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# 8

F R E E

So ut h Sid e Sp o t Ch ec k Duke Kahanamo ku Ap ert ure

I n

H a w a i ’ i

Ma k ua R ot hm a n | P h o t o : K e o k i


KOA ROTHMAN


FREE PARKING


In 1952 a dynamite blast to the reef at what is now Ala Moana Harbor awakened the heavy left-hand freak of a wave. This man-made phenomenon is, like most sights found in this half-Metropolis/half-Atlantis, a strange beauty to behold. Surfer: Isaiah Moniz Photo: Heff


Keoki

COVER STORY

STRIKE THREE’S - YOU’RE IN! By Mike Latronic The romance of the Hawaiian summer for surfers and ocean lovers is pointedly the colorful spirit and bustling beach and surf culture vibe of Waikiki. Other south shore venues like Sandy Beach, Kewalos and Diamond Head all have their unique and somewhat popular flavor… but Waiks is iconic. Waikiki’s near shore waters claim beautiful and gentle surfing areas, such as Queens, Walls, Pops, Canoes and Publics to name a few. But hands down the most alluring and sought after surfing rides are at the break known as ‘Number Threes’, or ‘Threes’ for short. It just so happened I was enjoying a small off season swell on the North Shore with current world number one WSL big wave surfer and rising musical artist Makuakai Rothman. It was popular knowledge that a large south swell was en route, and Makua and I got into a discussion about where the right spot might be. I mentioned there was no other place I’d rather be than Threes on the right swell and tide, and then Makua uttered the unthinkable… “I’ve never surfed Threes.” Baffled, I was quick to say Threes was indeed one of the best world class waves in Hawai‘i on the right conditions – albeit very fickle and immensely crowded with old school longboarders, respected watermen and “aunties and uncles” who live and breathe the spot. It’s also about a 15 minute paddle out. As you can see by this month’s cover shot, nabbed by Keoki Saguibo with a 50mm lens, Makua made it to Number Threes this summer in style! I got a chance to inquire with Makua about the session and his thoughts: “Well first I want to say thank you to Freesurf, for giving me the cover of this issue… Yeah it was the first time I’ve ever surfed Threes! Johnny Boy Gomes, my dad, and Tom Dosland ultimately got me out there. If it wasn’t for Tommy D (urging me) I wouldn’t have surfed there that day. Now I found my new favorite spot in Town.” “Super stoked, I got a warm welcome from all the uncles and longboarders out there… (thanks for) letting me catch a bunch of waves.” pau


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N e w s & E vent s /

S H O W

Features

R O O M

B I K I N I S , C LOT H E S & A CC E S S O R I E S

44 Profile: Duke Kahanamoku celebrating 125 years

48 Feature: T O W N is where it’s at

56 Aperture

south side summer swells

Brazilian Showroom Hawaii

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TA BLE O F C ONTE NTS

Departments 10 Free Parking

82 She Rips

12 Cover Story

70 Pau Hana

18 Editor’s Note

90 Damage Control

20 News & Events

86 Living Pono

76 Grom Report

92 Industry Notes

80 Shoots

96 Last Look

Maile Therrien Photo: Heff


Keoki

NEW

Editorial

Publisher Mike Latronic Associate Publisher / Editor Lauren Rolland Photo Editor Tony Heff Art Director John Weaver Multimedia Director Tyler Rock Ambassador-at-Large Chris Latronic Social Media Coordinator Keoki Saguibo Staff Photographers Brent Bielmann, Tony Heff, Chris Latronic, Mike Latronic, Tyler Rock, Keoki Saguibo Free Thinkers Blake Lefkoe, Jeff Hawe, Arielle Taramasco

Senior Contributing Photographers

L I M E C OL A D A

Erik Aeder, Eric Baeseman (outbluffum.com), Brian Bielmann, Ryan Craig, Jeff Divine, Pete Frieden, Gonzo, Dane Grady, Taylor Ivison, Bryce Johnson, Ha’a Keaulana, Ehitu Keeling, Bruno Lemos, Mana, Zak Noyle, Shawn Pila, Jim Russi, Jason Shibata, Spencer Suitt, Tai Vandyke

Contributing Photographers OLA DA T ROPICA L C P I Ñ A COL A DA

John Bilderback, Marc Chambers, Brooke Dombroski, DoomaPhoto, Rick Doyle, Isaac Frazer, Pete Hodgson, Kin Kimoto, Laserwolf, Tim McKenna, Dave “Nelly” Nelson, Nick Ricca, Heath Thompson, Bill Taylor, Wyatt Tillotson, Corey Wilson, Jimmy Wilson, Peter “Joli” Wilson, Cole Yamane Senior Account Executive Brian Lewis Business Coordinator Cora Sanchez Office Manager Nate Leclair

2ERVINGS

S

FULL

of hfsrmuallistize

in eac

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Rock

EDITOR’S NOTE SUMMER IN THE CITY Standing in downtown Honolulu, I excitedly try to absorb all the energy that surrounds me. The high rises reflect heat off their cement walls as the lunch crowds hurriedly pass by, heels clicking on sidewalk. The coconut trees and aged architecture stand as reminders of the past while trolleys and taxis transport tourists around the rapidly progressing city. Girls with red and blue longboards cross the white lines of Kalakaua while uncles and beach boys smile and talk story under a pavilion. This city is undoubtedly alive, buzzing with locals, visitors, cars, crowds. It’s easy to be overwhelmed by it all. But these characteristics are also what make a city so vibrant to explore, especially Honolulu, which is saturated in surf history and culture. The energy seems to radiate out in all aspects – the blue hues of Waikiki, the powerful waves at Bowls, the street performers and night goers, the history at the Iolani Palace and Pearl Harbor… it’s all so lively and so fundamentally unique.

With that energy also comes a sense of liberation, for me at least, every time I’m in Town. Like there’s an adventure to be had! Whether it’s touring Bishop Museum to learn about Duke Kahanamoku (read our tribute to the father of surfing on page 44), catching flicks at the Honolulu Surf Film Festival, or getting chased out of the water by men in grey suits, (Tony Heff’s experience, not mine), for every day the Freesurf team was on the south shore gathering materials, we had something exciting to talk about back at the North Shore office. In this issue you’ll see that we absolutely maximized our Town time. Swell after swell favored the south side lineups, and surfers island-wide fought the traffic, crowds, metered parking and sizzling heat for a piece of the action. And you can bet our shooters were there for the whole season to document. We haven’t seen a summer like this in years, everyone was frothing. This month’s Aperture gallery and Spot Check show off some of Honolulu’s best waves at their finest, plus we give you more graphic delight in our Feature (page 48), which illustrates the unique qualities of our island’s metropolis with a twist. I think anyone who lives outside of Honolulu feels that any time spent in the city needs to be maximized. As if you need to fit all of the exciting aspects and energy into one day. Surf, shoot, grind, stroll downtown, people watch, turn up your music in traffic, visit a friend, enjoy the lifestyle, soak in the energy. That’s what Town is all about.

Lauren Rolland Associate Publisher / Editor

The magic of town. Literally.


NEWS & EVENTS / KAMEHAMEHA CONTENDERS: CULTURE IN COMPETITION By Arielle Taramasco

Cayla Moore

Imai deVault

The Kamehameha Surf Team proved its unified strength by winning their second consecutive National Scholastic of Surfing Association Interscholastic High School Championship. The team consisted of eleven students from Kapālama and Maui campuses, and two coaches. The KS Surf Team traveled 2,500 miles to defend their title in the NSSA Interscholastic Championships in Salt Creek, California. Unlike the majority of the other schools competing, every morning the Kamehameha Surf Team gathered under one tent to discuss team strategies under the Hawaiian flag. “Everybody has a different talent in different areas,” explains Team Captain Cayla Moore, who won the NSSA High School Women’s Shortboard Championship for the second consecutive year, which led the Hawaiian squad to victory. “Everybody on our team was a strong surfer, as compared to just a couple [surfers] here and there.” The Kamehameha Surf Team was the only team representing Hawai’i, and for this kanaka maoli team, surfing is a way of perpetuating Hawaiian culture. “It’s not just about surfing for us,” says Moore, “it’s being with each other, representing where we come from, and bringing [the National title] home.” After living under the same roof for over a week, the Kamehameha Surf Team’s bond grew as the contest progressed. According to Moore, this attributes to the team’s cohesiveness and aloha for one another. “Not only are we a family in the water, we take care of each other at home,” she claims. This family definitely knows how to groom its members into champions. Even after a rough heat, each team member was cheered on, encouraged, and given constructive criticism, all regarded with humility instead of pride or anger. “When I’m with the Surf Team I know that

they’re there for me,” states Moore. “No matter what, they’re still going to be proud.” Despite the challenging conditions of California beach breaks, the Kamehameha Surf Team adapted to defeat San Clemente High by four points. With two National championships under its belt and six students graduating, including Moore, the Kamehameha Surf Team looks to continue perpetuating a winning legacy, but more importantly, the Hawaiian culture.


Kamalei Alexander


NEWS & EVENTS /

HONOLULU SURF FILM FESTIVAL By Lauren Rolland Photos Keoki The only film festival in Hawai‘i dedicated to showcasing the past and present in surfing, the 8th Annual Honolulu Surf Film Festival was hosted by the Doris Duke Theatre from July 11th through August 1st, 2015. The three-week event, presented by Nordstrom, highlighted surf-inspired cinematic entertainment, which included 20 features and 40 shorts, and roamed around Hawai‘i, Australia, California, Chile, Iran, Peru, Mozamique, India, Indo and more. Opening night was an exciting Bollywood-themed evening with the screening of Dave Homcy and Crystal Thornburg-Homcy’s film Beyond The Surface, live dancing by Aaja Nachle troupe, pupus by India Café and cold beers from Kona Brewing Co. The closing night reception, which took place Saturday, August 1st, also included live music, pupus and beer, plus the screening of Bud Browne’s 1964 classic Locked In! followed by a panel discussion with surf legends Peter Cole, Mark Cunninghman, Kimo Hollinger and Jock Sutherland. With such a wide variety of movies this year, the Honolulu Surf Film Festival was a testament to the ever-widening influence that surfing has on the world. From the highly anticipated, high performance display in Joe G.’s Strange Rumblings in Shangri La and the progressive movement in Dan Norkunas and Albee Layer’s Attractive Distractions to the fascinating documentary of Ramon Navarro in Chris Malloy’s The Fisherman’s Son, film curator Abbie Algar did a phenomenal job putting together this year’s collection. The female dominated stories of Marion Poizeau’s Into The Sea and the Homcy’s Beyond The Surface created a balance as well, plus the shorts like Keith Ketchum’s Brianna Cope, Leah Dawson’s Julune, Matt Luttrell’s Surf Town, and Keala Naihe and Kyle Watai’s Bird is the Word added different tones to spice up each feature. The Honolulu Surf Film Festival was a display of beautiful cinematography that inspired travel, social action, perpetuation, and of course, what we all came here to see, surfing. Crystal and Dave Homcy 22


NEWS & EVENTS /

50 th Anniversary

ON BROTHERHOOD

Through all the changes in Haleiwa over the years, Surf N Sea thanks you for allowing us to remain your Ocean Sports Headquarters. We’re committed to serving our customers with the same aloha spirit since ‘65!

By Mike Latronic Being a surfer can be downright risky. While there are millions of surfers worldwide, I’d be inclined to guess that only a small percentage actually do it daily or weekly – and even a smaller number that venture regularly into “extreme” conditions. By extreme that could mean perilously dangerous waves, rip currents or exposed rocks. Over crowding is the oxymoron here because an average ride at Trestles or Malibu is wayyyy more dangerous than less crowded breaks… but the less crowded breaks might be “more dangerous.” That keeps circling in my brain not making ANY sense but somehow it’s true… sorry. Then there are other natural dangers. Seaweed, sure – anyone who’s surfed has likely gotten tangled up in it at one point or another. Sun exposure, definitely – dermatologists world over make a consistent living from those humans who dare to bronze doing their favorite sports. Then there’s extremely cold water, potential dehydration, neck breaking shorebreak and the list goes on… Until it stops. And it stops at the single most frightening aspect of playing in our ocean… the shark. While more people actually perish on this planet from falling coconuts than sharks, the fear factor hits the red line for any human when it comes to potentially being eaten alive. Fortunately and scientifically, sharks aren’t all that interested in eating us and usually most incidents are nature’s mistakes. Albeit frightening and sometimes devastating mistakes. For the first time in history there was a major shark incident in a high level surfing event at this year’s WSL JBay Open… and it just so happened to our WCT #2 tour leader and past champion, Mick Fanning.

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Watching it live on the WSL webcast there were about 20 seconds where I literally didn’t breathe. The camera zooms in on Mick, one of the world’s most celebrated and humble surfers alive, as he sits


NEWS & EVENTS / I need to breathe. Fortunately moments later we see Mick pop up on a rescue ski, Julian next, and both are completely unscathed. It was astonishing. For all that splashing and frenzied movement the only damage reported was a small indent on Mick’s board and a severed surfboard leash!! And well apparently the shark may have a black eye as Mick claims to have punched him in the head a good one…

unsuspecting in the line up. Suddenly, a large shark fin emerges only a few feet away and the animal proceeds to aggressively ram into Mick, jarring him repeatedly until a wild roll knocks him off his board with a frenzy of flippers and splashing. The camera loses Mick behind a wave but the spray and splashing continue. The other finalist in the water, Julian Wilson, is visible and courageously paddling at full speed toward the scene to come to Fanning’s aid.

The adrenaline dump was huge. For Mick, for Julian, for his family and friends watching, for the world… the adrenaline dump was massive. I will man up and admit that I cried in joy that Mick was unharmed. But as tears welled out and the story unfolded on the live webcast and they continued to reveal Mick’s emotions along with his friends’ and Julian’s emotions, it became one of the most memorable displays of brotherhood I’ve ever witnessed. You could really hear it in their voices and see it in their eyes. Everyone they talked with (including Kelly Slater) was truly humbled and all knew Mick dodged the biggest bullet of his life. By the third time they showed the aerial footage of the scene, I absolutely fell in awe watching Mick in a whirlwind and Julian bee lining straight toward him… What the world might consider THE most “individual” of individual sports became the warmest brotherhood of athletes in history thus far. I’ve never been more proud to be a part of this family.

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NEWS & EVENTS /

HALE‘IWA ARTS FESTIVAL Words and Photos by Lauren Rolland July 18 & 19 saw the return of one of the best summer art celebrations on Oahu, the Hale‘iwa Arts Festival, which celebrated its 18th annual event this year under sunny skies. Hosted at Hale‘iwa Beach Park, the ocean front location draws hundreds of families, tourists and art supporters each year to enjoy Hawai‘i’s art community and browse the booths for a souvenir or new art piece. With a multitude of exhibits, activities and entertainment, the weekend was a success thanks to all the artists, vendors, visitors and festival Board of Directors. The art fest displayed everything from the paintings of Colleen Wilcox, Patrice Federspiel and Kimi Werner to the wood workings of Jen Homcy, to Welzie’s vibrant surf art, Doug Falter’s photography and Kaleimaeole’s jewelry, plus a host of live musical entertainment and local grinds, which added to the variety. Featured artist Heather Brown signed autographs all weekend, while new art was revealed for the first time to festival guests. It was a colorful weekend and both attendee and artist appreciated the North Shore entertainment. The purpose of the Hale’iwa Arts Festival non-profit organization is to promote education and public awareness of arts and culture, with emphasis on participation, for the betterment of the community. Be sure to check out haleiwaartsfestival.org for more information or to purchase apparel from this year’s festival at their online shop!


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Keoki

NEWS & EVENTS /

REDBULL PARTY WAVE BREAKS AT QUEENS QUEENS OF QUEENS DOMINATE QUEENS. By Chris Latronic RedBull invaded Waikiki once again for the 2nd coming of their RedBull Party Wave Competition at Kuhio Beach, Honolulu on Saturday, July 11th. Unlike any surf comp of its kind, this is a creative team event that involves a lot more than just wave riding skills. Hawai‘i celebrity surf judges Kai Lenny, Kainoa McGee and Billy Kemper were keen on giving critical points for craft creativity and ingenuity, team showmanship, and an entertaining introductory skit. A ten team roster made up the colorfully mind bending competitive field. With the lineup pitting JOB pirates against masked Uber drivers, professional BMXers vs. Olympic bobsledders, and WWF wrestling stars with bikini clad beach conservationalists, it was hard to dream up what kind of matchup you wouldn’t see in this wacky fun filled event. The opening skits were engaging and crowd drawing with varying acts creating a vibrant show. But it took a balance of skit showmanship and wave performance to tickle the fancies of the esteemed judges. Although some teams had flawless beach performances, a lot of their crafts were unable to catch waves. The Queens Of Queens, lead by Kahi Paccarro and the Sustainable Coastlines crew, were the last team to go out on their surf craft made entirely of recycled materials. To the amazement of all, their wave craft worked extraordinary. Catching multiple waves in the empty Queens lineup, the Queens were threading walls, fading drops, and even managing a few cutback turns. The performance was enough to impress the judges into giving them excellent to perfect scores and crowning them the inevitable RedBull Party Wave 2015 champions.


Elijah Gates

NEWS & EVENTS /

Seth Moniz

2015 NSSA NATIONAL CHAMPIONS PRESENTED BY BODY GLOVE Photos Kurt Steinmetz The 2015 NSSA National Championships presented by Body Glove came to a close last month, crowning Seth Moniz and Caroline Marks victorious in the two premier divisions. “So stoked to win the Open Men’s division after my brother, last year,” says Seth. “It’s my last amateur event. I’m super psyched. Today was a fun day; we had fun waves.” It was also a second year in a row win for a Moniz. Seth claimed the 2015 title while his older brother, Josh, earned the top title last year. Seth also took home the division win in Explorer Juniors (ages 17 & under) and the AI Open Mens Standout Inspired by Andy Irons. For Caroline Marks, it was the second straight Open Women’s victory. Defeating Oahu surfer Brisa Hennessy, both Marks and Moniz join the ranks of many legendary surfers whose careers began with wins at the NSSA Nationals, including John John Florence, Kalani David and Finn McGill. Big congrats to the other winners of the event, including Makana Franzmann, who is 2015’s Open Mini Grom Champion, Elijah Gates, who took home the Explorer Mens title, Levi Young, the Explorer Super Grom winner, Moana Jones, Explorer Womens champ, Mason Schremmer, Explorer Womens Longboard and Explorer Womens SUP titleist, Ty Simpson, Explorer SUP winner, Brodi Sale, who won the Kalani Robb Most Inspirational Performance, Gabriella Bryan who was crowned the Carissa Moore Rookie of the Year and Kelta O’Rourke who nabbed the Heart and Soul Award Inspired by Bethany Hamilton

32

RESULTS Open Mens (ages 16 & up) MAYORS CUP - Seth Moniz Open Womens (all ages) MAYORS CUP – Caroline Marks Open Juniors (ages 15 & under) – Eithan Osborne Open Boys (ages 12 & under) – Taro Watanabe Open Mini Groms (ages 10 & under) – Makana Franzmann Open Girls (ages 14 & under) – Caroline Marks Open Longboard (all ages) – Parker Sawyer Explorer Mens (all ages) – Elijah Gates Explorer Juniors (ages 17 & under) – Seth Moniz Explorer Boys (ages 14 & under) – Bo Raynor Explorer Menehune (ages 12 & under) – Dimitri Poulos Explorer Super Groms (ages 10 & under) – Levi Young Explorer Womens (all ages) – Moana Jones Explorer Girls (ages 14 & under) – Caroline Marks Explorer Masters (ages 25 & up) – Chris Keet Explorer Seniors (ages 35 & up) – Chris Keet Explorer Super Seniors (ages 45 & up) – Tim Albury Explorer Duke (ages 55 & up) – Patrick Schlick Explorer Longboard (all ages) – Parker Sawyer Explorer Womens Longboard (all ages) – Mason Schremmer Explorer Kneeboard (all ages) – Mike Fernandez Explorer SUP (all ages) – Ty Simpson Explorer Womens SUP (all ages) – Mason Schremmer National Airshow Champion – Nolan Rapoza National Junior Airshow Champion – Nick Marshall Kalani Robb Most Inspirational Performance – Brodi Sale Carissa Moore Rookie of the Year – Gabriella Bryan AI Open Mens Standout Inspired by Andy Irons – Seth Moniz Aloha Award Presented by Keanu Asing – David Letinsky Heart and Soul Award Inspired by Bethany Hamilton – Kelta O’Rourke Highest GPA with Top National Performance Presented by Connor Coffin – Dimitri Poulos


Keoki

NEWS & EVENTS /

Matthew and Tom Dosland sharing a wave.

MAKE-A-WISH VISITS THE VOLCOM HOUSE On a sunny Wednesday in July, the waves at Pipe and Backdoor were the perfect size for 11-year-old Matthew Courtright from New Jersey. Spending the day at the Volcom house with Tai Vandyke, Jason Magallanes, Tom Dosland and Jamie O’Brien, Matthew and his siblings got to experience a day on the North Shore surfing, swimming and cruising with the boys, all thanks to the Make-A-Wish Hawai‘i foundation and team of local surfers and volunteers. Matthew suffers from cystic fibrosis, a life-threatening genetic disease, which surfing has been known to ease. The Jersey boy had the chance to surf with the Mauli Ola Foundation in his home state, and after getting the surf stoke bug, knew right away what to wish for when he was approached by Make-A-Wish. Lunch was provided for Matthew and his family, along with mural painting entertainment by Mike Parillo and live music by Molonai, a talented artist from the Big Island. Matthew was given an ukulele and learned to play “Surf”, which was the perfect melody to his adventure. The Courtright family also got a thrill ride at Pipe with Jamie O’Brien on his infamous SUPsquatch, while Tai Vandyke documented the action. James Donnelly, hospitality and development manager at Make-AWish Hawai‘i, spent the afternoon pushing Matthew into waves at Pipe, and enjoyed every minute of it. “The most beautiful part of Hawai‘i is the hearts of our people,” Donnelly says. “This time on the North Shore was so special because of the community support.”


Heff

CATCH SURF GET WET TOUR The brand known for their Beater Boards and who also sponsor Jamie O’Brien’s crazy shorebreak antics presented their first Catch Surf Get Wet Tour in Hawai‘i, which took place June 24, 25, 26 & 27. Four different surf shops teamed up with Catch Surf to offer autograph signings, free gear, games, giveaways and high fives. Hi Tech Kihei sponsored the first stop of the Tour on Maui, followed by Surf N Sea in Haleiwa, Local Motion Koko Marina on Oahu and T&C Ward Centre in Honolulu. JOB and Kalani Robb shredded the expression sessions after each shop event, including at Big Beach a.k.a Makena, Kewalos and Sandy’s. There’s no better way to test out your Catch Surf shred stick than at Sandy’s shorebreak!

37TH ANNUAL DA HUI PADDLE RACE For close to 40 years, Da Hui has hosted the only patriotic paddle race along Oahu’s North Shore, where hundreds of people test their strength along the 7-mile course. Every 4th of July, paddlers gear up for the downwind race from Turtle Bay to Waimea, motivated by the stunning scenery of the coastline and ideal summertime paddle conditions. Celebrating 37 years of the Annual Da Hui Paddle Race, this event maintains its reputation as one of the biggest and longestrunning paddleboard races in the world. This year saw the addition of OC-1 & OC-2 crafts to the course, which added more excitement and a new level of fun competition to the event. 4th of July couldn’t have provided better conditions for the paddle race, and athletes made their way down the coast via SUP boards, outrigger canoes, SUPsquatches and the likes. Awards took place at Waimea Bay, while music blasted the beach and a water slide to the ocean provided entertainment for hours. To be part of next year’s event, check out dahuipaddlerace.com.


NEWS & EVENTS /

I HeART THE OCEAN By Jeff Hawe Turns out those environmental heads over at Sustainable Coastlines Hawai‘i really know how to throw a party. Evidenced by the 2015 I HeART The Ocean fundraiser, which took place June 28th at The Republik in Honolulu. With four bands, one big fashion show and a plethora of local art handcrafts and goods to take home, the night was anything but dull. In case you are one of the unlucky few who missed out on the evening, allow me to fill you in. Foreseeable Futures played to warm the night up. Not skipping a beat, Dread Ashanti took stage as the crowd continued filling in. The focal point of the night was the Marine Debris Fashion Show. In simple terms, it’s a fun way to reclaim and reuse refuse found in our seas. The crowd absolutely loved the models dressed in stylish trash and judges Mark Cunningham, Mele Estes and Noelani Love crowned Inessa Owen as top designer of the night. The Vitals took stage next, rocking the audience with roots reggae sounds. All the while a silent auction was tempting party-goers to bid on everything from artwork to splendorous weekend getaways. To bookend this night of entertainment, The Late Ones brought an energetic performance and fresh sound, sending the crowd home with ono beats resonating inside their heads. Intrigued by this fun-loving band of activists and what they do? You should be. Unfamiliar with Sustainable Coastlines Hawai‘i and what they are all about? No worries. In a nutshell they are a non-profit organization that inspires local communities to care for their beaches through hands on clean ups around Hawai‘i. Want to learn more and get involved? Do it. Look them up at www.sustainablecoastlineshawaii. org or track them down on Instagram @sustainablecoastlineshawaii for updates and upcoming events to get involved with.


Keoki

SPOT CHECK

Breaking Down Three of Town’s Best Waves By Keoki Saguibo


HISOTRY: In the early 1950’s, as part of a construction project to connect Kewalo Basin and the Ala Wai Small Boat Yacht Harbor, Hawaiian Dredging Co. excavated more than 280,000 cubic feet of dirt and coral to join the two harbors. What was done in the past made way for the future – South Shore’s most iconic left-hand reef break, Ala Moana Bowls. Known to some legendary waterman as the birthplace of modern day tube riding, ‘Bowls’, as it’s popularly known today, is town’s version of Pipeline. THE WAVE: Bowls has two main peaks, Middles and the Big Bowl. When waves are in the shoulder to head-high range, Middles is the dominant peak with a fast peeling wall. Middles is ideal for progressive surfing, which is why the majority of the south side’s surf contests take place here. When the waves are in the headhigh to over-head range, waves break on the Big Bowl. When Big Bowl turns on, the wave shifts into a wide, churning barrel that resembles the likes of Pipeline and Teahupo‘o.

THE CROWD: On any given day at Bowls, you’ll find that the groomed left-hander houses one of the most crowded lineups on the South Shore. From college students and nine-to-fivers to groms and locals, all converge at Bowls to get their daily wave fix. There are a few, humble locals that call Bowls their home break, like Mike Akima, Bryan Amona, Randall Paulson and Kekoa Cazimero, all who can be seen on the best and biggest days that Bowls throws at them. Put it all together and you have a melting pot of talent that makes Ala Moana Bowls the go to south shore wave of choice.

ALA MOANA BOWLS


Heff

HISTORY: Queens sits on one of the most iconic stretches of beach in the world, Waikiki, and on the foot of Mt. Le‘ahi (a.k.a. Diamond Head). Locals say Queens got its name from Queen Liliuokalani, who once surfed the break frequently and also had a beach house with a pier further south of the break toward Walls. Queens is also where Duke Kahanamoku, the father of surfing, ended his legendary ride of more than three thousand yards (1.8 miles) from outside Castles – notably the longest ride on a surfboard in Hawai‘i and a feat that has gone unbroken to this day.

SPOT CHECK

QUEENS

THE WAVE: Queens is a slow rolling, mellow, playful wave, perfectly groomed for longboarding, and is home to the majority of longboarding contests in Hawai‘i. When the waves are in the shoulder to head-high range, there’s a hollower, fast inside section that turns into a skate ramp-like wave allowing for aerials and progressive surfing.


THE CROWD: With a mixed bag of options, you’ll find a crowd that is unique all in its own. On any given day at Queens, you’ll see longboards, fishes, bodyboards, beginner to advanced surfers, tourists on brightly colored doughnut floaties, stand up paddlers and canoes populating the crowded lineup. Queens has a unique Hawai‘i feel that is drenched in surf history. When surfing at this break, you can’t help but feel like you belong to something bigger, as if adding to the history and prestige of the spot with every ride. Queens seems to entice you to catch one more last wave under the view of Mt. Le‘ahi, sharing in the stoke and beauty that millions of visitors and locals alike enjoy.


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HISTORY: Considered a swell magnet of the South Shore, Kewalos is a go to spot to wet your surf palate. But it wasn’t always this way. Kewalo Basin harbor used to be a shallow reef that surrounded a section of deep water, ideal for canoe landing during pre contact days. In 1919 the Hawai‘i Government approved a harbor extension to relieve congestion from the Honolulu Harbor and in 1924 offshore dredging began. Built during the 1920s, today Kewalos is still home to charter vessels and commercial fishing fleets, and is also now a South Shore version of Rocky Point.

KEWALOS

THE WAVE: The wave starts at the point of Kewalos channel giving surfers the option to go left or right. On the left, you’ll find a semicloseout peak on the outside that makes its way into a wedgy, rippable reform on the inside. The right is a little more daunting than the left because of the natural topography of the reef, which also breaks the wave into sections, offering a launch pad into the trade winds – a favorite for today’s progressive surfing talents.


THE CROWD: Once known as a heavy local spot, Kewalos now has a mellower vibe, transitioning into a family-oriented beach park with BBQ’s and pop-up tents. On any given day out in the water at Kewalos you’ll find the artistic show of Ezekiel Lau, Josh and Seth Moniz, Cole and Kylen Yamakawa, Noa Mizuno and Nick Mita, to name a few mainstays. Kewalos is also the hub for Oahu’s frothing groms and micro pro’s, who decimate each and every section thrown at them. This in turn makes the wave an ideal venue for some of the state’s most prestigious grom surfing contests.

SPOT CHECK


D U K E

125


NATIVE SON A Duke Kahanamoku Tribute By Lauren Rolland “Aloha is my creed.” Legacies are created in the wake of extraordinary people. Stories about the greats like Martin Luther King Jr., Galileo Galilei or Mark Twain have captivated people for centuries, playing a role in human history and the development of our civilization. Some figures are instantly pivotal, like Abraham Lincoln or James Cook, while others leave an impression after death, like Vincent van Gogh. Some make their mark over the course of their lifetime, unraveling their thread of fame one year at a time. One of the most influential men to hail from Hawai‘i and the most recognized name in traditional surfing is none other than the great Duke Paoa Kahanamoku. Duke was a man who made historical strides throughout his lifetime, beginning as a recordbreaking Olympic swimmer, continuing on as a surf innovator and aloha ambassador in Waikiki, and winding down as an entrepreneur of a small commercial empire, along with many other accomplishments in between. Humble, peaceful and even-keel, Duke had a stature that exuded Aloha. It’s no wonder he became an ambassador for Hawai‘i, welcoming movie stars, political figures and popular socialites to the islands; the man was hospitable and friendly, social yet modest, well-spoken yet soft-spoken. Duke dressed exceptionally well and was aware of the image he represented, taking care to be meticulous, clean and stylish. Duke was born in 1890 and raised in Waikiki by his parents, Duke Halapu and Julia Paoa Kahanamoku, and grew up speaking both Hawaiian and English fluently. The oldest of 9 children (6 boys and 3 girls), Duke and his siblings grew up on the land where the Hilton Hawaiian Village now sits. Raised within a full-blooded Hawaiian family, the Kahanamoku’s maintained very traditional aspects of their life, like fishing and gathering limu from the shallow coral reefs near their home. “That’s how Duke learned to swim, handle a canoe, how to surf – he was in the ocean all the time,” describes Bishop Museum historian and archivist, DeSoto Brown. “But he wasn’t just a surfer, he was an all-around waterman,” DeSoto continues. “He loved to sail, loved small boats, powerboats, yachts; he loved to fish and canoe surf, and was a steersmen in Waikiki.” Known today as the father of modern surfing, Duke Kahanamoku is internationally recognized as a figurehead of surfing’s revival in Waikiki. “In the very early part of the 1900s, when he was a teen and young man, Duke was part of a small group of people in Waikiki that were keeping surfing alive,” says DeSoto. “That’s why he’s such a major figure in surfing and why he’s still recognized today, because his life correlates to the evolution and growth of surfing.”

An equally big tribute was introducing surfing to Australia and New Zealand, where Duke first demonstrated longboarding in 1914 and 1915. The Hawaiian made a lasting impression on the people, influencing both countries to eventually become two of the most popular surf hubs in the world. Earlier this year in 2015, both Australia and New Zealand honored the centennial of Duke’s initial visit. “It’s not often that something as wide spread as surfing, or any other sport, gets to have a clearly defined birth,” explains DeSoto. “Other sports just sort of developed, there’s no particular point where you can say, ‘this is when it came into existence’. But for Australia and New Zealand, they can say this is when surfing started.” The man is a symbol of surfing in so many ways. Duke also helped popularize wave riding in California and was involved in surfing becoming a professional sport. Using his namesake to coin one of the first pro events, the Duke Kahanamoku Invitational Surfing Championships at Sunset Beach began in 1965 and continued long after Duke’s death in 1968. We can clearly see the stages of development in surfing, since it’s a relatively young sport, and Duke was alive to witness this evolvement. From cultural to amateur to professional to a lifestyle, Duke was as at the forefront of this movement. Although surfing is what Duke is most internationally known for today, the sport that originally launched his fame was swimming. Duke broke 3 freestyle world records in Hawai‘i’s first ever Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) swim meet in Honolulu Harbor in 1911. The following year, he competed at the Olympics in Stockholm, Sweden, and won Hawai‘i’s first Olympic gold medal for the 100-meter freestyle, and a silver medal for the 4×200-meter freestyle relay. Gaining international notoriety as a prodigious swimmer, Duke went on to attend the Olympics again in 1920, 1924 and 1932. During this time, Duke lived in Southern California (from 1922 to 1929) and appeared in nearly 30 Hollywood movies. Getting small roles as a pirate, Sioux Chief, Persian guard and Pacific Islander, among many others, the Hawaiian befriended legends like John Ford, John Wayne, Cary Grant, Charlie Chaplin, Babe Ruth, Amelia Earhart and Shirley Temple. After moving back to Oahu, Duke became a sheriff in Honolulu and oversaw the jail and inmates. He was first elected in 1934 and served for 13 consecutive terms until the office was abolished after Hawai‘i became a state in 1959. After this, Duke became Honolulu’s official greeter and ambassador and was proud to be American. In honor of what would be Duke’s 125th birthday (on August 24th, 2015), Bishop Museum in Honolulu is presenting an exhibit from August 9th through November 30, 2015. The museum boasts the


DUKE 125

largest collection of Duke’s personal items and plans to use many of them to help illuminate the life of Duke; as the Olympian, movie star, businessman, aloha ambassador, family man and celebrated surfer. One of the greatest legends of Waikiki surfing history is the story of Duke’s longest ride in 1917. The athlete rode what’s estimated to be a 30-foot wave all the way from Castles (near Diamond Head) to Canoes at Kuhio Beach, approximately 1.8 miles long! The ride took an estimated 2 and a half minutes to surf, and many of the beach boys alive today still relish in the memory. Bishop Museum exhibit engineers designed an interactive ride for guests on a replica of Duke’s finless wooden surfboard in a 3D video game, which allows the ‘surfer’ to experience the mile-long wave across Waikiki. Working in details like noserising for speed, turning, 46

and different viewpoints, the activity allows riders a look into surfing during that era and a recreation of ‘the longest ride’. Tested by yours truly, (and in heels nonetheless), the interactive activity was exciting and insightful, and was the perfect way to work on some cross stepping across Castles, Publics, Cunhas, Queens and finally Canoes. The museum will also have a ‘Race Duke’ swimming interactive where two players can swim against Duke in a recreation of his 1920 Olympic record time in the men’s 100 meter freestyle. Again, speaking from experience, this game is a fun workout, friendly competition, and really puts into perspective how fast Duke was, and the actual time it takes to swim a 100-meter freestyle competition. Guests will also find a ‘Then and Now’ photo feature, a touch screen that explains many of Duke’s personal possessions, his Olympic medals, ukulele, famous 10foot redwood surfboard and much more.


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Bishop Museum

With a grace and character that was uniquely his own, Duke developed a name that is drenched in culture and history. The original Bishop Museum exhibit brings to life his truly Hawaiian story in celebration of the 125th anniversary of his birth, giving visitors the occasion to get to know Duke in an inspiring way. Hard work, strong ethics and a humble sincerity is what led the man to live and share his motto:

“Try meeting or leaving people with Aloha. You’ll be surprised by their reaction. I believe it and it is my creed. Aloha to you.”


TOWN

PAUAH I K E E A M O KU AT KI N S O N N I U S A R ATO G A B E AC WAL K K AL AK AUA K APAH ULU C AM PB E L L PAK I BLA CK PO IN T KA H WAIOL A S A R ATO G A P U N CH B O W L WA I A L A E K A PI OL ANI DAT ES T RE E T M C C UL LY YOUNG B I S H OP B ER ETA N IA KIN G MO N CAMP B E L L D O LE U N I V E R S I TY L E MO N TA N TA LUS L I L I H A PAL AM A K AM E H AM E H A RI V E R H OT E L RI CHA R DS Q UEEN SO U KAHA LA K IL A UE A WA I A L A E H A R D I N G LU N A L I LO PAPU KOA OLOH ANA NI U AH UI NUUANU AL AK E A WA IKA MILO PUN CH MONS A R R AT K AH A L A MO I L I L I KA I M U K I PA LO LO M ANOA K AL I H I DI L L I NGH AM I S E NB E RG L E WE RS A IN A KOA MO O HEA U SOUTH C O R A L AU WA H I WA I M A N U PA UA H I K EE AM OKU AT K I NS ON NI U S ARATOGA B E AC WAL K K AL A KA UA KA PA HULU C PUNC H B O W L C O O KE WA R D P I I KO I WA I O L A S ARATOGA PUNC H B OWL WAI AL AE K API OL ANI DAT ES TR EET MCCULLY YO MOOH E AU K A L A N IA N AO L E PA H OA CA M P B E L L DOL E UNI V E RS I T Y L E M ON TANTALUS L I L I H A PAL AMA KA MEHA MEHA R KAPAH U LU C A M P B E L L PA K I B L A C K P O I N T K A H AL A K I L AUE A WAI AL AE H ARDI NG LUNAL I LO PAPU KOA O LO HA N A N IU MCCU L LY YO U N G B I S H O P B E R E TA N I A K I N G M ONS ARRAT K AH AL A M OI L I L I K AI M UK I PALOLO M ANOA KA LIHI DILLIN G H KAMEH A M E H A R IV E R H OT E L R I CH A R D S Q U E EN S OUT H C ORAL AUWAH I WAI M ANU PAUAH I K E E AM O KU ATKIN SO N N IU OLOHAN A N IU AH U I N U UA N U A L A KE A WA I KA M I LO PUNC H B OWL C OOK E WARD PI I KOI WAI OL A S ARATO G A PUN CHBO W DILLIN G H AM IS E N B E R G L E W E R S A I N A KOA M O OH E AU K AL ANI ANAOL E PAH OA C AM PB E L L DOL E UNIVER SITY LEMO N T


Somewhere in Honolulu an office phone is ringing. The man whose job it is to answer cannot hear it because out his window, a bomb set is approaching, and he's pau hana in 20 minutes. It's summertime in Town. The city's ablaze, and the waves are on fire. Surfer: Josh Moniz, Photos: Heff

H AL A KILAUEA WA IALAE H A R D I N G LU N A L I LO PA P U KOA OLOH ANA NI U AH UI NUUANU AL AK E A WAI K AM I LO PUN CHBO WL CO O N SA RRAT KAH ALA M O ILIL I K A I MU KI PA LO LO MA N OA KAL I H I DI L L I NGH AM I S E NB E RG L E WE RS AI NAKOA M O O HEA U KA LA N IA N U TH C ORAL A UWAH I WA IM A N U PA UA H I K E E A MO KU ATK I NS ON NI U S ARATOGA B E AC WAL K K AL AK AUA K APA HULU CA MPBELL H BOW L COOKE WARD P IIKO I WA I O L A S A R ATO G A P U NC H B OWL WAI AL AE K API OL ANI DAT ES T RE E T M C C UL LY YO UN G BISHO P U K A LANIANAO LE PAH OA C A MP BE L L D O L E U N I V E R S I TY L E M ON TANTALUS L I L I H A PAL AM A K AM E H AM E H A R IVER HOTEL R ICH C A MPBELL PA K I B L A C K P O I N T KA H A L A K I L A U E A WA I AL AE H ARDI NG LUNAL I LO PAPU KOA OLOH ANA NI U A HUI N UUA N U A LA O UNG B ISHOP B E R E TAN IA K I N G M O N S A R R AT K A H A L A M OI L I L I K AI M UK I PALOLO M ANOA K AL I H I DI L L I NGH A M ISEN BER G LEWE R I VER HOTEL R IC H ARD S Q U E E N S O U T H C O R A L A U WAH I WAI M ANU PAUAH I K E E AM OKU AT K I NS ON NI U S AR ATO G A BEA CWA LK U A HU I NUUAN U ALAK E A WA I K A MI LO P U N C H BO W L COOK E WARD PI I KOI WAI OL A S ARATOGA PUNC H B OWL WA IA LA E KA PIO LA N H A M ISENBERG LE W E RS AIN A KOA MO O H E A U K A L A N I ANAOL E PAH OA C AM PB E L L DOL E UNI V E RS I T Y L E M ON TA N TA LUS LILIHA U S A RATOGA B E A C WALK K A L A K A UA KA PA H U LU C A MPB E L L PAK I B L AC K POI NT K AH AL A K I L AUE A WAI AL AE HA R DIN G LUN A LI W L WAIALAE K AP IO LAN I DAT ES T R E E T MC CU L LY YO U N G B I S H OP B E RE TANI A K I NG M ONS ARRAT K AH AL A MO ILILI KA IMUKI PA TANTALUS LIL IH A PALAM A K A ME H A M E H A R I V E R H OTE L RI C H ARDS QUE E N S OUT H C ORAL AUWAH I WAI M A N U PA UA HI KEEA M


PAUAH I K E E AM O KU ATK I N S O N N I U S A R ATO G A B E AC WAL K K AL AK AUA K APAH ULU C AM PB E L L PAK I BLA CK PO IN T KA H LUNALILO PA P U KOA O LO H A N A N I U A H U I N U UANU AL AK E A WAI K AM I LO PUNC H B OWL C OOK E WARD PIIKO I WA IO LA SA KAPIO L A N I DAT ES T R E E T M CC U L LY YO U N G BI S H OP B E RE TANI A K I NG M ONS ARRAT K AH AL A M OI L I LI KA IMUKI PA LO LO ISENB E R G L E W E R S A I N A KOA M O O H E A U KA L A NI ANAOL E PAH OA C AM PB E L L DOL E UNI V E RS I T Y L E MO N TA N TA LUS LIL HOTEL R IC H ARD S Q U E E N S O U TH CO R A L A U WAH I WAI M ANU PAUAH I K E E AM OKU AT K I NS ON NI U S AR ATO G A BEA CWA L PAKI B L A C K P O IN T KA H A L A K I L A U E A WA I A L A E H ARDI NG LUNAL I LO PAPU KOA OLOH ANA NI U AH U I N UUA N U A LA KEA WARD P IIKO I WAIO L A S A R ATO G A P U N C H BO W L WAI AL AE K API OL ANI DAT ES T RE E T M C C UL LY YOUN G BISHO P BER ETA N MOILIL I K AIM U K I PA LO LO MA N OA KA L I H I D I L L I NGH AM I S E NB E RG L E WE RS AI NAKOA M OOH E AU K ALA N IA N AO LE PA HO LEMON TA N TALUS L I L I H A PA L A MA KA M E H A ME H A RI V E R H OT E L RI C H ARDS QUE E N S OUT H C ORAL A UWA HI WA IMA N U

PAUAH I K E E AM O KU AT KI N S O N N I U S A R ATO G A B E AC WAL K K AL AK AUA K APAH ULU C AM PB E L L PAK I BLA CK PO IN T KA H LUNAL ILO PA P U KOA O LO H A N A N I U A H U I N U UANU AL AK E A WAI K AM I LO PUNC H B OWL C OOK E WARD PIIKO I WA IO LA SA KAPIO L A N I DAT ES T R E E T MC CU L LY YO U N G B IS H OP B E RE TANI A K I NG M ONS ARRAT K AH AL A M OI L I LI KA IMUKI PA LO LO ISENBE RG LE W E RS A I N A KOA M O O H E A U KA L A NI ANAOL E PAH OA C AM PB E L L DOL E UNI V E RS I T Y L E MO N TA N TA LUS LILI RIVER H OT E L R IC H A R D S Q U E E N S O U TH CO R AL AUWAH I WAI M ANU PAUAH I K E E AM OKU AT K I NS ON N IU SA R ATO G A BEA CAMPBE L L PAK I B L A C K P O I N T K A H A L A KI L A U E A WAI AL AE H ARDI NG LUNAL I LO PAPU KOA OLOH AN A N IU A HUI N UUA PUNCH B O W L C O O K E WA R D P I I KO I WA I O L A S A RATOGA PUNC H B OWL WAI AL AE K API OL ANI DAT ES T REET MCCULLY YO U KING M O N S A R R AT KA H A L A M O I L I L I K A I MU KI PALOLO M ANOA K AL I H I DI L L I NGH AM I S E NB E RG L E WER S A IN A KOA MO O H CAMPBE L L D O LE U N I V E R S I TY L E MO N TA N TA LUS L I L I H A PAL AM A K AM E H AM E H A RI V E R H OT E L RI C HA R DS Q UEEN SO U

We endure thorough traffic. We scour for parking. We walk through crowded streets with feet burning, and hope to find that little bit of solitude. This is our town, and we love it. Surfer: Davey Boy Gonsalves. Photos: (clockwise) Rock; Keoki; Heff 50


H A LA KILAUEA WA IALAE H A R D I N G A RATOG A PUN C H B O W L WA I A L A E O M A NOA KALI H I DIL L IN G H A M IH A PA LAMA K AM E H A M E H A R I V E R L K KALAKAUA K APAH ULU C A MP BE L L A WAIKAMILO P U N C H B O W L C O O KE N IA KING MON S ARRAT K A H A L A OA C AMPBELL D O LE U N IV E R S I TY PA UAH I K E E A MO KU AT K IN S O N N I U S ARATO G A B E A C WALK K ALAK A UA K APAH ULU C AM P B E L L PA KI B LAC K P O INT K AH A L A K ILA U E A WA IALAE H A R D I N G LU N ALILO PA P U KOA O LO H A N A N IU A H U I N U UA N U A L A K E A WAIKA M I LO P UN C H B O W L C O O K E WA R D P I I KO I WA IO L A S A R ATO G A P UN C H B O W L WA IALAE K A P I O L A N I DAT ES T R E E T M C C U L LY YO U N G B IS H O P B E R E TA N I A K IN G M O N S A R R AT K AH A L A M O I L I L I K AIM U K I PALO LO M AN OA K A L I H I DIL L IN G H A M IS E N B E R G L E W E R S A IN A KOA M O O H E A U K ALAN IAN AO L E PA H OA C AM P BE L L DO L E UN IV E R S I TY L E M O N TAN TA LU S L ILIH A PA L A M A K AM E H A M E H A R IV E R H OT E L R IC H ARD S Q U E E N S O UT H C O R A L A UWAH I WA I MA N U PA UAH I K E E A MO KU H A L A K ILAUEA WA IALAE H A R D I N G A RATOG A PUN C H B O W L WA I A L A E M A NOA KALI H I DIL L IN G H A M IH A PA LAMA K AM E H A M E H A A CWALK KALAK A UA K APAH U LU N U A LAKEA WA IK A M ILO U N G BISHOP B E R E TAN IA H E AU KALANI AN AO LE PAH OA U TH C ORAL AU WAH I WA IM A N U


PA KI BLA CK PO IN T K H A R DIN G LUN A LILO NIU A HUI N UUA N U A L PUN CHBO WL CO O KE S A R ATO G A PUN CHBO DATESTR EET MCCULL B ER ETA N IA KIN G MO K A IMUKI PA LO LO MA I S EN BER G LEWER S A K A LA N IA N AO LE PA HO UN IVER SITY LEMO N T K A MEHA MEHA R IVER QU EEN SO UTH CO R A PA UA HI KEEA MO KU A B EA CWA LK KA LA KA U PA KI BLA CK PO IN T K H A R DIN G LUN A LILO NIU A HUI N UUA N U A L PUN CHBO WL CO O KE S A R ATO G A PUN CHBO DATESTR EET MCCULL B ER ETA N IA KIN G MO K A IMUKI PA LO LO MA I S EN BER G LEWER S A K A LA N IA N AO LE PA HO UN IVER SITY LEMO N T K A MEHA MEHA R IVER QU EEN SO UTH CO R A PA UA HI KEEA MO KU A B EA CWA LK KA LA KA U PA KI BLA CK PO IN T K H A R DIN G LUN A LILO NIU A HUI N UUA N U A L PUN CHBO WL CO O KE S A R ATO G A PUN CHBO DATESTR EET MCCULL B ER ETA N IA KIN G MO K A IMUKI PA LO LO MA I S EN BER G LEWER S A K A LA N IA N AO LE PA HO UN IVER SITY LEMO N T K A MEHA MEHA R IVER QU EEN SO UTH CO R A PA UA HI KEEA MO KU A B EA CWA LK KA LA KA U PA KI BLA CK PO IN T K H A R DIN G LUN A LILO NIU A HUI N UUA N U A L PUN CHBO WL CO O KE S A R ATO G A PUN CHBO DATESTR EET MCCULL B ER ETA N IA KIN G MO K A IMUKI PA LO LO MA I S EN BER G LEWER S A K A LA N IA N AO LE PA HO UN IVER SITY LEMO N T K A MEHA MEHA R IVER QU EEN SO UTH CO R A PA UA HI KEEA MO KU A B EA CWA LK KA LA KA U PA KI BLA CK PO IN T K H A R DIN G LUN A LILO NIU A HUI N UUA N U A L PUN CHBO WL CO O KE S A R ATO G A PUN CHBO DATESTR EET MCCULL B ER ETA N IA KIN G MO K A IMUKI PA LO LO MA I S EN BER G LEWER S A K A LA N IA N AO LE PA HO UN IVER SITY LEMO N T

TOWN

The city skyline sets the scene for this aquatic playground. So much has changed, yet, so much remains the same. (clockwise) Photo: Rock; Surfer: Micah Moniz, Photo: Heff; Surfer: Kelia Moniz, Photo: Heff; Photo: Heff.


K A HA LA KILAUE A WAIA L A E PA PU KOA OLO H A N A L A KEA WAIKA M ILO E WARD PIIKOI WA IO L A O WL WAIALAE K AP IO LAN I LY YOU NG BIS H O P N S A RRAT KAH A L A M O IL ILI N OA KALIHI DIL L IN G H A M A I N AKOA MOO H E AU OA CAMPBELL D O LE TANTALUS LILIH A PA L A M A R H OT EL RICH ARD S A L A UWAHI WA IM A N U AT K INSON NIU S A R ATO G A UA K APAHULU C AM P B E L L K A HA LA KILAUE A WAIA L A E PA PU KOA OLO H A N A L A KEA WAIKA M ILO E WARD PIIKOI WA IO L A O WL WAIALAE K AP IO LAN I LY YOU NG BIS H O P N S A RRAT KAH A L A M O IL ILI N OA KALIHI DIL L IN G H A M A I N AKOA MOO H E AU OA CAMPBELL D O LE TANTALUS LILIH A PA L A M A R H OT EL RICH ARD S A L A UWAHI WA IM A N U AT K INSON NIU S A R ATO G A UA K APAHULU C AM P B E L L K A HA LA KILAUE A WAIA L A E PA PU KOA OLO H A N A L A KEA WAIKA M ILO E WARD PIIKOI WA IO L A O WL WAIALAE K AP IO LAN I LY YOU NG BIS H O P N S A RRAT KAH A L A M O IL ILI N OA KALIHI DIL L IN G H A M A I N AKOA MOO H E AU OA CAMPBELL D O LE TANTALUS LILIH A PA L A M A R H OT EL RICH ARD S A L A UWAHI WA IM A N U AT K INSON NIU S A R ATO G A UA K APAHULU C AM P B E L L K A HA LA KILAUE A WAIA L A E PA PU KOA OLO H A N A L A KEA WAIKA M ILO E WARD PIIKOI WA IO L A O WL WAIALAE K AP IO LAN I LY YOU NG BIS H O P N S A RRAT KAH A L A M O IL ILI N OA KALIHI DIL L IN G H A M A I N AKOA MOO H E AU OA CAMPBELL D O LE TANTALUS LILIH A PA L A M A R H OT EL RICH ARD S A L A UWAHI WA IM A N U AT K INSON NIU S A R ATO G A UA K APAHULU C AM P B E L L K A HA LA KILAUE A WAIA L A E PA PU KOA OLO H A N A L A KEA WAIKA M ILO E WARD PIIKOI WA IO L A O WL WAIALAE K AP IO LAN I LY YOU NG BIS H O P N S A RRAT KAH A L A M O IL ILI N OA KALIHI DIL L IN G H A M A I N AKOA MOO H E AU OA CAMPBELL D O LE TANTALUS LILIH A PA L A M A


T O

PA UA HI KEEAM O KU AT K IN S O N N I U S A R ATO G A BE A C WAL K K AL AK AUA K APAH ULU C AM PB E L L PAK I B L AC K PO IN T KA HA LA KI WA IOLA SARATO G A P U N C H BO W L WA I A L A E KA P I O L A NI DAT ES T RE E T M C C UL LY YOUNG B I S H OP B E RE TANIA KIN G MO N SA R R A C A M PBELL DO L E UN IV E RS I T Y L E M O N TA N TA LU S L I L I H A PAL AM A K AM E H AM E H A RI V E R H OT E L RI C H ARDS Q UEEN SO UTH CO R K A HA LA KILAU E A WA IALAE H A R D I N G LU N A L I LO PA P U KOA OLOH ANA NI U AH UI NUUANU AL AK E A WAI K AMILO PUN CHBO WL

A profusion of options present the problem of "what to do?" The south shore seems to have a little bit of everything, with the only shortage being the hours in a day.


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IL A UEA WAIAL AE H A R DIN G LU N A L I LO PA P U KOA O LO H ANA NI U AH UI NUUANU AL AK E A WAI K AM I LO PUNC HBO WL CO O KE WA AT KAHALA MO IL ILI K A IM UK I PA LO LO MA N OA KA L I H I DI L L I NGH AM I S E NB E RG L E WE RS AI NAKOA M OOH E AU KA LA N IA N AO LE P R AL AUWAHI WAIM AN U PA UA H I KE E A M O KU ATK I N S O N NI U S ARATOGA B E AC WAL K K AL AK AUA K APAH ULU CA MPBELL PA KI BL C OOK E WARD P IIKO I WAIOL A S A R ATO G A P U N C H BO WL WAI AL AE K API OL ANI DAT ES T RE E T M C C UL LY YOUNG BISHO P BER ETA

(clockwise) Surfer: Zeke Lau, Photo: Heff; Surfer: Ulu Napeahi, Photo: Heff; Photos: Heff; C. Latronic; Rock; C. Latronic; Heff.


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Keoni Jones finds the sweet spot of the salty city. Photo: Heff

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Zeke Lau in the sky with diamonds. Photo: Heff


Makai McNamara, with room to roam. Photo: Rock


Eala Stewart, feeling the heat wave. Photo: Keoki

Jason Shibata, big turn, big rights. Photo: Keoki


Seth Moniz, altitude sickness. Photo: Heff

Ha‘a Aikau doing the town rounds. Photo: Heff


Billy Kemper, big city blues. Photo: Keoki


Kekoa Cazimero burrowed in the borough. Photo: Heff


Kai Sallas, skyline highline. Photo: Heff


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PAU HANA /

GREGG ‘DOUBLE G’ NAKAMURA By Lauren Rolland Photos Keoki

How many years surfing? I started boogie boarding when I was 6, surfing when I was about 10. I’m 35 years old now, so I’ve been surfing for 25 years. Hometown: I grew up in Kaimuki. Favorite surfer? Dane Reynolds and John John are my top two for sure. Favorite wave: Definitely Bowls. My interview with Gregg Nakamura inadvertently began in the harbor parking lot at Ala Moana Bowls. We were on a different assignment that morning, but planning to met up with Gregg at his high rise office later that afternoon. After lucking out on a parking space, unloading the gear and getting set up for our first interview, up walks Gregg, dripping wet, board in hand. I didn’t assume we’d see the civil engineer until noon. “Did you surf already?” It was only 8am. “Yeah, I like to get my sessions in early,” Gregg laughs, stoked and energetic. “I stayed out hoping to catch one more good one, now I’m gonna be late for work!” He hurries off, still smiling. At 11am, we take the elevator up to the 16th floor of the building on Bishop and South King Street to meet Gregg for the scheduled interview. This time he greets us in black slacks, shined shoes and a green aloha shirt. It’s a total transformation. From townie surfer to professional businessman, it was this moment I realized Gregg displays the art of balance. Despite now being in a bustling

office, the same genuinely stoked smile Gregg radiated after his session at Bowls was still alive and well. Gregg Nakamura a.k.a. Double G is a professional engineer for AECOM, a private firm that ranks in the Fortune 500 and is the # 1 engineering design firm (based on revenue) in the world. Gregg is among 200 people working in the Hawai‘i office and of 100,000 global employees for AECOM. The Kaimuki boy just made 11 years this summer at the megacorp. On the flipside, Gregg is a hard core surfer that competes regularly in events like the Local Motion Surf into Summer, HIC Sunset Pro and Vans Triple Crown of Surfing. In 2010, Double G entered the 1-star QS Sponsor Me Hawai’i event at Bowls with a paid entry by his sponsor and made it to the quarters. “I made a few heats and thought, ‘I can do this,’” says Gregg. “It was pretty fun and I made some money.” Garnering enough points to get into the HIC Sunset Pro, the execusurfer went on to make the quarters in that event as well, marking two of his best results to date. Then in 2012, Gregg got third place in the HIC Sunset Pro, next to Granger Larsen and Sunny Garcia. “I never thought I’d be on a podium for a professional event,” Gregg says. “Just standing up there with Sunny and all those guys, and getting to hold up the big check, that was definitely a dream come true.” That same year, the surfer got into


PAU HANA /

the Triple Crown and surfed in the Reef Hawaiian Pro at Haleiwa and the Sunset World Cup with all the top pros. “I surfed with the guys that I look up to,” Double G continues. “Even though I didn’t do well, it was still something I just never imagined I could do. That was my biggest accomplishment for sure.” While the 35-year-old could have taken the professional path at an earlier age, he came to a crossroad in his late teens where education seemed like the right choice. Throughout college at Cal Poly, Gregg continued to surf in between studying, never losing his competitive passion. It seems this lifestyle – dedication, discipline and focus – eventually led to the impressive results Gregg now accumulates as an adult, both in the surfing and business realm. Plus he’s a family man too!

What are your hobbies besides surfing? I have two girls so my main hobby is hanging out with the family; going to the beach, taking them surfing. Every now and then, maybe once or twice a year I’ll get out on the golf course and hack it up with my buddies. I like to play guitar too. At this point in my life, my hobbies are mostly focused around the girls, so watching them do gymnastics or swimming at the beach, whatever it may be I like just hanging out with them.

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What are your plans for competing this season? I just did the Surf Into Summer… I think I got enough points to get into the HIC Sunset so I’ll plan on doing that. The biggest goal for me is step one, get into the HIC Pro, step two, do well enough to qualify for the Triple Crown, and then step three to make a heat in the Triple Crown. It’s just baby steps, but that’s what I’m shooting for this year. I really want to thank Tokoro Surfboards, Monstah Glass, Vertra, Ronin Eyewear, Cyko Surf and Hurley for always supporting me! Do you consider yourself naturally competitive? Yeah, definitely. Growing up I did all the HASA’s and then in California the NSSA’s, Nationals and all that. It was always just kind of fun for me, up until college when I started having to pay my big entry fees for the pro events, then it didn’t become fun and so I lost interest. But I think now that I have a career, I’m not surfing to prove anything to anyone but myself and I just do it because it’s fun and I love it. It’s definitely a part of me. Proudest accomplishment as a professional engineer? That’s a tough one. Because with my profession it takes a while from the completion of design till you see the project actually constructed. I started out designing cesspools on the Big Island, and that’s not the proudest thing, kind of a crappy job. But I think one of the bigger projects was the command center at Fort Shafter. They’re almost


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PAU HANA /

PAU HANA: GREG NAKAMURA // HONOLULU CIVIL ENGINEER

finished with the construction of the first phase. That’s probably one of the biggest projects I’ve worked on so that’s pretty cool to see. Now I’m going into more of the management role, so getting projects completed with my team, seeing everyone work well together and everything go smoothly, getting the job done on time and on budget, that’s pretty rewarding too. Talk about your experience of balancing school and surfing. I made sure I got all my school work done first. It actually motivated me to try harder to get what I needed to get done so I could have time to surf. That’s kind of how it is now. If I surf in the morning, then I get to work, (maybe I’m a little late), and just bang out as much as I can, get it done so I have more time to surf. I’ve always kept the balance between work and surfing. Words of wisdom for maintaining a work/life balance? Finding a job that you like and a boss that understands the importance of work/life balance is key. My number one supporters are my wife and kids though. They let me dawn patrol when I want to so I don’t get grouchy! It also takes hard work and dedication both at home and at your job. Making the most of each day to spend time with the family and also putting your nose to the grindstone when at work is what it takes… being efficient to make the most of the hours spent in the office. A motto I like to use is, “you can sleep when you’re dead.”

pau


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GROM REPORT

NALUAKEA IKAIKAMEAOLALANI-KAWIKA CAVASSO By Chris Latronic

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Living his mother’s motto, ‘No scared ‘em, go get em’, Naluakea Ikaikameaolalani-Kawika Cavasso a.k.a. Nalu has been turning heads in every lineup he’s entered. Displaying raw natural surfing talent and a heart full of Aloha, this grom has been described as a ‘little animal in the water’. The Waimanalo surfer is ready to take his surfing to the local contests and show off some power-packed talent amongst Hawai‘i’s best. Look for Nalu in the lineup and on podiums island-wide soon!

Fav pro surfer: Kelly & Mick Fanning for old sku , John John & Koa Rothman for younger Fav meal in Hawai‘i: Poke bowl Fav meal outside Hawai‘i: Pizza & snow crab Fav shave ice flavor combo: Rainbow Fav surf maneuver combo: Pulling in barrels Biggest contest results: Haven’t entered enough to know

Age / grade: 10 / 5th grade Height: 4’7 Weight: 73 Ethnicities: Hawaiian, German, Portuguese, Cherokee Indian, Mexican, Caucasian. Homebreak: Sandy’s Years surfing: My whole life. I was surfing with mommy since I was a baby. Surfboard dimensions: 5’1 x 16” x 1 15/16 pin tail Sponsors: none yet School: Enchanted Lakes Elementary Sports: Surfing only Fav. subject: Math Fav surf spot: V-land for country, Half Point Sandy’s for east side, and Kaisers for south shore

Growing up in Hawai‘i is a special privilege nowadays, tell me about your earliest memories of learning to surf and growing up in the islands. I’m blessed to be born and raised in Waimanalo. The earliest memories of surfing was at Sherwoods and Bellows. My mom and dad love the ocean and growing up with my three brothers in the islands is so fun cuz we are always at the beach, on the boat or hiking somewhere. Do you remember your first wave? I got my first really long wave with my shortboard at Kaupo Bay/Baby Maks. I was with my mommy and older bro K’aena. I felt so excited to


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Short term, work on cut backs and enter contests. Long term, pursue my dream to be a professional surfer. Do you have any role models or people who really inspire you? My mom’s love for surfing inspired me, she took me all over with her to surf. My mommy is stoked cuz she says we share the same passion. I look up to my daddy and my mommy who take care of my brother and I and take us surfing. I also look up to my uncle Robert and uncle Pakana who have been helping coach me when they see me in the water. What’s next for Nalu? be on a real wave, feeling so free being able to enjoy God’s creation. Just surf and enter contests! Tell me about the first moment you knew you were hooked on surfing? I was hooked from the beginning of being in the ocean, and now want to become pro one day. I decided last year to focus mainly on surfing and quit all other sports. It’s all I want to do.

pau

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Ikaika Poki “While everyone’s swimming out to avoid the incoming sets, I’m back paddling, looking for the impact zone and waiting for the lip of the wave to touch down. That’s where the magic happens. When the wave displays its raw power, it’s simply mesmerizing.”


Keoki

SHE RIPS

MASON SCHREMMER Age: 14 DOB: 09/13/2000 Hometown: Honolulu, HI School/Grade: International Connections Academy, Grade 9 Sponsors: Margaritaville TV, Indian Ocean Paddle Surf Favorite Wave: Queens, Waikiki Favorite Board: Longboard Freesurf’s interest in Ms. Mason Schremmer was piqued when we saw the surfer girl logging Queen’s in Waikiki during the China Uemura Wahine contest earlier this year. With golden hair and a knack for nose rides, Mason went on to compete at NSSA Nationals at Huntington Beach Pier, placing first in both Explorer Womens Longboard and Explorer Womens SUP divisions. The wahine also triumphed earlier in April at the HSA State Championship at Ala Moana Bowls, placing first in Girls SUP and second in Girls Longboard, not to mention her free surf sessions around Town have been plentiful. Athletic and playful, the teen is garnering attention not only for her great contest

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results, but also for her soulful flair for freesurfing. With a grace on waves that seems well beyond merely fourteen years of age and only four on a board, Mason Schremmer has been clocking plenty of slide time this summer season. First wave memory? My first wave memory is from when I took my first surf lesson at Waikiki Beach. You seem to live amongst a family of surfers. Tell us about this dynamic. My dad and my two sisters, Lola and Scarlett, surf. My sisters and I like to shortboard, longboard, and SUP so some days we will go to Waikiki so we can longboard and SUP, but on other days we will go to places like Kewalos so we can shortboard. Having sisters who surf is really fun because I always have someone to surf with! You recently placed 1st in two divisions at NSSA Nationals, congrats! Describe this event and how you felt during the comp.

NSSA Nationals was a really great event. I got to see a lot of my surfer friends from the mainland, which was fun! The waves were tricky during the comp because they were coming in all over the place and also because of the wind in the afternoon. I was a little nervous going into my heats because I hadn’t surfed at Huntington too much before, so I tried to sit where the people in previous heats had been catching the best waves and getting the top scores. Who are your biggest competitors? Whoever is in my next heat. Who do you love to surf with most and why? I love surfing with my sisters the most because we always have the most fun with each other. When we surf together we get to split waves and catch party waves together!


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Kelia Moniz surf because they are all great surfers and I hope to be able to surf as well as they do one day. Tell us about the biggest wave you ever charged… The biggest wave I have ever charged was at Turtle Bay last winter for a SUP comp. I was having a hard time getting out on my SUP because the waves were so big, but when I finally made it to the outside I caught one of the biggest waves I have ever ridden! Any surf trips in the near future? My family and I plan on going back to Australia for the Noosa Festival of Surfing later this year! Your other hobbies include… Painting, swimming, hiking, traveling. Your ultimate surf goal is…

Your all-time favorite surfer?

I want to win a world title one day!

My favorite surfer is Carissa Moore because she is an awesome surfer and is very humble and always smiling when I see her out in the water.

Last words for the Freesurf audience…

Biggest inspiration? My biggest inspiration is watching girls like Carissa Moore, Coco Ho and

See you in the water!

pau

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LIVING PONO /

BAN’AN BOWLS MORE THAN JUST ANOTHER FOOD TRUCK By Blake Lefkoe Photos Tony Heff “We’re aiming to create a product that nourishes our land, our people, and our economy. We strive to stay mindful of these three spheres when making decisions at Banán.” The heat this summer has been intense. Unfortunately, it’s not really possible to spend every waking moment out in the lineup. At some point, we need to escape the sun, rest our tired arms and feed our hungry bellies. When it’s sweltering and nothing sounds appealing, what are your alternatives to the daily fare? The answer comes in the form of a hip new food truck located in Kaimuki, called Ban’an. Seven days a week they dish up bowls full of refreshing, tasty, healthy, soft-serve made out of nothing but frozen, locally grown fruit. On a hot day, or pre/post surf, nothing quite hits 86

the spot like one of these delicious, icy-cold treats. And if that isn’t enough, this business does so much more than simply sell food. While there is no shortage of food trucks on the island, none embody the spirit of “living pono” like this one. Ban’an is owned and operated by four friends who are driven by their mission “to provide Hawai’i with a healthy, wholesome, and affordable meal made from fresh produce picked right from the islands.” So far, they are doing just that. The owners, Luke Untermann, Matt Hong, Zak Barry and Galen McCleary were all born and raised on the Islands. This crew of young, entrepreneurial surfers aren’t just feeding people, they also “strongly believe in supporting local farmers and boosting the local economy. By consciously making the decision to buy local, people become more connected to themselves, their communities, and the land they live on. Banán strives to build a happier and healthier world by bettering these three spheres of our customers’ lives.” Virtually every ingredient used to make these tasty treats is bought locally. When

a customer buys a bowl, they are not only supporting a small local business, which keeps money in the islands, but they are supporting local farmers as well. Matt says, “We buy our bananas from Sugarland farms in Kunia. Our papayas come from all over Oahu and Big Island and we’re working to start a relationship with Kumu farms in Molokai.” You have probably heard of this new “farm to table” fad, but this down to earth crew takes it one step further; they are completing the circle with their practice of “table to farm.” All of the food-waste the truck produces is brought to Kunia Country Farms and turned into compost. What would ordinarily be rubbish is now actively contributing to the growth of more local food instead. This rootsy foursome has created a business model that does more than promote sustainability; it practices it. From using recycled materials, composting and buying local to making onsite recycling convenient and easy, the owners of Ban’an are finding ways to give back to the island and community they grew up in and love so much.


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LIVING PONO / BAN 'AN

Matt believes that, “This business is a good opportunity to connect with the community and feed the people in it. We’re trying to give our customers more of an involved experience. We do things like BYOP (bring your own papaya) and we’ll fill it with soft-serve or customers can bring in fruit to trade for a bowl. We want to make local eating as easy as possible for our customers and do it in a really fun, creative way.” And there is no end to their creativity. “We try and add a lot of art to what we do, whether it’s creating our bowls, building up the lot or painting the truck,” he adds. When world champion surfer, Carissa Moore isn’t on tour, she frequents the Ban’an truck. “I love their Farm-to-Table and Tableto-Farm philosophy,” Carissa says. “They feed the community food grown from Hawai‘i’s land and compost all their food waste with farmers, so they can help Hawai’i grow more food! The boys genuinely love what they do and love connecting with their customers. It’s inspiring to see how much they care about feeding Hawai’i healthy and local food. They also have such a fun, creative, and mindful company culture.” These young, motivated, bright surfers have a lot going for them; not least of which is how much they enjoy what they do. “It’s been such a fun endeavor because we get to work with our best friends and it’s incredibly fun and fulfilling to get to feed our customers and interact with our community,” Matt explains. In addition, because there are four of them, and it only takes two to run the truck, they get to take turns working and surfing. That sounds like a pretty good gig; especially when work consists of hanging out with your best friends, interacting with cool customers, helping the local economy and environment and making people happy by feeding them super yummy, healthy, locally grown food. The next time you’re hot, sweaty and craving some refreshing grinds, check these guys out- you won’t be disappointed in their bowls, or their ideology: “When we think about our food and our relationship to the environment, we make eating so much more than just a meal. It holds deeper potential than just tasting good. Food can also fill us with a sense of confidence and wholesomeness when we eat in a manner that is healthy for our bodies, our land, and the future generations.” pau


By Chris Latronic One of the biggest surfing personalities in Hawai‘i, the lineup, and the world is Kainoa McGee. Kainoa was well known as a premiere Hawaiian waterman early on. Winning his first bodyboard contest at age 10, becoming a sponsored professional at age 12 and winning the Bodyboard world championships by 18, Kainoa went on to succeed in bodyboarding, surfing, stand up surfing and the occasional Hollywood acting role. Becoming a City & County Lifeguard 9 years to this date, Kainoa’s passion for riding waves and knowledge of the ocean has become a huge asset to a lifeguard’s skill arsenal and has vitally aided in numerous rescues, saving multiple lives, especially on the North Shore of Oahu. Kainoa McGee takes us back to the first day he started patrolling and the series of events that ensued.

his friend was still attached. As he started to pull him up, bodyboarders, surfers, photogs and anyone who was close helped to make a floating platform with all of their boards and those with and without fins started kicking him towards the shore. Thankfully, world renowned waterman and badass surfer Gavin Sutherland was there and jumped up on the flotilla, of sorts, and gave him about 16 chest compressions, which brought him back before we got to him. I was the first lifeguard on the scene in the water and my partner Kevin Tinneny was right behind me with a rescue board. Right when we were loading him onto the rescue board, Kirk Zeigler showed up with the rescue ski and got him to the beach where they continued to work on him till EMS showed up and took him to emergency. Thank God he made a full recovery.

Hometown: Honolulu, Hawai’i Age: 43 Occupation: Pro Bodybarder, Pro Surfer, Hawaiian Waterman, North Shore Lifeguard Territory: North Shore and East Side Years of experience: 9 years total, the first 4 in town.

Lifeguarding in Town is awesome because… You never know what’s gonna happen or what you’re gonna see on any given day. Town is a trip and you don’t realize how crazy it is until you’ve spent day after day on the beach. You learn really quickly that “common sense isn’t that common”.

Your greatest rescue story is… My first day working on the North Shore. It was right at the end of the day and we heard everybody yelling and whistling, which means one of two things, either someone is gonna fight or someone is in need of serious help. In this case it was the latter. The patient ended up going over the falls as the sea parted beneath him. He hit his head on the bottom, which knocked him unconscious and played a major part in saving his life. Because he was unconscious he didn’t breathe in while underwater and drown himself out of a natural reaction to want to breathe. It appears that he was held under water during and after a big set, which in duration was about 3-5 minutes according to his friend who also saw his board floating in the channel. What he didn’t know was that his friend was still attached to the leash. He thought the leash broke and that maybe his friend swam in. To his surprise when he pushed the board towards the shore, the board stopped abruptly and he knew for sure

The most fulfilling part of being a lifeguard is… Being able to help keep all of the beach goers safe and help those who, most times, need saving from themselves whether they know it or not. Also I’d like to say a massive mahalo’s, love and aloha to all of my Ocean Safety coworkers as well as the brother and sisterhood worldwide. Keep up the awesome work. Even though most times our job is a thankless one it’s the resolve of each individual that makes us a strong team. Keep the world safe gangy.

pau

Heff

DAMAGE CONTROL / KAINOA MCGEE


Makua Rothman

Heff

INDUSTRY NOTES

Surftech announced that Aroona Pty Ltd will become its new distributor in Australia. Surftech is the one of the world’s largest designers and suppliers of surf and stand up paddleboards globally, manufacturing brands like BARK, Channel Islands, Robert August, McTavish and others. The announcement is another major step for the brand as it looks to build its global distribution partnerships and further its reach in key international markets. Volcom’s first BBQ Skate mash event for 2015 was held in June at the Kapolei Skate Park in the big bowl. This year’s format saw the 14 and Under division, Open Girls and Sponsored, with a 15 minute jam for each. The top 6 from each division got to skate another 15

#1 big wave surfer in the world, Makua Rothman, is helping his sponsor, Monster Energy®, kick-off a summer sweepstakes for Java Monster®. “I am very honored to be the face of our new Java Monster national campaign,” said Rothman. “Monster Energy has supported my career for many years and made it possible for me to do what I love as a professional surfer!” Rothman, who secured the World Surf League 2014/2015 Big Wave Tour World Championship and opened the 2015 surfing season by winning the Quiksilver Ceremonial in Punta de Lobos, Chile on May 1, is the face of the Java Monster campaign.

Brent Bielmann

The votes have been tallied and six legendary wave riders are once again forever enshrined in surfing’s history books. On July 30, 2015, a host of respected surf industry veterans, former professionals and surf journalists narrowed down a field of hundreds of candidates to name the six 2015 Surfing Walk of Fame’s honorees in their respective categories – Reno Abellira (Surf Champion), Paul Strauch (Surf Pioneer), Dick Graham (Surf Culture), Sofia Mulanovich (Woman of the Year), John Boozer (Local Hero) and David Nuuhiwa Sr. (Honor Roll). Legendary Hawaiian surfer/shaper Reno Abellira receives the Surf Champion nod with countless results on the early world pro circuit as well as numerous North Shore podiums.

Tatiana Weston-Webb

minute jam, with the top three champs winning custom trophies, Sector 9 skateboards, Electric sunglasses and backpacks full of Volcom goodies. First place in the Sponsored division walked away with an over-sized custom Volcom check and $150.00 in cash. The BBQ Skate Mash Tour will continue on the outer islands through October. Skate Mash is held on Saturdays and Pufferfish Surf Contests will be held on that following Sunday. On August 24th, (the eve of what would be the 125th birthday of Duke Kahanamoku) the Hawai’i Waterman Hall of Fame will celebrate four notable kama’aina for their lifetime of achievements and remarkable contribution to Hawai’i’s waterman legacy. Taking place at Outrigger Canoe Club, the net proceeds from the Waterman Hall of Fame dinner will benefit Outrigger Duke Kahanamoku Foundation’s (ODKF) college scholarships and athletic grants program. Congrats to the honorees: Joey Cabell, Duane DeSoto, Walter Guild and Soichi Sakamoto. Trying to keep it fresh, Sticky Bumps is re-designing some of their Signature Team Traction pads. The Dylan Goodale pad will get a little refresh, and they’re got a new Signature Traction pad being designed by CT rookie Tatiana Weston-Webb. These pads will have the same high quality foam and sticky backing as the old pads, just with a new look. Head High Wines partners Bill Price and Sam Spencer are thrilled to announce a new partnership with Sustainable Surf, a Californiabased non-profit organization committed to preserving beaches and oceans for surf enthusiasts. “As avid surfers, partnering with


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Sustainable Surf was a natural decision for me and Bill,” says Spencer. “Just as we treat our vineyards with the utmost care, we believe the ocean and beaches deserve the same attention. It’s an honor to be involved with this group.”

The Junior Lifeguards Program came to a close with the State of Hawai’i Junior Lifeguard Championships taking place August 1st at Hapuna Beach on the Big Island. Throughout the summer, kids from all over the state gathered at local beaches to learn ocean awareness, physical conditioning and self-confidence. A big mahalo to all the lifeguards and volunteers who help make these programs happen, ensuring that our keiki are ocean aware and become respectful watermen and waterwomen. 360fly, the world’s only single-lens camera capturing stitchless 360-degree video with interactive and virtual reality viewing capabilities, announced the addition of 17-year-old surfing and skateboarding sensation Kalani David to their team. Representing the brand and its game-changing video technology, Kalani will utilize 360fly to capture and share interactive surf, skate and lifestyle content.

New episodes premiere every two weeks OC 16 THU 9:00pm FRI 3:00am & 1:00pm SAT 12:30pm SUN 7:00am MON 5:30pm TUE 6:00am Outside Televion Fridays 9am EST

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Queens’ MarketPlace teamed up with vendors Volcom, Local Motion and Quiksilver/Roxy to make the fashion statement: “Summer Is Upon Us” in a sizzling surf, sand and sun runway show last month. Queens’ MarketPlace in Waikoloa Beach Resort is home to a family of in-demand surf brands in one convenient location near popular ‘Anaeho‘malu Beach. With shops like Volcom, Local Motion, Pac Sun, Kona Surf N’ Sandals, and Quiksilver – who just expanded their premier retail space to highlight creative new lines— the center is a shopping destination of choice for ocean-minded visitors to Hawai‘i Island and the lucky kama‘āina who live there. For more information, check out www.queensmarketplace.net. Introducing the Sofa Surfers - novelty fleece athletic shorts with a poly cotton stretch tethered waistband and Vissla woven labels. Good luck changing out of these. Featuring Derrick Disney in the Strands Fleece Short, available now at local specialty retailers and online at http://vss.la/SofaSurfers.


NOTES

Lucy Love welcomes a new Hawai‘i rep to their team, Khrystyne Phillips. The lovely lady will be repping the Lucy Love brand and spreading the aloha spirit – reach out now to see Cruise & Spring 2016 deliveries at khrystynephillips@me.com.

North Shore Soap Factory sponsored 1 out of 5 of the North Shore Swim Series’ swims, the North Shore Soap Factory Laniakea to Pua`ena Point Swim, which took place on July 25th. The soap company was there at every race with after-swim skincare, plus swimmers received a 15% discount at the Soap Factory on Race Day. The North Shore Swim Series is a great way to stay active on the North Shore during the summer season, and test your endurance in the water. If you missed the events this year, be sure to check it out in 2016! Find them online at northshoreswimseries.com. Kona Brewing Co. at Koko Marina Shopping Center is unveiling their $1 million renovations this month. The renovation projects include a bar, kitchen, and retail space expansion, new flooring, paint, fans, and light fixtures. Check out the refreshed waterfront restaurant and enjoy liquid aloha at its finest. Kelly Slater’s new sustainable clothing brand Outerknown launched last month, which ranges from basic tees and long sleeves to GQ sweaters and jackets. Looking this cool is going to cost you though, since the standard pocket tees cost $118 and jackets range from $300 to about $650. Check out the collection online at outerknown. com or at their various shop locations in Cali. SYCO Hawaii has opened up a new surf shop on the Big Island! Check them out in Kapaau at 54-376 Akoni Pule Hwy and find the complete line of Freesurf apparel. Tees, hats, bags, coffee mugs, cell phone cases and more! Plus SYCO Hawaii is also offering Dakine and Xcel, two core surf brands with awesome products. Last but not least, a big mahalo to Pono! This kid displayed the meaning of ‘living pono’ by returning Freesurf’s left-behind gear safely back to us! We would like to say thank you for being a good Samaritan and want to offer you a small gift of gratitude, so Pono, please email us at info@freesurfmagazine.com!


LAST LOOK

You can add foamball ride to your list of things to do while in town. Surfer: Makua Rothman Photo: Heff


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