Rock and Vine-Spring 2019

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Rock&Vine GOOD LIFE IN THE TEXAS HILL COUNTRY

ROAM RANCH restoring ecological health in the Hill Country

ROCKANDVINEMAG.COM $4.95

GATLIN BROTHERS buy into landmark theater MUSICIANS HIDE-OUT combines home and studio SPRING 2019


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HEATH SPARKLING WINES

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FEATURES

in every issue

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Restorative agriculture and holistic ranching restore Hill Country land

Publisher's Letter

Kimberly Giles

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Contributors

Hill Country music venues feed musicians souls and families Steve Taylor

26 Gatlin Brothers trio sign on to Hill Country music venue Alexandria Randolph

98 Drinkery Maps

108 Events

Find out what's happing in your area

114 End Notes

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DEPARTMENTS 37

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TASTE Hill Country Chefs curate and compare charcuterie boards with an array of textures and tastes

HAUS Musicians paradise amid a bucolic Hill Country scene.

Kimberly Giles

Canan Yetmen

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INDIE FEST IN FREDERICKSBURG Marks decade of showcasing rising film talent

HAUS Entry ways that make an entrance

Ken Cooke

Canan Yetmen

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DELIGHT Ceramic art insires a new generation of potters in Gruene

OFF THE BEATEN PATH Outdoor theater corral's movie goers

Megan Willome

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56 IN THE HILLS Mason County's tennis dynasty began in the early 20th century Michael Barr

64 INDULGE High end Mexican wedding shirts turn heads

Steve Taylor

DRINKERY Local microbrewery voted into existence Lee Nichols

104 STOMPING GROUNDS A spiritual winery makes spirits people can relax with Lorelie Helmke

Gayne C. Young

Robert G. Gomez captured the quiet tranquility of free roaming bison on this page. On the cover, he captured the essence of Katie Forrest and Taylor Collins, who meade it happen.

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contributors

Rock&Vine Featuring the best life has to offer in the Texas Hill Country. A product of Fredericksburg Publishing Company. Publisher/Editor Ken Esten Cooke Managing Editor Christine Granados Contributing Editor Sherrie Geistweidt Design Editor Andrea Chupik Contributing Writers Michael Barr, Kimberly Giles, Lorelei Helmke, Lee Nichols, Alexandria Randolph, Steve Taylor, Megan Willome, Canan Yetman, Gayne C. Young Contributing Photographers/Artists Paul Bardagly, Andrea Calo, Ashley Chinni, Jennifer Craig, Robbyn Dodds, Robert G. Gomez, Jessica Mall, Joel Salcido, Steve Rawls, Jason Resiner Advertising/Marketing Director Kimberly Giles Account Executives Ann Duecker, Kim Jung Rock&Vine Magazine 712 W. Main St. | P.O. Box 1639 Fredericksburg, Texas 78624 Phone 830 997 2155 rockandvinemag.com SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: $20 for two years www.rockandvinemag.com

COPYRIGHT: Rock&Vine Magazine is published by the Fredericksburg Publishing Company. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without permission of the publisher. Editorial content does not reflect the opinions of the publisher of this magazine. Editorial and advertising does not constitute advice or endorsement, but is considered informative.

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Simple pleasures in the Hill Country By KEN ESTEN COOKE Publisher ecently, I drove down Highway 290 and glimpsed spectacular blooms that dotted the ranches, highway medians and entryways to the wineries, breweries, shops and distilleries scattered throughout the region. The variety and abundance of the flowers – bluebonnets, Indian paintbrush, Indian blanket, pink evening primrose, Mexican hat, winecups, black-eyed Susan, coreopsis and more – matched abundance of businesses in our area. Days like that make me appreciate what the Hill Country has to offer and make me realize why I started Rock & Vine in the first place. I wanted a magazine that would showcase the amenities that my family and I get to enjoy on a daily basis. More importantly, I wanted people outside the area to meet the folks who call the Hill Country their home. I want people to get to know Taylor Collins and Katie Forrest, who are doing their part to restore their ranch to its original ecosystem through regenerative agriculture, and the Whites in Gruene, who appreciate the historical value of what their family’s business to offer. They are carrying on the tradition of pottery making. The Hill Country is special not only because of who is front and center in business, but also because of who is behind the scenes. In our pages, readers get to know the chefs who prepare charcuterie boards and contribute to the communities that they feed. In the pages of the magazine, visitors get to peek inside innovative and picturesque homes, like the Tatsch’s spread near the Hamilton Pool Preserve. The couple built a Hill Country paradise and adjoining music studio with eye-catching views. Even when I’m not at work, the character and quality of this place seep into my life. My high schoolaged sons play in the Oktubafest band during the annual Ocktoberfest celebration, and take film classes with Hill Country Film Festival directors and editors. This is why I love the Hill Country and why you will too. –R&V– We want to know what you think about our growing publication. Please send feedback and story ideas to ken@fredericksburgstandard.com. And thanks for reading.


WRITE US

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$20 for two years Send to 712 W. Main St., Fredericksburg, TX 78624 or subscribe at RockandVineMag.com

Editorial submissions: christine@fredericksburgstandard.com

Michael Barr is a retired teacher who writes a history column. Read his bi-weekly column in the Fredericksburg Standard newspaper.

Steve Rawls is a professional photographer living in Fredericksburg. See his work at steverawlsblog.wordpress.come or steverawlshomes.com.

Lorelei Helmke, CSW and Sommelier. Follow her on Twitter @Winesirens or see www.thewinesiren.com. Lee Nichols is a freelance writer based in Austin. He loves beer and two-stepping in Texas dance halls, especially with his daughter, Lucy. Alexandria Randolph is a freelance journalist, photographer and aspiring novelist living in Lampasas.

I just read cover to cover the like to highly commend you and your team for a great new issue and wonderful images and story content that place R&V a

Robbyn Dodd is a Hill Country-based photographer, who shoots candid and organic photos. Her work can be viewed at robbyndoddphotography.com.

Robert G. Gomez is an Austin-based, Texas-raised photographer with a bachelor of arts in history from the University of Texas and an associate’s degree in photography from Austin Community College. His work can be found at robertggomez.com.

Letters to the editor latest edition of R&V, and I would

Andrea Chupik is a graphic designer / art director living in Fredericksburg. View her work at designranchcreative.com.

Kimberly Giles is our Rock & Vine Ambassador, who is always scouting for stories in our Texas Hill Country and email her @ kgiles@fredericksburgstandard.com

...

magnitude higher than it has ever been. I enjoy reading in R&V about the many wonderful things that the Hill Country has to offer. Joel Salcido grew up in Mexico and the United States, straddling two languages and two cultures. His images appear in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the El Paso Museum of Art, the Harry Ransom Humanities Center at the University of Texas at Austin, and the Wittliff Collections at Texas State University. Visit joelsalcido.com for more information. Steve Taylor is a Fredericksburg freelance writer who works with Taylored Communications. More information is at anntaylorcontentmaster.com.

I look forward to your next issue! Thank you, Thuy Phung Houston, Texas

... I had a customer all the way from Lubbock carrying around her issue of Rock & Vine magazine; she came in and bought the couch we featured in our ad....

Megan Willome is a freelance writer and author of "The Joy of Poetry." . . .To read more of her work visit meganwillome.com.

So advertising with your magazine really does work! Thank you,

Gayne C. Young is a writer, hunter, and adventurer living in Fredericksburg. He is an editor and writer for numerous magazines.

CORRECTIONS:in the Winter 2019 issue of Rock & Vine Magazine, contact information was incorrect. To reach Diamond Vineyards call 830.998.4622 or visit 593 Ranger Trail, Fredericksburg

Christina Atkinson Owner Home Simple Goods & Design

...

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Southern Plains bison on Roam Ranch are 100 percent grass fed and pasture raised.

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A HOME, WHERE THE BUFFALO ROAM ONE FAMILY’S ANSWER TO REGENERATIVE RANCHING

By KIMBERLY GILES Photos by ROBERT G. GOMEZ

After tackling the world of food through their meat snack-bar line, Katie Forrest and Taylor Collins shucked it all to pursue their passion of regenerative agriculture. Regenerative ag seeks to improve a parcel of land’s ecosystem by enriching the soil’s biodiversity. After selling their meat-bar company EPIC to General Mills, the couple acquired 900-acres of land outside of Fredericksburg in 2017 and started the work of restoration. Collins and Forrest and their daughter, Scout, spread their time between Austin and the Hill Country. Rock & Vine talked to them about this new adventure. SPRING 2019

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THE GENESIS AND THE INSPIRATION FOR THE BISON IS THAT THEY ARE AN IMPORTANT AND KEYSTONE SPECIES IN THE UNITED STATES. – Taylor Collins

Katie Forrest and Taylor Collins are first-generation farmers hoping to restore a patch of Hill Country land with free range bison, cattle, pigs, ducks, chickens and turkey.

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Rock & Vine: How does regenerative agriculture work? Katie Forrest: One overarching theme is that with every decision we make we are trying to work with nature as opposed to against it. If we are running into a problem, we ask: What is the actual underlying cause here?” not necessarily what band-aid can we put on top of this? How would nature solve this in its untouched state and not touched by man state? Some of the principles that we try to abide by would be to minimize soil disruption. Whenever we plant, we use no trill drills so as not to disrupt the soil and release carbon into the atmosphere. Taylor Collins: Yeah, there’s no man-made tool that’s more effective at removing carbon from the atmosphere and storing it than healthy, thriving grasslands. They are a super highway for sequestering carbon. This has huge implications for global warming and climate change. The fact is, we can make a huge a dent in removing that heritage carbon from the atmosphere with healthy grasslands, and you can only have healthy grasslands with animal impact. We promote and encourage biodiversity. Where in nature are you going to find a monoculture? That just doesn’t exist. Along with planting different grasses, there are different species of animals to include as well as wildlife. We promote biodiversity when we let everything function and work in a complimentary way. Some other principles we use are to keep the soil covered. We don’t disturb it. We also always leave litter on the ground so residual organic matter feeds bacteria and microorganisms are really important. We also try to grow something year-round. Even in the winter, we plant a cover crop like legumes and forbs and winter grasses that actually thrive in cooler seasons. We are making sure we have roots growing and carbon is being sequestered and we are feeding organisms in the soil. This in turn grows forage for the wildlife and animals around that’s not just for the warm season. R&V: What are some of the challenges of spreading the idea of regenerative ranching and farming? TC: Ranching can be conservation and it can be very positive for the ecosystem. That is something that is blowing consumers’ minds. They don’t intrinsically get that, because there is still a lot of dysfunctional research out there that pertains to feed lots and the way chemicals are sprayed on the land. What we are demonstrating is that there’s a way to grow really nourishing foods that can heal consumers and that it is productive for animals. We are showing what that looks like and how that holistic system works. We are really passionate about this and want people to recognize that animals are not the problem, but it’s how humans manage animals – that can be a really destructive tool or it can be a really beneficial tool. What we need to be doing as a culture and civilization is utilizing the existing land we have, healing it, rebuilding it and restoring it through the power of the animal.

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R&V: What factors contributed to the land degeneration? TC: Over time the land gets degraded from row crops, animal over grazing, monocrop production, as well as tilling which disrupts the soil and releases carbon into the atmosphere. R&V: What was impetus to bring bison onto the land? TC: The genesis and the inspiration for the bison is that they are an important and keystone species in the United States. There were millions (40-60 million) of bison roaming up and down the Great Plains and Central Texas. The Fredericksburg area was on the southern tip. It was a natural migratory path for the bison. It blew our minds that they had been removed from that ecosystem and that land for at least 150 years. As humans we don’t fully understand the complexity of nature, but we do know that when bison are present, certain things start happening. Synergies start investing and we began to see different birds showing up on the property. We saw new insects that were desirable and favorable. The bison were spreading native seeds for us. They were aerating the soil and adding fertility to it. All these things that bison do intrinsically, we wanted that to happen on our property. The bison add fertility and build our soil’s organic matter that creates biodiversity on our land. They are a natural tool that we wanted to bring out to our property.

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R&V: Roam offers ranch tours, farm-to-table events and turkey harvests. What experiences do you want people to take away from these scheduled events? KF: I would say one of the biggest things is a strong connection to where food comes from. You can go to the grocery store and buy produce and meat and really have no idea how it came from the ground to your plate. There is such a huge disconnect in terms of how people think about animals, animal welfare and land management when you don’t see it or have any direct connection to it. Pretty much every public tour or event we hold includes some sort of regenerative principle or agriculture 101 tour.


R&V: Are you seeing signs of industrialized farming and ranching heading toward a more sustainable effort?

ONE OVERACHING THEME IS THAT WITH EVERY DECISION WE MAKE WE ARE TRYING TO WORK WITH NATURE AS OPPOSED TO AGAINST IT. – Katie Forrest

KF: I would say yes. Organic is in the right direction, but it’s not necessarily the only right direction. Organic still utilizes heavy tilling and soil disruption. Ultimately big companies like General Mills and Dannon recognize that we are not going to be able to feed future generations without changing our agricultural practices. TC: The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) agricultural products division of the United Nations, released a report two years ago that stated there are less than 60 harvests left on the planet. That’s our current industrial agriculture state because we are so focused on mechanization and extraction. We are so focused on extraction from the earth that we are not rebuilding and putting anything back into the soil. One of the biggest impacts that we’ve been able to have at General Mills and other big multinational corporations is that for a long period of time people have been using the word sustainability, like it’s this top tier attainable goal in food production. When you see that all of our land has been degraded and our greatest resources have been maximally extracted, that is not really sustainable any longer. This idea of regenerating, rebuilding, healing and restoring the land is a very intentional difference than how we have looked at sustainability in the past. This has been on the radar of all these big companies. Through the work we have done with EPIC and General Mills there are now other big multinationals coming on board which is super exciting and really, really cool. R&V

Katie Forrest demonstrates that nothing goes to waste on the ranch.

A mix of heritage breed berkshire, red wattle and large black pigs help turn the soil and clear the land from undesirable shrubs.

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MORE HILL COUNTRY VENUES SPURS GROWTH OF LIVE MUSICAL PERFORMANCES By STEVE TAYLOR

Photos by ROBBYN DODD SPRING 2019 21


AUSTIN IS SO EXPENSIVE TO LIVE. OUT HERE, YOU CAN PURSUE YOUR ART AND KEEP A ROOF OVER YOUR HEAD. IT’S A REAL GOOD TIME TO BE A MUSICIAN IN THIS AREA. GET YOURSELF A PLACE TO LIVE AND YOU CAN FIND PLACES TO PLAY. – Terri Hendrix

The multi-instrumentalist (guitar, madonlin and harmonica), Terri Hendrix was classically trained as a vocalist. She plays a variety of Hill Country venues.

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earby Austin calls itself “The Live Music Capital of the World.” But more and more, the claim to that title relies on the Texas Hill Country, where more opportunities are being created for soloists, duos and bands to perform at a growing number of attractive venues. Ask Gary P. Nunn, legendary Texas singer/ songwriter whose hit “London Homesick Blues” has been the theme song for the world-renowned Austin City Limits TV show. “It’s definitely picked up, especially in the last year or two,” he says, referring to his appearances at Hill Country venues that date back almost four decades. “I’m performing much more often in towns like Mason and Ingram and doing a lot of Hill Country dance halls.” Ask Lanette Pennell, leader, guitarist and vocalist with the Almost Patsy Cline Band, a fixture at venues ranging from the world-famous Luckenbach Dance Hall to O’Brien’s Restaurant in Bergheim. In April 2018, for example, the band played 14 Hill Country dates, more than the usual eight or so. “There’s so much music going on,” she says. “Like in Fredericksburg, it’s just incredible how many events they now have and wineries and restaurants with music. Or in Bandera, where we have four to five places now that have live music four to five days a week.” Ask singer/songwriter Terri Hendrix, who’s released 14 albums, co-wrote a Grammy-winning Dixie Chicks song and now resides in Martindale, near San Marcos. “Austin is so expensive to live. Out here, you can pursue your art and keep a roof over your head,” she says. “It’s a real good time to be a musician in this area. Get yourself a place to live and you can find places to play.” Ask Kevin Geil, front man for Two Tons of Steel, which in 2019 marks its 24th year of holding “Two Ton Tuesdays” at legendary Gruene Hall, Texas’ oldest dance hall. “Hill Country venues have a charm people love that you just can’t find in the city,” Geil says. “We get fans from France, Switzerland and other places who don’t want to go to San Antonio. They want to go out to honky tonks and dance halls.” Ask Lonnie Lett, a Fredericks-burg musician who continues to find full-time work at local wineries, eateries and elsewhere after arriving a decade ago. “Wineries want large numbers of visitors because it means more wine tasted, more new wine club members, more bottle sales,” he says. When he talks to winery operators he says, “It’s part of my sales pitch: there’s a lot of places where people can go. If I’m going to go out and this place has wine and that place has wine and entertainment, I’m going to that place to at least see if the entertainer is good. If

so, I’m not leaving there. I’m going to buy a bottle and stay awhile.” BOOMERS Pennell works days selling real estate and sees a parallel with the Almost Patsy Cline Band’s growing audiences. “Baby Boomers and Millennials are the two biggest parts of the U.S. population now,” she noted. “I encounter both groups more often in the Hill Country, but we especially have more retirees. “Young people tend to stay in the cities, where ‘it’s happening.’ But as folks get older, they want to slow down a little bit, live it up or live it down, which-ever they choose. So they come to the Hill Country – to live or to visit – and they can do both at the same time,” she said. A lot of them are women, Pennell says, “at least that’s what my Facebook page tells me. “A lot of widows follow us because we play all kinds of music from their era,” she says. “It touches them, it’s engaging for them, they remember when they heard our songs with their husbands.” Adds Geil, “They don’t want that hustle and bustle of city life. They want to go to a little tavern or bar or see the stars at night while listening to live music.” Lett likes to see a crowd with listeners age 40 or more. He says, “They get into the music more, and they have more money. My tip jar gets plenty of attention.” Adds Nunn, “I’m seeing more mature audiences, and they have more money to spend on my CDs and my book,” available for sale on a souvenir table. YOUNG FANS Lett’s audience also trends older, but he notices some of his biggest fans are younger. “I’ve had people just old enough to drink and they’re out there in the audience singing Merle Haggard with me,” he says. “They know the melody, they know the words. They go, ‘My daddy used to play that all the time on the radio.’ ” Hendrix believes swing music is attracting more fans around age 25 to local shows. “There definitely are more retirees, but the crowd demographics are all over the map,” she says. When the Almost Patsy Cline Band plays at Hondo’s on Main, a hot Fredericksburg nightspot, Pennell says, “I see a lot of young people there because of bridal parties and other groups out for the evening.” She also sees more young teenagers and small children attending shows with adults who appear to be grandparents. She thinks many youngsters live in the Hill Country because Grandma and Grandpa are helping to raise them – so they become familiar with older songs.

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restaurants and country stores from Fredericksburg to Bandera, Hunt to Marble Falls, Martindale to Kerrville – and beyond – offer music along with main courses and sides. “I think I’ve played most of them,” Lett jokes. Currently, he has regular gigs at several venues and is booked months into the future. Unlike when he was younger, he no longer does one gig during the day and another elsewhere the same night. “At 71 years old, I don’t want to do too much more,” he says. His two-a-day performance habit ended after being hospitalized right before his second show one evening. “I was in distress and they had to take me to the hospital with dehydration to the point where my kidneys were shutting down,” Lett recalls.

Gary P. Nunn, a Lone Star music icon, has picked up more and more gigs in the Hill Country. “I’m fortunate. I have a lot of fans in their 20s, collegeage kids,” Nunn says. “When I play at Luckenbach, it’s packed with people of all ages.” Like Geil, Lett and Pennell, Nunn says his audiences at Hill Country venues generally are growing in size. “They’ve just been consistently getting bigger the past couple of years,” he says. “They’ve picked up considerably.” Adds Geil, “The more you go out and play and people hear you, they come back and bring a few friends.” VENUES Like mushrooms, new signs pop up along and around High-way 290, alerting passersby to the latest wine tasting rooms that have opened. Meanwhile,

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SPECIAL OCCASIONS Musicians are also finding a lot of opportunities to play at private functions, such as weddings, anniversary celebrations, family reunions, corporate functions and other gatherings at dance halls, in meeting facilities and outdoors. “From time to time, I still do weddings,” Nunn says. Pennell noted the Almost Patsy Cline Band performs several times annually at high-end fundraisers for charitable groups. The five-member group’s monthly shows at O’Brien’s tend to sell out two weeks before each performance. About a dozen tables are reserved for every performance a year in advance, she said. “They leave our name up there (on the marquee outside the restaurant) and just change the date,” Pennell says. “We love that. It’s sort of like just going and playing in front of your friends.” Lett’s name tends not to be in lights where he plays, but he’s been around enough to be easily recognized. For example, Friday nights regularly finds him at Backwoods BBQ in Fredericksburg, where diners wave to him as soon as they walk in the door. “When I see them, I usually know what songs they want to hear because they’re there every Friday night,” he says. For other venues that don’t serve food, like many wineries, Lett can offer BBQ. He has a partner with a food truck who can join Lett and serve up local delicacies such as brisket nachos – which, like live music, can help attract customers and encourage them to stick around. “I offer full-band sound at a one-man price,” he says. “And if my friend shows up with a BBQ truck …” Nunn, Pennell and Lett believe a lot more musicians are performing these days in the Hill Country. Lett sees many driving in from elsewhere, making long trips because they have fans moving into the Hill Country. “You can see the influx of musicians coming in from places like Austin, but the cost of living here is pretty expensive, so they can’t move here,” Lett says. R&V


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TheRock&Vine Emmy-Award 26

winning Gatlin Brother trio tries their hands as entrepreneurs.


GATLINS STRIKE GOLD

IN FREDERICKSBURG Partnership in Rockbox Theater will add marquee name, expertise to downtown

By ALEXANDRIA RANDOLPH Photos by ROBERT G. GOMEZ

fter a decade of delightful entertainment for Hill Country residents and tourists, the Rockbox Theater in Fredericksburg has been revived by a new era of ownership. Rudy Gatlin of Larry Gatlin and the Gatlin Brothers musical trio shared a little about the core values, Texas pride and decades of experience he and his brothers plan to bring to the establishment. In September 2017, the Gatlin Brothers, a renowned fraternal trio with decades in the country music scene, announced their new ownership the theater. They became co-owners of the entertainment venue along with two business partners Brian and David Turrentine. The Rockbox Theater opened in June 2007 under the ownership of Ray and Stacy Rodgers, who have operated it since that time. “We’ve had this format of bringing in sun-setting artists,” Ray Rodgers said. “A lot of people bring in cover bands. We wanted to bring in the original artists.” Rodgers estimates the theater has presented over 2,000 shows and drawn audiences of around 350,000. “After 10 years of bringing good, clean, family entertainment to people of the Texas Hill Country and beyond, we felt it was time to take it to the next level,” Rodgers said. “These were the right people to do it.” The interest of the Gatlin brothers in the venue was peaked when eldest brother, Larry Gatlin, made a trip to Fredericksburg to star in an acoustic performance at the theater.

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Steve Gatlin is the middle brother, who attended Texas Tech University and earned an education degree. He taught for one year in Lubbock before he was called to Nashville.

WE ARE ALL TEXAS BOYS AND HAVE ALWAYS WANTED A TEXAS PRESENCE. – Steve Gatlin

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“He said, ‘There’s such a spirit in this place,’” Rodgers recounted. “We want people to legitimately enjoy their experience here.” After Larry returned to Nashville, he thought, “I need to bring the brothers back here,” Rudy Gatlin remembers. When the proposition for joint ownership of the theater was posed, Gatlin thought, “Let’s jump in here and help Ray and help it grow.” The Rodgers sold the business to the brothers and their associates, but maintained the theater house as their property. “I’m in the real estate business,” Rodgers said. “I really never intended to be in the music business. Our family built the venue.” The Rockbox Theatre, located just a half block off of Fredericksburg’s bustling Main Street, offers the Gatlin Brothers a chance to return to their Texas roots, said Steve Gatlin. “We are all Texas boys and have always wanted a Texas presence,” Gatlin said. “We were all impressed with the quality of what is here in Fredericksburg, and we believe adding some of our fellow artists and friends while touring in Central Texas makes it an even more exciting and a wonderful place to visit.” Built inside what was originally a furniture warehouse, the theater has maintained its charming industrial roots. “There are some really nice folks running it and really neat shows,” Gatlin said. The brothers hope to make the theater a renowned venue for the highly toured town. While there are a handful of music venues in the area, none are quite like Rockbox, Gatlin said. He added that the venue could become a Hill Country icon in its own right. “It adds another element to the town. You really need a theater setting,” Gatlin said. “It has worked in other places,” he added, citing the fame of Dollywood in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, and Dick Clark’s American Bandstand Theater in Branson, Missouri. The brothers hope to encourage the growth of Rockbox by calling in some of their own connections in the music industry. “We’re bringing in some of our friends,” Gatlin said. “Billy Dean is going to play there and we’ll have Jamie O’Neal as well.” Billy Dean will grace the theater with a solo acoustic performance on April 13 and Jamie O’Neal on April 27. When it initially opened, Rockbox focused on rock ‘n’ roll and the music of the 1950s and 1960s, hence its name. But in 2012, the theater began adding other special events and diverse musical genres. These shows feature classic bands that are still touring the nation as well as tribute artists and contemporary original groups. Upcoming performances include that of The Diamonds, Dion Pride and the Blackwood Quartet.


“We really appreciate how the public has supported it,” Rodgers said. The Gatlin Brothers will maintain the current Rockbox Theater entertainment model for the time being, Rudy Gatlin said. The venue features a mix of tribute shows, classic country and rock acts, and seasonal shows. Lynda Haynes, long-time House Director, will continue to run the day-to-day operations The Rockbox Theater is operated on several core principles, including servanthood, integrity, innovation, stewardship, grace, and “funtabulous”ness. “Larry and I became friends. We share a lot of common values,” Rodgers said. Rudy Gatlin said he and his brothers want to maintain those core principles, and would add a few of their own to the list. “We would reiterate those and add our own voice to that God, country and family,” he said. “We love our creator and love all of God’s people.”

Ray and Stacy Rodgers, who own the Rockbox Theater property, say 350,000 people have watched 2,000 shows since they opened the venue is 2007.

Larry Gatlin and the Gatlin Brothers had performed at the theater a number of times before decided to become part owners. Rudy and his brothers currently reside in Nashville, but have toured across the country in their six-decade career. Larry, Steve and Rudy, the Gatlin Brothers, are a Grammy Award-winning trio who have had 64 years in the music industry, beginning their careers at a talent show on March 8, 1955, when the brothers were just 7, 4 and 2 years old, respectively. Noteworthy achievements included a Grammy Award for Best Country Song, “Broken Lady,” three Academy of Country Music awards for Single of the Year, “All The Gold In California,” Album of the Year, “Straight Ahead,” and Male Vocalist of the Year for Larry Gatlin, along with five nominations for Country Music Awards Vocal Group of the Year, Single, Album and Male Vocalist of the Year. The trio has accumulated seven No. 1 singles, 32 top 40 records, 22 studio albums and five BMI “Million-Air” Awards. Larry Gatlin ranks fourth in solo writers with the most self-penned top 40 Billboard Hits, and has penned songs recorded by Elvis Presley, Barbara Streisand, Johnny Cash, Kris Kristofferson, Johnny Mathis and dozens of other renowned artists.

Larry Gatlin, the oldest of the three brothers, was the first to make inroads in Nashville as a song writer. SPRING 2019 29


FREDERICKSBURG IS A GREAT TOWN. IF THEY DON’T HAVE SOMETHING THERE FOR YOU, THERE’S SOMETHING WRONG WITH YOU! – Rudy Gatlin

Rudy Gatlin, is the youngest brother, started singing with his brohters when he was 2-years old.

Ray and Stacy Rodgers, friends, friends, co-owners with the Gatlin Brothers.

ROCKBOX THEATER 109 N. Llano St. Fredericksburg, Texas 830.997.7625 rockboxtheatre.com 30

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Gatlin said the trio is proud to have ownership in a community that is military service oriented. “Right down the street is the National Museum of the Pacific War,” he said. The trio doesn’t see the ownership of the theater as a stepping stone in their career, but another branch in the growing influence of their musical expertise, said Rudy Gatlin. Larry Gatlin and the Gatlin Brothers will continue to tour and plan to make multiple appearances at the Rockbox Theater. “We’ll be there two to three times a year,” Rudy Gatlin said, adding, “We’re going back a total of four times this year.” The next Gatlin brothers’ performance at the venue will be on May 10. As far as the future of the theater is concerned, Gatlin said many things are still in development. “Some other folks are having discussions about that,” he said. “There is more to be revealed.” Gatlin plans in the coming years to move into the central Texas area near to Dallas where he can be close to his children and their families, and he can be more involved with the theater’s operation. “I’m moving back to Texas one of these days and I will be glad to be a part of that establishment,” he said. “Fredericksburg is a great town. If they don’t have something there for you, there’s something wrong with you!” R&V


THIS AIN’T JUST WINE COUNTRY. HOME OF THE FIRST LEGAL BOURBON DISTILLERY IN T E X A S A ND 2-T IM E A M E R IC A N W HIS K Y OF T HE Y E A R .

Garrison Brothers Distillery in Texas Hill Country is dedicated to making the best bourbon in the world and true Southern hospitality. When you’re here, you’ll feel the warmth of our Texas spirit, right alongside the aroma of our sweet mash and the soothing hum of our copper pot-stills making more bourbon. Come pay us a visit. Distillery tours are at 10, noon 2 and 4. You don’t have to take a tour to taste our bourbon though, we serve bourbon flights at our Hospitality Cabin Wednesday through Sunday from 10 to 5. Make a reservation by visiting

W W W.GARRISONBROS.COM/ TOUR

,,

If you didn’t think Texas was on the world map of great whisky, it is now. JIM MURR AY

DRINK LIKE AN ADULT ™

garrisonbros.com

©2018 Garrison Brothers Distillery

SPRING 2019 31


Old Gringo Boots = Miss Macie Boots = Grace in LA = Cowgirl Tuff = Cinch Clothing = Rock and Roll Buffalo & Longhorn Mounts = Anderson Bean Boots for Men & Kids = Furniture & Lighting = Gifts & More

3915 HWY 290 E. • Freder icksburg • 830-998-2079 32

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YeeHawRanch.com


SPRING 2019 33


We have everything you’ll need to amaze and inpsire the little chef inside you!

258 East Main • Fredericksburg, TX • 830-997-4937 info@littlechef.com www.littlechef.com M-F: 10-5:30; Sat: 10-6; Sun: 11-4

2818 East US Highway 290 Fredericksburg, Texas 78624 (830) 990-2717 grapesandwine.ttu.edu

Pursue a Career in the Wine Industry With state-of-the-art facilities, including wine labs and a teaching vineyard, we offer students outstanding hands-on learning experiences through three education options. TEXAS VITICULTURE CERTIFICATE: Two-year program for wine industry entrepreneurs and prospective vineyard managers. TEXAS WINEMAKING CERTIFICATE: Two-year program for winemakers, cellar workers, and prospective winery employees. VITICULTURE & ENOLOGY SPECIALIZATION: The only four-year undergraduate program in Texas focused on the science and technology of grape and wine production. Major in Plant & Soil Science with a specialization in Viticulture & Enology.

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A new level of taste. 260 E. Main St., Fredericksburg, TX 78624 www.rathskellerrestaurant.net rathskellerrestaurant@gmail.com 830-990-5858

SPRING 2019 35


HOURS Wednesday - Saturday 7:30am - 3pm Sunday 10am - 2pm Closed Monday + Tuesdays

607 South Washington Street ▮ Fredericksburg, Texas 78624 ▮ emmaolliefbg.com 36

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taste

char•cu•te•rie /SHär'kood rē/ e

Hill Country chefs are onboard with European food trend By KIMBERLY GILES

SPRING 2019 37


taste

BEN RUNKLE

Executive Chef & Owner, Salt & Time

HOW DID YOUR INTEREST IN CHARCUTERIE BEGIN? Strangely enough, it started when I was a vegan in my early twenties. I was always making vegan jerky, bacon, sausage etc. When I decided to start eating meat again, I wanted to understand what I was eating from start to finish which lead me to becoming a butcher and charcutier. WHAT REGIONAL INGREDIENTS DO YOU UTILIZE IN YOUR CHARCUTERIE? I love chili pequin, they have such a fantastic citrusy flavor to compliment the heat. We also use maguey sap (raw agave nectar ) for our smoked hams. It has a really complex flavor with fruity and herbal flavors. It makes a great ham glaze. WHAT IS YOUR OPTIMAL CHARCUTERIE BOARD PRESENTED WITH? I generally like a combination of a hard salami, a cured whole muscle (prosciutto, coppa, etc.) a soft pate and something smoked. I think this covers the spectrum of charcuterie and offers a balance of flavors. I like to pair it with crostini or gnocco fritto. If I'm feeling really decadent, a strong whole grain mustard, some good pickles and a glass of dry Lambrusco. WHAT COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION INSPIRED BY OR INVOLVED WITH?

ARE

YOU

I have worked with Urban Roots for many years and I really admire the work they do. Recently, I have been incredibly impressed and inspired by the work Jose Andres and World Central Kitchen have been doing. I've never worked with them, but they are setting an amazing example of how chefs can be at the forefront of helping communities in crisis.

1912 E 7th St, Austin 512.524.1383 saltandtime.com 38

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taste

STEVE McHUGH

Executive Chef & Owner, Cured

HOW DID YOUR INTEREST IN CHARCUTERIE BEGIN? I wanted to take the whole animal approach to my cuisine. It is cost effective and the best way to preserve highly praised animals instead of freezing them where some of the taste is diminished. The structure of a protein and how it gets broken. It is not limiting and you can be as creative as possible. It honors the past in preserving food for survival. It maintains a connection with nature in a positive manner. WHAT REGIONAL INGREDIENTS DO YOU UTILIZE IN YOUR CHARCUTERIE? Texas olive oil, pequins, mesquite wood for smoking, pig, lamb, and goat that is from nearby farmers no further then 100 miles. WHAT IS YOUR OPTIMAL CHARCUTERIE BOARD PRESENTED WITH? Charcuterie Accompaniments but they change daily and seasonally. This is an example: Jams - Trinity Jam made with bell pepper, onion, celery, & chicken stock - Apple blueberry lavender jam - Lemon marmalade Mustards - Beet mustard - Tomato mustard - Onion mustard Pickles - Bread and butter pickles - Dill pickles - Shaved carrots [garnish] WHAT COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION INSPIRED BY OR INVOLVED WITH?

ARE

YOU

I'm on the Board of the Leukemia and Lymphona Society in San Antonio; Foodbank, and visit San Antonio's Culinary committe chair. 306 Pearl Pkwy #101, San Antonio 210.314.3929 curedatpearl.com

SPRING 2019 39


taste

JULIO LLOP Executive Chef, Epicure

HOW DID YOUR INTEREST IN CHARCUTERIE BEGIN? When I was growing up in Argentina, every winter my family slaughtered two hogs and made everything from prosciutto, chorizo, boudin noir, boudin blanc, pancetta, etc. to head cheese. It was my favorite time of the year because the family and community would gather for the weekend for the event. WHAT REGIONAL INGREDIENTS DO YOU UTILIZE IN YOUR CHARCUTERIE? We grind and season our own pork for our pork meatballs, we make Spanish Butifarra sausage from scratch using an authentic Catalan recipe from my grandfather. We make house-made chorizo to go with a new mussel entrée. We also serve a Texas Wild Boar salami. From time-to-time we offer a locally grown lamb entrée. WHAT IS YOUR OPTIMAL CHARCUTERIE BOARD PRESENTED WITH? We prepare in house condiments for all of our boards (both cheese and meat), including an apple mostarda (particularly good with pork), tomato jam and garlic caramel. Garlic Caramel is particularly good with grilled beef and with an aged Gouda. Tomato Jam pairs best with tart goat cheeses. Finally quince paste is a perennial favorite with guests on our charuterie boards. All our boards come with housemarinated olives, cornichons and housemade crostini. No board would be complete without a thirst-quenching ice cold beer or a great glass of wine. WHAT COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION INSPIRED BY OR INVOLVED WITH?

ARE

YOU

We participate in the annual Food Pantry “Empty Bowls Project,” the “PAWS” fund raiser for area animal shelters, the Friends of the Public Library’s annual fundraiser, the Pound House fundraiser, the Hill Country Conservancy fundraiser, and DSISD High School fund raising efforts. We live in and support our community. We also have ties to area wineries. We now proudly feature the wines of Hilmy Vineyards, Alexander Vineyards, Westcave Cellars and William Chris.

333 US-290 #437 Dripping Springs 512.858.7300 epicuretx.com 40

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taste

JORDAN MURAGLIA

Executive Chef & Owner, Vaudeville

HOW DID YOUR INTEREST IN CHARCUTERIE BEGIN? My Genovese-Italian heritage laid the foundation for my interest in charcuterie. Being inspired by my Italian roots, as well as traditional French culinary background inspired my renditions of classics as well as a passion for curating charcuterie from respected domestic and international purveyors. WHAT REGIONAL INGREDIENTS DO YOU UTILIZE IN YOUR CHARCUTERIE? For my Rabbit Riettes I prefer to use fresh local Fredericksburg, TX ingredients. WHAT IS YOUR OPTIMAL CHARCUTERIE BOARD PRESENTED WITH? I enjoy the combination of artisan mustard, pickles of any kind and seasonal fruit confiture to round off the complete experience. WHAT COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION INSPIRED BY OR INVOLVED WITH?

ARE

230 E Main St, Fredericksburg 830.992.3234 vaudeville-living.com

YOU

We recently implemented a sustainable approach to waste management here at Vaudeville. We contracted a private recycling company to expand on our green practices, as public recycling services are unfortunately not available in this community. We are also cutting down on our use of plastics significantly and turning to compostable materials, while simultaneously educating our younger employees about recycling. R&V

SPRING 2019 41


August E’s successfully marries extraordinary cuisine and exemplary service in an exquisite contemporary setting. Expect the unexpected with August E’s signature hand-cut steaks, exotic game, local wild game and fresh fish flown in weekly. Every Tuesday our guests are treated to the native Thai cuisine of Executive Chef Owner Leu Savanh. Chef Leu’s

Asian Fusion creations and traditional sushi always use the most consciously sourced organic ingredients. Our bar and lounge are a nightly destination where guests can enjoy a more casual experience, featuring a delectable bar menu and classic craft cocktail list.

Dinner Service,

Tuesday through Saturday: 5pm - Close 203 East San Antonio Street Fredericksburg, Texas 78624 830.997.1585 www.august-es.com Walk Ins Always Welcome Or Call To Make A Reservation

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YOU’LL ENJOY THE CUISINE AND

savor the memories Hill Country cuisine | over 40 wineries and tasting rooms | museums & historic sites | peaches & wildflowers German heritage | golf | sophisticated shopping | festivals & events | eclectic art galleries | cycling | live Texas music

VisitFredericksburgTX.com | 866 997 3600

SPRING 2019 43


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Best Brunch in town!

l!

est.

loca t i g n i Keep

BREAKFAST SERVED ALL DAY BEER • WINE • MIMOSAS FULL BAR

Brunch | Lunch

902 South Adams Fredericksburg, Texas 830.997.5904

Open Daily 7am-3pm Sunday Brunch 8am-2pm Closed Wednesday

Dinner | Late Night

www.downtownernb.com

sunsetgrillfbgtx.com SPRING 2019 45


A decade on screen HILL COUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL WILL MARK ITS 10TH YEAR By KEN ESTEN COOKE

or film fans, it doesn’t get any better than this. The 10th Annual Hill Country Film Festival – a fourday independent film party in picturesque Fredericksburg – will be held April 25-28 at Fritztown Cinema. For the past decade, executive director Chad Mathews and his crew of dedicated staff and volunteers have built the event into a paradise for indie film buffs, directors, producers, actors and actresses. And it’s an event which fits the laidback Hill Country vibe. Fans get hear movie personnel at panels, ask questions and even hobnob over a beer. The lack of pretension sets it apart from many larger movie festivals. And for Mathews, smaller is better. “Having participated in the film festival circuit, I came to love the camaraderie and shared respect of those who are committed to the art of indie filmmaking,” Mathews said. “HCFF was created to celebrate and showcase filmmakers from Texas and around the world.” This year’s fest-goers can choose from screen 15 feature films and 82 short films

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representing 12 countries, along with panel discussions, a closing night party and awards program, and a sendoff reception. Actor David Arquette will be on hand for the special screening of “Amanda and Jack Go Glamping,” directed by Brandon Dickerson. Different events are held around Fredericksburg, so attendees get a taste of the Ger-man flavor but with a hip feel. Yet the variety of film offerings – from laugh-filled short films to serious documentaries – will keep fans in their seats (if they can get one). Mathews has Hill Country roots and he has loved watch-ing his festival grow each year. He also serves as executive di-rector of the Fort Worth Film Festival, so he appreciates the scale of this indie fest. For Mathews, it’s about instil-ling a love for film. His Hill Country Film Society, which hosts the festival, also supports the next generation with screenings of some student films. His Hill Country Film Society also hosts a film camp each summer to give young talent the film bug.


Art of Food & Wine Pairing at Becker Vineyards Learn about Gastronomy in our small bites pairing with wine samples!

HAVING PARTICIPATED IN THE FILM FESTIVAL CIRCUIT, I CAME TO LOVE THE CAMARADERIE AND SHARED RESPECT OF THOSE WHO ARE COMMITTED TO THE ART OF INDIE FILMMAKING

Fridays – Sundays $35 + tax per person; WC Members $28 + tax pp Limited Seating; Reservations Preferred (NOTE: Walk-ins may be accepted based on availability.)

UPCOMING EVENTS: Lavender Fest / May 4th & 5th; Chili Cook-off / July 4th; Grape Stomp / Aug. 24th, 25th, 31st, and Sept. 1st.

– Chad Mathews

WHAT: 10th ANNUAL HILL COUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL WHEN: April 25-28 WHERE: Fritztown Cinema, 2254 South US Highway 87, Fredericksburg. To see 2019 film lineups or purchase all-access badges, visit www.hillcountryff.com.

Winery Tasting Room 464 Becker Farms Rd Stonewall

Tasting Room 307 E. Main St Fredericksburg

beckervineyards.com • 830-644-2681 SPRING 2019 47


WILLKOMMEN

Welcome to THE site for Fredericksburg, Texas real Estate and properties for sale. Nestled in the beautiful Texas Hill Country, Fredericksburg’s Small-town atmosphere, relaxed lifestyle, and the quality of life draw families and retirees from all over. Whether you are buying or selling, or just considering the perfect place for your retirement years, I would love to serve youEVERY STEP OF THE WAY.

CAROLE REED

CAROLE@CAROLEREED.COM

830-992-9446

Broker J.R. Russel Lic# 601430 48

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WHERE THE LOCALS EAT! Serving Breakfast and Lunch Outdoor Seating • Wifi Beer • Wine • Mimosas Catering • Parties & Private Events Rehearsal Dinners - Your Place or Ours (830) 997-2246 305 S. Lincoln Street • Fredericksburg, TX Mon - Sat 9 am - 3 pm • WoernerWarehouse.com

Der Lindenbaum the linden tree

German Restaurant Authentic German Cuisine

you will be glad you came

Where Good Times are Always On the Menu!

For a truly unique dining experience during your visit to Fredericksburg and its German-enriched attractions ... Stop by our Main Street Restaurant, where you can find American, German and other foreign-flavored dishes to appease even the most hungry of appetites. And, remember, good times and fellowship are always on our menu! Our skillful chefs take their precious time in preparing dishes (their “masterpieces”) that you can write home about and our service staff offers their visitors — both local and out-of-town — a refreshing friendliness as they care for all their needs. Whether in town for just a day or making Fredericksburg your home, Der Lindenbaum is ‘a must’. Our comfortable, yet elegant dining atmosphere, welcomes all tastes with open friendship.

authentic - schnitzel burgers - sandwiches home baked breads - german specialties - desserts mouth-watering After shopping, come relax in our quiet, cozy atmosphere with hot spiced wine, European pastries and more. Come join us for delicious international dishes in our comfortable dining room. We’ll be waiting for you (close to the Nimitz Museum.)

Open 7 Days a Week, 11am to 10pm Tuesdays, 11am - 4pm only Now accepting all major credit cards Travelers Checks, Personal Checks

312 E. Main, Fredericksburg, Tx. - 830-997-9126 SPRING 2019 49


delight

The Barn IN GRUENE

Kyle and Angie White bought the Barn from Angie's aunt and uncle Dee and Terry Buck in 2015. Together they continue the craft of Texas potting. 50

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delight

CREATING BEAUTY ON THE BANKS OF THE BRAZOS By MEGAN WILLOME Photos by JOEL SALCIDO

hen Angie and Kyle White wanted to get the pulse of the Gruene community, they did it by sticking their hands in Texas clay. In 2015 they took over Buck Pottery from Angie’s aunt and uncle, Terry and Dee Buck, and renamed it The Barn. “We as a family have always called it the barn,” Angie says. “It is the only old barn original to the town. Built, we have been told, in the 1870s.” While Angie learned the retail ropes, Kyle earned his bachelor of fine arts degree in ceramics, finishing at Texas State University. Now they both make pottery and run the fine art gallery. The Barn still carries Buck Pottery along with metal work, wood work and pieces by other potters. The fourth weekend of October more than 70 fellow potters come to town for the Texas Clay Festival. The shop is also a working studio, so if it’s a rare slow day, the Whites can still be productive. “Our studio is open for people to watch us all the time,” Angie says. The Whites use Texas clay, Blackjack low-fire clay by Actíva, which is mined near Murchison. It yields high-fire stoneware, which Angie says has more sand, making it durable for utilitarian kitchenware. “It’s a little bit stronger for everyday use, like if you have plates and are stacking them,” she says. Angie and Kyle use different techniques. She only handbuilds, using Sgraffito to scratch into the clay’s surface. Kyle primarily works on the wheel. “I always liked the functional work, plates and bowls and the relationship you make with pots you use every day, cooking and stuff like that,” he says. Angie says that relationship is why people are drawn to pottery. “Like using a handmade mug versus one from Walmart, I’ve had (a mug) for 15 years and used it every day,’” she recalls customers saying. “We’ve often found in breakups the pottery can be some of the most fought-over stuff.” Every item at The Barn is handmade, so sometimes a customer will email to ask about a particular item. “Someone will notice ‘You have wine cups.’ If they want two wine cups, I take a picture of six of them to send them,” Angie says. “We make sets of things, but each one is going to have a different blushing on it from the fire.” Located at 1296 Gruene Road in New Braunfels, The Barn is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., seven days a week, because “It’s so busy in town that there’s not a good day to be closed,” Angie says. R&V

For more information, call 830.629.7975 or visit thebarningruene.com

SPRING 2019 51


Romance Packages Small Group Packages Experience the Hill Country’s exclusive destination spa

info@willowroomspa.com By Appointment Only.

Gift Certificates Available

432.638.3729

Willow Room spa_willowroom

2 blocks from 401 S. Lincoln St Main Street above Fredericksburg, TX 78624 KingWood Studio 830.992.9681 www.kingwoodsuites.com 52

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608 East Creek Street

Fredericksburg, Texas

inspired accommodations

bespoke event venue hot breakfast delivered daily

HO US ES / SU I T ES / R O OMS

Bo o k You r Stay Call 830 . 997.6739 from 9am- 7pm or online at hoffmanhaus.com

HOFFMANHAUSFBG

DAY SPA SERVICES AVAILABLE Call to Schedule 830.992 .0349 SPRING 2019 53


Indulgences in Artful Living

Jewelry • Rugs • Lighting Books • Crystal • “Now” Decor

201 East San Antonio - One Block off Main 54

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TRES LUNAS ACCOMODATIONS ELOPMENT PACKAGES WEDDINGS

Rest. Relaxation. Rejuvenation. Renewal. 512.557.4853 treslunaresort.com

4887 Bucks Run Road Mason, TX 76856 (between Mason & Fredericksburg)

Wild Hare Bistro

Tasting Room & Restaurant on Main Introducing our handcrafted wine, beer and spirits with distinctive cuisine

319 East Main Street

and

WHBistro.com

Sleepy Hollow Boutique SleepyHollowBoutique.com Eclectic and unexpected finds 830.992.3070 See our websites for current hours SPRING 2019 55


in the hills

CENTRE COURTE in Mason Texas

HOW A SMALL HILL COUNTRY TOWN BECAME THE TENNIS CAPITAL OF TEXAS By Michael Barr

Latham family tennis trophies.

John Latham was the first tennis coach in Mason County in the 1920s. His son, Max Latham, along with his son's doubles partner were the first Mason athletes to compete in the Universtiy Interscholastic League State Tennis Tournament. 56

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in the hills

ason, Texas, and Wimbledon, England, are as different as Beef Wellington and barbecue, but the two places share a love for tennis. Mason, best known for cowboy boots, deer rifles and pickup trucks, took a fancy to the game almost a century ago. Today this small Hill Country town has more tennis championships than anywhere else in Texas. Tennis began as a sport of English royalty, but by the early 20th century, its appeal had spread to the rowdy masses. Its popularity grew even in rural America, where tennis stars May Sutton, Big Bill Tilden and Helen Wills became heroes in the unlikeliest of places. One of those places was Mason County, where a county judge, two rural school teachers and a summer camp counselor infected a generation of young people with the tennis bug. John Latham was the first tennis coach in Mason County, he was also the county judge. He built what may have been Mason’s first tennis court in 1922. Latham used a scraper pulled by a team of horses to level the ground. The playing surface was clay hauled in from a nearby clay bank. The judge’s best students were his sons. Johnnie Latham played tennis at Southwest Texas State Teacher’s College. Max Latham and his doubles partner Sterling Wartenbach were the first Mason High School athletes to compete in the UIL State Tennis Tournament. Steve Latham went to state in 1933, advanced to the semi-finals in 1934, and won the state singles title in 1935 – the first of a truckload of state tennis championships for Mason High School. Steve paid his own expenses. He hitchhiked to tournaments from Abilene to Austin carrying a few clothes and a tennis racket. The return trip was a lot harder. He had

to carry all those trophies. The Latham boys were just starting to put Mason on the map when Effie Cleveland introduced her students to the game on a primitive dirt court near the Art school house. At about the same time, Walter Adkins, a member of a tennis-playing family from Brady, took the job as principal at Peter’s Prairie, 10 miles north of Mason. “We had two clay courts at Peter’s Prairie,” 94-year-old Francis Bode says. “Our parents hauled in new clay every year from a hill on the Kasper Place. We had a homemade metal roller, and we rolled the clay out like pie dough.” “Most clay courts are red, but ours were a pale pink. And they didn’t play like clay courts in France where players slide all over the place. Our courts were hard and smooth, more like concrete.” The number of courts in the county doubled in 1931 when Tom Holland, a Boy Scout leader and tennis coach, founded a boy’s camp on the Llano River ten miles southwest of Mason. Camp Holland had three clay courts and one cement court “better than any in Austin.” While Mason County, with its macho cowboy culture, seemed the last place on earth where the sport of pretentious English royalty would catch on, tennis turned out to be a pretty good fit for tiny rural schools in the Texas Hill Country. “Peter’s Prairie didn’t always have enough people for team sports,” Bode says. “Tennis was about right for us. We built our own courts. We didn’t need a lot of expensive equipment. A racket cost $1.25. And tennis was the only UIL sport for girls in the 1930s.” Then just as tennis took hold in Mason County, a series of catastrophes almost killed the game. The Great Depression ruined the economy. Tom Holland’s camp washed away in the flood of 1935. A world war broke

Helen Tallent and Frances Bode played tennis for Peter's Prairie School in Mason County. Tennis was the only University Interscholastic League sport for girls in Texas in the 1930s.

SPRING 2019 57


life of riley

Helen Talent

Mason County residents hauled in clay every year and used a metal roller to create a court for players in the 30s. Athletes played in cowboy boots.

out in 1941. In the 1950s, a drought hit Mason County like a Bill Tilden forehand. Quite a few ranch families moved to the city to find work. But when the rain returned in 1958, so did the youngsters, now grown to middle-aged, who learned to play tennis in rural Mason County. Roy Lehmberg, one of Miss Effie’s first-graders, taught the game to three generations of Mason tennis players. Two of Walter Adkins’ students, Frances Bode and Helen Tallent, never lost their passion for tennis. Frances taught physical education at Mason Elementary School where tennis was a big part of her curriculum. Helen Tallent began coaching tennis at Mason High School in 1961 not long after Frances Bode’s husband Billy and friends built the first two tennis courts at Mason High school using World War II surplus landing mats to reinforce the concrete. Helen and Francis, with the help of the entire community, slowly built a tennis dynasty and a culture of winning at Mason High School. To date, the Mason Punchers have a combined 96 state championships in tennis. Dallas Highland Park is in second place, far behind with 55. In 1967, Helen and Frances launched the Mason Open Tennis Tournament as a fundraiser to build more courts. No one got too excited about it in the beginning. The first tournament had a modest 146 entries. Players 58

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used the two courts at high school and two private courts out in the country. But Helen and Frances spread the word, and by 1976 the number of entries had grown to over 1,100, which was no problem at all except there were only 67 motel rooms in the entire county. So the people of Mason opened their homes to participants and their families. “Somehow, we housed, fed and watered everybody,” Frances Bode says with a laugh, “along a few strays. One year, courts were in such short supply we painted lines for courts on the south side of the square. My husband Billy built portable chicken wire backstops. Even then we had to play all night to get the matches in.” After all these years, Mason is still crazy for tennis. Mason High School won four state tennis championships in 2018. Mason County may have more tennis courts per capita than any other county in Texas. It’s hard to find a Masonite who doesn’t play tennis. The friendliest people in the world live in this small Hill Country town, but on the tennis court they’ll beat your socks off. In Mason, tennis isn’t just an athletic contest. It’s a social event. Many weekends the courts are full of players in their 60s, 70s and 80s, dressed in white, arguing line calls and talking trash. Darned if it doesn’t sound a lot like Wimbledon. R&V


On the square in Mason Texas

(325) 347-1234

LEA LOU 21 CLUB (Full liquor bar) Live music Thurs/Friday

LEA LOU CO-OP

LEA LOU PIZZA & DELI BAR Open Wednesday-Saturday

Oct 27 - Lee Roy Parnell Dec 29 - Gary P Nunn

EVENT BARN Ask about reserving our event barn (indoor/ outdoor space) for weddings, reunions & corporate functions

G Fine Texas Wines & Gifts on Mason’s Historical Square

U HOURS: Mon-Thurs: 11 am to 7 pm; Fri & Sat: 10 am to 9 pm 120 Ft. McKavett Mason, TX 76856 (325) 347-1010

MurphyCreekCellars.com SPRING 2019 59


We’re looking just

Peachy!

Our clothing embodies Hill Country style with a European flair. We specialize in boys’ and girls’ clothing, shoes, and accessories to dress babies, toddlers, and tweens.

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ClassiC style

has a whole new look!

(830)307-9229 314 E. Main Street, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 | (830)328-5080 318 Main Street, Bandera TX, 78003 COLLINSOFTEXAS.COM | INFO@COLLINSOFTEXAS.COM SPRING 2019 61


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CUSTOMMADE COMFORT MEXICAN WEDDING SHIRTS ARE PERFECT CASUAL OR DRESSY

By GAYNE C. YOUNG Photos by JOEL SALCIDO

Visit Dos Carolinas at doscarolinas.com

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os Carolinas in San Antonio has not only reinvented the guayabera but elevated the classic men’s garment to elegant heights. Known as “Mexican wedding shirts,” and traditionally worn in hot, humid climates, the guayabera is a staple of many Texas Hill Country man’s wardrobe thanks to Caroline Matthews. “I don't think I picked guayaberas; they picked me,” the founder of Dos Carolinas jokes. “I had lost my job and was thinking about my own company and a friend suggested I make cotton guayaberas as she had not been able to find one for her husband. I knew that stores like Sears and Montgomery Ward - tells you how long ago this was - sold them for $19.99 and I knew I couldn't make them for that price. I told her so and that making guayaberas was not a business. Luckily for me I was wrong. I worked to build a market by making shirts for the old ranch families of San Antonio. They are the backbone of my business success.”

The shirts’ quality custom-madefit caught on with other professionals and soon customers were flocking to San Antonio to select fabrics and styles for their own custom guayabera. “I first saw one of Caroline’s shirts on a young lawyer in Houston,” recalls La Cruz de Comal Wines owner and Dos Carolinas fanatic Lewis Dickson. “I met Caroline and got some shirts of my own. Gosh, I probably own 25 of her shirts now and have given away at least that many. They’re just the perfect shirt. They’re super comfortable and you can dress them up or down.” Dos Carolinas shirts are made by hand and take an expert seamstress several hours to craft. Prices start at $160. “By making them bespoke, each customer can design their personal shirt to reflect their personality,” Matthews says. “We call Dos Carolinas the dressy end of casual, perfect for a day at the beach or dinner at the club.” R&V


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We call Dos Carolinas the dressy end of casual, perfect for a day at the beach or dinner at the club. - Caroline Matthews

Coordinating embroidery, fabric and pocket styles make these high-end men's shirts one-of-a-kind treasures.

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Shop & share your finds

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A MID-CENTURY INDOOR/OUTDOOR HOME IN

The gray stack-bond Acme Brick with white grout creates a focal point in the Tatsch family living room. 72

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haus

By CANAN YETMEN Photos by ANDREA CALO

SEAMLESS LIVING

THE HILL COUNTRY

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haus

The kitchen's floor-to-ceiling wall of cabinets and lower cabinets compliment the open floor plan and give the Tatsch family more room to live. 74

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haus

Built-ins are utilized throughout the Tatsch home in place of furniture for functionality and beauty. n a ten-acre ledge along Hamilton Pool Road that has sweeping views of the Austin skyline, sits a midcentury inspired recording studio/home that inspires musicians and homemakers. The 16-foot floor-to-ceiling glass wall allows a person to maintain a constant connection to the outdoors. “You can't take your eyes off it,� says Nick Mehl, a principal in Austin firm Element 5 Architecture of the view. The six-foot overhangs block any direct light and operable windows on both sides of the living space create passive cooling via cross ventilation. Randi and Taylor Tatsch moved from Colleyville to be closer to the Austin music scene, had they both had a clear vision for the place they would call home. Randi is an avid baker and cook and Taylor is musician and recording engineer. They both wanted a place that was calming, beautiful and functional with the simplicity and clean lines that are the hallmark of the mid-century aesthetic. They knew that the house needed to accommodate their two children and two dogs. Working closely with architect Mehl, Randi, in particular, threw herself into the project and was the driving force for how the house would look and feel. She managed the budget by care-fully sourcing fixtures and materials.

One of the three bathrooms in the 2,300-square-foot, four-bedroom family home. SPRING 2019 75


haus

The Tatsch's home floor-plan sits under a low-pitched gable, square roof with a courtyard in the middle marking the main entrance, which connects from the driveway. “I spent a lot of time thinking about function,” Randi says. “It was important to us to be together as a family.” Mehl focused on using simple materials in open spaces to create flexibility and durability that didn't relegate the kids’ activities into some separate space. “It’s refreshing to have a client like Randi,” says Mehl. “She was ready to move forward when she found something she likes.” Economic, off-the-shelf materials, applied by Randi, establish a design vocabulary that is both beautiful and livable. Most visible is the fireplace’s masonry wall, defined by gray stack-bond Acme Brick with white grout that creates an elegant visual focal point for the room. Concrete is used on the floor and on the hearth, which extends though the plane of glass that connects the living areas to the deck. The public spaces – an open plan kitchen and living room – are flanked on one side by smaller bedrooms and the other 76

Rock&Vine

by the master and guest suites. A long deck and the courtyard expand the home beyond its small footprint. “We wanted to expose how the house is built as much as possible,” says Taylor. The emphasis on functionality and beauty is prevalent throughout the house, where Randi and Taylor opted for built-ins to replace furniture wherever possible – desks in kids room, a dresser and shelves in the master, bookcase in the living room. The house’s plan is under a low-pitched gable square roof with a courtyard cut out of the middle that also marks the main entry connection from the driveway. “We wanted usable space both inside and outside because we wanted to keep the square footage of the house small to keep the costs down,” says Taylor Tatsch. Outside, board and batten siding - another mid-century modern favorite - was used all the way around the exterior


haus except in the more shielded courtyard, where natural wood is able to withstand the elements. The courtyard provides the formal entry procession from the driveway and is surrounded by windows on three sides, making connections between inside and out seamless. The shelter creates a micro-climate in the courtyard that is less breezy than the deck and more suitable for kids’ outdoor activities and crafts and a tree will provide additional shade once it’s matured. Off the back of the studio a small covered patio off the re-cording studio that also looks out to the view, and the natural site affords a one-mile hiking trail around its perimeter, which Taylor and his dad cleared. The family and visiting musicians make good use of this easy, nurturing and head-clearing access to nature. To allow Taylor to effectively work from home, a full recording studio was built adjacent to the house, keeping him within arm’s reach of family life while allowing him freedom to work the long hours a studio requires. The space is used by bands that book the studio for two or three days at a time and includes a kitchen and sleeping loft that accommodates four. Sound control was an obvious concern, despite the nearest neighbor not being close by urban standards, Taylor was attuned to not being a nuisance in the neighborhood. He worked with Mehl and contractor Zach Savage to design the recording studio and support spaces as boxes within a box, with double walls and window where needed. “Both Nick and Zach allowed me to have a lot of input on the soundproofing techniques so the sound doesn't escape and I don't bother anyone,” Taylor says. Sunrises are visible from the deck, and waking up to see the moon and constellations from the master bedroom window is a particular delight. They say the kids love watching the sun set and seeing rainbows in the sky after a storm has blown over. Taylor and Randi say they are more in tune with movement of the sun in this house, which they never experienced before and is something that has maybe spoiled them for living in any other house. R&V

To improve accoustics, walls in the studio are faceted and lined with fence boards Taylor Tasch salvaged from an old fence at the couple’s previous home. The house and studio share a driveway to make equipment loading easier.

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An insulated solid wood and metal garage door adds to the beauty of the large-sized entryway designed by Swing Door Company.

SHUT THE DOOR Custom-designed entryways meant to be admired By Canan Yetmen Photos by Paul Bardagjy SPRING 2019 83


SWING DOOR COMPANY (512) 977-7200 swingdoorcompany.com info@swingdoorcompany.com @SwingDoorCompany

howing people the door has a good connotation at the Swing Door Company, where custom-made entry ways are designed, fabricated and installed by hand. Dominique and Barbara Levesque, owners of Swing Door Company, are pushing the limits of traditional door ways with their modern and grand designs. “If you can dream it we can build it,” says Dominique. No longer limited by the needs of traditional doors, the openings can be as wide and as tall as the scale of the house or made of materials from metal, wood, glass or “anything a client may want,” says Dominque. Dominique and his wife Barbara acquired the Hill Country Doors, an established builder of custom garage doors in 2014 and reinvented the company in Swing Door Company, which is currently outgrowing its homebase of a 6,000 square foot warehouse just outside Austin. The couple also owns and operates Levesque & Co. builders. Barbara handles the marketing and social media platforms. The company employs four people, including the Levesque’s, sales and general manager Ivan Moses, who is also a skilled woodworker and Aaron Gibraski, an installer. The Levesque’s are making their mark designing and fabricating a wide range of pivot doors, which have become the go-to for architects and home-owners with a desire for larger, statement-making front doors. Because these larger doors can be too heavy to be supported by a traditional hinge system, Dominique designed a special hardware piece at bottom of the door that penetrates the floor or the frame for support, rather than using a hinge attached to the frame. This allows a very heavy door to operate with simple ease, and gives designers options to make thicker and ornate doors in line with the custom design of a home, he says. Dominique worked in construction growing up and when he moved to Austin to play music, came back to building as a day job. His method of learning things by osmosis and creative exploration informs his business strategy making his business an ever evolving and growing venture. Swing Door offers professional installation in the Central Texas region and ships to all lower 48 states. R&V

Left, Dominique Levesque designs dream doors for customers like these metal, wood and glass and solid wood pivot doors.

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Top right, behind the scenes of Swing Door Company were one-of-a-kind entries are created.


SPRING 2019 85


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Listening means... We know your priorities, we hear your heart, we empathize with your transition and we get to share in your excitement when you move in (we’ll bring the champagne!). Transitioning to a new home always has its bumps in the road, but we’re here to help smooth them out. Good neighbors take good care of each other. And as Hometown Advocates, we exist to be the friend to guide our new neighbors home. andershometown.com | Real Estate Transitions with Hometown Advocates.

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SPRING 2019 89


Affordable family fun THEATER BRINGS THE MOVIES OUTDOORS

The Corral Theatre is located at 100 Flite Acres Road in Wimberley. From RM 12 in the central part of town, take Farm to Market Road (FM) 3237 (also called Old Kyle Road) north east about 6/10 of a mile. Turn right on Flite Acres Road and the Corral is just ahead on the right

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off the beaten path

By STEVE TAYLOR Photos by STEVE RAWLS “See the Stars Under the Stars” is the tag line for what may be the only movie venue of its kind in the United States. Located just east of Ranch to Market Road (RM) 12 in Wimberley, the Corral Theatre is like a drive-in movie with folding chairs instead of cars. It’s believed to be the only outdoor, walk-in theater in the nation to show first-run films, allowing viewers to experience Hollywood’s latest while enjoying gentle Blanco River breezes beneath the town’s starry sky. This year marks the 70th summer since the original Corral was built by twin brothers Roy and Ray Avery. First located centrally in Wimberley, it was both a theater and community meeting place. The brothers sold it to Carol “Mama” Knolk, operator of another Wimberley institution, the Rocky River Ranch girls summer camp. Knolk moved the Corral to its present location adjacent to Rocky River in 1966. In 1971, Mary “Skeet” Anderson, a Girl Scout field director for 17 years, purchased Rocky River and the Corral, where campers see movies several nights each summer when the theater isn’t open to the public. The Corral’s locale has contributed to some interesting experiences for movie watchers. Like when Western films feature horses loudly running and neighing, attracting some of Rocky River’s horses next door to poke their heads over the fence. (They also seem to like the smell of fresh popcorn.) Or one night when it didn’t rain, some patrons still got soaked, thanks to some kids tossing water balloons over another fence. Films are scheduled Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights from Memorial Day to Labor Day weekends. Gates open at dusk and the movie starts after dark. For a listing of films scheduled for 2018, go to www.coraltheatre.com. Get there early to claim the best available folding chairs or gym-style bleacher spots. You also can bring your own seats (but not extended lounge chairs; they take up too much space), as well as your own snacks and drinks. There’s room for about 200 people per screening. Admission is $6 per person, cash or check only. Popcorn and candy bars are $1 each – again, no credit or debit cards. The Corral has long been a popular teenage hangout – even when a movie isn’t being screened. Anderson likes to recall a time when a mother phoned. “She said, ‘Did you have a movie last night at the Corral?’ I said, ‘No, ma’am, we haven’t started our season yet.’ She said, ‘Are you sure? My daughter told me she was at the movie theater last night.’” R&V

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SPRING 2019 93


drinkery

Barrow Brewing owners Graydon and K.D. Hill (pictured below) chose the old Silver Spur Theater to open Bell County's first microbrewery.

Fermenting friendships C O M M U N I T Y S AYS Y E S TO B E E R

By LEE NICHOLS Photography by JESSICA MALL

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drinkery

ny entrepreneur opening a new business has to play a nervous guessing game: Just how big will the market be? When Barrow Brewing opened up in Salado in April 2016, its owners already had a solid number: 784. That’s how many Saladoans voted in 2014, at the request of Barrow owners K.D. and Graydon Hill, to change a local law that would allow them to sell their products on the premises of the brewery. That 784 easily overwhelmed the 229 against, and today, the Hills honor their supporters with a Belgian-style witbier named 784. “Since the beginning we’ve support from the locals,” says K.D. “The first step was to petition. You have to get a certain percentage of the registered voters to sign the petition saying they want to vote on this.” But the Hills were aspiring brewers, not politicians, and newcomers to Salado. “We didn’t actually know what we were doing,” she says. “Graydon went down to city hall and they said, ‘If you want to be on the November ballot, you need to have 300 signatures by next Monday.’” That was only three days away. That should have been nearly impossible in a town so small (population 2,126), but apparently Saladoans were thirsty - the Hills gathered 500 over that Labor Day weekend. In the time from then until the November 2014 election, “We did a lot of educating. Some people said, ‘We can already get beer, we just go to the restaurant. Why do we need to change the law?’” Once they got the law passed, excitement really started to build - Saladoans wanted to know when their brewery was coming. “We had a year of people saying, ‘Hey, when do we get our beer?’” K.D. says. “The locals followed along - they were really invested in the whole process. People would come by on Thanksgiving and Christmas and they’d bring the whole family and say, ‘We had to show off our brewery’ - they’d use the possessive pronoun.” On the day Rock & Vine visited, it was hard to imagine why the vote wasn’t unanimous. Beautiful sunshine radiated from a cloudless sky, the temperature was perfect and the crystal clear waters of Salado Creek lazily flowed past just a few yards away. The only way to improve such a day would be to have a delicious beer in one hand and tasty pizza in the other … and Barrow had that covered.

Craft brewers are artists, and the Hills found this picturesque village that relies so heavily on the arts and crafts business was a perfect fit. “We moved here and fell in love with the community, the artists working here, literally handcrafting their dreams,” K.D. says. “Graydon had been a pilot, traveling all the time, and he was home brewing. He decided he wanted to do it full time. We looked at neighboring towns, but it just didn’t work out, and then we really got lucky with this venue.” Appropriately enough, it was a former live theater. The previous owner told the Hills he was willing to wait for the law to get changed, which was very generous, they say. They tore out the walls and stage, ordered fermenters, then set about working with local artisans. “There’s a legend around here, Lonnie Edwards - look up his chicken art online,” K.D. says. “He sourced some long leaf pine that he harvested from an old house, built in the 1850s. It’s beautiful golden wood, and we made our bar from it. We tell people our bar is older than Texas, because that tree must have been 100 years old when they built the house. We’ve been really lucky to work with the older generation of Saladoans, they’ve worked with us and cheered for us.” As for the beer, “We’re going for balance and drinkability,” K.D. says of Graydon’s creations. “We have a lot of rural beer drinkers and we’re the introduction to craft beer for a lot of them. Of course, we have some connoisseurs come up, too. “We wanted to be solid from the very beginning. We had that whole year from the election to our opening, so Graydon had time to really refine the recipes. Mostly, we haven’t changed anything since we opened, and business has been steady.” Adding to that business has been a pizza trailer that Barrow purchased, serving up pies. “Because of the beautiful setting, we’ve had a lot of taproom traffic. We’ve already outgrown it, so we bought the tennis court next door for more seating area,” Graydon says. The naming of 784 wasn’t Barrow’s only nod to the locals. Barrow’s best seller has been their Creek Don’t Rise Lager and their IPA is named Evil Catfish, after a character in a legend about Salado Creek (too long to repeat here, but it can be read on the cans or on Barrow’s website). The Coffee Creek Lager is brewed with coffee purchased from the nearby Strawberry Patch gourmet coffee shop. And then there is Tipsy Vicar Stout, named after a local priest… who also happens to be a beermaker.

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drinkery

Start your future... ...with our history.

Zach Rosen, tap room manager, and Clint Haverland, sales representative, peek through the tanks in the tap room at Barrow Brewing.

“You know you’ve found the right church when the priest is a homebrewer,” K.D. laughs. “He was one of our big cheerleaders. We had church ladies going door to door for us with the petition.” Barrow even had one of his recipes in its rotation for a while. K.D. says that inspired Barrow to hold a Priest’s Pint the third Thursday of every month, where a rotating group of ministers, priests, monks and theologians present a short topic and then the audience breaks into groups to discuss over a beer. It’s just yet another way in which Barrow has integrated itself into Salado, and helped Saladoans do the same amongst themselves. “I spend a lot of time in the taproom and I get to know the customers and neighbors. They’re very eclectic - military, golfers, retirees, hippies, artists, ranchers and farmers. It’s a good combo. Some of them say, ‘I never knew my neighbors and I’ve lived here 20 years.’ Now they’re regulars here, and a lot of it is intergenerational. “It’s a beautiful thing,” K.D. says. “This community sprung up on us. I like to say it’s friendships fermenting.” R&V

Private deck overlooking the Hill Country

Like us on Facebook PERMIT: FBGTX-17051

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Authentic German Beer • Quality Food • Great Tunes • Friendly Vibes

6120 East US 290 • Fredericksburg

SPRING 2019 97


drinkery maps Pontotoc

111

35 San Saba

Lake Buchanan

Tow

106

Buchanan Dam

29 29

Llano

Castell

102

29

Oatmeal

Lake LBJ

Sunrise Beach

Travis Peak

71

12

Spicewood

94

Round Mtn.

107

Cypress Mill

87

59 22 3

16

Stonewall

Johnson City

97 8

77

10

29

14

290

84 31

24 74 54

35 Driftwood 34 110

Sisterdale

38

90

19 10

89

Boerne

53 Bandera

18 23

183 San Marcos

Spring Branch

15

AUSTIN

71

92

Wimberley Comfort

68 Vanderpool

104

82

KERRVILLE

Center Point

Bee Cave

Dripping Springs

87

80

95

Lakeway

13 Henly 32

7 Blanco

Jonestown Lago Vista

50

75

Luckenbach

SEE PAGE 60

60

49

83 105 1 114 64 66 Hye

Lake Travis

Round Rock

69

Willow City

FREDERICKSBURG

45

183

40

Marble Falls

Horseshoe Bay

87

Georgetown

Liberty Hill

Granite Shoals 16

Rogers 35

78

Kingsland

28

Andice

Bertram

Burnet

99

Inks Lake

41, 72 & 86

290

100

79

Blufftown

71

Mason

Florence

281

Canyon Lake

Canyon City

63

281

30 61

35

Smithson Valley Bulverde

33

87

98

Gruene 46

N New Braunfels

26 Seguin W

103

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Hill Country Wine Region The Texas Hill Country region now has over 100+ breweries, distilleries, wineries and vineyards combined and continues to grow each month. With this growth, Rock & Vine has also expanded its reach with coverage to the northern counties of San Saba and McCullouch, down south to Bandera, Kendall and Comal, out west to Mason, Kimble and Menard, and east to Hays, Williamson and Travis counties.

Highlighted areas on page 100

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Listing numbers correspond with numbers on map. Locations are approximate not to scale. 1.

290 Vinery

30. Dodging Duck Brewhaus

60. Kerrville Hills Winery

91. Six Shooters Cellars

2. 290 Wine Castle

31. Driftwood Estate Winery

61. Kinematic Brewing Company

92. Solaro Estate Winery

3. 1851 Vineyards

32. Dripping Springs Vodka

62. Kuhlman Cellars

300 W. Main (Hwy. 290) • Johnson City 101 Durango • Johnson City 4222 S. Hwy. 16 • Fredericksburg

4. Altstadt Brewery

6120 E. US Hwy 290 • Fredericksburg

5. Alexander Vineyards 6360 Goehmann Lane Fredericksburg

6. Andreucci Wines

2 Locations 8898 US Hwy. 290 308 E. Main St. • Fredericksburg

402 River Rd. • Boerne

4001 Elder Hill Rd. • Driftwood 5330 Bell Springs Rd. Dripping Springs

33. Dry Comal Creek Vineyards 1741 Herbelin Rd. • New Braunfels

34. Duchman Family Winery 13308 FM 150 W. • Driftwood

35. Fall Creek Vineyards

2 Locations 18059-A FM 1826 • Driftwood 1820 County Rd. 222 • Tow

3600 Fredericksburg Rd. • Kerrville 635 E. Hwy 46, Suite 207 • Boerne 18421 E. US Hwy. 290 • Stonewall

63. La Cruz de Comal Wines 7405 FM 2722 • Canyon Lake

64. Lewis Wines

3209 W. US Hwy. 290 • Johnson City

65. Longhorn Cellars

315 Ranch Rd. 1376 • Fredericksburg

66. Longhorn Hills and Winery

555 Klappenbach Rd. • Johnson City

7. Andalusia Whiskey Company 6462 N. Highway 281• Blanco

36. Fat Ass Winery Tasting Room

67. Lost Draw Cellars

8. Arc de Texas

37. Fat Ass Ranch Winery

68. Lost Maples Winery

4555 Hwy. 281 • Johnson City

9. Armadillo’s Leap Winery

2 Locations 134 E. Main St 6266 E. US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg

10. Baron’s Creek Vineyard

5865 E. US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg

11. Becker Vineyards

2 Locations 307 E. Main St. 464 Becker Farms Rd. • Fredericksburg

12. Bell Mountain Vineyards

463 Bell Mountain Rd. • Fredericksburg

13. Bell Springs Winery 3700 Bell Springs Rd. Dripping Springs

153 E. Main St. • Fredericksburg

51 Elgin Behrends Rd. • Fredericksburg

113 E. Park St. • Fredericksburg 34986 Farm Market 187 • Vanderpool

38. Fawncrest Vineyard & Winery 69. McReynolds Winery 1370 Westside Circle • Canyon Lake

39. Fiesta Winery - 2 locations

147A E. Main St. 6260 US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg

40. Flat Creek Estate

24912 Singleton Bend East Rd. Marble Falls

41. Fly Gap Winery (Off Map)

2851 Hickory Grove Rd. • Mason

42. Four Point Cellars

10354 E. US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg

706 Shovel Mountain Rd. • Cypress Mill

70. Mendelbaum Winery/Cellars

10207 E. US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg

71. Messina Hof Winery

9996 E. US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg

72. Murphy's Cellars

120 Fort McKavett St • Mason

73. Narrow Path Winery 2 Locations FM 1623 (South of Hye) • Albert 111 E. Main St. • Fredericksburg

43. Fredericksburg Brewing Company 74. Newsom Vineyards 245 E. Main St. • Fredericksburg

717 Front St. • Comfort

44. Fredericksburg Winery

75. Pecan Street Brewing

45. Georgetown Winery

76. Pedernales Cellars

16. Bingham Family Vineyards

46. Garrison Brothers Distillery

77. Pelota Wines, Inc.

17. Blue Lotus Winery

47. Grape Creek Vineyards

78. Perissos Vineyards

18. Boerne Brewery

48. Grape Creek Vineyard on Main 79. Pilot Knob Vineyard

19. Branch on High

49. Hahne Estates Winery

14. Bella Vista Ranch

3101 Mount Sharp Rd. • Wimberley

15. Bending Branch Winery

142 Lindner Branch Trail • Comfort 3915 E. US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg 8500 W Hwy 290 • Hye 106 Sage Brush • Boerne 704 High St. • Comfort

247 W. Main St. • Fredericksburg 715 Main St. • Georgetown 1827 Hye Albert Rd. • Hye

10587 E. US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg 223 E. Main St. • Fredericksburg

14802 US Hwy. 290 East • Stonewall

106 E. Pecan Dr. • Johnson City 2916 Upper Albert Rd. • Stonewall 3209 US Hwy. 290 • Johnson City 7214 W. Park Road 4 • Burnet 3125 CR 212 • Bertram

80. Pint & Plow Brewing Company 332 Clay St. • Kerrville

81. Pontotoc Vineyard 20. Brewbonnet (inside Wildseed farms) 50. Hawk’s Shadow Estate Vineyard 320 W. Main St. • Fredericksburg 7500 McGregor Ln. • Dripping Springs 100 Legacy Rd • Fredericksburg

21. Calais Winery

51. Heath Sparkling (coming summer '19) 82. Real Ale Brewing Company

22. Chisholm Trail Winery

52. Hilmy Cellars

8115 W. US Hwy. 290 • Hye 2367 Usener Rd. • Fredericksburg

10591 US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg

12346 E. US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg

231 San Saba Court • Blanco

83. Ron Yates Wines

6676 W. US Hwy. 290• Hye

84. Salt Lick Cellars 23. Cibolo Creek Brewing Company 53. Hill Country Cellars & Winery 1800-C FM 1826 • Driftwood 3540 S. Hwy 16 Ste 2D • Bandera 122 N. Plant • Boerne

24. Comfort Brewing

54. Hill Country Distillers

85. Safari (opening soon)

25. Compass Rose Cellars Inc.

55. Horn Wineries

86. Sandstone Cellars (Off Map)

26. Copper Star Cellars (Off Map)

56. Hye Meadow Winery

87. Santa Maria Cellars

27. Cross Mountain

57. Hye Rum

88. Signor Vineyards

523 Seventh St. • Comfort 1197 Hye Albert Rd. • Hye 13217 FM 1117 • Seguin

308 E. Main St. • Fredericksburg

723 Front St. • Comfort

9953 E. US Hwy. 290 • Hye 9953 US Hwy. 290 • Hye

11247 W. US Hwy. 290 • Hye

28. Dancing Bee Winery (Off Map) 58. Inwood Estates Winery 8060 W. US Hwy. 190 • Rogers

29. Deep Eddy Vodka 2250 E. US Hwy. 290 Dripping Springs

10303 US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg

59. Iron Goat Distillery

817 Usener Rd. • Fredericksburg

5479 E. US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg

6264 E. US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg 13111 Silver Creek Rd. Dripping Springs

93. Southold Farm + Cellar 10474 Ranch Road 2721 Fredericksburg

94. Spicewood Vineyards 1419 CR 409 • Spicewood

95. Stone House Vineyard

24350 Haynie Flat Rd. • Spicewood

96. Texas Heritage Vineyards

3245 E. US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg

97. Texas Hills Vineyard

878 RR 2766 • Johnson City

98. Three Dudes Winery

125 Old Martindale Rd. • San Marcos

99. Torr de Lochs

7055 W. State Hwy. 29 • Burnet

100. The Vineyard at Florence 8711 W. FM 487 • Florence

101. The Vintage Cellar

6258 E. US Hwy. 290 • Fredericksburg

102. Thirsty Mule Winery & Vineyard 101 CR 257 • Liberty Hill

103. Timber Ridge Winery

2152 Timber Creek Rd. • Pipe Creek

104. Treaty Oak Distilling Company

16604 Fitzhugh Rd. • Dripping Springs

105. Vinovium

214 Edmonds Avenue • Johnson City

106. Wedding Oak Winery 2 Locations 316 E. Wallace (Off Map) • San Saba 290 Wine Rd., • Fredericksburg (Under construction)

107. Westcave Cellars Winery 25711 Hamilton Pool Rd. Round Mountain

108. Western Edge Cellars

228 W. Main St. • Fredericksburg

109. William Chris Vineyards 10352 US Hwy. 290 • Hye

110. Wimberley Valley Winery

2825 County Road 183 • Driftwood

111. Wines of Dotson Cervantes 13044 Willis Street • Pontotoc

112. Winotus

115 E. Main St. • Fredericksburg

113. Woodrose Winery

662 Woodrose Lane • Stonewall

114. Ron Yates Winery

676 W. US Hwy. 290 • Hye

115. Zero 815 Winery

11157 W. US Hwy. 290 • Hye

211 San Antonio St. • Mason

12044 S. Hwy. 16 • Fredericksburg 362 Livesay Lane • Fredericksburg

89. Singing Water Vineyards 316 Mill Dam Rd. • Comfort

90. Sister Creek Vineyards 1142 Sisterdale Rd. • Boerne

SPRING 2019 99


drinkery maps 93

GOEHMANN

Cain City

1376

COM RD. FORT

C LU

LOWER ALBERT RD.

47 51

11

ALBER RD 1623

76

Albert

HYE ALBERT RD.

GELLERMANN

7058

62 57 115

113

HAHN RD.

CITY

N BACH-CAIN . KE RD

RD.

MEUSEBACH CREEK RD .

WOODLAND DR.

RD. CAIN

IO

Blumenthal

52 88 42 37

Hye

290

Stonewall

T

ON

6

290

109

Pedernales River

PER

10 65

71

LBJ National LBJ State Historical Park Historical State Park Ranch

UP

NT SAN A

87

16 85

101 4 39 91 20 Rocky Hill 5 CITY

OLD

96

Pedernales River

JENSCHKE LANE

290

LUCKENBACH RD.

GOEHMANN LN.

LANE

.

16

KLEIN RD.

LANE

FREDERICKSBURG FREDERICKSBURG

2 17 56

55 21

25 46

73

OLD

Luckenbach

WINE CORRIDOR

DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG W. CENTRE ST.

PECAN ST.

ELM

W. COLLEGE ST.

TRAVIS ST.

ORCHARD ST. TRAVIS ST.

16 SCHUBERT ST.

Pioneer Museum

44

27

73 112 39 36

T

EEK S

E. CR

16

W

PARK ST. E

S

100

Rock&Vine

48

43

Museum of the Pacific War

290 11

MAIN STREET

6

SAN ANTONIO ST.

N

Visitor Information Center

LINCOLN ST.

9

LLANO ST.

Marktplatz

ADAMS ST.

AUSTIN ST.

UFER ST.

67

87

S WASHINGTON

MAIN STREET

108

CROCKETT ST.

81

ORANGE ST.

MILAM ST.

AUSTIN ST.

EDISON ST.

BOWIE ST.

ACORN ST.

CHERRY ST.

SCHUBERT ST.


wine tasting

cooking classes

Photo Cedit: Jason Risner Photography

for more information visit us at

das peach haus

1406 south US HWY 87 Rock & Wine

12/31/19

SPRING 2019 101


Enjoy our wines and scenic views at our Winery & Vineyard or visit our downtown Tasting Room to find respite while shopping Main Street.

WINERY & VINEYARD 6331 South Ranch Rd 1623 / Stonewall (830) 644-2144 MAIN STREET TASTING ROOM

113 East Main Street / Fredericksburg (830) 992-1404

102

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Old & New • Farmhouse • Vintage • Home Décor • Gifts

Discover all the good things we have gathered for your home and your life... 830.307.3032 www.gatheredandgood.com 401 Auguste, Fredericksburg (2 Blocks from Nimitz Museum)

Paint|Window Treatments|Area Rugs|Wood Flooring|Tile Floors|Tile|Back Splash

www.theinsidestorytx.com | 1324 S. State Hwy. 16 Fredericksburg | 830.997.8413 SPRING 2019 103


stomping grounds

PURE SPIRITS

Blue Lotus Winery gives visitors tasty delights By LORELIE HELMKE The Blue Lotus Winery is a winery and a Meadery. It all started while Michael Poole was in the Navy and he developed a passion for brewing beer. Michael developed a keen sense for making wine and dreamed of opening his own winery. When he and his wife, Melissa found their property on FM 20 near Seguin, they knew they found their home. On their Hill Country property, they produce meads, wines made from honey that are popular at renaissance festivals and well suited for Texas palates. Their wines are made from 100% Texas grown grapes and their meads are made 100% Texas bees. The Blue Lotus Winery offers something for everyone and has established itself as a venue for weddings, family gatherings and corporate events in Central Texas.

104

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stomping grounds

LEFT BANK RED 2015 Red Blend

VERMENTINO 2015 Texas

MUSCAT 2015 Moscato Greco

½

½



This is a blend of cabernet sauvignon, merlot and petite verdot. Cigar box spice surrounds the nose intertwining with blackberry anise and brambleberry. The tannins are silky with good structure and long on the finish. Pair this cellar worth wine with a rib eye or Stilton style cheese.

A bright yellow hay color adorns the glass. On first approach a lemony essence takes hold. There are white flowers, peaches and pear aromas that complement this light and crisp wine. A racy acidity makes the mouth salivate. This is a good foody wine. Pair with rosemary chicken or roasted pork dishes.

Delightful Florals Although this is a Muscat, it is not cloyingly sweet. The delightful floral aromas of honey and orange blossoms delight the senses. There are hints of white flowers and juicy fruit gum. Great on its own or with pepper jack cheese.

GRAND BLANC 2012 White Blend

 Aged in oak, the white blend shows its age beautifully in both color and flavor. It’s a honey color and aromas of oak, vanilla, apple, and citrus make up the pieces of the white conundrum. It has a balanced acidity and a long finish. Great with smoked chicken or Gouda.

RASPBERRY CHAMPAGNE NV Sparkling

½ Dispensed from a tap system, this sparkling beverage is made from grapes and raspberries. It has a unique flavor that resembles raspberry sherbet. A light and easy summer sparkler.

VIOGNIER 2016 Texas

½ MOUVEDRE 2016 Texas

 The color is a garnet in glass. On the nose, spicy black pepper and cloves mingle with ripe cherries and black plum mingled with smoke and leather. There is a tingling o the tip of the tongue from the lovely acidity and an extended finish. This beautifully complex wine can be paired with wild game sausages or stew.

This semi-sweet wine displays a bright hay color and a solid viscosity in the glass. Scents of white flowers, sweet pineapple and Meyer lemon grace the nose and hints of guava leading to a medium-long finish please the palate. A perfect wine to serve with spicy dishes and bacon wrapped jalapeno.

BLUE LOTUS WINERY bluelotuswinery.com 5151 FM 20 Seguin, TX 78155 8500 Hwy 290 Hye TX 78635 830-379-WINE (9463)

SPRING 2019 105


WANT TO GET IN

GREAT SHAPE?

Jump start your fitness goals with the expert guidance of a personal trainer.

Hayden Knopp, Personal Trainer, Certified Strength/Conditioning Specialist

847-431-5753

haydenknopp@icloud.com 1202 W. Austin, Ste. 200 Fredericksburg, TX 78624 106

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SPRING 2019 107


Events May 18

—Testicle Festival at Castell General Store, 19522 RR 152, Castell, TX 78643;

325-247-4100; castellgeneralstore.com.

19

—The 23rd Annual Americana Music Jam at Gruene Hall, 1281 New Braunfels Road, New Braunfels, TX 78130; 830-629-5077; gruenehall.com.

25-28—Memorial Day weekend events

at the National Museum of the Pacific War include, Pacific Combat Program and the laying of wreaths; 340 E. Main St., Fredericksburg, TX 78624; 830-997-8600; pacific-warmuseum.org.

June 14—Bandera

Corkpoppers Wine Share,

bring wine to share and appetizers will be provided; 5-7 pm; 510 13th St., Bandera, TX 78003; 830-796-3864; fron-tiertimesmuseum.org

7-8 —Llano

Open Pro Rodeo, features

bronc busting, bull riding, barrel racing, mutton busting and team roping, 7 p.m. at the John L. Kuykendall Events Center and Arena, 2200 W. Ranch Road 152 Llano, TX 78643; 325-247-5354

21-22 —58th Annual Stonewall Peach

JAMboree and Rodeo, in Stonewall, TX 78671; 830-644-2735; stonewalltexas.com.

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August July 4—Texas

Annual Independence Day

Parade The Best Little Parade in Texas,” 10 am; FM

25—Frontier

Times Jamboree, 1-4

pm ,

Frontier Times Museum, 510 13th St. Bandera, TX 78003; 830-796-3864; frontiertimesmuseum.org.

16—Boerne

Movies in the Park, 7

pm;

City Park, 106 City Park Road, Boerne,TX 78006; 830-248-1635; ci.boerne.tx.us/626/Movies-in-thePark

2325, Wimberley, TX 78676; 512-847-2201; wim-berley.org.

27

— Art Walk in Johnson City; 4-8

pm ;

Nugent Avenue and Main Street, Johnson City, TX 78636; 830-868-7684; artjc.org.

SPRING 2019 109


THE CLUB


Enjoy a Sommelier Guided, small bite food and wine pairing experience today. Tasting Room Hours: Thurs-Sat: 11-6 pm Sun-Mon: 12-5 pm Appointments are Requested At Kuhlman Cellars, it is All About the Wine.

Kuhlman Cellars

18421 E. U.S. Hwy. 290, Stonewall, Texas 512.920.2675 • www.kuhlmancellars.com

Enjoy a Sommelier Guided, small bite food and wine pairing experience today.

• Private Group sessions for up to 12 people Bridal Parties ~ Girls’ Weekends Corporate Retreats • Licensed AntiGravity Studio • Safe, fun, unique, unforgettable • Weekly classes

TASTING ROOM HOURS: Thurs-Sat: 11-6pm Sun-Mon 12-5pm Appointments are Requested At Kuhlman Cellars, it is All About the Wine.

Kuhlman Cellars 18421 E US HWY 290 • STONEWALL, TEXAS

733 Brehmer Lane ~ Fredericksburg, TX 78624 830.992.8840 ~ LizardDreamingYoga.com

512.920.2675 • kuhlmancellars.com

SPRING 2019 111


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Celebrating our

20th Year

of h o

s! sting special occasion

“Where extraordinary things happen” 20% discount on rental rate for 2019 dates. Full service catering for weddings, rehearsal dinners, and anniversary parties. Perfect for groups of 40-100 guests.

Join us for Second Saturday Series dinners featuring a 4–course dinner with local live music. Bring your own wine.

kairosbarn

1213 Kott Road | 830-990-9515 | www.kairosbarn.com

Texas Tech University now offers WSET (Wine and Spirit Education Trust) Qualifications WSET Level 1 (Award in Wine) and WSET Level 2 (Award in Wines and Spirits) Courses offered in Fredericksburg and Lubbock, Texas. Visit www.hs.ttu.edu/texaswine/wset.php for details.

SPRING 2019 113


END

notes

Compiled by CHRISTINE GRANADOS

YES, WE HAVE NO BANANAS. After a 20-year thaw, the public will be privy to the works of artists like Robert Frost, Theodore Pratt, Marcel Duchamp and Cecil B. DeMille. All works first published in the United States in 1923 entered the public domain at the beginning of 2019. The deluge of hundreds of thousands of books, musical compositions, paintings, poems, photographs and films means Americans can sing, record, republish works like 1923 hit “Yes, we have no bananas!”

MOSQUITO DIET Scientists figured out that obesity diet drugs work on mosquitos too. Researchers fed the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes (a species capable of spreading many mosquito-borne diseases, including Zika) experimental human drugs that target a specific

ALL HAIL MASON! Since its invention in 1858 by New Jersey native John Landis Mason, the Mason-jar is on its third resurgence. The glass canning jars jars experienced a renaissance during World War II, when the U.S. government rationed food and encouraged people to grow their own. In the ‘60s and ‘70s the DIY movement reacting to the idea that food and life were too processed, made the jars avant-garde. Today, the hipster, foodie culture has repurposed and brought it back to its early 20th century usefulness for canning.

receptor of NPY in people, called Y2. The drugs suppressed the mosquito’s thirst for blood and they were no longer interested in seeking out new hosts for a few days. This research is paving the way for pesticide-free ways to tackle mosquito-borne diseases like malaria, dengue and Zika virus.

RODENT A THING OF THE PAST Global warming has taken its first victim of the millennium – the Bramble Cay melomy. The long whiskered, lumpy tailed, round Australian rodent was declared extinct by the Austrialian government in February. One senator said it was a huge tragedy that Australia is home to the “first mammal in the world to go extinct from climate change on this gov.’s watch.”

Photo by Natalie Rhea Riggs

SOURCE: www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/first-time-20-years-copyrighted-works-enter-public-domain-180971016/# DE7GbJMF1BHWZDi2.99. The Atlantic, “The Mason Jar, Reborn: How a container once integral to farming culture came to be the hipster vessel of choice: an Object Lesson” by Ariana Kelly, Sept. 24, 2015. www.gizmodo.com/diet-drugs-might-makemosquitoes-stop-thirsting-for-our-1832434280. Washington Post, “Climate change officially claims its first mammal: The Bramble Cay melomys is declared extinct,” by Ben Guarino and Lindsey Bever, Feb. 20, 2019. 114

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THIS IS HOW WE DO COUNTRY 2 0 0Âą AC RE S | 1909 RANCH | DOSS, T X | M A S O N CO UNTY Texas Ranch Realty, a division of Fredericksburg Realty, is proud to present this 5,000Âą square foot Hill Country modern home. Designed to take full advantage of spectacular 30 miles views, this home is constructed with the finest quality materials and the latest in technology. In addition to the stunning residence, the remains of the original, early 1900s homestead sits adjacent to Cow Valley Creek and steps have been taken to safely preserve as much of it as possible. Abundant live water includes 2,900 feet along both sides of the creek plus two water wells producing 100 and 80 gpm respectively. There is also an insulated metal barn. Yes, Fredericksburg is only about 20 minutes away. But with unparalleled elegance, comfort and privacy like this, you may never want to leave. Additional acreage is available.

Texas Ranch Realty can assist you with the complexities of buying a ranch or raw land. Water and mineral rights, tax exemptions, ranch and wildlife management, improvements and conservation are all critical components to consider when making a ranch purchase. Our experienced agents can help you navigate these issues to your advantage. Call us today!

JUSTIN COP, BROKER | 8 3 0.9 9 8 . 2 8 9 5 T E X A S R A N C H R E A LT Y.C O M | 1 9 0 9 R A N C H .C O M SPRING 2019 115


Faith Family & Friends

In 1847, German immigrant John Christian Durst was a ssigned a 10 acre plot in Fredericksburg TX, which

o r t wo comp lime ntary glasses of wine per day

included a 120‘ mountain. Durst pushed through the brush a nd discovered the remains of a wooden cross. Durst

erected the cross to honor the land God had provided his

on w ine & all m erchandise

family. A winemaker himself, Durst was known to value his

faith, family and friends over a good glass of wine. Four

g enerations later, we hope our wine provides time for you to

I nvita tions to wine club events

reflect on how important your faith, family and friends are.

T H E O N LY I TA L IA N W I N E S G O One O D ofE aNkind OU G H F OR T E X A S wines from Italy’s top wine producers.

Where eve ryoneWith i s trdelicious e at ed like family. food pairings.

Stop by the Tasting Room for a Glass of Wine with Ours!

to Wine C lub Events

s r e e Ch

3 08 E . Ma i n St. | Downtown Fredericks bu rg, T X (83 0) 992 - 3 2 73

W W W. C R O S S M O U N T A I N V I N E Y A R D S . C O M 116

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