Texas Hill Country Art Guide 2022

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articles

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Early Pioneer Artists Sketches and paintings by Herman Lungkwitz and Richard Petri became rare interpretations of an era.

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Fredericksburg’s Mother of Pearl

Vanessa Tosoni’s journey to Fredericksburg brings a new layer of culture, color, and craftsmanship to the Texas Hill Country.

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The Draw of the West:

A deep believer of buona fortuna, Benini let himself be guided in both his career and life by an instinct for self-preservation and magic.

about the cover Spring Breeze - Insight Gallery by Robert Reynolds “My passion as an artist is a common thread throughout my life; my painting has always nourished and sustained me. Painting is something I practice, like a musical instrument. Each painting is linked as a necessary step to creating the next painting. I would love for the viewer to feel as if they are standing right there, to feel the place, the magic of the day. Painting, like life, is improvisational. As I lay down paint, I respond to

what’s happening on the canvas. Sometimes something unexpected, magical happens. I’m constantly deciding what to save and to change. I love the beauty of the paint itself.” Robert Reynolds

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advertising index 13 15 22 4 11 31 28 10 7 3 3 39

Auer haus Cabernet Grill Casey Craig Charles Morin Fine Arts Chuck and Barbara Mauldin Die Künstler von Fredericksburg Fredericksburg Art Guild & Gallery Friends of Gillespie County Country Schools Gallery 330 Grape Creek Vineyards Heath Sparkling Wines Highland Arts Guild & Gallery

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Highland Lakes Creative Arts Hoffman Haus InSight Gallery Jan Burley Fine Art Kerr Arts & Cultural Center Keri Kropp Design Larry Jackson Gallery Maryneil Dance Museum of Western Art Nan Henke Watercolor Workshop Pedernales Cellars Rivers Edge Gallery Western Galleries URBANherbal Yellow Door Studio

Texas Hill Country Art Guide is an annual publication highlighting the best in this area’s vibrant art scene.

TEXAS HILL COUNTRY

Find us on Facebook for updates on artists, galleries and art events.

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To be included, contact Kim Jung at Fredericksburg Publishing Company at 830.997.2155. ©2022 Fredericksburg Publishing Co., 712 West Main St., Fredericksburg, TX 78624

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From the Publisher It’s amazing how many of our visitors come to Fredericksburg for its vibrant art scene. It’s not only about the wineries, even though art and wine seem to go hand in hand. We love to feature this diverse array of galleries, artists and work in the various media in this Art Guide. It can help some of you when you decide to take a piece of this beloved Hill Country home with you. We’re so grateful to the artists who bless us with their talents. Art has lifted our spirits through these trying couple of years. Join us for a monthly boost at the First Friday Art Walk which showcases the many galleries and artists represented therein. Whether you’re looking for works by a local artist, such as Phil Bob Borman’s amazing, scenic works, or national artists as you can find at

InSight Gallery, the offerings go far beyond anything considered paintby-numbers. Another thing you’ll be amazed by is the knowledge of our gallery owners, whether you want to learn more about our late iconic artist G. Harvey, a Texas legend, such as Porfirio Salinas, or top national artists like Jeff Merrill and others. These gallery owners know their works and history. Art enhances our community in innumerable ways, whether it is seen in a gallery, on the walls of restaurants or wineries, or in our fine museums. It’s part of what gives this area its flavor and it makes it easy to find something that would look good in your home. Welcome, and enjoy.

Ken Esten Cooke Publisher

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Destination Art

Local galleries draw visitors to the Texas Hill Country.

Artisans – A Texas Gallery

234 West Main Street • 830-990-8160 • www.artisanstexasgallery.com Open Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Artisans Gallery represents and supports Texas artists who create an array of fine art, fine furnishings and fine craft. The gallery includes ceramics, furniture, wood turnings, sculpture, jewelry, mosaics, glass, functional pottery and kinetic outdoor art, along with paintings. The art displayed may be decorative or functional.

they think of painting. But fine craft is another category of art,” Karr said. “Our mission is to support our local artists from around the Hill Country.” The Karrs have been collecting art for more than 25 years and try to replicate the welcoming atmosphere they have enjoyed in other galleries. Behind every piece of art is a talented, experienced, hardworking artist with a unique story to tell through their creations. Artisans Gallery carries art in a wide price range, appealing to both the first-time art buyer and the collector. For First Friday Art Walk, Artisans hosts a reception from 5-8 p.m.

Owner Patricia Karr prides herself on the gallery’s “Texas-friendly atmosphere.” She defines fine craft as “handmade work of various mediums, but it’s the highest level of quality. When people think of art,

Auer haus

402 East Main Street • 830-997-6750 • www.facebook.com/Auer-Haus Open weekdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. From cacti to bluebonnets, from windmills to horses, from cowboys to sunsets — your home comes together at Auer haus, located across from the Admiral Nimitz Gallery. Every inch of the spacious shop is filled with distinctive furnishings, elegant accessories, fine lighting and original art, all with a Hill Country flair. Auer haus also offer design services. “We pride ourselves in carrying a lot of USA-made products and Texas artists,” said owner Shelly Mazurek. “You can furnish the whole house through us.”

Often a customer who is in the market for a sofa or a lamp sees a piece of fine art hanging nearby and decides to complete the look of the room. Auer haus carries art by C.J. Latta, Kay Walton and Kenneth Wyatt, who is collected by farmers, bankers, presidents, queens, movie stars and clergy. The shop’s artists may also do commissions for customers, upon request. In addition to fine art, some giclées are also available. “We try to do things differently than anybody else,” Mazurek said.

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Destination Art

Local galleries draw visitors to the Texas Hill Country.

Jan Burley Fine Art & Vintage Creations

210-845-7972 • janburley@yahoo.com • www.janburleyfineart.com scheduled for March 5-6 at the New Braunfels Art League.

Jan Burley’s paintings combine her artistic and scientific skills. She studied art under painter Charles Berkeley Normann at Texas School of Fine Arts and earned a degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.

“People say they can’t even draw a stick figure, but they walk away with a frameable collage,” she said. Her collages have won Best In Show at juried exhibitions, and her photographs of New Mexico’s Ghost Ranch were featured in the organization’s 2017 and 2018 calendars. She also coordinated a public art project with Wimberley Valley Radio, and two of her originals are featured on the building’s tribute to the Texas Hill Country. Burley also works in vintage restoration of furniture and Southwestern jewelry.

“I painted a bunch of longhorns — that’s how I paid my tuition in school,” she said. Burley spent her career at NASA and even designed an organizational patch. After retirement, she focused on art — watercolor, oil and collage. Burley teaches collage workshops online via Adult Craft LAB classes sponsored by Wimberly Village Library. She has a two-day in-person “Perspectives In Collage” workshop

View her collections on Instagram @JanBurleyFineArt_official and on her website.

Maryneil Dance

830-992-0136 • maryneil@beecreek.net • www.maryneildance.com Studio tour available by appointment. Maryneil Dance grew up as a fourthgeneration daughter of the Texas Hill Country, and she wanted to be a veterinarian. Since it was not yet a time when a woman could become a vet, she studied art and interior design and managed a successful custom furniture store and design studio in Dallas. She is credited with creating the iconic look known as Texas Country French.

Dance has painted with oil, but she prefers pastel, which dates back to Renoir and Monet. “I love the tactile, being able to use my fingers in it. And the immediacy — not having to wait for it to dry, the brilliant color it gives and the softness,” she said. “It works well for my animal portraits.” Dance is a member of the International Association of Pastel Societies and is an associate member of Pastel Society of America. Her work was featured in “Art on the Llano Estacado,” an exhibit at the Museum of Texas Tech University, her alma mater.

When she retired and returned to the Hill Country, Dance dove back into art. “I live on a Texas ranch that has beautiful hills, natural streams, longhorns, horses, donkeys, sheep and dogs that have all become my subject matter,” she said.

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Destination Art

Local galleries draw visitors to the Texas Hill Country.

Die Künstler von Fredericksburg

P.O. Box 1122 • www.dkfredericksburg.org • www.facebook.com/dkfredericksburg Die Künstler von Fredericksburg means “The Artists of Fredericksburg,” but most people refer to the group as DK. Founded in 1991, the club membership includes about 75 artists.

San Antonio Street. Meetings are free and open to the public and include live demonstrations by noted artists. DK’s Spring Fling Art Sale, with great blooms and great bargains, will be held April 16, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at historic Marktplatz. On November 11-13, DK will mark its 29th annual Fine Art Show and Sale at St. Joseph’s Halle, 212 West San Antonio Street. Club members present more than 200 original works in a variety of mediums and styles, attracting holiday shoppers from around the state and beyond.

DK’s purpose is to promote art appreciation and education in Fredericksburg and the Texas Hill Country for artists at every level of experience. The group meets at 6:30 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month at Gillespie County Historical Society, 312 West

Fredericksburg Art Guild & Gallery

308 East Austin Street • 830-997-4949 • www.fredericksburgartguild.com Open Thursday through Sunday, 12-4 p.m. have served our country. The guild also conducts children’s art classes and showcases their work in an October reception.

Fredericksburg Art Guild is a nonprofit organization founded more than 40 years ago by artist John McClusky to support the arts in the Texas Hill Country. All members are Texas artists. Featured shows rotate between the members each month.

Courtesy of Pedernales Creative Arts Alliance (PCAA), the guild is represented in a large tent at Oktoberfest. Support for the guild is provided by PCAA and the City of Fredericksburg’s Hotel Occupancy Tax.

Adult oil painting classes are offered throughout the year by Truby Hardin, and Nan Henke teaches watercolor. Most students participate in a juried show in February. A professionally juried show takes place in May for artists in and around Gillespie County. During Memorial Day weekend the guild hosts an Art Fest on the grounds, Saturday and Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., to celebrate art and those who

During First Friday Art Walk the gallery stays open until 8 p.m. Visitors interact with the guild’s artists while enjoying fine art and local wine in a historic building. Stay updated on upcoming events through the guild’s website.

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Destination Art

Local galleries draw visitors to the Texas Hill Country.

Fredericksburg Artists’ School 830-997-0515 • www.fbgartschool.com Classes held at 237 West Main Street.

Now in its 28th year, Fredericksburg Artists’ School, founded by Nancy and Bill Bush, brings to Fredericksburg nationally recognized artists from around the country. These professionals lead four- and five-day painting workshops, primarily in oil or pastel. Classes are open to artists who work in all types of mediums, and all levels of experience are welcome.

Nancy Bush, who shows in premier galleries around the country, also teaches at the school. Bill Bush is not an artist, but a CPA. More than 25 years ago after attending an art school in Santa Fe, Nancy turned to him and said they needed to start an art school. Which meant Bill needed to start an art school. “She made a deal that whatever did not involve putting paint on a canvas, I would do,” he said.

“Our students come from throughout the United States and come primarily to learn from these particular artists. And also because Fredericksburg is a wonderful city to visit,” said Bill Bush, who manages the school.

All classes are held at Appretiare, located at 237 West Main Street, home office of ISA-accredited appraiser Lee Ann Whatley.

Gallery 330

330 West Main Street • 830-307-3339 • www.gallery330.com Open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 1-4 p.m. Gallery 330, located on West Main between Orange and Milam Streets, specializes in contemporary realism and impressionism. It represents established and emerging regional and national artists in a variety of styles and mediums.

Fredericksburg. Honoring the historical significance of the town, they have lovingly restored the 1908 August Itz building, where Gallery 330 is located, as well as buildings hosting two iconic restaurants — Crossroads Saloon & Steakhouse and Altdorf Biergarten.

The gallery was opened in October 2017 by Gary and Maggie ScrippsKlenzing, who have a passion for art and for the community of

Gallery 330 is a proud participant in First Friday Art Walk and remains open until 8 p.m. for the monthly celebration.

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Early Pioneer Artists Their sketches and paintings became rare interpretations of an era.

When early pioneers Herman New Braunfels, before moving to the Lungkwitz and Richard Petri settled Fredericksburg area in late-spring or near Fredericksburg more than 150 early-summer of 1852. They bought years ago, they were like hundreds of 320 acres of land on the Pedernales other settlers and were determined to River about five miles southwest survive and thrive. of Fredericksburg on what is now What made them different was the known as the “Old Kerrville Road” artistic record they left of the world in and proceeded to build their homes and farm the land. which they lived. These two artists, however, Their sketches and paintings also devoted much of their became prized as rare time to painting the interpretations of an era Texas landscape as whose works of art are they saw it, leaving few and far between for today many today. prized pictures of Now museum scenes, buildings, treasures, their frontier life, even artwork provides Indians, which are a vivid reminder found in private of what life was collections and like “back then”, museums. particularly here in Two books have Gillespie County. been published Petri and Lungwitz about them. had become friends at The first one, the Royal Academy of copyrighted by the Texas Art in Dresden, Germany, Memorial Museum in 1978, and Lungkwitz later married was written by William W. Petri’s sister, Elisabet. Richard Petri Newcomb Jr., who was director These three were joined in of that museum from 1957 to 1978, their move to America by Friederike and who, at the time of its publication, Lungkwitz, Herman’s aged mother; was a professor of anthropology at the his sister Therese, and Petri’s sister, University of Texas at Austin. It is Marie. The group left Germany late entitled German Artist on the Texas in the summer of 1850, landed in Frontier: Friedrich Richard Petri. Hoboken, NJ, and moved to Wheeling The other one, Herman Lungkwitz; in what was then Virginia. Romantic Landscapist on the Texas Richard Petri’s health was poor, Frontier, copyrighted in 1983 by so they decided to come to The University of Texas Institute Texas, sailing down the Ohio and of Texan Cultures, was written by Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans James Patrick McGuire, then the where Adolph Lung­kwitz, Herman’s director of program management at younger brother, joined them. They the institute. traveled to Indianola and then to

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In addition to telling the complete Lungkwitz had become discouraged stories of these two famous artists, with trying to make a living by selling they include pages filled with pictures his paintings, so he decided to go to of their paintings. Virginia to study photography. Tangible evidence of their presence His wife and children stayed here on on their local farm are the graves of the farm, but when he returned, they Richard Petri, the painter, who died in leased it and moved to San Antonio. 1857 when he drowned The Lungkwitz family in the Pedernales while sold their farm to Jacob trying to get relief from and Ludwig Usener a high fever. Buried next on Jan. 11, 1869, and to him is Friederike this place was home to Lungkwitz. Each grave is Usener family members, marked with a rounded some of who are buried red granite boulder with alongside of Petri and a square surface in the Friederike Lungkwitz. center bearing these The property is now inscriptions: “Richard privately owned. Petri 1824-1857” and “Friederike Lung­ kwitz - geb. Hecht 1781-1855”. Herman Lungkwitz At the foot of the graves are small rounded rocks with the initials “RP” and “FL”. 1824: Richard Petri born in Germany. Changes took place with the approach of and during the Civil 1850: Hermann Lungkwitz and Petri War times. leave Germany for America with Petri’s sister (who married Lungkwitz) Marie Petri married Jacob Kuechler, and Lungkwitz’ mother, and land in a graduate of the University of New Jersey. Giessen who had been trained in civil engineering and became 1851: After a move to Wheeling, county surveyor for Gillespie County. VA, the foursome sails down the They lived on this farm near the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New main house. Orleans and are joined by Lungkwitz’ younger brother. They travel to Kuechler was one of those who Indianola and New Braunfels. chose to be “true to the Union” during the Civil War and, though 1852: The group arrives in wounded, made it to Mexico where Fredericksburg in early summer. he stayed until after the war ended. He returned to Texas where he 1857: Petri drowns in the Pedernales became Commissioner of the General River and the elder Mrs. Lungkwitz Land Office. dies. Lungkwitz studies photography in Virginia. Family leases farm and moves to San Antonio on his return. 1869: Lungkwitz family sells farm to Jacob and Ludwig Usener. 21


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Destination Art

Local galleries draw visitors to the Texas Hill Country.

The Good Art Company

218 West Main Street • 830-997-1111 • www.goodartcompany.com Open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Monday and Sunday, by appointment. The Good Art Company is a contemporary international gallery representing more than 40 artists from as close as the local Texas Hill Country to as far away as New York, Russia and South Korea. The gallery hosts a diverse curation of modern and traditional art, including heavy-textured oils, abstracts and contemporary Western paintings.

The gallery is located in the historic Schmidt-Dietz building and was featured in Texas Monthly’s August 2018 issue about small towns in an article titled “Creative Spaces.” The entire collection can be accessed by visiting the online gallery, and secure purchases can be made at any time.

Nan Henke

nanhenke@gmail.com • www.nanhenke.com Nan Henke teaches Simple Watercolors Workshops at Fredericksburg Art Guild. The classes, held once a month from January through October, are nonjudgmental, with a lot of laughter. No art experience is required. Each workshop focuses on creating one or two small paintings while learning watercolor basics. One of Henke’s goals is to help artists understand why watercolor works differently and to build confidence using this unpredictable medium.

up with the exact picture that you had in mind when you started.” She also teaches how to emphasize watercolor’s brilliance and transparency by outlining it with ink. “We enjoy following every strange, odd place that the watercolor went,” she said. “Even if there’s a mistake, we use the ink to highlight it.” Each two-hour workshop costs $40 and each one is different and does need to be taken in order. Classes are held at 308 East Austin Street. The schedule is on Henke’s website. Contact her to register, as space is limited.

“I like watercolor because you can’t completely control it.” Henke said. “You have to be OK with it doing what it wants to do. You can’t expect to end

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Destination Art

Local galleries draw visitors to the Texas Hill Country.

Highland Arts Guild & Gallery

318 Main Street, Marble Falls, TX 78654 • 830-693-7324 www.highlandartsguild.org • Instagram: @highlandarts.gallery Open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (5 p.m. in the warm months). Highland Arts Guild & Gallery celebrated its 50th anniversary last year. The nonprofit serves professional and up-and-coming artists. Every six months, the guild holds a drawing among its 60 members for exhibit space within its gallery, located in its own building. All the art is original. The gallery’s biggest shows are in the spring and fall.

artists and holds weekly classes in topics like acrylic, oil, watercolor, pastel and pen-and-ink drawing. Anyone can sign up for a class — guild membership is not required. In the summer, the guild holds a one-week camp for kids ages 9-15.

“We are always changing out the artwork,” said guild member Donna Bland. “We’re always trying to reach out to new artists.” Artists who are interested in membership can come by the gallery and fill out an application.

The guild also visits assisted living facilities to help residents complete an art project.

“It gets filled as soon as parents hear about it because it’s such a hit,” Bland said.

“They have so much fun doing that,” Bland said. “It’s giving back to the community.”

The guild holds demonstrations throughout the year with professional

Highland Lakes Creative Arts

P.O. Box 8936, Horseshoe Bay, TX 78657 • info@hlcarts.com www.facebook.com/Highlandlakescreativearts • www.hlcarts.com changing, temperatures can drop, the wind picks up — a real plein air artist is about half-mountaineer and half-artist,” he said.

Highland Lakes Creative Arts (HLCA) is a nonprofit art group that grew out of its events — Paint the Town, a juried plein air competition and sale, and Sculpture on Main, a celebration of public art. In 2022, the events will be combined, with Paint the Town held on April 24-30 and Sculpture on Main running concurrently, April 28-30. This year’s judge for Paint The Town will be Tim Newton.

All year long, HLCA invests in future artists. It works with school districts in Burnet and Marble Falls, donating art supplies and underwriting a student art book. Paint the Town includes a student art day in which young people are paired with a painting mentor for an afternoon. HLCA also partners with the Phoenix Center’s art therapy program, addressing children and families with mental health needs. During the holidays, HLCA sponsors live ice sculpture carving as part of Christmas in Marble Falls.

HLCA president Bill Rives loves watching plein air artists work (including his wife). “To paint is incredible in and of itself, but to paint a scene in which light is constantly changing, shadows are

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Auer Haus Cabernet Grill Casey Craig Charles Morin Fine Arts Chuck and Barbara Mauldin Die Künstler von Fredericksburg Fredericksburg Art Guild Fredericksburg Artist’s School Friends of Gillespie County Country Schools Gallery 330 Grape Creek Vineyards Heath Sparkling Wines Highland Arts Guild & Gallery Highland Lakes Creative Arts Hoffman Haus InSight Gallery Jill Holland Fine Art Kerr Arts & Cultural Center Keri Kropp Design Larry Jackson Gallery Mallory Agerton Maryneil Dance Museum of Western Art Nancy Bush Nan Henke Watercolor Workshop Pedernales Cellars Rivers Edge Gallery Slate Gray Gallery URBANherbal Yellow Door Studio

10.6 mi. 53.7 mi. 59 mi.

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Destination Art

Local galleries draw visitors to the Texas Hill Country.

Hill Country Images

830-342-7161 • sales@hillcountryimages.com • www.hillcountryimages.com America (PPA), the oldest and largest photography association in the United States. Several of her images have earned the Loan Collection Award, the highest individual award PPA gives, as well as other state and district awards.

Kathy Weigand is an accomplished photographer and artist and a native of Fredericksburg. She was raised on a small ranch outside of town, and the family’s quarter horses and Hereford cattle were her favorite subjects to sketch and photograph as a youth.

Western heritage is part of Weigand’s roots and is often reflected in her original artwork. Favorite subjects include the American West, Native American lifestyles, wild horses and local Texas Hill Country landscapes.

Weigand is mostly self-taught, and her signed oil paintings, prints and photographs have been acquired by clients and collectors across the country. Her images have been printed for use in marketing by large corporations, in advertising by local small businesses, and in books and magazines.

As an advocate for wild horses, Weigand donates part of the proceeds from her wild horse and equine art sales to nonprofits dedicated to keeping the West’s remaining wild horses safe.

She was awarded the prestigious Master of Photography degree by Professional Photographers of

InSight Gallery

214 West Main Street • 830-997-9920 • www.insightgallery.com Open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Sunday and Monday, by appointment—call 512-947-2916 or 830-998-4647. novices alike can come and enjoy the experience,” said Elizabeth Harris, who has owned and operated the gallery with her husband, Stephen, since 2015.

InSight Gallery represents a select group of today’s finest painters and sculptors. The 60 nationally recognized, award-winning artists are American Impressionist Society Masters, Cowboy Artists of America, Master Oil Painters of America and Pastel Society of America Masters. These artists are invited to participate in prestigious national museum shows, including Prix de West, Autry/Masters of the American West, Briscoe Museum’s “Night of Artists” and Eiteljorg Museum’s “Quest for the West.”

The gallery is located in the 1907 Schwarz building, which was restored in 2010. InSight Gallery staff shows everyone who walks in the door Fredericksburg hospitality. “We realize how fortunate we are to have this location — 8,000 square feet of open show space — tall ceilings, lots of natural light, original pine floors, original rock walls. It was an immaculate restoration,” she said.

“Amid such esteemed artists, we strive to provide a welcoming and hospitable environment so that art collectors, art lovers and art

For First Friday Art Walk, InSight Gallery remains open until 7:30 p.m.

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Fredericksburg’s Mother of Pearl By Sallie Lewis Inside designer Vanessa Tosoni’s Fredericksburg living room, strands of pearl necklaces glimmer in the afternoon sun. Pearls are a favorite of the Peruvian-born artist and a focal point of her collection, which she launched in 2006. “You can wear anything and once you put pearls on you are dressed up,” she said, lightly pressing the pearly pendant that glowed from her throat. Long before designing jewelry, Tosoni grew up in Lima, where she

was surrounded by art and creativity from an early age. “Art was always in my blood,” she shared, crediting her Peruvian mother, a fashion-designer, and her Italian father, a sculptor and an oil painter. Scattered around her Fredericksburg abode, canvases by J.E. Tosoni reveal the depth of her father’s talent, be it a still life of fruit on a simple white cloth, or a detailed landscape of Venice, Italy. Watching him paint was a masterclass in light, and something she admits drew her to the luminescence of pearls and gemstones.

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From childhood, she remembers fawning over amethyst crystal geodes and taking long walks with her family in the Peruvian mountains. There, they would find rocks and marble pieces left like treasure in the ground. Even still, nature is a steady source of inspiration for the artist who is drawn to organic stones and the splendor revealed from their facets within. “You don’t see the beauty until the stone has been cut and polished,” she said. “I love how you can expose the beauty of nature in such a unique way.” Like many artists, Tosoni’s journey to jewelry was a winding one. After immigrating to the United States in 1990, she studied graphic design at Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles. “As a graphic artist I was working but needed to do something more,” she shared. Weary of spending a lifelong career behind a computer screen, she began taking classes in jewelry design and making pieces on the side. Those finished pieces attracted the attention of both friends and strangers alike. In 2006, she decided to take a risk by launching her own business – and success quickly followed. Within the first six months she landed accounts with upward of fifty stores. That same year, she also met her husband, Luke Hricik. The couple married in 2008 and lived in Sonoma with their daughter before moving to Fredericksburg in 2019. Today, he is a Sommelier and the Director at Foyt Family Wines. More than fifteen years since establishing her brand, Tosoni has turned her passion into a prospering profession with famous clientele

like Eva Longoria, Sarah Jessica Parker, and Kamala Harris, to name a few. Some celebrities, like actress Madeleine Stowe, even have necklaces named after them. Be it a hand-hammered hoop earring or a hand-soldered golden chain, the designer’s artistry is deeply felt and part of the collection’s enduring allure. “My signature is layering,” she shared while styling a grouping of thin necklaces on a mannequin. The chain link bracelet jingling from her own wrist was made from scratch, with each link cut and soldered in sterling silver. Furthermore, because the collection is hand-crafted, no two pieces are exactly the same. Even her leather handbags are one of a kind, as each hide boasts its own unique markings. The bag business is Tosoni’s most recent venture and one she credits her mother for inspiring. Growing up, her parents ran a popular clothing shop in Lima selling all kinds of leather jackets, coats, and exotic furs. The smell of leather still sparks nostalgia. With bison hide in hand, she brought it to her nose, closed her eyes, and inhaled, letting the aroma take her back to her South American youth. Unlike many in the fashion industry, Tosoni is quick to admit she’s not one for designer culture. “I’m not a big brand person,” she said. “I like simple, practical, and unique.” Her bags are a fitting reflection of this: buttery soft, versatile, and easily foldable for convenience while traveling. With the scraps leftover from making these designs, the artist recognized

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another business opportunity. Today, she makes everything from business card holders to wallets, clutches, and bracelets, the latter of which are currently for sale at Vaudeville and in boutiques across California. Tosoni buys her leather from Chile, Argentina, Peru, and Italy in all colors of the rainbow, from chocolate to cherry, turquoise and lavender. One by one, she cuts them into strips and glues soft, contrasting clipping of suede to the underside of her bracelets so they’re smooth on the skin. On top, she fashions the wristlets with sterling tubes and gemstones that are made even more beautiful when layered with other pieces. At her long wooden worktable, raw African turquoise and malachite pendants glisten in shades of green. “I like rustic, natural, organic pieces,” she shared while selecting a piece. Crowning each of these charms is

Tosoni’s signature horseshoe setting, which she hand-solders as a tribute to her early days spent riding in Peru. The designer keeps her soldering station in the garage where she prefers working early to the sounds of soft jazz or classical music. Here, she explains that despite the years that’ve passed and the growth that’s ensued, she remains committed to her longtime vendors located around the world. Just as she is passionate about these relationships so too is she committed to the responsible sourcing of stones. “Nothing has been exploited,” she shared proudly. Back in the living room, Tosoni prepares for a client meeting. Holiday music plays softly from a speaker nearby while the family’s cat, a fluffy Himalayan named Oliver Twist, sleeps peacefully beneath the Christmas tree. Despite moving here just recently, the house feels like a well-lived-in home,

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albeit one to a humble and hardworking artist. Strands of freshwater pearls glow by the street-front window next to earrings fixed with watermelon tourmalines, Tahitian pearls, and smoky quartz. Much like her jewelry,

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Tosoni’s journey from Lima to Los Angeles, Sonoma, and finally Fredericksburg brings a new layer of culture, color, and craftsmanship to the Texas Hill Country.


TEXAS HILL COUNTRY

Destination Art

Local galleries draw visitors to the Texas Hill Country.

Kerr Arts & Cultural Center

228 Earl Garrett Street, Kerrville, TX 78028 • 830-895-2911 www.kacckerrville.com Open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Kerr Arts and Cultural Center (KACC) was founded in 1995 by local artists as an art destination in downtown Kerrville. KACC is located in the historic 1935 post office building, which was completely renovated into a first-class arts venue. Exhibits change once a month.

Texas Furniture Makers Show in November. In between the two events, on September 19-25, KACC will pair with Outdoor Painters Society for a plein air event. KACC also hosts cultural events and classes and workshops for artists of all ages and abilities. The gift shop features one-ofa-kind creations by local artists. Admission is always free.

KACC is the home of the Southwest Gourd Fine Art Show in May and the

Larry Jackson Fine Art & Antiques

201 East San Antonio Street • 830-997-0073 • www.larryjacksonantiques.com Open Tuesday through Saturday, 12-5 p.m. She describes her husband, co-owner Larry Jackson, as “Fredericksburg’s very own ‘Antiques Roadshow’ expert.” Larry brings 40 years of experience in art and antiques to the gallery. His expertise is recognized throughout the United States.

For more than 25 years, Larry Jackson has served Fredericksburg with a commitment to carry fine art, quality antiques and uncommon home decor. The gallery carries estate artwork by notable and collected artists, such as Vives Atsara, G. Harvey, Porfirio Salinas, Robert Pummill, Robert Wood and many others. Also featured are Western and contemporary bronzes that complement contemporary households.

The gallery specializes in helping clients indulge in artful living, with fine rugs, unique lighting, objects d’art and what Jeannie calls “unforgettables” of every imaginable description.

“We assist both first-time and longtime clients to select the perfect art, antiques, modern furnishings and accessories to create an up-to-date yet timeless look that will be enjoyed for a lifetime,” said Jeannie Jackson, whose education focused on art and design.

Larry and Jeannie Jackson are among the founding members of First Friday Art Walk.

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TEXAS HILL COUNTRY

Destination Art

Local galleries draw visitors to the Texas Hill Country.

Chuck and Barbara Mauldin

www.barbaramauldinart.com • www.chuckmauldin.com scenery as subject matter. His training as a research chemist fuels his artwork.

The Mauldins met when Chuck was a teaching assistant in an organic chemistry class and Barbara was a student, studying biology. At the time, they didn’t know they both began painting as children. Now they are married and share a studio.

“I think the connection between the two is a strong curiosity, a willingness to try new things, even when the outcome may be in doubt,” he said. Both Mauldins are members of Oil Painters of America and the American Impressionist Society, both have participated in national juried competitions, and both have had paintings printed on the cover of the Art Guide.

Barbara’s work is impressionistic and focuses on color, especially of prickly pear cactus. “Central Texas has a great variety of colors. We get a beautiful spring green, then all the flowers arrive in spring, and early summer brings cactus blooms. In autumn, we discover oaks, sycamores and cypress along the creeks and rivers, sporting fall color,” she said.

For more information about either Barbara or Chuck’s work, contact Gallery 330. “We’re very happy to be represented by such a wonderful gallery on the Main Street of Fredericksburg,” Chuck said.

Chuck’s paintings explore light, using Hill Country livestock, barns and

Charles Morin Fine Art

244 West Main Street • 210-710-6305 Gallery: www.vintagetexaspaintings.com • Estate sales: www.cmestatesales.com Open Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunday and Monday and after hours, by appointment. Charles Morin Fine Art is a second location for Morin, whose other gallery is in San Antonio. He owns more than 1,400 highly collectible paintings, and 95% of the work displayed in his galleries belongs to him.

works by living artists, including Martin Grelle, a member of the Cowboy Artists of America, and Steve Forbis’ colored pencil drawings that look like photographs. Morin’s collection includes 19th century Texas pottery and custom handmade furniture by Rex White.

“I sell art by famous dead people. My specialty is G. Harvey,” Morin said. He says visitors don’t need to know a lot about art to appreciate what he carries.

The original Charles Morin Fine Art is located at 1020 Austin Highway in San Antonio, within walking distance of the McNay Art Museum. It’s open Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday and Monday and after hours by appointment. The frame shop is only at the San Antonio location.

The Fredericksburg gallery includes paintings by Texas legends, such as Charles Beckendorf, Porfirio Salinas, Everett Spruce, Julian Onderdonk and his father, Robert Jenkins Onderdonk. Morin also carries work by Janet Lippincott and Birger Sandzén and

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The Draw of the West:

A Pilgrimage from Italy to Texas

Photo by Hans Bauer

By Lisa Butler-Giamporcaro Growing up, sitting on a hard wooden bench in the dark theater, a small Italian boy watched blackand-white Westerns, fascinated with the adventures of John Wayne and Alan Ladd. The faraway, open spaces and desertic landscapes contrasted with his village of Castello d’Argile in Emilia Romagna, with its narrow streets, espresso cafes and the 18thcentury stone palazzo communale where his father, the town’s tax official, was granted lodging for the family. Benini lived in eight different countries, and eventually chose to settle in the Texas Hill Country. Might those early Western movies have compelled him to seek this land of rugged live oak trees and vast open spaces? We visited him in Marble Falls at the beginning of January. In Benini’s own words, “The story goes back a long way – all the way to

1941, April 17, the beginning of spring in northern Italy.” Born in Imola, a small town 26 kilometers from Bologna, Benini arrived amidst the chaos of World War II. Assaulted with brutal sights and sounds of conflict, he often retreated to the local church where religious paintings and iconography surrounded him during peaceful moments. Eventually, he left his small town and traveled Europe as an itinerant artist, visiting major museums, painting Italian landscapes and village scenes as he traveled. A deep believer of buona fortuna, Benini let himself be guided in both his career and life by an instinct for self-preservation and magic. His decades-long career has spanned many countries and equally diverse subject matter. Travels took him to the white sandy beaches of Grand Bahama Island, then to a tiny village

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south of Gainesville, Florida, where he met and married his wife, Lorraine. In 1999, after 12 years in Hot Springs National Park, Benini and Lorraine chose the Texas Hill Country. They purchased a ranch once owned by President Johnson and established The Benini Galleries and Sculpture Ranch outside of Johnson City that Texas Highways Magazine called “an oasis of art.” Miles of sculpture trails showcased more than 160 large-scale, contemporary sculptures by artists from here and abroad. It wasn’t their intention to start a sculpture ranch, but after they installed a few pieces from their own collection, hopeful artists were calling to see if their work could be included. A resigned Benini said, “This is a godforsaken land. It only grows what it wants, and it wants sculpture.” Thousands of visitors followed annually. The popularity of the project eventually took time and focus away from their creative priorities. After scouting seven states west of Texas, the pioneering couple discovered a 35-acre property near Marble Falls about forty-five minutes from Fredericksburg. A pre-existing compound of buildings became Benini’s studio, Lorraine’s office, the archives, an extensive fine arts library, and a cottage residence. The first priority was to build a 6,500-square-foot museum to house hundreds of Benini’s paintings and three-dimensional works. Lorraine explains, “Museo Benini is a singleartist museum in the European tradition of conserving an artist’s work. An opportunity to witness the evolution of the career of one artist. A place for quiet contemplation and study.” As art writer Barbara Purcell remarked, “entering the museum is like entering a church”.

Asked what his work is about, Benini will quickly slide around a direct answer with an anecdote or a remonstration that artists do not

Photo by Hans Bauer

share their secrets. He is so in his work – work that is a product of a lifetime of experience, study, and application – that when he finally faces the canvas and paints, it seems he isn’t thinking about anything at all. He is, rather, surrendering to the mystical process of letting go that is necessary to be a conduit for creation.

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Benini is a master of acrylics, blending this notoriously fastdrying paint with a finesse that other artists will tell you is impossible. His luminescent, jewel-tone colors convey intense emotion and also somehow his indelible Italian-ness. Lines, spheres, orbs, and splatters are defining elements in his paintings that speak to me of journeys and progression, remembering and reconciliation. In the end, perhaps he is right to avoid the question of what his work means. It doesn’t mean anything. Benini’s work is a profoundly individualistic experience that, if you slow down long enough to become absorbed, takes you over and changes you. Reflects who you are back to yourself in the ouroboros that is inevitably what it means to experience art rather than see it.

Now open by appointment to university and school tours and visits by art lovers, the museum exhibits work that spans more than 60 years of Benini’s career from his 162 solo exhibitions internationally. Stepping outside the “art church” to catch my breath, there is much to absorb: the artist’s compulsion to create; the choices that led Benini and Lorraine to each other; their dynastic creative collaborations that have culminated in this place. It is a place at once entirely intentional and at the same time completely reliant on the vagaries of fate, just like art. And just like that little boy in the dark Italian theatre, where romantic film giants whispered in his ear to find the promised land.

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Destination Art

Local galleries draw visitors to the Texas Hill Country.

The Museum of Western Art

1550 Bandera Highway, Kerrville, TX 78028 • 830-896-2553 www.museumofwesternart.com Open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The legend of the West lives at The Museum of Western Art, which grew out of the Cowboy Artists of America (CAA), an invitation-only group. CAA member and sculptor Jason Scull is the resident artist, working in a studio on the grounds. Just step on the porch and knock on the sliding glass door to say hello.

Artifacts, including knives, guns and saddles, are also on display. The interactive Journey West exhibition in the Children’s Gallery allows kids to dress in period clothing, climb aboard a Conestoga wagon and sit inside a tipi. The museum was the last structure designed by noted Texas architect O’Neil Ford. The Fred Fellows life-size bronze “An Honest Day’s Work” is the museum’s most-photographed item.

Many authors have worked in the museum’s non-circulating library, the Griff Carnes Research Center, including James Michener, for “Texas,” and Larry McMurtry, for “Lonesome Dove.”

Outside, the Masel S. Quinn Pavilion overlooks the city of Kerrville and hosts outdoor events and education activities. The last Saturday of every month is Family Free Day. Check the website for upcoming events.

The museum’s permanent collection includes 150 sculptures and 250 paintings by artists working from the mid-20th century through today.

Rivers Edge

832 & 838 Water Street, Kerrville, TX 78028 • 830-895-5184 www.riversedgegallery.net Open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., or by appointment. Wilson specializes in conservation of family heirlooms, priceless art and vintage photographs.

Debbie and Mike Wilson own Rivers Edge, “The Jewel of Kerrville.” The 20,000-square-foot gallery also offers fine art printing and custom framing. The Wilsons can make copies of photographs or paintings and print them on fine art canvas or paper. They also clean and repair oil paintings.

“I do 3-D objects, like flags, Army uniforms. My favorite one was a CIA agent’s guns and handcuffs and badges,” Wilson said. “I do a lot of things that other frame shops have no idea how to do. When I frame it, you can’t even tell how it’s attached.”

“I’m not trying to be an upper-end gallery. I want to be a middle-class gallery, where they walk in and the artwork is affordable,” Debbie Wilson said. “We’re the best-kept secret in Kerrville.”

She loves hearing the stories customers bring, along with their valued heirlooms, and the trust they place in Rivers Edge to preserve their treasures.

Rivers Edge represents about 30 artists, including painters, sculptors and jewelry-makers. The gallery’s eclectic offerings include traditional and contemporary work.

“We try to save our customers as much money as possible but give them the art they deserve,” Wilson said.

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Destination Art

Local galleries draw visitors to the Texas Hill Country.

URBANHerbal

407 Whitney Street • 830-456-9667 • www.urbanherbal.com UrbanHerbal is off the beaten path — and that’s a good thing. Away from the bustle of downtown, visitors find art in three exhibit spaces as well as a network of gardens, a labyrinth, a greenhouse filled with beautiful plants and a gift shop of handmade herbal products. UrbanHerbal offers private classes and is available for weddings and special events. The expanded shop and laboratory sell comestibles, fragrances, skin care, candles and more. Each item is made on site by founder and owner Bill Varney. He calls UrbanHerbal “a natural antidote to routine.”

gallery and in turn, Varney spotlights a different artist at each First Friday Art Walk, building an entire event around their work. Varney, a former restaurateur, founded Fredericksburg Herb Farm and is the author of the award-winning book “Herbs.” He’s been featured on the Food Network for his knowledge of all things herbal. And he serves on the board of The Herb Society of America and oversees the south-central region of the U.S., including Texas and parts of Arkansas and Oklahoma. During First Friday Art Walk, UrbanHerbal hosts a reception until 8 p.m.

The gallery exhibits local artists. Each one is actively involved with the

The Yellow Door Studio & The Studio Next Door 810 & 808 North Llano Street • 830-456-1097 info@theyellowdoorstudio.com • www.theyellowdoorstudio.com Schedule available online.

along with kids’ camps. Private parties for Canvas Painting or Pottery Painting can be scheduled with a phone call.

“The story of our little studio is simple,” said Camille Cohn, owner of The Yellow Door and one of its instructors. “We wanted to create community around art. Young, old, experienced or novice — all are welcome. We hope our studio educates, inspires and enriches our community.”

In 2021, Cohn expanded into The Studio Next Door, providing classes in clay along with open studio hours. “The addition includes a ceramics studio that offers Paint Your Own Pottery and memberships for people wanting to practice hand building and wheel throwing,” she said.

For adults, The Yellow Door offers Saturday evening Art & Vino classes, wine glass painting, workshops taught by local artists, art history classes, DIY wood projects and plein air painting experiences around Fredericksburg and at local wineries. For children, The Yellow Door provides after-school and homeschool art programs for students from kindergarten through high school,

All the activities at The Yellow Door and The Studio Next Door are designed around one theme: Art Makes Me Happy. Contact Cohn for information about classes or to schedule private parties and team-building events.

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artist index

A listing of artists from featured local galleries.

Die Künstler von Fredericksburg Kristin Ashman Ann Baltzer Jan Banfield Robert Behan Annette Bennett Bonnie Bondurant Vee Ann Brodnax Ruby Lee Clark Nancy Coon Becky Copeland Stephanie Cox Sophie Cuppes Caroline Dechert Nora Dempsey Virginia deWolf Maryneil Dance Ann Douzat Jane Drynan Frieda Duggan Penny Duncan Loretta Eckert Donna Els Diana Faulkner Crystal Fox Dalton Fromme Beth Garrett Robert Ghiselli Ruby Annette Gonzalez Linda Hall Truby Hardin Nancy Hardison Nan Henke

Brenda Hild Svetlana Hipsky Virginia Howell Beth Hughes Ann Jackson Stacy Jenschke Mary Helen Johnson Peg Joyce Janet Justice Sheila Kale Donna Lafferty Marc Land Bridget Langdale Grace Larson Mary Lee Marion Loucks Kathy Lux Joyce Malatek Tom Martin Deb Mason Barbara Mauldin Susanne McComack Pat Miller Jan Miller Tom Miller Suzanne Morhart Louise Murphy Nancy Natho Karen Oldham Edyth O’Neill Melissa Opio Cathy Pankratz

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Marsha Pape Christa Peyton Martha Roland Laura Ronstadt Jeanne Rothberg Donald “Kaylen” Savoie Mary Kaye Sawyer-Morse Johnnette Scheuer Alice Segner Carol Seminara Keith Shafer Mary Simmons Nancy Skoog Linda Smith Bob Spencer Joanne Spencer Melissa Starry Bernadine Swanzy Emily Taylor Sue Thompson Susan Crawford Tracy Ron Vantz Marija Vojkovich Patricia Weeden Kathy Weigand Pat Wilkins Carolyn Wilkinson Fredda Williams Fred Witters Richard Williamson Bonnie Woods

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TEXAS HILL COUNTRY

artist index

Fredericksburg Art Guild & Gallery Bonnie Bondurant Teri Green Truby Hardin Nancy Hardison Nan Henke Peggy Joyce Chris Johnson Mary Lee

Marion Loucks Joyce Malatek Deb Mason Michael McAleer Therese McAteer Jan Miller Tom Miller Cathy Pankratz

Donna Roche Martha Roland Donald Savoie Keith Shafer Melissa Starry Gayle Wilson Kristine Ziems

G. Harvey Susan Hotard Kate Kiesler Stevie Jo Lake Nancy lilly Denise LaRue Mahlke Chuck Mauldin Barbara Mauldin Bill Mittag Kathie Odom John Rasberry Jerry Ricketson

Sherry Salari Sander Stefan Savides Allison Leigh Smith C.S. Talley Nancy Tankersley Ezra Tucker Nelson Tucker Jeff Williams Todd A. Williams Sara (Ahearn) Winters Marie Wise

Gallery 330 Mallory Agerton Daniel Anz Blair Atherholt Andre Balyon John Bennett Carla Bosch Larisa Brechun Julie Davis Terry Donahue Bill Farnsworth John Austin Hanna Cristall Harper

Gallery 330, Estate Collection Wanda Choate Tony Eubanks John Fawcett

Matthew Hillier Robert Pummill Joseph Sulkowski

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artist index InSight Gallery Cyrus Asfary Roy Andersen Carolyn Anderson Dan Bodelson Phil Bob Borman Jeremy Browne Tom Browning Mary Ross Buchholz George Bumann Scott Burdick Nancy Bush Jill Carver Cheri Christensen Douglas Clark John Coleman Nicholas Coleman Mick Doellinger Tom Dorr Leslie Duke Michelle Dunaway Teresa Elliott Jim Eppler John Fawcett Daniel Gerhartz Walt Gonske Pat Green

Bruce Greene David Griffin Brian Grimm Bob Guelich Abigail Gutting Eldridge Hardie Mark Haworth Qiang Huang Julee Hutchison Oreland C Joe, Sr. Francois Koch Damian Lechoszest David A Leffel Jhenna Quinn Lewis Calvin Liang Richard Loffler Susan Lyon Kyle Ma Sherrie McGraw Jeff merrill Robert Moore James Morgan Tibor Nagy Kay Northup George Northup JoAnn Peralta

Joan Potter Tony Pro Robert Pummill Robert Reynolds David Frederick Riley Laura Robb James Robinson Gladys Roldan-de-Moras Bill Schenck Lindsay Scott Mian Situ Aleksander Titovets Lyuba Titovets Hsin-Yao Tseng Clive Tyler Michael Ome Untiedt Ann Kraft Walker Brittany Weistling Fritz White Jeremy Winborg David Yorke Jie Wei Zhou Melissa Starry Gayle Wilson Kristine Ziems

Rivers Edge Gallery Rivers Edge Gallery, Kerrville Paulette Alsworth MaryAnn Brummer Cliff Cavin John Dormer

Curtis Dykes Travis Keese George Rhys James Snuffer

Colin Turner

Mike Wilson

URBANherbal Art Gallery Ben Beckendorf Charlie Briggs Ruby Lee Clark Crystal Fox Jim Fox Susan Gleye

Juan Maria Gonzalez Nan Henke Beth Hughes Ronda Ivy Louise Murphy Melissa Opio 50

Kevin C. Quattlebaum Carla Sanchez Patsy Sasek Cynthia Thompson John Williams


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FREDERICKSBURG TX • AN AMERICAN ART DESTINATION

Cover artwork: Spring Breeze, by Robert Reynolds


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