are able to meet your every legal requirement. Ray Ganda and Don Thomas have many years of experience working in the Titirangi and New Lynn areas. Now, along with the Directors and staff of the combined practices, a wider range of skills and resources is offered. See our website, www.thomas.co.nz, for more details of our history and personnel. We continue to maintain and improve our level of service for our community and clients. There is always someone here with the necessary knowledge and experience to assist with any legal matters that might arise. Give us a call, or come in and visit us. We welcome enquiries and are happy to answer any questions. Details of our office location and on-site parking can be found on our website. We have lift access and are also handy to the Bus/ Train Interchange. Visiting our offices is convenient and easy.

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The Fringe JULY 2019

2nd Floor, 3 Totara Avenue, New Lynn (09) 827 5907 www.thomas.co.nz advertise with the fringe & reach 70,000+ readers


music in the west

Freaky Meat release new EP: FUGU Having followed these fiercely independent locals since 2007 it’s been an interesting ride watching them develop from their earlier styles of jazz-beat poetry fusion through the release of their rather excellent first single Monkey Shines (2009), the superb Late night kebab EP (2010), their prizewinning Christmas song Zombie Xmas Hams and onwards. Two appearances at the Titirangi Festival of Music (2010 and 2011), plus introducing more rock elements into their sound, led to them releasing their first full album Delicatessen in 2011 to rave reviews and nationwide touring. 2012 saw a lineup change with original bass player, Rod Redgrave, leaving to focus on drumming (for local Titirangi RSA house band and other opportunities). In stepped Julian Petttitt who had previously been in metal band Deluge with Freaky Meat guitarist John McNab. Lots more shows and touring ensued with the band also finding time to film a video of Slow cooking in the ghost kitchen in the basement of the Hardware Café. 2014 saw the release of their It was like that when I found it EP which contained tracks with a fiercer, metal sound. Late 2014 also saw another lineup change with new drummer Chris Dawson stepping in and the band started writing Apocalyptic Radio (the track that eventually starts the new EP, FUGU). In a surprising twist, 2016 saw Rod Redgrave return to the band as drummer (with Chris playing live when Rod was unavailable) and the band subsequently released another EP The way we used to in 2017.

Of the four tracks on FUGU, Apocalyptic Radio is a mixture of amazing metal riffs, tight playing, clever vocals, progressive changes and shifts, double kick drums (Chris Dawson plays on this track) and contrasting moments of satisfying musicality. The second track, Badlands Boogie, is a catchy funk/ boogie-sounding lament to staying in and watching the world burn on social media. Or, at least, that’s one of the themes that vocalist Shane Hollands uses. An early version of the third track, One-Eyed Jackson, was originally played live in the studio on bfm back in April 2011. This new version is again a mash up of musical styles that allow Hollands’ poetic vocals to take the listener on a quieter contemplative road-trip reminiscent of the band’s earlier works. The fourth track Nil by Mouth is, to me, the epic of this EP. Again, an early raw (different arrangement) version of this track was played live at the Titirangi Toolroom in July 2011. This new version incorporates math metal elements (think Meshugah), doom metal elements, prog metal changes, a John Pettrucci-type solo, and some incredibly tight, sometimes brutal, playing by the band which never overpowers the vocals. Rather, the music forms an impressive platform that supports the vocals and propels the song to a very satisfying conclusion. What's next? It appears that the band will be working on a Punk EP. Knowing these guys it won’t be what you’re expecting. For a physical copy of FUGU contact the band on info@freakymeat. co.nz, or download it from https://freakymeat.bandcamp.com. – Paul Rogers

Curious Tamariki is a Gecko Trust project that teaches young people how to use digital storytelling to promote what's important to them and their community. They learn from professional filmmakers and get to explore with scientists and tell the story of their local environment. The free programme runs over three days, July 17 – 19, 10am-4pm at Te Uru and is suitable for ages 11 to 18. A free mini Film Festival Showcase featuring some of the films will take place on September 4, 6:308:30pm at Lopdell House Theatre. Visit www.curioustamariki.com for more. Harcourts Blue Fern Realty Ltd, Licensed Agent REAA 2008

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Unit 1/141 West Coast Rd, Glen Eden The Fringe JULY 2019

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places to go

WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN IN THE WEST...

Event organisers: Do you have an upcoming event you’d like listed in The Fringe? Send the details, including a contact person and number, to info@fringemedia.co.nz. Readers: While we take care to ensure listings are correct, errors may occur. Check with the contact person wherever possible.

july w – July 7, Matariki exhibition; West Coast Gallery, Piha. Phone 812 8029. www.westcoastgallery.co.nz. w – July 21, Re-generation, Jude Robertson investigates the relationship between people and their environment; Corban Estate Arts Centre. Phone 838 4455. w – July 21, Shall we work together? A call for collaboration curated by Ariane Craig-Smith and Chris McBride for The Kauri Project collective; Corban Estate Arts Centre. Phone 838 4455. w – August 18, Names held in our mouths, six artists and collectives reflect on how cultural knowledge is revived and sustained; Te Uru, 420 Titirangi Road. w – August 25, Rooms found only in the home, Marie Shannon explores objects and evidence of personal interactions; Te Uru, 420 Titirangi Road. w 3 – 6, LOPDELL FILM FESTIVAL, a selection of 12 films including drama, comedy, documentary and free movies for younger audiences; Lopdell House Theatre; $10, tickets from eventfinda.co.nz. Bookings 817 2583. Details at lopdellprecinct.org.nz or flickscinema.weebly.com. w 4 and 5, Kia Ora Shorts 2019, a programme of short films curated by the Wairoa Māori Film Festival; Corban Estate Arts Centre; 7.30pm; $9. Bookings phone 838 4455. w 5, West Auckland Men’s Rebus Club, guest speaker

and morning tea; Kelston Community Centre, Corner Great North and Awaroa Roads; 9.30-11.30am. Phone Roger 834 7945. w 7, Pony Rides, Huia Road Horse Club; 436B Huia Road, Laingholm; 3-4pm; $5 per child per ride. Phone 027 499 1732. w 7, Chrissie and Ronnie, live music; Titirangi RSA, 502 South Titirangi Road; 1-4pm; free, Phone 817 6415. w 9, West Auckland Historical Society Family History Group meeting; Henderson Central Library West Auckland Research Centre; 10-11.30am. Phone Gary Snow 832 5098, 021 618 434 or email gary@snofam.co.nz. w 9 and 23, Quiz night; Titirangi RSA, 502 South Titirangi Road; 7pm. Phone 817 6415. w 12, Ladies’ Probus Club, fellowship and fun; St John’s Hall, Te Atatū South; 9.45am. Phone Betty 09 832 0484. w 12, Flicks presents The Last Suit, an award-winning comedic and poignant film from Argentina; Lopdell House Theatre; 10.30am ($12/$10), 6pm and 8.15pm ($14/$12); tickets from eventfinda.co.nz or on door. Bookings by text 0210 222 5558 or phone 818 2489. w 13, Titirangi Folk Music Club presents the Jews Brothers, supported by Bluegrass and Beyond; Lopdell House Theatre; 7.30 pm; $20 on the door or book by phoning Tricia 818 5659. w 13 – August 11, Piha Preschool – young up-andcoming artists; West Coast Gallery, Piha. Phone 812 8029. www.westcoastgallery.co.nz w 14, BASTILLE DAY FRENCH FILMS, coffee, croissants, baguette, French wine and three award-winning French films: The School of Life (PG) with Francois Cluzet, 10.30am, My Afternoons with Margueritte (M) with Gerard Depardieu, 12.30pm and A Monster in Paris (PG),

an award-winning animated film at 2.30pm; Lopdell House Theatre; $12 per film, under 14 $7, eventfinda. co.nz and on door. Text bookings to 0210 222 5558. w 14, Ben & Friends, live music; Titirangi RSA, 502 South Titirangi Road; 1-4pm; free, Phone 817 6415. w 16, SeniorNet West Auckland, speaker, morning tea and chatting about computers; Kelston Community Centre; 10am. Phone June 021 179 3635. w 18, Waitākere Forest & Bird Talk: Auckland’s Regional Pest Management Plan with Dr Imogen Bassett; Kelston Community Centre, corner Awaroa and Great North Roads; 7.30pm; Koha appreciated. Phone Liz 027 476 2732 or email lizanstey@hotmail.com. w 20, Lions Club Book Sale; New Lynn Friendship Club Hall, 3063 Great North Road, New Lynn; 8am-4pm. Phone Mary 027 487 0639. w 20, Mamma Mia! Here we go again, movie fundraiser for Upstairs Gallery; Lopdell House Theatre; 7.30pm; Tickets are on sale now or book by phoning Sammy on 817 4278 or 027 916 2054. w 21, Flicks presents At Eternity’s Gate (PG) a second screening of this film about Vincent van Gogh starring Willem Dafoe; Lopdell House Theatre; 2.30pm; $12/$10/$7. Text bookings to 0210 222 5558. w 21, Paul O’Brien & Friends, live music; Titirangi RSA, 502 South Titirangi Road; 1-4pm; free, Phone 817 6415. w 23, Titirangi U3A with a range of activities including study groups, discussions, speakers and more; West Lynn Garden, 73 Parker Avenue, New Lynn; 1pm; gold coin. Contact 817 5519 or maggie.u3a.titirangi@gmail.com. w 26, The Combined Probus Club of Glen Eden; Ceramco Park Function Centre, Glendale Road, Kaurilands; 10-11.30am. Phone Brian Holt 838 5857.

Focussed on the issues: Urban planning Is a steel jungle the new face of Auckland? Is that what Auckland’s unitary plan is designed to deliver? Does Auckland have a plan for growth, beyond just growing? How does squeezing ever more buildings into mature suburbs, those established with a character sculpted by previous generations, improve the well-being of the people living there? I was asked these questions by neighbours of Fruitvale School (halfway down Titirangi Road) who have sat with a morning coffee on their deck watching the sun rise over Rangitoto and the Auckland skyline for three generations, but are to now stare at the huge back wall of a new building, and expected to come to terms with it in the name of growth. Only last July neighbours were assured: “It won’t affect your skyline.” Now that construction has started, neighbours have received a letter explaining that the advice was wrong. Not everyone can conceptualise the practical process and/or outcomes of a construction project just by reading plans, obviously not even

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The Fringe JULY 2019

bureaucrats. Or is this another example of affected parties being constructively ill-informed in a hope to speed up process. Auckland Council would not allow this situation if they were the affected party. And what of the Resource Management Act, there to protect people’s properties’ intrinsic value from the negative effects of neighbour’s actions? This family have themselves added a second dwelling to their property, and when doing so Council ensured rules and regulations stopped neighbours being adversely affected. Why now in turn are these rules and regulations absent. It’s these types of bureaucratic double standards that are making people feel ‘irrelevant’ and worse ‘manipulated’. Council will not grow our city into something we are all proud of, without justice and respect towards all residents. I will advocate on these people’s behalf for a fairer and better outcome. Ken Turner, WestWards

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places to go w 26, Flicks at Lopdell House Theatre; 10.30am, 5.30pm

l WHERE IT’S AT: • Corban Estate Arts Centre, 2 Mount Lebanon Lane, Henderson; 10am–4.30pm daily. 838 4455. • EcoMatters Environment Trust, 1 Olympic Place, New Lynn; Wednesday – Sunday 10am-2pm. 826 4276, info@ecomatters. org.nz. • Flicks cinema, Lopdell House Theatre. 818 2489, www.flickscinema.weebly.com. • Kelston Community Centre, corner of Awaroa and Great North Roads, Kelston. • McCahon House Museum, 67 Otitori Bay Rd; Wednesday – Sunday, 1-4pm, except public holidays. 817 6148, mccahon@ mccahonhouse.org.nz. • Playhouse Theatre, 15 Glendale Road, Glen Eden. 818 5751. • Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery, 420 Titirangi Road, Titirangi; 10am–4.30pm daily. 817 8087, info@ teuru.org.nz. • Titirangi Theatre, Lopdell House Theatre; Titirangi. 817 5812, infoline 817 5951, www.titirangitheatre.co.nz. • Upstairs Gallery, Level 1, Lopdell House; 10am–4.30pm daily. 817 4278, www. upstairs.org.nz. • West Coast Gallery, Seaview Road, Piha; Wednesday – Sunday, 10am–4pm. 812 8029, www.westcoastgallery.co.nz.

Titirangi Rd; 8.30pm. Phone 817 6415. w 26 – September 15, Labour of Body featuring six artists who work with textiles; Corban Estate Arts Centre. Phone 838 4455. w 26 – September 15, Capturing Liberty, paintings by Laura Williams; Corban Estate Arts Centre. Phone 838 4455. w 28, Titirangi Village Market: art, craft, produce and music; Titirangi War Memorial Hall; 10am-2pm. Contact Tess on tvm@gmail.com or phone 022 631 9436. w 28, Steve Rose, live music; Titirangi RSA, 502 South Titirangi Road; 1-4pm; free, Phone 817 6415.

august w August 2, West Auckland Men’s Rebus Club, guest

speaker and morning tea; Kelston Community Centre, Corner Great North and Awaroa Roads; 9.30-11.30am. Phone Roger 834 7945. w August 4, Pony Rides, Huia Road Horse Club; 436B Huia Road, Laingholm; 3-4pm; $5 per child per ride. Phone 027 499 1732. There is so much happening in and around our community, including many weekly events, that we can’t fit everything into these listings. To find out more about whatever you are interested in, from Air Scouts to yoga, visit:

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WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN IN THE WEST...

and 8.15pm.Phone 818 2489 for details.

w 26, OPEN MIC NIGHT; Titirangi RSA, 502 South


our place

feature: travel

Ahhhh... the good life – a reflection on a topical problem. Local Anna Crichton’s quirky illustrations have graced many of New Zealand’s leading publications. She is a five-time winner and five-time finalist of the New Zealand Canon/Qantas/Voyager Media Editorial Artist of the Year Award. Anna can be contacted at illustrator@annacrichton.com.

WIN

Family passes to Jungle Jambo

The Fringe has two family passes to Jungle Jambo to give away. To go in the draw to win one write your name, address and phone number on the back of an envelope, along with the name of the show’s art designer (see page 10) and post it to: Fringe Jambo Competition, PO Box 60-469, Titirangi, Auckland 0642 to reach us by July 9, or email your answer and contact details to info@ fringemedia.co.nz (with Jambo Competition in the subject line).

Some 1000km off the coast of Ecuador lie the Galapagos Islands, one of the world’s most prolific wildlife destinations. Its isolated terrain shelters a diversity of unique plant and animal species. With a lack of predators in the area you can experience close encounters with the Islands’ wildlife without them being fearful of you. The islands are best explored by specifically-designed small ships, to discover each Island’s wonderful differences. We recommend The Santa Cruz II. This-state-of-the-art vessel is home to 90 guests in 50 airconditioned cabins. Relax in the beautifully designed communal areas, the library, or in the two lounge bars. You will enjoy superb on-board service, friendly crew, and the best naturalist guides available, who will share their knowledge of flora, fauna and the geology of this incredible destination. Each day is filled with morning and afternoon excursions ashore, Zodiac rides to see more of the coast and snorkelling and glassbottom boat excursions to view the rich marine life beneath the waves. To get to the Galapagos you fly into Quito, Ecuador with Latam Airlines (Lan), via Santiago, and connect with a flight out to the islands. It is a good idea to spend a few nights in Quito to break your trip. Ecuador is a little gem of a country with incredible culture and wildlife and Quito was the first city to be listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site. You can visit the beautiful churches, the charming main square or wander the cobbled streets at your leisure, or enjoy a three-hour scenic transfer and spend a few days in the Ecuadorian Cloud Forest. Call Tina or Kathy at YOU Travel New Lynn for more details: 827 4917.

* T&Cs apply. Visit us in store for these and more great offers. Offers valid from 01 July – 30 September 2019 Only while stocks last.

PiperforWhau Piperforwhau@gmail.com Authorised by: W Piper, 2/164A Titirangi Road, New Lynn, Auckland

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The Fringe JULY 2019

GLEN EDEN advertise with the fringe & reach 70,000+ readers

DESIRABLE DESTINATIONS: A Fringe special feature

Where the wild things are


feature: travel

Join the river cruise revolution

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Grand France and French Riveria Escorted Tour

helloworld Travel Henderson has limited space available on its exclusive 19-night Avalon River Cruise Tour from $12,879*pp, double share in a deluxe stateroom. This cruise departs August 10, 2020 from Paris and will be escorted by Mary and Jason Buckley. A cruise and land itinerary is available. (International airfare additional.) This tour Includes one-night pre-cruise accommodation in Paris; 15-night Avalon River Cruise on Avalon Tapestry II and Avalon Poetry II (pictured above); all meals on aboard cruise and regional wine and beer with lunch and dinner; port charges and prepaid gratuities aboard the river cruise; guided sightseeing tour at each port; two nights in Marseille; four nights in Nice; Day Cruise and St Tropez; and a day tour to the famously independent city-state of Monaco. Contact the team at helloworld Travel Henderson on 839 0371 for more information on River Cruising.

The Fringe JULY 2019

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DESIRABLE DESTINATIONS: A Fringe special feature

Each year, thousands of New Zealanders are making the pilgrimage to the world’s most famous rivers to take part in a cruise revolution – river cruising. With more and more travellers discovering the delights of a river cruise holiday, it’s one of the fastest growing cruise sectors among Kiwis, but it’s also booming around the world. There is so much demand that river cruise operators are constantly building new ships, each more spectacular and luxurious than the last. River cruise operators are constantly upping the ante on what they offer guests. Whether it’s active excursions for health-conscious travellers, a cookery school, state-of-the-art amenities, or itineraries geared at families or younger holidaymakers, there is a river cruise to suit every type of traveller. From the Mississippi to the Mekong, the world’s rivers are becoming the hottest way to transport tourists in search of a new, relaxing way to travel. There is something blissful about exploring Europe via its medieval highways, each day disembarking in another picturesque riverside town to explore its cobblestoned streets or hilltop castles. From the Danube to the Seine, Europe is home to a vast network of waterways with a rich tapestry of cultures and cuisines and a river cruise is the best way to take in a panoramic view of thousands of years of European history. Like any other cruise, a river cruise enables guests to only unpack once and all the arrangements are taken care of as guests relax and enjoy the ride and with so much included in the fare, from fine dining, wine, excursions and transport, a river cruise is a great value and comfortable way to see a region.


places to go

Mid-winter at the Libraries

WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN IN THE WEST...

Titirangi Library is always warm and cosy and you are invited to visit and discover something to read or watch during these dark months. The library is open until 7pm on Thursdays and from 10am to 4pm on Saturdays. On Thursday July 4, 5.30-7pm, the International Dark Sky Association will be hosting a special event. The association works to protect the night skies for present and future generations, promoting initiatives to protect the night skies and fragile ecosystems in parks and protected areas worldwide. The library and the association are to launch the Dark Sky programme in West Auckland. This is a family event and we are planning on telescope viewing, however this will be weather dependent. The library also has several events for the school holidays: Matariki Craft: Upcycle t-shirts into new dancing poi, July 9, 10-11am. Matariki Stars: an opportunity to create Matariki stars using different materials, July 10, 10-11am. Matariki Whānau Disco: bring your family and friends and celebrate Matariki with dancing, games, bubbles and disco lights, July 11, 6-7pm Library Blast Off!: Get ready to explore the galaxy in a space adventure. Complete challenges and receive your space ranger certificate, July 15, 10-11am. Matariki Hei tiki clay creations: celebrate Matariki and get crafty creating colourful clay jewellery, July 16, 10-11am. Mini makers: bring along your mini maker and explore different STEM activities. There will be bubbles, ‘Dig for the dino’, Banana pianos, Sand art and Lego play. (Suitable for 3-6years.), July 17, 10-11am. Gaming after dark: Connect and play social games with your friends. Minecrafters and other gamers welcome – own logons and devices required, July 18, 6-7pm. New Lynn Library also has a busy month coming with: Matariki Storytime, July 3, 10.00am. Embroidery Workshop (ages 14+), July 6, 10am-12pm (booking essential). Make a Māori Lunar Calendar, July 6, 12-1pm. Poi Making (ages 14+) at New Lynn Community Centre, July 4, 4-5pm, and New Lynn Library, July 18, 4-5pm. A ‘Zine’ Workshop (make your own mini-magazine or comic, ages 14+), July 11, 3.30-5.00pm. There will also be a Children’s Art Class on July 14, 12.45-1.30pm. With the winter days and school holidays Glen Eden Library has a great line-up of free events to keep children busy. Matariki Hei Tiki Workshop, make your own Hei Tiki design using air dry clay and string, for ages 5 and over July, 5, 3.30pm-4.30pm. . International Pen Pals, receive a letter from a child at our partner library in Georgia, USA and write your reply, July 6, 2-3pm Maker Club: Construction Zone, July 9, 3.30-4.30pm Lego in the library meeting room, recommended for ages 5+, July 10, 3.30-4.30pm Fencing: Tuatahi Fencing presents a fun, free, drop-in session. Learn about this exciting sport and have a go with real equipment. Recommended for ages 8+, July 12, 3-4pm. Mad Scientists, fun experiments suitable for ages 4+, July 17, 2-3pm. Saturday 20th July 1.30 - 3.00PM Movies and crafts, suitable for all ages, July 20, 1.30-3pm. Storytime and Wriggle and Rhyme will have a break over the holidays and will start up again once school is back. Matariki Take 3 competition, get your card stamped and go in the draw to win. Competition runs until July 14. Whau Ace Adult and Community Education offer free support and advice in a relaxed environment. The free drop-in sessions include, CV preparation, career guidance, job search, online job applications and cover letters. Workshops are held every Wednesday, 1-3pm.

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The Fringe JULY 2019

feature: education

Open Day Saturday 27 July 9.30am – 2.00pm

A great place to go to school. Serving the families in Green Bay, Titirangi and surrounding areas, our focus is on learning that is innovative, connected and meets the needs of all students. Here at Green Bay High School, staff know their students. They make time to foster strong relationships with them and support all students to pursue their goals throughout the five years they are with us. New Principal, Fiona Barker, will speak in the auditorium at 10am,12pm and 1pm about what Green Bay has to offer your children. She will share the school’s future vision, how it continues to evolve with the ongoing changes in the education sector and outline its focus on meeting the diverse needs of secondary school students.

Green Bay High School’s size and environment enables us to develop bespoke opportunities for our students. As a school, we are focused on the future and continue to evolve with the changes in the education sector. The use of traditional pathways alongside innovative and personalised learning approaches allows us to target the curriculum needs of our students. The continued development of our facilities, buildings, and technology means that we support a diverse range of learning opportunities. The school plays an active role in the local community by engaging with families, local schools and community groups. Key to Green Bay’s success is a focus on meeting the educational needs of the community and upholding the same values. Our roll has grown to around 1350 students because there is: •

• •

A clear, strong vision shared by an effective Board of Trustees and Senior Leadership Team. A team of teaching professionals who are experts in their subjects and enthusiastically embrace the latest professional development and change. A strong school culture that promotes positive relationships as an essential part of effective learning. An imaginative use of NCEA; traditional learning pathways which sit alongside innovative curriculum initiatives. Academic counselling that supports all students to achieve their personal best. Major investment in upgrading ICT infrastructure; a carefully developed e-learning plan with a ‘bring your own device’ strategy.

• Active involvement and leadership of Ko-tuitui, our local community of learning network. • Multi-million dollar property upgrade including a Performing Arts Centre, Sports/PE facilities and classroom facilities with a new 2 million dollar upgrade to the Library and English block in progress. • Exciting growth in sport with a focus both on elite athletes (JETS programme) and those who love playing sports. • Huge opportunities to participate in performance and cultural activities. • Strong student leadership across the school, growing the leaders of the future.

Our continued strong focus on meeting the needs, aspirations and interests of our community and its young people underpins everything that we do. Fiona Barker Principal June 2019 PLEASE NOTE: Significant roll growth in recent years has meant the Board of Trustees is required to have an enrolment zone by the Ministry of Education. See our website for enrolment details.

www.greenbayhigh.school.nz

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feature: education

Avondale College wins Showquest

An outstanding creative performance with a strong environmental message saw Avondale College win the Auckland region’s Showquest performing arts competition early last month. The nationwide competition challenges students to put together a creative mini-spectacular, complete with video wall, sound and lighting. Avondale College's student leaders Cate McIntosh and David Tuitama had begun thinking about the performance in October last year, and following a round of auditions and rehearsals over the last few months, were both delighted with the way Avondale's environmentally-themed performance came together on the night.

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“Showquest was an incredible experience, from the nine months preparing to the performance day itself," said Cate. "We had 75 students involved in performing, designing costumes, props and makeup, and working behind the scenes with technical support. It was so amazing to be able to work with such a talented team and meet students from other schools who were also passionate about the performing arts. It was an experience that I will never forget!” In addition to the overall prize, Avondale College also won awards for lighting, choreography and theme.

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feature: education

On top of the world

University counselling at AIC

When ACG Sunderland Year 11 student Leo Li was awarded Top in the World in Cambridge International IGCSE Design and Technology this year, he became the second student to get the prestigious placing for teacher Cecilia Faumuina. Cecilia’s former student Milly Carlyle Rowe placed Top in the World in 2017. Principal Nathan Villars says “Cecelia is one of those, ‘one-in-a-thousand employees’ who gives her all to her Leo Li with ‘one-in-athousand’ Cecilia Faumuina. students. She is always at school, running tutorials, advising and guiding both her Design and Technology students and also her Māori/Pacific tutor groups, too.” As for Leo, his final course work was the design and development of a jewellery package for the brand Tiffany & Co. He doesn’t own anything from Tiffany’s himself (“too expensive!”) but when he researched famous names in jewellery design brands he was inspired by the iconic company’s turquoise colour scheme and silverware. The result was a 30-page portfolio documenting his comprehensive working process and a final prototype of the packaging. Ms Faumuina had high praise for his work ethic: “Leo is persistent and a perfectionist. He works hard for the results he wants. When others have given up or are content with what they have, Leo still strives that little bit harder.” Leo’s success topped off outstanding results across the board for ACG Sunderland in the 2018 Cambridge exams, including 100% pass rate at A Level, 88% University Entrance rate and 93% pass rate at IGCSE. Cambridge International is a globally recognised, exam-based school curriculum offered at ACG Sunderland as an alternative to NCEA.

One of the ways that Auckland International College differs from any other school in New Zealand is its focus on students’ applications to universities. AIC prioritises university counselling support by employing university counsellors at the College. These specialist counsellors provide a comprehensive threeyear programme of support and guidance. This includes preparing students for SAT tests, explaining what university admissions officers are looking for, providing specialist university interview coaching and making sure students are aware of all of the stages and deadlines for university applications. Since its first class graduated in 2006, AIC has had more offers of placings from the world’s top 50 universities than any other school in New Zealand. The college’s alumni are studying at or have graduated from Harvard, Princeton, Oxford, Cambridge, Stanford, Carnegie-Mellon, UCLA, UC Berkeley, New York University, the National University of Singapore, University of Tokyo, KU Leuven, and many more. For a full list of offers received visit http://www.aic.ac.nz/index.php/ aic-graduates/aic-university-destinations.html or visit the college. If you have high aspirations and want to make a difference in the world talk to AIC and see how it can help you reach your goals.

Auckland International College Pathway to the World...

The primary focus of AIC is academic excellence.

Preschool | Primary | College

Open Evening Thursday 25 July 6.30pm–8.30pm sunderland.acgedu.com 18

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A mix of local and international students creates a rich and diverse atmosphere. Supported by outstanding academic staff, year after year our students deservedly achieve top marks in the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme. Every day is an open day at AIC. If you are interested in joining the new school year, beginning in July, or even if you just want to look around, you’re welcome! Please phone or email to make an appointment.

09 3094480 | admissions@aic.ac.nz | www.aic.ac.nz

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sustainable solutions

Don’t Buy Into the Waste We all know that if we don’t buy packaging in the first instance, we won’t have to recycle it, writes FIONA DRUMMOND. I sometimes think back to a childhood that was relatively free of the packaging inflicted on us today. I grew up on a farm where we killed and bagged our own meat. I learnt to recycle butter papers for lining baking tins and we baked cakes and slices. Plastic bags were never single use and food waste went to dogs or chickens. We seldom ate takeaways and if we did it was fish and chips wrapped in newspaper, and in my early childhood we bought our groceries from the local store in brown paper bags (history is repeating). Up until the 1990s, soft drinks were primarily in glass bottles that were returnable. Milk bottles were put out at the gate and re-used. These were simpler, less consumer-oriented times, and our actions were easier on the environment. Today, however, so many foods are over-packaged and there are many types of plastic in use. Not all plastics can be easily recycled. Some types, 1 (PET) soft drink bottles and 2 (HDPE) milk bottles are easier to recycle than others. Some get contaminated with food waste and cost more to be recycled (take-away food and drink containers). Some plastic types (3, 4, 5, 6 and 7) are often not worth recycling. This is because there is low value in the recovered plastics as they are harder to recycle, there are small volumes and long travel distances, and manufacturers struggle to make any profit from them. Another example of packaging that is complex to recycle is Tetra Pak cartons, the outside of which are cardboard but the foil plastic inner requires separation. Tetra Pak and New Zealand Plastic Products have now Tetra Pak can now be recycled into wood plastic composite. formed a partnership to start recycling the used beverage cartons before the end of 2019. This will see the establishment of a new carton recycling plant in South Auckland which will take Tetra Pak waste from around the country, diverting another significant area of waste from landfill. Tetra Pak has stated that all materials from the cartons, including caps and straws, can be recycled into something new and useful – wood plastic composite (WPC) which can be used in the building industry, primarily for making wide profile decking. The paper fibres used to produce beverage cartons are long and strong, and the combination of polymers and aluminium along with the fibre produces a robust WPC. Another innovative example that embraces the circular economy concept is PET plastic. Previously we were importing PET resin, trays and containers from overseas. (We were even importing recycled PET (RPET) while exporting our own RPET for recycling.) However, a

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Wellington company, Flight Plastics, is now recycling New Zealand PET into RPET food containers meaning that we are importing less resin and reducing our carbon footprint. Countdown are using NZ Recycled PET for their bakery items and some fruit packaging companies like Eastpack in Te Puke are using the RPET containers Flight Plastic NZPET packaging for fruit such as kiwifruit. But we do have to ask: why are we buying cakes or fruit in plastic containers? It is great that we have some responsible manufacturers, but why buy into waste in the first place? It is up to us as consumers to say no to packaging. On that note, pressure from eco-conscious consumers has led to New World and Pak’n’Save stores trialling customers bringing reusable containers to staffed areas like seafood, bakery, delicatessen, and butchery from June. Shoppers can use any containers, but they must be cleaned thoroughly before being presented in store. The BYO container approach only relates to food counters where the container can be weighed, however, so products from the bulk bins still need to be placed into plastic bags. Pak’n’Save advises you to check your containers are leak-proof then clean and dry them. Hand your containers to staff at the food counters who will weigh the container before adding food. They will then label and seal your container with a barcode for scanning at the checkout. Stores such as Commonsense and Bin Inn have allowed BYO containers for years and as such are a waste-free alternative to the supermarket for your bulk bin items.

Let’s Get Our Recycling Right

We all know what goes into our rubbish and recycling bins, right? Actually wrong, most of us don’t. It’s easy to think that the recycling bin, collected every two weeks, is for things we commonly recycle (cartons, metals, glass, hard plastics, Tetra Pak cartons, cardboard and paper) while the rubbish bin is for landfill items including food scraps, soft plastics and everything else, excluding hazardous items and chemicals. But it’s not that straightforward. Find out the full story at https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/rubbishrecycling/rubbish-recycling-collections/Pages/default.aspx. (Of course, if you take your soft plastics to a Love NZ bin at local Countdown stores and compost your food waste, you won’t have to put the rubbish bin out very often.)

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naturally west with fiona drummond

The grey warbler, surrogate to the shining cuckoo As we enter mid winter, I have been enjoying the presence of small birds such as finches, sparrows and silver-eyes in the garden, attracted by the winter flowering blue salvia and some tasty morsels in the bird feeder. But one is less likely to see the grey warbler (riroriro), despite it being New Zealand’s most widely distributed native bird, as it is too busy catching insects in dense shrubs and trees and is well camouflaged. Its beautiful trilling song will give it away, however, and you have to marvel at the vocal intensity of a little bird weighing only six grams. Its song is not its only claim to fame. The riroriro is the only New Zealand native bird that routinely allows another bird species to lay an egg in its nest, and then proceeds to feed it and raise it – a bird several times its own size. The grey warbler is the only mainland host for the parasitic native shining cuckoo, also a notable songster, which makes one wonder if it is the warbler song that attracts the cuckoo to it, as well as a similar insectivorous diet. Like most cuckoo species, shining cuckoos mainly eat invertebrates and have the ability to eat toxic insects like hairy caterpillars and ladybirds that are avoided The diminutive grey warbler feeding by many other birds. They are one of the few New Zealand a much larger shining cuckoo chick. Photo by Malcolm Pullman. birds recorded eating monarch butterfly caterpillars, and taking red admiral butterfly caterpillars from tree nettle. The cuckoo is present in New Zealand for most of the year, but undertakes a trans-oceanic annual migration to New Guinea and the Solomon Islands in the winter months. Auckland Council has released its five-year plan for reopening Waitākere Ranges tracks. The programme has the support of Te Kawerau a Māki, The Tree Council, Waitākere Ranges Protection Society and Forest & Bird. Tree Council secretary, Dr Mels Barton is pleased that the Council has upheld the principles of both the rāhui and science-based biosecurity in finalising their report, including “protecting healthy kauri ecosystems, focussing recreation around the coastline and low-risk areas on the edge of the forest, and only opening tracks once they are agreed to have met the high standards required to protect kauri.” The main changes to the plan, following public feedback, are the inclusion of eight additional tracks including Spraggs Bush, Cutty Grass and McElwain Lookout Tracks for reopening within the next five years, in addition to the 35 tracks that were identified in the draft programme. Spraggs Bush and Cutty Grass Tracks were two of

In November the female shining cuckoo removes a single egg from the warbler clutch, replacing it with her own egg. It’s a delicate job, and requires precise timing. Too early, and her egg will stand out in an empty nest; too late, and her chick might not get the attention it needs from its surrogate parent. Then to add insult to injury, the cuckoo chick, The grey warbler. Photo by Craig after hatching, ejects all the grey McKenzie. warbler eggs and chicks and is raised alone for several weeks after fledging by its warbler foster parents. Why the riroriro suffers this indignity I can only conclude is due to a very small brain. Fortunately, thanks to the wide distribution of the riroriro, there are plenty of nests that avoid the indecency of the shining cuckoo and a good number of warbler chicks fledge and grow to adulthood. In Māori bird lore the position of the riroriro’s nest was believed to indicate the prevailing wind, as the nest’s entrance faced away from the wind. The riroriro’s song signalled the time to plant crops. The bird is also mentioned in a saying about a lazy person who doesn’t help plant the seeds, but turns up later to eat the harvest: I whea koe i te tangihanga o te riroriro, ka mahi kai māu? (Where were you when the riroriro was singing, that you didn’t work to get yourself food?) This saying could easily be attributed to the shining cuckoo for leaving the livelihood of its offspring to the riroriro. The riroriro certainly deserves the annual Forest & Bird ‘Bird of the Year Award’ for its generosity so vote for this plucky little bird when 2019 voting comes around (https://www.birdoftheyear.org.nz/). the five tracks most requested by submitters for reopening. Further investigative work is planned for some additional tracks identified as important to the community. However 10 popular tracks are not scheduled for upgrades in the next five years as they run through areas of high value, nonsymptomatic kauri, symptomatic kauri or are in the inner forest area. These include the Cascade, Centennial, Farley, Hamilton, Home, Huia Ridge, Odlin Timber, Ridge Road, Walker Ridge and Zion Ridge tracks. A further 46 currently-closed tracks will remain closed as they were not a high priority with submitters for reopening. The decision as to whether they will remain permanently closed will be considered as part of the Regional Parks Management Plan review in 2020. You can check the status of any Waitākere track at https://www. aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/environment/plants-animals/pests-weeds/ Documents/waitakere-ranges-track-list.pdf – Fiona Drummond

Linda Cooper

Councillor for Waitakere

Please feel free to contact me 021 629 533 linda.cooper@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz 135 Albert Street, Auckland Private Bag 92 300, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142 www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

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walking west with michael andrew

Zig Zag Track Reopens

Photo by Michael Andrew.

A favourite local walk right on Titirangi’s doorstep has reopened. Zig Zag Track is just one of a handful of tracks in the Waitākeres that have been reopened after extensive upgrades to prevent the spread of kauri dieback in accordance with MPI’s Controlled Area Notice (CAN). Which basically means it’s now supposed to be less muddy. At the start of the track on Park Road, I’m confronted by an imposing sanitation station, its bright yellow colours and stern, official text ordering me to scrub my shoes and keep to the track. Strangely it didn’t add that I shouldn’t talk to strangers ... It’s rather overwhelming. But I make sure to appease the CAN and saturate my boots with disinfectant before moving onto the track. Oh it’s flash all right. It’s got new boardwalks and bridges and fancy new bitumen packed tightly on jack mesh, which keeps me safe from all that icky mud. But as I traipse along the wooden boardwalk, at once admiring and resenting the quality of its workmanship, I can’t help noticing how tidy everything is. It all seems rather sanitised, polished, as if I should have paid an admission to enter the track. It feels … touristy. Nevertheless, it’s a small price to pay to be back in the bush again. And it is truly good to be back with the smell and the sounds as the track zigzags its way down the hill before crossing the cascading Paturoa stream, a great place to see glow worms at night. Suddenly, I get the peculiar feeling I’m being watched. Is it a council security camera somewhere? Or a teenager wagging school? Maybe it’s the dreaded CAN, hiding in the trees, watching and waiting for me to slip up and put a foot off the track ... It turns out to be a fantail. I forgot just how many granddaddy trees there are in here; ancient pūriri mushrooming over the canopy, and sagacious kahikatea with their lofty heads teeming with life, like cities in the sky. Not many kauri, strangely enough. Apart from at the start and the finish, I only see one from the track for the majority of the 20 minute walk. That is until I get to the end, where a 200-metre boardwalk takes me through a kauri grove and through another cleaning station at Titirangi Beach Road. I head back up the track, savouring the silence and the fresh air heavy with moisture from the trees. It’s a curious thing; the bush is the bush. It’s wonderful and soothing. But I can’t help feeling nostalgic for a bit of mud, or the precarious descent down a slippery bank. There’s something quintessentially kiwi about the mess. But perhaps this is the way our tracks are going. Perhaps the days of slipping along mud pools, clutching at roots, rock hopping across streams and scooping up refreshing handfuls of icy Waitākere water are going to be a thing of the past in the West. I suppose it’s a small sacrifice to have access to our magnificent forest again. We, the people have spoken. We want more tracks opened. And we want them opened now. But the question is, just how enjoyable will these tracks be with the CAN always there? Always watching?

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weather by the moon Ken Ring’s predictions for July July will be very chilly at times. The month starts with a frost and a fine day and should remain mostly clear for the first five days. From the 5th–10th expect scattered showers and between the 10th and 25th, there are fine skies with only a few intermittent wet periods. The rest of the month is wet. The heaviest falls may be on the 27th. The windiest days may be the 5th-7th. The average maximums may be 14-16°C and the average minimums, an unusually low 3-4°C. The warmest day may be around the 9th with about 19°C max, and the coolest night may be around the 23rd with -3°C. Frosts in low-lying areas are possible on nine days, the 1st, 12th-15th and 21st-24th. Average humidity is around 85%. Overall the barometer may average 1017 mbs. Highest readings (1030mbs) may be when the moon is furthest south on the 13th-15th, and the lowest (below 1000mbs) in the last three days. The best intervals for outside activities should be the 12th-16th and 21st-23rd. Highest (king) tides are on the 5th, with a lesser tide on the 19th, and neap tides are on the 12th and 27th. For fishermen, the best bite-times are around noon on the 3rd-4th and 16th-19th. Chances are also better around dusk on the 8th-12th and 24th-26th. Southeasterlies may be common between the 13th-20th. For gardeners, the best sowing interval is the 4th-14th, when the waxing moon is ascending. The best pruning periods are the 1st-2nd and 18th-30th, when the waning moon is descending. If harvesting for preservation and longer shelf-life, choose the lower water-table days of the 12th and 26th. Allow 24 hour error for all forecasting. For future weather for any date, visit www.predictweather.com. © Ken Ring 2019.

213 – 215 Woodlands Park Road, Titirangi, Auckland 0604 Phone: 09 817 8495 or 09 817 6188 www.kenturnermotors.co.nz

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live @ the lounge Yeah gidday. Lizard here. Hope you’re handling the early winter fog? Speaking of foggy, our first born, Lizard Junior, asked me to proofread a letter he had drafted before he sent it in to the Fringe magazine. I admire his passion but have had to perhaps ‘translate’ it, as he uses a language that is very foreign to anyone over 30, or who hasn’t listened continuously to loud, dreadful, American gangster wannabe rap music. Please bear with him as I’m sure you’ll understand his and many of his mates’ frustrations. His letter began... S’up Holmes. The handles LJ. Lone Jogger. Lizard Junior. No colours. Damn gangsta yo. Figures yo crossed the hood with my deadbeat oldy Lizard and ho-fo Mama, Shaz. They sic. See what I mean? Translation: Hello. My name is Lizard Junior. I’m not a gang member. There is every possibility that you have met my father and mother. They are cool. He then says he is twenty-one, lives with his girlfriend and four-year-old child [who is adorable by the way] and that he is frustratedly looking for employment, while living in the caravan behind our caravan on the section ... Iz two tens and one with a baby mama and a walky-talky mouth to feed look-a-like me bruv. Daily Iz toils to score my right in this land of blood and moans. No time clock available for me to punch while our crib on wheels rusts in the weeds. True Iz scrapped and winked at the five-O and never paid due diligence to the three Rs but given a break, I’d graft the grindstone to the bone and pound the ground like a personal trainer yo’all. No need to eyeball the till on my watch. I’m as straight as Notoriour B.I.G. at an Elton John sleepover. In other words, Lizard Junior has had a few run-ins with the law and was expelled from several schools, never passing any exams, but he’s confident that, given an opportunity, he would work very hard for his employer, never steal and always be truthful. He goes on to say that he dreams of owning his own home but is incredibly frustrated by the

total ineptness of consecutive governments in their dealing with the housing crisis. Straight up yo. Just deal from the top of the deck. Iz tripping for a crib of our own with baby mama and child. Back to back they control the lies while messing with the poor. Gorging on their grandparents’ efforts. Ten homes each for them, yet, no rooms to rent. Damn. Wez rotting ’til eternity in the landlord’s back shed. Baby ka-boomers. Here’s how it is. I went to score my daily milk and bread. The owners iz way solid. No credit but always open. 24/7/365. No time off for good behaviour then perhaps the dark thought of looking down the barrel for 50 packs of cigarettes. No on-line shopping here bro. Face to face. Working late. Kids upstairs. Blood in. Blood out. Lizard has been shopping, as have we, at the local dairy. The owners have been there for 33 years working seven days a week. They take a holiday every five or six years, for a week! They live with the fear of being robbed for alcohol or cigarettes. Their rent is thousands a month. They will probably never own their own home. The older generation have paid off their many houses. Now the deposit is more than they paid for the entire farm. Impossible for anyone to raise. I agree with every word. Junior signs off his letter with a final plea from his heart. I love him, his wife and our beautiful grandchild but constantly worry about their lack of opportunity. The hopelessness of their situation. It’s not fair. Please yo, please give my close-as besties a day in the sun. A kind hand, not a back hand. Yo’all had the advantages. You went to work cause there were jobs bro. I sleep through the day to stop the boredom. The devil’s idle hands. Aotearoa is our hood! But has no home! You had Saturday dances in the hall, I have to siphon petrol from Whitevan to report to the dole office. No-one chooses the hard life bro. It’s a long drag between laughs waiting for the wealth to trickle down. Peace y’all, LJ.

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The following advertisers support us and our community by making this publication possible. They deserve our gratitude and support. APPAREL

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Quality plants at reasonable prices Open 7days 159a Scenic Drive, Titirangi 817 3498 --- 021 113 0987 www.gordonsnurseries.co.nz Opinions expressed in the The Fringe are solely those of the writers and are not necessarily endorsed by the publication or its publisher. Fringe Media Ltd is not responsible in any way for the contents of any advertisement, article, photograph or illustration contained in this publication. While every reasonable care will be taken by the Editor, no responsibility is assumed for the return of unsolicited material. © Copyright 2019 by Fringe Media Ltd. All content in this issue is the property of Fringe Media Ltd and may not be reproduced in any way or form whatsoever without permission from the publisher. All rights reserved.

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Yo ur Trusts

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Profile for Fringe Media

The Fringe (formerly Titirangi Tatler) for July 2019  

A community magaziine serving West Auckland

The Fringe (formerly Titirangi Tatler) for July 2019  

A community magaziine serving West Auckland

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