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Annual Report

2004-2005

Community Vision...World Class Education


Our Mission

The mission of Friendship Public Charter School is to prepare students to become ethical, literate, well-rounded and selfsufficient citizens by providing a world-class education that motivates students to reach high academic standards, to enjoy learning, to achieve success, and to contribute actively to their communities.

What We Do

Through innovative, challenging classroom learning experiences and extended learning programs, Friendship instills an appreciation for education, high academic and personal standards and prepares students to become responsible contributors to their communities and world.

Who We Are

Founded in 1997, Friendship Public Charter School is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation. Friendship established its first charter schools in 1998, opening the Chamberlain and Woodridge Elementary campuses. Today, Friendship has elementary, middle and high school campuses throughout the District of Columbia, serving more than 3,000 children and youth in pre-Kindergarten through grade 12. Friendship also serves students in traditional public schools through Supplemental Education Services and Saturday programs.

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Contents 04 Chairman’s Message 05 05 11 19 25

FPCS School Programs Chamberlain Elementary Woodridge Elementary & Middle Blow Pierce Junior Academy Collegiate Academy at Carter G. Woodson

33 FPCS School Performance 50 Accountability Plan Performance 58 Organizational Performance 62 Finance 63 2004-2005 Budget 64 2004-2005 Donations & Grants 65 Governance and Leadership 67 Board of Trustees 68 Staff Leadership 68 Lessons Learned and Actions Taken 68 CertiďŹ cation of Authorizations 68 Reporting of Accountability Information

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Chairman’s Message

T

he results are in. Friendship Public Charter School students soared for the 2004-05 school year, demonstrating significant academic gains across all grade levels. As the data in this annual report will affirm, Friendship is a system of effective public schools. The nearly 3,500 students enrolled at our four campuses benefited from an exceptional team of teachers, administrators and staff; innovative, research-based classroom instruction; 21st century technology; attractive school facilities; and a network of parents and community stakeholders singularly focused on high-quality, sustained student learning. Friendship’s formula for student achievement begins with an elementary program driven by high academic standards yielding tangible results. We are proud to report this year students attending Friendship’s two elementary campuses not only exceeded state requirements, they raised the achievement bar. As evidenced by 2004-05 Stanford 9 performance results, Chamberlain Elementary increased reading and math proficiency by more than one level, with 62 percent of students exceeding the national average in reading and 68 percent exceeding the national average in math. Woodridge Elementary, now serving pre-kindergarten – grade six, experienced the greatest gains in math, with 55 percent of students scoring above the national average. Comparatively, Friendship’s elementary schools academically outpaced or equaled schools of similar demographics in the District. Science and technology defined the school year for Friendship’s junior and collegiate academies. Blow Pierce Junior Academy hosted its first Technology Awareness Week with speakers from Lockheed Martin, the National Society of Black Engineers and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and five Collegiate Academy students won 1st place in the citywide Science Fair. Collegiate Academy established a clear path toward higher education with the launch of its Early College program in partnership with the University of the District of Columbia, the Gates Foundation and the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. Especially significant, 90 percent of Collegiate seniors were accepted to college. Standardized test scores for both academies remain on an upward trajectory. Collegiate students leaped ahead by nearly two levels in reading, and more than half of Blow Pierce students scored above the national average in math. Friendship’s impact proves large, urban public schools can be successful. Yet, there is still critical work to be done! We believe superior academic achievement is an attainable goal for every student. As a major step forward, we have joined with Venture Philanthropy Partners to design a five-year strategic vision that will guide Friendship in expanding its academic program and launching two new schools-Friendship Tech Prep, a career-focused Early College high school and Friendship Preparatory Academy, a pre-K-12 international baccalaureate program in Northwest, D.C. The early signs confirm Friendship is headed in the right direction. We are unified in our resolve to do all that is possible to move from great to EXTRAORDINARY. Committed in service to children,

Donald L. Hense Chairman FPCS

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FPCS School Programs

Chamberlain Elementary Home of the Champions

Campus Overview:

E

stablished in 1998, Chamberlain Elementary is one of the largest elementary schools in the District of Columbia, serving more than 700 students in kindergarten through grade ďŹ ve. In 2004-05, Chamberlain students achieved the highest Stanford 9 reading and mathematics test scores of all District elementary schools of similar demographics. These results continue six years of academic achievement that exceed state performance goals. Chamberlain Elementary is located in Ward 7 at 1345 Potomac Avenue, Southeast. Hours of operation are from 7:50 a.m. to 4 p.m., with enrichment activities before and after school and on weekends. Campus Leadership Principal John Pannell Resident Principal James Shepard Academy Director Deanna Mingo Academy Director Manjot Shepard FPCS FPCS

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FPCS School Programs

Chamberlain Elementary Curriculum Design and Instructional Approach

enrich the mathematical experiences of children and teachers. This program is based on research that suggests students fully understand concepts only after repeated exposure. Students study important concepts over consecutive years, each grade level extending conceptual understandings established in prior grades. The curriculum builds on fundamental mathematical strands such as numeration and order; measures and measurement; reference frames; operations; patterns, functions, and sequences; data and chance; elementary concepts related to geometry and spatial sense; algebra and the use of variables. The curriculum integrates mathematics into other subject areas, classroom routines, outdoor play and the transitional moments that occur every day.

Kindergarten to Grade 5

Reading: Reading is taught in small classes of students all working at the same level. We emphasize cooperative learning and provide individual tutoring for students requiring additional training. Phonics, word-attack, comprehension and study skills are taught through the literature-based approach of the Open Court Reading curriculum. The Wilson Reading System is used for students in grades 3 to 5 who are behind grade level. Science: Active, hands-on explorations help students build their understanding of key scientific concepts and big ideas that explain our world. Through the curriculum package Teaching Relevant Activities for Concepts & Skills (TRACS), students regularly work on topics related to physical science, earth and space science, life science and technology.

History and Social Science: Our projectbased, proprietary program emphasizes the use of children’s literature in social studies instruction. Utilizing the Social Studies Alive textbook, projects and activities are often cross-curricular and guided by a multicultural perspective. Character and ethics lessons occur several times a month through a literaturebased curriculum developed by the Heartwood Institute.

World Language: Beginning in kindergarten, students acquire a second language by learning conversation and culture with the long-term goal of being able to communicate fluently in Spanish.

Fine Arts: Music and visual art are presented as a combination of history, performance, appreciation and practice.

Writing and Language Arts: The writer’s workshop approach enables teachers to instruct students through the stages in which writers advance: prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, proofreading and publishing. Utilizing the Step Up to Writing & Writing Source textbook, we teach writing in all subject areas. As students become more fluent writers, they hone their skills in the mechanics of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

Physical Fitness and Health: We focus on nutrition and developmentally appropriate objectives in the areas of speed, flexibility, endurance, strength and agility. Special Education: We are committed to educating each child, to the maximum extent appropriate, in the general education classroom. Our philosophy of “responsible inclusion” brings the support services to the child rather than moving the child to the services. Students

Mathematics: We use Everyday Mathematics, an elementary-level curriculum intended to FPCS

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FPCS

FPCS is committed to educating each child, to the maximum extent appropriate, in the general education classroom. Our philosophy of “responsible inclusion” brings the support services to the child. with special education needs are provided direct services and intensive basic skills instruction through co-teaching and pull-asides. The intensity of these direct services varies with the needs of the individual child. Students are also supported through indirect services such as teacher consultations, house problemsolving, model-teaching, materials adaptation and student monitoring. In addition to the instruction students receive in general education classrooms, special education students receive related services (such as speech/language, OT, PT, etc.) as specified in their IEPs (Individual Education Programs). If all of these support services combined prove insufficient (which happens only in a small number of cases), other arrangements, services or placements are made with an eye to increasing the connections with general education classrooms over time.

Key Mission-Related Programs and Accomplishments Arts and Community Partnerships: School year 2004-2005 marked a significant increase in external partnerships that complement the curriculum and programs. The best representation of these partnerships is in the arts, where FPCS partnered with various cultural institutions to enhance classroom instruction, provide field trips and professional

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development. Partners included the Kennedy Center, Arena Stage Student Playwrights, Washington Performing Arts Society In-School Artist Residency Program, Dance Institute of Washington Master Teachers, Shakespeare Theater Text Alive! and the National Building Museum. Health Promotion Programs: FPCS offers a variety of health and wellness programs for elementary students. The Butterflies program promotes healthy eating habits, physical activity, positive self-images and helps parents and students understand the importance of aligning weight and height to the proper guidelines for school-age children. Extracurricular Activities: Chamberlain offered 15 extra and co-curricular activities for the 2004-2005 school year. Activities included basketball, volleyball, music ensemble, choir and book club. Student Recognition: Chamberlain students were winners of the District of Columbia Run for the Arts program and participated in the citywide poetry slam.

Annual Report


Established in 1998, Chamberlain Elementary is one of the largest elementary schools in the District of Columbia. Chamberlain is located in Ward 6 of the District of Columbia at 1345 Potomac Avenue Southeast.

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FPCS School Programs

Woodridge Campus Home of the Eagles

Campus Overview:

E

stablished in 1998, Woodridge Elementary and Middle was originally founded to serve grades kindergarten through ďŹ ve. In 2004-05, an additional wing was built on the campus and Woodridge expanded to serve pre-school, pre-kindergarten and grade six. Woodridge will eventually add grades seven and eight to become a full middle school with early-learning programs. Woodridge Elementary and Middle is located in Ward 5 of the District of Columbia at 2959 Carlton Avenue, Northeast. Hours of operation are from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., with enrichment activities before and after school and on the weekends. Campus Leadership: Principal Marian K. Bobo

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FPCS School Programs

Woodridge Campus Curriculum Design and Instructional Approach

Teaching Relevant Activities for Concepts & Skills (TRACS), students regularly work on topics related to physical science, earth and space science, life science and technology.

Pre-School and Pre-Kindergarten

Creative Curriculum Program: This year, Woodridge launched the Creative Curriculum program for three- and four-year-olds. The curriculum focuses on social, emotional, physical, cognitive and language development. It uses an experiential, instructional approach guided and measured by each child’s progress through a series of developmental steps in each focus area. Open Court Program: Woodridge also implemented the Open Court program for its four year-old pre-kindergarten students. The program is a research-based curriculum utilizing an explicit, systematic approach for instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics and word knowledge, comprehension skills and strategies, inquiry skills and strategies, and writing and language skills and strategies. All instruction is presented through a literature-rich approach that promotes reading in various genres.

Kindergarten to Grade 5

Reading: Reading is taught in small classes of students all working at the same level. We emphasize cooperative learning and provide individual tutoring for students requiring additional training. Phonics, word-attack, comprehension and study skills are taught through the literature-based approach of the Open Court Reading curriculum. The Wilson Reading System is used for students in grades 3 to 5 who are behind grade level. Science: Active, hands-on explorations help students build their understanding of key scientific concepts and big ideas that explain our world. Through the curriculum package FPCS

World Language: Beginning in kindergarten, students acquire a second language by learning conversation and culture with the long-term goal of being able to communicate fluently in Spanish. Writing and Language Arts: The writer’s workshop approach enables teachers to instruct students through the stages in which writers advance: prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, proofreading and publishing. Utilizing the Step Up to Writing & Writing Source textbook, we teach writing in all subject areas. As students become more fluent writers, they hone their skills in the mechanics of spelling, punctuation and grammar. Mathematics: We use Everyday Mathematics, an elementary-level curriculum intended to enrich the mathematical experiences of children and teachers. This program is based on research that suggests students fully understand concepts only after repeated exposure. Students study important concepts over consecutive years, each grade level extending conceptual understandings established in prior grades. The curriculum builds on fundamental mathematical strands such as numeration and order; measures and measurement; reference frames; operations; patterns, functions, and sequences; data and chance; elementary concepts related to geometry and spatial sense; algebra and the use of variables. The curriculum integrates mathematics into other subject areas, classroom routines, outdoor play and the transitional moments that occur every day.

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FPCS

FPCS partnered with Creative Learning Systems to install a SmartLab learning environment on its Woodridge campus. History and Social Science: Our projectbased, proprietary program emphasizes the use of children’s literature in social studies instruction. Utilizing the Social Studies Alive textbook, projects and activities are often cross-curricular and guided by a multicultural perspective. Character and ethics lessons occur several times a month through a literaturebased curriculum developed by the Heartwood Institute. Fine Arts: Music and visual art are presented as a combination of history, performance, appreciation and practice. Physical Fitness and Health: We focus on nutrition and developmentally appropriate objectives in the areas of speed, flexibility, endurance, strength and agility. Special Education: We are committed to educating each child, to the maximum extent appropriate, in the general education classroom. Our philosophy of “responsible inclusion” brings the support services to the child rather than moving the child to the services. Students with special education needs are provided direct services and intensive basic skills instruction through co-teaching and pull-asides. The intensity of these direct services varies with the needs of the individual child. Students are also supported through indirect services such as teacher consultations, house problemsolving, model-teaching, materials adaptation and student monitoring. In addition to the instruction students receive in general education

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classrooms, special education students receive related services (such as speech/language, OT, PT, etc.) as specified in their IEPs (Individual Education Programs). If all of these support services combined prove insufficient (which happens only in a small number of cases), other arrangements, services or placements are made with an eye to increasing the connections with general education classrooms over time.

Grade 6

Reading And Language Arts: Students develop comprehensive reading and language strategies through a variety of reading material and hone vocabulary and grammar skills in the context of real writing. Students also improve speaking and listening skills through a discussion-based program, Touchstones, which is the foundation of the junior academy character and ethics curriculum. History and Social Science: Students spend two years studying world history, from ancient civilizations through the Age of Exploration. In 8th grade, students study U.S. history through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Mathematics: Students are introduced to the Prentice Hall Mathematics Grades 6-12 program with courses One, Two and Three. The three courses offer comprehensive content coverage. A scope and sequence organized around major strands and specific objectives allows students to develop, maintain and apply skills in the areas of number properties and operation, measurement,

Annual Report


geometry, data analysis and probability, algebra, and mathematical processes. Course work can be differentiated into basic, core and/or advanced scope levels. Process skills referenced in the NCTM Principles and Standards for School Mathematics 2000 are also included in the comprehensive materials provided by Prentice Hall Mathematics. Science: The Science Plus 3-Year program is the middle school science curriculum. Comprised of eight units, each unit focuses on one major scientific concept while integrating process skills and supporting content from other disciplines. The program covers the eleven major science process skills with individual units focusing on specific skills. Science Plus also provides numerous teacher resources including assessments, teaching transparencies and Internet websites. The curriculum combines investigations with readings and discussions about science using text and teacher-generated questions to challenge students. Students work cooperatively in groups of five discussing investigations and reaching conclusions. Within the chapters, students pose questions, make predictions, design experiments, collect and analyze data, make presentations, and conduct research to learn more about how science and technology affect the world in which they live. World Language: The program emphasizes culture and communication as students further develop grammar, syntax and vocabulary skills in a second language. Entering 6th graders, with little or no knowledge of Spanish, receive special attention from teachers and are aided by a cooperative-learning structure. Fine Arts: The program is integrated with other subject areas and continues the discipline-based FPCS

and performance approaches students practiced in earlier academies. Physical Fitness and Health: By focusing on individual fitness goals, we help all students understand the benefits of continuing the vigorous physical activity enjoyed in earlier academies. We encourage students to participate in intramural sports programs, and we introduce peer-coaching activities that promote mutualskill development. Home Base Advisory: Students meet with advisory groups and individually with advisors to ensure their progress is followed closely by adults who know them well. Special Education: We are committed to educating each child, to the maximum extent appropriate, in the general education classroom. Our philosophy of “responsible inclusion” brings the support services to the child, rather than moving the child to the services. Students with special education needs are provided direct services, intensive basic skills and strategic instruction through co-teaching and pullasides. The intensity of these direct services varies with the needs of the individual child. Students are also supported through indirect services: teacher consultations, house problemsolving, model-teaching, materials adaptation and student monitoring. In addition to the instruction students receive in general education classrooms, special education students receive related services (such as speech/language, OT, PT, etc.) as specified in their IEPs (Individual Education Programs). If all of these support services combined prove insufficient (which happens only in a small number of cases), other arrangements, services or placements are made, with an eye to increasing the connections with general education classrooms over time.

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Key Mission-Related Programs and Accomplishments Extended Learning: Woodridge has instituted a campus-wide, extended learning program. The program has a two-part focus. First, it provides after-school instruction for students grades 1 to 6 experiencing difficulties in the curriculum areas of reading and math using the Voyager-Passport intervention programs. These students are assigned to their required intervention(s) before participating in any extracurricular activities. Second, the program focuses on accelerated learners in grades 6 and 7. These students engage not only in extracurricular activities, but through our alliance with the Collegiate Early College program, can enroll in accelerated courses for middle school learners with a special acumen for mathematics and the sciences. Parent Advisory Committee: Woodridge benefits from an active Parent Advisory Committee. Returning officers are Eric King, president and Patricia Ragland, vice president. Other elected PAC representatives include Academy Parent Liaisons elected annually in October.

Edgewood/Brookland Collaborative; Annette Rollins, National Capitol Girl Scouts; Frank Malone, ANC Commissioner; Joi Buford, Families Forward; Michael Williams, community activist; The Honorable Vincent B. Orange, Ward 5 Councilmember and chairman of the D.C. Committee on Government Operation. Building Expansion: Woodridge added a new wing to its school building to accommodate the addition of the middle school. The new wing includes a gymnasium, SMART Lab, science lab and dedicated space for art and music. Extracurricular Activities: Woodridge offered extra and co-curricular activities for the 20042005 school year. Activities included Joy of Sports, Shakespeare Theatre, Girl Scouts, music ensemble, cheerleading, basketball, choir and book club. Student Recognition: Woodridge student poets participated in a city-wide Poetry Slam. Students Ogui Offoarro and Malcolm English placed 3rd and 5th respectively in the Washington regional spelling bee. Student Ogui Offoarro placed 9th place in the District of Columbia spelling bee.

Board of Friends: Woodridge benefits from an ongoing collaboration with various community representatives and organizations. It welcomes these supporters as its Board of Friends. Members include: Paula Nickens, community activist; Fannie Tate, community activist; James Mountain, Bingham & McCutchen LLP; William Lippe, St. Anselm’s Abbey School; Rachel Grossman, The Shakespeare Theatre; Frederick D. Patterson Research Institute; Christopher Brown II, Ph.D.; Joyce Johnson, community activist; James Epps, community activist; Jeanette McCune, John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts; Pat Fisher,

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Established in 1998, Woodridge was originally founded to serve grades K through 5 only and was expanded in 2004 to serve pre-K through middle school. Woodridge is located in Ward 5 of the District of Columbia at 2959 Carlton Avenue, N.E. Hours of operation are from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., with extended learning hours before and after school and special weekend activities. FPCS

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FPCS School Programs

Blow Pierce Junior Academy Home of the Phoenix

Campus Overview:

E

stablished in 1999, Blow Pierce Junior Academy is a thriving middle school serving students in grades six through eight. In 2004-05, Blow Pierce students achieved the ďŹ fth highest Standard 9 mathematics scores of all District of Columbia middle schools. Blow Pierce Junior Academy is located in Ward 7 at 725 19th Street, Northeast. Hours of operation are 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with enrichment activities before and after school and on weekends. Campus Leadership: Principal Raymond Miller (through February 2005) Interim Principal Brian Beck (February 2005 through June 2005) Academy Director Mary Young Academy Director Haroldine Pratt Dean of Students Phillip Bullock FPCS

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FPCS School Programs

Blow Pierce Junior Academy Curriculum Design and Instructional Approach Grades 6 to 8

Reading And Language Arts: Students develop comprehensive reading and language strategies through a variety of reading material and hone vocabulary and grammar skills in the context of real writing. Students also improve speaking and listening skills through a discussion-based program, Touchstones, which is the foundation of the junior academy character and ethics curriculum. History and Social Science: Students spend two years studying world history, from ancient civilizations through the Age of Exploration. In 8th grade, students study U.S. history through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Mathematics: Students are introduced to the Prentice Hall Mathematics Grades 6-12 program with courses One, Two and Three. The three courses offer comprehensive content coverage. A scope and sequence organized around major strands and specific objectives allow students to develop, maintain and apply skills in the areas of number properties and operation, measurement, geometry, data analysis and probability, algebra, and mathematical processes. Course work can be differentiated into basic, core and/or advanced scope levels. Process skills referenced in the NCTM Principles and Standards for School Mathematics 2000 are also included in the comprehensive materials provided by Prentice Hall Mathematics. Science: The Science Plus 3-Year program is the middle school science curriculum. Comprised of eight units, each unit focuses on one major scientific concept while integrating process

FPCS

skills and supporting content from other disciplines. The program covers the eleven major science process skills with individual units focusing on specific skills. Science Plus also provides numerous teacher resources including assessments, teaching transparencies and Internet websites. The curriculum combines investigations with readings and discussions about science using text and teacher-generated questions to challenge students. Students work cooperatively in groups of five discussing investigations and reaching conclusions. Within the chapters, students pose questions, make predictions, design experiments, collect and analyze data, make presentations, and conduct research to learn more about how science and technology affect the world in which they live. World Language: The program emphasizes culture and communication as students further develop grammar, syntax and vocabulary skills in a second language. Entering 6th graders, with little or no knowledge of Spanish, receive special attention from teachers and are aided by a cooperative-learning structure. Fine Arts: The program is integrated with other subject areas and continues the discipline-based and performance approaches students practiced in earlier academies. Physical Fitness and Health: By focusing on individual fitness goals, we help all students understand the benefits of continuing the vigorous physical activity enjoyed in earlier academies. We encourage students to participate in intramural sports programs, and we introduce peer-coaching activities that promote mutualskill development.

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Students meet with advisory groups and one-onone with advisors to ensure their progress… Home Base Advisory: Students meet with advisory groups and individually with advisors to ensure their progress is followed closely by adults who know them well.

HOTS Program: Blow Pierce 6th grade math, reading and technology teachers implemented the Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) program.

Special Education: We are committed to educating each child, to the maximum extent appropriate, in the general education classroom. Our philosophy of “responsible inclusion” brings the support services to the child, rather than moving the child to the services. Students with special education needs are provided direct services, intensive basic skills and strategic instruction through co-teaching and pullasides. The intensity of these direct services varies with the needs of the individual child. Students are also supported through indirect services: teacher consultations, house problemsolving, model-teaching, materials adaptation and student monitoring. In addition to the instruction students receive in general education classrooms, special education students receive related services (such as speech/language, OT, PT, etc.) as specified in their IEPs (Individual Education Programs). If all of these support services combined prove insufficient (which happens only in a small number of cases), other arrangements, services or placements are made, with an eye to increasing the connections with general education classrooms over time.

Friendship News Network: Blow Pierce students became the first FPCS students to join the Friendship News Network, a studentmanaged media enterprise. Students interviewed U.S. Congressman Charles Rangel (D-NY) and began production of a news magazine, Rated-T for Teens. Technology Advancement: Blow Pierce held its first Technology Awareness Week. Speakers included representatives from Lockheed Martin, the National Society of Black Engineers, the U.S. Department of Defense and U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Student Recognition: Blow Pierce 7th grader Clifton Williams was a finalist in the District of Columbia Piano Ensemble, and several Blow Pierce students were selected for the District’s Chorale Ensemble.

Key Mission-Related Programs and Accomplishments Robotics: The Blow Pierce robotics teams competed in the Lego League Robotics Tournament in Maryland.

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Established in 1999, Blow Pierce Junior Academy serves students in grades 6 to 8. The Blow Pierce campus is located in Ward 6 of the District of Columbia at 725 19th Street, N.E. Hours of operation are 7:30 am to 4:30 pm.

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FPCS School Programs

Collegiate Academy at Carter G. Woodson Home of the Knights

Campus Overview:

E

stablished in 1999, the Collegiate Academy at Carter G. Woodson Campus is a college preparatory high school serving students in grades nine through 12. Collegiate supplements its rigorous, core curriculum with a broad offering of academic courses that introduce students to careers in technology, engineering, law, medicine, public health, science and communications. The Collegiate Early College Program offers highly able students an opportunity to earn a maximum of two years college credit as they complete their high school diploma. In 2004-05, Collegiate achieved a 95 percent graduation rate and a 90 percent college acceptance rate. Collegiate Academy is located in Ward 7 at 4095 Minnesota Avenue, Northeast. The campus is open for extended hours from 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. on weekdays and special hours on weekends for academic tutorials, career- and service-learning activities, and athletics programs. General hours of operation are from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 2004-2005 Campus Leadership: Head of School Michael Jackson Upper School Principal Michael Cordell Lower School Principal Brian Beck FPCS FPCS

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FPCS School Programs

Collegiate Academy at Carter G. Woodson Curriculum Design and Instructional Approach Grades 9 to12

Beginning in school year 2004-2005, Collegiate Academy converted to a 90-minute-block schedule with four periods from 8 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. The new schedule emphasizes intensive classroom instruction in English and math. The schedule consists of the following: • • • • • • •

90 minutes of English everyday for 9th and 10th grade 90 minutes of English every other day for 11th and 12th grade 90 minutes of math everyday for 9th grade 90 minutes of math every other day for 10th – 12th grades Advance placement (AP) classes meet everyday for entire school year Science, social studies, electives, world language and career courses meet 90 minutes everyday for a semester Introduction to computers everyday for 10th grade

Mathematics: Collegiate utilizes the Prentice Hall Mathematics curriculum. Student progress is ensured with continuity of content from course to course. Mathematics strands such as number theory, algebra, geometry measurement, data analysis, statistics and probability are appropriately incorporated for each level. Course work can be differentiated into basic, core and/or advanced scope levels, while process skills referenced in the NCTM Principles and Standards for School Mathematics 2000 are included. In the 9th grade, based on diagnostic tests, students take Algebra I Part 1, Algebra I Part 2 or Algebra 1 and Geometry.

FPCS

Students scoring below 5th grade level are placed in a Transitions math class built on the Saxon mathematics curriculum. Mathematics courses are offered based on the following course options listed in sequence: • • • • • • • •

Transitions 1, 2 and Business Math (for below level math students) Algebra I Algebra I Part 1 and Algebra I Part 2 Geometry Geometry I Part 1 and Geometry I Part 2 Algebra II/Trigonometry Pre-Calculus Calculus

Mathematics continued: Teachers also have subscriptions to the Prentice Hall On-Line program where students can use Internet tutorials to improve skills, and a diagnostic test determines deficiencies. Science: Collegiate offers a range of science courses including Physical and Earth Science for 9th grade, Biology for 10th grade and Chemistry for 11th grade. Environmental Science, Microbiology, College Physics and AP Biology are offered in the 12th grade. History and Economics: 9th grade examines D.C. Government and History, 10th grade World History or AP History, 11th grade U.S. History and 12th grade Economics or AP Economics. Literature and Language Arts: Ninth grade examines the origins and development of American literature. Tenth grade examines world literature, focusing on historical and regional surveys from each of the major regions. During these years, students develop skills in

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Collegiate utilizes the Prentice Hall Mathematics curriculum. Student progress is ensured with a continuity of content from course to course. literary criticism and hone their abilities to write persuasively and accurately. Collegiate upper academy students receive Early American Literature, British Literature or AP American Literature courses. The Wilson Reading System is used for students who have decoding problems identified by a SRI score below 4th grade level, and a Woodcock Johnson word recognition score in the 1st and 2nd grade levels. This very structured program focuses solely on decoding skills. Students are taught in small classes with 12 or less students grouped by ability level. Electives: All students take courses in art, music, health and physical fitness. Eleventh and twelth graders can elect to take an SAT preparation course. Physical Fitness and Health: We focus on nutrition and developmentally appropriate objectives in the areas of speed, flexibility, endurance, strength and agility. Tutorials: These periods provide opportunities for additional work in core academic areas or supervised independent study. Special Education: We are committed to educating each child, to the maximum extent appropriate, in the general education classroom. Our philosophy of “responsible inclusion” brings the support services to the child, rather than moving the child to the services. Students with special education needs are provided direct services, intensive basic skills and strategic

FPCS

instruction through co-teaching and pullasides. The intensity of these direct services varies with the needs of the individual child. Students are also supported through indirect services: teacher consultations, house problemsolving, model-teaching, materials adaptation and student monitoring. In addition to the instruction students receive in general education classrooms, special education students receive related services (such as speech/language, OT, PT, etc.) as specified in their IEPs (Individual Education Programs). If all of these support services combined prove insufficient (which happens only in a small number of cases), other arrangements, services or placements are made, with an eye to increasing the connections with general education classrooms over time.

Key Mission-Related Programs and Accomplishments Transitions Course for 9th Grade: As part of the overall transition to high school, 9th graders are offered a Transitions course that helps them successfully matriculate into the upper grades. Students are trained in effective study habits, interpersonal skills, and writing and language skills. As part of the course, students are encouraged to begin a career portfolio by researching colleges, programs of study and prospective careers. High School Career Academies: In addition to courses in core academic areas, students at the

22

Annual Report


high school level are provided the opportunity to participate in the high school Career Academies. The academies are described below. Arts and Communications Academy: The Arts and Communications Academy recognizes that students must be allowed to express themselves creatively. Students are encouraged to develop their talents while challenging themselves, their peers and their community. Course offerings are grouped in three majors: Communications, Visual Arts and Performing Arts. Communications Career Major Foundations of Arts and Communications Public Speaking Media Ethics News Writing and Reporting Broadcast Production

10th grade 11th grade 11th grade 12th grade 12th grade

Visual Arts Career Major Foundations of Arts and Communications Art II Drawing Painting Art Studio

10th grade 11th grade 11th grade 12th grade 12th grade

Performing Arts Career Major Foundations of Arts and Communications Modern Dance Creative Productions Arts Management Elective (advanced dance, drama or choir)

10th grade 11th grade 11th grade 12th grade 12th grade

Cisco Network Engineer Career Major Principles of Engineering CISCO I CISCO II CISCO III CICSO IV

10th grade 11th grade 11th grade 12th grade 12th grade

Engineering Career Major (Project Lead the Way) Principles of Engineering 10th grade Foundations of Digital Engineering 11th grade Engineering Design and Development 11th grade Computer Integrated Manufacturing 12th grade Aerospace Engineering 12th grade (optional) InďŹ nity Project 11/12th grade

Health and Human Services Academy: The Health and Human Services Academy is designed to expose students to careers within the human services sector. Students receive the specialized training needed to become caring, responsible, compassionate public servants. Most importantly, students develop a plan for career advancement and independence. Course offerings and activities focus on the following areas: Business Administration, Allied Health and Protective Services. Business Administration Career Major Foundations of Business and Finance 10th grade Marketing Strategy 11th grade Financial Planning 11th grade Entrepreneurship 12th grade Securities and Insurance 12th grade Optional (accounting) 11/12th grade

Engineering and Technology Academy: The Engineering and Technology Academy is designed to prepare students for careers in engineering, networking, programming, software development and architectural design. Students on the technology track have an opportunity to be certiďŹ ed. Course offerings are grouped in two majors: Cisco Networking Engineer and Engineering.

FPCS

Allied Health Career Major Foundations of Business and Finance Allied Health 101 Medical Terminology Anatomy and Physiology Intro to Health Care

10th grade 11th grade 11th grade 12th grade 12th grade

Protective Services Career Major Foundations of Business and Finance Criminal Justice 1 Criminal Justice 2 Street Law or Constitutional Law Law Enforcement 1

10th grade 11th grade 11th grade 12th grade 12th grade

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Annual Report


Collegiate Early College Program: In partnership with the University of the District of Columbia, Collegiate offers one of the District’s first Early College programs. Students can earn up to two years of college credit as they complete high school diploma requirements.

summer learning opportunities. We offer a range of services through our partnership with DC Mental Health, including instruction on topics such as medical depression, anger management, grief counseling, pregnancy, drug and alcohol abuse, sexual abuses and alienation.

Technology Integration: Technology is integral to Collegiate’s school program. Located throughout the campus are mobile computer carts, each containing thirty wireless laptop computers. All laptop computers are connected to a T-1 line, printer, LCD projector and digital camera. Teachers lead students through Internet research, presentation design and other technology tools needed for higher education and the workforce.

Extracurricular Activities: Collegiate recognizes that many of its students have limited exposure to extracurricular activities outside of the high school experience. To broaden student horizons, we offer a range of athletic teams including soccer, football, basketball, and track and field. Male and female students participate in all sports, with the exception of football. The Boys Basketball team won the league championship.

A school technology integration specialist works with teachers to improve their technology skills and help them prepare technology-integrated, cross-curriculum lessons. Teachers complete their own digital portfolios and work with students to create digital portfolios. Collegiate also features “Smartboards” in several of its classrooms. These electronic whiteboards take the place of traditional chalkboards and allow teachers to capture a wide variety of information. Students also have access to a state-of-the-art broadcast studio.

Collegiate also offers non-athletic programs including an award-winning cheerleading and step team that competes throughout the Washington metropolitan area. We offer a variety of student clubs, honor societies and associations including the National Honor Society, Collegiate Student Government Association, art club, technology club, debate club, fashion club, aerobics club, world language club and community service club.

Partnerships: Collegiate Academy partners with numerous community organizations, universities and other groups to extend the support available to our students. We partner with The Princeton Review and Thompson Learning to provide SAT preparation courses during and after school for all juniors and seniors. We partner with Catholic University, hosting Biology classes in their science labs. American University law school students teach Street Law and Constitutional Law classes. Top students participate in the city-wide Moot Court competitions. Collegiate robotics teachers have partnered with NASA, Capitol College and DeVry University to offer in-school demonstrations and FPCS

24

Annual Report


Established in 1999, the Collegiate Academy at Carter G. Woodson campus serves high school students in grades 9 through 12. The campus is located in Ward 7 of the District of Columbia at 4095 Minnesota Avenue, N.E.

FPCS

25

Annual Report


FPCS School Performance

School Performance

Accountability Plan Performance Organizational Performance

FPCS

26

Annual Report


CHART OF ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN PERFORMANCE Chamberlain Campus (2003-04 to 2007-08) I. Academic Performance Objectives Performance Objective or Goal

Baseline Data (Year One Performance)

Annual Target

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading.

45.3 (03-04)

1 percentage point increase in the number of students with an NCE gain of 0 or greater in reading

49.3 percent of students will demonstrate NCE gain of 0 or greater in reading

59.2

1.2 Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in mathematics.

57.4 (03-04)

1 percentage point increase in number of students with NCE gain of 0 or greater in mathematics

61.4 percent students will demonstrate NCE gain of 0 or greater in mathematics

61.1

1.3

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading.

39.6 (03-04)

3 percentage point increase in number of students scoring proficient and above on state assessment in reading

51.6 percent of students will score proficient and above on state assessment in reading

53.0

1.4

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in mathematics.

44.1 (03-04)

3 percentage point increase in number of students scoring proficient and above on state assessment in mathematics

56.1 percent of students will score proficient or above on state assessment in mathematics

49.0

1.5

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading.

23 (04-05 Baseline)

20 percentage point increase in number of students scoring an average of 70 percent and above in reading on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March (grades 3 to 5)

25 percentage point increase in number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in reading on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March (grades 3 to 5)

23 (04-05 Baseline)

1.6

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in language arts.

18 (04-05 Baseline)

15 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent and above in language arts on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March (grades 3 to 5)

20 percentage point increase in number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in language arts on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March (grades 3 to 5)

18 (04-05 Baseline)

1.7

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in mathematics.

31 (04-05 Baseline)

20 percentage point increase in number of students scoring an average of 70 percent and above in mathematics on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March (grades 3 to 5)

25 percentage point increase in number of students scoring an average of 70 percent and above in mathematics on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March (grades 3 to 5)

31 (04-05 Baseline)

1.8

Students will demonstrate increased proficiency in oral communication skills

0 (04-05 Baseline)

5 percentage point increase in number of students with average score of proficient or above on oral presentations

15 percent of students scoring proficient or above on oral presentations

0 (04-05 Baseline)

1.9

Students will demonstrate increased proficiency in the use of technology

5 percentage point increase in number of 5th grade students scoring proficient or above on technology assessments

15 percent of 5th grade students scoring proficient or above on technology assessments

0

1.1

0 (03-04)

Five-Year Target

2004-2005 Year Two Performance

II. Non-Academic Performance Objectives Performance Objective or Goal

Baseline Data (Year One Performance)

Annual Target

Five-Year Target

2004-2005 Year Two Performance

2.1

Students will attend school regularly.

93 (03-04)

92 percent average daily attendance rate

92 percent average daily attendance rate

93

2.2

Students will be wellrounded participants in the school community.

17 (03-04)

5 percentage point increase in students participating in organized extra/co-curricular activities

37 percent of students will participate in organized extra/co-curricular activities

38

2.3

Students will demonstrate the internalization of core values of justice, respect, responsibility, courage, integrity, compassion, hope, and wisdom.

13.5 (04-05)

15 percentage point increase in number of students meeting 80 percent of character education checklist skills

58.5 percent of students will meet 80 percent of character education checklist skills

13.5 (04-05 Baseline)

2.4

Parents will be active participants in students’ education

63 (03-04)

5 percentage point increase in parent participation rate in PAC and QLC Conferences, field trips, and other schoolsponsored activities

83 percent parent participation rate in PAC and QLC Conferences, field trips, and other school sponsored activities

62.3

2.5

Students will express satisfaction with the school atmosphere

7.2 (03-04)

6 to 7 mean rating for school atmosphere on Harris student survey

7 mean rating for school atmosphere on Harris student survey

7.7

*As reported for the October 2005 deadline. Data is continually updated and verified.

FPCS

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Annual Report


CHART OF ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN PERFORMANCE Woodridge Campus (2003-04 to 2007-08) I. Academic Performance Objectives Performance Objective or Goal

Baseline Data

1.1

Pre-K students will demonstrate mastery of basic literacy skills

55 (04-05 Baseline)

1.2

Pre-K students will demonstrate improved social development

1.3

Pre-K students will demonstrate improved mastery of logical thinking and basic math concepts

Annual Target

Five-Year Target

2004-2005 Year Two Performance

5 percentage point increase in number of 4 year old pre-K students demonstrating 70 percent mastery of skills as outlined in the Open Court reading assessment.

70 percent of 4 year old pre-K students will demonstrate 70 percent mastery of skills as outlined in the Open Court reading assessment.

55 (04-05 Baseline)

35 (04-05 Baseline)

8 percentage point increase in the number of 4 year old pre-K students demonstrating mastery in 3 of 5 areas under “Sense of Self” and “Responsibility for Self and Others”

59 percent of 4 year old pre-K students will demonstrate mastery in 3 of 5 areas under “Sense of Self” and “Responsibility for Self and Others”

35 (04-05 Baseline)

50 (04-05 Baseline)

2 percentage point increase in number of 4 year old pre-K students demonstrating 70 percent mastery of math skills

56 percent of 4 year old pre-K students will demonstrate 70 percent mastery of math skills

50 (04-05 Baseline)

Pre-Kindergarten

Elementary Level (Grades K-5) 1.4

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

61 (03-04)

1 percentage point increase in number of students with NCE gain of 0 or greater in reading

65 percent of students will demonstrate NCE gain of 0 or greater in reading

48.4

1.5

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

45.7 (03-04)

1 percentage point increase in number of students with NCE gain of 0 or greater in mathematics

49.7 percent of students will demonstrate NCE gain of 0 or greater in mathematics

60.1

1.6

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

27.1 (03-04)

3 percentage point increase in number of students scoring proficient and above on state assessment in reading

39.1 percent of students will score proficient and above on state assessment in reading

35.2

1.7

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

32.9 (03-04)

3 percentage point increase in number of students scoring proficient and above on state assessment in mathematics

44.9 percent of students will score proficient and above on state assessment in mathematics

41.6

1.8

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

21 (04-05 Baseline)

20 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in reading on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March (Grades 3 to 5)

25 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in reading on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March (Grades 3 to 5)

21 (04-05 Baseline)

1.9

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

29 (04-05 Baseline)

15 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in language arts on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March (Grades 3 to 5)

20 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in language arts on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March (Grades 3 to 5)

29 (04-05 Baseline)

1.10 Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and math

39 (04-05 Baseline)

20 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in mathematics on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March (Grades 3 to 5)

25 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in mathematics on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March (Grades 3 to 5)

39 (04-05 Baseline)

1.11 Students will demonstrate increased proficiency in oral communication skills

60 (04-05 Baseline)

5 percentage point increase in number of students with average score of proficient or above on oral presentations

75 percent of students will demonstrate an average score of proficient or above on oral presentations

60 (04-05 Baseline)

1.12 Students will demonstrate increased proficiency in the use of technology

60 (04-05 Baseline)

5 percentage point increase in number of 5th grade students scoring proficient or above on technology assessments

75 percent of 5th grade students will score proficient or above on technology assessments

60 (04-05 Baseline)

FPCS

28

Annual Report


CHART OF ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN PERFORMANCE Woodridge Campus (2003-04 to 2007-08) I. Academic Performance Objectives Performance Objective or Goal

Baseline Data

Annual Target

Five-Year Target

2004-2005 Year Two Performance

Middle Level Grade 6 – SY 2004/05; Grades 6-7 – SY 2005/06; Grades 6-8 – SY 2006/07 1.13 Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

49.0 (04-05 Baseline)

1 percentage point increase in number of students with NCE gain of 0 or greater in reading

65 percent of students will demonstrate NCE gain of 0 or greater in reading

49.0 (04-05 Baseline)

1.14 Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

57.1 (04-05 Baseline)

1 percentage point increase in number of students with NCE gain of 0 or greater in mathematics

49.7 percent of students will demonstrate NCE gain of 0 or greater in mathematics

57.1 (04-05 Baseline)

1.15 Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

20 (04-05 Baseline)

5 percentage point increase in number of students scoring proficient and above on state assessment in reading

35 percent of students will score proficient and above on state assessment in reading

20 (04-05 Baseline)

1.16 Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

22 (04-05 Baseline)

5 percentage point increase in number of students scoring proficient and above on state assessment in mathematics

37 percent of students will score proficient and above on state assessment in mathematics

22 (04-05 Baseline)

1.17 Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

-5 (04-05 Baseline)

10 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in reading on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March

15 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in reading on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March

-5 (04-05 Baseline)

1.18 Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

-25 (04-05 Baseline)

5 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in language arts on the monthly benchmark

10 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in language arts on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March

-25 (04-05 Baseline)

1.19 Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and mathematics

-16 (04-05 Baseline)

10 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in mathematics on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March

15 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 70 percent or above in mathematics on the monthly benchmark assessments between September and March

-16 (04-05 Baseline)

1.20 Students will demonstrate increased proficiency in oral communication skills

0 (04-05 Baseline)

5 percentage point increase in number of students with score of “B” or above on oral presentations

15 percentage point increase in the number of students with score of “B” or above on oral presentations

0 (04-05 Baseline)

___ percentage point increase in number of 8th grade students scoring a “B” on electronic portfolio by the end of the school year

___ percentage point increase in number of 8th grade students will score a “B” on electronic portfolio by the end of the school year

1.21 Students will demonstrate improved proficiency in the use of technology

Baseline begins in 06-07

FPCS

29

Annual Report

Baseline begins in 06-07


CHART OF ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN PERFORMANCE Woodridge Campus (2003-04 to 2007-08) II. Non-Academic Performance Objectives Performance Objective or Goal

Baseline Data Year One Performance

Annual Target

Five-Year Target

2004-2005 Year Two Performance

Pre-Kindergarten 2.1

Parents will be active participants in students’ education.

62.6 (04-05 Baseline)

5 percentage point increase in parent participation in PAC and QLC Conferences, field trips, and other school-sponsored activities

77.6 percent of parents will participate in PAC and QLC Conferences, field trips, and other school-sponsored activities

62.6 (04-05 Baseline)

2.2

Students will attend school regularly.

91 (04-05 Baseline)

90 percent average daily attendance rate (pre-S/pre-K)

90 percent average daily attendance rate (pre-S/pre-K)

91 (04-05 Baseline)

2.3

Students will attend school regularly.

96 (03-04)

92 percent average daily attendance rate (elementary)

92 percent average daily attendance rate (elementary)

94

2.4

Students will demonstrate the internalization of core values of justice, respect, responsibility, courage, integrity, compassion, hope, and wisdom.

20 (04-05 Baseline)

5 percentage point increase in number of students meeting 80 percent of character education checklist skills

35 percent of students will meet 80 percent of character education checklist skills

20 (04-05 Baseline)

2.5

Students will express satisfaction with the school atmosphere

7.7 (03-04)

7 to 8 mean rating for school atmosphere on Harris student survey

8 mean rating for school atmosphere on Harris student survey

6.1*

2.6

Students will be wellrounded participants in the school community.

27 (03-04)

5 percentage point increase in number of students participating in organized extracurricular activities

47 percent of students will participate in organized extra-curricular activities

32

2.7

Parents will be active participants in students’ education

43 (03-04)

5 percentage point increase in parent participation in PAC and QLC Conferences, field trips, and other school-sponsored activities

58 percent parent participation in PAC and QLC Conferences, field trips, and other school sponsored activities

Elementary Level (K-5)

52.1

Middle Level (Grades 6-8) Grade 6 – SY 2004/05; Grades 6-7 – SY 2005/06; Grades 6-8 – SY 2006/07 2.8

Students will attend school regularly.

95 (04-05 Baseline)

90 percent average daily attendance rate

90 percent average daily attendance rate

95 (04-05 Baseline)

2.9

Students will be wellrounded participants in the school community.

15 (04-05 Baseline)

10 percentage point increase in number of students participating in organized extra/cocurricular activities

45 percent of students will participate in organized extra/co-curricular activities

15 (04-05 Baseline)

0 (04-05 Baseline)

3 percentage point increase in number of students scoring “satisfactory” on Character education assessment

9 percentage point increase in number of students scoring “satisfactory” on Character education assessment

0 (04-05 Baseline)

Baseline begins in 06-07

___ percentage point increase in number of 8th grade students scoring “B” or higher on college/career portfolio

___ percent of 8th grade students will score a “B” or higher on college/career portfolio

Baseline begins in 06-07

2.12 Students will express satisfaction with the school atmosphere

6.1* (04-05 Baseline)

6 to 7 mean rating for school atmosphere on Harris student survey

7 mean rating for school atmosphere on Harris student survey

6.1* (04-05 Baseline)

2.13 Parents will be active participants in students’ education

47 (04-05 Baseline)

3 percentage point increase in parent participation in PAC and QLC Conferences, field trips, and other school-sponsored activities

56 percent of parents will participate in PAC and QLC Conferences, field trips, and other school sponsored activities

47 (04-05 Baseline)

2.10 Students will demonstrate the internalization of core values of justice, respect, responsibility, courage, integrity, compassion, hope, and wisdom. 2.11 Students will be prepared to enter high school career academies.

*Data analysis aggregates students at elementary and middle levels (Grades K-6). Data will be updated upon receipt of disaggregated Harris Survey results from Edison.

FPCS

30

Annual Report


CHART OF ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN PERFORMANCE Blow Pierce Jr. Academy Campus (2003-04 to 2007-08) I. Academic Performance Objectives Performance Objective or Goal

Baseline Data (Year One Performance)

Annual Target

Five-Year Target

2004-2005 Year Two Performance

1.1

Students will demonstrate improved levels of academic achievement in reading and mathematics.

57.8 (03-04)

1 percentage point increase in number of students with NCE gain of 0 or greater in reading

61.8 percent of students will demonstrate NCE gain score of 0 or greater in reading

55.6

1.2

Students will demonstrate improved levels of academic achievement in reading and mathematics.

63.3 (03-04)

1 percentage point increase in number of students with NCE gain of 0 or greater in mathematics

67.3 percent of students will demonstrate NCE gain score of 0 or greater in mathematics

57.8

1.3

Students will demonstrate improved levels of academic achievement in reading and mathematics.

22.6 (03-04)

5 percentage point increase in number of students scoring proficient or above on SAT 9 state assessment in reading

42.6 percent of students will score proficient or above on state assessment in reading

23

1.4

Students will demonstrate improved levels of academic achievement in reading and mathematics.

15.3 (03-04)

5 percentage point increase in number of students scoring proficient or above on SAT 9 state assessment in mathematics

35.3 percent of students will score proficient or above on SAT 9 state assessment in mathematics

22

1.5

Students will demonstrate improved levels of academic achievement in reading and mathematics.

9.7 (04-05 Baseline)

10 percentage increase in the number of students scoring an average of 80 percent and above in reading on the monthly benchmark assessments from September to March

15 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 80 percent and above in reading on the monthly benchmark assessments from September to March

9.7 (04-05 Baseline)

1.6

Students will demonstrate improved levels of academic achievement in reading and mathematics.

4.7 (04-05 Baseline)

5 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 80 percent and above in language arts on the monthly benchmark assessments from September to March

10 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 80 percent and above in language arts on the monthly benchmark assessments from September to March

4.7 (04-05 Baseline)

1.7

Students will demonstrate improved levels of academic achievement in reading and mathematics.

14.3 (04-05 Baseline)

10 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 80 percent and above in mathematics on the monthly benchmark assessments from September to March

15 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring an average of 80 percent and above in mathematics on the monthly benchmark assessments from September to March

14.3 (04-05 Baseline)

1.8

Students will demonstrate increased proficiency in oral communication skills

74 (04-05 Baseline)

3 percentage point increase in number of students with score of “B” or above on oral presentation

83 percent of students will score a “B” or above on oral presentation

74 (04-05 Baseline)

1.9

Students will demonstrate improved proficiency in the use of technology

89 (04-05 Baseline)

2 percentage point increase in number of students scoring a “B” or above on technology exercise by the end of the school year

95 percent of students will score a “B” or above on technology exercise by the end of the school year

89 (04-05 Baseline)

FPCS

31

Annual Report


CHART OF ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN PERFORMANCE Blow Pierce Jr. Academy Campus (2003-04 to 2007-08) II. Non-Academic Performance Objectives Performance Objective or Goal

Baseline Data (Year One Performance)

Annual Target

Five-Year Target

2004-2005 Year Two Performance

2.1

Students will attend school regularly.

90 (03-04)

90 percent average daily attendance rate

90 percent average daily attendance rate

91

2.2

Students will be wellrounded participants in the school community.

20 (03-04)

10 percentage point increase in number of students participating in organized extra curricular activities

60 percent of students will participate in organized extra/co-curricular activities

27

2.3

Students will demonstrate the internalization of core values of justice, respect, responsibility, courage, integrity, compassion, hope, and wisdom.

85 (04-05 Baseline)

3 percentage point increase in number of students scoring satisfactory on Character education assessment

94 percent of students will score satisfactory on Character Education assessment

85 (04-05 Baseline)

2.4

Students will be prepared to enter high school career academies.

97 (04-05 Baseline)

1 percentage point increase in number of 8th grade students scoring “B” or higher on college/career portfolio

100 percent of 8th grade students scoring “B” or higher on college/career portfolio

97 (04-05 Baseline)

2.5

Students will express satisfaction with the school atmosphere

5.8 (03-04)

6 to 7 mean rating for school atmosphere on Harris student survey

7 mean rating for school atmosphere on Harris student survey

6.1

2.6

Parents will be active participants in students’ education

40 (03-04)

5 percentage point increase in parent participation in PAC and QLC Conferences, field trips, and other school-sponsored activities

60 percent of parents will participate in PAC and QLC Conferences, field trips, and other school sponsored activities

55

FPCS

32

Annual Report


CHART OF ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN PERFORMANCE Collegiate Academy Campus (2003-04 to 2007-08) I. Academic Performance Objectives Performance Objective or Goal

Baseline Data (Year One Performance)

Annual Target

Five-Year Target

2004-2005 Year Two Performance

1.1

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and math

57.9 (03-04)

1 percentage point increase in number of students with NCE gain of 0 or greater in reading

61.9 percent of students will demonstrate NCE gain score of 0 or greater in reading

63.1

1.2

Students will demonstrate an improved level of academic achievement in reading and math

57.8 (03-04)

1 percentage point increase in number of students with NCE gain of 0 or greater in mathematics

61.8 percent of students will demonstrate NCE gain of 0 or greater in mathematics

39.3

1.3

Students will demonstrate increased proďŹ ciency in the use of technology

88 (04-05 Baseline)

2 percentage point increase in number of students earning a C in the 10th grade Intro to Technology course

94 percent of students will earn a C in the 10th grade Intro to Technology course

88 (04-05 Baseline)

1.4

Students will prepare to enter college or the workforce upon graduating from high school.

74 (03-04)

80 to 85 percent annual range of students accepted into 2-year or 4-year institutions

85 percent of students will be accepted into 2-year or 4-year institutions of higher learning

92

1.5

Students will prepare to enter college or the workforce upon graduating from high school.

49 (03-04)

2 percentage point increase in the number of students in grades 11 and 12 earning a C or above in a career program major course

57 percent of students in grades 11 and 12 will earn a C or above in a career program major course

84

1.6

Students will prepare to enter college or the workforce upon graduating from high school.

43 (03-04)

5 percentage point increase in the number of students in grade 9 earning a B or above in Transitions course

63 percent of students in grade 9 will earn a B or above in Transitions course

65

1.7

Students will prepare to enter college or the workforce upon graduating from high school.

23 (03-04)

3 percentage point increase in the number of students scoring a B or above on the senior thesis

35 percent students will score a B or above on the senior thesis

57

1.8

Students will prepare to enter college or the workforce upon graduating from high school.

1146

25 point increase in average verbal and mathematics S.A.T. scores for 11th and 12th grade students on the January assessment

1246 point average S.A.T. scores for 11th and 12th grade students

1.9

Math – 375 Verbal – 389 (x 1.5 for comparison to new SAT scores)

1136 Math 372 Verbal 389 Writing 375

Students will prepare to enter college or the workforce upon graduating from high school.

18 (03-04)

5 percentage point increase in number of students earning a C or above in AP course

38 percent of students will earn a C or above in AP course

89

1.10 Students will prepare to enter college or the workforce upon graduating from high school.

0 (03-04)

5 percentage point increase in number of students in 11th and 12th grades scoring a 3 or higher on the AP examination

20 percent of students in 11th and 12th grades will score a 3 or higher on the AP examination

3

1.11 Students will complete their high school education

96 (03-04)

91 to 96 percent of students will graduate

96 percent of students will graduate

95

FPCS

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Annual Report


CHART OF ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN PERFORMANCE Collegiate Academy Campus (2003-04 to 2007-08) II. Non-Academic Performance Objectives Performance Objective or Goal

Baseline Data (Year One Performance)

Annual Target

Five-Year Target

2004-2005 Year Two Performance

2.1

Students will attend school regularly.

95 (03-04)

94 percent average daily attendance rate

94 percent average daily attendance rate

93

2.2

Students will be wellrounded participants in the school community.

32 (03-04)

5 percentage point increase in number of students participating in organized extra/cocurricular activities

52 percent of students will participate in organized extra/co-curricular activities

24

2.3

Volunteer/community service hours

21 (03-04)

10 percentage point increase in number of students meeting community service requirement

61 percent of students will meet community service requirement

20

2.4

Students will express satisfaction with the school atmosphere

7.2 (03-04)

7 to 8 mean rating for school atmosphere on Harris student survey

8 mean rating for school atmosphere on Harris student survey

6.7

2.5

Parents will be active participants in students’ education

78 (03-04)

2 percentage point increase in parent participation in PAC and QLC Conferences, field trips, and other school-sponsored activities

86 percent of parents will participate in PAC and QLC Conferences, field trips, and other school sponsored activities

87

FPCS

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Organizational Performance The charts below outline Friendship Public Charter School’s SY 2004-2005 organizational performance in accordance with the criteria outlined by the D.C. Public Charter School Board in its Charter Review Framework document.

Governance Performance Objective or Goal

Performance Target

Performance

Comments

Meetings and Board Structure

Hold regular meetings with sufficient membership to meet a quorum and submit copies of all minutes to the PCSB as required. The minutes reflect exceptional governance in areas such as policy making and oversight of academic and financial performance through the effective use of committees

Exemplary (highest PCSB rating)

Friendship PCS Board of Trustees meets on a quarterly basis at a minimum. Friendship PCS Board of Trustees must have a quorum as required in organization’s bylaws. Friendship Board receives regular updates from principals regarding status of student achievement and programs implemented at the school level. Minutes are submitted to the PCSB in accordance with requirements.

Requirement for PCSB Action

The school has demonstrated exceptional performance, thereby requiring no remedial action from the PCSB.

Exemplary (highest PCSB rating)

Friendship PCS was not issued any notices during SY 2004-2005.

Annual Reporting

The board submits timely Annual Reports that fully describe the school’s performance in relation to the targets established in its accountability plan. Quantitative evidence of performance is presented and aligned with all accountability plan targets.

Exemplary (highest PCSB rating)

Friendship PCS has submitted its 20032004 annual report by the November 1, 2004 deadline along with its annual financial audit. The PCSB did not issue any notice regarding late submission of required information.

The board and the school’s administration ensure adequate resources to further the academic and organizational success of the school, including, but not limited to, adequate facilities, appropriate professional development, services for special needs students, and additional funding.

The board and the school’s administration deploy resources effectively to further the academic and organizational success of the school.

Exemplary (highest PCSB rating)

Friendship PCS board staff have raised over $1 million through grants and philanthropy during SY 2004-2005.

The board and school leadership ensure effective implementation of the school design.

Administrators and board members have a strong understanding of the school design and refer to it regularly in managing and governing the school.

Exemplary (highest PCSB rating)

Friendship PCS board, central staff & school leaders meet regularly to discuss the progress of the schools and the performance of students and staff.

The board has ensured strong and stable leadership.

The board has established a school that maintains exceptional performance and stability through its school leader. Changes in the school leader either lead to exceptional performance or have not negatively impacted the school’s exceptional performance.

Exemplary (highest PCSB rating)

Overall, Friendship PCS campuses have maintained stable leadership. In SY 2004-2005, a leadership transition at the Blow Pierce campus was addressed through the interim appointment of a long-term principal from another campus.

The board is operating within its bylaws

The board’s composition and operations are substantially in keeping with its bylaws. Bylaws are reviewed on a regular basis to ensure alignment between operations and bylaws. Appropriate changes are made as needed.

Exemplary (highest PCSB rating)

Through its Board Counsel, Stafford Smiley, the Friendship PCS Board of Trustees consistently reviews its bylaws.

FPCS

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Annual Report


Compliance Performance Objective or Goal The school has complied with applicable laws, rules and regulations, as evidenced by Compliance Review Findings in the maintenance of: health and safety regulations; Certificate of Occupancy reflecting maximum occupancy consistent with enrollment; insurance certificates; completed background checks; open enrollment process; and NCLB requirements.

Performance Target

Performance

School has an exemplary record of compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations, maintains highly effective systems and controls for ensuring that legal requirements are met, and is currently in substantial compliance with relevant authorities.

Exemplary (highest PCSB rating)

Comments Friendship PCS has not been issued any notices for noncompliance with applicable regulations and laws.

Fiscal Management Category

Performance Target

Performance

Comments

Internal Controls – Procurement

School is in compliance with PCSB’s contracting/ procurement requirements.

Above Average (highest PCSB rating)

Friendship PCS complies with PCSB contracting procurement requirements. Friendship publicly bids all procurements and conducts an internal review of proposals to select vendors.

Transparency of Financial Management – Annual Budgets

The school prepares an annual operating budget, a cash flow projection, and, when required, a capital budget by June 1 of each year. Budget reflects thoughtful planning and detailed assumptions. These documents are certified by the Board of Trustees. Modifications are made as necessary and are submitted to the PCSB.

Above Average (highest PCSB rating)

Friendship PCS submits annually by June 1 of each year the budget and cash flow projection to the PCSB.

Transparency of Financial Management – Management Organizations

School accurately discloses relationships with its management organization. Contracts are provided to PCSB and are deemed reasonable and fair.

Above Average (highest PCSB rating)

Friendship has submitted all contracts with Edison Schools, Inc. to the PCSB. The PCSB accepted the contracts as reasonable and fair.

Transparency of Financial Management – Related Party Transactions

The school accurately discloses transactions with related parties, as required by PCSB’s guidelines.

Above Average (highest PCSB rating)

Friendship PCS discloses all related party transactions as a part of its annual financial audit requirements.

Fiscal Prudence – Balanced Budget

The school has a balanced budget, based on reasonable assumptions, for the upcoming fiscal year. Expenses are less than revenues, or there is reasonable explanation for deficit spending. Budgeting is thoughtfully aligned with long-term financial goals.

Above Average (highest PCSB rating)

Friendship PCS always projects a balanced budget. This budget is inclusive of annual reserves that were required as part of the school’s bond revenue financing requirements.

FPCS

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Annual Report


Finance

2004 - 2005 Financial Statements 2004 - 2005 Donations & Grants

FPCS

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Annual Report


INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees Friendship Public Charter School, Inc. Washington, D.C.

September 23, 2005

We have audited the accompanying statements of financial position of Friendship Public Charter School, Inc. as of June 30, 2005 and 2004, and the related statements of activities and cash flows for the years then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the School's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards issued by the Comptroller General of the United States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion. In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Friendship Public Charter School, Inc. as of June 30, 2005 and 2004, and the change in its net assets and its cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued our report dated September 23, 2005 on our consideration of Friendship Public Charter School Inc.'s internal control over financial reporting and on our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts and grant agreements and other matters. The purpose of that report is to describe the scope of our testing of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and the results of that testing of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on the internal control over financial reporting or on compliance. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards and should be considered in assessing the results of our audits.

FPCS

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Annual Report


STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION JUNE 30, 2005 AND 2004

2005 ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS: Cash and cash equivalents Current portion of notes receivable - related parties Grants receivable

$

2004 (Restated)

9,811,246 95,174 810,492

$ 1,269,855 134,895 1,478,292

10,716,912

2,883,042

604,263 9,059,009 40,315,887

182,726 14,549,082 34,399,083

3,528,877 69,903

3,655,284 86,418

53,577,939

52,872,593

$ 64,294,851

$ 55,755,635

$

6,701,301 1,744,724 1,107,798

$ 1,815,017 158,096 1,133,562

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

9,553,823

3,106,675

LONG-TERM DEBT - less current portion

46,177,416

47,259,082

55,731,239

50,365,757

8,563,612

5,389,878

$ 64,294,851

$ 55,755,635

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS NONCURRENT ASSETS: Notes receivable - related parties, less current portion Restricted and investments Property Proper e ty and equipme er equipment, m nt, net of accumu me accumulated m lated dep mu depreciation e reciation ep Loan issuance costs, net of amo amortization m rtization of mo $210,679 and 84,272 fo fforr 2005 and 2004 Deposits Dep e osits ep TOTAL NONCURRENT ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS CURRENT LIABILITIES: Accounts payable and accrued expenses Deferred Defe fer fe erred revenue Current portion of long-ter long-term e m deb er debt e t eb

TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS Undesignated - unr unrestricted n estricted nr TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS See notes to financial statements. FPCS

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Annual Report


STATEMENTS OF ACTIVITIES YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2005 AND 2004

2005

2004 (Restated)

$ 32,072,948 4,208,843 745,374 454,544 509,679

$ 30,704,386 3,380,690 703,434 139,226 288,426

37,991,388

35,216,162

18,854,831 1,032,129 2,678,622 1,232,014 161,773 5,089,977 147,407 417,599 405,138 2,473,108 624,733 1,700,323

17,892,349 616,122 2,668,244 791,946 152,516 5,100,317 158,544 398,054 564,749 2,440,740 201,014 1,146,697

34,817,654

32,131,292

CHANGE IN NET ASSETS

3,173,734

3,084,870

NET ASSETS: Beginning of year

5,389,878

2,305,008

REVENUE: Pupil revenue Federal Feder e al grants er Summer Summ mme mm mer er school Interest Inter e est er Other e er TOTAL REVENUE EXPENSES: Personnel Per e sonnel and salaries er Direct student costs Occupancy Administration Admi m nistration and profe mi professional f ssional fe fe ffees es Charter e fe er ffeee Management Manageme m nt fe me ffeee Extended learning Subcontracted grant ser services e vices er Summer Summ mme mm mer er school - direct Interest Inter e est er Other e er Depreciation Dep e reciation and amo ep amortization m rtization mo TOTAL EXPENSES

End of year

$

See notes to financial statements.

FPCS

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Annual Report

8,563,612

$

5,389,878


STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2005 AND 2004

INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS: Cash fl fflows ows fr ffrom om operating activities: Change in net assets Adjustments Adj d ustme dj m nts to reconcile change in net assets to net cash provided me (used) by operating activities: Depreciation and amo amortization m rtization mo Amortization Amo m rtization of loan discount mo Grants receivable Deposits Accounts payable and accrued expenses Deferred Defe f rred revenue fe Total adj adjustments d ustme dj m nts me Net cash provided by operating activities Cash fl fflows ows fr ffrom om investing activities: Purchase of property and equipme equipment m nt me Issuance of notes receivables Proceeds on repayme repayment m nt of notes recievables me Purchase of restr restricted t icted cash and investme tr investments m nts me Sales of restr restricted t icted cash and investme tr investments m nts me Net cash used by investing activities Cash fl fflows ows fr ffrom om fi ffinancing nancing activities: Payments Payme m nts on principal of notes payable me Payments Payme m nts on capital lease obligation me Proceeds of Distr District t ict of Columb tr Columbia m ia loan net of discounts and issuance costs mb Proceeds fr ffrom om credit enhanceme enhancement m nt note payable me Net cash provided (used) by fi ffinancing nancing activities

2005

2004 (Restated)

$ 3,173,734

$ 3,084,870

1,700,323 26,132 667,800 16,515 4,886,284 1,586,628

1,146,697 17,421 (136,338) 27,065 (753,802) (624,224)

8,883,682

(323,181)

12,057,416

2,761,689

(7,490,720) (415,154) 40,000

(5,581,360) (317,621)

5,483,411

(20,517,164) 5,968,082

(2,382,463)

(20,448,063)

(755,000) (378,562)

(26,975,522) (415,032) 40,633,152 3,000,000

(1,133,562)

16,242,598

NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

8,541,391

(1,443,776)

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS: Beginning of year

1,269,855

2,713,631

$ 9,811,246

$ 1,269,855

$ 2,268,969

$ 2,294,634

End of year SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Cash interest paid See notes to financial statements.

FPCS

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Annual Report


NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 1 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES The financial statements of the Friendship Public Charter School, Inc. (the Charter) have been prepared on the accrual basis. The Charter's accounting policies are described below to enhance the usefulness of the financial statements to the reader. The Charter is required to report information regarding its financial position and activities according to three classes of net assets: unrestricted net assets, temporarily restricted net assets, and permanently restricted net assets. The Charter has no temporarily or permanently restricted activity or net assets. Cash and cash equivalents - The Charter considers unrestricted short-term highly liquid investments (including money market funds) with maturities of three months or less to be cash equivalents. Restricted cash and investments consist of cash and cash equivalents and U.S. Treasury notes, which are carried at market value which approximate cost. These amounts are restricted by certain provisions of the loan agreements and management agreements and therefore are generally not available for the general operations of the Charter. Accounts, grants and notes receivable are stated at amounts management expects to collect from outstanding balances. Management provides for probable uncollectible amounts through a provision for bad debt expense and an adjustment to a valuation allowance based on its assessment of the current status of individual accounts. Balances that are still outstanding after management has used reasonable collection efforts are written off through a charge to the valuation allowance and a credit to accounts receivable. Changes in the valuation allowance have not been material to the financial statements. Grants receivable consist primarily of grant reimbursements outstanding at year-end. No allowance is considered necessary and no provision for bad debts have been recorded. The loan issuance costs are amortized into interest expense over the life of the loans using the straight-line method. Deferred revenue - Deferred revenue consists primarily of funds received prior to the close of the fiscal year for certain grants and the operation of summer school for which the related expenses had not yet been incurred. Property and equipment are recorded at cost and depreciated over the remaining estimated useful lives using the straight-line method. The loan discount is netted against long-term debt and amortized into interest expense annually in proportion to the related interest expense incurred. Functional allocation of expenses - The costs of providing the various programs and other activities has been summarized on a functional basis in the notes to the financial statements. Accordingly, certain costs have been allocated among program services and management and general expenses based on management's estimates.

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Annual Report


NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 2 – NATURE OF ORGANIZATION, RISKS, AND UNCERTAINTIES Organization - The Friendship Public Charter School, Inc. is a public charter school authorized under Section 2203 of the District of Columbia School Reform Act of 1995 by the District of Columbia Public Charter School Board. The Charter operates one preschool - 6, one K-5, one 6-8, and one 9-12 instructional program under a management agreement with the Edison Schools, Inc., which provides substantially all educational materials for a management fee. The Charter has been granted tax-exempt status under the provisions of Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code and, as such, is not subject to federal income taxes other than those arising from unrelated business income. The Charter is required to disclose significant concentrations of credit risk regardless of the degree of such risk. Financial instruments that potentially subject the Charter to concentrations of credit risk consist principally of temporary cash investments and receivables. The Charter places its temporary cash investments with high-credit-quality financial institutions. Although such investments and cash balances exceeded the federally insured limits at certain times during the year an, at year-end they are in the opinion of management, subject to minimal risk. Concentrations of credit risk with respect to grants receivable is limited due to the nature of the organizations that fund the Charter's grant activities. Concentration of credit risk with respect to notes receivable relate to the credit worthiness of the related parties to which the notes have been issued. The process of preparing financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires the use of estimates and assumptions regarding certain types of assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses. Such estimates primarily relate to unsettled transactions and events as of the date of the financial statements. Accordingly, upon settlement, actual results may differ from estimated amounts. Under the terms of the grant agreements, the final determination of allowable expenses is subject to interpretation and adjustments by grantor agencies.

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Annual Report


NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 3 – RESTRICTED CASH AND INVESTMENTS Restrictions have been placed on cash and investments under the terms of loan and bond documents and the management agreement as follows: 2005 Unspent project proceeds: Money market funds U.S. Treasury notes Commercial Paper Unrestricted liquid asset fund - money market fund Technology reserve - money market funds Facilities reserve - moneyy market funds Restricted for debt service - money market funds Restricted for repayment of the District of Columbia Public Charter School Credit Enhancement Committee note payable (See Note 5) guaranteed investment contract

$

350,339 1,798,729 179,040 2,156,397 1,022,155 477,628 74,721

2004 $

8,041,229 1,841,944 1,027,437 472,600 159,129 6,743

3,000,000

3,000,000

$ 9,059,009

$ 14,549,082

The unrestricted liquid asset fund (ULA) must be 15% and 20% of the 2003 project formula payments by November 2008 and 2013, respectively. The 2003 project formula payments are defined as the quarterly payments based on the number of students attending the Charter's facilities comprising the 2003 project operated by the Charter which are payable, allocable or awarded to the Charter by the District of Columbia. These funds may be used by the Charter for certain operating shortfalls and capital expenditures as defined by the loan documents. The Charter is funding the (ULA) based on projected amounts to reach the amounts required by 2008 and 2013. Technology and facility reserves are required under both the loan and management agreements. The technology reserve is to be funded at $200 (adjusted annually) per pupil and can be used for technology related purchases. The facilities reserve is to be funded at $50 (2004) to $150 (2006) per pupil and must not be less than $460,000 at June 30, 2005. The facilities reserve can be used at the discretion of the Charter to pay for capital projects.

FPCS

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Annual Report


NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 4 – PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT Property and equipment at June 30 consist of the following: Years of useful life Land Buildings and leasehold improvements Computer equipment Furniture and office equipment Curriculum Software Construction in progress

20 - 40 5 15 - 20 5 3

Less accumulated depreciation and amortization

2005 $

408,677 40,394,646 3,434,173 501,494 595,237 25,218 19,385

2004 $

408,677 30,378,481 3,084,220 411,468 595,237 25,218 2,984,810

45,378,830 5,062,943

37,888,111 3,489,028

$ 40,315,887

$ 34,399,083

In July, 2003 under terms of the new management agreement with Edison, the Charter began leasing $1,417,547 of building improvements, furniture and curriculum under capitalized leases. The accumulated depreciation was $305,896 and $152,948 at June 30, 2005 and 2004, respectively. Depreciation expense was $152,948 for the years ended June 30, 2005 and 2004. NOTE 5 – LONG-TERM DEBT Long-term debt consists of the following at June 30:

2005 Note payable - District of Columbia payable quarterly in annual totals ranging from $755,000 to $2,850,000 plus interest at 3% to 5.75%. Secured by the per pupil revenue received from the District of Columbia and mortgages on the related properties. $ 44,125,000 Less unamortized discount (463,739) 43,661,261

FPCS

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Annual Report

2004

$ 44,880,000

(489,871)

44,390,129


NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 5 – LONG-TERM DEBT (Continued)

2005

2004

Note payable - District of Columbia Public Charter School Credit Enhancement Fund Committee, with interest only payments until maturity in 2033. Interest is to be paid quarterly at a minimum of 4% or greater if the related investments (guaranteed investment contract in Note 3) provide a higher return. $ 3,000,000

$ 3,000,000

623,953

1,002,515

47,285,214 1,107,798

48,392,644 1,133,562

$ 46,177,416

$ 47,259,082

Capital lease obligation due to Edison Schools, Inc. with interest imputed at 7%. Less current portion

Payments made on the note payable to the District of Columbia have been assigned by the District of Columbia under a trust agreement for the benefit of the bond holders for the full payment of the $44,880,000 of District of Columbia Revenue Bonds (Friendship Public Charter School, Inc. Issue – Series 2003) issued in November 2003. The bonds were issued to refinance existing debt related to the prior purchase of three school buildings and leasehold improvement at a fourth leased school building as well as renovate and provide for technology upgrades for these facilities. Payments of the bonds are guaranteed by a bond insurance policy, the loan payable between the Charter and the District of Columbia, the related per pupil revenue (2003 project formula payments), mortgages on the related properties and certain debt service reserve funds. As of June 30, 2005, $44,125,000 of these bonds remained outstanding. The Charter is subject to certain financial covenants under the terms of the note payable to the District of Columbia for which the Charter is in compliance.

FPCS

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Annual Report


NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 5 – LONG-TERM DEBT (Concluded) Maturities of notes payable are as follows:

Year ending June 30, 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 - 2015 2016 - 2020 2021 - 2025 2026 - 2030 2031 - 2033

$

775,000 795,000 1,000,000 870,000 1,000,000 5,165,000 6,700,000 8,625,000 11,065,000 11,130,000

$

47,125,000

The capitalized lease obligations require payments as follows: Year ending June 30, 2006 2007 2008

Amounts representing interest

Principal portion

Total payments

$

332,798 154,938 136,217

$

33,135 14,646 5,220

$

365,933 169,584 141,437

$

623,953

$

53,001

$

676,954

FPCS

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Annual Report


NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 6 – OPERATING LEASES The Charter leases school facilities from the District of Columbia Public Schools and administrative offices from an unrelated entity under operating leases expiring through 2020. Future minimum operating lease payments required over the next five years are as follows:

Year ending June 30, 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

$899,893 $651,121 $614,135 $615,907 $548,631

Rent expense for the years ended June 30, 2005 and 2004, was $287,590 and $126,148, respectively. All leases with the District of Columbia Public School contain an option to purchase the facilities during the term of the lease. As of the report date, the Charter is negotiating a 99 year term for the Woodson lease. The anticipated payments under the new lease are disclosed above. NOTE 7 – RETIREMENT PLAN Under the Public School Reform Act (the Charter School Law) teachers and administrators who have taken leave of absence from DC Public Schools remain in District of Columbia Teachers' Retirement Plan. Teachers who resign from DC Public Schools to take positions in charter schools may elect to remain in the Retirement Plan. Benefits are payable to employees at retirement or disability, and refunds are made upon death or termination prior to retirement. Employees contributed 8.5% percent of their salaries into the plan each year in 2005 and 2004; Employers (D.C. government and, eventually the Charter) make contributions based upon actuarially determined funding requirements. Participants who retire at age 55 with 30 years of service, at 60 with 20 years, or at 62 with 5 years are entitled to an annual annuity, payable monthly for life, equal to 1.5% percent of their average salary for the highest consecutive 3 years for each year of service up to 5 years, 1.75 percent for each year over 5 years, and 2 percent for each year over 10 years, up to a maximum of 80 percent, excluding credit for unused sick leave. Benefits vest upon reaching 5 years of service and increase after retirement based upon inflation. Refunds are made if separation occurs before 5 years of service.

FPCS

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Annual Report


NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 7 – RETIREMENT PLAN (Concluded) Additional information relating to this plan is available in the District of Columbia Public School's Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR). Teachers and administrators who are not part of the DC Public School Teachers' Retirement Plan may participate in a 403(b) plan. Under the plan employee contributions are matched 50% by the Charter on the first one thousand dollars of employee contributions. NOTE 8 – MANAGEMENT AGREEMENT - EDISON SCHOOLS, INC. The Charter has entered into a five year management agreement expiring in June 2008 with Edison Schools, Inc. (Edison) for substantially all operations of the Charter. Edison's management fee for operating the Charter is primarily calculated using a fixed per capita fee per pupil based on official enrollment counts. The fee is adjusted annually based on the rate of increase in governmental revenue appropriation levels. Payment of certain portions of management fee are subordinated to the payment of certain operating costs of the Charter, including portions of the operating reserve. The subordinated management fee is to be paid to Edison in the subsequent year prior to the payment of the subsequent fixed per capita fee. Edison provides the Charter the use of certain technology, curriculum, furniture and other property the cost of which is generally charged to the Charter over a five-year period. Effective with the management agreement implemented in July 2003, the title to these assets passes to the Charter upon payment in full of the individual assets. In addition, upon termination of the contract, the Charter is required to purchase these assets for the remaining cost not previously paid to Edison. Accordingly, these assets will be capitalized and treated as capital leases (See Notes 4 and 5) with the exception of certain assets with nominal remaining useful lives as of July 1, 2003 which will continue to be treated as operating leases. NOTE 9 – RELATED PARTIES The Charter's central administrative staff were employees of Friendship House Association (FHA), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, until July 2004 when the Charter discontinued its association with FHA. The total payroll and fringe benefit costs of the central administrative staff and the cost of the administrative services amounted to approximately $20,270 and $1,167,780 for the years ended June 30, 2005 and 2004, respectively. Accounts payables to FHA were $0 and $18,381 for the years ended June 30, 2005 and 2004, respectively.

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Annual Report


NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 9 – RELATED PARTIES (Concluded) Friendship Food Service System (FFSS) is organized as a separate 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. The Charter holds certain board of director positions resulting in a non controlling interest in FFSS. The Charter receives meals for students and USDA compliance reporting from FFSS. In October 2003, the Charter also loaned $232,776 to the FFSS to reorganize its operations. The note bears interest at 3.15%. The Charter received approximately $33,000 in principal payments in 2005 and will reassess the repayment terms in October 2005. Management feels the receivable is fully collectible and no allowance for uncollectible amounts is necessary. The Center for Youth and Family Investment (the Center) was organized to help youth in area public charter schools including the Charter. The Charter holds certain board director positions resulting in a non controlling interest in the Center. As of June 30, 2005 and 2004, the Charter had advanced the Center $500,000 and $84,845 on a working capital loan. The note carries interest at 3.15% with interest only payable until October 2005 at which point principal and interest will be paid at $11,100 per month until October 2009 The Charter received and disbursed approximately $200,000 of grant dollars to the Center in an agency capacity. NOTE 10 – FUNCTIONAL ALLOCATION OF EXPENSES In accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 117, Financial Statements of Not-for-Profit Organizations, the Charter allocates expenses as they relate to program and management functions.

2005 Educational activities Management and general

2004

$

28,395,478 6,167,176

$

26,156,223 5,975,069

$

34,562,654

$

32,131,292

The management and general classification included the management fee earned by Edison Schools. The management fee includes depreciation factor designed to cover Edison School's initial investment in capital outlay over time.

FPCS

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NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 11 – PENDING LITIGATION The Charter along with certain related parties are named defendants in a lawsuit filed by a vendor for alleged breach of contract. The suit seeks damages of approximately $600,000. Based on its estimated cost to settle, the Charter has recorded a Liability of $255,000. The Charter has been named defendant in a lawsuit filed by a related party for alleged breach of contract. The suit seeks damages of approximately $800,000. The Charter contends that there was no breach of contract and no amounts owed to the related party and will defend it's position vigorously. No liability has been recorded at June 30, 2005 for this contingency. NOTE 12 – COMMITMENTS At June 30, 2005, the Charter has open construction contracts with remaining balances of approximately $1.1 million related to building renovations being paid for with the bond proceeds. NOTE 13 – NET ASSET RESTATEMENT Net assets at June 30, 2004 and 2003 have been restated to reflect grants receivable not previously recorded. Net assets were increased by $320,554 and $280,910 at June 30, 2004 and 2003, respectively. The change in net assets was increased by $39,644 for the year ended June 30, 2004. This amount was recorded as federal grant revenue. NOTE 14 – SUBSEQUENT EVENT The Charter opened another campus (Southeast Elementary Academy) in August 2005.

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Annual Report


DONORS & SUPPORTERS 2004-2005 SCHOOL YEAR

In 2004 - 2005 Friendship successfully received nearly 2 million in grants to support special programs for our students. Donors & Supporters

Program Grant Funded

Funds Recived

Bakke Foundation

Early College

$12,000.00

Capitol Hill Association of Merchants And Professionals

Friendship News Network

$2,500.00

DC Children and Youth Investment Corporation

After School Programs

$40,000.00

DC Children and Youth Investment Corporation

After School Programs

$20,000.00

21st Century Community Learning Centers

Community Learning Centers Program

$100,215.00

Career And Technical Education

Secondary Career Technical Education

$152,500.00

Comprehensive School Reform

School Improvement

$147,000.00

Enhancing Education Through Technology

Technology Education Program

$211,400.00

Reading First Program

DC Reading First Initiative

$167,835.00

Fight For Children

Saturday Program At Blow Pierce

$15,000.00

Hattie M. Strong Foundation

Engineering And Technology Enrichment

$5,000.00

Philip L. Graham Fund

Early College

$50,000.00

US Dept Of Education, Smaller Learning Communities

Smaller Leaning Communities Program

$107,922.20

Venture Philantropy Partners

Investment Partneship

$400,000.00

Walton Family Foundation

Woodridge Middle School Start Up

$179,975.00

Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Early College

$200,000.00

National Society Of Black Engineers

Robotics

$2,000.00

Total

$1,813,347.20

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Annual Report


Governance and Staff Leadership

Board of Trustees Staff Leadership

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Board of Trustees/Staff Leadership

FPCS Central Leadership Staff

Donald L. Hense*, Chairman

Friendship Public Charter School President & CEO, Center for Youth & Family Investment

Patricia Brantley, Chief Operating Officer Michael Cordell, Chief Academic Officer

Dr. Floretta Dukes McKenzie*, Vice-Chair

Catherine Sanwo, Chief Financial Officer

Accountability Committee Chair and Nominating Committee Member Senior Advisor, The American Institutes for Research Founder/Former Chairwoman, The McKenzie Group, Inc.

Kimberly Campbell, Chief of Staff Alicia Adams, Director of Professional Development Charlene Glymph, Director of Special Education

Victor E. Long*, Secretary

A. Jerry Haley, Director of Affiliate and Special Initiatives

Finance Committee Member, Discipline Committee Member and Parent Representative Partner, Regan, Halperin & Long

Barry Lofton, Director of Communications Dianne Harris, Director of Health-Related Programs

W. Edward Walter, Treasurer

Ulf Zeitler, Director of Technology

Finance Committee Chair Chief Financial Officer, Host Marriott Corporation

FPCS Campus Leadership Staff

Theodora Brown*

John C. Pannell, Principal Chamberlain Elementary

Discipline Committee Chair and Parent Representative Attorney (private practice)

James Shepard, Resident Principal Chamberlain Elementary

Michelle Coley*

Discipline Committee Member and Parent Representative Government Contractor

Marian K. Bobo, Principal Woodridge Elementary Campus

Kenneth Umansky

Raymond Miller, Principal Blow Pierce Jr. Academy (through 2/05)

Finance Committee Member President, ArnoldWorldwide

Brian Beck, Interim Principal Blow Pierce Jr. Academy (2/05 to 6/05)

Jan Gillespie-Walton

Accountability Committee Member Assistant Superintendent, Camden Public Schools

Michael Jackson, Head of School Collegiate Academy at Carter G. Woodson

Dr. Gregory Prince

Michael Cordell, Upper School Principal Collegiate Academy at Carter G. Woodson

Accountability Committee Member President, Hampshire College

Brian Beck, Lower School Principal Collegiate Academy at Carter G. Woodson

Helen Ver Standig*

Finance Committee Member Philanthropist Founder, Madame Wellington Jewelry Stores

Chris White*

Finance Committee Member Chairman and CEO, Global Events Partners *Notes District residents. Seven of 11 Board of Trustees members are residents of the District of Columbia.

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Annual Report


900 Pennsylvania Avenue SE Washington, DC 20003 tel: (202) 675-9060, fax: (202) 675-8314

www.friendshipschools.org


Annual Report 04-05