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A CLoser Look 2013 – 2014 We believe in kindness, teach compassion, encourage generosity of spirit, and demand Academic Excellence.

F r i e n d s’ C e n t r a l Sc h o o l

Philos oph y | Cou r s e of fe rings | Life at F rie n ds ’ C e n tr a l | In for m ation for Pa r e n t s


The Friends’ Central School

Board of Trustees

Table of Contents

Robert Gassel ’69, Clerk

George Elser

Suzanne Morrison

Karen Horikawa ’72, Vice Clerk

Wilson Felter

James Murdock ’73

Christine Gaspar ’70

Ann Satterthwaite

Edward Grinspan

Joanna Haab Schoff ’51 (Trustee Emerita)

Melissa Neubauer Anderson

1 The Friends’ Central school Philosophy

Peter Arfaa (Trustee Emeritus)

Kent Julye

2 At the Heart of

Barbara Cohen (Trustee Emerita)

Michael Kelly

3 Lower School

Caroline Cohen

Hillard Madway (Trustee Emeritus)

Friends’ Central School

Curriculum

Kenneth Dunn

Matthew Levitties ’85

Philip E. Scott ’73 Joy Takahashi

Philosophy

S

ince its establishment in 1845 by the Religious Society of Friends, Friends’ Central School, a coeducational college preparatory day school for preschool through 12th grades, has been guided by Quaker testimonies of simplicity, peace, integrity, community, and equality. Underlying all facets of

School life is the belief that “there is that of God in everyone.” Meeting for Worship is central, providing time for connections among members of the community and between individuals and their spiritual sources. Peaceful resolution of conflicts, seeking truth, and collaborative process are key aspects of a Friends’ Central education.

6 Middle School

Friends’ Central offers rigorous and varied educational experiences in

Curriculum

academics, the arts, and athletics, helping our students realize their potentials

10 Upper School

and achieve on the highest levels possible. We encourage trial and error,

15 Life at Friends’

curriculum. We strive to balance competence in using sophisticated technology

critical thinking and questioning, and intellectual courage in all areas of our

Curriculum

Central school

18 Tuition and

Financial Aid

20 Admission

Calendar 2013–2014

with the richness of a humanistic education. Students’ individual interests are encouraged and supported while essential skills are carefully honed.

Tuesday, September 3

Orientation Day

Wednesday, September 4

First Day of School

We intentionally seek a wide spectrum of diversity in our School community. We respect unreservedly that diversity and strive to enhance and support it.

Friday, October 11– Monday, October 14 Wednesday, November 27– Friday, November 29 Saturday, December 21– Sunday, January 5

Columbus Day, No Classes Thanksgiving Break Winter Break (classes resume on Monday, January 6)

Diversity influences how we teach, learn, and communicate. It enriches the community and furthers understanding that each human life is intrinsically valuable and interrelated, one with another. We realize that our students have instant access to world events, and we help them generate a social conscience in their actions within the community as well as in the wider world. We want them to develop compassion for fellow human beings across national boundaries and to value the environment.

Monday, January 20

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, No Classes

Monday, February 17

Presidents’ Day, No Classes

learning provides us with the awareness that we, to whom much has been

Friday, March 21– Monday, March 31

Spring Break (classes resume on Tuesday, April 1)

given, can make a difference both locally and globally.

Monday, May 28

Memorial Day, No Classes

Friday, June 6

Last Day of School

Saturday, June 7

Commencement

Accordingly, there are many opportunities for service, where experiential

We believe that a friendly, nurturing, and kind school environment fosters true scholarship and helps students develop strong ethical values. In a wellordered community, adults model behavior for students and encourage inner discipline. In such an environment, it is our strong belief that students will grow into contributing, optimistic members of society who will have a positive impact on human life.

Friends’ Central 2011 2013 – 2014 2012 Curriculum Guide

1


AT The heart of

Academic Programs LOWER

friends’ central school

SCHOOL

Nursery school

Two full-time, highly qualified teachers guide our youngest students through their first steps in the Friends’ Central School community. Their world is their classroom, yet all around them circles the fascinating life of the Lower School. Three-year-olds play on their own playground, yet also take “fieldtrips” to explore the woods, ponds, and playgrounds of our 18-acre campus. In the classroom they investigate their world through play, while learning thematically with an integrated approach to language arts, math, and social studies. Their experience is further enriched by visits to the Lower School art, music, science, and Spanish classrooms as well as regular visits to the gym and Lower School library.

PRE-K THROUGH 5TH GRADE

The Lower School teaches beginning skills in reading, writing, and mathematics and guides students through a sequence of more advanced levels of competence and understanding. Along with decoding skills in reading, children learn to find pleasure and information in books, to process what they read, and to think critically. The math curriculum emphasizes problem solving, estimation, spatial relationships, and computation. Manipulatives, everyday objects, and calculators are used along with worksheets. Children also learn about the physical world and the interdependence of people. The Lower School has a flexible structure so that a child can progress at his/her own developmental rate, cooperating with, rather than competing against, others. There is time to experience the joy of creating in all areas including music, drama, and art. Cultivating a child’s social awareness and nurturing individual growth are essential to the program. The curriculum for each grade includes language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, art, computer instruction, library skills, music, and physical education. Spanish is introduced in nursery school and continues throughout the Lower School years. Instrumental music lessons, early morning math club, chess club, and Saturday morning basketball and swimming complement the Lower School program.

Meeting for Worship Meeting for Worship, the Quaker religious service, is an integral part of student life at Friends’ Central School. As each division comes together in the manner of Friends, students consider issues of integrity, responsibility, conflict, loss, and growth. In listening to the ministrations of students and faculty members alike, participants are offered an opportunity for reflection on issues related to their own personal development.

Coeducation Friends’ Central has been educating boys and girls in a coeducational setting for more than a century and a half. The School is founded on the belief that coeducation provides the best environment for learning. The faculty does recognize, however, that girls and boys may learn differently. Therefore, our teachers employ a variety of teaching methods to make sure that the needs of all of our students are being met and that opportunities are open to every Friends’ Central student.

Diversity Friends’ Central School is committed to the idea of building a community of students and faculty of different racial, religious, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds. The School’s multicultural curriculum is designed to create an environment of respect for the individual where the open exchange of ideas is appreciated and encouraged. The diversity of our community enhances the academic experience as students and faculty bring their personal perspectives on global issues to class discussions. Because this message of respect for the individual and acceptance of divergent viewpoints is present in the curriculum, encouraged in interpersonal interactions, and ever-present in Meetings

Language Arts

for Worship, these ideals are an integral part of the fabric of the Friends’

The Lower School faculty uses a variety of techniques to teach reading, including whole language, phonics, sight, and kinesthetic approaches. Children learn to read for information, gain criticalthinking skills, and develop an appreciation for the pleasures of reading. Books are chosen to complement classroom themes, and individual selections are tailored to the level and interest of the child. In the early grades, students are

Central community.

2

Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

Curriculum encouraged to use “inventive” spelling in their writing in an effort to encourage the flow of ideas; however, formal spelling programs begin in grade 1. The writing process is taught beginning in pre-kindergarten as students learn to write, edit, and rewrite their work. Creative and expository writing, along with research skills are emphasized as students progress through the grades. Two reading specialists are available to provide individual support for students

as the need arises. This auxiliary reading program begins in kindergarten with an emphasis on phonemic awareness to enhance development of skills needed for early reading. In grades 1 and 2, all students receive additional instruction in word patterns and decoding skills from the reading specialist. When appropriate, reading support is offered for students from kindergarten through Grade 5 in word recognition skills as well as fluency and comprehension. Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

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Lower School Curriculum, continued

Mathematics Throughout the Lower School, a sequential mathematics program provides an “applications-oriented” approach that helps students understand the many ways in which math comes into play in their daily lives. Students gain the ability to gather, organize, and interpret data as well as develop basic computation skills. Manipulatives are used extensively in the early grades to ensure a thorough understanding of basic concepts before moving to symbolic and abstract levels. Working in small groups, students expand and enrich their experiences through the use of math games and cooperative math activities. Cooperative problem-solving is a thread that runs throughout the curriculum and encourages students to use diverse approaches to solve mathematical problems.

4

Recent All-School Themes Journeys Renaissance World Into the Woods Islands The Arts Latin America The Mediterranean World Literary Places Bright Ideas Flight Rivers The Middle Ages

Grade-Level Spring Themes Pre-k

Insects/Space

Kindergarten

World Tour

Grade 1

Asia

Social Studies

Grade 2

Africa

Friends’ Central’s Lower School is strongly committed to thematic education, a holistic approach that unifies diverse subject matter around a central theme. This creates a depth of interest and understanding often missing in other approaches. A new Lower School fall theme is chosen each year and is followed by grade-level themes in the spring semester. Topics are selected to encourage students to recognize and appreciate the racial, religious, and ethnic diversity of the world. Friends’ Central prides itself on its multicultural approach to education.

Grade 3

Native Americans

Grade 4

USA—Land of Diversity

Grade 5

Ancient Civilizations

Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

Science From nursery school to grade 5, all students have regularly scheduled classes in the science lab. A hands-on, experiential approach is used as students cover a variety of disciplines including biology, botany, and the basic principles of chemistry and physics. Children are encouraged to use their acquired knowledge to solve real-life problems. The curriculum stresses an appreciation for conservation and ecology, utilizing the gardens, woods, bird-blind, and ponds on our 18-acre campus.

Technology

The Arts

Computer classes, taught in groups of approximately ten students, are designed to complement the learning that takes place in the individual classrooms. Students and teachers use the classroom, library, and lab computers to research, compose, calculate, draw, read stories, and reinforce math skills. In addition, the library’s card catalog is available to students, teachers, and parents online. Students in grades 3, 4, and 5 learn keyboarding, word processing and presentation applications. Digital cameras are used throughout the Lower School and interested students can take a digital photography class.

Lower School students enjoy art and music classes designed to challenge and stimulate creative expression. Art classes utilize a multimedia approach. Students have the opportunity to explore clay and papier-mâché, tempera and watercolors, stenciling and printmaking. In art, as well as in music, classes include history, theory, and an appreciation of the masters. The music curriculum allows students the chance to sing for the pleasure of singing, become acquainted with the instruments in the orchestra, and learn to read musical notation. All students participate in winter and spring concerts where they can share their enthusiasm for performing. Individual instrumental

Physical Education Lower School students participate in an active physical education program that stresses a sequence of developmentally appropriate skills. Younger students work on balance, eye-hand coordination, and cooperative games, while older students develop skills in specific sports such as soccer, hockey, and basketball.

Spanish The primary focus of the Spanish program is to teach children to use Spanish as a communication tool. The approach includes the use of games, puppets, props, dialogues, storybooks, and music. Instruction is conducted in Spanish, but is integrated with the overall classroom curriculum. Lessons are designed and coordinated with the children’s grade level, thematic focus, and developmental progress in mind. Skills emphasized include listening, oral comprehension, and speaking. Students in grades 3, 4, and 5 begin to write in Spanish.

music lessons are available beginning in grade 2. Drama is integrated into the general curriculum as each class stages a formal production at least once a year.

Library The Lower School Library is designed to help students develop a love of reading and the skills necessary to enjoy researching the topics they are studying. With over 14,000 books to choose from, children visit the library at least once weekly, where they are introduced to the best in children’s literature. Research projects serve as the context for teaching library skills in collaboration with classroom teachers. A wide variety of age-appropriate reference materials and laptop computers make it possible for

full classes to do research simultaneously. The Lower School Library is completely computerized, with an online card catalog that is accessible throughout the School.

Academic Evaluation Parent/teacher conferences are held in the fall and spring of each year, and written evaluations are sent home in December and in June. Written reports include a narrative overview of the student’s progress and a checklist that provides information about specific skills in each academic discipline. In addition to the specified conferences, parents and teachers communicate as the need arises.

Lower School Specials (Number of classes per week) Art

Computer

Library

Music

P.E.

Science

Spanish

Nursery

1x

*

1x

2x

2x

1x

2x

Pre-k

1x

*

1x

2x

3x

1x

2x

K

1x

1x

1x

2x

3x

1x

2x

Grade 1

2x

1x

1x

2x

3x

1x

2x

Grade 2

2x

1x

1x

2x

3x

2x

2x

Grade 3

2x

1x

1x

2x

3x

2x

2x

Grade 4

1x - ½ group

1x

1x

2x

3x

2x

2x

Grade 5

1x - ½ group

*

1x

2x

3x

**

**

* Computer instruction provided by regular classroom teachers for nursery and pre-k students. Grade 5 works one-to-one in the classroom with iPads. ** Grade 5 science is taught as a core subject along with language arts, mathmatics, and social studies. Additionally Grade 5 students receive special instruction in Prima Lingua, health, and Quakerism.

Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

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Academic Programs Middle

6TH THROUGH 8TH GRADE

SCHOOL The Middle School was started in 1974 to address the needs of early adolescents and to help students develop the skills necessary to become independent learners and contributing members of society. Along with the Upper and Lower Schools, the Middle School strives for excellence in academics, the arts, athletics, and community service. The Middle School’s diverse and creative faculty is dedicated to “finding the light within” as they help students develop their active minds, strong bodies, and social consciences. Teachers serve as coaches, advisors, mentors, service project coordinators, and role models. Teachers meet each week to discuss student progress and academic programs. Daily meetings with advisees help build bonds of trust and rapport. Because the process of learning how to be successful is essential to a student’s future academic efforts, the Middle School program emphasizes the development of strong study skills. The curriculum provides students with an abundance of hands-on experiences with exciting learning opportunities taking place both inside and outside the classroom.

Curriculum

6

Language Arts

Mathematics

Social Studies

The Middle School language arts curriculum is designed to help students increase their awareness of language as a communication tool. As students explore literature, they learn to appreciate effective writing, read for comprehension of plot, themes and symbols, and increase their own analytical writing skills. Grammar and vocabulary development are emphasized through written assignments. Literary selections such as George Orwell’s Animal Farm, William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, and Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird drive the minds of students to confront moral, political, and ethical issues as they also develop a deep appreciation for the pleasures of reading.

Students in the Middle School continue to cultivate the basics of mathematical thinking that began in the Lower School. While they work on fundamental operations in regard to whole numbers, Middle Schoolers also learn to apply those processes to fractions, decimals, percentages, and integers. The foundations of algebra are explored and students learn to make connections between algebra and geometry, between words and mathematical notation, and between theoretical and actual data. Real-life problem-solving experiences help students gain confidence in their ability to predict the reasonableness of answers. By the end of Middle School, all students will have completed Algebra I. For those students whose abilities require a faster-paced program, there is an option to accelerate the Middle School mathematics program.

The Middle School social studies curriculum begins with a study of ancient civilizations. Students examine the many factors that result in cultural differences as they explore Roman civilizations and the Middle Ages. Through their readings, they gain an appreciation for the richness of these cultures and an understanding of how these groups have influenced the growth of our own culture. American history is explored from the beginning of European colonization to the present. As they think about societies and cultures, students write and reflect on issues of diversity, racism, and social justice. Attention is given to a comprehensive look at current events in an effort to better understand events in history.

Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

Science

Specials Rotation

Academic Evaluation

In Middle School, students hone their observation, prediction, and interpretation skills as they proceed through their survey studies of life, physical, and earth sciences. Through readings, demonstrations, field study, laboratory experiments, and reflective and analytical writing, students gain scientific knowledge and begin to understand relationships among disciplines. From astronomy to zoology, students become better able to make connections regarding human needs, actions, and environmental systems.

Throughout the three years of Middle School, students rotate through courses in art, computers, drama, health, study skills, music, and Quakerism. Each of these courses adds breadth and depth to the Middle School curriculum. Through their exposure to the performing and visual arts, students have the opportunity to tap into their creativity, learning to express themselves through the disciplines of art, drama, and music. They are challenged to wrestle with new ideas as they expand their knowledge base and are encouraged to formulate and articulate positions on issues. Students explore the tenets of the Quaker religion, which help them to understand and appreciate the mission of the School.

The Middle School’s academic calendar is organized into trimesters, with meetings or telephone conferences held at the midpoint of each term and written progress reports emailed home to parents at the end of each term. During midterm conferences, advisors provide a general overview of the academic, behavioral, and social development of the students. Written reports, sent home in December, March, and June, contain a grid with letter grades and a teacher narrative. Students are evaluated in skill areas such as oral communication, reading comprehension, written work, and testing as well as work habits and concern for the community. In addition, teachers may send home individual special reports at any time during the year in order to inform the parents of any noteworthy developments in the student’s classwork or behavior.

Technology All Middle School students are encouraged to see the computer as a tool for problem solving as well as for the presentation of material. Sixth graders learn to manage student accounts on the School’s Intranet and are introduced to the basics of Microsoft applications. They learn how to share work on the Intranet and search and collect information from the Internet. In seventh and eighth grade, students explore technology on school-issued tablet computers and in the computer lab. This allows them to develop their word processing, database, spreadsheet, and PowerPoint skills.

athletics Athletic activities are required of all Middle School students, and opportunities are available for students to participate in seasonal sports activities and physical education. Interscholastic athletics begin in grade 6.

Foreign Language Foreign language study in grade 6 is centered on the Prima Lingua program. During this course, students study the evolution of language and culture. In grades 7 and 8, Middle School course offerings include French, Latin, or Spanish. Students gain confidence in their ability to express themselves and think in a foreign language.

Fall

Winter

Spring

Cross Country

Aerobics

Baseball (Boys)

Field Hockey

Basketball

Lacrosse

Flag Football

Dance

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education

Softball (Girls)

Soccer

Swimming

Tennis (Boys)

Tennis (Girls)

Wrestling

Track and Field

Water Polo

Squash

Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

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Middle School Curriculum, continued

Sample Schedule: Grade 6 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

8:25

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

8:30

Language Arts

Prima Lingua

Specials

Social Studies

Language Arts

9:10

Mathematics

Science

Language Arts

Mathematics

Science

9:50

Meeting for Worship

Community Block

Mathematics

Assembly

Club Block

10:25

Recess

Recess

Recess

Recess

Recess

10:40

Social Studies

Language Arts

Service/Lunch

Social Studies

Social Studies

11:20

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

12:00

Specials

Mathematics

Prima Lingua

Specials

12:40

Prima Lingua

Specials

Prima Lingua

Science

Mathematics

1:15

Chorus/Advisory

Orchestra/Advisory

Social Studies

Jazz Band/Advisory

Chorus/Advisory

1:55

Athletics

Athletics

Science

Athletics

Athletics

Dismissal

Dismissal

2:30 3:10

Athletics Dismissal

Dismissal

Dismissal

Language Arts Curriculum — Required Reading In addition to the selections here, students read short stories, folk tales, myths, and poetry. They are also required to fulfill independent reading requirements. Readings include but are not limited to the following:

Grade 6 The Breadwinner

Deborah Ellis

Book of Short Stories

Published by Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich

Fever 1793

Laurie Halse Anderson

Literature Circles — selections include The House of the Scorpion and The Giver

Nancy Farmer Lois Lowry

Grade 7 The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian

Sherman Alexie

A Raisin in the Sun

Lorraine Hansberry

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

William Shakespeare

Literature Circles — selections include Flowers for Algernon

Daniel Keyes

Grade 8 • Specials include: art, computers, health, music, and Quakerism. • The following instruments are offered as private lessons: cello, clarinet, flute, guitar, percussion, piano, trumpet, viola, and violin.

Sample Schedule: Grade 8 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

8:25

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

Homeroom

8:30

Science

Language Arts

Mathematics

Specials

Science

9:10

Foreign Language

Social Studies

Science

Foreign Language

Social Studies

9:50

Meeting for Worship

Community Block

Foreign Language

Assembly

Club Block

10:25

Recess

Recess

Recess

Recess

Recess

Service/Lunch

10:40

Specials

Science

Language Arts

Specials

11:20

Mathematics

Foreign Language

Mathematics

Mathematics

12:00

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

12:40

Language Arts

Mathematics

Language Arts

Social Studies

Foreign Language

1:15

Chorus/Advisory

Orchestra/Advisory

Specials

Jazz Band/Advisory

Chorus/Advisory

1:55

Athletics

Athletics

Social Studies

Athletics

Athletics

Dismissal

Dismissal

2:30 3:10

Animal Farm

George Orwell

West Side Story

Arthur Laurents

Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare

To Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee

Haroun and the Sea of Stories

Salman Rushdie

Night

Elie Wiesel

Peter

Kate Walker

Athletics Dismissal

Dismissal

Dismissal

• Specials include: art, computers, drama, health, music, and media literacy. • Students choose to take two years of French, Latin, Spanish, or writing workshop. • The following instruments are offered as private lessons: cello, clarinet, flute, guitar, percussion, piano, trumpet, viola, and violin.

8

Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

9


Academic Programs Upper

9TH THROUGH 12TH GRADE

SCHOOL

English Curriculum — Required Reading In addition to the selections below, students read short stories, essays and poetry. Readings include but are not limited to the following:

The Upper School curriculum is designed to prepare students for higher education and to be contributing citizens of the community when they graduate. The program includes rigorous college preparatory classes; athletic, artistic, and performance opportunities; and a wide variety of extracurricular programs. The classroom environment is one in which students are encouraged to find their own voices, learn to trust one another, listen carefully to and respect the opinions of others, and collaborate in group problemsolving efforts. Leadership skills, cooperation, and self-discipline are also developed in programs such as interscholastic athletics, Model United Nations, the performing arts program, and many clubs and organizations on campus. During fall and spring service days, students participate in a variety of community service projects at agencies and organizations in the greater Philadelphia region. Seniors develop a spring term Senior Project that includes a 40-hour service component or may be entirely devoted to service.

Grade 9 – Literature and Composition I The Catcher in the Rye Salinger Macbeth Shakespeare Persepolis Satrapi Life of Pi* Martel Grade 10 – Literature and Composition II Antigone Sophocles Things Fall Apart Achebe Twelfth Night Shakespeare Death of a Salesman Miller The Things They Carried O’Brien Ru Kim Thuy A Lesson Before Dying Gaines Of Mice and Men* Steinbeck Nickel and Dimed* Ehrenreich Grade 11 – Survey of American Literature** The Scarlet Letter Hawthorne The Awakening Chopin Their Eyes Were Watching God Hurston Angels in America Kushner Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Douglass, an American Slave The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Twain “Civil Disobedience” and excerpts Thoreau from Walden The Great Gatsby* Fitzgerald Grade 12 – Literature of the Western World ** Beloved Morrison Frankenstein Shelley The Metamorphosis Kafka Hamlet Shakespeare Arcadia Stoppard Wit Edson The Secret Sharer Conrad Oryx and Crake* Atwood

Curriculum A typical Upper School schedule includes five major courses: English, foreign language, history, mathematics, and science. In addition, 9th grade students rotate through single-trimester courses in Quakerism, information and digital literacy, and introduction to drawing. The 10th grade rotation includes concepts in visual arts, music and society, and life skills (health). Students in 11th and 12th grades have more opportunity to tailor their course selection to reflect individual interests and to select from an array of year-long arts courses.

SCIENCE

MATHEMATICS

HISTORY

The Upper School mathematics program allows for a high degree of flexibility in course selection and sequence. A typical Upper School path includes geometry, algebra 2, precalculus, calculus and/or statistics. Students are required to take three years of mathematics; however, most FCS students enroll in a mathematics course each year. There are regular and advanced levels of most mathematics classes in order to address the individual needs of the students. The Upper School has an active Math Team and many students compete in national mathematics competitions. 10

Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

Science study begins in 9th grade with Foundations of Scientific Knowledge— an integrated course which covers physics, chemistry, and biology. Once this course is completed, students have the preparation necessary to continue advanced work in all science disciplines. Coursework is supplemented by weekly lab periods so that students learn the process of gathering, organizing, and interpreting scientific data. Opportunities abound for students to continue scientific study outside of the classroom.

A typical Upper School path in history begins in 9th grade withWorld History from the Reformation to the 20th Century, continues in 10th grade with an examination of Global History: WWI to the Present, followed by American History in the 11th grade. A wide variety of electives is available for both 11th and 12th graders. As students progress through the program, courses increasingly emphasize the analysis of primary sources as students ultimately write their own history with a thesis-driven research project in 11th grade. Outside of class

students can participate in the Model U.N. program.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE French, Latin, and Spanish are offered in the Upper School with options to take regular or advanced levels in each. Courses cover the basics of language acquisition which form the foundation for more advanced study. Through classroom participation, use of the computer labs, and the exploration of literature, students gain confidence in their ability to think and process in a foreign language. French, Latin, and Spanish trips and exchange programs provide opportunities for cultural study as well as use of the language.

ARTS Because we believe that students benefit from a well-rounded educational experience, all Upper School students take rotation courses in art and music as well as a full-year arts course. The performing and visual arts programs provide opportunities to create, compose, and perform throughout the year and nurture the creative spirits of our students.

*Required Summer Reading. **Two-Trimester Course

Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

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upper School Curriculum, continued

Academic Courses at a Glance Grade 9 Arts

English

Chorus Instrumental Ensemble

Mathematics

World History (req’d)

Geometry

Geometry

Geometry Adv.

Algebra II Adv. Precalculus Adv. Foundations of Scientific Knowledge

Electives

Rotations Courses

12

French Latin Spanish Global History: WWI to the Present

Algebra I

Geometry Adv.

Science

Chorus Drama (Classical & Modern) Instrumental Ensemble Music History Music Theory Mixed Media Photography Studio Art I

Grade 11 Chorus Drama (Classical & Modern) Instrumental Ensemble Music History Music Theory Mixed Media I & II Photography Studio Art I & II

Literature and Composition I Literature and Composition II American Literature

Foreign Language French Latin Spanish History

Grade 10

Algebra II or Algebra III Adv. Precalculus Adv. Calculus I Adv. Foundations of Scientific Knowledge Biology I Chemistry I or I Adv. Physics I Adv.

Computer Science I: Web

Information & Digital Literacy Drawing Quaker Faith & Practice

Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

Concepts in Visual Art Life Skills Music & Society

Writers’ Workshop Spring Seminars French Latin Spanish American History (required) The Ancient City: Jerusalem, Athens, Rome Capitalism & Consumption History of Architecture International Relations Peace Studies Philosophy Post-Colonial Africa Algebra II or Algebra II Adv. Precalculus or Precalculus Adv.

Grade 12 Chorus Drama (Classical & Modern) Instrumental Ensemble Music History Music Theory Mixed Media I & II Photography Studio Art I & II Woodworking

Independent Projects

Participation in physical education and athletics is required of all Upper School students. Friends’ Central offers 25 sports/activities from which to choose. Students must participate in interscholastic sports for a minimum of four of their 12 trimesters, two of which must be completed before the end of the sophomore year. During the remaining trimesters, students may choose either physical education or interscholastic sports. Friends’ Central competes in the Friends Schools League.

Senior Project

Fall Boys

Literature of the Western World Writers’ Workshop Spring Seminars French Latin Spanish The Ancient City: Jerusalem, Athens, Rome History of Architecture International Relations Modern European History Adv. Peace Studies Philosophy Post-Colonial Africa Algebra II or Algebra II Adv. Precalculus or Precalculus Adv. Calculus I or I Adv.

Calculus II Adv. Statistics or Statistics Adv.

Calculus II Adv. Statistics or Statistics Adv. Topics in Calculus III & Linear Algebra

Biology I or I Adv.

Biology I or I Adv.

Biology II Adv. Botany Chemistry I or I Adv. Chemistry II Adv. Physics Physics I Adv. Physics II Adv. Comparative Religions Comparative Religions Computer Science I: Web Computer Science I: Web Computer Science II: Application Computer Science II: Application Media Studies Media Studies STEAM (non-credit) Sexuality and Society STEAM (non-credit)

Winter

Spring

Cross Country

Basketball

Baseball

Soccer

Squash

Lacrosse

Indoor Track

Tennis

Swimming

Track & Field

In the spring of senior year, students prepare written proposals for five-week work or study experiences. With Senior Project Committee approval, students pursue their projects, preparing and presenting materials for final evaluation at the end of the project period. A minimum of one of the five weeks must be spent on a service project. The Senior Project and Service Committees help students find suitable service placements.

Wrestling Girls

Capitalism & Consumption

Calculus I or I Adv.

Chemistry I or I Adv. Chemistry II Adv. Physics Physics I Adv. Physics II Adv.

Athletics

coed

Cross Country

Basketball

Lacrosse

Advising and Evaluation

Field Hockey

Squash

Softball

Soccer

Indoor Track

Track & Field

Tennis

Swimming

Water Polo

Cheerleading

When students enter the Upper School they are assigned to homerooms, and their homeroom teachers serve as their advisors. The advisors monitor student progress, provide counsel when necessary, help with course selection, and communicate with parents on a regular basis. The Upper School functions on a trimester system, and an academic report is sent home at the end of each trimester. Letter grades are given for each course in the areas of effectiveness in oral and written communication and success in mastering course content. Mid-trimester progress reports in the first trimester provide parents and advisors with an early academic update.

Golf

Dance

Service As a Quaker school, Friends’ Central believes that service is a vital spiritual and social component in the overall education of its students. Working in service to others offers the students an opportunity to know that there is “that of God” in themselves and in those whom they serve. Students enhance their own sense of self-worth as they realize how their service contributes to the quality of life for others and for the School community. Through ongoing service projects and reflective discussions, students become aware of their responsibilities to the Friends’ Central community as well as to the larger community and learn ways to work with people in different life circumstances. Projects are integrated into the life of the School and are arranged to encourage both individual responsibility and cooperation. The program aims to enable students to understand the value of service both at

Friends’ Central and, upon graduation, as adult members of society. • Service Days During the year, time is set aside for work in areas of social concern with the focus on community service. During a three-day program in November and a two-day program in May, Upper School students work at organizations such as the Greater Philadelphia Food Bank, the American Friends Service Committee, and the John Heinz Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum. • Campus Service Faculty and students in the Upper and Middle Schools participate in an oncampus work program designed to foster responsibility, cooperation, teamwork, and self-discipline. Students are assigned to jobs for trimester intervals, with faculty and staff supervision. This program allows students to contribute to the well-being of the entire School community.

College Counseling Beginning in grade 11, college counselors meet individually with students and their parents to guide families through the college admission process. These meetings continue throughout the junior and senior year. Each year, representatives from approximately 80 colleges and universities visit the campus to meet students and answer questions about their schools.

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upper School Curriculum, continued

College Statistics

National Merit

SAT—2009-2013 5 year Average

For the Classes of 2009 – 2013, 17% of the graduates attained the distinction of National Merit finalist, semifinalist, or commended student. Thirteen of these students were awarded Merit Scholarships.

642 Critical Reading / 629 Math / 641 Writing

College Matriculations — Recent five Years (2009-2013) Adelphi University Albright College (3) Allegheny College American University (2) Amherst College (2) Arcadia University University of Arizona (2) Arizona State University The University of the Arts (2) Bard College Barnard College (2) Bates College (3) Bennington College Bentley University Bloomsburg University of PA Boston University (8) Bowdoin College (3) Brandeis University (4) Brown University (8) Bryant University Bryn Mawr College (6) Bucknell University (2) University of California Berkeley California University of PA Carnegie Mellon University (6) Case Western Reserve University Catholic University of America Chapman University College of Charleston Chestnut Hill College University of Chicago (2) Clarion University of PA Clark University Clemson University Colby College Colgate University (2) University of Colorado Boulder Columbia College Chicago

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Columbia University (2) Connecticut College (4) Cornell University (5) Culinary Institute of America University of Delaware (7) Denison University Dickinson College (4) Digital Animation/Vis. Effects Sch. Drexel University (13) Duke University (4) Earlham College (3) East Stroudsburg Univ. of PA Elizabethtown College Elon University Emerson College Emory University (9) Eugene Lang College The University of Findlay Florida Southern College Fordham University Franklin & Marshall (11) George Mason University George Washington University (14) Gettysburg College Goucher College Hamilton College (5) Harvey Mudd College Haverford College (9) High Point University Hobart & William Smith Colleges (2) Howard University Indiana University Bloomington (4) Indiana University of PA Ithaca College (3) Jewish Theological Seminary Johns Hopkins University (7) Kenyon College Lafayette College (6)

Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

LaSalle University Lehigh University (4) Loyola College Maryland Macalester College (3) Maryland Institute College of Art University of Maryland (5) University of Miami (4) Middlebury College University of Mississippi (2) Muhlenberg College (13) New York University (8) Niagara University Univ. of North Carolina Wilmington Northeastern University (4) Northwestern University Oberlin College (7) Occidental College (4) Ohio Wesleyan University (2) Parsons - New School for Design (2) Penn State University (8) University of Pennsylvania (27) Pepperdine University Philadelphia University University of Pittsburgh (10) Pomona College (2) Princeton University (4) Providence College Purdue University Quinnipiac University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (2) Rice University University of Richmond (2) Rochester Inst. of Technology (3) University of Rochester (6) Rollins College Rose-Hulman Inst. of Technology Saint Joseph’s University Sarah Lawrence College (5)

Univ. of the Sciences in Philadelphia The University of Scranton Scripps College (2) Shippensburg University of PA Skidmore College (5) Smith College University of Southern California (2) Spartanburg Methodist College Saint John’s College Saint John’s University (4) Swarthmore College (8) Syracuse University (5) Temple University (16) Texas Lutheran University Trinity College (CT) (3) Tufts University (4) Tulane University (6) Union College (4) Ursinus College Vanderbilt University (2) Vassar College (5) University of Vermont Villanova University University of Virginia (2) Wagner College Wake Forest University (2) Washington & Lee University Washington Univ in St. Louis (10) Wesleyan University (4) West Chester University (8) Wheaton College (3) Widener University College of William & Mary Williams College (3) University of Wisconsin Madison The College of Wooster Worcester Polytechnic Institute (3) Yale University (8)

Life at

friends’ central school Guidelines Friends’ Central School is known not only for our students’ academic achievements and their success in athletic and extracurricular activities but also for their conduct at school and in the community. Life at Friends’ Central teaches students to respect the rights and feelings of others. We expect parents to help support our principles and guidelines. In accordance with the Friends’ belief in simplicity and moderation, students are expected to dress simply, neatly, and comfortably in clothing appropriate to their ages and to all the activities of the school day. Other specific School policies are outlined in the School handbook and on the Friends’ Central School website.

Academic Reporting Friends’ Central School encourages the involvement of all parents in the education of their children. Through report cards and conferences, the faculty seeks to keep parents apprised of academic achievement and social growth and development. In the case of divorced parents, the School believes that it is in the interest of every child to have both parents follow his/her educational progress. Therefore, the School normally sends reports to both parents and honors all legitimate requests by parents for reports on their children.

Faculty and Staff To view faculty and staff profiles, please visit www.friendscentral.org.

Arrival All Middle and Upper School students report to their homerooms at 8:30 am. Lower School students may arrive on campus after 7:30 am. Supervision is provided on the playgrounds or, in case of inclement weather, in the gymnasium until the bell rings at 8:30 am, at which time the students report to their classrooms.

Dismissal Half-day nursery school and pre-kindergarten students are dismissed at 12:00 noon. Full-day nursery school and pre-kindergarten students, along with all other Lower School children, are dismissed at 2:50 pm. Middle School students are dismissed at 3:10 pm, except when they are involved in an athletic event, an extracurricular activity, or a meeting with a teacher. Upper School students are dismissed after sports practice or at the end of classes (3:10 pm, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, and 2:30 pm, Friday) if the student is not participating on a team.

health Friends’ Central has a full-time registered nurse on each campus and a certified athletic trainer is present on the City Avenue campus every afternoon. In addition, two school psychologists are available to work with children, parents, and teachers concerning psycho-educational issues. Counseling is free of charge. Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

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Life at Friends’ central school, continued

Athletics Students in grades 6 through 8 may participate in interscholastic sporting events. Athletic practices are held during the last period of the school day and games are scheduled after 3:10 pm, usually on Mondays or Wednesdays. Upper School students involved in interscholastic sports report for practice at 3:30 pm. Athletic schedules, which state the time and location of games and meets, are available on the FCS website.

aquatics program Friends’ Central Aquatics is designed to provide swim instruction and swim team experience for students of all ages in the Shimada Athletic Center on the City Avenue campus. Detailed information regarding Friends’ Central Aquatics can be found at www.swimfca.org.

THE LARGER COMMUNITY Home and School Association

Friends’ Central has offered summer learning and recreational activities since 1929. The camp programs and optional extended-day programs on the Lower School and City Avenue campuses are all directed by Friends’ Central faculty chosen for their experience in working with children. The City Avenue campus allows older children to choose directed programs in tennis, drama, or art in the afternoon and houses a six-week advancement summer school for students in grades 7 through 12. Since 1989, Friends’ Central’s Basketball, Reading, and Math Clinic has offered combined athletic and academic activities to Middle and Upper School students.

Auxiliary Services

Friends’ Central School Alumni/ae Association

Detailed information regarding the following can be found on the Friends’ Central website at www.friendscentral.org/aux.

From its beginning as the Old Pupils’ Association in 1902, the Alumni/ae Association of Friends’ Central School has dedicated itself to keeping alumni/ae aware of School activities and to continuing friendships begun in the classroom, in the schoolyard, in the arts program, and on the athletic fields. Friends’ Central holds several yearly events for its over 3,500 alumni/ae, including Homecoming, reunions, young alumni/ ae gatherings, a basketball party, Racers’ Day (a luncheon for graduates of 50 years and more), a golf outing that benefits financial aid, Baby Day (a morning for alumni/ae and their young children), and regional get-togethers. The Association keeps in touch with alumni/ae via various publications, such as Quaker Works, Forum, e-newsletters, and Facebook. A 20-member alumni/ae board advises Friends’ Central on appropriate programs to encourage alumni/ae interest in the School.

• Extended Day Program — Lower School Created to provide quality childcare for families who need after-school services, the program runs daily from 2:50 pm to 6:00 pm and is also available on parent conference days. • Food Service In Lower School, students may either bring lunches from home or may choose to purchase the yearly lunch contract. In Middle and Upper School, students may purchase the yearly contract plan, pay with cash daily, use our computerized debit system, or bring their lunches from home. Daily breakfast and snacks are also available. • Instrumental Music Lessons Friends’ Central students are offered the opportunity to take private music instruction on both the Lower School and City Avenue campuses. Violin, viola, and cello lessons are available to 2nd graders. In grade 3, students may choose piano as well. Brass and woodwinds are added to the list of choices in grades 4 and 5. Once students move to the City Avenue campus, additional opportunities exist to study guitar and percussion instruments or to take voice lessons. • Private Transportation Friends’ Central offers convenient door-to-door transportation for students in Philadelphia and surrounding suburban areas. This service is available for both campus locations and includes the regular morning and afternoon busing of Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

• School Store Students and adults may purchase books, supplies, clothing, and gift items at the School Store on the City Avenue campus. Store hours are listed in the School directory and on the Friends’ Central School website.

The purpose of the Home and School Association is to acquaint parents with the School’s educational philosophy and purpose, to enlist parents’ help in carrying out these goals, and to provide a forum for parents and faculty to work together for the students’ best interests. The Association keeps parents informed of School events. In addition to hosting a reception for parents new to the School, there are grade-level gatherings, class dinners, and planned activities that provide opportunities for interaction with the faculty and with other parents. Yearly dues are $30 per child. All parents are encouraged to attend the Home and School Association meetings. Dates for all divisional meetings are listed in the yearly calendar sent to families at the start of the school year and updated on the website (www.friendscentral.org/parents).

Summer Activities

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students, shuttle service between campuses, and late bus transportation at 5:30 pm daily. Free shuttle service from the Overbrook Train Station to the City Avenue campus is also available each morning and afternoon. Friends’ Central’s bus service is staffed by experienced and fully qualified drivers. Every effort is made to consider each transportation need in order to best serve riders in all areas.

Annual Giving Campaign Friends’ Central conducts an Annual Giving Campaign on a yearly basis throughout the School’s fiscal year (July 1-June 30). Annual Giving is the School’s primary fundraising activity, essential because it supports the daily operations of the School. Like every private school, Friends’ Central’s tuition does not cover the full cost of educating our students. Gifts to Annual Giving provide the funds that cover a substantial portion of the shortfall. All members of the School community—parents, alumni/ae, parents of alumni/ae, trustees, and friends—are asked to support the Campaign. The unrestricted funds raised through Annual Giving allow the School to have the flexibility to recruit and retain its excellent faculty, to offer programs that enhance the students’ educational experience, and to maintain campus facilities. Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

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Tuition

and Financial aid Tuition 2013–2014 Grades 9-12

$29,200

Grades 6-8

$25,900

Grade 5

$25,000

Grades 2-4

$22,200

Grade 1

$21,000

Kindergarten

$19,500

Pre-kindergarten

$18,200

Nursery School

$14,250

Tuition may be paid in one of the following ways: • Full tuition, minus 1% discount, payable on or before June 15. • Full tuition due and payable on or before July 15. • Payment of two-thirds of the tuition on or before July 15 and the remaining one-third of the tuition on or before January 2. • 10 monthly payments through Higher Education Services (HES), with the first payment due to HES by April 30. No other extended payment plans are permitted. No student may attend school if his or her tuition has not been paid.

Financial Aid Program The request for financial aid by new students is separate from the admission process and does not affect the student’s application for admission to the School. Financial aid grants are awarded to students of all grade levels and are decided on the basis of need and availability of funds. For the 2013-2014 academic year, Friends’ Central provided financial assistance to 32 percent of its students in the amount of approximately $5 million. Grants ranged from $1,000 to nearly full tuition, with the average grant being approximately $17,000. It is important that each family assume primary responsibility for financing their student’s education. Families must explore personal resources before applying to the School for funds. However, with the assistance of the Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, foundations, alumni/ae, parents, and friends, Friends’ Central School is able to offer financial aid to deserving students who demonstrate financial need.

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Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

How to Apply for Financial Aid 1. Make a request for financial aid during the initial phone call or parent interview. 2. In the fall, parents who are applying for financial aid must complete the Parent Financial Statement which is available at sss.nais.org. Both natural parents and their current spouses, if any, must complete this form using information from their most recent tax return. In the case of divorce or separation, it is the responsibility of the custodial parent to ask the noncustodial parent to fill out the necessary forms. If information is not received from all parents, the Financial Aid Committee will be unable to award a grant to the student. 3. In addition, parents must submit a copy of their most recent federal tax return filed with the IRS (Form 1040 and all schedules) and Wage and Tax Statements (Form W-2). This information must be sent to SSS by NAIS, Application Processing Center, P.O. Box 449, Randolph, MA 02368-0449. 4. Financial aid decisions are made by the Financial Aid Committee in early February, at which time accepted students are notified of their grant status. The information families provide is kept in strictest confidence. Substantial delay in providing the required information may jeopardize a student’s chance of receiving an award.

Wynnefield Community Scholar Program The Wynnefield Community Scholar Program is an endowed scholarship in memory of Elizabeth Whereat ’43. The program is for new students entering grades 5 through 9 who reside in the 19131 and 19139 postal zip code zones. This need-based scholarship is awarded to a student whose performance on a competitive scholarship exam, previous school record, and good citizenship qualify that student for this honor. The scholarship is renewable each year so long as the student maintains good citizenship and academic standing and financial need remains. Interested families can access details on how to apply at www.friendscentral.org/admission/financial-aid/wynnefield-scholar. Please note that applications and supporting materials for the scholarship must be received by November 8, 2013.

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Admission

all grades Friends’ Central School admits the best-qualified applicants without regard to religious, national, or racial background. When selecting applicants, the Admission Committee considers a number of factors. In addition to admission testing and a classroom visit, the Committee takes into account the student’s ability to handle college preparatory work and to show good citizenship. Admission decisions are announced in mid January to early February, with a reply date of March 1.

1. Complete the application form and return it along with the $50 application fee.

6. Arrange for your child to take the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISCIV). Depending on the student’s age, the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI-III) may be substituted. These tests are not administered by Friends’ Central School and must be scheduled with a licensed psychologist who is trained to administer these tests. The Admission Office can assist you in locating a tester in your area. If your child has taken either of these tests within the past two years, those results may be acceptable. For students applying to Grade 5, the Independent School Entrance Exam (administered by the Educational Records Bureau) is also acceptable.

2. Schedule a parent interview and tour with the Lower School Admission Office.

7. All steps in the admission process must be complete by January 17, 2014.

3. Schedule a one-hour visit for your child. This visit gives our teachers the opportunity to observe your child in our educational setting.

Grades 6 through 12

How to Apply for Admission The steps needed to complete the application process depend on the child’s grade level. Please note that Friends’ Central has an age cutoff date of September 1.

Nursery school

Pre-kindergarten 1. Complete the application form and return it along with the $50 application fee. 2. Schedule a parent interview and tour with the Lower School Admission Office. 3. Schedule a half-day visit for your child. This visit gives our teachers the opportunity to observe your child in our educational setting. 4. Submit the confidential teacher recommendation form to your child’s current teacher, where applicable (available online at www.friendscentral.org or from the Admission Office). Request that this form be returned directly to Friends’ Central School. 5. Additional testing may be required for those applicants for whom the Admission Committee feels there is insufficient information upon which to base a decision. In such cases, the Committee may request that parents make arrangements to have the student take the WPPSI-III (Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence). The Admission Office will provide more information if needed.

2. Schedule a parent interview/tour and a full-day student visit for your child. Students will be asked to complete a writing sample during their visit. 3. Arrange for your child to take either the Independent School Entrance Exam (administered by the Educational Records Bureau) or the Secondary School Admission Test (administered by the Secondary School Admission Test Board). Registration forms for these tests are available from the Admission Office or online. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV) is also acceptable for grades 6–12. In certain instances, an SAT, PSAT, or Otis Lennon score is acceptable. 4. Request that Friends’ Central receive from your child’s current school at least one set of standardized test scores along with a copy of your child’s grades from the previous school year and from at least one current marking period.

Kindergarten through grade 5 1. Complete and return the application form along with the $50 application fee.

6. All steps in the admission process must be complete by January 17, 2014.

2. Schedule a parent interview and tour with the Lower School Admission Office. 3. Schedule a half-day visit for students applying for kindergarten and grade 1 and a full-day visit for those students who are applying for grades 2–5. 4. Submit the confidential teacher recommendation form to your child’s current teacher (available from the Admission Office or online at www.friendscentral.org). Request that this form be returned directly to Friends’ Central School. Friends’ Central 2013 – 2014 Curriculum Guide

1. Complete and return the application along with the $50 application fee.

5. Request that your child’s current English and mathematics teachers complete and return, directly to Friends’ Central School, the confidential teacher recommendation forms. These forms are available from the Admission Office or online at www.friendscentral.org.

6. All steps in the admission process must be complete by January 17, 2014.

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5. Submit the transcript request card to your child’s current school (Grades 2-5). The official transcript should include grades from the previous school year and at least one marking period of the current school year, as well as the most recent set of standardized test scores.

Friends’ Central School admits students of any race, color, religion, sexual orientation, or national or ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the School. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sexual orientation, or national or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational policies, admission policies, financial aid, and athletic and other School-administered programs.

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Friends’ Central School Lower School Nursery School through Grade 5 228 Old Gulph Road Wynnewood, PA 19096-1019 610-642-1018 610-642-6983 (fax) Middle and Upper Schools Grades 6 through 12 1101 City Avenue Wynnewood, PA 19096-3418 610-645-5032 610-658-5644 (fax) www.friendscentral.org

Printed on 100% recycled post-consumer fiber

A Closer Look 2013-2014  

The Admission Viewbook supplement for Friends' Central School