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PHOTO: TIM JONES


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Photo: Baeseman

[Get out of the way. Here comes the captain, Kala Alexander.]

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THE BALANCE OF OPPOSITES VOLUME 02 | CHAPTER 02 C A P TA I N A R C H Y The beginning of the trip was a complete yard sale. After pulling off the highway to avoid a wreck—boards flying all over—everybody jumped out to clean up the mess. Talk about too many cooks in the kitchen. Archy quickly took control of the situation and directed traffic. You can always count on the Captain to get the train rolling again.

RVCA.COM/SURF

RVCA.COM | RVCAANPQ.COM PHOTOS: STEVE SHERMAN


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Photo: Heff

2008 has been a year of crashes: the stock market crash, the Dude Cruise car crash and Mark Healey’s knee splitting Pipeline crash. As the dust settles on 2008 and we look to the arrow of time pointing to 2009, it’s apparant that life is only getting nuttier. If Mark is dropping in to serious Pipe on a wooden plank with a single one-inch fin, what’s he going to come up with for 2009. Yikes! This is a time of doers and visionaries, like Crystal Thornburg and her expedition with Surfers For Cetaceans in Chile, and the unique, one-of-a-kind expressions of the Woolley brothers’ artistic endeavors. With the beauty and natural splendor of the islands available to us all, it’s time to drop in and take advantage.

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2008 TITLES 1st Place • Oakley Pro Junior Global Challenge 1st Place • Billabong Sunset Beach Pro Junior

2008 TITLES 1st Place • Billabong Pro Junior Series Canggu/Bali 1st Place • US Surfing Championships 18 & under 1st Place • US Surfing Championships 16 & under

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Oahu // Waikiki • Koko Marina • Windward Mall • Pearlridge • Waikele Maui // Queen Ka‘ahumanu Center • Kukui Mall • Lahaina Big Island // Queen‘s MarketPlace


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ULTRA LIGHT WASTE-FREE OUTSOLE FEATURING 速 VANSLITE TECHNOLOGY IN A CLASSIC WINO SILOHUETTE.


A product of Manulele Inc. VOLUME 5 • NUMBER 12 publisher MIKE LATRONIC editorial --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------managing editor KEVIN WHITTON copy editor NOA MYERS content manager TONY HEFF free thinkers SIRI MASTERSON, MANNY PANGILINAN, TYLER ROCK, CRYSTAL THORNBURG, CHRISTEN VIDANOVIC design ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------art director KYLE TANAKA (March 2008 - December 2008) graphic designer TK staff photographers ERIC BAESEMAN, TONY HEFF, JUSTIN RIDDLEBERGER, TYLER ROCK contributing photographers

NATHAN ADAMS, ERIK AEDER, SCOTT AICHNER, BERNIE

BAKER, JAMIE BALLENGER, MARK BERKOWITZ, BRIAN BIELMANN, JOHN BILDERBACK, BO BRIDGES, VINCE CAVATAIO, DAREN CRAWFORD, HILTON DAWE, BEN DECAMP, DOOMAS, DAMEA DORSEY, WILLI EDWARDS, BRANDON ELLS, BEAU FLEMISTER, HANK FOTO, ISAAC FRAZER, PETE FRIEDEN, KENNY GIBBS, STU GIBSON, GORDINHO, YHAZI GRAHAM, HAJ, JOHN HEPLER, JON HUBERMAN, ERIK IPPEL, JOLI, BUZZY KERBOX, DANNY KIM, PETER KING, LANCIFER, RIC LARSEN, BRUNO LEMOS, CARL LUCAS, MANA, MIKE MCGINNIS, IKAIKA MICHAELS, JUSTIN MORIZONO, ALLEN MOZO, NOA MYERS, NOA, DAVE NELSON, CAROL OLIVA, SERGIO OLIVERA, BRUCE OMORI, BRADY OSHIRO, MANNY PANGILINAN, CHRISTIAN PERALTA, JIM RUSSI, PAKE SALMON, EPES SARGENT, BOBBY SCHUTZ, SPENCER SUITT, BILL TAYLOR, TK, KEVIN WHITTON, DARRELL WONG

sales ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------director of sales and marketing SEAN WINGATE advertising executive SHAUN LOPEZ business coordinator CORA SANCHEZ executive assistant SIRI MASTERSON advertising inquiries -----------------------------------------------------------------------contact 808-429-8460 or swingate@freesurfmagazine.com www.freesurfmagazine.com FreeSurf Magazine is distributed at all Jamba Juice locations, most fine surf shops and select specialty stores throughout Hawai‘i. You can also pick up FreeSurf on the mainland at Barnes & Noble and Borders bookstores and select newstands. Ask for it by name at your local surf shop! Subscribe at freesurfmagazine.com. Other than “Free Postage” letters, we do not accept unsolicited editorial submissions without first establishing contact with the Editor. FreeSurf, Manulele Inc. and its associates will not be responsible for lost, stolen or damaged submissions or the return of these submissions. One-way correspondence can be sent to P.O. Box 1161, Hale‘iwa, HI 96712 Email editorial inquiries to info@freesurfmagazine.com Catch Billabong Surf TV Mondays at 1:30pm, Tuesdays at 2pm and 7:30pm, Wednesdays at 1:30am, Thursdays at 4:30am and 4:30pm, Fridays at 12:30pm and Saturdays at 3:30am and 9am and Sundays at 7:30am. And don’t forget Board Stories on Mondays at 2pm, Tuesdays at 5pm and 8:30pm, Wednesdays at 2:30am and 9:30am, Thursdays at 5:30am and 5:30pm and Saturdays at 2:30am and 7:30am and Sundays at 9:30am and 4pm.


’S NOTE

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By Kevin Whitton All right, so I finally did it. I took a step away from my shortboard comfort zone, expanded my horizons and tried something new. I went stand-up paddling. Maybe you were expecting something a little more exciting, edgy, out there. Sorry to disappoint, but over the last few years I’ve been watching people stroll around lineups all around the island and seen some people nab some great waves, yet never gave it a go myself. Of course, there are several schools of stand-up paddle surfing, from cruising up and down the coast to charging Backdoor. Some surfers and surf journalists have written it off as another goofy trend, a waste of time if you’re not throwing tail or hitting the lip, dubbing the sport “sea sweeping.” But after spending the afternoon cruising with Laird, not the man, but the board, I seriously doubt any of the naysayers have even given the sport a try. We don’t have a stand-up paddleboard at the office and I don’t have any beach boy friends in Waikı¯ kı¯ to trade a six-pack for a board for the afternoon, so the closest I’ve come to rocking a big board is longboarding tiny V-land lefts over the summer. I wish I had a couple grand lying round to drop on a board and a paddle, but that’s just a pipe dream. I guess up until now, the opportunity had never presented itself. My wife and I and the baby went to Duke’s in Waikı¯ kı¯ for a little Sunday afternoon food and relaxation. Coincidentally, my friend Drew and his girlfriend unexpectedly posted up at the table next to ours on the lanai. They had just returned from a SUP session at Threes and were enjoying the libations and a burger, their massive boards resting on top of the thatched roof of the board rental setup next door. I got inquisitive and started asking some questions. “What, you’ve never done it before?” Drew asked, in between huge bites of his burger. “You want to try it? I’ll go out for another session. The girls can chill here with the baby.” “I’m down,” I said, and started slathering on another coat of sunscreen. The Laird board is 12’1” tall, 31” wide and over 4” thick; it’s an extreme departure from the typical shortboard. I dragged it down the

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beach and placed it in the water. With paddle in hand I jumped on the board and started sweeping—easier than I thought. Drew was right behind me and quickly passed me up. I dug in to keep up. A set was rolling through Canoes and I thought I’d spin around and catch one of the lefts from the shoulder. That’s when I realized—turning around, not so easy. Canoes was packed, of course, no room to get around anyway, so we made our way up to Threes. Paddling by the pack at Pops was interesting. I could see slight resentment in the longboarders’ faces, “Oh, great, another kook on a stand-up paddleboard. Better not get in my way.” Not to mention, it was a weird sensation to be standing in the lineup, waiting for a wave, physically looking down on the other surfers. With plenty of faces and not many waves and even fewer smiles, I continued up the reef. Threes was two feet and practically empty. Only a few other standup paddlers making their way around the peak. Time to get some waves. Once again, easier said than done. I kept trying to paddle into the waves with the board pointing down the line, like on a shortboard, but the waves just kept sweeping under me, leaving me to bobble around and regain my balance, trying to spin the board around and get back outside before another wave came rolling through. Turning was getting easier, though not much quicker and after a few circles through the lineup, mis-timing the waves, I paddled straight into a nice right, leaned back on the tail to lift the nose and set my edge down the line. The board hooked in and took off, picking up speed rapidly. On the shoulder I set my paddle in the water to cut back into the wave that was starting to spin left on the inside while picturing in my mind how Laird or Ikaika Kalama surf waves on their SUP boards. After catching a few more waves, I was licked and could start to feel the burn in my arms. Paddling back to the beach in front of Duke’s, against the wind—not so fun. I woke up the next day, triceps tight and abs sore, but stoked to have cruised Waikı¯ kı¯ on the stand-up paddle and scored a few fun waves, exemplifying that nostalgic aura of what Waikı¯ kı¯ is all about. I don’t think I’m ready to drop a grand on a board, but at least now I’ve got a Waikı¯ kı¯ connection. [PAU]


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EHHOWZIT! 1 Seth Moniz couldn’t think of a Halloween costume, so he just rubbed chocolate cake all over his face. photo: Fukunaga

7 When the surf is flat and the wind is wrong, we catch mahi instead of monchong. photo: nelson/spl

2 Hmmm, should I take my board to Jelly’s Professional Board Repair or Jerry’s Repair Froppessional? photo: Frieden

8 Let’s get ready to rummmble. photo: Rock

3 “Don’t you have enough of these Kelly? It’s mine.” photo: Heff

9 If these two groms stick with it, they could really make a name for themselves one day. Oh wait, one day is already here, Coco Ho and Ezekiel Lau in the good old days of the menehune division. photo: courtesty volcom

4 Can you feel it?

photo: Oliva

5 Hey T.J., not sure if that fin placement is going to work so well. photo: Rock 6 Lloyd and Harry in Aspen in search of Mary Samsonite. photo: Heff

10 Obviously, they’re not impressed. photo: Heff 11 Rory Parker found out what RVCA means by company branding. photo: Baeseman

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Photo: Hank

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[Dane Ward loosens up in the land of lefts.]

Words by Crystal Thornburg Photos by Hilton Dawe

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[Rasta expanded the locals’ knowledge of marine conservation and backhand tube riding.]

[Parko and Chilean big-wave surfer Ramo- n Navarro.]

Our journey through Chile started in the arid northern town of Arica, where we launched the Surfers For Cetaceans Chile Tour. Our goal was of much importance and gravity: to increase protection of marine mammals and marine life, of reefs and of ocean ecology on the whole. For me, being part of Dave Rastovich’s and Howie Cooke’s group, Surfers For Cetaceans, is an honor and a great way to engage locals to promote sustainable industries to a developing Chile in which surfing can be both a positive and a leading part of the accruing change. Arica is a small port town, filled with enthusiastic surfers ready to exchange stories of the sea. Even though my Spanish speaking abilities are not so great, I was still able to communicate the common language of “surf stoke.” Through this universal language we mounted our Visual Petition campaign across the country, capturing pictures of the individuals passionate about the permanent ending of the international slaughtering of whales and dolphins. We needed to collect as many petitions as possible to present at the International Whale Commission (IWC) conference at the end of our mission in June, hosted by the country’s capital, Santiago. While in town we visited a school called Escula Tucapel-Arica to host a short presentation and film about environmental degradation along coastlines and oceans worldwide to the classroom full of eager environmental studies students. In exchange, some of the students

[Parko, amping up in the cold.]

–Rasta

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[Rasta. Pre-session warm up.]

–Chris Del Moro

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performed a traditional dance for us in full costume. They were eager to learn about our cause and were thrilled to be part of the Visual Petition. Our next stop on the tour was Iquique, a day’s drive following sand dunes south, which featured statues of historical indigenous cultural significance. Arriving at night into town, we were stopped by an incindeary trucker strike that was in full effect throughout the country. The glowing smoggy haze of burning tires lighted the roadside. We sat in amazement and apprehension while strikers hit passing busses and taxies with rocks and sticks. Dave Homcy scratched to capture the action on film while driving and I was taking photos from the front seat trying not to display our equipment with the worry of being attacked or robbed. Without incident, we made it to the populated city of Iquique, anxious about the upcoming swell that was due to hit the following day. The swell was expected to reach heights of twenty feet with talk of a tow-in session. But when the swell reached the coast, it had downgraded to twelve feet, peeling right along the rocks. “We traveled to Chile with the desire to surf the coast, meet the people and to share the issue from person to person,” shared Rastovich, before paddling out with fellow eco-conscious surfer Dane Ward and local eco-surfers for a board meeting of sorts.


[Parko]

[Dave Homcy]

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[Ramo- n Navarro lays it down, local style.]

[Rasta]

Our first tour of duty in Iquique was to meet the Mayor, Myrta Dubost, to discuss oceanic environmental issues and propose Iquique be the first town in Chile to support a Chilean version of the Humpback Icon Project (HIP). Created by Howie Cooke, co-founder of Surfers For Cetaceans, HIP was designed to bring about cetacean awareness by getting local towns to “Adopt a Whale.” Mayor Myrta Dubost was excited to learn more about the project and was eager to connect with the local university and Iquique surf community to participate in the project. We continued on from Iquique to Isla Grande de Atacama where we met with local Marine Park Authorities and experienced the diverse marine habitats in the area, presenting Humpback Icon Project information and continued with our collection of Visual Petitions. Of course, we also jumped in the water for a surf session or two. Artist and surfer Chris Del Moro joined the crew in Valparaiso before we made a rush to San Antonio to catch local fisherman in the throws of a protest. When asked about why he supports the cause, Chris simply stated, “…because I have been given so many blessings from the sea.

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Once you have seen footage or learned about the audacities happening to such amazing prehistoric creatures, it’s hard not to get personally invested in protecting their well being.” The fishermen in San Antonio are taking notice of the massive reduction in fish count and the loss of cultural connection with ocean ecology in general. Founder of the Natural Museum in San Antonio, Jose Luís Brito, noted that it is hard to explain to people in the area about ocean awareness and sustainable fishing practices because most of the town people are very economically deprived and depend on the ocean for food resources. He also suggested that because of population expansion from inlanders, they do not have a strong cultural connection with the ocean as might have been in past generations. We made our way down the coast to Puertecillo, a very small village on the sea. The villagers export seaweed, known as cochallullo, all the way to Japan, as well as a fish called corvine. Down the beach from our cabanas was a nice left peeler that ran beautifully along the sand bottom point. Needing to rid ourselves of multi-layered off-road driving scum,


[Parko jumped at the chance to get involved in Surfers For Cetaceans, and to sample Chile’s icy lefts.]

–Rasta

we relished in a much needed surf session. After our surf we started a bonfire and roasted some cochallullo we scrounged up. It has an interesting texture, kind of like trying to eat a wetsuit, but very tasty. During the next few days at Puertecillo we made our way to a few pounding points and beachbreaks, linking up with WCTer Joel Parkinson, who joined us for the remainder of our Chile tour. Rolling out of Puertecillo at dusk we drove south to Pichilemu, to a lodge tucked into the eucalyptus cloaked hills above the surf break Punta de Lobos. Waking up to a view of the point and serious swell, we rushed down to check out the action, surfing Punta de Lobos for a few days with local big wave surfer Ramon Navarro. In Pichilemu we hooked up with Rodrego Farias, organizer of the Pichilemu Surf Festival, to present his film Chile Oculto. He invited us to also show our slide show of the Visual Petitions and whale footage taken in Byron Bay, Australia. We also met up with environmentalist and Chilean program director Joshua Berry, from the organization called Save The Waves Coalition. He screened the trailer for his up and coming movie called All Points South. Local artists showed their works and three local bands played for the crowd after the movie. It was a much needed break to get our whole crew of nineteen dedicated environmentalists together in a non-working environment to unwind, but the environment doesn’t continued on page 110

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[Carissa Moore]

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Photo: Russi

Looking back at 2008

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We Want Moore

[Miss Moore] Photo: Russi

d nners and more goo With impeccable ma it’s e nc gla t k, at firs nature than Saint Nic rissa Moore is the Ca t tha ve lie be to hard men’s surfing. wo in most feared name , d oozing progression Loaded with style an ladies the for ard nd sta Moore is setting the say effortless—dare we these days with her nfro an cle for knack “manly”—carves, a en lately she’s even be tside reverses, and ng nti pu , ht school spotted attending flig r forehand and backhe th bo on s air it leg d Moore has continue hand. In 2008, Miss vpro rt, spo the we view to redefine the way and n me en twe be gap ing that the gender n shrinking faster tha women in surfing is ll your 401K. —Jeff Mu

[Bruce Irons]

Bruce Step

s Down

Photo: Rock

2008 was th e final year fo r Bruce Iron World Tour as s on the everyone’s fa vorite black opted to trad knight e in the sing let and jetla freesurfs and g for video segmen ts. Before we talking abou go t the good ol d days when was on tour, Bruce keep in mind that Bruce is going anywhe n’t re anytime so on. As we al there’s a who l know le lot more to the Sport of than a World Kings Tour. Count on Bruce to the goods in deliver ’09, be it on both celluloid in the flesh. and —Jeff Mull

Cat O Nine Tales won his ninth World Title and Yes, it’s Groundhog Year, again. Slater been, and quite possibly alhas s proved once more that he is, alway stepped on a board. He is the ever have to r surfe best ways will be the will not go away: Kelly Stalin, ruling militant dictator of surfing that g these references. But is this gettin e you’r Yasser Slater—I really hope s feel about the Iron Fist of really how his fellow minion competitor volent Buddha of the sport, bene surfing? Or is he possibly an admired, of ripping? In the early path st highe and ous righte truly showing us the ying his immaculate repla and ‘90s, did you break the VCR rewinding me? like surfing, studying every turn, just is far better than ten It’s 2008 and the level of surfing on tour contests. It’s only a seven of years ago, and he’s still winning five out commandments. ten his ers deliv et Proph matter of time before The ister Flem t. —Beau We’ll watch via web-cast on the Moun Photo: peter/coveredimages

[Emperor Slater]


[Granger Larsen]

The Competitive Arsonist

Photo: Doomas Photos

A Maui son who rose higher into the surf scene spotlight this year was Granger Larsen, a new school perpetuator of hacks and airs with old school grace and fluidity. He was an essential element to Hawai‘i’s attainment of the bronze medal at the ISA World Championships this year, he surfed as a WCT wildcard in the Jeffreys Bay event—where he was understandably ousted by Dane Reynolds, Mick Fanning and Andy Irons—and coming into the NSSA Nationals, he was touted the “surfer to beat” by the media hype squad. He lived up to the many expectations set for him as he secured first place in Explorer Juniors and Explorer Mens and was unbeaten all the way up until the final heat in the coveted Open Mens division. It’s been a pretty spotless year for Granger and though the WCT brutes bested him, he racked up two formidable scores (a 14.06 and an 11.83) to make a Dream Tour statement of what’s to come. —Noa Myers [Kai Barger]

[Kalani David]

Okay, I’ll ask what every Hawai‘i grommet’s parents are thinking after seeing their kid compete at Trestles, “Why do all the other kids suck?” Check out any results page from the last ten years of the NSSA Nationals or the U.S. Amateur Championships and probably four to five out of the six finalists are from Hawai‘i. In short, they continually manage to turn a national contest into some version of a Hawai‘i state championship. This year, the Explorer Mens division looked like a “Hawai‘i’s Best Of” with Maui’s Granger Larsen taking the win, followed by mates Kai Barger, Alex Smith and Tyler Newton. Granger also won the Explorer Juniors division, Keanu Asing won the Explorer Boys, Koa Smith won the Explorer Menehunes and Open Boys, Kalani David won Open Mini Groms and Leila Hurst won Explorer Womens and Explorer Girls. I just lost my breath. The exact cause of this phenomenon of domination is debatable. Some say that the great waves and eight-month winter season breeds superior surfers, others go with the fact that the sport was born in these kids’ backyard, the cosmic-homeland theory. Whatever it is, these kids rule. Period. —Beau Flemister

Photo: Heff

Photo: Rock

Leaders of the Pack

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Photo: Baeseman

[Kekoa Cazimero] [Randall Paulson]

Photo: Baeseman

Photo: Heff

[Sean Moody]

Surf and Swell For the past few summers, the waves have been over hyped and generally spotty on solid advisory level swells, if not completely lacking. Surfers were left with taunted adrenal glands and a tinge of spite for surf surf forecasters. Enter summer of ’08, as forecasters spun the Hawai‘i . community in the other direction For over six weeks, there was continual swell hitting southern shores from a successive string of red-painted swells on the Surfline LOLA charts. Coupled with either sea breeze or tradewind conditions, Town was basically good enough to justify a drive down from Country. The in swells tapered in size towards the end of the event along with heads less out paddle to seemed groms the for except y everybod the lineups as Ala and less. “Everyone was super surfed out,” confessed Makana Ciotti,

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swell Moana Bowls regular. “They all got spoiled, too, because the first so was crip and the second swell was all hyped up, but wasn’t as big, Bowls t three-foo score could you days certain people were over it. But on you where normally people would be scrambling for waves, but instead were all by yourself.” Frother appetites satisfied, the summer season began to act more sealike its old self. Just about when surfers started looking north, a late Zealand, New below from kick-up son south swell showed up—the last ial some Antarctic icing on the cake. The ideal direction and substant surf size of the swell got the juicier spots working as solid six-foot plus best its did and shores southern ed corduroy groomed by offshore trades Myers —Noa weeks. couple another winter back hold to


[Jamie O’Brien]

Photo: Kinsan

Photo: Rock

[Danny Fuller]

When Ten Points is Not Enough The sixth annual Da Hui Backdoor Shootout, a go in 2008, was not only the best surfing contest to have run in the whole state, it was the best contest to have run anywhere on the globe this year. Prove me wrong. You just can’t. The surf was epic: two days of macking ten- to twelve-foot Pipe with the last day held in six- to eight-foot perfect Backdoor. On show were some of the best surfers in the world, definitely the best at Pipe, surfing arguably the best tube in the world in the most epic conditions one could hope for. Even the 12-point scoring format seemed to

[Bruce Irons]

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Photo: Baeseman

de of the mysteriously predict the magnitu ented plim com y entl equ event, which cons . Of iant brill so were es wav the e it sinc s, Jamie course, the likes of Bruce Iron s PaMyle and ley, Hea k O’Brien, Mar er for the emb rem to show a on put daca always crowds lining the beach, but they were ive ress imp e mor even be do. May game like the younger newcomers to the shocker and kell Gas k Ola Eleogram, Han some heavy into ed pull who ton New r Tyle e few days. bombs over the course of thos I say more? d Nee tos. pho the Just look at —Beau Flemister


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*Price and participation may vary. TM & Š 2008 Burger King Brands, Inc. All rights reserved.


[Tyler Newton]

Wave of the Year

Photo: Heff

a career. For Tyler Newton, that wave came in Sometimes, all it takes is one wave to make i the Backdoor Shootout. For Newton, a Kaua‘ the form of a meaty Pipeline double-up during approach at -wall to-the ballsn’s Newto , 2008 In . native, pulling back was never an option of respect from his friends, and the “Wave Pipe earned him a slew of media coverage, heaps last year at Pipe is any indication of what ng of the Year” award from us at FSM. If his showi really on. —Jeff Mull re’s pressu the Now . he’s capable of, look out 2009

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sly

The Year of Living Dangerou

Photo: Dorsey

rough year for surfers and sharks It’s no secret that ’08 has been a Man in the Gray Suit has been and we’ll be the first to say it: The sure what his problem is, but not e We’r a bit of a donkey this year. everywhere from Ma¯ kaha to the he’s attacked surfers and swimmers attacks coming this year some grue Big Island with one of his more st lost his right leg. almo shige Mura Todd when at Crouching Lion, ’09. in u er men Here’s hoping we’re not on the dinn

Shave and a Haircut For nearly a decade the property mauka side of the highway at Rocky Point, adorned with a boulder on top of a statue, was an earthy staple of the area. With a restaurant and gift shops lining the road, colorful yet rickety shacks advertiser hot dog and soda for $1.50, nightly entertainment and a slew of repaired used boards filled in the gaps. Behind the businesses, the area was known as a place where Brazilians surfers could find a cheap place to set up camp. That decade came to a close at the hand of a bulldozer blade and backhoe this summer. A makeshift flea market appeared overnight on the side of the Kam Highway as the business and residents unloaded their possessions for an extra buck. Soon the dilapidated facades were no more, all the trash on the side of the road was removed and now there’s an odd sight on the North Shore—open space. —Kevin Whitton

Of course, the reaction was part isan: the lucky few who live along that stretch and already have a place to park along with those who migrate up and dow n the coast via peddle power were stoked to keep the extra peop le out of the lineup. It seemed Town surfers were relegated between Lania¯ kea and Waimea Bay. On the other side of the coin, surfers who drive to Country were fum ing, jamming into any available nook along Kei Nui Road and up into the housing tracts, thereby pilfe ring street parking already in short supply for the residents. Some people took matters into their own hands, vigilante justice, and used their trucks to knock down the parking signs. Cops were giving warnings instead of tickets at first, but that didn ’t last long and surfers daring enough to buck the law were coming back to tickets on their windshields. No one likes being told what to do

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and soon, even North Shore surfers who wanted to drive down the road for a quick surf check were getting upset. Spurred by much protest, the state removed most of the no parking signs, sticking to their original bargain of no parking 20 feet from an intersection—another example of tax payer dollars well spent. —Kevin Whitton

Photo: Heff

By the end of January 2008, a two-mile stretch of the Kam ehameha Highway along the Nort h Shore looked more like Oran ge County than Country. No, it was n’t because of an influx of dud es with spiky hair and white sung lasses, it was the overnight add ition of what seemed like hundreds of no parking sign along both the makai and mauka sides of the road from V-land to Log Cabins. Due to years of complaints by North Shore residents about the dangers of turning onto Kam Highway blinded by all the park ed cars on the side of the road, the state agreed to take action in the name of public safety by erec ting no parking signs within 20 feet of an intersection. Somewh ere along the way, 20 feet from an intersection turned into ever y 20 feet and residents, surfers and beachgoers awoke one mor ning to hundreds of red and whit e no parking signs staring them in the face no matter where they looked. That’s about as far from country as it can get; in fact, it’s very SoCal.

Photo: Lemos

No Parking


Photos: Courtesy Beau Flemister

[Beau Flemister]

5 Q’s with Road Warrior Beau Flemister oning and In a surf world chock full of pampered boat trips, air conditi out there surfers few a still scented wax, it’s nice to know that there are of indulgfavor in trip surf modern the of es pleasur willing to forsake the ripe with locales in travel surf ld old-wor of buffet the in lves themse ing of course, sweat, malaria-inducing mosquitoes, corrupt officials, and surf ntury 21st-ce own FSM’s Meet . picking the for empty waves ripe er. writer and ’round-the-world expeditionist, Beau Flemist We know you FSM: So you just got back from traveling around the world. hairy situapretty some in f went off the map this time around and put yoursel trip. your about us Tell waves. ded tions to get some uncrow all around the Beau: Yeah, I was gone for about eight months and I went to PakiGuinea New Papua to India world. Pretty much everywhere from wasn’t that but waves good some got I bique. Mozam to stan to Sri Lanka regular surf trip all of the trip. A big part of it was getting away from the and seeing some off-the-map places. FSM: What would you say the heaviest part of your trip was? there. In the Beau: There were a few things that were pretty nuts out and I hurt my beginning of my trip I was in PNG [Papua New Guinea] rest of my the for surf t couldn’ I foot pretty bad surfing. I was afraid dad met up My . though stuff of lot a saw I lly. eventua trip, but it healed heavy. I pretty was hat with me in Nepal and got attacked by a bear—t was That too. n, Pakista in fight pit nkey saw some crazy dog-verses-mo the idea that I with inded open-m trip my into went I but , intense pretty of place to me wouldn’t try and judge other cultures, so what seems out them. to normal might be considered FSM: How about the best part of your trip? good for a Beau: As far as surfing is concerned, I scored J-Bay really

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long time. PNG for the month of February was incredibly good. The waves were amazing. Non-surf: seeing the wildlife in the nature reserves in Kenya was the experience of a lifetime. You know, seeing lions in their natural habitat. I really liked Pakistan, too. I enjoyed getting far away from where I started. I was actually so far away from everything in Pakistan that I was closer to Tajikistan than Bombay. I guess I was just interested in getting away from the usual road. FSM: What would you say to someone interested in taking a trip around the world? Beau: Do it, but keep in mind that you can’t go everywhere. You can do a lot in a year, but I’d recommend staying in one place as long as you can. I’m guilty of it, but we say, “I did that country,” like you f--ked it real fast or something. That’s not the best way to see a culture. Pick five areas and really get to know the place. Don’t pick 25 different countries and just jam through it, but take your time and get to really know the destination. FSM: You have any travel trips after being gone for so long? Beau: Always approach people with a smile and stay humble and respectful. You know, “excuse me,” stuff like that. Everyone likes that. Hawai‘i’s a pretty perfect place as an example. You wouldn’t just yell at someone for directions over here. Secondly, learn to lie. I know that sounds bad, but most places look at foreigners as dollars signs so be weary of that and do your best not to get taken advantage of. India is notorious for hagglers. A lot of times if I was on a trip and needed a cab ride, they would quote me this ridiculous price and I’d tell them I’d been here before and I know they’re ripping me off, when in fact I’d never been there before. You know, just travel smart. —Jeff Mull


Good Mooring

[Mentawai Madness]

Photo: Nathan Adams

r Jamie FSM caught up with oceanographe ing back Sels lee Gove and conservationist Jubi on a ed hopp they re befo in April, just days tawai IsMen the to down ured vent and e plan most populands to install 21 moorings at the tawai Surf Men park Wave nd arou s lar surf spot ion to the Resort and Kandui Resort, a solut ors that damaging effects of small boat anch name the r unde ing Work . daily reef scour the nth 6-mo their t, Mentawai Mooring Movemen and r mbe Nove in close a to e sabbatical cam essful. their determination proved very succ fast stead the to Trial and error led lly planned, anchoring of all 21 moorings initia trafficked with multiple moorings at the most ops Pitst ui, Kand , Tikis breaks: Hideaways, ess of succ the With few. a e nam to s and Rifle ring Moo i tawa Men their initial operation, the boat r large de inclu to s plan Movement has Mentawai moorings and moorings outside the ton Islands. —Kevin Whit

[Jamie Gove and Jubilee Selsing]

Photo: Courtesy

The Kokua Festival went beyond green this year with an all out showcase of sustainability. The event was touted as zero-waste with recycling, food waste and composting stations for all different types of trash. Cups, forks and knives were made from corn, the trash bags were biodegradable and the food waste was sent to the hog farms to be processed for feed. Water stations were available where reusable containers were refilled for free. People who arrived on bikes were rewarded with complementary bike valet and the concessions were made from locally grown, organic and natural foods. The carbon emissions from the event were calculated and offset credits were purchased by the Kokua Foundation to make the festival climate-neutral. When that was all said and done, Go Jimmy Go, Mason Jennings, Paula Fuga, Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds and of course, Jack Johnson and his merry band of eco-minstrels lulled the cruisey crowd into ultra-mellowness with smooth sounds and an old-fashioned green time. —Kevin Whitton

Photo: Courtesy

Gimme the Green

Photo: Heff

[Jack Johnson]

The HonuGuide is spearheading a monthly networking shindig based on the popularity of Green Drinks, except this gathering is focused on a fusion between sustainability and the boardsports industry. Ecolounge is the third Thursday of every month at Indigo in Honolulu’s Chinatown, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

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Photo: Heff

Eco-infusion


www.HawaiianSpring.com


Photo: Clark Little

[Flynn Novak, Waimea Bay]

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[Bruce Irons (yellow) strokes into his infamous winning wave during the 2004/2005 Quiksilver Eddie Aikau Invitational, Waimea Bay.]

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Photo: Heff

[Roy Powers, Rockpiles]

Photo: seandavey.com

[Log Cabins]

Off The Wall, it’s one of the heaviest waves on the North Shore—Backdoor and Pipe’s evil twin. The take off is gnarly, it’s shallow and reefy and it goes into a sandbar, so if you make it that far it’s more forgiving than Backdoor, where if you come out of the barrel it’s dry reef right there. But more people get hurt at Off The Wall than Backdoor and Pipe. When you’re out there and there’s only a few guys in the water and then that big one you’ve been waiting for comes in, it’s like, oh shit, do I really want to go on this, but you have to go. It’s just a really heavy wave; the bottom is jagged—scary. —Jason Magallenas

Photo: Baeseman

Photo: Rock

[Dave Wassel, Off The Wall]

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Photo: Heff

[John John Florence, ‘Ehukai]

Photo: Willi

[Crystal Dzigas, Pu-pu-kea]

Pu-pu-kea is best on a north swell when there is some sand on it, so not early in the season and not late. It’s kind of a fat, mushy, rippable right and left peak usually dominated by girls, longboarders, fun boards and kids. It is not too challenging, just a fun wave to surf and a great high performance wave. I like surfing out there because it’s very accessible, I can usually get tons of waves and I always get a good work out and feel like I had a fun surf. —Megan Abubo

Photo: Heff

Photo: Heff

[Fred Patacchia, Pu-pu-kea]

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A celebration of surf and the season

Featuring: Walfrido Garcia, Steven Power, John Severson, Heather Brown, Clark Little, and other accomplished surf artists

Wyland Galleries Haleiwa Saturday, December 13, 6 to 10 and Sunday, December 14, 2 to 7

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Photo: Vidanovic

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Mario and Luigi ain’t got nuthin’on them By Christen Vidanovic

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Nat and Shaun Woolley are taking surf art to a whole new level in Waialua. With matching nostalgic grins, they look out the front doors of the recently renovated Waialua Library, where they both got their first library cards. Inside those doors, there’s more creativity thriving than the historic Bank of Hawai‘i building has ever seen. The landmark building is now the home of the Woolley Bros. screen printing shop. With its freshly painted walls, new bathroom and colorful art displays, it’s easy to forget that this really is the old Sugar Bar. Creative juices are flowing where once it was just beer and liquor. The drastic transformation leaves no trace of the former dive and the alcohol-induced stupors are thankfully forgotten. Nat, the artistic half of the dynamic twin team, and Shaun, the business and screen printing guru, seem to have taken after an inspiring role model, their mom Nancy Woolley, part owner of The Growing Keiki in Hale‘iwa. Her philosophy to “do what you love, be of service to others and never compromise comfort or quality” seems to have been bred right into her sons. The brothers’ other creative partner, Nate Tyler, a graphic


Photo: Vidanovic

Photo: Vidanovic

Photo: Vidanovic

Photo: Vidanovic

“We don’t want to mass produce it. For the people that have it, I want it to be their ‘one’.”

designer that Shaun befriended in California during college, forms the last leg of the hard-working, free-thinking trio. But what the Waialua High School grads have been doing with their business goes far beyond just screen printing. Part of their mission is to create something that benefits their childhood community. The guys provide screen printing services for local businesses like Bonzer Front, Haleiwa Café and WRV in addition to customizing board art under their label “On The In Side,” a slogan that they say refers to the way you should live your life. The screen printing shop is the Woolley brother’s way of staying connected to the community and covering the overhead costs of their artistic endeavors. Highly focused on creating unique pieces of surf art, their shirts and boards serve as vehicles for their creative vision that simultaneously roots them to their unique island home. Lively t-shirts, vivid and memorable board art—its all an attempt to keep their art moving. “If you make art mobile, it gets to touch a lot more people than you might expect,” says Shaun Woolley, of their quirky characters and vibrant

designs that have also recently expanded onto snowboards and skis. Nat’s hand drawn boards are quickly becoming a coveted item by friends like Pete Hutchinson, Jason Shibata, Kekoa Cazimero and Megan Abubo. As getting the best shot becomes more and more of an artistic collaboration between surfer and photographer, Nat’s designs are becoming an integral part of making those maneuvers promote more than just sponsors, but also grab attention with exclusive local artwork. Despite their recent dive into commercial fashion (their t-shirts were recently sold at the grand opening of high-end Japanese shopping center REbuilt), each piece remains an intentional and thoughtful piece of work. The guys dedicate themselves to the integrity of their work. Each shirt is hand made, one at a time and they are never exactly the same. Shaun and Nat both share a love for the craftsmanship that goes into the innovative art meets fashion craze. They don’t want you to just buy any old shirt. They want you to put it on and feel it. [PAU]

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NEONTTES ITSOR&’SEV NEDEW COM AZ IN E. R FM AG FR EE SU

Photo: Heff

[Dusty Payne]

Sunset hits and junior pros hit back When Sunset Beach comes alive for the first time at the beginning of each winter, summer has already been shelved as a distant memory. The Billabong Junior Pro In Memory of Ronnie Burns, the first Sunset event of the ’08-’09 winter, capitalized on two different swells that arrived with clean waves and pristine conditions for the young men and women. With the two top spots representing Hawai‘i at the Billabong ASP World Junior Championships in Australia up for grabs, the junior pros were attacking the hard hitting waves that Sunset is known to deliver. The early rounds of the men’s division and the entire women’s comp through the semis went down on the first day. With shifty peaks rolling in, the under-20 competitors had a large playing field to deal with, meaning local knowledge was going to be key. Makai McNamara, Isaiah Moniz and Kaimana Jaquias were several of the younger competitors to make good on handed down knowledge, surfing beyond their years.

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Photo: Heff

[Casey Brown]

Photo: Tron

[Kai Barger]

By Kevin Whitton The final day was graced with sunny skies, light and variable winds and four- to five-foot surf, held on the first day of the Xcel Pro’s waiting period—a definite score for the event and the surfers. The ladies started off the morning with their final heat, which saw Carissa Moore post two solid scores right off the bat, one being the highest of the women’s event, comboing the field. The rest of the heat became a battle for second and in the dying minutes, Coco Ho pushed from fourth to second with a combination of carves and roundhouse cutbacks. Round 32 was soon underway for the men and by the final heat, all O‘ahu surfers had bowed out leaving a neighbor island final showdown. The heat started off slow, but when a stacked set rolled through, everyone got on the board with a good score. The heat was tighter than a wet Speedo with Dusty Payne getting the best of the exchange. Once again, it all came down to the last set in the final minute of the heat. Everyone nabbed a wave, leaving Dusty out the back to literally blow the top off the first critical section. After that, it was in the bag.


Photo: Tron Photo: Heff

[Kaimana Jaquias]

Photo: Heff

Photo: Heff

[Carissa Moore]

Event: Billabong Junior Pro In memory of Ronnie Burns Location: Sunset Beach Date: Oct. 4 & 27, 2008 Conditions: 5-foot and roping BILLABONG JUNIOR PRO In memory of Ronnie Burns Results: ASP Grade 2 Men’s Pro Junior Event 1) Dusty Payne 2) Casey Brown 3) Kai Barger 4) Levin Gonzales

ASP Grade 1 Women’s Pro Junior Event 1) Carissa Moore 2) Coco Ho 3) Alessa Quizon 4) Leila Hurst


FR EE SU

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[Mason Ho]

BUILDING HOUSE Mason Ho and Seabass excel in California By Kevin Whitton The Ho dynasty continues to expand in the surf world, not just on Hawai‘i soil, but abroad as well. This time it was Mason taking top honors in Northern California at Steamer Lane, the classic righthander. With plenty of swell pulsing past the headland, Mason said that the conditions reminded him of his home break, Sunset Beach. With the conditions on his side, Mason jumped out to an early lead with explosive maneuvers and came away with a near perfect heat total (19.10) to win the event. “It just feels good to know that hard work pays off,” Ho said, ecstatic over his victory. “The reward is great and it’s just cool to win one. My uncle helped me with my heats and my board was just really good.” The Oakley Pro Junior at Steamer Lane also marked the third and final event in the Macy’s CA Trifecta Oakley Pro Junior Surf Series. Coming out on top was fellow Hawai‘i shredder Sebastian Zietz, who took home $7,000 for his overall performance. His victory at the Oakley Pro Junior at Lower Trestles and seventh at the Pro Junior event in Newport Beach helped him hold his lead throughout the series despite his 25th place finish at Steamer Lane. Event: Oakley Pro Junior ASP North American Championship Location: Steamer Lane, Santa Cruz, California Date: October 21 – 27, 2008 Conditions: 4- to 6-foot and clean OAKLEY PRO JUNIOR ASP NORTH AMERICAN CHAMPIONSHIP RESULTS: 1) 2) 3) 4)

Mason Ho (HAW) Jayke Sharp (AUS) Bruno Rodrigues (USA) Matt Pagan (USA)

Photo: MacDaddy

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[Carissa Moore]

2

[Dusty Payne]

Carissa Moore (1) claimed top honors in the Heartbreaker division of the Billabong Freewave Challenge Mainland edition. The 16-year-old phenom had both the first- and second-placing waves in the online event, which examined the best surfing performances captured on video on the U.S. mainland during the summer months ending September 22, 2008. Moore's winning wave included five big slashes at Upper Trestles on September 9 and was shot by her father, Chris Moore. Carissa received $2,500 for the shralping ride, while Chris only pulled in $650 for catching the moment on camera. Freewavechallenge.com Dusty Payne (2) barreled his way to victory in the Oakley Pro Junior Global Challenge in Bali, Indonesia in early October, claiming the world’s largest payday for a pro junior event. The event was held at Keramas, an ultra perfect right hand reef break, which lived up to its hype, serving out epic six- to eight-foot barreling waves for most of the inaugural $75,000 competition. 19-year-old Payne rode barrel after

Photo: Russi

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Photo: Ells

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perfect barrel to beat French surfer Marc Lacomare (Hossegor) in an extended 45-minute man-on-man final. Claiming his first win in over eight years, the exciting naturalfooter excelled in the Hawai‘i-like conditions, setting the pace on the final day of competition by scoring big throughout the quarters, semis and final to pocket a mind-blowing $20,000. “I’m so happy,” said Payne. “I haven’t won an event in so many years. It’s the best feeling in the world. That’s why I still compete.” The Outrigger Duke Kahanamoku Foundation and Primo Brewing & Malting Co. created a hall of fame recognizing Hawai‘i’s most accomplished watermen and waterwomen. The display is housed at The Grand Waikikian resort near the newly restored Duke Kahanamoku Lagoon. Nine ocean and water sports legends of Hawai‘i will be announced as the inaugural class of inductees. Banzai Productions is celebrating their one year anniversary of Wahine Blue TV on Ocean Network in Hawai‘i. Wahine Blue is a show that features women


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3

[Banzai Betty]

4

[Kekoa Bacalso]

athletes and is the first ever monthly production that covers women doing the water sports they love. Producers Leila Alli and Betty Depolito (3) launched the show with the intention of giving women a platform in boardsports media. Both Depolito and Alli were professional wave riders. "I have put a lot of time into the project because I care about women's sports," said Alli. "To be a part of producing this product for women is great. It's an avenue to give back to the women's careers and the future of the athletes." Depolito's perspective is similar. "We are working hard to bring great images of the girls to a growing audience of interested viewers," explained Depolito. WQS surfer Kekoa Bacalso (4) nabbed second place at the 6-star prime La Santa Surf Pro in the Canaries and tour mate Dustin Barca (5) went on a competitive tear in Brazil, charging all the way to the quarters at the 6-star Rio de Janeiro International and placing second at the 6-star Maresia Surf International. Make way for the new Kazuma Surfboards (6) factory

Photo: Hawaiian Swell

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Photo: Heff

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outlet, offering a huge selection of boards (over 150 in stock), service and factory direct prices. In addition, custom orders will be built to specification in less than two weeks. Milkman SUPs are available for sale, rent or test ride and there is a huge selection of top quality used surfboards from their Hawai‘i surf team. The new store is located at Kazuma’s glassing factory, 375 west Kuiaha Road, Unit 62, Ha‘iku, Maui. You can even peep the glassers at work through the viewing windows. The 2008 Rip Curl GromSearch National Final presented by Boost Mobile went off in November as the world's first solar powered surfing webcast. "Minimizing the footprint in all of our events has been a huge global initiative for us," said Rip Curl marketing director Dylan Slater. "From the world’s first carbonoffset ASP event at the Rip Curl Pro at Bells this past year to now bringing the nation's best young talent to the world through solar power, we feel this is a great evolution to this already amazing event." By partnering with budding solar company, Sequoia


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5

[Dustin Barca]

6

[Anna Fry riding a Kazuma board]

Solar, a large 18-foot truck was on site and fully equipped with large solar panels that powered everything from the webcast, to the live scoring, to the music and announcing. No Fear Energy is now the official energy drink sponsor of the NSSA. Hawaiian Optics is looking for an established sales rep for O‘ahu. Contact Marti at marti@ hawaiianoptics.com. It’s official, power surfer Pancho Sullivan (7) is retiring from the ASP World Tour after this season, opting to spend more time with his family. Volcom enlisted Ebonee Spence to their army as the women’s team manager. Ocean and Earth released a flashy Bobby Martinez (8) signature series professional model traction pad just in time for the holidays. T&C Surf welcomed Alessa Quizon to the team and is stoked to have the young and strong wahine on board. Future Fins saw an unprecedented sweep of the 2008 O’Neill Coldwater Classic by their team. All four finalists in the event,

Photo: Willi

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Photo: Heff

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Nat Young, Chris Waring, Granger Larsen and Sean Moody, as well as the Macy’s CA Trifecta WQS winner Micah Byrne and Macy’s CA Trifecta Oakley Pro Junior winner Sebastian Zietz rock the fin system. Granger Larsen resigned with DVS Shoe Company, his first new contract as a professional, through 2011. HIC brought it home this Christmas to reclaim their local customers with the release of their special HIC/Spam collaboration boardshorts. Available in two styles, minus the preservatives, you can take your pick between Spam musubi all over your shorts or the Spam can artwork. Both are available at HIC on O‘ahu, Hanalei Surf Company and De´ja` Vu on Kaua‘i and Big Island Surf Shop on Hawai‘i. AccesSurf Hawai‘i and the City and County of Honolulu Department of Parks and Recreation’s Therapeutic Recreation Unit hosted the first annual “On Sand, On Land and In the Sea” beach awareness event recently at Ali‘i Beach Park’s Hale‘iwa Surf Center. Dedicated


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7

[Pancho Sullivan]

8

[Bobby Martinez]

to making Hawai‘i’s beaches accessible, AccesSurf Hawai‘i donated a Mobi-Mat (access pathway) and a Tiralo beach wheelchair to the City and County of Honolulu for public use at Ali‘i Beach Park. The Hawaiian wahine contingent placed one through five at the Rainbow Sandals Gerry Lopez Battle of the Paddle, the biggest stand-up paddle race to date. Held at Doheny State Beach in Dana Point, Calif., paddlers from California, Hawai‘i, Washington and Tahiti went head to head in both the Open and Elite classes with over 350 entrants braving the brisk 15-knot northwest on-shore winds. The grueling winds made for tough conditions, but it was evident that the wahine from Hawai‘i dominated as KailuaKona's Jenny Kalmbach took first place and $2,500 in the Women Elite followed by Waikiki's Candice Appleby, Honolulu's Morgan Holstery, Tiare Lawrence from Maui and Jennifer Koki from Honolulu. In the Open class, Hobie's Chuck Patterson from Dana Point scored the first place 10K check, followed by Hawaiian paddlers

Photo: seandavey.com

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Thibert Lussia out of Kailua-Kona and Pearl City resident Aaron Napoleon. Aloha Army and RVCA collaborated on a limited edition t-shirt featuring the artwork of George Thompson, aka EWOK, a talented multimedia artist from California and a member of RVCA’s Artist Network Program (ANP). Thompson incorporated the Hawaiian Islands, No. 50 and “Aloha” in the design of the RVCA/Aloha Army T-Shirt. Only 150 of these shirts were made and will only be available at Aloha Army on 226 Lewers Street in Waikiki. The first swell of the winter season to hit advisory levels in October had the North Shore lifeguards working overtime. Over 60 water rescues were made and 500 precautionary actions reported over the two-day period. Across the pond, three people drowned at Queen’s Bath on Kaua‘i’s north shore and another ocean-goer perished at Kapa‘a on the windward side of the Garden Island. [PAU]


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