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OCTOBER 2010

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How to Present Magazine

October 2010

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DIARY DATES INFLUENTIAL PRESENTATION SKILLS (2-day Public Program) Become an influential presenter today! Join Michelle at her public program IN SYDNEY on: • October 19-20 • November 16-17 • December 1-2 Join Michelle at her next public program IN MELBOURNE on: November 3-4 For details please email: michelle@michellebowden.com.au

Who is Michelle Bowden? Michelle is an expert in influential presentation skills in business. Michelle has run her 2-day Influential Presentation Skills program over 550 times with many thousands of people and sheʼs been nominated in both 2009 and 2010 for Educator of the Year. Michelle is one of only 25 Australian females who is a Certified Speaking Professional - this is the highest designation for speakers in the world. For a list of Michelleʼs clients please go to: www.howtopresent.com.au www.howtopresent.com.au

Michelle’s Update Welcome to the second issue of How to Present! A magazine designed to give you tips and techniques for presenting your ideas in business. We have a bumper second edition that focuses on boosting your confidence which I’m sure you will enjoy as well as some exciting new sections this month. Managing your nervousness is a must if you want to be engaging and confident. Weʼve included some tips on how to manage your nerves for your next meeting. PowerPoint can be a wonderful business tool as well as a real hinderance to getting your message across in meetings. So weʼve included a section on how to use PowerPoint with your audience in mind so it works as it was intended - as an “aid” to your message. Plus we have a brand new section for parents who want to help their children be more confident public speakers - a must read if you have children. We also share how to use your voice wisely, PLUS some inspiring success stories and a Special Feature from Kathryn Orford on how to increase your confidence at work. Please do engage with me on my blog www.howtopresent.com.au Iʼm passionate about presenting at work and I love the conversations we have! And if youʼve enjoyed the magazine, please forward it to a friend or click the “like it” button on the magazine pages to show your support. So grab yourself a ʼcuppaʼ, put your feet up and have a read! And most importantly, make sure you put the invaluable advice into immediate action so you see some fast results. Happy Presenting!

How to Present Magazine

October 2010

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SUCCESS STORIES! What prompted you to work with Michelle in the area of Influential Presentation Skills?

SARAH BOYCE VP ALEXION PHARMACEUTICALS

Simply put, I was told she was the best, she is.   How did Michelle's executive mentoring change your attitude to presenting in business? I have always enjoyed presenting and with Michelle's mentoring it became a passion. I was challenged by the art of language - how to be as influential as possible and how to build rapport through clever words I also can't help myself coaching others now. She increased my effectiveness and helped me make my messages stick in the minds of my audiences. In general, what positive outcomes have you achieved from improving your presentation skills?

Sarah has had an amazing career to date. She’s currently the VP of Nephrology at Alexion Pharmaceutials in the US. Prior to this role Sarah was Vice President & Global Program Head, for the Pediatric and Speciality Business at Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics in the US. She has also been the Business Unit Head - Australia and New Zealand at Novartis, as well as Executive Director - US Marketing at Novartis, and the Marketing Director for Novartis Oncology, UK . What kind of presenting do you do at work? A whole range from presenting to the board to presenting to the entire global sales force, to team meetings, to strategic planning and presenting in many different countries.

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I have done a lot since I started working with Michelle. My increased confidence on stage has helped me drive even greater results for me personally and also for my business. I have been promoted a couple of times and now I work in the US as a VP. I am more engaging and my messages are simple and easy to follow - which means people are more likely to remember what I say. Michelle’s lessons are always in my mind. What were your top three take aways from Michelle's mentoring? 1.

Less is more.

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How to structure so the audience understands your key messages and

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How to deal with the elephant in the room and manage objections so they become a ‘non-event’ in the minds of the audience.

How to Present Magazine

October 2010

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STOP! YOUR POWERPOINT IS KILLING ME! BY MICHELLE BOWDEN Are you setting yourself up to use PowerPoint as a lethal weapon? PowerPoint is an invaluable, powerful and exciting tool used to create visual aids that transform average speakers into masterful presenters. Or is it? You have probably noticed that PowerPoint slides have become so content heavy and difficult to read that the phrase, ‘death by PowerPoint’ has been coined. Business people need to do what they can to make sure they don’t cause ‘death by PowerPoint’ when they present. Whilst the typical audience in business is used to seeing a plethora of small numbers in tables, you still have a responsibility to yourself, your company and your audience to provide information in a way that ensures key messages are easily perceived and your audience says ‘yes’ to what you want. It’s critical that you use your slides to reinforce your key selling messages to your audience.

your slides is clouding your judgment as a presenter? Have you thought enough about the need to concentrate more on your verbal and nonverbal communication than your visual aids? Try the, ‘Will my slides cause death?' test to work out whether you are relying too much on your slides at the expense of influencing your audience:

Are you guilty of the ‘kid in a toyshop' syndrome, where your enthusiasm for communicating absolutely everything you know on

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Do you lack confidence as a presenter? Would you be horrified at the thought of presenting to an audience without the use of visual aids?

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How to Present Magazine

Are you guilty of using PowerPoint slides to take the focus off yourself?

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Do you use PowerPoint slides as convenient palm-cards? Do you find yourself looking back at your slides to remember what to say?

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Do you use PowerPoint to write your presentation?

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Do you try to use the entire functionality of PowerPoint as a way of improving your presentation? (Have you even sent your Personal or Executive Assistant on a PowerPoint training program?)

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STOP! YOUR POWERPOINT IS KILLING ME CONTINUED

What is the purpose of slides? What should they look like? The purpose of slides is to reinforce your key messages for your audience, not to remind you, the presenter, what to say next. Slides have the potential to create a visual, kinesthetic and maybe even an auditory connection between your audience and your message. In other words, they help stimulate your audience in a variety of ways that will help them to remember your content. If you find yourself answering ‘YES' to these questions, then there is a good chance you have been relying on PowerPoint slides to carry you as a presenter, rather than simply as a visual aid to highlight the key messages for your audience. You may have impressive technical skills and you may be an expert in your profession, but your slides may well be preventing you from connecting with your audience, and communicating your ideas. In fact, your slides might well be causing your audience to ‘switch off’ from your presentation - obviously not good for business development!

An ideal presentation with slides doesn’t cause ‘death by PowerPoint’. An ideal presentation is delivered with confidence and charisma and ensures your audience doesn’t disengage from your message. I believe the main reason people don’t use PowerPoint to its advantage is they are busy. It’s easier to rely on PowerPoint to ‘tell the story’ than to rehearse and then connect with the audience and engage them person to person. Have a look at these 10 tips for designing slides to help you set yourself up to be a powerful presenter who uses slides as an aid to influence your audience. They will maximise the likelihood of changing your audience’s behaviour.

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How to Present Magazine

Go to http:// www.howtopresent.com.au/ products-page/ to buy my comprehensive e-book: STOP! Your PowerPoint is Killing Me!

10 POWERPOINT TIPS 1. Dark text on a light background. 2. Minimum of 30 pt font. 3. Times New Roman or Verdana font. 4. Reduce the number of slides to a minimum. 5. Try handouts, whiteboards and flipcharts. 6. Replace words with pictures or graphs as often as possible. 7. Colour-code graphs. 8. Use beautiful, clever graphics, not overused, tired ones. 9. Ensure your transitions from one slide to the next don’t distract. 10.Keep the lights on.

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BOOST YOUR CONFIDENCE IN FRONT OF AN AUDIENCE BY MICHELLE BOWDEN There is no single thing or magic formula that is a panacea for a l a c k o f c o n fi d e n c e w h e n presenting. There are no short cuts, however, people who are lacking in confidence should consider a change of approach. Begin by writing a slogan in big letters: IT’S NOT ABOUT ME, IT’S ALL ABOUT MY AUDIENCE!

Structure the message – if you have a nice, tight, well-crafted message and you have designed it with a model that allows you to remember the information without relying on notes, then of course you’ll feel more confident! I teach three models for the design and structure of a presentation: 13steps, 4Mat and Storyboarding. And then try the following tips: These models help you know what to say and when to say it so Get feedback – in my Analyse the audience – that the audience’s needs are met experience, many people it’s critical to spend some and so you are more likely to focus a lot on their negative time analysing both the change their behaviour. points and their nervousness, current and desired state of your rather than on their positive audience. Connect with the people attributes like their voice or their – when it’s time to deliver personal presentation. Setting up One way to do this is to ask your presentation it’s yourself: ‘What is my audience essential to re-read your slogan: a system in your organisation where you can give and receive thinking about me, my message IT’S NOT ABOUT ME, IT’S ALL feedback from others whom you a n d m y d e p a r t m e n t o r ABOUT MY AUDIENCE, and to respect, and who are sensitive to company?’, ‘What is my audience look into the whites of your your needs, is a great way of feeling about me, my message audience’s eyes – really see the finding out what you are doing a n d m y d e p a r t m e n t o r individuals in the audience, rather well. company?’ and ‘What will the than skim their heads or pretend atmosphere or vibe of the room to look at them. Know they are Try these tips and notice the be like before I present?’ This real live humans who you have impact they have on boosting way you know what to expect the wonderful opportunity to your confidence as a workplace influence and help. This takes when you walk in. communicator. your focus off your nerves and Then, plan your desired outcome places your attention on the by asking yourself, ‘What do I a u d i e n c e – w h i c h i n t u r n want my audience to think about enhances your connection or “Michelle is passionate, likeable m e , m y m e s s a g e a n d m y rapport with them. If you are not knowledgeable and such an department or company?’, ‘What focused on yourself, how could astute observer.” do I want the audience to feel you be nervous? Remember, it’s about me, my message and my not about you, it’s all about the Steve Jobson, VP Compuware department or company?’ and audience! ‘What do I want them to do once I have finished talking?’

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How to Present Magazine

October 2010

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ARE YOU APPROACHABLE OR CREDIBLE? Have you thought about the way you speak lately? The way we speak communicates much more than the actual meaning of the words we say doesn’t it? Think of that person with a commanding, authoritative voice and now also think of that person with the happy, friendly voice. Both people could say the same thing but the commanding voice sends a clear message of “I mean business!” whereas the happy, friendly voice that sends the message “I’m someone you can joke around with and you don’t have to take me seriously!” Which one are you? Michael Grinder, brother of John Grinder (who was one of the co-founders of neuro-linguistic programming or NLP) has a nice, simple way of labeling this. He describes the different approaches as being either credible or approachable. Credible - voice pattern is flat and drops on last accentuated syllable, associated with males, tends to exude the definitiveness that is often held in esteem by busy people, used when sending information, to stress importance of a message, or give more emphasis. Approachable - voice with rolling intonation that curls up on the last accentuated syllable before end of sentence, or before a pause, used to elicit more information, to emphasise relationship or soften emphasis. Each has a different purpose - why not experiment with this today?

I NAILED IT! Cathy Waters is an Analyst at Advantedge. Advantedge Financial Services is a financial service provider in the Mortgage product space. Cathy does Management Reporting and some adhoc training on the company principles and cultural change program. She was asked to speak at a leadership course on the principles in front of company managers and she 'nailed it'! CATHY SAYS:

“Well, I did it! I applied the skills I learnt from you and I nailed it! I will not deny that a lot of 40 minute train trips were taken up practising and my spare time was not spare, but it was all worth it! I actually enjoyed all the time I spent on it and now I know it was worth it!  I had several comments after the presentation that I was great and that it all flowed so well they thought I was a professional. Anyway, I had to email you Michelle - I still have a huge smile on my face! Thanks for being so great and sharing your skills!” www.howtopresent.com.au

How to Present Magazine

October 2010

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COMMUNICATING WITH CONFIDENCE IN THE WORKPLACE BY KATHYRN ORFORD We’ve all heard the phrase that someone exudes confidence. But what are we referring to? And how does it show up in the workplace? Self Confidence is a feeling - an inner fire and an outer radiance, a basic satisfaction with who one is, plus a reaching out to become more. Contrary to popular belief, confidence is not something a few people are born with and others are not. It is an acquired characteristic.

Kathryn has been empowering people to live their dreams for over 30 years! Kathryn is in demand as a Peak Performance and Confidence Coach, and specialises in working with business people, athletes, performers, teachers and coaches. She is passionate about equipping people with the skills to believe in themselves, and be the best version of themselves that they can be!

Most people have more to work with than they realise. One noted physicist calls this “unused excellencies” and finding and releasing this potential in ourselves is one of the major challenges of modern life. The great danger is not that we shall overreach our capacities, but that we shall undervalue and under-employ them, thus never realising our truest potential. Self-confident people trust their own abilities, have a general sense of control in their lives, and believe that, within reason, they will be able to do what they wish, plan, and expect. Having self-confidence doesn’t mean that the person will be able to do everything. However they have the confidence and ability to ask for help in areas they lack expertise in.

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How to Present Magazine

On the other hand people who aren’t self-confident depend excessively on the approval of others, in order to feel good about themselves. They tend to avoid taking risks because they fear failure. And instead of learning from past experiences, they allow their past mistakes to dictate their future, and therefore don’t expect to be successful. They often put themselves down and tend to discount or ignore compliments paid to them. If any of this rings true for you, there are lots of little things you can do on a daily basis, to start building your confidence. First of all, next time someone gives you a compliment, simply take a breathe, look them in the eye and say “thank you.” Start noticing what you say to yourself. We all have habitual things we say to ourselves, especially when we stuff up or get stressed. If you find yourself saying something negative, immediately reprogram it by: ★ Changing the tone from critical to silly, or sultry. (The idea is to take the sting away and replace it with something that makes us laugh or feel good)

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COMMUNICATING WITH CONFIDENCE IN THE WORKPLACE CONT. ★ Turn down the volume or hit the mute button. ★ Drown it out by saying something like “out of here, I don’t need you anymore” or “that’s not true”. ★ Replace the negative with a positive by adding what I call a Y.U.I. ie: Yet, Up until now, to the end of the sentence. This disempowers the negative thought and replaces it with a feeling of hope and possibility. Have fun experimenting with what works best for you! Self confidence leaves clues. Think of someone in your workplace that exudes self confidence. How do they move and hold their body? How do they communicate with others? Do they make direct eye contact with whoever they’re speaking to? Write down what you’ve noticed, and choose one skill each week to copy. Remember that’s how we all learned to walk and talk. We copied everyone around us! I’m a firm believer in the concept of “fake it till you make it” when learning a new skill. Act as if you’re confident right now (even if you’re shaking like a leaf inside) take a few deep breaths, throw back your shoulders, stand tall and proud, and walk and talk with purpose,........and over time you too will exude confidence! www.howtopresent.com.au

THE WRAP 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Confidence is an inner fire and an outer radiance Confidence is an acquired characteristic Trust your own abilities Start noticing what you say to yourself Change the tone to silly or sultry Turn down the volume Drown out the negative language Replace the negative with the positive

How to Present Magazine

October 2010

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PARENTS CORNER PUBLIC SPEAKING SECRETS FOR PARENTS TO HELP THEIR CHILDREN BY MICHELLE BOWDEN

Parents Corner is a dedicated section designed to give adults tips for equipping their children with one of the most fundamental skills they can develop in life - the skill of public speaking. We present from an early age From the day your child starts pre-school they will find themselves in situations where they are giving little speeches. Some places call it ‘show and tell’ others call it ‘news’. And as they move up the grades in school they will be called on more and more to ‘present’ to their classmates and teachers – sometimes even for assessment or grading. Do you want to help your child? You probably know that public speaking is in the top three fears for most adults – it develops from somewhere – generally our childhood. So if you are a parent, you might be looking for a way to help your child to be one of the few people who can engage a crowd and get through their speech so they feel terrific and proud of themselves at the end. You can assist your child or children to be confident public speakers by simply following a few simple tips. Practice makes perfect

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One of the first things you can do to help your child feel calm and at ease is to give them some practice speaking in front of people. One way to do this is to ask your child questions about their day and give them direct eye contact as you sit down and listen intently to what they are saying. If they can stand up and ‘deliver’ the summary of their day to you that helps establish a presentation mindset. If they struggle to explain something then be patient, smile and encourage them to keep going. Eventually, you may want to add people to the audience: grandparents, siblings, neighbours. The more they practice in front of others the more the fear will be reduced. Practice also builds self confidence. Make sure you look out for next month’s Parent’s Corner tips to help your child present their ideas with confidence.

How to Present Magazine

October 2010

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SUCCESS STORIES! VANESSA FARRUGIA Peter Alexander

Vanessa has worked in the beauty & fashion industry in Strategic National Marketing, Planning and Online Management roles with retail companies such as Estee Lauder Group of Companies, M.A.C Cosmetics, David Jones & The Just Group with the Peter Alexander brand. Vanessa has a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in Marketing and Management. What presenting do you do? I have presented internationally and nationally with Media, Retail Specialists and International Company Presidents. The types of presentations range from updating and training retail field teams, u p d a t i n g re t a i l p a r t n e r s o n marketing and product strategy and presenting at international conferences to audiences that number in the hundreds.

What prompted you to attend M i c h e l l e ' s I n fl u e n t i a l Presentation Skills program? With any management role comes the requirement of presenting so The Estee Lauder Group sent me to Michelle’s course about 8 years ago as part of my development plan, just before I was promoted to a management role, to equip me with the skills to communicate more effectively. I really wanted to build my presentation skills confidence and better manage the n e r v e s o n e e n d u re s b e f o re presenting. How did Michelle's program change your attitude to presenting? Prior to undertaking Michelle’s course the thought of presenting made me cringe! The program is delivered in a safe lear ning environment - the fun and practical exercises make the content relatable & easy to retain. I have had the opportunity to put Michelle’s techniques into practice a lot and I now enjoy presenting. In general, what positive outcomes have you achieved from improving your presentation skills? I honestly do not think I would have come as far in my career without Michelle’s program – the ability to present effectively and c o n fi d e n t l y a d d s a l e v e l o f professionalism that gets noticed. I use the skills everyday negotiating with internal and external stakeholders, managing my team, and achieving brand objectives in meetings and conferences.

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In what specific ways have your presentation skills improved? Dramatically! From the way I approach planning a discussion, to the words I choose, to the execution. I am now a confident and effective presenter. I know exactly how to manage nerves and build rapport with my audience. I am regularly complimented on my p re s e n t a t i o n s t y l e a n d c a n h o n e s t l y s a y i t ’s t h a n k s t o Michelle’s course 8 years ago. What were your top three ‘take aways’ from Michelle's program all those years ago? 1. Using the art of Pacing and Leading have assisted in influencing my stakeholders and clearly conveying viewpoints in meetings and presentations. 2. A n t i c i p a t i n g a u d i e n c e objections has enabled me tailor my message to influence the outcome required in line with business needs and derive a win-win outcome for everyone . 3. The third take away, key to my presentation success, is the technique of Extending yourself – In order to feel comfortable in the location of the presentation a bit early to “feel the space” & determine where I will best position myself to build rapport and connect with my audience. I will never forget Michelle saying – “It’s not about me, Its all about the audience!” remembering this in conjunction with plenty of rehearsal has worked tremendously in giving me the confidence to present effectively and with impact.

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POWERPOINT SERVICES Powerful Points will design an outstanding presentation for you, help you improve your template, spruce your current presentation or train you or your staff in how to build presentations so they stand out, make an impression and get results! They are running a Building Powerful Presentations program on October 19th 2010 and offering a special discount to readers who contact them prior to October 14th. Simply mention How to Present Magazine. www.powerfulpoints.com.au

LIP COLOUR Girls! Want to apply your lipstick in the morning and not think about it again? Try Amplified Creme Lipstick - from M.A.C Cosmetics. Of course I LOVE ‘Girl About Town’

CD OF THE MONTH

CHARITY Are you running an event and looking for a charity to sponsor or support? The Trish MS Research Foundation was established to research a cure for multiple sclerosis and they need our help. Go to http:// www.trishmsresearch.org.au/ for more information.

BOOK OF THE MONTH

I’ve spent the last month compiling some amazing interviews with 14 of Australia’s top speakers. Email: michelle@michellebowden.com. au for advance orders.

MICHELLE RECOMMENDS

Here are some of my favourite things for you

SEMINAR

HYDRATE YOURSELF

Terry Hawkins - NSAA Educator of the year in 2010 is presenting her ME INC. program in Australia. Go to www.peopleinprogress.com.au/ programdates.php

Coffee and tea can have the effect of dehydrating you before your speak. So why not develop a taste for T2 herbal peppermint tea?

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How to Present Magazine

OK, I know it’s MY book, but if you are serious about really improving your presentation skills then I highly recommend Don’t Picture me Naked. Go to http:// www.howtopresent.com.au/ products-page/

ELIMINATE THOSE NASTY SWEAT RINGS Mitchum deodorant is the deodorant many professional speakers wear on stressful days to avoid those nasty sweat rings when you are presenting. Available at the supermarket and chemist.

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Photo Gallery

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October 2010

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