Prime Time Jan. 2023

Page 1

Prime Time

Going steady

Frederick High School couple retire together

Sacks’ century

100-year-old lawyer has practiced law for 74 years

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Retire your shovel not your lifestyle

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Lauren LaRocca

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Angela Roberts Calendar Editor Sue Guynn

Photographer Bill Green Multimedia Marketing Consultants

James Constantine Heather Lowman Kathi Smith

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On the cover: Carl and Linda Reed, who have been married for 51 years and will soon retire from Frederick High School, where they have worked for many years.

Staff photo by Bill Green

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THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST | PRIME TIME FREDERICK | JANUARY 2023 | 3

Frederick High School lovebirds retire together

‘Cadets forever’

In a conference room inside of Frederick High School’s main office on a recent afternoon, Linda and Carl Reed recounted the many different ways their paths could have crossed — but didn’t — in the years leading up to their first date.

The two New Englanders attended the University of New Hampshire at around the same time. Later, when Linda’s best friend from college married Carl’s best friend, they were both at the wedding. Carl was the best man.

“I know I shook her hand,” Carl said. “I probably shook the hand of everybody who came through the wedding party.”

But the first time they remember meeting each other, they were a long way away from Durham, New Hampshire. Nearly 6,000 miles away.

Carl and Linda Reed, who have been married for 51 years and retired from Frederick High School together at the end of 2022, started to get to know each other while strolling the streets of Heidelberg, Germany.

Linda, who was in charge of attendance at the local high school since 1995, had stopped in the city while touring Europe after her first year of teaching home economics in Connecticut. At the time, Carl, who ran the high

school’s front desk, was stationed there as part of his military service. Linda’s best friend from college, the same friend whose wedding Linda and Carl both attended, suggested she meet up with him.

When Linda wrote to him, he responded, promising to show her around. They wound up spending a whole day together. For lunch, they went to Carl’s favorite pizza restaurant. It felt like they had managed to fit 10 dates into one.

In some ways, Carl is grateful it took him and Linda so many years to meet.

“I needed to grow up,” he said. “I was 17 when I went to college. It was good for me to mature. I needed to see Miss Linda when I was in the Army.”

Carl was drafted for the Vietnam War when he was working on his master’s degree at the University of New Hampshire. He didn’t want to fight, and he wanted to finish his studies, so he appealed the draft all the way up to the governor’s office.

In the end, he was able to graduate. He defended his thesis on a Friday and joined the Army that Monday, a day before he knew he would be drafted.

In another turn of good fortune, he was stationed in Europe, instead of Vietnam, and was allowed to remain in Heidelberg as a clerk, rather than become an officer.

After he and Linda met, they wrote letters to each other every day. When Carl got out of the Army three months early to work on his friend’s Christmas tree farm in Connecticut, Linda came to visit him every weekend.

They were married on July 11, 1971, and moved to Gaithersburg, so Carl could work at the National Institutes of Health. Linda soon began teaching home economics at Frederick High School and West Frederick Middle School.

Their two sons later graduated from the local high school.

“I feel like we’ve been cadets forev-

er,” Carl said.

Linda nodded. “A long time.”

She stopped working at the high school after her children were born but continued volunteering at the school. She returned to work in the attendance office in 1995. After her husband retired, he followed her there five years later.

It was always their dream to work together, they said, and for the past 22 years, it’s been wonderful. They walk to the high school together every morning, rain or shine, and use their summer vacations to travel.

For many years, when Carl took over

4 | JANUARY 2023 | PRIME TIME FREDERICK | THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST
PEOPLE

manning the front desk, they worked just a few feet away from one another. They also love their coworkers. Carl survived two heart attacks and a bout with cancer while working at Frederick High, and the school’s employees were so supportive of him and Linda.

But now feels like the right time to move on, the couple said. Their last day at the school was Dec. 22, the last school day of the calendar year for everyone attending Frederick County Public Schools.

It probably won’t sink in that they aren’t going back, Linda said, until she and Carl are in Australia — the first

destination in their post-retirement voyages.

While they’re sure they’ll miss their coworkers and students, they know their last day won’t be goodbye forever. They plan to stick around the Frederick area. Some children have joked that they’ll probably still walk to school every morning and stand at the door, waving hello.

“Well, we might,” Carl said, chuckling.

“Not that early,” Linda said with a grin.

Follow Angela Roberts on Twitter: @24_angier

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST | PRIME TIME FREDERICK | JANUARY 2023 | 5
Carl and Linda Reed, who have been married for 51 years and will soon retire from Frederick High School, where they have worked for many years. Staff photos by Bill Green

Should I leave my child a buck?

It is irresponsible enough that absent-minded parents occasionally manage to leave their children behind when they leave the park or get off the bus. Even so, it seems far more incomprehensible that parents could possibly forget to include one or more of their kids when they are in the process of drafting their wills and allocating their estates.

However, believe it or not, this happens often. Conscientious parents might draft their wills after the birth of a child or when the rest of their family is still relatively young.

But sometimes, another child will be born later on, and the parents will simply forget to update their wills after the fact. While it is not always a fatal omission or an intentional act, there are unlucky consequences that can arise as a result.

That said, many states will consider the child who was born later to be a beneficiary. This is because states will often revert to relevant intestacy rules, which are the default guidelines that govern situations where parents die without a will in the first place.

So, the courts have ways by which they can rectify an inadvertent omission or a clerical mistake. This should remedy the problem unless the wills left behind by parents have specifically excluded the omitted child on purpose.

How to leave a token bequest

Disinherited heirs may initially be shocked to find out that their parents left them either a very small amount of money or even nothing at all. Children may regard a situation such as this to be insulting, leading them to question the relationship they had with their deceased parent or guardian.

It makes sense to interpret such a situation as adding salt to the wound. Many

estate lawyers suggest that testators leave at least a nominal amount of their estate to an heir whom they wish to cut off rather than simply failing to mention them by name.

At a bare minimum, this alternative offers some sort of closure to the child being excluded or omitted. That said, the bequest does not need to be in the form of money.

People often leave sentimental heir looms with very little financial value as a gesture of affection. If you wish to be queath your old, cracked teapot instead of allocating any of your money to your child, you could do just that while accomplish ing the goal of including every one in your will.

In all fairness, William Shake speare left his wife his second-best bed in his will, and while beds were indeed much more valu able 400 years ago than they are today, the point still stands. You may also want to write a memo to yourself and state your decision to only leave a trivial amount to your child.

The document can serve to re inforce that your choice was not impulsive nor was it conceived as a result of external pressure. That said, be careful with your wording.

Try not to attempt to come across as being overly emotional or critical when drafting your justifications. If your will is ever challenged in the future, any cir

cumstances you originally cited might no longer be true.

For example, if you describe your good-for-nothing son and state that he has never done a day of honest work in his life, he might be holding down a wellpaid job when it comes time to challenge the contents of your will.

Less is more

While certain people will encourage testators to leave something small for potential heirs, other experts will discourage people from even offering the tiniest of bequests. Those with this mindset would contend that it is more cost effective to merely acknowledge the relationship and leave it

The real goal is to at least mention the disinherited person in a brief fashion so that you can address their existence while eliminating the possibility of them believing they were accidentally overlooked. Moreover, those who contest wills might latch onto situations, such as a one-dollar bequest, deem-

ing it a cruel provocation that is out of character in regard to the testator.

For instance, the disinherited individual might use the minimal bequest as evidence of mental incapacity on the part of the testator. The less you give the disinherited individuals to work with, the more likely your requests will be upheld.

Another danger of leaving even a single dollar is that any amount of money will automatically make the child a beneficiary. Adding a beneficiary to the list can affect the protracted probate process.

Once you have officially transformed someone into a beneficiary of your estate, the executor will be obliged to distribute accounting documents, pleadings and administrative records to them as they must do for all beneficiaries. This costs money, and even the most mundane administrative tasks can take away from the estate’s assets while also delaying probate resolutions.

If you ultimately decide against a bequest, you can achieve similar results with the help of straightforward language. Your attorney can draft words to the effect that after thoughtful and careful consideration, you have decided not to include Junior.

There are a number of ways to phrase your intentions or state your preferences. For instance, you could include a clause such as “I am intentionally disinheriting Junior as well as Junior’s descendants for reasons I deem to be sufficient.”

It is always recommended you consult with a lawyer as you work to prepare your will. Seeking expert advice is imperative, especially if you are contemplating the idea of making a token bequest.

From the Law Office of Lena A. Clark, 129 W. Patrick St., #11, Frederick; lenaclarklegal.com.

6 | JANUARY 2023 | PRIME TIME FREDERICK | THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST
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‘I want to keep going’

100-year-old lawyer has practiced law for 74 years

Some people live for 74 years. Others practice law for that long — and counting.

Meet Stanley Sacks, a 100-year-old Norfolk attorney who has practiced since 1948. That makes him the longest-serving attorney in the state at any point since the Virginia State Bar began keeping records in 1938.

That’s a lot of cases — a lot of phone calls with clients and a lot of legal briefs — in a century of life. Sacks’ son, also an attorney, estimates his father has represented upward of 25,000 clients in his life.

Sacks doesn’t get around as easily as he once did. He uses a wheelchair, no longer goes to court and hasn’t been to his firm’s office, Sacks & Sacks, since before the pandemic.

But Sacks, the firm’s senior partner, works regularly from home, making phone calls with a robust voice and polished demeanor. He typically works 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. The challenges of the job, he said, help keep his mind young.

“It’s a wonderful profession,” Sacks said.

Most of his work involves personal injury cases — talking to his clients and pushing insurance companies to settle. He said he’s good at that “because of the experience that I’ve had — you know, 70-something years practicing.”

He reads the medical charts, sometimes involving several doctors, “to acquaint myself with all the injuries my client has,” Sacks said. “The more knowledgeable I am, the more I can discover in those medical records and

put that together with what [the client] tells me.”

Sacks then calls the insurance companies and knows how to push them to settle. He knows exactly which parts of his client’s case to emphasize, such as that his client will come across well to a jury, and which ones to downplay — all while being a straight shooter.

“That’s the fun of it, too,” he said. “You don’t shortcut it, but you’re trying to win with your skill.”

Sacks has an assigned investigator on his cases. He doesn’t have a home computer but accesses Google on his phone for research. He also has paralegals downtown who can get him whatever files he needs.

“Just making it to 100 and being able to breathe is a remarkable milestone,” said his son Andrew Sacks, a law partner with his father. “But here’s somebody who’s actually not only there, he’s productive. He’s sharp,

mentally. He’s motivated. He’s curious still. It’s just wonderful.”

A few months ago, an employee of the Virginia State Bar’s membership department recently noticed that Sacks was born in 1922 — and still regularly submitting his annual continuing legal education hours, a crucial part of keeping an attorney licensed.

Dee Norman, editor of Virginia Lawyer, a publication of the Virginia State Bar, said the agency “threw

8 | JANUARY 2023 | PRIME TIME FREDERICK | THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST
Billy Schuerman/The Virginian-Pilot
PEOPLE
Stanley Sacks sits for a portrait at the kitchen table at his home in Norfolk, Va., on Nov. 10. Sacks is 100 years old and the oldest active attorney in Virginia. He works from the kitchen table in his house every day. “He practiced until the very end too,” Sacks said about his father, who started the Sacks & Sacks firm.

down the gauntlet” in October, saying he may be the nation’s oldest active attorney.

“We put on social media that he’s perhaps the oldest practicing attorney in the United States,” Norman said. “We were waiting to see if Texas or Florida or California would say, ‘We’ve got an active attorney who’s 101.’ But I haven’t heard of it.”

Legal work is in Sacks’ blood.

His late father, Herman Sacks, the son of a Lithuanian Jewish rabbi, began practicing law in downtown Norfolk in 1911, and he began his own firm there a few years later. Like his son, Herman also had longevity, living until 97 and working until the week before he died in 1983.

“He was talking law to us and reading the newspaper in the last hours,” Andrew Sacks said of his grandfather, saying the three generations practiced together for three years.

Stanley Sacks grew up in Norfolk with two sisters, one still living at 96.

He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps in the Pacific during World War II, then graduated from the Washington & Lee law school in 1948. He immediately went to work with his father.

Sacks said there are lots of differences between how law is practiced now versus how it was practiced when he was cutting his teeth as a new lawyer. For one thing, he said, lawyers were not as specialized back then, taking on criminal law, civil law, divorces and lots more.

“A lot of people were solo practitioners,” he said. “And they did a little bit of everything. You had to have the knowledge.”

Moreover, Sacks said, the law was a decidedly white male club. He said out of “a couple hundred” lawyers in Norfolk at the time, there were only a couple Black law firms in the entire city, with a few lawyers apiece.

Sacks said the city’s law firms were centralized near the downtown courthouses, and offline conversations be-

tween lawyers and judges were more frequent. “Things were a bit more informal,” he said.

Without Google and legal research websites, lawyers would actually have to read all those law books lining their shelves. “You can get in five minutes on Google what would take me a day to get out those books before,” Sacks said. “No more of that burning the midnight oil poring through those books.”

Sacks hit a turning point in his career in the early 1950s.

He said though he began as a generalist, he happened to be in New York City on vacation with his wife when they came across a lawyers’ convention focused on an up-and-coming legal field: personal injury law.

Soon, personal injury cases — from car accidents to medical malpractice to slip and fall cases — would become Sacks’ career focus. He bought a lot of books on personal injury law, learning all he could about the field, he said.

But that experience led him to be-

come a voracious reader on a host of topics, including astronomy, travel, history and biographies. At one point, his collection reached upward of 5,000 books.

“I realized that there’s so much that I didn’t know, and it opened up just a desire to know about other things,” Sacks said. “I wanted to know everything, and reading became a great part of my life.”

He said all that reading has kept him mentally sharp even after a century of life.

Between the reading and legal work, Sacks had time to have a family, too. His wife of 68 years, Carole, died last year, and he has two children — Andrew and Bette Ann — and seven grandchildren.

Sacks was one of nine lawyers who founded the Virginia Trial Lawyers Association in 1960, the only one of the founders who’s still alive. That organization now has several thousand members statewide.

Sacks also served two terms on the House of Delegates in the Virginia General Assembly. He represented Norfolk as a Democrat from 1966 to 1970 and helped lead the revolt against a political machine of powerful conservative Democrats once led by Harry Byrd.

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NOVEMBER CALENDAR

Events are subject to change. Contact the sponsoring organization for any updates.

JAN. 1

First Day Hike

Easy, self-guided 2.2-mile hike along Hunting Creek and over U.S. 15 via a steep footbridge to the historic Catoctin Furnace Site.

Time: All day

Location: Cunningham Falls State Park, 6709 Cunningham Falls Park Road, Thurmont Contact: 301-271-7574 or dnr. maryland.gov

First Day Hike

Lower Falls and Cliff Trail Loop. Ranger-led moderate 1.25-mile hike. No pre-registration required. Time: 11 a.m.

Location: Meet at the Falls trailhead, Cunningham Falls State Park, 14274 William Houck Drive, Thurmont Contact: 301-271-7574 or cunninghamfalls.statepark@maryland. gov

First Day Hike

Self-guided easy 1-mile hike on combination of marked trails with three overlooks. Begins at High Knob Nature Center and follow signage. Free.

Time: All day

Location: Gambrill State Park, 8448 High Knob Road, Frederick Contact: 301-271-7574 or cunninghamfalls.statepark@maryland. gov

First Day Hike

Ranger-led 4-mile hike beginning at Crampton’s Gap and hike on the AT to Brownsville Pass, one of the lesserknown locations that played a major role in the 1862 Maryland Campaign and the Battle of South Mountain. Once we reach Brownsville Pass, you will have the option to hike back or continue towards Weverton Cliff Overlook. No registration required.

Time: 1 p.m.

Location: Gathland State Park, 900 Arnoldstown Road, Jefferson Contact: 301-791-4656 or greenbrier. statepark@maryland.gov

JAN. 2

FAC After Hours & Yogamour: Restorative Yoga with Soundbath

Take a break and join a Gentle Yoga Flow on the main level while enjoying art work that adorn the walls of this historic space. This is a practice available to ALL levels which includes Beginners. Some yoga mats available. $15.

Time: 7:30 p.m.

Location: FAC Art Center, 5 E. Second St., Frederick Contact: yogamour.org/public-yogaclasses

JAN. 4

“Russian History: The Big Picture”

In many ways, Russia is unique in both geography and history. A study in contrasts, the story of Russia’s people is one of great achievements set against unbearable tragedies. This “Big Picture” survey of Russia’s long history brings to light the patterns, trends, and key events that have brought us to the Russia of today and the world view of its people. In partnership with the Institute for Learning in Retirement at Frederick Community College; underwritten by Shirley Cruickshank Wolfe bequest). Free. Pre-register (4-weeks). Time: 1:30 p.m.

Location: Frederick 50+ Center

Contact: VirtualSeniorCenter@

FrederickCountyMD.gov or 301-6003525

FAC After Hours: Joe Keyes Improv Jazz

Equal parts frontman, poet and conductor, Joe Keyes leads his ninepiece Late Bloomer Band through a fresh concoction of funk, R&B, soul, rock, and jazz while drawing on the musical auras of Miles Davis, Gil ScottHeron, Sun Ra, and early ParliamentFunkadelic. Free. Time: 7 p.m.

Location: FAC Art Center, 5 E. Second St., Frederick Contact: 301-662-4190 or frederickartscouncil.org

JAN. 5

Dementia Live Training

Dementia Live® is a high-impact, dementia simulation experience that immerses participants into life with dementia, resulting in a deeper understanding of what it’s like to live with cognitive impairment and sensory change. Caregivers, professionals, and individuals will better understand the hardships and confusion that occurs for a person with dementia. This training is open to the public. It is facilitated by Frederick County Senior Services Division and Daybreak Adult Day Services. Free, pre-register.

Time: 10 a.m.

Location: Daybreak Adult Day Services, 7819 Rocky Springs Road, Frederick

Contact: DementiaFriendlyFrederick@ FrederickCountyMD.gov or 301-6001234

Senior Fitness Class

Join Jen Ringer with Fusion Fitness as she leads a senior fitness class with modifications for all levels. Help with strength and stability related to the senior age groups. Free.

Time: 10:30 a.m.

Location: Walkersville Public Library, 2 S. Glade Road, Walkersville

Contact: 301-845-8880 or fcpl.org

Dance Off the Winter Blues

Are you ready to work off those holiday pounds? Reach new goals? Shake off the winter blahs? Come on in to dance it off with Salsa Aerobics. Get ready to move! Beginners welcome. Thursdays through Jan. 26. Free.

Time: 11:15 a.m. to noon

Location: Urbana Regional Library, 9020 Amelung St., Urbana

Contact: 301-600-7004

Mindfulness in Middletown

Mindfulness has been shown to reduce stress while helping us to feel more aware of ourselves and connected to the world around us. Join Ray Manyoky from

10 | JANUARY 2023 | PRIME TIME FREDERICK | THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST
the Frederick Meditation Center Staff file photo by Katina Zentz Chelsea Grabham, of Damascus, walks carefully through snow by her horse, Harley, at The Sevens Ranch near Jefferson in January 2022. The terrain across the property was coated with snow and a thick sheet of ice, an outcome from the winter storm that passed through the county Sunday night. The horses on the ranch wore horse blankets to protect themselves from the elements.

who will provide instruction and then lead us in a mindfulness practice. This will be followed by a Q&A session. Group meets every Thursday in January, except Jan. 12. Free.

Time: 6 to 7 p.m.

Location: Middletown Branch Library, 101 Prospect St., Middletown Contact: 301-600-7560 or fcpl.org/ calendar

JAN. 6

Pickleball 101

Beginner class is for an individual who has never played organized pickleball. Basic techniques and score keeping will be taught. Class size is limited. $25 city residents, $35 non-city. Pre-register. Time: 10:30 a.m. to noon, Fridays through Jan. 27

Location: Talley Rec Center on Fridays; Trinity Rec Center, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Mondays Jan. 9-30 Contact: 301-600-1492 or cityoffrederickmd.gov/webtrac

JAN. 7

First Saturday

Live music and entertainment, shopping and dining. See website for details.

Time: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Location: Downtown Frederick Contact: 301-698-8118 or downtownfrederick.org

Sierra Club Catoctin Group Meeting Meets monthly.

Time: 11 a.m. to noon

Location: Common Market Community Room, 927 W. Seventh St., Frederick Contact: 301-318-7995 or sierraclub. org/maryland/catoctin-group

JAN. 8

Breakfast Fundraiser

All-you-can-eat pancakes, scrambled eggs, sausage biscuits, sausage gravy, puddin’, hominy, muffins and more. Benefits the fire company; cancelled if snow emergency plan is in effect. $10 adults, $5 ages 6-12, under age 6 free; $12 for carryout. Prices subject to change as market prices dictate.

Time: 7 to 11 a.m.

Location: Union Bridge Fire Co., 8 W. Locust St., Union Bridge Contact: 410-775-7422 or 443-5479477

JAN. 9

Pickleball Advance Skills Clinics

Also Jan. 23, Feb. 6 and 20, and March 6 and 20. Pickleball 101 is a pre-requisite for this session to learn additional game strategy. $6 city residents, $8 non-city per session, registration required.

Time: 1:30 to 3 p.m.

Location: Talley Rec Center, 121 N. Bentz St., Frederick Contact: 301-600-1492 or cityoffrederickmd.gov/webtrac

JAN. 10

MAP: Programs Through Frederick Health

Learn about programs that may benefit you that are offered through Frederick Health. Maryland Access Point of Frederick County (MAP) is a trusted source of information and assistance for Frederick County residents who need or want to plan for their immediate and future needs. MAP serves adults 50 years and older, adults 18 years and older with a disability, family members and other caregivers, and health or business professionals. Free. Preregister.

Time: 9 a.m.

Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: VirtualSeniorCenter@ FrederickCountyMD.gov or 301-6001234

“Cold War: Tension and Response” Learn about the role of cryptology and Signals Intelligence during the Cold War. This is a virtual program. Presenter: Jennifer Wilcox, director of education, National Cryptologic Museum. Free. Pre-register.

Time: 2 p.m.

Location: Frederick & Urbana 50+ Centers. Also online Virtual 50+ Center Contact: VirtualSeniorCenter@ FrederickCountyMD.gov or 301-6007020

JAN. 11

Joy of Movement

Essentrics is a dynamic full body movement class that increases cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, and joint mobility. Done standing (no getting up and down from floor) with modifications (including seated options) so it is safe and accessible for everyone fitness! No equipment necessary. 6 week session continues through Feb. 15, ages 18 and older. $42, registration required.

Time: 10 a.m. Wednesdays

Location: Ballenger Creek Park, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick Contact: 301-600-2936 or recreater. com

50+ Taking Care When Hiring InHome Care

When hiring outside caregivers it is important to make sure that our loved ones are safe and comfortable. In this presentation, Eileen McLaughlin from Right at Home will discuss safe ways of obtaining in-home care and what to watch out for. Free.

Time: 1 p.m.

Location: Middletown Branch Library, 101 Prospect St., Middletown Contact: fcpl.org/calendar Pilates

Focuses on the core postural muscles which help keep the body balanced. These postural muscles are essential to providing support for the spine. Six-week session, $42, registration required.

Time: 6 p.m. on Wednesdays Location: Oakdale Rec Center, 12406 Old National Pike, Mount Airy Contact: 301-600-2936 or recreater. com

JAN. 12

Beginners Guitar 55+ 10-week course. The goal is to begin learning to read and write music tablature for guitar; learn basic chord shapes, strumming patterns and how chords are created. BYO guitar, music stand and other supplies required. $130, registration required. Time: 11 a.m. to noon Thursdays Location: Talley Rec Center, 121 N. Bentz St., Frederick Contact: 301-600-1492 or cityoffrederickmd.gov

New to Medicare Workshop

Are you new to Medicare, or will be soon? Join us for an overview of Medicare. Trained State Health Insurances Program (SHIP) staff help Medicare beneficiaries, family members and caregivers understand Medicare benefits, bills, and Medicare rights. Free, pre-register.

Time: 2 p.m.

Location: Frederick 50+ Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick. Also online Virtual 50+ Center

Contact: VirtualSeniorCenter@ FrederickCountyMD.gov or 301-6001234

Wonder Book Classic Film Series: “The Thin Man” (1934, PG)

Former detective Nick Charles and his wealthy wife Nora investigate a murder case, mostly for the fun of it. Cast: William Powell, Myrna Loy, Maureen O’Sullivan. (1 hour 31 min.) $7.

Time: 7:30 p.m.

Location: Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick Contact: 301-600-2828 or weinbergcenter.org

JAN. 13

Memory Cafe

Frederick County Senior Services Division and the Alzheimer’s Association Memory Café offers a fun and relaxed way for people living with memory loss and their care partners to get connected with one another through social events that promote interaction and companionship. Free. Pre-register.

Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Location: Urbana 50+ Community Center, 9020 Amelung St., Urbana

Contact: CaregiverSupport@ FrederickCountyMD.gov or 301-6006001

Bluegrass Jam

Open to all levels of acoustic musicians and vocalists. Spectators, families welcome. Sandwiches, snacks and sodas available for purchase. No smoking or swearing. $5 donation at the door requested.

Time: 7 to 10 p.m.

Location: Mount Pleasant Ruritan Club, 8101 Crum Road, Mount Pleasant

Contact: 301-898-3719

“1964: The Tribute”

“1964” meticulously re-creates the magic of a live Beatles’ performance with artful precision and unerring accuracy, and brings you as close as anyone could possibly get to feeling the magic of a Fab Four live performance. For over 30 years, “1964” has thrilled audiences with what is considered to be the most authentic tribute to The Beatles using period instruments, clothing, hairstyles and onstage banter with an accuracy that is unmatched. $22.50 to $32.50.

Time: 8 p.m

Location: Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick Contact: 301-600-2828 or weinbergcenter.org

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST | PRIME TIME FREDERICK | JANUARY 2023 | 11

JAN. 14

Silent Film Series: “Speedy” (1928)

Harold “Speedy” Swift, a fan of Babe Ruth and the New York Yankees, saves from extinction the city’s last horse-drawn trolley, operated by his girlfriend’s grandfather. Cast: Harold Lloyd, Ann Christy and Bert Woodruff. (1 hour 25 min.) $7.

Time: 3 p.m.

Location: Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick Contact: 301-600-2828 or weinbergcenter.org “Songs in the Attic: The Music of Billy Joel”

David Clark entertains with spot on accuracy with dynamic and high energy. If you love the music of Billy Joel, this show is a can’t miss. $54.50.

Time: 7 p.m.

Location: The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown Contact: 301-790-3500 or mdtheatre. org

JAN. 15

“Moving Into the New Year with Mindfulness”

In this workshop, Jasmyn James will discuss the 10 attitudes of Healing Presence, the importance of selfcompassion, mindfulness practices and how they can be useful in our everyday lives. Bring a journal and a pen for some journaling activities during the workshop. $15.

Time: 10 a.m.

Location: Fox Haven Farm, Retreat & Learning Center, 3630 Poffenberger Road, Jefferson Contact: 240-490-5484 or foxhavenfarm.org

JAN. 16

SRC Talley Book Group

Time: 10:15 a.m.

Location: Talley Rec Center, Classroom A, 121 N. Bentz St., Frederick

Contact: Jane at 301-658-8680

JAN. 17

Fresh Conversations: “Sunshine”

Vitamin and Depression

Discuss current nutrition and health topics, learn about low-cost, healthy recipes, and discover new ways to stay active and independent. Learn tips on how to make easy changes to help you manage diet-related health conditions. Get motivated to eat healthier and get more physically active. Presenter: Joi Foss Vogin, Family and Consumer Sciences Agent, University of Maryland Extension. Free. Pre-register. Time: 10 a.m.

Location: Urbana 50+ Center, 9020 Amelung St., Urbana

Contact: VirtualSeniorCenter@ FrederickCountyMD.gov or 301-6007020

JAN. 18

Medigap/Supplemental vs. Advantage Plans

Come learn more about these different types of Medicare programs to help determine which type of program may be the best for you.

Time: 11 a.m.

Location: Online and hosted by Senior

Services Division Virtual 50+ Center

Contact: VirtualSeniorCenter@ FrederickCountyMD.gov or 301-6001234

JAN. 19

Fresh Conversations: “Sunshine”

Vitamin & Depression

Discuss current nutrition and health topics, learn about low-cost, healthy recipes, and discover new ways to stay active and independent. Learn tips on how to make easy changes to help you manage diet-related health conditions. Get motivated to eat healthier and get more physically active. Presenter: Joi Foss Vogin, Family and Consumer Sciences Agent, University of Maryland Extension. Free, pre-register.

Time: 10 a.m.

Location: Frederick 50+ Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick

Contact: VirtualSeniorCenter@ FrederickCountyMD.gov or 301-6003525

See the full calendar at newspost.com

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B o r e d o m B u s t e r s SOLUTIONS ACROSS 1. ABC 4. AAR 7. BOA 8. ABBEY 10. SALE 12. SMITE 13. OTIC 14. TSH 16. DIN 17. RECTA 19. ARC 20. SEES 21. BLOOD AND WATER 25. DAH 26. LAN 27. BARB 29. ELBE 30. EKE 31. CRO 32. JEAN STAPLETON 39. EVEN 41. ABN 42. SPYRI 43. YES 44. A LA 45. IRAN 46. ANTIC 48. CATE 49. SUEDE 50. NOT 51. EDP 52. TRY SOLUTIONS DOWN 1. ABSORB 2. BOATEL 3. CALICO 4. ABM 5. ABIDER 6. RETIE 8. ASH 9. YENS 11. ECTO 14. TRW 15. SCALLOP 18. AD 19. ADH 20. SENE 22. ADRENAL 23. NAB 24. TAB 27. BEEN 28. AKA 29. ERA 31. CTN 32. JESTED 33. SBA 34. LS 35. EPIC 36. TYRANT 37. ORATOR 38. NINETY 39. EYAS 40. VENUE 44. ACE 47. IDP CROSSWORD PUZZLE CLUES ACROSS 1. Basics 4. Swiss river 7. Constrictor snake 8. Building occupied by monks 10. Discount 12. Deal a blow to 13. Relating to the ear 14. Thyrotropin 16. Loud, unpleasant noise 17. Large intestines 19. Move with a curving trajectory 20. Witnesses 21. You need both to live 25. Dash 26. Network 27. Dig 29. C. European river 30. Supplement with difficulty 31. Corporate executive 32. Carroll O’Connor’s onscreen wife 39. No variation 41. Airborne (abbr.) 42. “Heidi” author 43. Affirmative 44. Pie _ __ mode 45. W. Asian country 46. Grotesque or bizarre 48. Delicacy (archaic) 49. Textile 50. Denial 51. Electronic data processing 52. Attempt CLUES DOWN 1. Engulf 2. Waterside hotel 3. Printed cotton fabric 4. Defensive nuclear weapon 5. One who follows the rules 6. Lace up once more 8. Fire byproduct 9. Hankerings 11. Outer 14. One-time aerospace firm 15. Seafood 18. Commercial 19. Epoxy hardener (abbr.) 20. Samoan monetary unit 22. Type of gland 23. Arrest 24. Check 27. Past participle of be 28. Alias 29. A major division of geological time 31. Kids programming channel (abbr.) 32. Joked 33. Helps little firms 34. Roman numeral 50 35. Impressive in size or scope 36. Domineering leader 37. A person who delivers a speech 38. One after 89 39. Young hawk 40. The scene of any event or action 44. A team’s best pitcher 47. Integrated data processing THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST | PRIME TIME FREDERICK | JANUARY 2023 | 13

SUDOKU

Here’s How It Works:

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

14 | JANUARY 2023 | PRIME TIME FREDERICK | THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST B o r e d o m B u s t e r s
Call Today for Your FREE Estimate! 301-761-4656 *All par ticipants who attend an estimated60-90-minutein-home produc tconsultation will receivea$25 VISA Gift Card Retail value is $25. Offer sponsored by LeafGuardHoldings Inc.Limit one per household.Companyprocures, sells,and installs seamless gutter protec tion. This offer is valid forhomeowners over 18 years of age.Ifmarried or involved with alifepar tner,both cohabitating persons must attend and completepresentation together.Par ticipantsmusthavea photoIDand be legally able to enterintoa contract.The following persons arenot eligible forthis offer: employees of Companyoraffiliatedcompanies or entities,their immediate family members,previous par ticipants in aCompanyinhome consultation within the past 12 months and all currentand former Companycustomers.Giftmay not be ex tended, transferred,orsubstituted except that Companymay substitutea gift of equal or greatervalue if it deems it necessar y. Giftcardwill be mailed to thepar ticipantvia first classUnitedStatesMailwithin 10 days of receipt of the promotion form. Notvalid in conjunction with anyother promotion or discountofany kind.Off er notsponsored and is subjec tto change without noticeprior to reser vation. Offer not available in the statesofCA, IN, PA and MI. Offer expires12/31/22. LeafGuardoperatesasLeafGuardofDCinMar yland under registration numbeer MHICLicense #116693 *Guaranteed not to clog for as long as you own your home, or we will clean your gutters for free LIFETIME NO-CLOG WARRANTY MADE ONSITE SPECIFICALLYFOR YOUR HOME THE ONLYONE-PIECE SEAMLESS DEBRIS SHEDDING GUTTER SYSTEM. SCRATCHGUARD® PAINT FINISH SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE $25 VISAGIFTCARD Upon completion off appointment 75% OFF LABOR* Does not include cost of materials TIS’ THE SEASON SEASO Savings THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST | PRIME TIME FREDERICK | JANUARY 2023 | 15
No person shallbesubject,onthe basis of race,color,sex, sexual orientation, religion, national origin, familial status or disability, to discriminationinthe termsorconditions foradmission to, treatment or the provisionofser vices in, oneofour Communities. www.HomewoodFreder ic k.com Enjoy the Freedom and Lifestyle You Deserve! MakeYour New Year’sResolution Happen in 2023! Make the move to Homewood at Frederick where you can enjoy maintenance free living and so much more! 16 | JANUARY 2023 | PRIME TIME FREDERICK | THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST