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MAGAZINE

THIS FREE IN HAWAI’I JUNE V9#6 FREESURFMAGAZINE.COM

MAUI ALBEE LAYER PHOTO : QUINCY DEIN


N AT H A N F L E T C H E R

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PHOTO: JASON WOLCOTT


F R E E

P A R K I N G One of Maui’s greatest natural wonders - Honolua Bay. This fickle Maui wave only turns on a couple of times a year. But when it does turn on, it is the very embodiment of perfection. Photo : Merkel / A-Frame


D O U B L E

P A R K E D

With his 1st ever win in a WCT event in Brazil last month John Florence has every right and reason to stand proud and sure... Photo : Domenic Mosqueira / A-Frame


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50 Dusty Payne Talking Injury & Girls Surfing

20 Editor’s Note Risen from the Shadows

TABLE OF CONTENTS

66 Aperture Quincy Dein Portfolio

56 ISA Hawaii is Gold

48 Packing Barrels Albee Layer @ Jaws

24 This is Maui A Unique Breed

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V9#6 JUNE Albee Layer Photo : Quincy Dein

E d i t o r i a l Publisher : Mike Latronic Editor -at- Large : Chris Latronic Managing Editor : Matt Luttrell Photo Editor : Tony Heff Art Director : Chance Carpenter Multimedia Director : Tyler Rock Copy Editor : Lauren Shanahan

Free Thinkers : Casey Butler, James Stone, Jordon Cooper Staff Photographers : Eric Baeseman, Tony Heff, Mike Latronic, Tyler Rock

C o n t r i b u t i n g

P h o t o g r a p h e r s

Nathan Adams, Erik Aeder, Kirk Lee Aeder, Jamie Ballenger, Brian Bielmann, John Bilderback, Chris Burkard, Tom Carey, Vince Cavataio, Kanoa Dahlin, Hilton Dawe, Quincy Dein, Patrick Devault, Jeff Divine, Willi Edwards, Grant Ellis, Paul Fisher, Isaac Frazer, Pete Frieden, Jeff Hall, Noah Hamilton, John Helper, Dave Homcy, Ha'a Keaulana, Ehitu Keeling, Kin Kimoto, Ric Larsen, Tracy Kraft Leboe, Bruno Lemos, Mana, Mike McGinnis, Allen Mozo, Zak Noyle, Carol Oliva, Tom Sanders, Kaz Sano, Epes Sargent, Bobby Schutz, Jason Shibata, Batel Shimi, Pake Salmon, Pat Stacy, Vince Street, Spencer Suitt, Bill Taylor, Steve Thrailkill, JP VanSwae, Jessica Wertheim, Jimmy Wilson.

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WHIP Brand new for 2012, the Whip is the cure for the Summertime (small wave) blues. In line with the trend towards fuller planshapes, this board is a completely different animal on the bottom contour. Featuring a deep single concave that isn’t parabolic like most, but rather more like an inverted vee. This creates a turbocharged effect with exceptional drive, tail control and directional stability. It’s low-entry nose rocker helps it paddle and catch waves easily, while the rail curve and accentuated tail lift enable the rider to execute fast, full-rotational carves in the face. The Whip is an excellent paddling, high-performance shortboard in disguise. Size this model 1 - 2” shorter, and 1/8 - 3/8" wider than your regular short board.

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RIOT The Riot is another high performance grovel-machine that will keep you in the water on even the smallest of Summer days. At first glance the Riot looks like a short and stout brother to Eric’s GX model. At closer glance, however, you’ll find increased rail curve, which comes from blending-in bottom elements of the K4 model. Most classic “grovelers” are wide and meaty, with ultra-flat rockers making them less than maneuverable in waves above chest high. The Riot, however, stays fast and lively, thanks to it’s blend of the K4 rail curve and concave with the GX outline. The result is an increase in drive and speed with full rotation turns and release off the lip.

K4 The K4 is a great all purpose, high-performance shortboard for Summer that works well in a variety of wave types and sizes. With its low entry nose rocker and accentuated tail rocker, the K4 combines exceptional front foot drive with quick, full rotational top turns. The deep, single to double concaves generate bursts of acceleration out of turns, while a bit of width in the nose enhances its drive and stability. If you need one board to handle any wave that Summertime might throw at you, the K4 is it. Tail Options: Squash, Thumb, Diamond, Swallow, and Round Pin.

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surfer : Unknown photo : Quincy Dein

This is Maui

IT HAS LONG BEEN A PRECONCEIVED NOTION THAT BEING A SURFER ON MAUI PRESENTED SOME SERIOUS OBSTACLES. Namely the islands of Molokai and Lanai (and Kauai and Oahu) block a healthy amount of swell from arriving at Maui’s reefs. And then there is the wind. Maui is a gusty place and has been better known as a windsurfing nirvana as of late. Despite being home to one of the world’s greatest waves and playing host to one of the gnarliest tow-in waves on the planet, Maui’s place in the surf world has remained decidedly underground. Perhaps that is how surfers from Maui like it? Personally, I wonder if Maui surfers ever secretly question their patron Demi-God’s choice of location when he pulled the island of Maui from the ocean floor with his magical fish hook, Manai-i-ka-lani. Maybe if the great Demi-God had pulled Maui up a few miles North, the Valley Isle wouldn’t get blocked by all but the most gigantic of Northwest swells. Maui would be even more of a paradise, with Honolua Bay turning on 20 to 40 times each winter, rather than just a handful of times each year.

Despite having perfection, Maui surfers have to be patient. Perhaps that explains the Maui’s surfer rising. After years spent living in the shadows of Kauai and Oahu, Maui’s upstarts have grabbed the surf world by its cojones. Look no further than the victors of the 2011 and 2012 Innersection Project, Albee Layer and Matt Meola. Taking out back to back victories in Taylor Steele’s egalitarian surf video project is kind of a big deal, and the best friends are now each $100,000 richer. And speaking of surf videos, what about Dusty Payne’s surfing in Lost Atlas? Ridiculous. Mind blowing. Radical. These words don’t even do justice to Dusty’s surfing in Mexico and Indonesia. Finally, FreeSurf catches up with the Verizon Hawaii Junior Surf Team. Fresh from Panama, Team Hawaii won the Da Kine ISA World Surfing Championships. Hawaii has finally reclaimed their rightful spot atop the surf world. Its about time!


surfer : Clay Marzo photo : Quincy Dein

THIS MAUI BREEDS UNIQUE SURFERS. Perhaps that is because getting the perfect conditions for flawless surf in Maui is a bit like hitting the lottery. It doesn’t happen often, but when it does it is a thing of beauty. Maui surfers are thus equal opportunity frothers when it comes to waves. They are adept at finding the stoke in windblown slop as they would in groomed, offshore barreling perfection. This stoke in a land of sporadic perfection has spurred these Maui surfers to the forefront of the surf world.

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THIS IS MAUI

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MAUI Clay Marzo is a freesurfing genius. Marzo doesn’t just surf waves, he seeks waves out and decimates them. In short, Clay surfs like a rock star. He can ride the foam ball with the best of em, he can boost incredible airs, and he does all of this with Aspergers syndrome. Clay hasn’t let his autism hamper his immense talent. If anything, Aspergers has helped place Clay’s futuristic surfing even more in the limelight, landing a feature article in Rolling Stone. It doesn’t get more rock-nroll than that.


surfer : Ian Walsh photo : Mike Neal / A-Frame

Ian Walsh burst upon the surf world in dramatic fashion, splayed across the pages of all surf magazines riding massive waves at Jaws as a 16-year-old. Since then, Ian has been tracking down the largest surf on the planet with Shane Dorian. Walsh is no one-trick pony though. Ian is a well rounded surfer that can boost huge airs and win contests. Yet his endeavors in the big stuff continue to cast him in the spotlight, with his paddle in sessions at Jaws being the stuff of legends.

ian walsh

THIS IS MAUI

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THE LANAI

AVAILABLE AT BoArdrIdErs CLuB NorTh shorE QuIksILVEr PoIPu


surfer : Ola Eleogram photo : Quincy Dein

olamana eleogram 03

THIS IS MAUI

Hana’s Olamana Eleogram has been a busy man. You might remember Ola catching the wave of the event at the O’Neill Sunset Beach Pro, backdooring a massive barrel and then ollieing over the water patrol’s rescue sled. Ola then backed up his incredible performance at Sunset by making the final of the Drug Aware Pro at Margaret’s River in March. Both great results, but no big deal, because Ola’s 2012 hit an all time high when he asked longtime girlfriend Monica Byrne-Wickey to marry him. She said yes.

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surfer : Ian Gentil photo : Heff

ian gentil 04

THIS IS MAUI

Ian Gentil is only 16 years old. Despite his age, Ian is already known around the world as a super grom. Ian recieved the ultimate compliment three years ago when the late Andy Irons said Ian was the best 13 year old he had ever seen. Take a moment to think about that statement. The best the 3-time world champ had ever seen. Expect big things from Ian in the very near future.

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surfer : Albee Layer photo : Quincy Dein

Albee Layer and Matt Meola are best friends. Not only are they best friends, but they are two of the surf world’s biggest video stars. That’s what happens when you win the first two Innersections, Taylor Steele’s genius little surf video contests that pit the best surfers and surf filmmakers in an egalitarian competition.

albee layer

THIS IS MAUI

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surfer : Matt Meola photo : Heff

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THIS IS MAUI

Both Albee and Matt’s videos are ridiculous, filled with how did he make that air after freaking air. In this day of DIY ethos, these two young Maui surfers have laid down performances that have propelled them into the forefront of the surf world. Thank God for technology.

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surfer : Kai Barger photo : Ells

Kai Barger rides the barrel at Pipeline with the best of them. Always casual and always deep, Barger draws elegant lines at Pipeline. He makes it look easy, but don’t be fooled, his approach requires an intimate knowledge of the spot, along with the ability to take off underneath the lip. Kai’s knowledge paid off at the 2012 Volcom Pipeline Pro, where he battled his way to the finals.

kai barger

THIS IS MAUI

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©2012 Luxottica Group. All rights reserved.

COMES WITH EXTRA SET OF INTERCHANGEABLE ARMS


surfer : Granger Larsen photo : Heff

In 2010, Granger Larsen came within a hair of qualifying for the ASP World Championship tour. Coming that close to one’s dream can oftentimes crush a lesser man’s soul, but for Granger Larsen, it is just a bump in the road. With impeccable style and incredible railwork, Granger belongs among the best.

granger larsen

THIS IS MAUI

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surfer : Hank Gaskell photo : Latronic

hank gaskell 09

THIS IS MAUI

There might be be no other maui surfer that commands as much respect as Hank Gaskell. A soft spoken guy, Hank has managed to persevere in a cut throat industry, letting his progressive power surfing do the talking. Hank is a legend.

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Billy Kemper is a battler. While most surfers would have given up the pro surfing dream without corporate sponsorship, Kemper has taken control of his own destiny. He continues to charge insane waves at Pipeline, Jaws and other outer reefs purely for the stoke of riding waves. Fittingly, Kemper won the first Live Like Sion Steep and Deep Challenge honoring the late Sion Milosky this past winter.

billy kemper

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surfer : Billy Kemper photo : Latronic

THIS IS MAUI

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PRESENTS

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surfer : Dege O’Connell photo : Eric Baeseman

dege o’connell 11

THIS IS MAUI

Dege O’Connell flys under the radar, which is kind of incredible considering how stylish this kid from Hana surfs. While you might not recognize Dege’s name, you would certainly recognize his patented forehand power hack, which is regularly featured in this magazine. Expect more from Dege. We do.

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Friends, Family, Fun

HOKULANI’S STEAK HOUSE Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner

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Tatiana Weston-Webb Under 18 Girls, Bronze Medal

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surfer : Albee Layer photo : Batel Shimi

PAC K I N G B A R R E L S

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WHETHER IT BE PUNTING AIRS ON TWO FOOT WAVES OR TRYING TO CATCH THE BIGGEST WAVE EVER RIDDEN, SURFERS FEEL THE NEED TO EVOLVE. On January 4th I woke up at about 5am to make sure I had everything ready for the peak of the swell at mid-morning. After a week of charting this storm from Japan on our computers, we finally headed down to the cliff. All we could see were dark lines rolling in, yet the cliffs were already packed. All we could hear were the rumbling of bombs pounding the reef. First light showed us how big it re-

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ally was. It was really fucking big. We didn’t know if it was going to be possible to paddle but we decided to head out anyway. After barely making it down the muddy trail in the pouring rain, we jumped off the rocks to begin the paddle out. After a 20 minute paddle we saw someone get towed into a huge one. Reaching the lineup we were still kind of wondering if it was gonna be possible to paddle. Guys were sitting on the end bowl and some guys were out the back on the north peak. We decided to sit in the middle area awhile and paddled for a few waves. Finally, a pretty buttery north one came and I stroked into the first wave of my session. Dropping into the

wave, I let the adrenaline and anticipation of the previous days flush through me. Over the next few hours I witnessed some amazing rides. After catching a small north one, I watched a few west bowls come through that were throwing huge caverns. I rode back out to the lineup on a ski with Kurtis Chong Kee. During the ride he asked me about my RIP Turtle tattoo I had gotten in honor of our good friend Tristan “Turtle” Brennan, who had just recently passed away. Turtle was an amazing surfer, and I told Kurtis that I had to pack a big barrel for that crazy bastard. Almost immediately after jumping off the


ski a perfect west bowl came straight to me. Paddling in I thought I was a little deep but I decided to go any way. The wave let me in pretty easy. I made my bottom turn and pumped into the west bowl. Setting my line, I could see the skis on the shoulder as a sense of slow motion came over me as two sections threw over. Luckily I was in the perfect spot and I came out right before the spit. While I didn’t feel the need to claim the wave I slapped the tattoo on my left arm and pointed up at the sky where I could feel him looking down on me. On the way back out I was almost brought to tears thinking of him. I had also finally accomplished a goal I’d set for myself since paddling Jaws was even slightly

mentioned. I’m not saying it was the wave of the day by any means. It was just a special ride that really hit home and I was stoked about it. The rest of the day went on with more than a dozen rides that helped change the sport. Dave Wassel paddled into possibly the biggest wave ever paddled into. Many of the other big names got ridiculous rides on huge waves. I pretty much sat back and enjoyed the show after getting the wave of my life. Because if there’s one thing you learn about Jaws it’s to never go for more than you should. I know that all the boys from maui could feel

Turtle’s presence out there and felt a sense of safety knowing he was watching over us. We all made it back to our cars or skis OK and with ear to ear smiles. It was amazing for me and all my friends to be a part of such a game changing session and to get a few great waves amongst it all was too much for words to describe. We can’t wait for the next day like that, or better or bigger, at this point no ones sure what the limits really are paddling out there, and we are excited to find out. --Albee Layer Rest in peace Tristan Brennan. 8-11-81 11-11-11


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Dusty’s surfing was a thing of progressive genius


And so began Dusty Payne’s treatise on women’s surfing, six minutes into his game changing performance in Lost Atlas, 2011‘s biggest surf movie. The question elicited a now infamous remark that has singlehandedly overshadowed his groundbreaking performance in the film. Dusty’s surfing was a thing of progressive genius, with his incredible no grab air reverse ending the film. (Was it me or was Dusty practically inverted on that gigantic frontside huck?!). Kai Neville, the auteur and director of Lost Atlas, showered Dusty with praise when the film came out last summer. Neville’s first film Modern Collective introduced the surf world to a new era in aerial boardriding. Just as Tay-

lor Steele’s Momentum defined radical surfing for a generation, the Modern Collective introduced a new breed of radical for a new generation. With his eagerly awaited follow up, the director told anyone who would listen that Dusty had worked the hardest during filming, and was in his opinion, the standout performer of Lost Atlas. Just consider Dusty’s Lost Atlas co-stars; Mitch Coleburn, Jordy Smith, Dane Reynolds, John John Florence and Yadin Nicol (to name but a few). Pretty bold statement there by Kai. Yet, one of the Modern Collective’s biggest stars sits on the sideline. Not because of the comment though. (Come on, we’re surfers, not theologians. Who gives a crap what we think, we just want to be titillated by radness.) It has been three months since Dusty Payne has set foot on a surfboard. The last time

Dusty surfed was during the Volcom Pipe Pro back on January 31st. In spite of the injury, Dusty nabbed a Backdoor bomb that netted him a perfect 10-point score. Unfortunately, Dusty couldn’t find a backup score and was eliminated in the Round of 64. While the loss was bittersweet, it was nothing compared with the ankle injury Dusty had been ignoring since late fall. THE INJURY Since Dusty’s high octane surfing continually pushes performance boundaries, it is not all that surprising Dusty would suffer an ankle injury like this. What is surprising is the wave he injured himself on, Steamer Lane. Dusty had punted an average (for him) lien in his first heat at the O’Neill Coldwater Classic. Landing in Steamer Lane’s wonky backwash,

surfer : Dusty Payne photo : Lawrence / A-Frame

What do you think about girls surfing? “Don’t even get me started brah.”


Dusty tweaked his deltoid ligament. Amazingly, Dusty continued surfing on his bum ankle in order to re-qualify for the tour instead of immediately rehabbing. After three months though, the ankle was in bad shape. By the time this issue goes to press, Dusty will have missed the first 3 to 4 events of 2012. For much of the year, the young prodigy from Maui has been landlocked in California. This time off has given Dusty a chance to observe the World Tour from a distance, offering him a different perspective and better insight into his own competitive surfing. Rehab is the most important order of business, and Dusty has been seeing several specialists and rehabbing his ankle twice a day as he gears up to rejoin the tour.

MAUI ROOTS Born in Wahiawa, Oahu, the Payne clan moved to Maui when Dusty was five. Dusty began surfing on the front of his Dad’s longboard, eventually graduating to his own board at the age of 6. For the next 8 years the windy, shifty peaks at Hookipa would become Dusty’s training grounds. Eager to impress the spots older locals, Dusty pushed himself at the tricky spot. Hookipa’s windy walls honed Dusty’s impeccable speed, flow, and aerial wizardry. At the age of 14, Dusty’s family moved over to Lahaina. It was at this time that Dusty began surfing Honolua Bay regularly. The Bay polished Dusty’s hyperkinetic surfing, smoothing Dusty’s explosive repertoire of tricks into a cohesive package that has become the infatuation of grommets around the world.


Dusty signed with Volcom at the age of 15. Surf coach/guru Dave Riddle immediately began working with Dusty. Riddle took all of Dusty’s raw, explosive talent and harnessed it into a competitive package. Just as he had polished Bruce Irons competitive game, the Riddler helped Dusty excel throughout his amateur career. So good was Riddle’s training and Dusty’s talent, Dusty managed to qualify for the World Tour after his first year on the QS, becoming the first Maui surfer to graduate to the big leagues.

on the surf world’s biggest stage has proved somewhat elusive for the prodigy. Despite the close heats, Dusty threw out moments of incredible brilliance. At Bells Beach during his rookie year, Dusty threw down a frontside finner at Winkipop that had competitors, announcers and judges in disbelief. They might have been flashes in the pan, but they were flashes nonetheless. And no one will forget the dramatic fashion in which Dusty re-qualified by beating Mick Fanning with a last second Backdoor bomb.

After qualifying for the WCT in just one year, Dusty looked poised to put a progressive dent on the competition, yet competitive success

Whether Dusty attains competitive success or not after he gets back on tour is a mute point. Regardless, his talent will trail blaze

about the very evolution and upward progression of our sport. His legacy will be cemented in the annals of our sports library, showing up in the newest Kai Neville flick, pulling crazy rotations, and making it look easy with his steezed out style that is the envy of today’s youth. Although Dusty hasn’t completely ruled out Volcom’s first World Tour event in Fiji, its looking like a long shot. Dusty has set his sights on returning to the tour in Tahiti. While that is a bummer for fans of ultra progressive surfing since we won’t be seeing Dusty until August, at least we can watch Lost Atlas a few more times this summer.

surfer : Dusty Payne photo : Heff

DUSTY


Kalani David boosting Team Hawaii to Gold. All Photos : Shawn Parkin

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T H E N T H E 2 012 DA K INE ISA WOR LD JU N IOR C H A M PION SH IPS, P R E S E NTE D BY B IL L AB ON G , WAS T H E R EGA L C ON VEN TION OF TEEN AG E SU R FIN G ROYALTY.

Over 400 surfers and officials from 31 countries converged on the long stretch of beach at Playa Venao, Panama. The crescent shaped bay was an ideal location for the International Surfing Associations week long surf bonanza and was blessed with consistent rippable surf. Aloha was indeed in the air. The Olympic style event kicked off with a colorful and very jubilant parade in the nearby town of Pedasi. Once again, ISA President Fernando Aguerre was lyrical in his presentation speech opening the games. Panama’s President, Ricardo Martinelli; Salomon Shamah, the country’s Minister of Tourism; and Ricardo Fabrega, the Minister of Government and one of the country’s first surfers were even on hand to dignify the procession.

Each year the ISA negotiates a different site worldwide to run what could be considered the most prestigious youth surf competition. Formed in 1964 as the International Surf Federation, the ISA has evolved into a well oiled machine complete with the top international judges, medical team, and a massive media stream complete with a webcast. From the first blow of the horn until the closing ceremonies the surf never ebbed below 3 to 4 feet. Playa Venao’s long sandbar, coupled with several river mouth breaks, provided a textbook playground for progressive aerial surfing. Although it hadn’t rained heavily for weeks, making for more critical wave choices at low tide since the sand banks were a bit straight, the waves were quite good. With a double scaffold format resulting in two functioning competition areas, the 300 plus surfers all had a chance to exhibit their very best surfing in the no elimination qualifying rounds, and a second chance in the repercharge rounds.


A MIRAGE OF COLORS AND FLAGS DOTTED THE BEACH WHILE TEAMS CHEERED AND SWAYED WITH NATIONAL PRIDE AFTER EACH HEAT FOR NEARLY A WEEK STRAIGHT

Ian Gentil

Kaoli Kahokuloa

Team spirit was high throughout the event. Win or lose team members and supporters would gather on the beach. A mirage of colors and flags dotted the beach while teams cheered and swayed with national pride after each heat for nearly a week straight. Long days in the sweltering Panamanian heat were as exciting as they were exhausting. Oddly, not a drop of rain came to this tropical beach for over a week. Beyond the surfing (and wins and losses), Team Hawaii’s Head Coach Rainos Hayes explained the junior surferswork ethic and determination best. “This contest, with its duration and intensity, is a lot like the lessons that these kids learn in life. It’s extremely difficult, it doesn’t always go your way, and as long as you can do your best…theres no more you can ask of yourself… regardless of the result… that’s the lesson…the work ethic, the humility and learning

Koa Smith

to dig within themselves that they learn here… that’s what it’s gonna take to make it in life. I’m hoping they can transfer what they learn here into their daily life and take it home and be a gift for their families and communities.” Yet, after eight long days of competition featuring the best junior surfers in the largest and most important under-18 surfing event in the world, Hawaii’s team stood strong. The red, white and blue of the Hawaiian flag waved victorious. Tears of joy flowed freely from Team Hawaii’s athletes, parents and coaches directly following the announcement that three out of four finalist in the women’s division had made the grand final. This was the moment Team Hawaii had been waiting for since 2005. With two other finalists in the boys


Jake Halstead

Team Hawaii

Kain Daly

Brianna Cope


TEAM HAWAII STOOD UPON THE PODIUM, HEADS HELD HIGH. THESE 12 JUNIOR SURFERS FROM HAWAII BROUGHT HOME THE GOLD, SHOWING UP AND BLOWING UP LIKE TRUE CHAMPIONS.

Dax McGill

divisions it didn’t take a math expert to realize that Team Hawaii had almost guaranteed a win. Having traveled with the team personally on several outings over the past few years, and seeing them now with true stoke charging through their cheers and smiles… well… I had my hat and glasses on… I was safe to let it all out as well. From Team Hawaii it was two of the youngest on the team, 14-yearold Dax McGill (competing in Girls Under-18) and 14-year-old Kalani David (Boys Under-16), that wound up hoisting the Aloha State flag proudly. Under sunny skies Dax and Kalani were carried up the beach after winning their respective divisions. Other Hawaiian finalists were Mahina Maeda, Tatiana Weston Webb and Josh Moniz. Brazil’s Matheus Navarro, one of the most dynamic, entertaining and innovative surfers of the event, won the Gold Medal in Boys Under-18.

After the last heat of the day, the festivities moved to the medal podium. Team Hawaii stood upon the podium, heads held high. These 12 junior surfers from Hawaii brought home the gold, showing up and blowing up like true champions. Coach Bert Ishimaru summed up the experience best. “The team, all of us coaches, we really want to try and show the Aloha spirit. We do want to win. We want to bring home the gold. But overall, our mission has always been to be a good representation of Hawaii, the sport of surfing. Hawaii is known to be the birthplace of surfing, the sport of kings. Each year we come to this event to show the Aloha spirit. This team has done an awesome job of that. I’m proud to say that I am involved with this group this year. Very pleased with how are kids have performed, and acted, throughout the whole event. My hats off to them.” - Mike Latronic


Takumi Nakamura

Hawaii Team Coaches : Shibata, Hart, Ishimaru, Hayes

Michael Rodrigues

Seth Moniz

Girls Under-18 Final

Boys Under-16 Final

Boys Under-18 Final

Gold: Dax McGill (HAW) – 12.60

Gold: Kalani David (HAW) – 13.50

Gold: Matheus Navarro (BRA) – 16.93

Silver: Ellie Jean Coffey (AUS) – 9.20

Silver: Takumi Nakamura (JPN) – 13.40

Silver: Deivid Silva (BRA) – 16.83

Bronze: Tatiana W-Webb (HAW) – 8.53

Bronze: Noe Mar McGonagle (CRC) – 11.34

Bronze: Vasco Ribeiro (POR) – 11.77

Copper: Mahina Maeda (HAW) – 8.24

Copper: Josh Moniz (HAW) – 11.17

Copper: Joshua Hay (AUS) – 11.37

Final ISA World Juniors Team Ranking

The DAKINE ISA World Junior Surfing Championship Presented by Billabong is made possible with the support of the following event partners: DAKINE, Billabong, Panamá, Super Deportes, Mini, Dollar Rent A Car, Copa Airlines, Extreme Surf & Sport. The media partners are Surfea Panama, FOX Sports, Surfersvillage and Surfos. The Official Forecaster for the event is Surfline.

Gold: Hawaii Silver: Australia Bronze: Brazil Copper: USA


Maui

Whalers Village, KaĘťanapali Front Street Lahaina Cannery Mall South Kihei Shops At Wailea

Big Island

Kona Inn Shopping Village Kings’ Shops Waikoloa

Oahu

Outrigger Waikiki Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Walk Sheraton Princess Kaiulani

Kauai

Poipu Shopping Village Anchor Cove


Ow en W ri gh t


CHECK OUT THE VIDEO

Fanning

Machado

Dorian

Reef

Seth

Mikala

J d

Evan


ALBEE spotting his landing among the urchins at a rarely surfed slab of lava on the west side.

APERTURE Q u i n c y D e i n Po r t fo l i o

QUINCY DEIN IS A TALENTED YOUNG PHOTOGRAPHER OUT OF MAUI. WITH A PENCHANT FOR CAPTURING GORGEOUS IMAGES FROM THE WATER, QUINCY ALWAYS MANAGES TO FIND MAUI’S BEST SURFERS WHEN THE WAVES ARE PUMPING. FROM HONOLUA BAY TO THE VARIOUS UNNAMED SLABS, TAKE A MINUTE AND ENJOY QUINCY’S WORLD.


Honolua legend and shaper Mark Anderson deep in the cave section at Honolua Bay.


Kalalau Beach, Napali Coast, Kauai.


CLAY MARZO unleashing on a stormy morning close to home.


KAITO KINO

Photo: Cole Yamane

TM

DEMPSEY

INTRODUCING THE DIZM ECO COLLECTION FEATURING HANDMADE RB CELLULOSE ACETATE Handmade RB Cellulose Acetate is a 100% Renewable and Biodegradable (RB) plant based material. As opposed to being made from post consumer recycled products, our optical quality frames are made from renewable raw materials: cotton, wood and palm oil. With the appropriate environmental conditions the frames will decompose into water, carbon dioxide and biomass. No, they will not decompose on your face. Meets compliance with the American and European certification for biodegradation. These frames are lightweight, durable and allow for a variety of vibrant colors.

WWW.DIZMEYEWEAR.COM


PATRI MCLUGHLIN, Maalaea, Maui.


Kailea at Makena, Maui


DEGE O’CONNELL slotted on a sunset gem at Honolua Bay.


THE WINNER OF A CUSTOM T&C SURFBOARD IS KAUAI BOY BRONSON LOVELL. THIS FREESURF MAGAZINE READER WILL BE GETTING A CUSTOM SHRED STICK FROM SHAPING LEGEND GLENN PANG! CONGRATS BRONSON!

kaleimaeole

handcrafted jewelry

Earth friendly Fine Silver Sunrise Shells and other designs available online at

www.96712jewelry.com or at the

North Shore CouNtry Market Open Saturdays from 8 am - 2pm


FreeSurf Magazine Instagram Tag your best summer surf Photo shot with #summerswells and @freesurfmag. Contest Winning photo will be

published in FreeSurf and will win their choice of HIC Boardshorts from HIC or a Bikini from Roxy Kailua. Enter now!


They finally did it! The ocean stewards over at the Surfrider Foundation (along with numerous groups and activists) have just won a 25-year battle to save one of the fastest waves in the world, Ma’alaea. The Hawaii DLNR and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had planned on expanding the boat harbor, but recently announced they would be abandoning the plan.


2012 is supposed to be the year of the dragon. FreeSurf would beg to differ. We think 2012 is the year of John John. The young prodigy just won his first ever WT event, the Billabong Rio Pro down in Brazil. Having already won the Volcom Pipe Pro and the Drug Aware Pro in Margaret’s River, this is JJF’s 3rd victory this year. Most impressively, John John is tied for 5th place with Taj Burrow in the World Tour rankings! It’s looking like it isn’t a matter of if JJF will win a world title, but rather when. Congrats John John!


spaghettini

6/9/06

3:28 PM

Page 1

Open Daily from 11:00 am to 8:00 pm In the heart of Haleiwa

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808 955 0058 1441 Kapiolani boulevard suite 907, honolulu, hawaii 96814


Big news for everyone’s favorite Oahu power surfer. Kekoa “Bam” Bacalso just resigned with sponsor Rip Curl. After a year apart, Rip Curl inked a deal with the 2009 ASP Rookie of the Year. Congrats Bam!

The Finest Tobacco Accessories:

• HOOKAHS

• Water Pipes • Detox • Cigars • Vaporizers • Awesome local glass • Tobacco Spoons & More!


L A S T

L O O K Next month we go in search of empty, perfect waves. That’s right, it is time for our annual Travel Issue. Enjoy this little tease of Indonesian perfection. Mikala Jones enjoying the road less traveled. Photo : Brad Masters


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