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The art of keeping secret spots secret

State of The

Art Chop Shop

Art and image converge

VOLUME 6 NUMBER 4

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FREESURFMAGAZINE.COM

pg.24


Nathan Fletcher

INSPIRED FREE-SURF EXPLORATIONIST

SAN CLEMENTE, CA

GRIDLOCK

LOOK FOR NATHAN’S UPCOMING MOVIE “LAVESE LAS MANOS.”


Free g Parkin

A shadowy figure joins Clark Little in the eye of this firey sunrise barrel, aptly titled “Smokin'.� Photo: Clark Little

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Contents FSM V6#4

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Chop Shop Elements converge as we weld man, machine and photography—careful you don’t sear your retina

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How's Thou Art? The eclectic facets and faces of the leaders of art in Hawai‘i

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Who do you surf for? You don’t need stickers on your board to rip

Photo: Latronic

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Contents FSM V6#4

Photo: Heff

10 FREE PARKING Blowing Glass 16 COVER STORY Lahiki Minamishin 18 MASTHEAD 20 EDITOR’S NOTE Art or Science 22 FREE TIME GALLERY Eh, Howzit! 24 INSIDE SECTION Pine Trees Fresh// Secret Spots// Press Play// Wiping Out in Style// Vintage Surf Auction

26 WHATEVAS Artist Artis 56 NEWS & EVENTS NSSA Turtle Bay 58 FREE PLUGS Industry Notes 68 LAST LOOK Last Ride


e On Thr e v o C

Photo: Baeseman

Filling a Blank Canvas “How do you define art?” was a question once posed to me in a dimly lit, overcrowded art history classroom when I was a student at UH. The class struggled with the answer for an entire semester, debating the merits and drawbacks of everything from gruesome street tags to performance art, music, and impressionism. In the end, after four months of wrong answers and over-thinking, the professor dropped some gold on the class by presenting what was quite possibly the most succinct and easily digested answer I came across in my academic years: “If the artist says it’s art…then it’s art.” Made sense to me. To the artist goes complete creative control. With that Spartan prose embedded in our editorial minds, we went on the hunt for a cover shot tailor made for this Art Issue. Nothing was off limits. We were going to create a cover and call it art…because by definition, we can. Aggressively prowling our desktops like a rabid pack of starving wolves in search of something moody, something that hopefully spoke to creativity and uniqueness embedded upon in our surf culture, we came across this a gem of young Lahiki Minamishin, lighting up a blank canvas with an ample mix of dark-colored sea and sultry sunset set to a Big Isle seascape. It wasn’t too ridiculous or offensive, yet by no means too stock or standard. Our opus was complete. With that said, here’s to creativity and all of the art that blossoms from approaching the standard in a new way. Hope you enjoy. —Jeff Mull

On The Cover: Lahiki Minamishin Photo: Baeseman


K A L A N I T H E

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A product of Manulele Inc. VOLUME 6 • NUMBER 4 publisher Mike Latronic editorial editor KEVIN WHITTON associate editor JEFF MULL content manager TONY HEFF free thinkers Siri Masterson, Beau Flemister design art director RICHARD HUTTER staff photographers ERIC BAESEMAN, TONY HEFF, MIKE LATRONIC, TYLER ROCK contributing photographers

NATHAN ADAMS, ERIK AEDER, Kirk Lee Aeder,

JAMIE BALLENGER, MARK BERKOWITZ, BRIAN BIELMANN, JOHN BILDERBACK, Holt Blanchard, BO BRIDGES, VINCE CAVATAIO, Mike Coots, DAREN CRAWFORD, HILTON DAWE, PATRICK DEVAULT, DAMEA DORSEY, WILLI EDWARDS, BRANDON ELLS, BEAU FLEMISTER, ISAAC FRAZER, PETE FRIEDEN, Kirby Fukunaga, Ryan Gamma, KENNY GIBBS, STU GIBSON, GORDINHO, CHRIS HAGAN, HAJ, JOHN HEPLER, JON HUBERMAN, Rick Hurst, ERIK IPPEL, JOLI, BUZZY KERBOX, DANNY KIM, Kin Kimoto, PETER KING, RIC LARSEN, BRUNO LEMOS, CARL LUCAS, MANA, MIKE MCGINNIS, IKAIKA MICHAELS, JUSTIN MORIZONO, ALLEN MOZO, DAVE NELSON, CAROL OLIVA, SERGIO OLIVERA, BRUCE OMORI, BRADY OSHIRO, MANNY PANGILINAN, CHRISTIAN PERALTA, Steve Robertson, JIM RUSSI, PAKE SALMON, EPES SARGENT, BOBBY SCHUTZ, SPENCER SUITT, BILL TAYLOR, Paul Teruya, KEVIN WHITTON, DARRELL WONG

sales director of sales and marketing SEAN WINGATE advertising executive SHAUN LOPEZ business coordinator CORA SANCHEZ executive assistant SIRI MASTERSON advertising inquiries contact 808-429-8460 or swingate@freesurfmagazine.com www.freesurfmagazine.com FreeSurf Magazine is distributed at all Jamba Juice locations, most fine surf shops and select specialty stores throughout Hawai‘i. You can also pick up FreeSurf on the mainland at Barnes & Noble and Borders bookstores and select newsstands. Ask for it by name at your local surf shop! Subscribe at freesurfmagazine.com. Other than “Free Postage” letters, we do not accept unsolicited editorial submissions without first establishing contact with the editor. FreeSurf, Manulele Inc. and its associates is not responsible for lost, stolen or damaged submissions or their return. One-way correspondence can be sent to P.O. Box 1161, Hale‘iwa, HI 96712 E-mail editorial inquiries to info@freesurfmagazine.com Catch Billabong Surf TV Mondays at 1:30pm, Tuesdays at 2pm and 7:30pm, Wednesdays at 1:30am, Thursdays at 4:30am and 4:30pm, Fridays at 12:30pm and Saturdays at 3:30am and 9am and Sundays at 7:30am. And don’t forget Board Stories on Mondays at 2pm, Tuesdays at 5pm and 8:30pm, Wednesdays at 2:30am and 9:30am, Thursdays at 5:30am and 5:30pm and Saturdays at 2:30am and 7:30am and Sundays at 9:30am and 4pm.


Science Vs. Art When I grab my board off the wax-coated wooden pegs of the surf rack behind the office, the last things on my mind are the scientific principles of water displacement and drag that allow me to set an edge and turn off the bottom, or the shaper’s artistic interpretations of the rail contour that allows me to bank off the lip and reenter the wave, nose down, without catching an edge. Yet, without the forces of nature acting on our hardened chemical crafts of immaculate design, there would be no such thing as surfing. In all actuality, when I grab my board off the rack, I’m usually cursing myself for not changing my slippery, old wax more often. There’s no way around it though, surfing, in all of its forms, is some marriage of form and function, of art and science. Whether you know it or not, you embrace one form over the other, based on your impetus for this Sport of Kings. Some guys are style bandits, masters of drawing the perfect, timeless line, always in the right place at the right time. They are all art. They can sense the nuances of a turned-down rail, a fuller nose and variations in bottom contours. Others are balls-out chargers, the bigger wave the better, and closeouts are of no concern. Any surfboard will do as long as they are getting shacked off their head. The game is simple: harness as much speed as possible and point the nose toward the end of the tunnel. Style is not a necessity when it’s life and death. In no other area of surfing is the relationship more evident than in the shaping bay. Shapers juggle the art of crafting a vessel with no straight lines with a series of guiding measurements. Their calculations and cuts are foreshadowed by principles of hydrodynamics, drag and buoyancy. The rest is art, the refinements and fine touches—the swish of sandpaper on naked foam. Even a computer-shaped blank needs a little

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Photo: Heff

es Ed Not

From vision to creation, Clark Takashima brushes his “Dream Tour Series.” Top: Lower Trestles; Inset: Pipeline.

touch up with hand tools manipulated under the skilled eye of an artisan. Art also permeates a once-thought-invincible-now-feeling-the-effects surf industry. When complex business models and corporate strategies can’t fix the outgoing tide of an ailing world economy, the big blokes turn to art. The $20 T-shirt gets a face-lift, a new computer-designed graphic spearheads an international marketing campaign and the multi-billiondollar industry rushes to reinvent itself with bright colors and recycled styles of decades past. But art can mean so much more than a fresh new logo or acrylic paint on the end of the brush. Take for instance the classic novel, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values. The author applies principles of Zen Buddhism to the daily maintenance of his motorcycle on a lengthy road trip with his son. Message: Don’t just rush through the duty of changing a spark plug, but be one with the spark plug and the motorcycle, take time to understand and focus and put your whole mind and body into everything you do. Parlay that to mind surfing. The act of visualizing a maneuver is a meditative art form practiced to complete a task in your head, putting your mind and body in the right place to be able to pull off the move when the appropriate times comes. You’re brain will already know what it feels like to land that 360 air and your muscles will be ready to react. Wait a second. That sounds like psychology, like science is sticking its head in the door. Surfing is science. Surfing is art. It’s how you temper the two elements to create your own surf stoke, a different combination for every waterlogged surfer across the islands. Now if you’ll excuse me, I have to go change my wax before I forget again. —Kevin Whitton


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5 Every month our magazines are greeted with smiling faces when we rip open the box and hand over the latest issue of FreeSurf. A big mahalo to all our distributors.

1 Surf n Sea.

9 Xcel.

2 HIC, Kailua.

10 Cholos.

3 Breakers.

11 Quiksilver, Hale‘iwa.

4 Jamba Juice.

12 San Lorenzol.

5 Blue Hawaii.

13 Mauka To Makai.

6 Kua Aina, Ward.

14 Shark's Cove Surf Shop.

7 Tropical Blend.

15 RV's.

8 Billabong.

16 Blue Planet.


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Insiden Sectio

Leaving Nothing In Their Wake

Photo: Heff

When the Verizon Wireless Hawaii Junior Surf Team showed up on Kaua‘i to train and compete in the NSSA contest at Pine Trees, they cleaned up, in every sense of the word. Several Junior Surf Team members snagged first place in their division and all the Junior Team surfers made it into the finals. In addition to their competitive clean up, they also staged an even more important beach clean up during the event. Hard Rock Café and the NSSA lent a hand coordinating the efforts as the kids came together to scan the beach for trash on the heavily used stretch of Hanalei coastline. “It’s a vital part of Verizon Wireless, Hard Rock Café and the Hawaii Team’s goal this year,” remarked Rainos Hayes, Hawaii Junior Surf Team coach. “Because the beach and ocean are such a vital part of our sport, our economy and lifestyle, we have decided to be proactive wherever we train, compete or just hang out. We want to leave every beach cleaner than we found it, even as we travel round the world.” “Hawai‘i is the birthplace of the sport of surfing,” added Hayes. “It’s the goal of the team to represent and reinforce all facets of the sport as well as aloha to the world, while uniting our islands from Hilo to Hanalei. This beach clean-up is just one of many planned for 2009. Our goal is to continue to keep the team active in many relevant activities within our Hawaiian oceansport community.” Hopefully, surfers around the world will follow their conscious example. —Kevin Whitton

The Art of Keeping a

Photo: Heff

Secret Spot

secret

Press Play Photo: Heff

Since surfing’s conception the “secret spot” has always been a surfers most coveted and protected friend. Yeah, it’s great to surf with your buddies, or even with a crowd if the waves are pumping, but surfing alone or with maybe one other person out at a great wave is a transcendental experience. Guardians of these rare diamonds in the rough truly know what it takes to protect such sacred waters from would-be molesters. These guardians know that while their entire being may want to scream out to the world how much they scored that day, they must find the strength to resist the temptation of bragging. It is an ancient yet progressive art form involving all manners of trickery, deception and various lies of omission. Who can you tell? Your girlfriend, your mother, your god? Basically, the answer is none of the above, no one. But what if a curious spoiler rubbernecking for a quick fix spots your holiest of holies? Just break it down to him like this: Him: “Dude, it looks sick out there. Is it always like this?” You: “It’s not that good. It’s mainly a closeout. It’s super shallow and the reef is so sharp. It’s more of a novelty wave, not really worth it.” Him: “Dude, did you check that wave out by ____________? I heard you surf out there sometimes.” You: “Nah, that place is never good. I surfed Country instead.” Him: “Dude, was that you surfing way out there? I saw you get a pretty good one.” You: “That was a bad idea. I got chased in by a huge shark—HUGE—I’m lucky I’m still alive. I wouldn’t paddle out.” —Beau Flemister

Photo: Rico

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Musica

Surfica

In a direct break from the traditional surf film, Musica Surfica focuses on the unlikely pairing of the classical violin and the finless surfboard. In a complete change of direction from anything that we’ve seen done before, the documentary follows Richard Tognetti, a leading violinist and artistic director of the Australian Chamber Orchestra, as he seeks out new forms of inspiration for his music, namely the sans-fin surfboard. Shot entirely on King Island in Southern Australia, the landscape delivers a breathtakingly beautiful element to the viewer. With the help of Tom Carroll, Heath Joske, and Derek Hynd, an influential and highly creative surfer and journalist in his own right, Musica Surfica challenges the violinists and the surfers to feed off of each others creativity by reexamining what’s possible in their respective fields. If at first the thesis of the film seems like a stretch, you’re not alone in your thinking. But we promise that after a few minutes of the beautiful cinematography, keelless surfing and impromptu classical violin, you’ll be rethinking all of the different forms of inspiration around you. Highlights include a late-night violin jam session (don’t hate on it till you see it…trust us) and a finless ride at J-Bay by Derek Hynd that left our jaws on the table. Definitely worth a look. —Jeff Mull


Insiden Sectio

Out For The Count

The wipeout is an inevitable part of surfing. Even the greats take their lickings like the rest of us. Rogue cleanup sets, catching an edge, sharp reef and crowded impact zones have claimed countless victims over the years. While most of the time we walk away luckily unscathed or with the minor, instantaneously-infected reef cut, there are instances of physical punishment and harm. The art of the wipeout is not so much how you wipeout, often you don’t get a choice in the matter, but to take a lickin’ and keep on tickin’. These guys are Hawai‘i’s bounce-back champions: Titus Kinimaka — Kaua‘i big-wave surfer and long-standing Eddie competitor broke his femur on Christmas morning, 1989 while surfing Waimea. He later said that he could feel his foot touching his head. Now, he charges the biggest waves he can find throughout Hawai‘i. Tamayo Perry — On a serious 15-foot day at Pipe on Nov. 17, 2005 someone bailed their board in front of Tamayo as they scratched to get under a clean-up set. The guy’s board hit Tamayo in the head spliting it open from ear to ear and requiring over 50 staples to close the gaping wound. Now, Tamayo continues to dominate the Pipe lineup, albeit with a helmet. Mark Healey — “It was real good Pipe to get hurt,” said Healey about Monday, Feb. 11, 2008 when his back foot slipped off his board while he was dropping in. He got launched and compressed into the reef, hitting his left knee and heel at the same time, splitting his kneecap and fracturing his heel. Now, he’s been caught pulling into ridiculous slabs in the North Pacific. —Kevin Whitton Photo: Baeseman

Spring Cleaning

Photo: Heff

The Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction is rolling back into Town once again, setting up shop at the Blaisdell Center for two days of board-lover’s delight. The auction draws collectors from all over the world, looking forward to the latest “under-the-house” finds and classic shapes. The show kicks off this year on Friday, July 17 with a viewing of the collection to be auctioned off and the much-anticipated Antique Road Show, where anyone can show up at the door with an old classic and get it appraised. If a board discovered during the Antique Road Show meets event Producer Randy Rarick’s high standards and the owner is willing to part ways, last-minute additions to the collection can be made. Veteran surfboard designers, shapers and manufactures will be in attendance, including Matt Kivlin, Joe Quigg, Greg Noll, Dick Brewer, Ben Aipa, Bing Copeland and Ole Olson, alongside surf stars of the 60s like Jock Sutherland, Fred Hemmings, Ricky Grigg, Joey Cabell and Buffalo Keaulana. This year they will be joined by shortboard pioneers of the 70s and 80s; Pipeline Masters Gerry Lopez, Rory Russell and Jeff Crawford; as well as world champions Mark Richards, Peter Townend, Shaun Tomson and Tom Carroll, all of whom will have personalized surfboards from the various eras. Rarick was able to get his hands on a few never-before-seen surfboards, including an ancient 1850 breadfruit board, turn-of-the-century redwood planks, hollow paddle boards, design-changing early wood/fiberglass prototypes, big-wave guns of the 60s and pro boards of the 70s and 80s. In addition to the boards, the auction is a hub of surf memorabilia including an eclectic selection of Hawaiiantheme artwork, surf contest items, some of the first images of surfing ever depicted in print from Missionary times and off-beat surf advertising from early media. “We are still on the hunt for items to round out the offerings and hope that people will come forward with unique items for possible consignment,” said Rarick. You heard the man, the call is out. So clean out the garage, check up in the rafters, look under the lanai, look under your neighbor’s lanai because you never know where the next $30K surfboard is hiding, gathering red dust. —Kevin Whitton F RE E SUR F M A G A Z I NE . C O M

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vas Whate

“The North Shore is the only place in the world where I feel like I can be me.”

Art Is By Siri Masterson

Ron Artis is a special guy. To say that he is a dedicated father who likes to play music and paint is an understatement. Art is his family, music and expression; he sleeps, eats, and breathes it. He paints what he sees: beautiful North Shore landscapes, waves, turtles, birds, flowers, people, whatever happens to be on his mind. Ron and his wife, Victoria, celebrate their world—a family of 11 children—by creating art every day. Performing and recording live music in their studio, they entertain guests daily from all over with their broad scope of music. Currently, they are ranked the number one Family Band in the world and their music is featured on iTunes. Artis is well known for his paintings on broken surfboards that line his yard and studio. The studio is named Resurrection City after the efforts of the family turning what was once the most unattractive plot of land in Hale‘iwa into a colorful and vibrant recording and art studio in the North Shore Marketplace. Ron fills many rolls including painter, author, composer, teacher, pastor, husband and father, but it hasn’t always been easy for the artist and his family. As a professional musician working with artists such as Stevie Wonder, Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson, Chaka Khan, Luther Vandross and Van Halen, he saw first hand the life-draining nature of the recording industry and made his escape to Hawai‘i. “The North Shore is the only place in the world where I feel like I can be me,” says Artis, and that says a lot for a man that has been on the search his whole life. FSM: How did you get your artwork and music started on the North Shore? Ron Artis: Well, not many people know this, but I came to the North Shore to start canvas art. But the galleries here had a monopoly on that, so I had to find my own niche. And it was just by chance my wife said to me, “Why don’t you try painting on one of those?” It was a broken surfboard. I’ve done some innovative things in my life and I said, “I bet it’s been done before.” She said, “But you haven’t done it.” So I did it. I painted a turtle and it sold almost instantly. It took some time before people started warming up to us. At first they thought we were Ethiopian drug dealers. We played music next to Surf N Sea and eventually, as we met more people we got more community support. I’ll never forget when Jay Adams came in his big Cadillac filled up

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with broken boards and said, “We really like what you are doing, man, keep it going.” And that’s how the surfboard thing got started. FSM: How does your family inspire you as an artist? Artis: It wasn’t until I met my wife, my best friend Victoria, that I began to really grow as a human. When we began to have children, our children are way more creative than either of us, so I began to examine what they needed. They needed good principles, good family, good bonding and good love in order to be creative because the heart of creativity is sensitivity. So its important that we create art every day and use the gifts God gave us and not ignore them. Art is a battlefield; you just can’t see your enemy. As an artist, your sensitivity can be your worst enemy because you can feel everything and can get consumed by the darkness of the world unless you understand why you were blessed with the sensitivity. So when they were young I taught the children mixed martial arts, like Tai Chi, so they can see how they can use power in a very positive way without it being destructive. FSM: Does faith and religion play a role in your life? Artis: Because I am a product of my society, a Christian society, that is what I believe. I have looked at other religions of the world, but my wife and I feel very comfortable embracing Christianity. I could not have raised the family I have without God in the middle. With all the things being thrown at youth and families these days, it’s hard to stay focused. And if you remove God, it’s really easy to slide off the wagon. So I show my children by example why I don’t harbor many of the cultural negatives like some other people do: racism, hatred. Those things are destructive. It’s good to understand what those things are, but don’t let them become part of you. FSM: What are your future musical endeavors? Artis: We want to build our own family theater so we can bring people to paradise to listen to music instead of going around the world on tour. I want to establish the Artis name globally and show that we are authentic and committed to what we do. Like every seed you plant in the ground you have to go through that process of growing and that’s what we are doing.


Oahu

Maui

Kauai

Big Island

Outrigger Waikiki Hilton Hawaiian Village Pearlridge Center Aloha Tower Marketplace Waikiki Beach Walk Sheraton Princess Kaiulani Royal Hawaiian Center Poipu Shopping Village Anchor Cove

Whalers Village, Ka’anapali Front Street Lahaina Cannery Mall South Kihei Shops At Wailea Paia

Kona Inn Shopping Village Kings’ Shops Waikoloa

www.honoluasurf.com


PHOTOS BY: DORSEY


s Chop o p Elements converge as we weld man, machine and photography —careful you don’t sear your retina

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Surfer: Mason Ho. Photo: Latronic. Artist: Heff.

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Surfer: Wesley Larsen. Photo: Latronic. Artist: Rico.

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Surfer: Flynn Novak. Photo: Heff. Artist: Brooklyn.


PANCAKE PLATTER With Sausage Available During Breakfast Hours Only

HAVE IT YOUR WAY TM & © 2009 Burger King Brands, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2009 The Coca-Cola Company "Minute Maid" is a registered trademark of the Coca-Cola Company.


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Surfer: Jamie O'Brien. Photo: Rock. Artist: Rock/Rico.

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Surfer: Kahea Hart. Photo: Latronic. Artist: Rico.


HOW'S THOU ART?

A LOOK INSIDE THE HAWAI‘I ART SCENE TO WHET YOUR PALETTE Photo: Hilton Dawe

Dave Homcy Once upon a time, surf movies meant something. But by the late ’90s, the movies had turned to videos and then eventually turned to flicks, leaving surfers with a formulaic and segmented view of surf culture and more so, the world, as locales mattered little compared to the waves. Snap, cutback, tail slide, tube ride, air, floater; Repeat. Meet one of the renaissance leaders of the movement to make surf movies cinematic again—Dave Homcy. This quiet North Shore resident has pulled the trigger and harnessed the imagery of such deliciously refreshing surf films such as A Brokedown Melody, Shelter, One Track Mind, and Sliding Liberia. “A friend of mine just told me that there are no squares in nature. This is why I love shooting on 8, 16, and 35mm motion picture film,” says the humble surf cinematographer. “There are no pixels. Film, like nature, is round, handling light and mood better than video.” Dave Homcy, along with a few others such as Thomas Campbell and the Malloys, value an actual story in their films. As shown in his recent and political film Sliding Liberia, Dave projects the stories behind the faces; the faces of real people living in the places we as surfers may be visiting. “As a cinematographer, it’s my job to paint pictures through motion, work with light, and make viewers feel emotion.” It’s guys like Dave we have to thank for adding “the feeling” back into a new era of surf cinema. —Beau Flemister davehomcy.com

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Tom “Pohaku” Stone

Photos: Heff

Tom Stone is not a shaper. He’s not a board builder, glasser, sander, airbrusher or CAD softwear engineer. Tom Stone is a cultural practioner. He carves papa he‘enalu. There’s no need for templates or calipers. The grain of the wood is Tom’s guide to the outline and shape of the board. When Tom receives a piece of wood fit to be carved into an olo, kiko‘o, alaia or papio board, he harnesses its mana, meditating on the wood’s transformation back into the stream of energy as a surfboard. “I perpetuate the wood’s life, not death,” says Stone, as he glides his hand planer down a smooth length of koa. “It’s not that the tree came down and died, but instead, it’s going through a metamorphosis.” Mango, wiliwili and koa all possess different properties of flex and flotation and offer a different experience for the surfer. Tom cuts a basic shape out of his raw material with a chainsaw, uses a steel ad to chisel out a rail and a block planer for finetuning. The boards are sealed with traditional dyes and waxes, utilizing traditional ingredients passed down through chants and story. The boards are raw and imperfect, the complete opposite of the homogeneous shortboard of the 21st century. And for Tom, that is the beauty and uniqueness of each board. Every piece of wood that becomes one of his traditional carvings has a personality and a story. It is up to the individual to give the board a history. —Kevin Whitton Hawaiibc.com

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Andrew Miller aka “DrewToonz” You may not necessarily know what artist and animator DrewToonz looks like, but any visitor or resident on the North Shore has inadvertently seen his work. Remember all those abandoned, broken down and stripped shells of vehicles on the side of the road that magically became painted in color and vivid scenes of animated art? That was Drew. Or the Triple Crown Pipeline Masters beach park mural? Again, Drew. “I painted the waves as well as the crowd of spectators. As people would come up to me as I was painting the mural, I would paint them in, and by the end of the contest I had painted 1000 people from real life in the mural,” recalls Drew. But on the North Shore, this surreal perception of a cartoon world, painted by a man inspired heavily by “The Simpsons,” may not be too far-fetched. Maybe the North Shore really does have its Barts or Homers, its bullies and stoned bus drivers. Other projects Drew is famous for include the educational Junior Lifeguard Movie, the Volcom produced Dawn of the Stone Age, and even doing art on surfboards bought by the likes of Adam Sandler. “Art and surfing are two things people want to get paid to do, but nine times out of ten, you have to get a job shoveling shit or hammering nails cause it don’t pay the bills.” Drew further recommends that aspiring artists going to school and add some business classes to their schedule in order to learn the lingo to avoid becoming a starving artist such as himself. —Beau Flemister

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Clark Little

The Waimea shorebreak charger that traded in polyurethane and fiberglass for a camera and water housing is on to something special. Clark Little leads the charge of self-made photographers in Hawai‘i by breaking the mold of shooting pro surfers deep in the pit or perfect empty Pipeline shots. Instead, he’s capturing the uniqueness, mood and beauty of water as waves interact with the shoreline and attracting the interest and eye of countless ocean lovers, not just wave-starved surfers. Clark quickly moved beyond starving artist and elevated to successful photographer with the awe-inspiring moments of light, water, sand and sky, taken from his tumultuous vantage point. A savvy business man, he invested in the right equipment to power his operation and is a one-man band from the time he depresses the shutter button till the production printer spits out a sharp and dynamic image to be mounted and sold in art galleries and at retailers across the state. Since his recent success, many a surf photographer has tried to mimic his style and snap the shorebreak relationship, but Clark’s knowledge of the surf zone, perseverance and willingness to put himself in harm’s way for his Clark’s-eye viewpoint is apparent in the quality of his craft. With thousand of waves crashing onto beaches everyday and each one of them different and unique, Clark Little’s influx muse will always keep him searching for the next shot. —Kevin Whitton clarklittlephotography.com

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Heather Brown At first glance, with her free-flowing blonde hair and love of all things oceana, you’d be forgiven if you mistook Brown as just another bronzed, beautiful North Shore fixture. But there’s more than meets the eye when it comes to Heather Brown, as she has cemented herself and her artwork (a mix of ocean-inspired pieces highlighted with broad, clean lines and brush strokes) into one of the most prominent surf-themed gigs around today.

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Photo: Heff

It seems that Heather is just now hitting her stride as an artist as her art is turning up everywhere as of late. From her Kokua Festival merchandise and event posters to the hipsters adorned in her T-shirts, Heather Brown’s artwork abounds. The past year has seen Heather contracted by Rip Curl to be their “Artist of the Search,” an impressive undertaking to say the least. Not relegating herself to just an acrylic medium, she also has

an impressive eye when it comes to photography and other types of prints. In the future, Brown is expanding her art east, setting up galleries and shows in Japan in the coming months. As Brown readies herself to take over Asia, we look for this hometown girl to continue impressing us with her vibrant use of color. —Jeff Mull Heatherbrownart.com


Nat Wooley

Photo: Heff

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Let us introduce you to Nat Wooley, a man with a Yoda-like mastery of spray-based surf designs. At 26 years of age, Nat grew up honing his surf skills amid the seven-mile stretch of wavedrenched paradise affectionately known as the North Shore of O‘ahu. As Nat grew older, he developed a passion for all things spray paint, taking special note of the tags sprawled across Honolulu’s city blocks. In no time, Nat began coming up with a few designs of his own that began showing up on the decks of some of the word’s best surfers. “I grew up with those guys,” says Nat, “and I’m stoked to help them out. You know, if some of the designs I do for them help them get noticed and get a few more shots…I’m stoked.” Since getting into spraying boards, Nat turned his backyard operation into a full-time business where he’s decked out the likes of Freddy Patacchia, Joel Centeio and the rest of the crew on the North Shore with his own artwork. Currently working alongside Eric Arakawa cutting and spraying boards, Wooley has recently elevated his craft to another level, starting his own clothing line featuring his own unique works of art under the moniker On The In-Side. In the future, look for Wooley to continue producing some of the most progressive and eye-catching board sprays around. —Jeff Mull

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Who Do You Surf For? You don’t need stickers on your board to rip The question “Who do you surf for?” is obvious in Hawai‘i’s star-studded lineups. One needs only to check the nose of the board of the guy sitting next to you in the water and it’s obvious who’s paying his bills. Subconsciously in the world of surf journalism, emphasis falls on stickers, logos and brands as much as it does on the surfer. This gallery is dedicated to the surfers who answer the question, “Me.”

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Splitting his time between the North Shore and Bali, Mikala Jones definitely enjoys the good life. Photo: Baeseman

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An unlikely candidate for a surfer riding a board without stickers, but then again, Kelly Slater’s worldwide appeal is bigger than any brand. Photo: Baeseman

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Albee Layer gets no friction from stickers on the bottom of his board.

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Evan Valiere is the quintessential dark-horse underground ripper.

Photo: Heff

Photo: Heff


Not sponsorless, but sponsored less; Casey Brown could care less.

Hank Gaskell is one of the best surfers in the world not carrying a clothing sponsor. Go figure.

Photo: Ells

Photo: Baeseman

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Randall Paulson charges with style any day, hands down, no questions asked.

Photo: Baeseman

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NSSA Turtle Bay

Groms Infiltrate the Pool Bar Photos: Riddleburger

The usual scene at Turtle Bay Resort consists of tourists in Speedos sipping on cocktails with umbrellas. NSSA Hawai‘i decided to change things up a bit for a weekend and bring in some groms in boardshorts gulping down energy drinks (as if they need it) for what came to be their first event of the season on January 31 and February 1. This comes as a surprise, as the Pine Trees contest on Kaua‘i was canceled due to unruly surf. Nonetheless, it was a great way to kick off the season at Kuilima Point, which hasn’t hosted a contest in over six years. The waves weren’t pumping, but winds were pleasantly offshore and the groms still managed to post high scores and throw some big hacks. Though every heat seemed to be filled with talent, some standouts still emerged from the pack. The usual suspects, Ezekiel Lau, the Moniz ‘ohana, Kalani David, Kaimana Jaquias, Malia Manuel and Leila Hurst all had great performances in their heats, but the star of the show was Dylan Goodale, who had final appearances in three divisions, winning every heat on the way and taking home a first in the Explorer Men’s Division. To add to the competitive pressure, Rainos Hayes, Verizon Wireless Hawaii Junior Surf Team coach, was on deck to do some scouting for this year’s team. There was also more at stake than a chance at Nationals. Rising talent Kekoa Cazimero introduced a first-ever essay contest, reinforcing the scholastic side of the NSSA. The winner of the essay contest will receive a free trip with their parents to the Nationals, a free board by Eric Arakawa and, to top it off, a trip to Disneyland, all made possible by Cazimero’s non-profit organization, the Koa Tree Foundation. —Noa Myers For complete results check freesurfmagazine.com


[Lahiki Minamishin ]

[Leila Hurst]

[Malia Manuel]


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Nike 6.0 Giveaway Kai Barger has been blowing up the amateur competitive circuit for quite some time, made some trips to the podium, but has never been able to nail down any big titles. That all changed when Kai was crowned the ASP World Junior Champion in January. Nike 6.0 was beyond stoked and they want to share their enthusiasms for the young champion by sharing the wealth with you. Be the first to tell us where Kai surfed his way to the ASP World Junior Title and Nike 6.0 will throw the official Barger Champ Pack your way. Send your entries to info@freesurfmagazine.com and type “Kai Barger” in the subject line. Peep the Nike 6.0 Barger Champ Pack • Kai Barger ASP Junior Champion T-shirt • Kai Barger ASP Junior Champion Trucker Hat • Kai Barger ASP Junior Champion Stickers • Nike 6.0 Zoom Oncore Shoes • Hurley Phantom Rocket Boardshort One entry per person. First correct entry received is the winner.

Get on it!


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1 Jamie O'Brien

Photo: Courtesy IBA

Jamie O’Brien (1) made a startling appearance at the Turbo Bodyboards Pipeline Pro in February. The surf was firing and Jamie went for it. O’Brien took some seriously big sets and did well to hold his rail and drive through some big tubes, only to be pinched on the end sections. Unfortunately he didn’t make the heat, but former World Champion Ben Player (Australia) commended him on a job well done.

Haleiwa Town Center

�next to Food For Thought�

10 :00 am – 6 ISH 808. 637.9670 guavahawaii.com

Open

Primo Beer came out with a 22-ounce, single-serving bottle that caters to those who feel that 12 ounces of Primo just isn’t enough. The new bottle is called the Bombucha. To get the message out they sponsored the 250-plus-pound “Bombucha Division,” reserved for the biggest of the big boys of surfing, during the 33rd Annual Buffalo’s Big Board Surfing Classic. Primo’s sponsorship of the Buff’s Classic also included both the Longboard and Bully Board competitions in the Bombucha Division. Prizes included a custom Primo longboard and bully board, bottle opener trophies and specially designed T-shirts. Not only is Primo taking on the big boys, but also they’re making the big jump back to the mainland, the first time in over a decade. Honolulu’s Kainoa Haas, 17, tasted victory for the very first time at stop number eight of the Hard Rock Cafe Surf Series, presented by the Hawaii Surfing Association (HSA), staged at Hale‘iwa’s Ali‘i Beach Park. Haas defeated current HSA ratings leader Kylen Yamakawa in the final and is now on track to qualify for the Hawaii State Championships that are to be held at Ala Moana Bowls in June. With this result, Haas jumped to third on the Hard Rock HSA ratings behind Yamakawa and Matty Costa (2).


ClarksSurfArtHawa ii.com


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2 Matty Costa

Photo: Heff

ContraBrand, a rebellious new action sports brand, is donating nearly 100 articles of clothing to the Vietnam Veterans of America Household Goods Donation Program, an organization that raises funds to serve the needs of Vietnam War-era military veterans. The clothing was collected by street teams at venues in both Orange and San Diego Counties as part of the brand’s unique, “Give Us the Shirt Off Your Back” campaign, which confiscated played-out mainstream brand T-shirts and replaced them with hot new gear from ContraBrand. In addition, ContraBrand donated fresh shirts from its newly launched line of clothing. Project Green Flex is the latest eco-initiative from FCS. They’ve designed a new fin made from post-consumer material. The fin maintains the strength and flex properties equal to its revolutionary Glass Flex material, yet has a minimal impact on the environment. The new material is unique because it derives all of its resin from other materials that would otherwise become landfill. O’Neill Wetsuits created a biodegradable bag to protect wetsuits, vests and UV products, made from biodegradable plastic.  The new bags are made from bioplastic materials based with 80percent starch content, are 70.3-percent decomposed within 90 days and are biodegradable in compost, wet soil, fresh water, seawater and activated sludge. Makani McDonald, was nominated by the ISA as the Hawai‘i judge for the 2009 Quiksilver ISA World Junior Surfing Championships. The Surfrider Foundation hired Stuart H. Coleman to be the organization’s first Hawaiian Islands Field Coordinator. Coleman will work with Surfrider chapters across the state (Oahu, Kaua‘i, Maui and the Big Island) to help grow their membership and promote key environmental programs. “After seven years of volunteering for the organization, I’m stoked to be working for Surfrider,” Coleman says. “I want to thank Primo Beer and the O‘ahu Chapter for their generous support.” Coleman will help coordinate communication among the chapters in the development of their statewide Rise Above Plastics (RAP) Campaign, which seeks to reduce the amount of single-use plastic bags, bottles, and debris that end up in our waterways and oceans. In addition, he will continue working with all of the chapters to support legislation and policies that promote beach access, responsible shoreline development, reduced plastic marine debris and ocean conservation. riseaboveplastics.org


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3 Bonga Perkins

4 Joy Monahan

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6/9/06

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Photo: Heff

5 Melanie Bartels

Photo: Heff

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6 Kelly Slater Photo: Latronic

Open Daily from 11:00 am to 8:00 pm In the heart of Haleiwa

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ASP World Longboarding Champion Bonga Perkins (3), Women’s World Longboarding Champion Joy Monahan (4), ASP World Junior Champion Kai Barger and Women’s World Tour “Most Improved” Melanie Bartels (5) traveled to the Goldie in February to receive their crowns and awards for the 2008 ASP season. They met up with other tour compadres for an emotional evening as Wayne “Rabbit” Bartholomew spoke about his tenure in the surf industry and his decision to step down from his post as ASP International President. In addition, Kelly Slater (6) announced he would be going for his tenth World Title. Who would have guessed? In other ASP news, Melanie Bartels finished second at the Roxy Pro Gold Coast. She took down Coco Ho in the semis. Miss Ho had a great run for her maiden ASP Women's World Tour appearance. Mike Miller, of the Peter Miller Foundation, created a new surf-related clothing line called Twin Islands Clothing. twinislandssurf.com


Imaikalani Devault, organically grown on Maui


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Surf art by Elise Nicole

OceanGirlArt.com

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GIVING BACK

This is no sob story. This is a story of one of my best friends who is in the biggest test of his life. His name is Delta Thompson. Delts has been diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. When I got the news I dropped everything and called him up. Delta is the most positive person on the planet and the first thing he said was, “Eric, this is just a test. I’m going to make it through this.” Growing up with Delta, I know that he learned to be so positive through his respect and love for the ocean. He is a certified lifeguard and has also done superb work as Water Patrol at Pipeline. An elite waterman from Kailua-Kona, he continues to pass on his knowledge to future generations on the Big Island. Every year, Delta travels to Nationals in California and the North Shore to coach and support Big Island surfers. To create camaraderie and community he started his own clothing line, F.B.I., “From Big Island,” and it took off. Everyone from the Big Island is so proud to wear Delta’s gear. With all the support of communities nationwide, Delta will make it through this. —Eric Baeseman

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66-560 Kam Hwy Haleiwa, HawAii 808-637-4573


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After the sun sets And the lineups clear, Twilight descends upon the waves, A psychedelic, aquatic atmosphere. —Kevin Whitton Photo: Heff

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