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REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS & PROPOSALS for the

Redevelopment of French Broad Trading Co-operative, Inc. Located at the 60-100 block of Biltmore Avenue Asheville, North Carolina 28801

Response Due Date: June 1, 2016 Submit proposal to: Ms. Sage Turner, Project Manager 90 Biltmore Avenue Asheville, NC 28801 CoopRFP@gmail.com


Table of Contents

Page

1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Executive Summary

3

1.2 Site Description

4

1.3 Background

5

1.4 Existing Studies

6

1.5 Soil Conditions

7

1.6 Additional testing

7

1.7 Zoning

7

1.8 Neighborhood

7

1.9 Incentives may be available

8

1.10 Community Input & Involvement

8

1.11 Questions

8

2.0 REDEVELOPMENT ISSUES TO BE ADDRESSED BY PROPOSERS 2.1 General Development

9

2.2 Land Use

10

2.3 General Information

12

2.4 Experience and Resources

12

2.5 Qualification of Vision

12

2.6 Ownership Structuring

12

2.7 Utility Uses

13

2.8 Renewable Energy

13

2.9 Building Certifications

14

2.10 Workplans and Designs

14

2.11 Financing Structure

14

2.12 Project Phasing

15

2.13 Certifications

15

2.14 Evaluation and Selection

16


1.1 Executive Summary The history of Asheville as a town began in 1784. Buncombe County was officially formed in 1792. The county seat, named “Morristown” in 1793, was incorporated and renamed “Asheville” in 1797, after NC Governor Samuel Ashe. Asheville is now the largest city in Western North Carolina, and the 11th largest in North Carolina. It is steadily increasing in population, growing each year for 40+ years, at an average annual pace of 1.3%, in the top 20th percent for growth in the all US metro areas. That equates to 3 new people moving to Asheville each day. The primary growth is in-migration. Projections from the NC Office of Budget & Management extrapolate population to City 113k, and County 300k by 2035. Asheville is a thriving hub of outdoor recreation and creative arts, and a growing community for local entrepreneurs and business innovation. Current socioeconomic issues include housing, wage, and food insecurity. City officials are expressing a need to increase the tax base and revenue streams to balance simultaneous legislative funding losses and increased demand. There is a poor job climate; citizens need more and better paying jobs. Infrastructure is beginning to suffer from rapid growth; permanent funding plans are needed. Rapid growth is also encouraging larger retailers to move to Asheville; citizens are rallying against chains. Gentrification is rampant; vacancy rates and affordability are at all-time lows. Food insecurity continues to worsen; 1 in 4 children and 1 in 5 adults do not know where their next meal will come from. French Broad Trading Co-operative was established in 1975 on the front porch of a neighborhood in Asheville, NC. The goal, as with most Co-ops in the formative years, was to source and share in bulk purchasing of better quality foods. The store moved 3 times, including a home on the French Broad River, hence the name. In 1994 a .66 acre tract of land with 2 structures was purchased in the central business district of Downtown Asheville, and the Co-op operates there to this day, with 3800 sq feet of retail. A myriad of economic upticks and downswings have occurred in our small city in recent years (current census data is 87,236 city, 247,912 County) and the Co-operative is performing better than ever before. Gross sales are at an all-time high, as are sales/sq ft, net profit, and member - ownerships. The purpose of this redevelopment is rooted in the need for the Co-operative to grow to 14k sf of retail. The Co-op believes in community building and our values stem from a focus on improving economic conditions for staff, owners, and the greater public. Our mission is to be a transformative force. As such, the Co-op was the first grocery store in the nation to be certified for paying a Living Wage. We support as much local business and persons as possible, whether it be through local farm support, job training programs, partnerships with local businesses, speaking engagements on food insecurity, policy advocacy for GMO labeling, rooftop honey bee hives and education, arts programs sponsorships, community festival hosting, classes, farmer’s market, truck load sales… and more. The Co-op is real change in real time, and is committed to utilizing assets and long term plans to continue revitalizing what was a boarded up down town block only 25 years ago. Finding partners, proposals, and a master developer that best understands these values is the goal of this RFP/Q.


1.2 Site description: Parcel 9648-49-6458 .17 acres; 7,405 square feet Address: 60 Biltmore Avenue Currently a parking lot owned by an LLC that is partnering in development Parcel 9648-49-6391 .66 acres; 28,749 square feet Address: 76 Biltmore Avenue Currently single story, 1843 sf commercial building Co-op has long term lease, option to purchase, and first right of refusal. Parcel 9648-49-7118 .67 acres; 29,185 square feet Address: 90 Biltmore Avenue Currently two buildings: French Broad Food Co-op, 7,012 sf and Warehouse, 8,904 sf Owned by Co-operative Parcel 9648-49-6087 .22 acres; 9,583 square feet Address: 100 Biltmore Avenue Currently Grey Rock Inn Hotel, 22 rooms, 4,470 sf 2 story building Owned by an LLC and partnering in development Parcel 9648-48-6949 .23 acres; 10,018 square feet Address: 102 Biltmore Avenue Currently parking lot at corner of Hilliard Ave and Biltmore Ave Owned by Co-operative Parcel 9648-49-7422 .20 acres; 8,712 square feet Address: 70 S Market Street Currently single story, 2673 sf commercial building Owned by LLC, partnership pending Total combined site: 2.15 acres, 93,652 square feet


1.3 Background:  French Broad Trading Co-operative is seeking proposals for the redevelopment of a mixed-use property at the 60 – 100 block of Biltmore Avenue  The core of the proposal is the redevelopment of the French Broad Food Co-op and its storefront needs, detailed later in this RFP  The Mission of FBTC is to be a transformative force in our community. As such, we recognize multiple socioeconomic issues of late, and desire to help change them. o

Vacancy Rate: Asheville .9%, Buncombe County .8%

o

Unemployment Rate: 4.4% Asheville, 4.6% Buncombe County

o

Median Household Income: $46k

 Downtown is a vibrant mix of residential, office, retail, entertainment, cultural, and public uses that is recognized in top lists across the nation: o

2015 Frommers: http://www.frommers.com/slideshows/847982-frommer-s-bestplaces-to-go-in-2015#slide848855

o

2015 Travel Channel : http://www.travelchannel.com/destinations/us/nc/asheville/articles/insiders-guide-toasheville

o

2015 Travel Chanel Top 5 Pet Friendly Towns: http://www.travelchannel.com/interests/pets/articles/top-5-pet-friendly-towns

o

2015 Thrillist America’s 12 Great Music Cities: https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/best-cities-for-live-music-new-york-memphisasheville-and-austin?ref=twitter-869

o

Collaborate Top 12 Foodie Cities for Meetings: http://www.collaboratemeetings.com/feature/foodie-cities/

o

2015 Business Jet Traveler Best US Foodie Mecca: http://www.bjtonline.com/lists15

o

2015 Good Morning America: http://mountainx.com/news/frommer-on-good-morningamerica-asheville-is-2015s-no-1-travel-destination/

o

2014 Good Morning America Most Beautiful Place in America: http://abcnews.go.com/Travel/best_places_USA/good-morning-americas-10-beautifulplaces-america/story?id=14235228

o

2014 Conde Nast Traveler Friendliest City in US: http://www.cntraveler.com/galleries/2014-08-04/friendliest-and-unfriendliest-cities-inus

o

2015 Huffington Post America’s Best Beer Cities: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/conde-nast-traveler/americas-best-beercities_b_6488826.html


o

2014 USA Today Best Summer Weekend Escape: http://experience.usatoday.com/weekend/story/my-weekendexperience/2014/05/30/10-best-weekend-escapes-results/9775683/

o

2015 MusicFromTheRow.com Top 10 Music Cities other Than Nashville: http://www.musicfromtherow.com/home/top-10-music-cities-other-than-nashville

o

2014 National Geographic World’s Best Cities: http://www.citizen-times.com/story/carol-motsinger/2014/10/28/asheville-best-citynational-geographic/17724233/

o

2015 Livability.com Top 100 Best Places to Live in America: http://www.livability.com/nc/asheville/real-estate/why-asheville-one-top-100-bestplaces-live-america

o

2014 USA Today 10 Best Fall foliage in USA: http://experience.usatoday.com/weekend/story/my-weekendexperience/2014/10/22/10best-fall-foliage/17718179/

o

2014 Outside Magazine Top 4 Best Towns in America: http://www.outsideonline.com/1923716/voters-choice-4-best-towns-america

o

2013 Forbes Top 25 Best Places to Retire: http://www.forbes.com/pictures/mjd45ehkdg/asheville-north-carolina/

o

USA Today Best Local Food Scene Top 10: http://www.10best.com/awards/travel/best-local-food-scene/

o

2014 Buzzfeed.com #1 Coolest Small City It’s Time To Road Trip To: http://www.buzzfeed.com/fuze/coolest-small-cities-its-time-to-roadtrip-to#.lxy7ARrMZ

1.4 Existing Studies & Plans: Boundary and Topographic Survey of all parcels, Blue Ridge Land Surveying Phase I Environmental Site Assessment, S&ME Closure Report of Underground Storage Tank Removal, Neo Corporation Code Study & Building Systems Evaluation for 76 Biltmore Avenue, Matthews Architecture Asheville Area Economic Indicators, August 2015 Downtown Asheville Master Plan, available online City of Asheville Comprehensive Parking Study, Kimley-Horn & Associates, Inc. Comprehensive Affordable Housing Strategy, City of Asheville Alternatives to Gentrification in the East of the Riverway, Syneva Economic Planning Incentives, City of Asheville


1.5 Soil Conditions: Geotechnical analysis of the parcels has not been performed. Notably, nearby projects have found subpar conditions, including previous demolition materials from razing of structures. 1.6 Additional Testing: It is the responsibility of the selected respondent to investigate all conditions of the site to their satisfaction. Access and right- of-entry to perform analysis will be granted as needed. 1.7 Zoning: Asheville Downtown Master Plan, 114 pages, published 2009 Development Code, available at municode.com View Corridor, attached image 1.8 Neighborhood: The parcels are located within the Central Business District (CBD) of the City of Asheville, amongst predominantly low rise buildings constructed in the 20th century. Area buildings accommodate specialty retail stores, offices, bars, restaurants, hotels, municipal buildings, and entertainment venues. Residential uses are occasionally located on upper floors but lack exterior access, limiting accessibility. Boundaries: North: Interstate 240 East: Charlotte Street South: Asheland and Southside Avenues West: Clingman Avenue Access: Roadway access is considered good using the following thoroughfares: Interstate 240, Interstate 26, Biltmore Avenue, Broadway Street, N & S Lexington Avenue, Asheland Avenue, Charlotte Street, Patton Avenue, Hilliard Avenue, and Clingman Avenue. Public transportation access: Asheville’s transit station (ART) is located 0.3 miles away and offers public transportation across 17 routes to all areas of the city and to the adjacent city of Black Mountain. Transit runs from 5:30 am to 10:30 pm Monday through Saturday and Sundays/Holidays 8:30 am to 6:30 pm Transit routes and information are included.


Utilities Available: Electricity, natural gas, telephone, water, sewer. Flood Hazards: The neighborhood has minimal flood hazard areas. Barriers to Growth: Few infill lots remain. The neighborhood is constrained by the limited availability of land, topography, zoning and public safety regulations, including height restrictions, and environmental protection standards. 1.9 Incentives for affordable and workforce housing may be available: o

Block grants

o

Tax credits

o

Housing trust funds

o

Fee Rebates

o

Land Use Incentive Grants

1.10 Community Input & Involvement: o

A public community input forum was held on March 21, 2015 and attended by 108 people. A summary of the results is included

o

Annual Meeting of the French Broad Co-operative was held in June of 2015, and included additional questions and input from Owners and community members

o

Owner Advisory Council, open to Owners of the Co-operative are being held on an ongoing basis

1.11 Questions: All questions regarding this RFP, its contents, or any related topic shall be submitted in writing or via email to Sage Turner, Project Manager. Contact information is included on the first page.


II. REDEVELOPMENT ISSUES TO BE ADDRESSED BY PROPOSERS 2.1 General Development & Land Uses: o

The redevelopment project must create an intensive, sustainable, vibrant, urban, mixed-use community that creates a unique experience and strong sense of place.

o

Architectural and landscape design that establishes a brand and focuses on high quality and sustainable materials

o

The food Co-operative must have ideal placement and road frontage on Biltmore Avenue.

o

Parking for the food Co-operative must be structured to support customer access with store front level spaces, with placement around the storefront entrances, and at the rate of 12 spaces per 1000 sf of Co-operative retail space, or 174 spaces. It is not required that all spaces be adjacent to the storefront.

o

Parking to support project and public needs; recent developments have reduced public spaces by hundreds

o

Integration of Co-operative systems, including extensive mechanical equipment for cooler systems and commercial kitchen

o

Integration of distinctive public, open places, and green space, with green connectivity whenever possible

o

Job creation; quality and quantity of jobs. French Broad pays a Living Wage and encourages local workers being utilized for design and construction

o

Continuity of structures along Biltmore Avenue, connecting the project to Downtown

o

Increasing residential population to support commercial development and reinforce our vision of a vibrant downtown with an active environment and that is multimodal

o

Including the maximum feasible affordable and workforce units within residential component

o

Increasing retail storefronts with restrictions on national chains and emphasis on locally owned businesses with a diverse array of services and products


o

Respect and inclusion of the historical community surrounding the block whenever possible

2.2 Land Uses:

o

Desired land uses in a sustainable, market feasible, mixed-use, high intensity urban context

o

Including retail, residential, hotel, condo, office, open space, green space, parking, community and cultural, research & development, industrial, and other used may be proposed.

o

If proposed, retail should complement existing retail in downtown and focus on the food cooperative as the primary retail location

o

If proposed, residential should provide for a mix of housing opportunities, rentals and or ownership, and across a variety of income levels, including affordable and workforce income levels. Current AMI and accepted definitions of affordable and workforce are included.

o

If proposed, office space components are encouraged to be connected, publicly accessible, provide for a variety of programs, with an emphasis on FBTC retaining ownership of retail spaces

o

If proposed, green space components are encouraged to be accessible to the public, with special interest in rooftop courtyards, gardens, grey water supported water features, and seating areas that promote outdoor and community type outdoor entertainment areas

o

if proposed, fitness based components including gyms, spas, pools, and wellness centers are encouraged to be open to all components and the ownership of the Co-operative for use

o

If proposed, a restaurant should be of like vision of the Co-operative and local food culture of Asheville

o

If proposed, shared community space is encouraged to include conference space, community rental space, creative and tech co-working, and business incubator space

o

If proposed, taller structures are encouraged to offer access and views accessible to the public

o

Ongoing management of open spaces are to be addressed


o

Permanent placement of current rooftop honeybees (Co-operative mascot]

o

Loading dock and semi-truck delivery access for Co-operative

o

Permanent placement of 20+/- farmer’s market spots to support Downtown Farmer’s Market that has been on site for decades. Co-op’s option C includes expanded sidewalks along parking connective road to support eating area and portico style market stands

o

If proposed, parking structure shall accommodate current and future needs and is encouraged to include greening, green wrapping, and or vertical greenhouse innovation. Examples are included.

o

Multiple parking entrances and levels to maximize land use and minimize turnarounds are encouraged. Access to and from S Market street is required. Working with public need and possibly partnering with the City to accommodate area parking needs is encouraged.

o

Identify any significant transportation improvements necessary to support the project

o

Adequate space to accommodate storage systems for bicyclists commuting to town and bike rental business for visitors to downtown

o

Multimodal access and functionality are encouraged


2.3 General Information: o

Names and Principals of the organization

o

Signed proposal form, included

o

Name, telephone number, address, and email of the representative(s) of your organization that are authorized to discuss your proposal

o

Please submit (12) twelve copies of the proposal, including one unbound and one electronic copy on CD/DVD in PDF format.

2.4 Experience & Resources: o

Describe your organization and is capabilities, in particular your capacity to perform this work

o

Identify and provide relevant background information about current and expected development team members

o

Two years of financial information, audited if applicable

o

Include a list of developments completed

o

Provide a detailed list of professional references

o

Provide a listing and description of all legal actions in which the firm, or any team member, has been a debtor, a defendant in a lawsuit for deficient performance on a project, a defendant in an administrative action for deficient performance on a project, or a defendant in any criminal

o

action. Include certification of installation team members by the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP

2.5 Qualification of Vision: Include a narrative that:

o

Details of mission and or vision of your organization as it relates to the Co-operative’s mission and vision

o

Includes a statement of interest, including why your organization is interested in this project, this block, and this city

o

Examples, if available, of having previous experience with community building and economic impact

2.6 Ownership structuring: o

French Broad Trading Co-operative desires to maintain ownership of its newly redeveloped buildings and other retail and offices spaces.

o

If desired, proposer should identify any interests in ownership of retail and office spaces

o

FBTC does not desire to own or manage any rental or ownership housing components


o

Detail of Ownership structure and offers/agreements needed to support such structure

2.7 Utility Uses: o o o o

Solar panel placement from neighboring parcel agreement Additional solar panels to support Co-operative Hood systems to support commercial kitchen within Co-operative Compressor byproduct heat utilization

o Recycled grey water utilization in green spaces o Edible landscaping with educational component 2.8 Renewable Energy: o FBFC is interested in exploring as much on site renewable energy generation as possible in the redevelopment. Including but not limited to solar thermal systems and photovoltaic systems (either roof mount or Building Integrated) Proposals that maximize these technologies will be considered favorably

o FBFC wishes to create a state of the art project that maximizes energy efficiency and demonstrates innovation in design of its mechanical and building control systems. Proposals that consider and include the most current innovations in advanced building HVAC systems are encouraged. Possibilities include but are not limited to:

o o o o o

Living Machines systems grey water/rain water/condensate water capture waste heat recovery units ground source heat pumps efficient lighting design including comprehensive day-lighting design and advanced building controls

o radiant ductless distributions systems o considering the integration of vertical agriculture on building loads o

Proposals should include a detailed description of the proposed installation, including proposed equipment along with warranty and life expectancy information; energy performance guarantees offered by your company; and space requirements for roof or grade mounted equipment and inside the building

o Projected costs of design and installation; a detailed description of available energy purchase financing and equipment ownership options; and calculations of the annual savings (including backup calculations) and long-term costs and benefits of your proposed installation


2.9 Building Certifications: o

Certification may be sought, proposals that consider the following are encouraged: o o o

Living Building Challenge Green Globes LEED may be pursued

Waste Removal: o

Responsible waste removal program to coincide with a proposed LEED certified project. Including detail on and plan fo dumpsters for separation of recyclable materials and general waste, not limited to sheet rock, concrete, wood, metal, glass, plastic, mixed paper, etc.

2.10 Workplans and Designs: o

Proposed development schedule

o

Key milestones for proposal and timeline for reaching key milestones, including approval of final site plan, architectural approval, and all needed City approvals

o

Timelines demonstrating the closure and removal of existing buildings, if applicable, and closing of roads for construction purposes

o

Detail of commitment to avoid interruption of current staffing and daily operations of food Cooperative

o

Overall preliminary site plans 

1” = 50” scale



Sized to fit 11” 17” for distribution

o

Prototype design details for open and green spaces

o

Color renderings, elevations and perspective views, and other illustrations which depict street scenes, facades, fenestration, energy systems

o

Green building and development plan that is demonstrated by the developer’s commitment to LEED

o

Direct and indirect economic impacts including job creation, impact on existing businesses, tax revenues, and other economic impact criteria

o

Narrative that demonstrates the project is beneficial to the community and the surrounding neighborhoods


2.11 Financing Structure: o

Proforma detailing proposed financial structure

o

Description of services to be provided by each team member

o

Descriptions of relationships with equity providers

o

Equity investment by each entity

2.12 Project Phasing:

o

Identify the amount of sf to be built by land use type and phase

o

The value of construction by land use type and phase

o

Estimated time required to build out each phase

2.13 Certifications: Please include a letter from your president, chairman, or CEO certifying that: o

no member of your organization has made inquiries or contacts with respect to this RFP, other than in an email or written communication to Sage Turner, Finance & Project Manager seeking clarification of the items contained in this RFP.

o

all information in your proposal is true and correct to the best of his/her knowledge.

o

no member of your organization gave anything of monetary value or promise of future employment, such that the person’s action or judgement will be influenced


2.14 Evaluation and Selection: A selection Committee composed of Development Committee Members, Advisory Council Members, and Development Staff will review all proposals and select a master developer. The Proposals will be evaluated under the following criteria: o

Creativity and feasibility of the proposed project

o

Aesthetic quality, design, mix and architectural compatibility of the proposed development

o

Building materials, alternative energy implementation, and sustainability

o

Evidence of availability of debt and equity sources to fund proposal

o

Ability to obtain subsidies and other resources for Affordable components

o

Proposals that use the least amount of FBTC’s resources

o

The extent to which the proposal addresses objectives set forth in RFP

o

The applicants experiences and success in redevelopment of underperforming properties

o

Past experience with obtaining subsidies and tax credits in a timely manner

o

Applicant’s demonstrated commitment to neighborhood revitalization

o

History of effective working relationships with lenders

o

Applicants ability and commitment to establish and maintain strong community relations and to create a high quality retail, public, and housing environment for the residents of the property, surrounding properties, and community partners

o

Overall responsiveness and timeliness to the requirements of the RFP

French Broad Trading Co-operative has not committed itself to undertaking the work set forth in this RFP. FBTC reserves the right to reject any and all bids, and to enter into negotiations with one or more bidders. Information regarding the property is believed to be reliable; however, interested parties should rely on their own experts and studies for counsel

Exhibits: A. Aerial view of parcels as per GIS B. Bus schedule and route for Asheville C. Overview of projects occurring in Asheville (hotels/parking/ housing) D. Summaries from community input meetings and images E. Affordable and Market Rate figures F. Printouts of buildings & concepts we like


Exhibit A


Exhibit B Overview of projects happening in the area


Exhibit C Community Meeting invites and input


Exhibit D


Exhibit E Housing and AMI criteria

UPDATE: City of Asheville adjusted Workforce Housing to 100% AMI in October of 2015

Workforce Housing Standards Maximum Rent-120% AMI

Family Size* 1 2 3 4 6

Utility Allowance** 60 77 95 117 146

100% AMI 39,250 44,813 50,428 56,000 65,000

120% AMI 47,100 53,776 60,514 67,200 78,000

Max affordable rent at120% Rent + AMI*** Utilities 1,118 1,178 1,267 1,344 1,418 1,513 1,563 1,680 1,804 1,950

80% 31,400 35,850 40,350 44,800 52,000

Max affordable rent at 80% Rent + AMI*** Utilities 725 785 819 896 914 1,009 1,003 1,120 1,154 1,300

Affordable Housing Standards Maximum Rent-80% AMI

Family Size* 1 2 3 4 6

Utility Allowance** 60 77 95 117 146

100% AMI 39,250 44,813 50,438 56,000 65,000

*Assumes 1.5 persons per bedroom. ** Utility allowances based on Housing Authority Standards for Multifamily units.


VISION Our Vision at the French Broad Food Co-op is to be a transformative force in our community and in our work, and to serve as a model of a sustainable business alternative that nurtures social and economic well-being in an environmentally sensitive manner. MISSION The French Broad Food Co-op is dedicated to serving our owners and the Western North Carolina community by providing high quality natural foods and personal care products through a mutually beneficial exchange. •

We support consumption of healthful and organic foods, grown or produced locally with ecological and social responsibility. We encourage informed choice and consumer empowerment, with an emphasis on education and customer assistance. We are committed to use profits to strengthen and improve the Co-op community, and to provide a livable wage to our employees. We pledge to maintain a pleasant environment that fosters goodwill, cooperation, and participation.

The Co-op defines “cooperative” according to the following principles, as articulated by the International Co-operative Alliance, copyright 2005 - 2010: 1. Voluntary and open membership 2. Democratic member control 3. Member economic participation 4. Autonomy and independence 5. Education, training, and information 6. Cooperation among cooperatives 7. Concern for community NONDISCRIMINATION The Co-op shall not discriminate on the basis of race, nationality, religion, age, gender, sexual preference, or other arbitrary basis.


Aerial video footage is available in high definition here: Filmed in the Fall of 2015, a drone approaches from each direction, goes up 250 ft, and includes 360 degree views from the roof of the co-op. http://www.frenchbroadfood.coop/community/expansion/

Link to Expansion Public Meeting footage: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCKGQYuU-IQ

Recent Press:

It takes a village: French Broad Food Co-op announces expansion proposals Posted on October 31, 2015 by Max Hunt

SERVING THE COMMUNITY: Since it's grassroots origins as a small, owner-led grocer in 1975, the French Broad Food Co-op has grown into one of the most popular businesses in downtown Asheville. The FBFC now plans to expand its facilities and offerings and is proposing ideas for addressing community issues of affordability and housing. Photo via the French Broad Food Co-op. Exciting news from the French Broad Food Co-op: The iconic community-owned food market and grocer has announced initial plans to expand its current space on the 60-100 block of Biltmore Avenue and plans to reach out to community organizations and the city of Asheville to begin discussions on the possibility of a massive multi-use facility. According to a press release from the FBFC, the Co-op has issued a development “request for proposals� and wants to offer the city its help in addressing several economic woes that have plagued residents in recent years.


“Co-ops have always looked at the bigger picture and how our involvement can impact even one customer or one staff or one farmer,” says Sage Turner, finance and project manager for the FBFC. “When we step back and look at the amount of land we are dealing with, we realize it would be an under-use of crucial land in downtown to simply repave it as a fancier or bigger parking lot.” She cites the FBFC’s history of innovation among local businesses — such as providing employees with a living wage, its support of community festivals like the Lake Eden Arts Festival and Lexington Avenue Arts Festival, as well as its work with local nonprofits to provide job opportunities and help feed those in need around Asheville — as reasons the grassroots organization has risen to prominence. This high local profile provides an opportunity to be a voice for the greater community and take a leadership role in addressing citywide problems, Turner says. “Before our development team published or announced any planning, we hosted a meeting that was open to the public and asked, ‘What would you do?'” she notes. “Over 100 people attended, chose the 20-plus possible topics themselves, divided into groups to elaborate, and then presented their ideas: Mixed use, addressing parking and sustainable building were the top three.” While it would be easy to get ahead of itself with all these grandiose proposals, Turner notes that “this expansion is about the co-op first. Owners want a full shopping experience, want us to remain financially strong and want us to continue our community-building work.” To that end, the co-op has conducted studies on expanding its retail floor space from the current 3,800-square-foot space to anywhere from 10,000 to 14,000 square feet. “We are aiming to become a full shopping experience for the greater community and to fill gaps that force residents of downtown to leave downtown for basic needs,” she says, noting that customers have “pleaded with us for years to add additional departments and expand areas like fresh foods, dry goods, and grab and go items.” But serving their mission downtown, Turner says, means looking beyond their immediate needs and toward some of the greater issues in the community. “We’d like to help address our astonishing [downtown] vacancy rate (0.9 percent) and do so with as much affordable and workforce housing as possible.” The FBFC is looking to partner with organizations around the community and city officials to begin discussions on how the expansion project can possibly incorporate units for housing, retail, a new parking deck and public space, among other ideas. “We’ve run the studies. We can see growth, but also limits,” Turner says. “The conversation has become: Is just a store the highest and best use? Can we do more? If we can find the right partners we can help address several economic woes.” FBFC General Manager Bobby Sullivan concurs, saying, “We think we have a unique opportunity here to anchor this side of downtown to be everything local people want for the future of Asheville.” The co-op has already let several organizations involved in housing and equity issues in on its vision, including Mountain Housing Opportunities, whose Vice President and Director of Community Investments, Cindy Visnich Weeks, is excited about the idea. “MHO is committed to visionary projects like this,” she says of the FBFC’s proposal. “They change the development paradigm while meeting the housing and economic development needs of our local citizens.”


While Weeks acknowledges that such grandiose projects can be more challenging to finance and build, she notes that “they are more sustainable and are always the ones we are proudest of.” And according to Turner, the FBFC understands that the issues facing the community are complex and interconnected. “We can build all the affordable housing we want, but if we do so apart from food and transportation access, we have only band-aided the issue and created a new one.” While the Co-op has proposed and implemented ideas to address some of the socioeconomic woes of their patrons and the surrounding community for years, including rooftop gardens, food donations and fulfilling needs in “food deserts” throughout the area, Turner says that, “ultimately, co-ops require volume to succeed and prosper. Any one of those ideas could have stretched us too thin in our lean state of $4 million [in] annual sales and 2-4 percent net profitability.” But she adds that Asheville residents’ unique focus on supporting local businesses and making conscious decisions in what they buy and where they shop presents an opportunity for the co-op to flourish even as it expands its scope. “We’d like to grow this co-op to $10 million or more in sales, create more jobs, support more producers and farms, keep food prices low for our community, and create a 2-4 percent net margin that provides enough cash flow to do the aforementioned dreams without putting the co-op at risk.” The FBFC hopes to finalize its expansion plans in 2016 and begin construction sometime in 2017. “It’s such an exciting time for the co-op and the greater community of Asheville,” says Clare Schwartz, Outreach Coordinator for FBFC. “I invite you to become an owner and join our vision to support local, create healthy and sustainable jobs and relationships and, as our Global Ends Policy states, serve as a model of a sustainable business alternative that nurtures social and economic well-being.” For more information on the French Broad Food Co-op, its current offerings and community programs and its proposals for expansion, check out frenchbroadfood.coop or see the official press release below.


10.29.15 Press release:

Downtown co-op issues development RFP for 60100 block of Biltmore AVE, offers city opportunity to address several current economic woes The Co-op to build bigger store on current site, seeks partners for housing, retail, offices, parking deck, public space, and a poses a radical question: Could a Co-op & City owned hotel help fund community needs? Asheville, NC, – In case you hadn’t noticed, the community owned French Broad Food Co-op is a local socioeconomic powerhouse. What began in 1975 as a group of citizens trying to source better quality foods has evolved into a growing engine of community fervor and impact, channeling $20M through Asheville in the last five years. Notably, the Co-op became the nation’s first certified living wage grocer and became a primary sponsor of LEAF in Schools & Streets, LAAFF, and other area causes that support community. They added a hot bar, filled it with food made by GO! job training programs, and completed the cycle by sending leftover hot foods to area shelters each night. They’ve hosted urban homesteading fairs and brought chickens, rabbits, fruit trees, and classes into town. The Co-op has hosted a downtown’s farmer’s market for 18 years, added downtown’s first rooftop honeybees, sent their CEO to Capitol Hill to fight for GMO labeling, and maintained sales growth in one of the most saturated natural foods markets in the US- even after multiple big box chains opened. The Co-op has always looked to local producers and farmers first and focused on ways to get affordable foods to the public. Getting involved means saving money on groceries, and quadrupling in size means increased opportunities for many local businesses and farms, as well as 60+ new permanent jobs, and hundreds, if not thousands, of temporary jobs during construction. Sage Turner, Finance & Project Manager says, “This expansion is about the Co-op first. Owners want a full shopping experience, want us to remain financially strong, and want us to continue our communitybuilding work. Our Owners are also bright and innovative folks, quickly voting mixed use and sustainability to the top of the priorities list. One Owner inspired me, saying, ‘It isn’t affordable housing if our Co-op staff can’t afford it.’ The Co-op can limit the expansion to only a larger footprint store. We’ve run the studies. We can see growth, but also limits. The conversation has become, is just a store the highest & best use? Can we do more? If we can find the right partners we can help address several economic woes. We may be Beer City and Best Destination this and that, but we are also top ten food insecure and have a .9% vacancy rate. And let’s not forget the over crowded streets, infrastructure demands, loss of revenues due to legislative changes, and the community’s desire for more public space in downtown. Everything comes down to viability. We won’t put the Co-op at risk, we’re simply saying let’s have this conversation.” Bobby Sullivan, the General Manager of the Co-op says, “Co-ops offer a dynamic business model that nurtures authentic relationships with the local community to make sure local people have a say in how


businesses develop in their city. We think we have a unique opportunity here, to anchor this side of downtown to be everything local people want for the future of Asheville.” Cindy Visnich Weeks, VP & Director of Community Investments at Mountain Housing Opportunities says, “MHO is committed to visionary projects like this. They change the development paradigm while meeting the housing and economic development needs of our local citizens. Infill, mixed use, redevelopment projects may be more difficult to finance and construct but they are more sustainable and are always the ones we are proudest of.” Clare Schwartz, Outreach Coordinator for the Co-op says, “It’s such an exciting time for the Co-op and the greater community of Asheville. I invite you to become an Owner & join our vision to support local, create healthy & sustainable jobs and relationships and, as our Global Ends Policy states, serve as a model of a sustainable business alternative that nurtures social and economic well-being. We’ve extended our Owner Drive through Nov 5. Come see us.”


Food Co-Op looking at housing, offices John Boyle, jboyle@citizen-times.com 9:33 a.m. EDT October 30, 2015

ASHEVILLE — Already determined to expand its own store and add a parking garage, the French Broad Food Co-Op is now thinking even bigger. An institution in Asheville for 40 years, the Co-Op previously announced plans to triple the size of its Biltmore Avenue store, opened in 1996, and add a parking deck, as well as some public space. But now the member-owned food store is seeking partners to help explore the possibility of building office and affordable housing space, more retail and possibly even a "cityowned hotel" that could help fund community needs. "We were already being presented with opportunities from developers, so we decided to sideline them and say, 'We think these are great ideas, but we think even better ones are out there,'" said Sage Turner, finance and project manager for the Co-Op. "We have been approached by several developers." Through a news release issued Oct. 28, the Co-Op is asking for formal request-for-proposals from developers. Turner said the plan is to officially issue the notice with a Nov. 1 start date and a 90-day time frame, with a possibility for extensions. "We’ve had some initial engineering done," Turner said, referring to the store plans and parking deck. "We would love to have plans finalized sometime in 2016, and construction starting in 2017." Asheville Mayor Esther Manheimer said Wednesday the city is "always looking for opportunities to partner with folks to explore opportunities to address issues that we’ve got in the city, such as affordable housing." The mayor said she's met with Turner once and other city officials have discussed the co-op's ideas with them. "We would explore opportunities to partner with them," Manheimer said. "I hope through the (requestfor-proposals) process, that that would enable people with experience in these mixed-use developments to step forward with ideas."


While Turner notes that some cities in other states have built and operate hotels, Manheimer said that likely would prove difficult in North Carolina, which generally prohibits governments from competing with private sector companies. Right now, the Co-Op is mostly looking to get some ideas on the table and figure out the best possible use for the land. The Co-Op owns two parcels along Biltmore Avenue outright and has a long-term lease and right to purchase on another, with three other nearby parcels owned by others but potentially in the mix. In all, the Co-Op believes 2.15 acres could be transformed. In 2014, the Co-Op became essentially debt-free. Its owners — a group of Asheville-dwelling stakeholders 2,400-people strong — know they have a hot commodity with several parcels of land on one of downtown's busiest streets. "We think we have a unique opportunity here, to anchor this side of downtown to be everything local people want for the future of Asheville.� Bobby Sullivan, the general manager of the Co-Op, said in the news release.


Asheville's French Broad Co-Op expands, stays rooted Mackensy Lunsford, mlunsford@citizen-times.com 8:21 a.m. EDT September 10, 2014

(Photo: wsanders@citizen-times.com ) Story Highlights • • •

The French Broad Food Co-Op has plans to add a parking garage which will open up to S. Market Street behind the store, enabling easier access. The store will likely triple in size, adding a full-service meat counter and deli. The store's 1,600 owners own outright the downtown Asheville property on which the Co-Op is situated.

Focusing on natural foods was seen as alternative — even a little weird — around the time a small group of people who took eating right seriously hatched the idea that became French Broad Food Co-Op. The food-buying club started on a few front porches in the mid-1970s, made its first expansion by moving into a potter's shed and then found some elbow room in a previously abandoned building on Carolina Lane. With a prime downtown spot today — and a payroll nearing $1 million — the co-op is planning to triple its size, add a parking garage and go toe-to-toe with bigger stores also emphasizing natural foods. The groundbreaking for an expansion has a loose target of late 2016. "We really need a full-service meat counter, a full-service deli, all that stuff," said Bobby Sullivan, the store's general manager. "It's nice that we have all of these examples of stores in Asheville that we can look at and say 'Hey, let's do this.'" The growth marks French Broad Food Co-Op's largest expansion since it opened a storefront in downtown Asheville in 1996.


Favorite example of rooftop green space and park, flanked by housing

Rooftop housing and or office space with green roof


Deep sidewalks to accomodate heavy pedestrian traffic, outdoor seating, and planters.


Green wrapping


Exterior aesthetic and fenestration samples


Exterior aesthetic and fenestration samples


Green roof with shared and public space


Rooftop gardening


Connectivity lined with green space


Art infused connectivity and common space


Another favorite concept: painted interior of parking structure. Host local artists?

Camouflaged parking deck with housing above, concept potentially along the backside of Market St. Incorporate art somehow.

Art infused parking structure


Multimodal support secured garages and rentals


Public bike rental, park cars in deck, disperse into downtown on bikes


parking deck with bicylce storage


parking deck with food systems


French Broad Food Coop: Area Map Prepared by Wildwood Consulting, LLC Septemer 2015

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French Broad Food Coop: Tree Map Prepared by Wildwood Consulting, LLC Septemer 2015

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French Broad Trading Cooperative Tree Study 1 ID

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Species Thornless Honeylocust Thornless Honeylocust Thornless Honeylocust Thornless Honeylocust Thornless Honeylocust Thornless Honeylocust Thornless Honeylocust Thornless Honeylocust Serviceberry Serviceberry Serviceberry Serviceberry Colorado Blue Spruce Colorado Blue Spruce Colorado Blue Spruce Colorado Blue Spruce pear apple peach apple peach Pear Silver Maple Pyracantha Pyracantha Pyracantha Pyracantha American sycamore Eastern Redbud Eastern Redbud Eastern Redbud Box Elder Apple Weeping Willow American Sycamore Box Elder White ash European Cherry Tree-of-Heaven White Ash Tree-of-Heaven Hackberry Boxelder Boxelder Southern Catalpa Wild Black Cherry Tree-of-Heaven Tree-of-Heaven Tree-of-Heaven Tree-of-Heaven American Sycamore Boxelder Hackberry Hackberry Tree-of-Heaven Apple Red Maple Redbud Redbud Black locust averages

DBH Apx. Ht Native 8 20 Native varietal 8 20 Native varietal 8 20 Native varietal 8 20 Native varietal 8 20 Native varietal 8 20 Native varietal 8 20 Native varietal 8 20 Native varietal 6 15 Native varietal 6 15 Native varietal 6 15 Native varietal 6 15 Native varietal 9 30 Non-native 9 30 Non-native 9 30 Non-native 9 30 Non-native 1 5 Fruit 1 5 Fruit 3 10 Fruit 1 5 Fruit 5 15 Fruit 8 40 Fruit 6 25 Native 1 5 Non-native 1 5 Non-native 1 5 Non-native 1 5 Non-native 36 90 Native 4 15 Native 4 15 Native 4 15 Native 5 20 Native 3 10 Fruit 26 25 Non-native 41 90 Native 12 30 Native 9 50 Native 11 60 Non-native 8 30 Non-Native 12 50 Native 16 60 Non-Native 14 50 Native 15 40 Native 13 40 Native 20 65 Native 7 35 Native 11 60 Non-Native 15 60 Non-Native 16 60 Non-Native 10 60 Non-Native 35 90 Native 8 30 Native 10 55 Native 7 45 Native 7 30 Non-Native 4 25 Fruit 11 40 Native 3 10 Native 3 10 Native 13 65 Native 566 9.4

Natural Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Planted Natural Planted Planted Planted Planted Natural Planted Planted Planted Natural Planted Planted Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Natural Planted Planted Planted Planted Natural

total trees: 60 total species 21 city owned 8 removed since study 4 average age 9.6 years

Notes City Owned, Dead City Owned City Owned City Owned City Owned, Dead City Owned City Owned City Owned

immature immature immature needs pruning needs pruning

65-85 years old?

65-85 years old? Dying

65-85 years old? Dying Dying

Dying


Planning & Development INCENTIVES SUSTAINABILITY IN EVERY DEPARTMENT

Incentives for Development The City of Asheville offers incentives and other resources that encourage sustainable development and building practices. Designed to support long term environmental, economic, and social goals and plans developed for our region, these incentives promote affordable, fiscally responsible, green and sustainable development. Consistent with the objectives outlined in Asheville City Council’s Strategic Goals, these incentives encourage development projects that improve the quality of life for city residents, and lead to increased job growth and economic development. Providing much needed affordable housing, while encouraging a mixed use development area along transit corridors within the city limits, incentives help increase the livability of Asheville, a city with long term viability, while preserving our nearby mountain landscapes. Since affordability and sustainability are both objectives, we invite you to review all of our current incentive programs, and return to our site often as new opportunities are listed. How do these incentives fit into the big picture? The City of Asheville has adopted long term development plans that serve as a roadmap to realize the vision of a sustainable Asheville

The City of Asheville Planning and Development Department is here to help create this city with vision: providing technical assistance, recognition, preference, expedited review, and cost-savings to eligible participating projects. Pre-application meetings are available to assist developers with project assessment and eligibility.

CITY OF ASHEVILLE

Quick Links: Land Use Incentive Policy Sustainability Development Map Sustainable Development Projects Bonus Evaluation Form Sustainable Development Ordinance

Large employers considering relocation or expansion to Asheville are especially encouraged to contact the city for information related to incentives and other accommodations. These planning and construction based incentives can be used individually or in combination with each other:

Low Interest Loans

Low Interest Loans

support the development of the Glen Rock Depot, a mixed use project with both historic renovation & new LEED construction.

Land Use Incentive Grants Cost Sharing for Public Infrastructure Fee Rebates Increased Density Bonus New Incentives Under Consideration

www.ashevillenc.gov/incentives

Permit Fee Rebates First permit plan review rebate was issued to Biltmore Farms LLC, for the Hilton Asheville, after achieving LEED Silver Certification


PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT INCENTIVES

Low Interest Loans:

The Affordable Housing Trust Fund

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Creating more affordable housing is a priority of the City of Asheville. The City of Asheville Affordable Housing Advisory Group was established to work in conjunction with City leadership and staff to implement the 2008 Affordable Housing Plan

Created in 2000, The City of Asheville’s Affordable Housing Trust Fund program has helped support the development of affordable housing: $7.7 million has been loaned to support the addition of 751 affordable rental and homeownership units within our area. All permanent financing for rental housing will be in the form of secured loans for a term up to thirty years. The Housing Trust Fund will not make grants, forgivable loans or indefinitely deferred loans. All construction loans will be due and payable 24 months from the date of closing.

MOST RECENT LOANS

Beaucatcher Properties will receive a loan for $200,000 amortized at 3 percent interest for 30 years for the construction of a $1,1610,000, 18-unit rental development. Mountain Housing Opportunities will receive two grants from the fund to complement its federal HOME grant in the amount of $235,000 for continuing to develop the Glen Rock Hotel. MHO will pay 2 percent interest on a deferred-principal loan in the amount of $165,000; and 2.5 percent interest on a $55,000 loan amortized over 20 years.

Call XXXX for more information The Trust Fund supports affordable housing in Asheville, like The Griffin Apartments, developed by Mountain Housing Opportunities

Working with the Office of Economic Development If you are interested in opportunities for development in the City of Asheville, the Office of Economic Development offers assistance throughout the process before the review process may begin with Department of Planning. Economic Development supports sustainable, diverse and economically vibrant economic and workforce development. Facilitating industry and neighborhood business clusters, establishing collaborative partnerships, the City of Asheville strives to create a business friendly environment while addressing the overall needs of the community. Services offered include assistance for minority businesses, real estate management and economic planning development. To learn more, review our policies or get involved by contacting the Planning and Economic Development Committee. Economic Development Incentives Policy Planning and Economic Development Committee

New Belgium Brewery will take advantage of economic development incentives in their expansion to the River Arts District


PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT INCENTIVES

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FEE REBATES

Fee rebates are calculated using an assessment formula, but may also be combined with other incentives to offer an attractive financial return on investment. This is addition to the benefits enjoyed by the community, and for generations to come.

Rebate Public Objectives The objectives of planning incentives are to encourage the development of affordable and sustainable projects along transit friendly corridors.

Rebate Public Process Planning incentive grants and rebates require a public hearing before the Asheville City Council.

Fee Rebates The City of Asheville Land Use Incentive Policy provides incentives to encourage development projects that fulfill important public objectives outlined in City Council’s Strategic Plan. Projects located within the Sustainability Map area may qualify for property tax exemptions and fee reductions by gaining public benefit points related to green building/energy; affordable and workforce housing; and mixed-use and transit orientation. Incentive grants require a public hearing before the City Council and are granted based on an evaluation of the submitted project.

10% Reduction in fees for every ten points earned, in addition to rebates for affordable housing

This reduction is in addition to the existing fees rebated for affordable housing projects.

10 Points FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT AT XXXXXXXX

Contact Info

Every 10 points can earn one year of economic incentive equivalent to city property taxes, (in excess of currently assessed taxes for one year) annually applied, from the date of the release of all occupancy permits and certification of all green building and/or energy standards designated for the project. Tax rebate incentives can’t begin until designated third party certification is received. Every ten points can also earn a 10% reduction in related fees and charges: zoning permit, building permit, driveway permit, grading permit, plan review fees, and water service connection fees.

FAST FACTS

Can earn up to one year of economic incentives equivalent to one year of city property taxes

Assessment Formula

Asheville’s Sustainability Map was created so that development would be encouraged in transit friendly areas close to employment, shopping and schools

Affordable housing projects eligible for the 50% fee waiver are not eligible for additional fee waivers for points garnered for housing affordability, although they can benefit from the “green” additional points.


Land Use Incentive Grants

PUBLIC BENEFIT POINTS

The City of Asheville Land Use Incentive Policy provides incentives to encourage development projects that fulfill important public objectives outlined in City Council’s Strategic Plan. Projects located within the Sustainability Map area may qualify for property tax exemptions and fee reductions by gaining public benefit points related to green building/energy; affordable and workforce housing; and mixed-use and transit orientation. Incentive grants require a public hearing before the City Council and are granted based on an evaluation of the submitted project.

Affordable Housing

Assessment Formula: Every 10 points can earn one year of economic incentive equivalent to city property taxes, (in excess of currently assessed taxes for one year) annually applied, from the date of the release of all occupancy permits and certification of all green building and/or energy standards designated for the project. Tax rebate incentives can not begin until designated third party certification is received. Every ten points can also earn a 10% reduction in related fees and charges: zoning permit, building permit, driveway permit, grading permit, plan review fees, and water service connection fees.

Must agree to 10 year affordability, with rents at 80% of area medium income: 10%+ affordable: 10 points 20%+ affordable 20 points 30%+ affordable 30 point 40%+ affordable: 40 Points

Workforce Housing Must agree to 10 year affordability criteria for rents at 120% of area medium income: 25%+ workforce : 5 points 50%+ workforce: 10 points 75%+ workforce: 15 points

This reduction is in addition to the existing fees rebated for affordable housing projects. Affordable housing projects eligible for the 50% fee waiver are not eligible for additional fee waivers for points garnered for housing affordability, although they can benefit from the “green” additional points.

Green Building & Energy

Minimum requirements for Land Use Incentive Grants: • • • • •

Energy Star certification Developers assume all legal costs if incentives are challenged 20% equity participation by the party requesting the incentive The proposed development must consist of two or more dwelling units The project is inside Asheville city limits and within ¼ mile of the following major highways: Patton Ave, Hendersonville Road, Sweeten Creek Road, Tunnel Road, Haywood Road, Merrimon Avenue, New Leicester Highway, and Brevard Road, and to the end of the city’s corporate limits. See Sustainability Area Map.

Energy Star Certified: 5 points LEED Bronze or Healthy Built Silver: 10 points LEED Silver or Healthy Built Gold: 20 point LEED Gold or Healthy Built Platinum: 30 points LEED Platinum: 40 points

Mixed Use & Transit Orientation Minimum 20% non-residential: 5 Points Within a “Sustainability Bonus” area:5 Points Brownfield Development: 15 Points


PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT INCENTIVES

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Density Bonus Developed with the Mayor’s task force on Affordable Housing and community stakeholders, and a public hearing process, “Sustainable Development Projects” offer an increased density option in exchange for affordable and/or green building projects. Projects are assigned points based on the features of the project. “Green building” is based on LEED Certified or NC Healthy Built third party certification. Changed from a Conditional Use Permit application to a Use-by-right application, the density bonus has eligibility requirements and includes mandatory and optional elements Density Bonus Eligibility Requirements • Project site must be located within 1/8 mile of key transportation corridors. • Must be a minimum of 5 units & must be energy star certified • Additional density may be applied to the base density Mandatory Elements : • Good Neighbor Agreement • Design compatibility standards for: Parking Building orientation & design Pedestrian orientation/ multi-modal features • Deed restrictions on affordable units • Certification of LEED or Healthy Built units

Example of mixed use development consistent with density objectives

Affordable Housing and Green Building For an affordable housing project, an additional 10% may be added to the affordable housing density bonus for each level of NC Healthy Built or corresponding LEED Certification achieved.

Green Building and Affordable Housing For a green building project, an additional matching percentage of bonus may be added for the percentage of affordable units included in the project.

Density Bonus Affordable Criteria: • 50-80 points = 20% density bonus • 81-100 points = 50% density bonus • 100+ points = 100% density bonus Density Bonus Optional Elements • Projects may be affordable and/or green • Affordable: points assigned based on features of the project • Green: based on LEED or NC Healthy Built (NCHB) Green Building Density Bonus Option: • • • •

NC Healthy Built Silver: 20% density bonus LEED Silver or NC Healthy Built Gold: 40% density bonus LEED Gold or NC Healthy Built Platinum: 60% density bonus LEED Platinum: 80% density bonus

Depot Street in Asheville at the turn of the century, and in 2010. Density bonuses are meant to help revitalize pre-existing neighborhoods like the River Arts District, and prevent sprawl development.


PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT INCENTIVES

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Cost Sharing, Public Infrastructure Option 1 : 50% rebate of water connection fees for Green projects, including tap and meter for single family homes, and meter for commercial projects (fees vary based on size of meter.)

Option 2 :

As much as 50% of the costs can be shared for connection fees and public water line infrastructure

Example for Option One:

Cost sharing for new public water line Infrastructure • Water is an enterprise fund and water revenue must be reinvested in water infrastructure • $200,000 of water fund money set aside every year, projects must compete for available funds

Single Family- Tap and Meter = $2,303.00, eligible for total rebate of: $1,151.50 Commercial 2” drop in meter = $9,813.80, eligible for total rebate of: $4,906.90

• Development must meet 80 points from evaluation form • Must include 5 or more residential units • Minimum 20 year investment payback • 50% of infrastructure cost or $100,000, which ever is less

Example for Option Two: • New 70 unit apartment building • All units are “affordable”, scores 90 points on evaluation form • Requires new water line extension from main road along new road

New line estimated cost is $220,000.00 Additional Infrastructure Cost Sharing may be available for storm water mitigation, evaluated on a case by case basis

City participation, sharing costs of: $100,000.00


Long Term Development Plans A Sustainable Vision for the City of Asheville: Long Term Planning

Plans have been developed and adopted for our region to provide a roadmap to realize the vision of a sustainable Asheville. A “triple bottom line” approach to sustainability, which includes economic , social as well as environmental goals and objectives, was an essential part of the planning process. A green and sustainable Asheville is a core strategy in the City of Asheville Strategic Plan adopted by City Council for fiscal year 2010-2011. These plans were creating using a process of stakeholder and public engagement, best practices review, and consideration of Asheville’s unique population, history and culture. Plans are reviewed and revised as new opportunities, leadership and feedback shape the vision, continually in progress.

City of Asheville Strategic Plan

Sustainability Management Plan Downtown Master Plan Affordable Housing Plan Individual Neighborhood Plans New! East of the Riverway Project Greenways Recommendations and Plans Wilma Dykeman Riverway Plan

Want to get involved in planning, development and sustainability at the City of Asheville? The SACEE Committee or Sustainable Advisory Committee on Energy and the Environment serves to research and support the development of sustainability initiatives across disciplines. Working closely with City staff and community organizations, SACEE contributes to the policy development and implementation throughout the calendar year.


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SUTTON AVE PARK-N-RIDE Transfer To Mountain Mobility’s Black Mountain Trailblazer

HOW TO RIDE THE BUS Boarding Locate a signed bus-stop along the route you are traveling. Make sure you are on the side of the road in the direction you wish to travel. Ensure you are visible to the driver; a courteous wave can be useful. Stand behind the curb while the bus approaches. Have the exact fare ready. If you plan on transferring to another route, ask the driver for a transfer ticket.

Departing Touch the yellow “touch tape” on the bus before you arrive at your desired stop. If you need wheelchair or other assistance, wait for the driver to assist you. All buses have bike racks on the front of the bus. When departing the bus, inform the driver you need to unload your bike.

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his

W

to

Bu

r ve

Ri

t Pa

Rd

To Asheville Regional Airport

lem

O LID AY

Sa

S3

ing az

Am es ov Gr

w

H

NDAY

Rd

Fanning Bridge

t

SU

h

po r Air

e N en arr Rd W lson i W

Rock Hill Pl

Rd

l

Hil Rock

Rock Hill

Buck Shoals

nc

ls

Busbee View

US 70

O

ue

Bl

Warren Wilson College Library

ou

D

170

ra

oa

TO BLACK MOUNTAIN

PORTER’S COVE RD.

S5

e ov

Sweeten Creek Industrial Park

W Chapel Dawnwood Cir

Forestdale

Glen Bridge

170

rw ay River

sB

l

Taft

Caribou

E2 O LID AY

n

Un

aka

Rid

Sw

v. Go

hw

st Ea

r ne

d

Re

Moffit Branch Rd

Rd Vi

Ar

ro

ew

co

ok

tt ke

oo Ove rb d

oc Cr

ac

nil

Ke

Sto

ck di

H

NDAY

Be

er y

h wo

rt

ive

gs rin Sp le M

ap

Haw Cr O ld Ne w

H

Middlebrook

J r.

K

ans nst Du St

New Haw Creek Rd

Ing les SEE DOWNTOWN INSET

C @ harl Co ott lle e ge

Biltmore Ave

ia Victor

Ha

ith

a rni be Hi

Pressley

e eg Co ll

sto P n Gr ine ov e

Rd d Brevard

Fai

Charlotte

n Merrimo Asheland

S. French Broad Ave

Ga

an gm Clin

Louis iana

Cha rlo

He igh t iv. Ha yw oo

Westwood

ar rF ge

Hanover

k ar me

rP

iew rv ve

ea D

M

Be a

Ci r

W est wo o

ham Bing

na Louisia

Nevada

ts

e

Ap

or tm

es W

Ro

V ir g in ia

rd Fo

W olf eC

ov e

Elkwood

Un N Be ar C reek

Rd ew Vi h ga Pis

O LID

aR nano Swan

R ive r R d

Jim

Av on

E

SU

AB

rC

p

MOR BILT

E

Federal

Hawthorne

te

to

h

ton

Spruce

g Lexin

Churc

COX

ASHELAND

R

JR. D

nder

AY

VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER

Gov.View Rd

r Po

sS

Valley

on

in

T DS

s

ry

E1

Manna Food Bank

Ridge

Bu

TTE RLO C HA

Oak

et Mark

Y DWA BROA

gt Lexin

Rank

OO YW HA

Page

en O’H

Dillingham

d

C h a pe

k

360 W. Haywood St., Asheville, NC 28801

W

n Cree

49 Coxe Ave. Downtown Information Desk

Fairview Ave

S1

Forest

ille

i

iride@ashevillenc.gov

E1 Night Service Ends

Fairvie w Rd

Sweete

onv

Text “41411” then enter your “nextART ID#” or call 828.253.5691

@

MLK

Kensington

Swan nano a

I-240

t ar h nc ra yB

Transfer To T Henderson County Apple Country Transit

Shiloh

u Caribo

ers le

Route Terminus

Get transit directions with GoogleMaps at: ridetheart.com

H

US

MEDICAL PARK DRIVE

Heywood

Sh

Airport Park Dr

828-253-5691 TDD/TTY: 711

S p r u c e H ill

oo W

Busbee

Blake

alm W

Transfer Point to Regional Service

Asheville Airport Terminal

Ridgefield

CONTACT US

na

od wo

T

Note: Be sure to locate the bus stop sign and be on the side of the street in the direction you desire to travel.

26

cK en

ck

Major Transfer Point

ul

Jeffress

ville son der Hen

Hen d ad Br

Ro

Haywood

Ha

d

rd

One-Way Service

on

Pine Tree Dr

Chapel

W. Chapel

Linamar

ld

M

Heart

er

NDAY

Azalea

Wyatt

Forest

O

Not to scale

I N T E R S TAT E

Haywood Rd at Avon Ave

Av

Rd

40

Bostic

Long Shoals

Ingles

Sardis

U-

lR

S3

Mills Gap

Pine

ASHEVILLE OUTLETS

Be ve rly

I N T E R S TAT E

Springside

Dogwood

Asheville Outlets

ek Cre

Arco

Belvedere

NDAY

Gerber

W2

ne

Shady Oak

n Londo

SU

H Peachtree O LID AY Turtle Creek

26

ART Station - Patton - N Louisiana - Emma

SU

e

Lambeth

Breva

W5

M il l

Haw Creek Area Served by buses going toward downtown only

Bethesda

Cheerio

Raleigh

Carolina Day School

Rocky Ridge

aumont Be

Alexa

Brooklyn

I N T E R S TAT E

ART Station - Patton - New Leicester

un

Irwin

Ascot Point

ART Station - Patton - Goodwill

aw

KOHLS/ WALMART

Future

E Sweeten ast vie Creek w

Farmer’s Market

Pond

W E W3 S T W4

ST

Ree

ll nvi rso nd e

O LID AY

I N T E R S TAT E

ART Station - Hilliard - Clingman - Haywood PVA - Brevard - Asheville Outlets

nel

S

oa River nan n a w

Vanderbilt Park

W2

Tun a

S4

Greenbriar

River Hills

S Bear Creek

W1

k

Rd r ro

ale

Bryson

Lodge

40

I N T E R S TAT E

Oti

tn Au

gd

H

240

ART Station - Hilliard - Clingman - Haywood PVA - Deaverview Area

Asheville Mall

Warwick

d

UNDAY

S

oo br w illo W

yM

PVA hC Community Hig Center 240 I-240

ART Station - Tunnel Rd - Warren Wilson Swannanoa River - Black Mountain

rin

ART Station - Asheville Mall - Haw Creek - Tunnel

ur

Th

He

170

Shelburne

d lan

Caledonia

ore

t our

l Rd Tunne

Do

Biltm

Morningside

r

Student Center

A-B TECH

Harvest House

d

oo

rw She

sD ctor

lle HS

GOOD WILL PARK-N-RIDE

I N T E R S TAT E

E2

Sp

a

l oriaal Mem pit Hos

240

ill

Oakland

no

y

anb

Gr

tH

na

Normandy

res

an

Southern

ital

tal

I N T E R S TAT E

Chateau

w

spi

Waters

Kenilworth

White Pine

sp Ho

Ashevi

Pe

Davenport

ia

an

ylv

s nn

Montana

Livingston

te

Transfer To Mountain Mobility’s Enka-Candler Trailblazer

Sw

HILLIARD

Dailey

z ard

Bell

Kirkman

Fo

Bear Creek

Depot

I-240

cta

Choctaw

eek

Chunns Cove

McCormick

Ho

SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

Rd

Short Coxe

ll

H

t

on

m

r Ve

nel

Southside/Charlotte

o Ch

we

lfe

Su

Choctaw

Southside

Do

p rS

o ayw

Brownwood

ML

Mc

od

RIVER Bartlett ARTS DISTRICT

Morgan

S2

e Pin

m.

s

g rin

Tun

Ele

T

Ri

ege

son

e

u Bl

Rumbough

O LID AY

ick

Cl

e dg

Marcellus

d

n

Vernell

Avon

Haywoo o int

Aston Park Towers

Cravens

Druid

d Rd

H

D ac

P

Chestnut

ART MULTIPLE ROUTES Asheville Mid. Sch.

n atto

Aston

Haz

Blair

Woodfin

OUTES IPLE R

Sta

ART Station - Tunnel - Asheville Mall - South Tunnel Swannanoa River - VA

Iss

ce

en

vid

o Pr

Wilborn

W3

E1

ston John

Cub

NDAY SU

E A S T

for nt

ART Station - Biltmore - Hospital - Biltmore Village Fairview - Swannanoa River - Wood Ave

ate

S5

a

O

tg Wes

S4

Dea ver view

n

Eagle

Howland

Coll

Owens Bells Roberts

Patto

t

on

km

Chestnut

Cullowhee

MULT

rt

O LID AY

ART Station - S French Broad - Depot Livingston Heights - AB Tech

Hazel Mill

Druid

W1

CANTERBURY APTS.

r

ark

H

ste

rie

Hillside

Courtland

s kin At ross ll C Hi

ida

S3

ART Station - Asheland - McDowell Biltmore Village - Hendersonville Rd - Airport

Disability Partners

UNDAY

Flor

S

eice

Reso

Ne wL

nt P

ART Station - Biltmore - Hospital - Forest Hill Kenilworth - Chunns Cove - Social Security

Rege

S2

Old County Home/ Evelake

O LID AY

n co

PARK

MLK JR. P A RK

CITY & COUNTY BLDGS.

Marjo

Sawyer

ASTON

M o u nt ain

Bond

Hillside

Chestnut

on

Hillcrest (3 Stops)

ill aH

t

mp

NDAY

N3

H

Emm

on

Waneta

Mo

a

Emm Co

S O U T H

SU

m

Emma Elem. Sch.

gha

ART Station - Biltmore - Hospital - Biltmore Village London - Shiloh - Caribou - Rock Hill - Sweeten Creek

26

ON

PATT

ard

GE

LLE

CO

Edwin

I N T E R S TAT E

Bin

w Ne ster ce Lei

e om

yH

unt Co

S1

Eliada Home Rd

KLONDYKE

Keith

Ma

Spears

Crossroad

Mosswood

Murdock

Coleman

Santee Bulldog Panola Watauga

(2 Stops)

Arctic LAND OF SKY REGIONAL COUNCIL

N

ut Waln

DOWNTOWN LIBRARY

Pritch

HILLIARD

Longchamps Condominium

eaver WT W

Edgemont

d O LID AY eR idg r B Pearson on Bridge Rd ars Pe

l Hil

Chamberlain Dr

GROVE PARK INN

Edgewood

NDAY

s am

ART Station - Chamber - Hillcrest

N

ON PATT

Grove

W4 Old

N3

ART Station - Merrimon - UNCA - Beaverdam

H

Larchmont

Carter

r Rive

N2

W AY

Gracelyn

W5

H

ST

Pearl

road

SU

D

O

O

A nn

ch B

ART Station - Merrimon - UNCA - Lakeshore

LL HI

Ottari

STOP LIST: Edgewood Rd Sherrill Center Governors Hall Brown Hall Zeis Hall

Fren

N1

Ad

N O R T H

Klondyke - Montford - ART Station - MLK Charlotte - Grove Park

CIVIC CENTER

S. FRENCH BROAD

Mt Vernon Pl

fin

240

ave

UNC ASHEVILLE

N

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Kimberly

t rP

t Flin

Be

r

eD shor

Lake

Wembley

ke

Wood

I N T E R S TAT E

d

er La

FARE FREE ZONE

y

err

Ch

D

Beav

Be

tland

Timber Trail

Elk Mtn Scenic Hwy

en

ard

Cour

n so rri

n

Sycamore

t or Sh

M

Merrimo

Killian am

n rla be

a idl

d ver

m Cu

nd

R FO

Valley Park

Valley

NT

Northridge

rd

tfo

a Str

Map shows routes downtown and at the ART Station. Note that routes traveling using Patton outbound use College whe n returning to the ART Station on the return trip.

N2

st

MO

T

re

Ha

LAKESHORE

irc

Wild Cherry

Transfer To Mountain Mobility’s North Buncombe Trailblazer

O LID AY

Fa

Pin eT ree

N1

H

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE

GOLDEN LIVING CENTER

Ri

Carter Cove

tte

NDAY

d Gl en vie w

SU


Frequent Service Map

Route Hours of Operation MON. - FRI.

Use buses along the frequent service corridors. Buses make trips at least twice an hour in the frequent service corridors.

First Trip Departs

First Trip Departs

5:45am* 6:45pm

Merrimon @ Beaverdam

UNC ASHEVILLE

First Trip Departs

First Trip Departs

Last Trip Departs

*Thur. - Sat. last ride departs 12:00am

N2

Larchmont

5:30am* 9:00pm

N1

6:15am 8:00pm*

Edgewood

MON. - FRI. First Trip Departs

6:30am* 9:00pm

6:15am 5:15pm

First Trip Departs

Last Trip Departs

First Trip Departs

7:00am 10:00pm

8:15am 5:15pm

7:00am 10:00pm

SATURDAY

Last Trip Departs

*Starts at Johnston at N Bear Creek Rd

E1

First Trip Departs

Last Trip Departs

5:18am* 10:00pm

6:18am* 10:00pm

SUNDAY & HOLIDAY: 8:00am – 5:00pm

E2

W2

6:15am 6:15pm

7:15am 6:15pm

6:30am 6:30pm

7:30am 6:30pm

SUNDAY & HOLIDAY: 8:30am – 5:30pm

Routes E1, E2 and 170 connect with the Greyhound station via the bus stop on Tunnel Road.

S3

Barnard

King

WT

N2

Murdock

eaver W

6:45am 5:30pm

Coleman

S3 7:45am 5:30pm

5:30am 7:00pm

*Starts at Airport

6:08am* 7:00pm

*Fri. last ride departs same as Sat

Service varies each trip. See individual route schedule for full service details

170

6:03am 9:03pm*

7:03am 12:03am

Route S3 connects with the Asheville Regional Airport.

W3 6:00am 7:00pm

SUNDAY & HOLIDAY: 7:38am – 5:30pm*

7:00am 7:00pm

SUNDAY & HOLIDAY: 8:00am – 5:00pm

Spears

N3

n Merrimo

Hillside

6:35am 10:35pm

lle ge Co

les Ing

te

ML K

arl ot

laz a Co

Ch

tP

Ot is an

S. BroFrenc ad h

Clin gm

ART

By Email: iride@ashevillenc.gov

Holidays

E1 E2

od hw o ac

ch er y

Kensington

ea Bl

S2

Forest Hill

E1

Manna Food Bank

R ive r R d .

Bryson St

Lodge

S1

S5

PVA Community Center

S4

S1

W3

W1

W5

S5

W4

W2

Ticket Office N

N1

E1

S2

170

N2

E2

S3

N3

COXE AVE

Wal Mart/ Kohls

Swa n nano a

Caledonia Rd

BILTMORE VILLAGE

ART Station Map

Azalea

Be

Lex ingt o

land Ash e

ad Gro ve

Bro

gm an Clin

ren ch

S. F

Biltmore Ave

d

Tunnel

ASHELAND AVE

Hanover

Plan your trip using

By Mail: 360 W. Haywood St., Asheville, NC 28801

n

ul

Choctaw

Ha

Ha yw oo

Asheville Mall

d.

ia

6:30am 6:30pm

Hawthorne

Short Coxe

U-

an

Gov View Rd

E1 E2

White Pine

Southside/Charlotte

R el

ylv

6:30am 6:30pm

Visit us online at: ridetheart.com

VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER

nn

ns

W5

E1

Kenilworth

Montana

State

7:30am 6:30pm

Need interpretation ser vices? Contact: Necesita un interprete en español? Contacte: Нуждаетесь в услугах переводчика? Обращайтесь в Горсовет Эшвила.

By Phone: 828-253-5691 TDD/TTY: 711

Tu

Swannanoa

I-240

Hospital Brownwood

7:30am 7:30pm

6:30am 6:30pm

SUNDAY & HOLIDAY: 8:30am – 5:30pm

S.

Westwood

7:30am 7:30pm

re

te

Pe n

S5

nel Tun

o Biltm

Sta te

Rd.

Unadillia Ave

Sta

Br ev ard Lo uis ian a

ood Hayw

d

t

k

ida

Cravens Avon

oo d

nel

7:00am 7:00pm

SUNDAY & HOLIDAY: 8:00am – 5:00pm

Hilliard Owens Bells Roberts

Hay w

or

all ate M

r Reso

t Par

n

Patto

Tun

ge

Colle

W4

ROUTES WITH SUNDAY & HOLIDAY SERVICE HIGHLIGHTED IN YELLOW.

Chunns Cove

d

oo yw Ha

W5

W1 W2

ntf

tg Wes

n Rege

Flor

ster

iana Louis

e Leic New

W3 W4

ur

Mo

n so kin At ross ll C Hi

6:00am 7:00pm

*Exception note. See individual route schedules for details.

Marcellus

N3

7:05am 10:35pm

SUNDAY & HOLIDAY: 8:35am – 5:35pm

Chestnut

Hillcrest (3 Stops)

S4

Contact Us

Holidays with Reduced Transit Service: New Year’s Day Martin Luther King Jr. Day Good Friday Memorial Day Independence Day Labor Day Holidays with No Transit Service Thanksgiving Day Christmas Eve - (after 6:00 pm) Christmas Day

Transit Fares

Tips for Travel

Safety

Lost Items

Accessibility

Cash Fare

Plan your trip using

ART’s first priority is the safety of its passengers. For this reason, boarding the ART only occurs at signed transit stops. Ensure you are visible to the driver ; a cour teous wave can be useful. Stand behind the curb while the bus approaches. When riding the bus, please sit if possible. If standing please hold onto a railing.

Forget something? Inquire about lost items by calling:

ART is pleased to provide accessible service on all routes.

Adult Discount*

$1.00 $0.50

11 Ticket Book Adult Discount*

$9.00 $4.50

Monthly Pass Adult Discount*

$20.00 $10.00

Annual Pass Adult Discount*

$220.00 $110.00

Children Age five (5) and under ride free Discount fares are available to all seniors 65+, individuals with disabilities, Medicare recipients, and elementary, middle, & high school students ages 6-19. Medicare cards accepted to obtain the discounted rate.

Cash or credit cards are accepted at the Transit Station.

Transfers After you pay the driver your fare, request a transfer and you will be entitled to unlimited travel for the duration of the transfer. Transfers are valid for 90 minutes from end of the route, not from the time of boarding. Show the transfer to the driver each time you board the bus until the transfer expires.

Fare Free Zone Downtown and adjacent areas are Fare Free Zones. For boundaries, see the Fare Free Zone map in the downtown insert.

Boarding Locate a signed bus stop along the route you are traveling. Make sure you are on the side of the road in the direction you wish to travel. Ensure you are visible to the driver ; a cour teous wave can be useful. Stand behind the curb while the bus approaches. Have the exact fare ready. Deboarding When you get within a block of your destination (or your destination is the next stop), press a yellow touchpad to signal the driver that you wish to exit. Please stay seated until the bus comes to a complete stop, then exit through the rear doors, if possible, to help speed the loading and unloading of your fellow passengers.

PASSport Program Ask your employer about the PASSport program, an employer-based program that allows employees to ride for free. Also, employers can become a Best Work Place for Commuters by providing employees with an alternative to driving to work at a reduced rate. For more information, please contact: (828) 232-4531 TDD/TTY: 711

Bikes on Buses Bicycle racks are available on all transit vehicles at no extra charge. Loading and unloading your bicycle is easy. Visit www.ridetheart.com for instructions

(828) 253-5691 TDD/TTY: 711 Lost items will be kept for 30 days and proper identification should be presented to claim them. ART is not responsible for lost or stolen items.

When boarding or deboarding please: Watch your step and do not rush Use the back door to deboard Wait for the bus to leave the bus stop before crossing the street Cross at the intersection

Regional Partners Mountain Mobility: Buncombe County Phone: (828) 250-6750 TDD/TTY: 711 www.buncombecounty.org/transportation Apple Country Transit: Henderson County Phone: (828) 698-8571 TDD/TTY: 711 http://www.applecountrytransit.com

Smoking | Eating | Drinking Smoking, eating, and drinking are strictly prohibited on all transit buses. Please extinguish cigarettes and dispose of or store away all food and beverages before boarding the bus.

Security All our buses may be equipped with a video and audio surveillance system.

All buses are accessible for mobility devices and priority seating is available with wheelchair securements. Individuals with disabilities are eligible for discounts. (please see fare section) ParaTransit

Adverse Weather Schedules subject to change due to weather conditions beyond our control. Notices will be provided in advance when possible. During times of adverse weather, please: Tune to your local radio and television stations regarding scheduling and operations Visit our Service and Weather Alerts page on www.ridetheart.com or

ART provides next-day complimentar y paratransit ser vice to people with disabilities 1 within the paratransit ser vice area 2. Ser vice is provided during equivalent hours as ART routes. Eligible recipients can use paratransit for all activities. To determine eligibility call Mon. – Fri. 8am-5pm. To schedule a trip, call anytime for next day ser vice. Call Mountain Mobility at (828) 250-6750, ext. 5. TDD/TTY: 711. Cost $2 a trip. 1 Required by the American with Disabilities Act of 1990. 2 Ser vice area is ¾ mile of routes and City-wide.

Call ART at (828) 253-5691 TDD/TTY: 711 Sign up for My NextBus Advanced Alert Feature, Watch Route Alert

nextART Quick Guide You can use your touch tone telephone, mobile device (standard cell phone or smart phone) or web enabled computer to find exactly where the bus is and when it will arrive at your stop. Text 41411 then enter “nextART”, space and the 3-digit bus stop I.D. number

Visit ridetheart.com or nextbus.com/art

Dial (828) 253-5691, press 5

Visit nextbus.com

Pets on Buses Service animals which have been trained to assist an individual in living independently are permitted on board. Smaller domesticated animals (cats & dogs) can be carried on the bus in pet carrying cages held in your lap.

ART Station Hours Located at 49 Coxe Ave.

Mon - Fri: 6:00am - 9:30pm Sat: 7:00am - 9:30pm Sunday & Holiday: 8:30am - 6:00pm

UPDATED: 1/2015

Un i v.

He

ig

ht s

SUNDAY & HOLIDAY: 8:00am – 5:00pm

170

E1 E2

W1

SUNDAY & HOLIDAY: 8:00am – 5:00pm

S2

7:15am 12:00pm*

MON. - FRI.

SATURDAY

Last Trip Departs

S1

*Starts in Shiloh

6:45am* 6:45pm

SATURDAY

Last Trip Departs

N1

Gracelyn

STOP LIST: Edgewood Rd. Sherrill Center Governors Hall Zeis Hall

Last Trip Departs

N

*Starts on Montford Ave Ottari

MON. - FRI.

SATURDAY

Last Trip Departs

Connecting Services


Tab 11 - Help Methodology While virtually every chain in the United States provides STR with data on almost all of their properties, there are still some hotels that don't submit data. But we've got you covered. Every year we examine guidebook listings and hotel directories for information on hotels that don't provide us with data. We don't stop there. We call each hotel in our database every year to obtain "published" rates for multiple categories. Based on this information we group all hotels - those that report data and those that don't - into groupings based off of price level and geographic proximity. We then estimate the non-respondents based off of nearby hotels with similar price levels. Similarly, we sometimes obtain monthly data from a property, but not daily data. We use a similar process. We take the monthly data that the property has provided, and distribute it to the individual days based on the revenue and demand distribution patterns of similar hotels in the same location. We believe it imperative to perform this analysis in order to provide interested parties with our best estimate of total lodging demand and room revenue on their areas of interest. Armed with this information a more informed decision can be made.

Glossary ADR (Average Daily Rate) Room revenue divided by rooms sold, displayed as the average rental rate for a single room. Affiliation Date Date the property affiliated with current chain/flag Census (Properties and Rooms) The number of properties and rooms that exist within the selected property set or segment. Change in Rooms Indicator of whether or not an individual hotel has added or removed rooms from their inventory. Exchange Rate The factor used to convert revenue from U.S. Dollars to the local currency. The exchange rate data is obtained from Oanda.com. Any aggregated number in the report (YTD, Running 3 month, Running 12 month) uses the exchange rate of each relative month when calculating the data.

Open Date Date the property opened as a lodging establishment. Percent Change Amount of growth, up, flat, or down from the same period last year (month, ytd, three months, twelve months). Calculated as ((TY-LY)/LY) * "100". Revenue (Room Revenue) Total room revenue generated from the sale or rental of rooms. RevPAR (Revenue Per Available Room) Room revenue divided by rooms available Sample % (Rooms) The % of rooms from which STR receives data. Calculated as (Sample Rooms/Census Rooms) * "100". Standard Historical Trend Data on selected properties or segments starting in 2005. STR Code

Extended Historical Trend Data on selected properties or segments starting in 2000.

Smith Travel Research's proprietary numbering system. Each hotel in the lodging census has a unique STR code.

Demand (Rooms Sold) The number of rooms sold (excludes complimentary rooms).

Supply (Rooms Available) The number of rooms times the number of days in the period.

Full Historical Trend Data on selected properties or segments starting in 1987.

Twelve Month Moving Average The value of any given month is computed by taking the value of that month and the values of the eleven preceding months, adding them together and dividing by twelve.

Occupancy Rooms sold divided by rooms available. Occupancy is always displayed as a percentage of rooms occupied.

Year to Date


Tab 2 - Data by Measure Tract: Asheville, NC Created: October 22, 2015 Occupancy (%) 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Avg

January 37.4 35.7 34.3 37.0 40.3 43.6 50.0 39.8

February 42.9 43.9 43.7 47.1 48.2 48.9 54.7 47.1

March 48.2 47.5 52.4 58.0 58.8 61.1 67.3 56.3

April 58.8 61.9 64.3 64.4 68.1 68.9 79.1 66.6

May 60.1 62.4 64.9 67.7 72.6 72.2 77.6 68.3

June 67.7 70.5 75.9 75.5 76.9 77.5 81.0 75.0

July 70.6 76.1 77.1 76.4 77.8 81.1 83.5 77.6

August 60.0 67.3 68.6 69.7 74.9 80.2 78.9 71.4

September 59.9 65.7 67.0 69.4 72.2 73.0 75.5 69.0

October 72.1 78.4 77.5 78.8 80.7 86.4

January 84.61 81.57 82.31 88.22 90.46 97.89 102.61 90.64

February 82.51 83.84 84.73 90.37 95.24 99.78 104.93 92.35

March 87.51 86.52 90.20 97.58 101.06 105.43 113.02 98.50

April 98.34 97.81 102.74 106.66 110.77 119.59 130.90 110.60

May 103.32 103.32 104.16 110.65 118.35 127.19 139.82 116.38

June 106.93 106.17 107.56 114.58 122.21 130.26 142.32 119.24

July 111.39 112.76 116.77 120.80 129.08 134.60 148.98 125.53

August 108.02 108.04 110.59 116.62 128.60 135.45 147.08 123.25

September 104.58 102.80 110.55 117.32 123.77 129.99 141.20 119.49

October 123.34 127.50 132.76 140.01 147.78 158.19

January 31.65 29.12 28.24 32.63 36.50 42.68 51.35 36.07

February 35.39 36.82 36.99 42.55 45.90 48.77 57.44 43.49

March 42.15 41.13 47.26 56.60 59.41 64.47 76.09 55.42

April 57.84 60.59 66.06 68.70 75.48 82.43 103.51 73.62

May 62.11 64.45 67.60 74.86 85.88 91.83 108.44 79.43

June 72.36 74.88 81.64 86.45 93.97 100.96 115.23 89.47

July 78.60 85.77 90.09 92.30 100.45 109.17 124.43 97.36

August 64.85 72.71 75.90 81.28 96.31 108.60 116.12 88.00

September 62.68 67.58 74.06 81.39 89.41 94.92 106.63 82.46

October 88.92 99.94 102.84 110.31 119.29 136.67

January 209,281 224,223 223,355 221,960 225,370 224,936 223,200 221,761

February 189,028 202,524 201,740 200,452 203,952 203,168 201,600 200,352

March 209,281 224,223 223,324 221,929 225,804 224,936 223,200 221,814

April 207,390 216,990 216,120 214,110 218,520 218,100 216,000 215,319

May 214,303 224,192 223,324 221,247 225,804 225,339 223,200 222,487

June 207,390 216,960 216,120 213,990 219,240 218,070 216,000 215,396

July 216,783 224,192 223,324 221,123 226,579 225,339 223,200 222,934

August 221,123 224,130 223,324 224,688 226,579 223,231 223,200 223,754

September 213,990 216,900 216,120 217,440 219,270 216,030 218,700 216,921

October 221,123 224,037 223,324 225,184 226,579 223,231

November 216,990 216,810 216,120 218,100 219,270 216,030

December 224,223 223,355 221,929 225,370 226,641 223,231

Total Year 2,550,905 2,638,536 2,628,124 2,625,593 2,663,608 2,641,641

223,913

217,220

224,125

2,624,735

January 78,296 80,036 76,631 82,106 90,933 98,072 111,684 88,251

February 81,068 88,935 88,078 94,389 98,288 99,313 110,347 94,345

March 100,799 106,577 116,999 128,723 132,751 137,542 150,276 124,810

April 121,975 134,412 138,954 137,904 148,901 150,320 170,798 143,323

May 128,828 139,856 144,943 149,674 163,852 162,694 173,099 151,849

June 140,340 153,017 164,034 161,466 168,584 169,030 174,894 161,624

July 152,968 170,521 172,294 168,949 176,321 182,771 186,422 172,892

August 132,760 150,833 153,264 156,594 169,689 178,980 176,208 159,761

September 128,250 142,602 144,791 150,841 158,407 157,758 165,161 149,687

October 159,405 175,617 172,999 177,406 182,887 192,857

November 119,249 126,734 132,721 137,552 146,232 151,303

December 125,623 122,782 125,054 134,225 140,578 151,931

Total Year 1,469,561 1,591,922 1,630,762 1,679,829 1,777,423 1,832,571

176,862

135,632

133,366

1,663,678

January 6,624,561 6,528,597 6,307,852 7,243,597 8,226,215 9,599,941

February 6,688,865 7,456,070 7,462,477 8,529,633 9,361,009 9,909,270

March 8,821,179 9,221,373 10,553,453 12,560,693 13,415,496 14,501,664

April 11,995,397 13,147,100 14,276,049 14,709,100 16,494,059 17,977,125

May 13,310,981 14,449,351 15,096,797 16,561,505 19,391,130 20,693,828

June 15,007,131 16,245,643 17,643,385 18,500,253 20,601,930 22,017,166

July 17,039,022 19,228,790 20,118,384 20,408,891 22,759,876 24,600,327

August 14,340,118 16,295,977 16,949,684 18,262,082 21,821,553 24,243,150

September 13,412,633 14,658,960 16,006,133 17,696,515 19,605,895 20,506,486

October 19,661,290 22,390,477 22,966,905 24,839,102 27,027,917 30,508,201

79.0

November 55.0 58.5 61.4 63.1 66.7 70.0 62.4

December 56.0 55.0 56.3 59.6 62.0 68.1 59.5

Total Year 57.6 60.3 62.1 64.0 66.7 69.4 63.4

Sep YTD 56.4 59.1 61.0 62.9 65.7 67.5 72.1 63.6

ADR ($) 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Avg

138.90

November 107.95 108.22 113.62 121.43 130.42 135.77 120.40

December 104.36 109.84 118.21 123.08 132.28 135.87 121.39

Total Year 104.03 104.79 108.69 114.62 121.73 128.64 114.37

Sep YTD 100.67 100.47 103.68 109.27 115.99 122.75 132.84 113.18

RevPAR ($) 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Avg

109.71

November 59.32 63.26 69.78 76.59 86.97 95.09 75.18

December 58.47 60.38 66.61 73.30 82.05 92.48 72.24

Total Year 59.93 63.23 67.44 73.33 81.23 89.24 72.49

Sep YTD 56.78 59.38 63.26 68.72 76.18 82.89 95.76 71.95

Supply 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Avg

Sep YTD 1,888,569 1,974,334 1,966,751 1,956,939 1,991,118 1,979,149 1,968,300 1,960,737

Demand 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Avg

Sep YTD 1,065,284 1,166,789 1,199,988 1,230,646 1,307,726 1,336,480 1,418,889 1,246,543

Revenue ($) 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

November 12,872,767 13,714,632 15,079,974 16,703,564 19,070,921 20,542,419

December 13,109,529 13,486,161 14,782,498 16,520,506 18,596,249 20,643,489

Total Year 152,883,473 166,823,131 177,243,591 192,535,441 216,372,250 235,743,066

Sep YTD 107,239,887 117,231,861 124,414,214 134,472,269 151,677,163 164,048,957


2015 Avg

11,460,434 7,998,742

11,579,074 8,712,343

16,983,931 12,293,970

22,357,775 15,850,944

24,203,307 17,672,414

24,890,155 19,272,238

27,772,708 21,704,000

25,916,920 19,689,926

23,320,042 17,886,666

24,565,649

16,330,713

16,189,739

190,266,825

188,484,346 141,081,242

STR’s Trend Report is a publication of STR, Inc. and is intended solely for use by paid subscribers. Reproduction or distribution of the Trend Report, in whole or part, without written permission of STR is prohibited and subject to legal action. Site licenses are available. Ownership, distribution and use of the Trend Report and its contents are subject to the terms set forth in the contract you have entered into with STR. Source 2015 STR, Inc.


Tab 6 - Twelve Month Moving Average with Percent Change Tract: Asheville, NC Created: October 22, 2015 Date

Jan 10 Feb 10 Mar 10 Apr 10 May 10 Jun 10 Jul 10 Aug 10 Sep 10 Oct 10 Nov 10 Dec 10 Jan 11 Feb 11 Mar 11 Apr 11 May 11 Jun 11 Jul 11 Aug 11 Sep 11 Oct 11 Nov 11 Dec 11 Jan 12 Feb 12 Mar 12 Apr 12 May 12 Jun 12 Jul 12 Aug 12 Sep 12 Oct 12 Nov 12 Dec 12 Jan 13 Feb 13 Mar 13 Apr 13 May 13 Jun 13 Jul 13 Aug 13 Sep 13 Oct 13

Occupancy This Year 57.3 57.3 57.2 57.5 57.7 58.0 58.5 59.1 59.6 60.1 60.4 60.3 60.2 60.2 60.6 60.8 61.0 61.5 61.6 61.7 61.8 61.7 61.9 62.1 62.3 62.6 63.0 63.1 63.3 63.2 63.2 63.3 63.5 63.6 63.7 64.0 64.2 64.3 64.4 64.7 65.1 65.2 65.4 65.8 66.1 66.2

ADR

% Chg

4.7 5.0 5.0 5.9 5.8 5.8 6.0 5.2 4.3 3.7 2.6 2.5 2.8 3.4 3.9 4.0 3.7 3.7 2.9 2.6 2.6 2.7 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 2.8 2.1 2.6 2.9 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.1 4.2

This Year 103.85 103.81 103.68 103.59 103.58 103.53 103.78 103.83 103.67 104.33 104.37 104.79 104.88 104.94 105.09 105.50 105.56 105.71 106.14 106.39 107.07 107.60 108.04 108.69 108.90 109.13 109.57 109.90 110.47 111.16 111.56 112.13 112.74 113.56 114.20 114.62 114.60 114.83 115.06 115.36 116.06 116.79 117.65 118.81 119.38 120.25

RevPar % Chg

0.7 1.0 1.1 1.4 1.8 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.5 3.3 3.1 3.5 3.7 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.2 4.6 5.2 5.1 5.4 5.3 5.5 5.7 5.5 5.2 5.2 5.0 5.0 5.1 5.1 5.5 6.0 5.9 5.9

This Year 59.55 59.53 59.34 59.57 59.78 60.03 60.69 61.37 61.77 62.74 63.06 63.23 63.16 63.18 63.71 64.16 64.43 64.98 65.34 65.61 66.14 66.37 66.91 67.44 67.83 68.27 69.07 69.29 69.91 70.29 70.46 70.93 71.54 72.20 72.76 73.33 73.61 73.83 74.04 74.59 75.54 76.18 76.91 78.19 78.86 79.64

Supply

% Chg

5.5 6.1 6.1 7.4 7.7 7.8 8.2 7.6 6.9 7.1 5.8 6.1 6.7 7.4 8.1 8.4 8.0 8.5 8.2 7.8 8.1 8.2 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.5 8.1 7.2 7.7 8.1 8.4 9.2 10.2 10.2 10.3

This Year 2,565,847 2,579,343 2,594,285 2,603,885 2,613,774 2,623,344 2,630,753 2,633,760 2,636,670 2,639,584 2,639,404 2,638,536 2,637,668 2,636,884 2,635,985 2,635,115 2,634,247 2,633,407 2,632,539 2,631,733 2,630,953 2,630,240 2,629,550 2,628,124 2,626,729 2,625,441 2,624,046 2,622,036 2,619,959 2,617,829 2,615,628 2,616,992 2,618,312 2,620,172 2,622,152 2,625,593 2,629,003 2,632,503 2,636,378 2,640,788 2,645,345 2,650,595 2,656,051 2,657,942 2,659,772 2,661,167

Demand % Chg

3.4 2.8 2.2 1.6 1.2 0.8 0.4 0.1 -0.1 -0.2 -0.4 -0.4 -0.4 -0.4 -0.4 -0.5 -0.5 -0.5 -0.6 -0.6 -0.6 -0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -0.1 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.7 1.0 1.3 1.5 1.6 1.6 1.6

This Year 1,471,301 1,479,168 1,484,946 1,497,383 1,508,411 1,521,088 1,538,641 1,556,714 1,571,066 1,587,278 1,594,763 1,591,922 1,588,517 1,587,660 1,598,082 1,602,624 1,607,711 1,618,728 1,620,501 1,622,932 1,625,121 1,622,503 1,628,490 1,630,762 1,636,237 1,642,548 1,654,272 1,653,222 1,657,953 1,655,385 1,652,040 1,655,370 1,661,420 1,665,827 1,670,658 1,679,829 1,688,656 1,692,555 1,696,583 1,707,580 1,721,758 1,728,876 1,736,248 1,749,343 1,756,909 1,762,390

Revenue % Chg

8.3 8.0 7.3 7.6 7.0 6.6 6.4 5.3 4.3 3.4 2.2 2.1 2.4 3.0 3.5 3.5 3.2 3.1 2.3 1.9 2.0 2.2 2.7 2.6 3.0 3.2 3.0 2.6 3.3 3.8 4.4 5.1 5.7 5.7 5.8

This Year 152,787,509 153,554,714 153,954,908 155,106,611 156,244,981 157,483,493 159,673,261 161,629,120 162,875,447 165,604,634 166,446,499 166,823,131 166,602,386 166,608,793 167,940,873 169,069,822 169,717,268 171,115,010 172,004,604 172,658,311 174,005,484 174,581,912 175,947,254 177,243,591 178,179,336 179,246,492 181,253,732 181,686,783 183,151,491 184,008,359 184,298,866 185,611,264 187,301,646 189,173,843 190,797,433 192,535,441 193,518,059 194,349,435 195,204,238 196,989,197 199,818,822 201,920,499 204,271,484 207,830,955 209,740,335 211,929,150

% Chg

9.1 9.0 8.5 9.1 9.0 8.6 8.7 7.7 6.8 6.8 5.4 5.7 6.2 6.9 7.6 7.9 7.5 7.9 7.5 7.1 7.5 7.6 8.4 8.4 8.6 8.6 8.4 7.7 8.4 9.1 9.7 10.8 12.0 12.0 12.0


Tab 6 - Twelve Month Moving Average with Percent Change Tract: Asheville, NC Created: October 22, 2015 Date

Nov 13 Dec 13 Jan 14 Feb 14 Mar 14 Apr 14 May 14 Jun 14 Jul 14 Aug 14 Sep 14 Oct 14 Nov 14 Dec 14 Jan 15 Feb 15 Mar 15 Apr 15 May 15 Jun 15 Jul 15 Aug 15 Sep 15

Occupancy This Year 66.5 66.7 67.0 67.1 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.6 68.1 68.1 68.6 68.9 69.4 69.9 70.4 70.9 71.8 72.2 72.5 72.7 72.6 72.8

% Chg 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.5 4.1 3.4 3.3 3.4 3.4 3.1 3.6 3.5 4.0 4.4 5.0 5.4 6.6 7.3 7.6 7.5 6.7 6.9

ADR This Year 121.00 121.73 122.02 122.25 122.53 123.26 124.07 124.83 125.41 126.10 126.65 127.87 128.32 128.64 128.70 128.83 129.28 130.20 131.33 132.44 133.85 134.92 135.86

RevPar % Chg 5.9 6.2 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.8 6.9 6.9 6.6 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.0 5.7 5.5 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.9 6.1 6.7 7.0 7.3

This Year 80.49 81.23 81.76 81.99 82.43 83.00 83.50 84.07 84.80 85.82 86.27 87.69 88.35 89.24 90.00 90.69 91.69 93.43 94.84 96.00 97.29 97.93 98.90

% Chg 10.6 10.8 11.1 11.1 11.3 11.3 10.5 10.4 10.3 9.8 9.4 10.1 9.8 9.9 10.1 10.6 11.2 12.6 13.6 14.2 14.7 14.1 14.6

Supply This Year 2,662,337 2,663,608 2,663,174 2,662,390 2,661,522 2,661,102 2,660,637 2,659,467 2,658,227 2,654,879 2,651,639 2,648,291 2,645,051 2,641,641 2,639,905 2,638,337 2,636,601 2,634,501 2,632,362 2,630,292 2,628,153 2,628,122 2,630,792

Demand % Chg 1.5 1.4 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.3 0.1 -0.1 -0.3 -0.5 -0.6 -0.8 -0.9 -0.9 -0.9 -1.0 -1.1 -1.1 -1.1 -1.0 -0.8

This Year 1,771,070 1,777,423 1,784,562 1,785,587 1,790,378 1,791,797 1,790,639 1,791,085 1,797,535 1,806,826 1,806,177 1,816,147 1,821,218 1,832,571 1,846,183 1,857,217 1,869,951 1,890,429 1,900,834 1,906,698 1,910,349 1,907,577 1,914,980

Revenue % Chg 6.0 5.8 5.7 5.5 5.5 4.9 4.0 3.6 3.5 3.3 2.8 3.1 2.8 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.4 5.5 6.2 6.5 6.3 5.6 6.0

This Year 214,296,507 216,372,250 217,745,976 218,294,237 219,380,405 220,863,471 222,166,169 223,581,405 225,421,856 227,843,453 228,744,044 232,224,328 233,695,826 235,743,066 237,603,559 239,273,363 241,755,630 246,136,280 249,645,759 252,518,748 255,691,129 257,364,899 260,178,455

% Chg 12.3 12.4 12.5 12.3 12.4 12.1 11.2 10.7 10.4 9.6 9.1 9.6 9.1 9.0 9.1 9.6 10.2 11.4 12.4 12.9 13.4 13.0 13.7

STR’s Trend Report is a publication of STR, Inc. and is intended solely for use by paid subscribers. Reproduction or distribution of the Trend Report, in whole or part, without written permission of STR is prohibited and subject to legal action. Site licenses are available. Ownership, distribution and use of the Trend Report and its contents are subject to the terms set forth in the contract you have entered into with STR. Source 2015 STR, Inc.


Tab 10 - Response Report Tract: Asheville, NC Created: October 22, 2015 2013 STR Code 36912 63174 46731 31263 30255 24890 20540 24888 24887 43863 4627 24848 24841 30383 8357 18002 4628 36918 268 33999 25503 24854 24838 24831 24843 14210 3002 61686 59692 63821 63992 12935 60611 64002 34946 59349 42819 38377 32025 43847 58408 30214 53815 4255 4473 18667 12937 24832 12936 43846 5630 12939 44760 32034 54184 8899 24857 4626 36151 24858 8355 44502 24853 53966 7863 8356 26724 20536 31633 3247 28217 24833 267 1315 266 26338 24839 24842 265

Name of Establishment City & State Comfort Inn Asheville Airport Arden, NC Courtyard Asheville Airport Arden, NC Closed Sun Valley Motel Arden, NC Quality Inn & Suites Biltmore South Arden, NC Quality Inn Black Mountain Black Mountain, NC Monte Vista Hotel Black Mountain, NC Super 8 Black Mountain Black Mountain, NC Apple Blossom Motel Black Mountain, NC Acorn Reeds Motel Black Mountain, NC Closed Mountain Spring Cabins Chalets Candler, NC Days Inn Ashville West Candler Candler, NC Plantation Motor Inn Candler, NC Closed Miami Motel Candler, NC Budget Motel Fletcher, NC Econo Lodge Asheville Fletcher Airport Fletcher, NC Fairfield Inn Asheville Airport Fletcher, NC Knights Inn Asheville Airport Fletcher Fletcher, NC Hampton Inn Suites Asheville I 26 Fletcher, NC Clarion Inn Airport Fletcher Fletcher, NC Comfort Inn Mars Hill University Area Mars Hill, NC Wolf Laurel Resort Mars Hill, NC Renaissance Asheville Hotel Asheville, NC Closed Interstate Motel Asheville, NC Downtown Inn Asheville, NC Closed Mountain Health Inn Asheville, NC Haywood Park Hotel Asheville, NC Four Points by Sheraton Asheville Downtown Asheville, NC aloft Hotel Asheville Downtown Asheville, NC Hotel Indigo Asheville Downtown Asheville, NC Hyatt Place Asheville Downtown Asheville, NC The Windsor Boutique Hotel Asheville, NC Closed American Court Motel Asheville, NC Brookstone Lodge Asheville, NC Village Hotel On Biltmore Estate Asheville, NC Residence Inn Asheville Biltmore Asheville, NC Hilton Asheville Biltmore Park Asheville, NC Inn On Biltmore Estate Asheville, NC Baymont Asheville Asheville, NC Clarion Inn Biltmore Village Asheville Asheville, NC Closed The Plaza Motel Asheville, NC Autograph Collection Grand Bohemian Hotel Asheville Asheville, NC Biltmore Village Lodge Asheville, NC Residences @ Biltmore Asheville, NC Ramada Asheville Southeast Asheville, NC Closed - Howard Johnson Express Asheville Biltmore Asheville, NC Doubletree Biltmore Hotel Asheville Asheville, NC Closed Forest Manor Inn Asheville, NC Closed Biltmore Motel Asheville, NC Closed Buena Vista Motel Asheville, NC The Log Cabin Motor Court Asheville, NC Closed Four Seasons Motor Inn Asheville, NC Omni Grove Park Inn Asheville, NC The Pines Cottages Asheville, NC Days Inn Asheville North Asheville, NC Holiday Inn & Suites Asheville Downtown Asheville, NC Closed Veteran`s Quarters Inn Asheville, NC Thunderbird Motel Asheville, NC Closed Mountain View Inn Asheville, NC Extended Stay America Asheville Tunnel Road Asheville, NC Town House Motel Asheville, NC Econo Lodge Asheville Biltmore Asheville, NC Springhill Suites Asheville Asheville, NC Closed - Independent Blue Reach Motel Lodge Asheville, NC Homewood Suites Asheville Tunnel Road Asheville, NC Super 8 Asheville Biltmore Asheville, NC Quality Inn & Suites Biltmore East Asheville, NC Motel 6 Asheville Asheville, NC Closed Capri Motel Asheville, NC Courtyard Asheville Asheville, NC Best Western Of Asheville Biltmore East Asheville, NC Days Inn Asheville Biltmore East Asheville, NC Blue Ridge Motor Lodge Asheville, NC Holiday Inn Asheville Biltmore East Asheville, NC Hampton Inn Asheville Tunnel Road Asheville, NC Days Inn Asheville Mall Asheville, NC Country Inn & Suites Asheville Downtown Tunnel Road Biltmore Asheville, EstateNC Intown Motor Lodge Asheville, NC Mountaineer Inn Asheville, NC Ramada Asheville Biltmore West Asheville, NC

Zip Code 28704 28704 28704 28704 28711 28711 28711 28711 28711 28715 28715 28715 28715 28732 28732 28732 28732 28732 28732 28754 28754 28801 28801 28801 28801 28801 28801 28801 28801 28801 28801 28801 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28803 28804 28804 28804 28804 28804 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28805 28806

Class Upper Midscale Class Upscale Class Economy Class Midscale Class Midscale Class Midscale Class Economy Class Economy Class Economy Class Upper Midscale Class Economy Class Economy Class Economy Class Economy Class Economy Class Upper Midscale Class Economy Class Upper Midscale Class Upper Midscale Class Upper Midscale Class Upscale Class Upper Upscale Class Economy Class Economy Class Economy Class Luxury Class Upscale Class Upscale Class Upscale Class Upscale Class Luxury Class Economy Class Upper Midscale Class Upper Midscale Class Upscale Class Upper Upscale Class Luxury Class Midscale Class Upper Midscale Class Economy Class Upper Upscale Class Midscale Class Luxury Class Midscale Class Economy Class Upscale Class Upper Midscale Class Economy Class Economy Class Upscale Class Economy Class Upper Upscale Class Upper Midscale Class Economy Class Upper Midscale Class Economy Class Economy Class Economy Class Economy Class Economy Class Economy Class Upscale Class Midscale Class Upscale Class Economy Class Midscale Class Economy Class Economy Class Upscale Class Midscale Class Economy Class Economy Class Upper Midscale Class Upper Midscale Class Economy Class Upper Midscale Class Economy Class Economy Class Midscale Class

Aff Date Open Date Rooms Jul 1998 Jul 1998 58 Sep 2015 Sep 2015 91 Jul 2007 0 Jul 2000 Apr 1995 107 Oct 2013 Jun 1995 57 Jun 1919 Jun 1919 60 May 1997 Apr 1980 85 20 22 Jan 2004 0 Jun 1972 Jun 1972 112 23 Jun 2003 0 Jun 1994 Jun 1994 30 Jun 1985 Jun 1985 60 Oct 1993 Oct 1993 107 Jun 2012 Sep 1976 56 Sep 1998 Sep 1998 95 Feb 2010 Jul 1984 150 Apr 1997 Apr 1997 56 Jun 1970 Jun 1970 71 Dec 1999 Jun 1970 277 Nov 2003 0 Nov 2008 Jun 1968 92 Aug 1992 0 Jun 1986 Jun 1986 33 Mar 2008 Jul 1970 150 Aug 2012 Aug 2012 115 Nov 2009 Nov 2009 115 U/C 138 Apr 2014 Apr 2014 14 May 2004 0 Apr 2009 Apr 2009 73 U/C 209 Nov 1997 Nov 1997 72 Aug 2009 Aug 2009 165 Mar 2001 Mar 2001 210 Jun 1999 Jun 1999 71 Sep 2015 Oct 1995 69 Jan 2006 0 Apr 2010 Apr 2009 104 Aug 2014 Jul 1994 64 Apr 2007 Apr 2007 51 Dec 2005 Nov 1985 174 Aug 2014 Jun 1968 0 Apr 2002 Oct 1989 197 May 2008 Jun 1952 0 Jun 2000 0 Jun 1998 0 18 Jan 2005 Jun 1966 0 Jul 2013 Jun 1913 513 Jun 1929 Jun 1929 15 Sep 1995 Sep 1995 49 Jan 2008 Jan 2008 111 Jun 2008 Jun 1975 0 34 Apr 2005 Jun 1973 0 Feb 1998 Feb 1998 101 29 Jan 1988 Jan 1988 53 May 2002 May 2002 88 Dec 2010 Jun 1952 0 Oct 2005 Oct 2005 94 Nov 2008 Jun 1963 56 Jan 2004 Apr 1982 132 Dec 1990 Dec 1988 105 Oct 1992 0 Aug 1996 Aug 1996 78 Jun 1966 Jun 1966 95 May 2002 Oct 1990 84 64 Jan 1974 Jan 1974 111 Apr 1995 Apr 1995 120 Jan 2000 Jun 1975 128 Apr 2004 Jun 1970 74 Jun 1960 Jun 1960 45 Jun 1939 Jun 1939 78 Dec 2007 Jun 1968 159

Chg in Rms Y

2014

2015

J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ○ ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ○ ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Y Y Y

● ● ○ ● ● ●

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● ● ○ ● ● ●

● ● ○ ● ● ●

● ● ○ ● ● ●

Y

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Y Y

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

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○ ● ● ●

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○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

Y

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

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○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ● ● ●

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

Y

Y

Y Y Y Y

Y

● ● ● ● ●

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● ● ● ● ●

● ● ● ● ●

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● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ○ ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ○ ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Y ● ● ● ●

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● ● ● ●

Y

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

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Tab 10 - Response Report Tract: Asheville, NC Created: October 22, 2015 2013 STR Code 58591 59531 59307 7864 30378 24439 32582 28192 24851 24850 26856 33647 39019 39493 8761 9858 35154 35550 36305

Name of Establishment City & State Value Place Asheville Asheville, NC Country Inn & Suites Asheville West Biltmore Estate Asheville, NC Whispering Pines Motel Asheville, NC Holiday Inn Asheville Biltmore West Asheville, NC Closed Richmond Hill Inn Asheville, NC Red Roof Inn Asheville West Asheville, NC Holiday Inn Express & Suites Asheville Biltmore Square Mall Asheville, NC Hampton Inn Asheville I 26 Biltmore Area Asheville, NC Closed - Independent Rockola Motel Asheville, NC Rock Haven Terrace Motel Asheville, NC Comfort Suites Outlet Center Ashville Asheville, NC Comfort Inn Biltmore West Asheville, NC Country Inn & Suites Asheville @ Biltmore Square Mall Asheville, NC Rodeway Inn & Suites Near Outlet Mall Asheville Asheville, NC Rodeway Inn Asheville Asheville, NC Crowne Plaza Resort Asheville Asheville, NC Fairfield Inn & Suites Asheville South Biltmore Square Asheville, NC Sleep Inn Asheville Biltmore West Asheville, NC Budget Motel Asheville, NC

Zip Code 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806 28806

Class Economy Class Upper Midscale Class Economy Class Upper Midscale Class Luxury Class Economy Class Upper Midscale Class Upper Midscale Class Economy Class Economy Class Upper Midscale Class Upper Midscale Class Upper Midscale Class Economy Class Economy Class Upscale Class Upper Midscale Class Midscale Class Midscale Class

Aff Date Open Date Rooms Oct 2008 Oct 2008 105 Jul 2009 Jul 2009 80 Jun 1984 Jun 1984 16 Dec 2007 Mar 1984 156 Apr 2009 0 Jun 1986 Jun 1986 109 Apr 1998 Apr 1998 108 Jul 1990 Jul 1990 120 Aug 2009 0 22 Aug 1989 Aug 1989 125 Jan 1996 Jan 1996 62 Sep 1999 Sep 1999 57 Nov 2008 Jan 2000 65 Nov 2008 Nov 1984 62 Jun 2005 Jun 1974 272 Apr 2005 Jul 1997 92 Aug 1997 Aug 1997 74 Jun 1989 Jun 1989 25 Total Properties: 98 7637

Chg in Rms Y

2014

2015

J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Y

Y Y

Y

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

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○ - Monthly data received by STR ● - Monthly and daily data received by STR Blank - No data received by STR Y - (Chg in Rms) Property has experienced a room addition or drop during the time period of the report.

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Request For Qualifications & Proposals, French Broad Trading Cooperative, Asheville NC  

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Request For Qualifications & Proposals, French Broad Trading Cooperative, Asheville NC  

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