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A CLOSER LOOK 2016 – 2017

F R I E N D S’ C E N T R A L S C H O O L

PHILOS OPH Y | COU R S E OF FE RINGS | LIFE AT F RIE N DS ’ C E N TR A L | IN FOR M ATION FOR PA R E N T S


BOARD OF TRUSTEES Philip E. Scott ’73, Clerk

Jim Groch

Eve Troutt-Powell

Fariha I. Khan, Vice-Clerk

Paul Halpern

Stephen Yarnell

Craig Owens, Treasurer

Susan J. Holt

Matthew Levitties ’83, Recording Secretary

Steven Katznelson

Peter Arfaa (Trustee Emeritus)

Melissa Anderson

John McKinstry

Betty Bard

2 AT THE HEART OF

Merlin Muhrer

Quinn Bauriedel

Andrew Newcomb ’87

Roger Chiang

Nancy A. Sanders ’83

4 LOWER SCHOOL

Elizabeth J. Cohen ’83

Joy Takahashi

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1 FRIENDS’ CENTRAL SCHOOL

MISSION, VISION, AND PHILOSOPHY

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL SCHOOL

CURRICULUM

8 MIDDLE SCHOOL CURRICULUM

13 UPPER SCHOOL CURRICULUM

19 LIFE AT FRIENDS’

CENTRAL SCHOOL

22 TUITION AND

FINANCIAL AID

24 ADMISSION

Kristin Kimmell

Barbara Cohen (Trustee Emerita) Hillard Madway (Trustee Emeritus) Joanna Haab Schoff  ’51 (Trustee Emerita)

Jonathan A. Fiebach ’82

CALENDAR 2016–2017* Thursday, September 1

Orientation Day

Tuesday, September 6

First Day of School

Monday, October 3

Rosh Hashanah, No Classes

Wednesday, October 12

Yom Kippur, No Classes

Wednesday, November 23– Friday, November 25 Saturday, December 17– Monday, January 2 Monday, January 16

Thanksgiving Break Winter Break (Classes resume on Tuesday, January 3) Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service, No Classes

Monday, February 20

Presidents’ Day, No Classes

Saturday, March 25– Sunday, April 2

Spring Break (Classes resume on Monday, April 3)

Friday, April 14

Good Friday, No Classes

Monday, May 29

Memorial Day, No Classes

Friday, June 9

Last Day of School

Saturday, June 10

Commencement

* For a more complete listing of all calendar events, including parent/teacher conference days and teacher in-service days, please visit friendscentral.org


FRIENDS’ CENTRAL SCHOOL OUR MISSION We cultivate the intellectual, spiritual, and ethical promise of our students.

OUR VISION To awaken courage and intellect – and peacefully transform the world.

OUR “CENTRAL 4” Joining the Friends’ Central community is more than simply enrolling in a school. We pursue our Mission and Vision in distinctive and exciting ways that begin with integrating four central principals into every aspect of life at Friends’ Central: we are guided by our Quaker values, educating for excellence, inspiring tomorrow’s leaders, and honoring the individual. (See page 2-3 for more about our Central 4.)

OUR COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY & INCLUSIVITY From the founding of the Society of Friends in the mid-17th Century, Quakers have recognized the spiritual equality of all persons. This basic tenet of Quakerism stems from the belief that there is “that divine spark” in everyone. This philosophy has guided Friends’ Central School’s commitment to the ideal of respecting all persons. Friends’ Central School is committed to building and maintaining an inclusive and diverse community. All constituencies - faculty, staff, students, administrators, parents, trustees, and alumni/ae - are responsible for an awareness of and ongoing dialogue around equity issues of race and ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, privilege, religion, physical ability, and family structure. Our commitment is based on Quaker testimony and practice in which we honor each perspective and life experience. Through an intentional curriculum and differentiated methods of teaching, we seek to empower and engage all traditionally marginalized groups. Our community as a whole benefits when we listen and involve a broader range of voices.

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

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FOUR CENTRAL IDEAS AT THE HEART OF FRIENDS’ CENTRAL SCHOOL GUIDED BY QUAKER VALUES Our Quaker commitment to truth seeking and belief in the idea of Continuing Revelation drive an intense commitment to an education that is intellectual, thoughtful, and diverse. This includes our dedication to building a globally engaged community of students and faculty from different racial, religious, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds and a pedagogy that is grounded in reflection, integrity, and a willingness to accept responsibility. Meeting for Worship and community service are at the very center of teaching these core values.

EDUCATING FOR EXCELLENCE Challenging, intellectual, and engaging, Friends’ Central’s curriculum builds foundational skills within an education that is innovative, thoughtful, and dynamic. At every level, our students are encouraged to ask questions and to seek answers that push beyond their impressive accumulation of facts. Never satisfied by “what,” our students are always asking “why,” “how,” and, perhaps most importantly, “why not?” Friends’ Central students distinguish themselves while at FCS, in college where they are known for their exceptional preparation, and in the world where their contributions are extraordinary.

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FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK


INSPIRING TOMORROW’S LEADERS From nursery to grade 12, our curriculum requires students to amass knowledge and skills as individuals as they learn and collaborate in teams. With creativity fueling their progress, our students learn to adapt to new situations and ideas and to work hard to achieve their goals. Throughout their transformation from playful, eager children to skilled, self-possessed, socially conscious teenagers, they remain intellectually curious, independent, and engaged thinkers. Friends’ Central students gain both the academic skills and the personal qualities they draw upon to succeed in a rapidly changing, global world.

HONORING THE INDIVIDUAL At the heart of everything we do is the belief that each individual is valued and that each voice is important. Our students thrive because we approach each child as an individual and encourage the social and emotional development and academic growth of all our students. With a confidence that grows out of a community built on respect and individual value, our students find the courage to express their convictions and the empathy to listen respectfully to divergent viewpoints.

“I love sitting around our dinner table and hearing about the emotional and intellectual insights my children gain from Quaker principles, Meeting for Worship, and all-school assemblies.”

- Parent

“The educational experience [at FCS] taught me how to think for myself, analyze different viewpoints, and come up with my own independent conclusions. In addition to the intellectual side, the spiritual side was so ingrained in every activity that it was just who we became.”

- Alum

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS LOWER

SCHOOL

NURSERY SCHOOL

Two full-time, highly qualified teachers guide our youngest students through their first steps in the Friends’ Central School community. Their world is their classroom, yet all around them circles the fascinating life of the Lower School. Three-year-olds play on their own playground, yet also take “field trips” to explore the woods, ponds, and playgrounds of our 18-acre campus. In the classroom they investigate their world through play, while learning thematically with an integrated approach to language arts, math, and social studies. Their experience is further enriched by visits to the Lower School art, music, science, and Spanish classrooms, as well as regular visits to the gym and library.

PRE-K THROUGH 5TH GRADE

Friends’ Central’s Lower School is a place where joy-filled learning is embedded in play, exploration, and discovery. Whether at a desk, in the garden, art studio, or playground, learning is engaging as “skills and drills” take their place alongside critical questioning – why?, how?, what if?, teamwork, and collaboration. The experience is as academically challenging and exciting as it is supportive and structured. An emphasis on the Quaker values of simplicity, peace, integrity, community, equality, and service underlies every aspect of our Lower School, including academics. These values guide children and adults to treat one another with respect and appreciation, creating a safe and trusting atmosphere that inspires the very best in children. Our broad and varied curriculum offers opportunities for each child to explore, discover new interests, and shine. Classes are small and instruction is individualized, allowing students to progress at their own rates, with many students excelling far beyond their grade levels. Friends’ Central students develop the confidence to speak up and the skills to articulate their thoughts insightfully and effectively. Our Lower School teaches decision-making processes that help students throughout their lives. They learn to be good problem solvers – both academically and interpersonally. Through a careful balance of expectations and freedom, students are given the choice to pursue individual interests and to take intellectual risks. Students are held accountable for their words and actions and learn to develop internal judgment and control. Individual social development and awareness of others are nurtured in tandem with academic benchmarks.

CURRICULUM LANGUAGE ARTS Reading and writing instruction is progressive and individualized based on formal and informal assessments, ensuring that every child will be challenged and inspired. The Lower School faculty uses a balance of whole language and phonics to teach reading both in large and small groups. With the 4

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

youngest students, our language arts program focuses on listening and speaking. Teachers guide students in expressing their ideas, needs, feelings, and knowledge; they support them in using language effectively to solve problems through conversation and create narratives that accompany works of art or imaginative play. A Lower

School Reading Specialist helps to identify students who may require reading support and provides challenges for early readers. For most children, writing acquisition progresses in the following manner: in nursery, students begin figuring out the sounds they hear in words and learning the letters that make those sounds. In


FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR ACADEMIC PROGRAMS, VISIT FRIENDSCENTRAL.ORG/ACADEMICS pre-kindergarten, teachers work one-to-one with students to put those phonetic spellings down on paper in sentences that express their ideas, and by kindergarten, students add simple sight word vocabularies to their phonetic skills and begin to write full sentences independently. In the early grades, use of phonetic — “inventive” — spelling encourages the flow of ideas without fear of making mistakes. This is critical as students find and grow their voice. As reading and writing skills develop, other aspects are added — formal spelling programs, writing mechanics, writing in different genres, from different perspectives and for different audiences, and formal essays with introductions and conclusions. Poetry, creative, and expository writing are emphasized as students progress through the grades.

MATHEMATICS   A sequential mathematics program emphasizing problem-solving and conceptual understanding gives our Lower School students an understanding of the many ways math connects to their daily lives. Students develop basic

computation skills and learn to gather, organize, and interpret data. In the early grades, use of manipulatives nurtures the development of number sense. This ensures a thorough understanding of basic concepts before students move to pictorial and then to symbolic and abstract levels. Working in small groups, students expand and enrich their understanding through math games and cooperative math activities. Teachers encourage students to question math terms and figure out why numbers and concepts work as they do. Problem-solving ability is stressed as students learn to break down math problems and identify what a problem is asking of them and what operations are needed. Number sense continually develops. As our youngest students work to understand the magnitude and relationships of quantity — what each number means by itself and in relation to others — older students develop the ability to use numbers fluidly, flexibly, and fluently in adding, subtracting, dividing, and multiplying, first in simple operations and later in multi-step problems. While each grade has benchmarks for math achievement, teachers in all grades

differentiate math instruction for students, based on pre- and post-unit assessments who are ready for more challenging work. Our learning specialists also provide enrichment and support as needed.

SOCIAL STUDIES Our Lower School is strongly committed to thematic education, a holistic approach that unifies disciplines around a central social studies-based theme and creates a deeper, more meaningful understanding of topics. This integration of disciplines illuminates relationships and ways in which disparate aspects of the world are connected — the past and present, geography and culture, the arts, literature, and history. All areas of learning and the stories of many people are connected by common threads. A new Lower School fall theme is chosen each year and is followed by grade-level themes in the spring semester. The topics selected encourage students to recognize, appreciate, and celebrate the diversity of the world.

SCIENCE All classes, nursery through grade 5, have one or two weekly classes in our

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

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LOWER SCHOOL CURRICULUM, continued science lab, a space that entices students of all ages with its equipment — all manner of building materials, microscopes, measuring devices, and other tools — and collections of fossils, rocks, minerals, shells, and other objects of natural history. Using a hands-on, experiential approach, students cover a variety of disciplines, including biology, botany, and the basic principles of chemistry and physics. Almost as much class time is spent outdoors as indoors. The science curriculum uses the 18-acre campus with its woods, fields, pond, bird-blind, access to a nearby creek, and the centrally located organic garden.

TECHNOLOGY Use of technology is integrated into classrooms with one-to-one iPads for students in K-grade 5. Students use iPads to research, collaborate, and create, giving them the ability to do creative projects, such as make movies and build multi-media presentations, offering them a wider choice to respond to what they are learning, and providing them with a potentially much wider audience for their work.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION   Lower School students participate in an active physical education program that stresses mastery of a sequence of developmentally appropriate skills and

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FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

emphasizes teamwork. Younger students play cooperative games and work to develop fundamental movement skills, balance, and eye-hand coordination. Older students develop skills in specific sports such as soccer, field hockey, and basketball that prepare them for participation in the Middle School sports programs. Health and wellness is specifically taught in grade 5, but it is also discussed, taught, and lived throughout the year in the entire Lower School physical education program.

SPANISH Our Lower School Spanish program includes exposure to and practice of the language as well as an introduction to countries where Spanish is spoken and their cultures. Lessons are designed and coordinated with the children’s grade level, thematic focus, and developmental progress in mind. Listening, oral comprehension, and speaking skills are emphasized. Students in grades 3 and 4 begin to write in Spanish. Grade 5 language instruction is taught through Prima Lingua — a foundation course which prepares students for in-depth study of a foreign language in Middle School.

THE ARTS Lower School is rich in artistic excitement and expression. The dynamic art

and music programs turn hallways into inspiring galleries that reflect the children’s joyful creative spirits and often lead to spontaneous bursts of song from groups of students reprising favorite pieces learned in music class. Lower School captures the natural and abundant creativity in every child, encouraging the development of visual literacy and awareness and helping students to understand and interpret the world around them. The program uses both traditional media – different kinds of paints, natural and synthetic clays, drawing materials that include pencils, pastels, markers, fabric crayons, india ink, and charcoals – and nontraditional media such as sunprint kits, duct and colored tapes, found objects, metal foils, yarn, fabric, and objects from nature. They also work on potters’ wheels and iPads and use a variety of printmaking materials and techniques. The works of historical and contemporary artists are studied. Children respond to music innately. Our Lower School music curriculum is based on the belief that music is for all people and designed to nurture musical creativity in each child. The Lower School music curriculum is based on the Orff and Kodály approaches to music education, as well as the music learning theory of Edwin Gordon. The program develops musical independence and music literacy and includes opportuni-


ties for individual and ensemble improvisation. Starting in grade 2, the Lower School also offers an extra curricular instrumental program including a string ensemble and private lessons on piano, violin, and cello.

THE ULMER FAMILY LIGHT LAB Completed this October, the new Lower School Light Lab with its four studios brings together our talented faculty with state-of-the-art design, increased space, and a plethora of tools and resources. This new Makerspace – a collaborative space for learning, exploring, and sharing – facilitates the integration of all subjects in one learning environment.

LIBRARY In collaboration with classroom courses of study, the Lower School library curriculum is designed to inspire and foster a lifelong love of reading. The program also promotes visual, textual, digital, and technological literacy to help children acquire the thinking skills

needed to become independent learners. Children are taught digital citizenship and ethical behavior in the use of information and technology. Issues of copyright, plagiarism, crediting sources, and bibliographies are introduced in grade 3 and studied more deeply in grades 4 and 5 when there is also a more in-depth focus on use of print and online resources for research, search techniques, evaluating sources, and note taking.

FOOD PROGRAM A new Lower School food initiative has been introduced this year to inspire children to work toward a healthier and more sustainable world by teaching them to source, produce, and prefer delicious, planet-friendly foods. The lunch table is supplied overwhelmingly by local farms – including our own expansive, on-campus organic garden. Our chef introduces the meals to students and has time-tested methods for encouraging children to try new foods, including providing opportunities for students to take part in food preparation. Part of the initiative includes an intentional connection between the Lower School curriculum and the food program. For example, first graders studying India might find themselves trying Indian food for lunch. This change to our food service is an exciting step toward linking our curriculum and our garden together with the food we eat.

ACADEMIC EVALUATION Parent/teacher conferences are held in the fall and spring of each year, and written evaluations are sent home in January and June. Written reports include a narrative overview of the student’s progress and a checklist that provides information about specific skills in each academic discipline. In addition to the specified conferences, parents and teachers communicate as the need arises.

LOWER SCHOOL SPECIALS (NUMBER OF CLASSES PER WEEK) ART

LIBRARY

MUSIC

P.E.

SCIENCE

SPANISH

Nursery

1x

1x

2x

2x

1x

1x

Pre-k

1x

1x

2x

2x

1x

2x

K

2x

1x

2x

2x

1x

2x

Grade 1

2x

1x

2x

3x

2x

2x

Grade 2

2x

1x

2x

3x

2x

2x

Grade 3

2x

1x

2x

3x

2x

2x

Grade 4

2x

1x

2x

3x

2x

2x

Grade 5

2x

1x

2x

3x

3x

**

* Computer instruction provided by regular classroom teachers with the support of two technology specialists. Nursery and pre-kindergarten students work in small groups using iPads. All students in K-5 have school-issued 1:1 iPads. ** Grade 5 students receive special instruction in Prima Lingua and health. FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS MIDDLE

6TH THROUGH 8TH GRADE

SCHOOL Friends’ Central’s Middle School plays a critical role in transforming eager, enthusiastic, and motivated elementary school students into self-aware, critical thinking, and empathetic eighth graders. Students in grades 6-8 are at a unique point in their cognitive, social, and emotional development. They possess the foundational skills of reading, writing, and math and they are ready to to apply these skills in new ways, both individually and collaboratively. They are ready to think more abstractly, question more critically, and problem-solve more creatively. They are increasingly ready to look outside themselves and our community to consider a more global context. Our Middle School program and curriculum are designed to target and capitalize on this unique moment in our students’ lives. The time and attention our Middle School teachers devote to encouraging, challenging, and supporting our students as individuals and members of the larger community sets our Middle School apart. Our teachers understand and delight in the opportunities and challenges that come with shepherding children into adolescence. It is because of the individual attention our teachers pay to our students’ intellectual, spiritual, and ethical selves that they thrive. Our program includes a curriculum rich with academic, artistic, and athletic opportunities, as well as clubs, weekly community service and Meeting for Worship. We provide students with an abundance of hands-on learning experiences in and out of the classroom. A strong emphasis on study skills and personal responsibility are catalysts for success in Upper School. The adoption of 1:1 technology combines our long history of academic excellence with our commitment to innovation and preparation for a rapidly changing world.

CURRICULUM LANGUAGE ARTS The Middle School Language Arts curriculum is designed to help students increase their awareness of language as a communication tool. As students explore literature, they learn to appreciate effective writing, read for comprehension of plot, themes, and symbols, and increase their own

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FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

analytical writing skills. Grammar and vocabulary development are emphasized through written assignments. Students are working towards an understanding of the impact of reading and interpreting fiction on interpersonal skills and empathy. Works of literature are selected to push students to confront moral, political, and ethical issues as

they develop a deep appreciation for the pleasures of reading. The sixth grade curriculum includes the works The Breadwinner, Book of Short Stories, The Giver, and Fever 1793. Seventh grade required readings include The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian, Boxers & Saints, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Chike and the River. For eighth grade, works include


Animal Farm, West Side Story, Romeo and Juliet, To Kill a Mockingbird, Night, and Peter. Along with the required reading, students read short stories, folk tales, myths, and poetry. They are also required to fulfill independent reading requirements.

MATHEMATICS Students in the Middle School continue to cultivate the basics of mathematical thinking that began in Lower School. While they work on fundamental operations in regard to whole numbers, Middle School students also learn to apply those processes to fractions, decimals, percents, and integers. The foundations of algebra are explored, and students learn to make connections between algebra and geometry, between words and mathematical notation, and between theoretical and actual data. Real-life problem solving experiences help students gain confidence in their ability to predict what might be a reasonable answer. By the end of Middle School, all students will have completed Algebra I. For those students whose abilities require a faster-paced program, there is the opportunity for an accelerated curriculum.

SOCIAL STUDIES In grade 6, the Middle School social studies curriculum begins with an exploration of the Middle Ages examining the time period in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas. As the students move to the European Age of Exploration and Discovery, they have a chance to discover and explore the many factors that contribute to cultural differences. Through their readings, discussions, and activities, students gain an appreciation for the richness of these cultures and an understanding of how these groups have influenced the growth of our own culture. American history, from the beginning of European colonization to the present, is explored in grades 7 and 8. Through writing, reflecting, and role play, students are able to connect historical events to issues of racism and social justice. Attention is given to a comprehensive look at current events in an effort to better understand events in history.

SCIENCE In Middle School, students hone their observation, prediction, and interpretational skills as they proceed through their survey studies of life, physical, and earth sciences. The

program cultivates our students’ curiosity about the world around them with a “hands-on” approach to science – from conducting experiments to using our campus and nearby park as an outdoor lab. Through readings, demonstrations, field study, laboratory experiments, and reflective and analytical writing, students gain scientific knowledge and begin to understand relationships among disciplines. From astronomy to zoology, students become better able to make connections regarding human needs, actions, and environmental systems.

TECHNOLOGY Friends’ Central is a 1:1 iPad school. Each day, all Middle School students are expected to bring their own iPads to school. This allows all of our students to have a powerful tool at their fingertips. Middle School students are encouraged to see the computer as a tool for problem solving both individually and through collaboration, a device that allows for better access, sharing, and presentation of information. There is an emphasis on meeting the challenge of responsible use and what it means to be a good digital citizen. Our goal for the 1:1 program can be divided into broad categories: enhancing the curriculum, supporting

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

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MIDDLE SCHOOL CURRICULUM, continued student learning, preparing students with essential skills, and cultivating curious and caring citizens.

SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES Admission Office Athletic Service

PRIMA LINGUA, MODERN AND CLASSICAL LANGUAGES

School Store

Foreign language study in grade 6 is centered on the Prima Lingua program. During this course, students study the evolution of language and culture. In Grades 7 and 8, Middle School course offerings include French, Latin, and Spanish. Each curriculum provides a multi-media approach to language acquisition. Students gain confidence in their ability to express themselves and think in a foreign language.

Development Office

Carousel House Easter Seals FCS Pre-K Buddies Lankenau Hospital Recycling Newspaper Overbrook Preschool Rosemont Presbyterian Village Saunders House Service-thru-Art Streamwatch

COMMUNITY SERVICE Learning through service and instilling a commitment to community service is an essential part of life at Friends’ Central School. All Middle School students participate in service projects every Wednesday for about an hour and a half. As we expose our students to a broad range of projects on and off campus, the notion of a world bigger than their own becomes a reality. Our students learn to be comfortable in new and different situations, to find commonalities with people different than themselves and, most importantly, they learn that they can make a difference in the School community and beyond.

Students of Culture Yearbook

are encouraged to formulate and articulate positions on issues. Students explore the tenets of the Quaker religion, which help them to understand and appreciate the mission of the School.

CLUBS Spanish Food & Culture Softball/Baseball Student Council Board Games History/Current Events Music Appreciation Open Art Studio Yoga Anime & Manga Make Club Improv Mythology in the Movies

SPECIALS ROTATION Throughout the three years of Middle School, students rotate through courses in art, computers, drama, health, music, and Quakerism. Each of these courses adds breadth and depth to the Middle School curriculum. Through their exposure to the performing and visual arts, students are encouraged to tap into their creativity, learning to express themselves through the disciplines of art, drama, and music. They are challenged to wrestle with new ideas as they expand their knowledge base and

Literary Magazine

ACADEMIC EVALUATION The Middle School’s academic calendar is organized into semesters. During midterm conferences, advisors provide a general overview of the academic, behavioral, and social development of each student. Written reports, sent home in December, March, and June, contain a grid with letter grades and a teacher narrative. Students are evaluated in skill areas such as oral communication, reading comprehension, written work, and testing, as well as work habits and concern for the community. In addition, teachers may send home individual special reports at any time during the year in order to inform the parents of noteworthy developments in the student’s class work or behavior.

GRADE 6 OVERVIEW For students entering grade 6, Middle School is a new realm. For most, the transition includes a change from

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FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK


self-contained classrooms with a single teacher to navigating the demands of a changing schedule and increasing academic demands. Guiding students through this process is an important aspect of every grade 6 teacher’s role. Grade 6 is a year of tremendous academic growth. Students build upon strong elementary school foundations and begin to acquire new, more sophisticated skills essential to their success in Middle School and beyond. Some examples include reading for more than plot, inferring authors’ messages, and noticing literary techniques; drawing on prior knowledge and making predictions; learning the difference between working in a group and active collaboration; and developing plans to manage long term assignments.   Some highlights of grade 6 are: • Weekly community service • Clubs • Mini Courses • Study of the Renaissance with a trip to the Renaissance Faire

GRADE 7 OVERVIEW Students entering grade 7 are mastering the transition to Middle School and are working to understand and manage the responsibility that comes with increasing independence. They are beginning to ask more of themselves, taking on some leadership roles in Middle School, preparing to step into the many demands of grade 8. Grade 7 is an important year in our students’ academic development. They move from the important lessons of grade 6 to increasingly abstract and independent thinking, viewing their world and the greater world in a more analytical way. Some examples of this include working effectively within a group by helping the group to problem solve, supporting a point of view with textual evidence, using prior knowledge to ask good questions, and challenging

assumptions thoughtfully and carefully. Increasingly, grade 7 students are learning to understand their own thought processes and the way they learn. Some highlights of grade 7 are: • Weekly community service • Clubs • Mini Courses • A week at Echo Hill Outdoor School

GRADE 8 OVERVIEW Grade 8 is a critical year in our students’ preparation for Upper School and beyond. Grade 8 students are the leaders of Middle School. Their leadership skills are mentored, and they are encouraged to take leadership roles in activities. This often involves mentoring younger students. They are beginning to know themselves and to pursue their passions, using their gifts to achieve individual success and for the community. With the help of teachers, grade 8

students have learned about themselves as learners. They understand how to approach different aspects of their learning – how to study for tests, how to approach projects, how to choose group members who will complement them - to ensure future success. They know how to use the resources around them effectively – advisors, teachers, support staff, family, and friends. They understand how to safely and appropriately take risks – whether intellectual or otherwise. Some examples include creating and supporting an original argument, making increasingly sophisticated connections between and among their studies of different disciplines, being self-directed learners planning their own approaches to projects and mapping out their timelines. Some highlights of grade 8 are: • Weekly community service • Clubs • Mini Courses • Earth Force projects • The 8th Grade Showcase

ATHLETICS Because we believe in the connection between sound mind and sound body and the importance of teamwork, athletics is built into the school day and all Middle School students participate. Students may choose between interscholastic and intramural teams and physical fitness activities.

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Cross Country

Basketball

Baseball (Boys)

Field Hockey

Dance

Lacrosse

Flag Football

Physical Fitness

*Physical

Physical Fitness

Swimming

Softball (Girls)

Soccer

Wrestling

Tennis (Boys)

Tennis (Girls)

Squash

Track and Field

Fitness

Water Polo * Limited enrollment

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MIDDLE SCHOOL CURRICULUM, continued

MIDDLE SCHOOL SAMPLE SCHEDULE: GRADE 6 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

8:25

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

8:30

Language Arts

Prima Lingua

Specials

Social Studies

Language Arts

9:10

Mathematics

Science

Language Arts

Mathematics

Science

9:50

Assembly

Community Block

Mathematics

Meeting for Worship

Club Block

10:25

Recess

Recess

Recess

Recess

Recess

10:40

Social Studies

Language Arts

Service/Lunch

Social Studies

Social Studies

11:20

Specials

Mathematics

Lunch

Lunch

12:00

Lunch

Lunch

Prima Lingua

Specials

12:40

Prima Lingua

Specials

Prima Lingua

Science

Mathematics

1:15

Chorus/Advisory

Orchestra/Advisory

Social Studies

Jazz Band/Advisory

Chorus/Advisory

1:55

Athletics

Athletics

Science

Athletics

Athletics

Dismissal

Dismissal

2:30 3:10

Athletics Dismissal

Dismissal

Dismissal

• Specials include: art, computer science, health, music, and Quakerism. • The following instruments are offered as private lessons: cello, clarinet, flute, guitar, percussion, piano, trumpet, viola, and violin.

MIDDLE SCHOOL SAMPLE SCHEDULE: GRADE 8 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

8:25

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

8:30

Science

Language Arts

Mathematics

Specials

Science

9:10

Foreign Language

Social Studies

Science

Foreign Language

Social Studies

9:50

Assembly

Community Block

Foreign Language

Meeting for Worship

Club Block

10:25

Recess

Recess

Recess

Recess

Recess

Service/Lunch

10:40

Specials

Science

Language Arts

Specials

11:20

Mathematics

Foreign Language

Mathematics

Mathematics

12:00

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

12:40

Language Arts

Mathematics

Language Arts

Social Studies

Foreign Language

1:15

Chorus/Advisory

Orchestra/Advisory

Specials

Jazz Band/Advisory

Chorus/Advisory

1:55

Athletics

Athletics

Social Studies

Athletics

Athletics

Dismissal

Dismissal

2:30 3:10

Athletics Dismissal

Dismissal

Dismissal

• Specials include: art, computer science, drama, music, and woodworking. • Students choose to take two years of French, Latin or Spanish. • The following instruments are offered as private lessons: cello, clarinet, flute, guitar, percussion, piano, trumpet, viola, and violin.

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FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK


ACADEMIC PROGRAMS UPPER

9TH THROUGH 12TH GRADE

SCHOOL Friends’ Central’s Upper School curriculum provides students an exceptional college preparatory program in an atmosphere that sets the highest of academic and personal standards. The environment is one in which students are encouraged to find their own voices and pursue their own intellectual, spiritual, and ethical passions. They listen carefully to and respect the opinions of others and collaborate in group problemsolving efforts, all of which promotes independent thought, the courage to voice their opinions, and the faith that these opinions will be valued. The challenging and innovative program includes lively and rigorous classes, as well as athletic, artistic, and performance opportunities. The Friends’ Central classroom emphasizes advanced levels of critical and conceptual thinking and independent projects that require significant student research. Students also have academic-based travel opportunities to places such as France, Spain, Greece, Japan, and Peru. The adoption of 1:1 technology in the fall of 2014 combines our long history of academic excellence together with our commitment to innovation and preparation for a rapidly changing world. Leadership skills, global awareness, and self discipline are developed throughout the curriculum and in extracurricular activities such as Model United Nations, Maker education, Debate, Mock Trial, athletics, drama, music and numerous other clubs and activities. The Upper School program includes a required community service component with Upper School students and faculty spending five full days each year at agencies and organizations throughout the greater Philadelphia region.

CURRICULUM A typical Upper School schedule includes five major courses: English, world language, history, mathematics, and science. In addition, grade 9 students rotate through single-semester courses in Quakerism, information and digital literacy, and introduction to drawing. The grade 10 rotation includes concepts in visual arts, music and society, and life skills (health). Students in grades 11 and 12 have more opportunities to tailor their course selection to reflect individual interests and to select from an array of yearlong arts courses.

ENGLISH Recognizing the power of strong written and verbal communication, sophisticated reading, careful listening, and critical thinking, Friends’ Central

requires that all students take English every year. Skills are developed through a curriculum of challenging and diverse texts, both classical and contemporary. In discussion-based seminars, students learn to read carefully, listen with open minds, and speak authentically. Students hone their oral and written expression skills through repeated practice, support, and feedback. While the grade 9 and 10 courses are yearlong, students in grades 11 and 12 select from a wide variety of seminar courses in the spring, giving them the opportunity to explore an aspect of literature in depth. Students are encouraged to participate in related activities such as Ink, the Friends’ Central Literature and Arts Magazine;

Focus, the school newspaper; the Humanities Core team; and the Poetry Club. Required reading for grade 9 The Journey Begins: Becoming Ourselves (English I) includes Catcher in the Rye, Macbeth, Persepolis, The Piano Lesson, and Life of Pi. In Pursuit of Justice: The Self in the World (grade 10) works include Antigone, Things Fall Apart, Twelfth Night, Death of a Salesman, The Things They Carried, Ru, A Lesson Before Dying, Of Mice and Men, and Nickel and Dimed. Becoming American: Self Discover, Self Invention (grade 11), works include The Scarlet Letter, Their Eyes Were Watching God, Angels in America, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, and The Great Gatsby.

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UPPER SCHOOL CURRICULUM, continued Gods and Monsters: What it is to be Human (grade 12) required reading includes Beloved, Frankenstein, The Metamorphosis, Hamlet, Arcadia, Wit, and Oryx and Crake. In the spring, students in grades 11 and 12 select from a wide variety of seminar courses, giving students the opportunity to explore an aspect of literature in depth. A full year seminar, Writers Workshop, is available to students in grades 11 and 12. Interested students may participate in a number of related clubs or projects such as Ink, Literature and Arts Magazine, the Humanities Core team, and the Poetry Club.

HISTORY An appreciation of historical context is central to understanding the world around us. Friends’ Central’s study of history is an exploration of human experience: the ways diverse peoples have differed in their ideas, institutions, and cultural practices, the ways experiences vary by period and nationality and

social circumstances, and the ways people(s) have struggled with each other. We ask our students to make connections between the past and the world they now inhabit and to ponder the question – how did we get this way? All Upper School students take World History in grade 9 and American History in grade 11. Most students also take Twentieth Century Global History in grade 10, and virtually all choose from a broad range of history electives in grade 12. Electives include American Architectural History, Capitalism and Consumption, Women in 20th Century America, Resistance and Reconciliation, Peace Studies, Introduction to Philosophy, and Modern Africa (advanced). Our history courses emphasize the analysis of primary sources in the development of critical thinking and original argument. Students in grade 11 complete a capstone, primary source-based piece of original research as part of the American History course. Interested students may also join clubs like Model United Nations, the Debate Team, and

Mock Trial, where knowledge and a deep understanding of the origins of current events is essential.

MATHEMATICS Friends’ Central’s math department combines a belief in the ability of our students to rise to intellectual challenges and a program that offers a high degree of flexibility in course selection and sequence. For example, students can design a sequence that includes a year of calculus without doing additional summer work. More advanced students have the opportunity to progress through the third level of calculus within our curriculum. Friends’ Central facilitates independent study or enrollment in math classes at nearby colleges and universities for students who exceed the third level of calculus. All students are required to take three math courses; the majority take one each year. Most classes have both a regular and an advanced level offered. Some students choose to accelerate by taking a summer course. A typical

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR ACADEMIC PROGRAMS, VISIT FRIENDSCENTRAL.ORG/UPPER-SCHOOL-CURRICULUM

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FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK


Upper School path includes algebra II, precalculus, and calculus. While many students take two years of calculus before graduating, others choose statistics over a second year of calculus. We have an active math team, and many students compete in national mathematics competitions.

performing arts. We encourage students to discover their individual creative voices and to collaborate within ensembles – furthering the acquisition of unique skills, tools, and vocabulary. Students emerge confident, capable, curious, and expressive from their interactive arts experiences at FCS.

SCIENCE

Community service at Friends’ Central is part of the School’s identity, culture, and tradition. We believe that caring for our school, local, and global communities serves the guiding testimonies of stewardship, community, peace, and integrity. Service work creates strong individual and institutional relationships, which in turn strengthen our community and each student’s sense of self-worth. Upper School students engage in service learning in many ways, through outreach to communities outside our school, within our school community, and through our Upper School student-run Service Committee.

The Friends’ Central science curriculum strives to foster a deep appreciation for the meaning and relevance of science, while cultivating the development of independent learners skilled in critical thinking and original analysis. The sequence begins with Integrated Physical and Biological Sciences, a course taken by all students in grade 9. Developed by Friends’ Central teachers, this distinctive course explores physics, chemistry, and biology. Students learn the process of gathering, organizing, and interpreting scientific data in regular laboratory investigations. In the following years, students enroll in regular and advanced chemistry, biology, and physics classes, which are available to students in grades 10, 11 and 12. Students passionate about science may choose to take more than one science course and can pursue a second level of advanced chemistry, biology, and physics. Each class has an active and integrated lab program. Interested students in all grades may participate in the Distinguished Visiting Scientist Program over the course of the year. This program offers a regular seminar meeting for instruction and dialogue, visits and conversation with the visiting scientist and summer travel to see scientists at work in the laboratory or the field.

ARTS The Friends’ Central Arts Department offers diverse courses and extracurricular activities encompassing visual and

SERVICE LEARNING

• Service Days During the year, time is set aside for work in areas of social concern with the focus on community service. During a three-day program in November and a two-day program in May, Upper School students volunteer at organizations such as the Philabundance, Philadelphia Public and charter schools, and the John Heinz Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum. • Campus Service Faculty and students in the Upper and Middle Schools participate in an on- campus work program designed to foster responsibility, cooperation, teamwork, and self-discipline. Students are assigned to jobs for semester intervals, with faculty and staff supervision. This program allows students to contribute to the well-being of the entire school community.

• Service Committee The long-standing student-run Service Committee gives students with a passion for service the opportunity to lead the Upper School community in endeavors that help to train our focus on those who are on the margins of our society. These events have included fundraisers such as a smoothie sale to benefit AIDS Fund, a car wash to benefit Aid for Friends, food and clothing drives, and selling pies for MANNA.

ADVISING AND EVALUATION When students enter the Upper School, they are assigned to homerooms, and their homeroom teachers serve as their advisors. The advisors monitor student progress, provide counsel when necessary, help with course selection, and communicate with parents on a regular basis. The Upper School functions on a semester system, and an academic report is sent home at the end of each semester. Letter grades are given for each course in the areas of effectiveness in oral and written communication and success in mastering course content. Mid-semester reports keep parents and advisors up to date on academic progress.

COLLEGE COUNSELING Friends’ Central provides highly personalized, expert college admissions counseling to students and their families. Beginning in grade 11, college counselors meet individually with students and their parents to guide families through the college admission process. These meetings continue throughout the junior and senior year. Each year, representatives from approximately 80 colleges and universities visit our campus to meet students and answer questions about their schools.

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

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ACADEMIC COURSES AT A GLANCE GRADE 9 Arts

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

Chorus

Chorus

Chorus

Chorus

Instrumental Ensemble

Instrumental Ensemble

Instrumental Ensemble

Instrumental Ensemble

Students in grades 9-12 choose from a wide range of art elective courses, including Concepts in Visual Art, Music Composition, Musical Theater, Introduction to Stage Acting, Architectural Drawing & Model Making, Photography, Wearable Art, Introduction to Drawing, and many more. Visit friendscentral.org/upper-school-curriculum for a complete listing of art electives.

English

English I: The Journey Begins: Becoming Ourselves

English II: In Pursuit of English III: Becoming American English IV: Gods & Monsters: Justice: The Self in the World Self Discovery, Self Invention What Does it Mean to be Human? Writers’ Workshop Writers’ Workshop Visit friendscentral.org/upper-school-curriculum for a complete listing of Spring English Seminars for grades 11 & 12. Spring Seminars Spring Seminars

World Languages French

History

French

French

French

Latin

Latin

Latin

Latin

Spanish

Spanish Global History: WWI to the Present

Spanish

Spanish

World History (req’d)

American History (required)

Students in grades 11 & 12 choose from a wide range of history elective courses, including Modern European History Advanced, Capitalism & Consumption, History of World Architecture Advanced, Quaker History, Women in 20th Century America, The 1960s: America Re-imagined, Modern Chinese History, Modern Africa Advanced, Introduction to Philosophy, and International Relations. Visit friendscentral.org/upper-school-curriculum for a complete listing of history electives.

Mathematics

Algebra I

Geometry

Geometry

Geometry Adv.

Algebra II Adv.

Algebra II or Algebra II Adv. Precalculus Adv.

Precalculus Adv.

Calculus I Adv.

Geometry Adv.

Algebra II or Algebra II Adv. Precalculus or Precalculus Adv.

Precalculus or Precalculus Adv.

Calculus

Calculus I or I Adv.

Calculus I or I Adv.

Calculus II Adv.

Calculus II Adv.

Statistics or Statistics Adv.

Statistics or Statistics Adv.

Intro. to Economics Calculus III: Topics & Linear Algebra

Intro. to Economics

Science

Integrated Physical and Biological Sciences

Integrated Physical and Biological Sciences Biology I

Calculus

Biology I or I Adv.

Biology I or I Adv.

Chemistry I or I Adv.

Biology II Adv.

Chemistry I or I Adv.

Chemistry II Adv.

Botany

Physics I Adv.

Physics I or I Adv.

Chemistry I or I Adv.

Physics II Adv.

Chemistry II Adv. Physics I Adv. Physics II Adv.

Electives

Computer Science I: Web

Computer Science I: Web

Computer Science I: Web

Computer Science II: Application

Computer Science II: Application

Media Studies

Media Studies

STEAM (non-credit)

Sexuality and Society STEAM (non-credit)

Non-Dept. Courses

Introduction to Computer Science Quaker Faith & Practice

Wellness Course (Required) 16

Human Sexuality

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

Introduction to Computer Science Computer Science: Data Visualizations Computer Science: Interactive Installations Computer Science: Models & Simulations Health

Introduction to Computer Science Computer Science: Data Visualizations Computer Science: Interactive Installations Computer Science: Models & Simulations

Introduction to Computer Science Computer Science: Data Visualizations Computer Science: Interactive Installations Computer Science: Models & Simulations Sexuality & Society


UPPER SCHOOL CURRICULUM, continued

ATHLETICS Friends’ Central’s athletic program is considered among the best in the Philadelphia area. We are a leading program in the Friends Schools League (FSL) and Pennsylvania Independent Schools Athletic Association (PAISAA). We provide opportunities for leadership, elite competition, and all levels of participation. Students are required to participate on an athletic team during four (out of a total of twelve possible) seasons while in the Upper School. During seasons when students are not participating in athletics, they will be enrolled in physical education, which meets two or three times in our scheduling cycle. As an alternative to the physical education curriculum, students may take Lifeguarding. This is a yearlong offering that meets three times in our scheduling cycle during the school day.

FALL BOYS

GIRLS

COED

WINTER

SPRING

Cross Country

Basketball

Baseball

Soccer

Squash

Lacrosse

Indoor Track

Tennis

Swimming

Track & Field

Cross Country

Basketball

Lacrosse

Field Hockey

Squash

Softball

Soccer

Indoor Track

Track & Field

Tennis

Swimming

Water Polo

Wrestling

Golf

Cheerleading Dance

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

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COLLEGE STATISTICS

SAT—2014-2016 3 YEAR AVERAGE 648 Critical Reading / 634 Math / 649 Writing

NATIONAL MERIT

For the Classes of 2014 – 2016, 20% of the graduates attained the distinction of National Merit finalist, semifinalist, or commended student. Five of these students were awarded Merit Scholarships.

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL SCHOOL – COLLEGE CHOICES 2012-2016 University of Alabama Albright College American University (2) Amherst College Arcadia University (3) Arizona State University College of the Atlantic Babson College Barnard College (3) Bates College (2) Boston University (7) Bowdoin College (2) Brandeis University Brown University (10) Bryn Mawr College (5) Bucknell University (9) University of California, Berkeley (3) California University of PA Carnegie Mellon University (3) Case Western Reserve University College of Charleston Chestnut Hill College University of Chicago Clark University Colby College (2) University of Colorado Boulder (2) Columbia University (2) Cornell University (6) Dartmouth College University of Delaware (7) Denison University University of Denver Dickinson College (5) Drexel University (10) Duke University (2) Duquesne University (4) Earlham College (2)

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FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

East Stroudsburg University of PA Elizabethtown College (3) Elon University Emerson College Emory University (10) Endicott College Eugene Lang College (2) University of Findlay Florida Southern College Fordham University Franklin & Marshall (5) George Mason University George Washington University (18) Georgia Institute of Technology Gettysburg College Goucher College Hamilton College (4) Haverford College (9) High Point University Hobart & William Smith Colleges (2) Hofstra University Howard University Indiana University Bloomington Indiana University of PA (2) Johns Hopkins University (3) Kenyon College Lafayette College (5) Lehigh University (5) Loyola Marymount University Loyola University Maryland (2) Macalester College (3) Maryland Institute College of Art University of Maryland (6) Massachusetts Maritime Academy McDaniel College McGill University University of Miami (8)

University of Michigan (3) Middlebury College Mount Holyoke College Muhlenberg College (6) University of New Haven New York University (10) Niagara University University of North Carolina at Wilmington (2) Northeastern University (6) Northwestern University Oberlin College (3) Occidental College (3) Orange Coast College Pace University (2) Parsons School of Design (3) Penn State University (11) University of Pennsylvania (42) Pepperdine University Philadelphia University (2) University of Pittsburgh (16) Pomona College (4) Pratt Institute Princeton University (3) Quinnipiac University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (2) Rhode Island School of Design Rhodes College University of Richmond (4) Rochester Institute of Technology (2) University of Rochester (3) Saint Joseph’s University (2) Sarah Lawrence College (2) Univ. of the Sciences in Philadelphia University of Scranton Scripps College Shippensburg University of PA (2) Skidmore College

University of South Carolina (2) Southeast Missouri State University University of Southern California (2) St. John’s University (2) St. Thomas Aquinas College Stanford University Swarthmore College (4) Syracuse University (6) Temple University (10) University of Toledo Towson University Trinity College (CT) Tufts University (7) Tulane University (9) Union College (8) Ursinus College (4) Vanderbilt University Vassar College (5) University of Vermont (2) Villanova University University of Virginia (3) Virginia State University Wagner College Wake Forest University (2) Washington Univ. in St. Louis (12) Wesleyan University (7) West Chester University (6) West Virginia University Wheaton College (2) Whittier College Widener University College of William & Mary Williams College University of Wisconsin-Madison (2) The College of Wooster Worcester Polytechnic Institute (2) Yale University (6)


LIFE AT

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL SCHOOL

GUIDELINES Friends’ Central School is known not only for our students’ academic achievements and their success in athletic and extracurricular activities but also for their conduct at school and in the community. Life at Friends’ Central teaches students to respect the thoughts and feelings of others. We expect parents to help support our principles and guidelines. In accordance with the Friends’ belief in simplicity and moderation, students are expected to dress simply, neatly, and comfortably in clothing appropriate to their ages and to all the activities of the school day. Other specific School policies are outlined in the School handbook and on the Friends’ Central School website.

ACADEMIC REPORTING Friends’ Central School encourages the involvement of all parents and guardians in the education of their children. Through report cards and conferences, the faculty seeks to keep families apprised of academic achievement and social growth and development. In the case of divorced parents, the School believes that it is in the interest of every child to have both parents follow their child’s educational progress. Therefore, the School typically sends reports to both parents and honors all legitimate requests by parents for reports on their children.

ARRIVAL All Middle and Upper School students report to their homerooms by 8:25 am. Lower School students may arrive on campus after 7:30 am. Supervision is provided on the playgrounds or, in case of inclement weather, in the gymnasium until the bell rings at 8:30 am, at which time the students report to their classrooms.

DISMISSAL Half-day nursery school and pre-kindergarten students are dismissed at 12:00 noon. Full-day nursery school and pre-kindergarten students, along with all other Lower School children, are dismissed at 2:50 pm. Middle School students are dismissed at 3:10 pm, except when they are involved in an athletic event, an extracurricular activity, or a meeting with a teacher. Upper School students are dismissed after sports practice or at the end of classes at 3:10 pm on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday. On Tuesday, students are dismissed at 2:35 pm for clubs and to meet with faculty during their office hour time. On Friday, students are dismissed at 2:35 pm if they are not participating on a team.

HEALTH Friends’ Central has a full-time registered nurse on each campus, and a certified athletic trainer is present on the City Avenue campus every afternoon. In addition, two school psychologists are available to work with children, parents, and teachers concerning psycho-educational issues. Counseling is free of charge.

ATHLETICS Students in grades 6 through 8 may participate in interscholastic sporting events. Athletic practices are held during the last period of the school day and games are scheduled after 3:10 pm, usually on Mondays or Wednesdays. Upper School students involved in interscholastic sports report for practice at 3:30 pm. Athletic schedules, which state the time and location of games and meets, are available on the FCS website.

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

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LIFE AT FRIENDS’ CENTRAL SCHOOL, continued

AQUATICS PROGRAM Friends’ Central Aquatics (FCA) is designed to provide swim instruction and swim team experience for students of all ages in the Shimada Athletic Center on the City Avenue campus. Detailed information regarding Friends’ Central Aquatics can be found at www.swimfca.org.

SUMMER PROGRAMS Friends’ Central has offered summer learning and recreational activities since 1929. The camp programs and optional extended day programs on the Lower School and City Avenue campuses are all directed by Friends’ Central faculty chosen for their experience in working with children. The City Avenue campus allows older children to choose directed programs in tennis, drama, art, and other specialized camps and houses a summer school for students in grades 7 through 12. Since 1989, Friends’ Central’s Basketball, Reading, and Math Clinic has offered combined athletic and academic activities to Middle and Upper School students.

AUXILIARY SERVICES Detailed information regarding the following can be found on the Friends’ Central website at www.friendscentral.org/aux. • Extended Day Program — Lower School & Middle School Created to provide quality childcare for families who need after-school services. The Lower School program runs daily from 2:50 pm to 6:00 pm and is also available on parent conference days. The Middle School program runs daily from 3:30 pm to 6:00 pm. • After-School Clubs — Lower School The Lower School offers a vibrant After-School Clubs program for students in Kindergarten through grade 5. Featuring exciting activities from Textile Design and Stop-Motion Animation to Video Game Design, Out of the Actor’s Toolbox, and Super Sports, After-School Clubs provide many opportunities to learn a new skill or nurture a budding passion. Clubs take place from 3:00-4:00 pm. • Food Service In Lower School, students may either bring lunches from home or choose to participate in our school lunch program. In Middle and Upper School, students may purchase the yearly contract plan, pay with cash daily, use our debit system, or bring their lunches from home. Daily breakfast and snacks are also available. • Instrumental Music Lessons Friends’ Central students are offered the opportunity to take private music instruction on both the Lower School and City Avenue campuses. Violin, viola, and cello lessons are available to students in grade 2. In grade 3, students may choose piano as well. Brass and woodwinds are added to the list of choices in grades 4 and 5. Once students move to the City Avenue campus, additional opportunities exist to study guitar and percussion instruments or to take voice lessons. • Transportation Friends’ Central offers convenient door-to-door transportation for students in Philadelphia and surrounding suburban areas. This service is available for both campus locations and includes the regular morning and afternoon busing of students, shuttle service between campuses, and late bus transportation at 5:30 pm 20

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK


daily. Free shuttle service from the Overbrook Train Station to the City Avenue campus is also available each morning and afternoon. Friends’ Central’s bus service is staffed by experienced and fully qualified drivers. Every effort is made to consider each transportation need in order to best serve riders in all areas. • School Store Students and adults may purchase supplies, clothing, and gift items at the School Store on the City Avenue campus. Store hours are listed in the School directory and on the Friends’ Central School website.

THE LARGER COMMUNITY HOME AND SCHOOL ASSOCIATION The purpose of the Home and School Association (HSA) is to acquaint parents with the School’s educational philosophy and purpose, to enlist parents’ help in carrying out these goals, and to provide a forum for parents and faculty to work together for the students’ best interests. HSA strives to keep parents informed of School events and to provide opportunities for parents to get to know one another and our School. In addition to hosting a reception for parents new to the School, there are grade-level gatherings, class dinners, and planned activities that provide opportunities for interaction with the faculty and with other parents. Yearly dues are $30 per child. All parents are encouraged to attend HSA meetings. Dates for all divisional meetings are listed in the yearly calendar sent to families at the start of the school year and updated on the website (www.friendscentral.org/parents).

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL SCHOOL ALUMNI/AE ASSOCIATION From its beginning as the Old Pupils’ Association in 1902, the Alumni/ae Association of Friends’ Central School has dedicated itself to keeping alumni/ae aware of School activities and to continuing friendships begun in the classroom, in the schoolyard, in the arts program, and on the athletic fields. Friends’ Central holds several yearly events for its over 3,500 alumni/ae, including Reunion, young alumni/ae gatherings, Baby Day (a morning for alumni/ae and their young children), and regional gettogethers. Our Alumni/ae Association keeps in touch with alumni/ae via various publications, such as Quaker Works – the Magazine of Friends’ Central School, e-newsletters, Facebook, and Twitter. A 20-member alumni/ae board advises Friends’ Central on appropriate programs to encourage alumni/ae interest in the School.

THE FRIENDS’ CENTRAL FUND Annual gifts to the Friends’ Central Fund are the School’s primary fundraising activity, essential because it supports the daily operations of the School. Like every independent school, Friends’ Central’s tuition does not cover the full cost of educating our students. Gifts to the Friends’ Central Fund provide the ability to cover a substantial portion of the shortfall. All members of the School community — parents, alumni/ae, parents of alumni/ae, trustees, grandparents, and friends — are asked to support the Friends’ Central Fund. The unrestricted monies raised through annual gifts to this Fund allow the School to have the flexibility to recruit and retain its excellent faculty, to offer programs that enhance the students’ educational experience, and to maintain campus facilities. FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

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TUITION

AND FINANCIAL AID TUITION 2016–2017 Grades 9-12

$34,500

Grades 6-8

$30,750

Grades 2-5

$26,000

Grade 1

$23,000

Kindergarten

$23,000

Pre-kindergarten

$18,000

Nursery School

$18,000

Tuition may be paid in one of the following ways: • Full tuition, minus 1% discount, payable on or before June 15. • Full tuition due and payable on or before July 15. • Payment of two-thirds of the tuition on or before July 15 and the remaining one-third of the tuition on or before January 2. • 10 monthly payments through FACTS, with the first payment due to them by April 30. No other extended payment plans are permitted. No student may attend school if his or her tuition has not been paid.

FINANCIAL AID PROGRAM The request for financial aid by new students is separate from the admission process and does not affect the student’s application for admission to the School. Financial aid grants are awarded to students of all grade levels (except Nursery) and are decided on the basis of need and availability of funds. For the 2015-2016 academic year, Friends’ Central provided financial assistance to 32 percent of its students in the amount of approximately $5 million. Grants ranged from $1,000 to nearly full tuition, with the average grant being approximately $17,000. It is important that each family assume primary responsibility for financing their student’s education. The School expects that families who enroll without receiving financial aid will continue to support their child’s education at Friends’ Central without assistance. However, when unforeseen circumstances arise to significantly change a currently enrolled family’s financial situation, an application for financial aid can be made. Students must be enrolled for a minimum of two years in order to be eligible to apply for financial aid. Families must explore personal resources before applying to the School for funds. However, with the assistance of the Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, foundations, alumni/ae, parents, and friends, Friends’ Central School is able to offer financial aid to deserving students who demonstrate financial need.

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FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK


HOW TO APPLY FOR FINANCIAL AID 1. Note your intention to apply for financial aid on the online inquiry form. 2. In the fall, parents who are applying for financial aid must complete the Parent Financial Statement available at sss.nais.org. Both parents and their current spouses, if any, must complete this form using information from their most recent tax returns. In the case of divorce or separation, it is the responsibility of the custodial parent to ask the noncustodial parent to fill out the necessary forms. If information is not received from all parents, the Financial Aid Committee will be unable to award a grant to the student. 3. In addition to the Personal Financial Statement, parents must submit a copy of their most recent federal tax return filed with the IRS (Form 1040 and all schedules) and Wage and Tax Statements (Form W-2). This information should be uploaded to their SSS account. 4. In most cases, financial aid decisions are made by the Financial Aid Committee at the same time as the offer of admission. The information families provide is kept in strictest confidence. Substantial delay in providing the required information may jeopardize a student’s chance of receiving an award.

WYNNEFIELD COMMUNITY SCHOLAR PROGRAM The Wynnefield Community Scholar Program is an endowed scholarship in memory of Elizabeth Whereat ’43. The program is for new students entering grades 5 through 9 who reside in the 19131 and 19139 postal zip code zones. This need-based scholarship is awarded to a student whose performance on a competitive scholarship exam, previous school record, and good citizenship qualify that student for this honor. The scholarship is renewable each year, as long as the student maintains good citizenship and academic standing and financial need remains. Interested families can access details on how to apply at www.friendscentral.org/wynnefield-scholar. Please note that applications and supporting materials for the scholarship must be received by November 1, 2016. Friends’ Central School admits students of any race, color, religion, sexual orientation, or national or ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the School. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sexual orientation, or national or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational policies, admission policies, financial aid, and athletic and other School-administered programs.

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

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ADMISSION

ALL GRADES Friends’ Central School admits the best-qualified applicants without regard to religious, national, or racial background. When selecting applicants, the Admission Committee considers a number of factors. In addition to admission testing and a classroom visit, the Committee takes into account the student’s ability to handle academically challenging work and to show good citizenship. In order to be considered in the first round of decisions, applications for the 2017-2018 school year must be submitted by December 15. Students who complete all subsequent required parts of the admission process by January 15, 2017 will receive an admission decision before February 1, 2017. The enrollment deadline is March 1, 2017. Late applicants will continue to be considered based on availability of space after February 1, 2017 and will receive an admission decision approximately two weeks after the completion of all parts of the admission process.

HOW TO APPLY FOR ADMISSION The steps needed to complete the application process depend on the child’s grade level. Please note that Friends’ Central has an age cutoff date of August 31.

NURSERY SCHOOL 1. Complete the application form online and submit it along with the $50 application fee. 2. Schedule a parent interview and tour with the Lower School Admission Office. 3. Schedule a one-hour visit for your child. This visit gives our teachers the opportunity to observe your child in our educational setting. 4. Submit the confidential teacher recommendation form to your child’s current teacher, where applicable (available online at www.friendscentral.org or from the Admission Office). Request that this form be returned directly to Friends’ Central School. 5. All steps in the admission process must be completed by January 15, 2017.

PRE-KINDERGARTEN 1. Complete the application form online and submit it along with the $50 application fee. 2. Schedule a parent interview and tour with the Lower School Admission Office. 3. Schedule a one-hour visit for your child. This visit gives our teachers the opportunity to observe your child in our educational setting. 4. Submit the confidential teacher recommendation form to your child’s current teacher, where applicable (available online at www.friendscentral.org or from the Admission Office). Request that this form be returned directly to Friends’ Central School. 5. Additional testing may be required for those applicants for whom the Admission Committee feels there is insufficient information upon which to base a decision. In such cases, the Committee may request that parents make arrangements to have the student take the WPPSI-IV (Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence). The Admission Office will provide more information if needed. 6. All steps in the admission process must be completed by January 15, 2017. 24

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK


KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 5 1. Complete the application form online and submit it along with the $50 application fee. 2. Schedule a parent interview and tour with the Lower School Admission Office. 3. Schedule a one-hour visit for students who are applying for Kindergarten, a half-day visit for students who are applying for grades 1, 2, and 3, and a full-day visit for those students who are applying for grades 4-5. 4. Submit the confidential teacher recommendation form to your child’s current teacher (available from the Admission Office or online at www.friendscentral.org). Request that this form be returned directly to Friends’ Central School. 5. Submit the transcript request card to your child’s current school (grades 2-5). The official transcript should include grades from the previous school year and at least one marking period of the current school year, as well as the most recent set of standardized test scores. 6. Arrange for your child to take the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISCIV). Depending on the student’s age, the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI-IV) may be substituted. These tests are not administered by Friends’ Central School and must be scheduled with a licensed psychologist who is trained to administer these tests. The Admission Office can assist you in locating a tester in your area. If your child has taken either of these tests within the past year, those results may be acceptable. For students applying to grade 6, the Independent School Entrance Exam (administered by the Educational Records Bureau) is also acceptable. 7. All steps in the admission process must be completed by January 15, 2017.

GRADES 6 THROUGH 12 1. Complete the application form online and submit it along with the $50 application fee. 2. Schedule a parent interview/tour and a full-day student visit for your child. Students will be asked to complete a writing sample during their visit. 3. Arrange for your child to take either the Independent School Entrance Exam (administered by the Educational Records Bureau) or the Secondary School Admission Test (administered by the Secondary School Admission Test Board). Registration forms for these tests are available online at erblearn.org (ISEE) or ssat.org (SSAT). The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV) is also acceptable for grades 6–12. In certain instances, an SAT, PSAT, or Otis Lennon score is acceptable. 4. Request that Friends’ Central receive from your child’s current school at least one set of standardized test scores, along with a copy of your child’s grades from the previous school year and from at least one current marking period. 5. Request that your child’s current English and mathematics teachers complete and return, directly to Friends’ Central School, the confidential teacher recommendation forms. These forms are available online at www.friendscentral.org. 6. All steps in the admission process must be completed by January 15, 2017.

FRIENDS’ CENTRAL 2016 – 2017 A CLOSER LOOK

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FRIENDS’ CENTRAL SCHOOL Lower School Nursery School through Grade 5 228 Old Gulph Road Wynnewood, PA 19096-1019 610-642-1018 610-642-6983 (fax) Middle and Upper School Grades 6 through 12 1101 City Avenue Wynnewood, PA 19096-3418 610-645-5032 610-658-5644 (fax) www.friendscentral.org

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A Closer Look 2017  
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