Page 1


C A R E & R E H A B I L I TAT I O N C E N T E R O F F R E D E R I C K

SKILLED NURSING & LONG TERM CARE Nursing Services • Rehabilitation Services • Regular Physician Visits • Physical Therapy • Speech Therapy Occupational Therapy • Respite Care • Wound Care • Incontinence Care • Hospice & Palliative Care Podiatry Services • Pharmacy Services • Medication Management • On-Site Access Lab & Radiology Registered Dietitian • Social Worker • Activities Program • Beauty & Barber Services • Laundry Services Translation Services • Transportation Services

RESPIRATORY SERVICES

MEMORY CARE UNIT

• Ventilator Care • Tracheotomy Care • 24 Hour Intervention & Treatment • Cough-Assist Care

• Dementia / Alzheimer’s Care • Safe & Secure Environment • Individualized Care Plans • Promote Dignity & Respect

240.772.9200 | Fax 240.608.6468 | CitizensCareFrederick.com | Admissions 24 Hours A Day 7 Days A Week

CITIZENS AUXILIARY GIFT SHOP - OPEN TO THE PUBLIC ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE RESIDENTS OF CITIZENS CARE & REHABILITATION CENTER OF FREDERICK SPONSORED BY VOLUNTEER OF THE AUXILIARY

A

• • • • • • • • • • • •

In-House Physician Podiatry Suite Art Therapy 24 Hour Nursing Care & Services Dental Suite Movie Night Professional Housekeeping Staff Transportation Available Cooking Club Professional Activities Staff Furnished Apartments Activity Room w/ Computer Lab

• • • • • • • •

S

S

I

S

T

E

D

L

I

V

I

N

G

Alzheimer’s/ Dementia Care Spacious Living Areas Restaurant Style Dining Pharmacy Services Kitchenette w/ Microwave Private Dining Room Medication Management Cable & Phone Ready Rooms (Family Visits) • Smart Moves Wellness Program • Large Closet • Laundry Room

MONTEVUE

• • • • • • • •

Physical Therapy Private Bath w/ Walk-In Shower Outdoor Courtyard & Pavilion Speech Therapy Building Wi-Fi Video Security Surveillance Occupational Therapy Beauty & Barber Salon

1910 Rosemont Avenue, Frederick, MD 21702 | 240.772.9140 | montevuealf.com

2

|

APRIL 2019

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


Historic Mount Olivet Cemetery History Lecture with Editor Lauren LaRocca

Contributing Photographer Bill Green

Designer Kurt Samuel Samantha Bangh

Contributing Writer Erik Anderson

(bring a bag lunch to enjoy)

Calendar Editor Sue Guynn

Learn more about products offered and the general costs associated with traditional burial, cremation interment and memorialization.

Publisher Geordie Wilson

Multimedia Marketing Consultants

Revenue Director Connie Hastings

James Constantine

Kevin Berrier Terri Davis

Creative Director Anna Joyce

STORIES IN STONE

Chris Haugh Wednesday, April 10th Key Memorial Chapel 12-1:30pm

Visit our website or Sales Office for more info and tours. (M-F 8:30am-5pm)

Michele Fox

Sales Support Manager Noelle Hallman

Mike Santos Debra Tyson

Distributed monthly in The Frederick News-Post and through selected distribution outlets. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED BY COPYRIGHT. Prices, specials and descriptions are deemed accurate as of the time of publishing. This publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher. Advertising information has been provided by the advertisers. Opinions expressed in Senior Living are those of editors or contributors and do not necessarily reflect those of Ogden Newspapers of Maryland, LLC. All terms and conditions are subject to change. The cover, design, format and layout of this publication are trademarks of Ogden Newspapers of Maryland, LLC and published by The Frederick News-Post.

Friendly Reminder: We sell a wide variety of custom-design monuments and memorials! Compare our prices. 515 S. Market Street · 301-662-1164 · www.mountolivetcemeteryinc.com

Cover photo: Francine Coffey Morin, the Duchess of Windsor’s personal shopper looks back on her life of fashion. Photo by Bill Green.

NOMINATE A SENIOR If you know someone who would be a good candidate to be featured in our monthly Senior Living Q&A, email ajoyce@newspost.com with the subject line “Senior Living.” The person must be a least 55 years old. What else would you like to read about in Senior Living? Let us know!

We Care

We Help

We Listen. We Care. We Help.

• Always Here. Always Ready • Non Medical In Home Care • Nurses Aides Companions • 24 Hr Service, 7 Days/Wk • Serving Fred. Co. Over 30 Yrs

301-662-1618 THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

APRIL 2019

|

3


LIVING

A Walking Tour for Every Taste BY LAUREN LAROCCA

Feminist? Foodie? Artist? History buff?

Whether you’re a feminist, a foodie, a history buff or just curious to learn more about Frederick, there’s a walking tour for you. When you want to get outside for some fresh air, why not add a little education and culture to your leisurely strolls by trying out of these guided tours in Frederick?

There’s a walking tour for almost everyone in Frederick.

THE FREDERICK NEWBIE

To get a sense of Frederick and orient yourself a bit to all it has to offer, try the self-guided Downtown Frederick Walking Tour, provided by Visit Frederick. You can download a guide at https:// www.visitfrederick.org/things-todo/tours/self-guided-tour and walk through the historic district at your own pace, learning as you go. Some stops include City Hall, the Delaplaine Visual Arts Education Center, St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church, the Barbara Fritchie House and Carroll Creek Linear Park. Even if you’re not new to Frederick, you may be surprised by how much you learn about your town.

THE ARTIST

Heritage Frederick provides an Art & Architecture Walking Tour that is sure to enhance your appreciation for the aesthetics of Frederick’s downtown historical district. The 90-minute tour explores architectural styles that can be seen in the town’s structures, as well as a primer on local art and art history. It’s a must for any art lover. Tours run on the second Saturdays and fourth Sundays of each month from April 13 through Oct. 27. 4

|

APRIL 2019

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

Staff photos by Graham Cullen

Left photo: Scott Grove and Carrie Delente interact with their recently developed Frederick Walking Tour smarthone application. Photos on right: Stops on walking tours of sights in downtown Frederick.

THE FEMINIST

If you want a history tour with a bit of an edge, try the Museum of Civil War Medicine’s “Not Respectable” — The Enterprising Women of Civil War Frederick walking tour. Learn the stories of influential women who made and changed history right here in Frederick during Civil War times. The tour is on June and runs about 90 minutes in downtown Frederick and is suitable for all ages.

THE HISTORY BUFF

If you’re a history buff, you undoubtedly have the most tours to choose from, as Frederick has a wealth of historical

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

ties and resources for exploring them. The National Museum of Civil War Medicine hosts thematic walking tours, as does Heritage Frederick, both located in downtown Frederick. Some upcoming ones are Heritage Frederick’s Civil War Walking Tour on the first Saturday of each month from April 6 to Oct. 5 and its Drunk & Disorderly tours on the second Saturday of each month from May 11 to Aug. 10, which delves more into Civil War-era libations, as well as stories of war and mysterious happenings in town. Historian John Lustrea will host the downtown Frederick tour Divided Loyalties, sponsored by the Museum of Civil War Medicine, on May 4, edu-

cating guests about the conflicts within Frederick and its families, as it was a border town during the Civil War. For those interested in learning more about the local African-American community within a historical content, Roger Brooke Taney House will host African American History Walking Tours on the third Saturday of each month from May 18 to Sept. 21.

THE FOODIE

The three-hour Market Street Food Tour takes guests around Frederick and provides commentary on the city’s architecture and history while exploring its burgeoning restaurant scene — including tastes from some of Frederick’s favorite restaurants and specialty food shops. These culinary adventures can be arranged as private tours or with groups on select days from April 6 through June 30 during lunchtime. Guests can sample such items as artisan chocolates at Zoe’s Chocolate Shop, as well as locally brewed beer. These tours are open to foodies of all ages, but keep in mind, you’ll be walking at a moderate pace for about three hours. Perfect way to walk off the food and drink you indulge in along the way.


A great place to hang your hat! Edenton provides our residents the opportunity to spend more time on what is important each day. Our community is designed to enhance an independent lifestyle along with the convenience and security of amenities and services.

OPENING IN SPRING 2019

A brand new residential assisted living home is opening its doors in Frederick County. Here you will find a warming living space, private and semi-private bedrooms, three bathrooms with roll-in showers, dining room for eight (plus kitchen island with seating), fire protection sprinkler system, monitored $500 off security system, a sunroom, and a large backyard.

base rate for

Independent • Assisted Living Memory Care • Home Care

Our services will include 3 months levels of care 1-3, freshly cooked meals, assistance with activities of daily living, medication management, laundry services, 3:1 resident to staff ratio, and social and religious activities. Residents can expect respectful and quality care in an intimate setting based on their individual needs.

5800 Genesis Lane Frederick, MD 21703 www.Edenton-Retirement.com 301-694-3100

We believe you should live in a place that feels like home!

Home sweet

www.ThisIsHomeAssistedLiving.com

dream home.

Discover how good it feels to come home to Buckingham’s Choice, Frederick County’s premier senior living community. Every maintenance-free residence comes standard with a host of luxury amenities, finishes, and upgrades—giving you the magazine-worthy home you’ve been dreaming of. Outside your door, you’ll find a community bustling with friendly neighbors, countless experiences, and a complete system of support should you need us. Love where you live: find your dream home now at BuckinghamsChoice.org.

Call 301-644-1605 now to schedule your tour Adamstown | buckinghamschoice.org

A Not-for-profit Community

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

APRIL 2019

|

5


6

|

APRIL 2019

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


PEOPLE

Passion for Fashion Francine Coffey Morin was the personal shopper for the Duchess of Windsor BY LAUREN LAROCCA

I

t’s no stretch to say that Francine Coffey Morin has led a glamorous life that most of us would dream of. Because of her love of fashion and being a gifted seamstress, she traveled all over the world, had a weekly TV spot on the Dinah Shore Show and, perhaps most notably, became a personal shopper for none other than Wallis Simpson, an American socialite who became the Duchess of Windsor. After living in Manhattan for most of her adult life, Coffey Morin, 81, moved to Tranquillity at Fredericktowne in Frederick about two years ago. Everybody in Coffey Morin’s family sewed. Her French grandmother, her German grandmother, aunts, uncles, everybody. Her mother taught her. “It really and truly made my career,” she said. “When I met the Duchess of Windsor, the first thing we talked about was how we were going to make those clothes that she needed.” While growing up in St. Louis, Missouri, “a French town that’s very up on fashion,” she said, she became a teen model for department stores. She later moved to Florida to attend Florida State University and the University of Miami, where she earned a master’s degree in French. “The whole point was to live in Paris,” she said, “for the fashion there.” She lived in Paris for about two years, and it was a magical time. “I got to work with the great designers there,” she reminisced. She became the house

Photos by Bill Green

Francine Coffey Morin, The Duchess of Windsor’s personal shopper looks back on her life of fashion in Paris and New York City.

interpreter for Yves Saint Laurent and the personal shopper for the Duchess of Windsor while there. Wealthy women would know how to find people who could get them a Saint Laurent dress, she said. He wouldn’t give you a dress, but he would lend you one, and Coffey Morin would know how to get it. “All these wealthy women have people like me. Do you think they could look that great on their own?” Coffey Morin asked with a laugh. “Everybody wanted to have Wallis Simpson come to their home for dinner. She was kind of like a stamp of approval. I got to know

her early on because what happens is these very famous people don’t have time to go shopping for clothes whatsoever, so when you meet them, they’ll name the events that their husbands have been invited to. They’ll say they need a dress for something on the 28th, and they need a gown for something they’re doing on Nov. 1, or whatever. They wanna look good for their husbands. They’re photographed all the time. They’re in a tight spot and need help. You have to line up all the clothes, buy the clothes and get the accessories, down to the underwear and stockings.”

But working for the Baltimore-born Simpson was nothing out of the ordinary, Coffey Morin insisted, though they did form an immediate bond because they were both American. “The French women were extremely difficult. The Americans were easier to work with,” Coffey Morin said. “She looked at me like, ‘You’re an American, too.’ Very down to earth. She was like a sister to me, like an older sister. I never felt like she was anything more than just a friend. I was never intimidated by her. That’s what happens when you’re

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

See FASHION, 23 |

SENIOR LIVING

|

APRIL 2019

|

7


PEOPLE

Q&A: Pauline “Skippy” Zimmerman ones left at home. We moved to Frederick, and my mother never drove, but she was always preparing chicken and rice casseroles for people in need. She’d call one of us children up and say, “So-and-so died — will you take this casserole to them?” So it’s something my family has always done. I love people, and I think that a lot of it is my Christian upbringing of serving and taking care of others and sharing.

Photo by Bill Green

BY ERIK ANDERSON SPECIAL TO SENIOR LIVING

Pauline “Skippy” Zimmerman, a two-time cancer survivor who just celebrated her 86th birthday, regularly tells her friends and family, “I don’t want to grow up because I don’t know what I want to be.” In an ongoing effort of service and personal growth, the lifelong Frederick County resident has kept her mind young with countless hours of volunteer work every week for more than 30 years. Her labors of love include the Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary, the Citizens Nursing Home Auxiliary, and mentoring women who suffer from breast cancer as she did. She spends most of her volunteer time visiting homebound senior citizens through an effort organized by Zion Lutheran Church in Middletown.

What moves you to dedicate your retirement years to volunteer work? I was born on a big farm [in Middletown], and I remember when I was 15 my father died, and the neighbors just came to the rescue. When my father passed away, my younger brother and I were the only 8

|

APRIL 2019

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

What do you think your work means to the people you help? They all seem very appreciative. At the nursing home, where I work at the gift shop, I learn about people’s families when they come in and buy things. At Christmas, we have a shopping day for the residents, and everything is donated. We give the residents play money, and they can come and buy stuff from $1 to $5, and some of the $5 items can be worth $20 or $30. They can buy gifts they can give to their families. It’s a very wonderful thing. The first year we did it, the families couldn’t believe it. They’d say, “Where did mother get this gift?” It’s just a very rewarding thing when you see the residents come in and go shopping that day. What else is rewarding about your work? I make soup for the volunteers who help with the Salvation Army. They take care of about 1,000 children every year with a distribution out at the fairgrounds. Several years ago, the Salvation Army people asked us auxiliary women if we would provide food for them, and I made homemade noodle soup. You see the people that are receiving [donations], you see them get their bag and their food package, and to me, that is Christmas. That’s a week or two before Christmas, and I already feel like my Christmas has been filled when I see the children. You’re older than a lot of the senior citizens that you help. How do you keep yourself healthy and energetic? By the grace of God and good genes. My mother lived to be 90, and she was very active. She was crippled, but she still did things. I’m fairly healthy. I have survived cancers. I feel very blessed at that.

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

I had breast cancer and I also had a melanoma. It was caught very early, and I feel very, very blessed. I take fairly good care of myself.

What is the hardest part about keeping up with all of your volunteer work? Sometimes I get overwhelmed because I have too many things to do, especially around Christmas. Sometimes I over-extend myself. My children tell me I don’t know how to say no. My one sister used to tell me that, too. I don’t want to be boasting, but I have a very good mind. I wish my body were as good as my mind. I just called my bother the other day — he’s 94 — and I said having a good mind and a good memory is a blessing and a curse. My head says that I can do all of this stuff, but then my body says, “No you can’t.” And I get tired. I’m not as active as I used to be, so I spend a lot of time in my recliner. But I still drive, and I maintain my home. What are some things you do for yourself when you’re not volunteering? I love watching movies. I watch a lot of television. I get my nails done every three weeks. I go out to eat a lot. I have a very busy social life. Between friends and relatives, I’ve been out to eat, I think, every night but one this week. I have three grown children, I have four living grandchildren, and I have two great-grand daughters. What advice would you give to other senior citizens who would like to get involved with volunteering? What I tell people I know who are retiring is be sure you have something to do. Keep busy. Don’t sit at home in the rocking chair. Keep busy and be generous to other people. I get great pleasure out of helping other people and doing things for people. You don’t think about your own problems at times. If you know someone who would be a good candidate to be featured in our monthly Senior Living Q&A, email ajoyce@newspost.com with the subject line “Senior Living.” The person must be at least 55 years old.


Retirement living that’s a little

unexpected

SENIOR LIVING MADE SIMPLE.

We have lively happy hours filled with laughter,

chef-prepared meals including regional favorites, and even trips to the theater.

When it’s time to consider senior housing, call us.

Our campuses are filled with lavender from aromatherapy

A free service that navigates senior housing options. We provide personalized resources and tour communities to find the“right” fit.

classes, cheers of friendly competitions and residents’

Call today! 301.456.6378

dogs that do tricks. We’re even family owned and involved. It’s all part of what makes

Kriste Kidd, MA, CT, CSA

life here a little better.

Certified Senior Advisor KKidd@YourOasisAdvisor.com OasisSeniorAdvisors.com/Frederick ®

We offer a full range of services from independent living to

OasisPrintAd_4.49x4.92_KKidd.indd 1

Tranquillity Tranquillity at FREDERICKTOWNE

assisted living and memory

11/28/2018 9:58:06 AM

care. But we also do a lot of things a little differently.

at FREDERICKTOWNE Assisted Living & Memory Care Assisted Living & Memory Care

10

Learn 10 ways our retirement communities are a little different (and a little better).

Walk In Wednesdays Walk In Wednesdays 4-6 pm 4-6 pm a special gift! Join us for a tour and receive

une xpe c

ted

ways w retiremen e make t living be tter

9

#

Pets are welcom e.

Download today at CountryMeadows.com/ Unexpected.

Noaappointment necessary Join us for tour and receive a special gift! No appointment necessary 6441 Jefferson Pike | Frederick, MD 21703 301-668-6030 6441 Jefferson Pike | Frederick, MD 21703 DSM@Tranquillity-Frederick.com 301-668-6030 DSM@Tranquillity-Frederick.com

Independent Living Assisted Living Memory Care Restorative Care

5955 Quinn Orchard Road Frederick (minutes from I-70)

301-228-2249

Country Meadows offers services and housing without regard to race, color, religion, disability, marital status, ancestry, national origin, sexual orientation or gender.

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST CM Ret Living - Frederick NP March 4.49x10 R2.indd 1

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

APRIL 2019

|

9

3/4/19 7:53 AM


H E A LT H

Patient’s Orders What you need to know about living wills, POLST forms, and DNRs BY JUDITH GRAHAM THE WASHINGTON POST

“Don’t resuscitate this patient; he has a living will,” the nurse told the doctor, Monica Williams-Murphy, handing her a document. Williams-Murphy looked at the sheet bearing the signature of the unconscious 78-year-old man, who had been rushed from a nursing home to the emergency room. “Do everything possible,” it read, with a check approving cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The nurse’s mistake was based on a misguided belief that living wills automatically include “do not resuscitate” (DNR) orders. Working quickly, Williams-Murphy revived the patient, who had a urinary tract infection and recovered after a few days in the hospital. Misunderstandings involving documents meant to guide end-of-life decision-making are “surprisingly common,” said Williams-Murphy, medical director of advance-care planning and end-of-life education for Huntsville Hospital Health System in Alabama. But health systems and state regulators don’t systematically track such mix-ups, which receive little attention amid the push to encourage older adults to document their end-of-life preferences, experts acknowledge. As a result, information about the potential for patient harm is scarce. Regina Hoffman, executive director of the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, says the problem is that 10

|

APRIL 2019

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

doctors and nurses receive little if any training in understanding and interpreting living wills, DNR orders and Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment forms. Communication breakdowns and a pressure-cooker environment in emergency departments, where life-or-death decisions often have to be made within minutes, also contribute to misunderstandings, other experts said. Ferdinando Mirarchi, medical director of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, has, through multiple studies, asked medical providers how they would respond to hypothetical situations involving patients with critical and terminal illnesses. In one study, for instance, he described a 46-year-old woman who is brought to the ER with a heart attack and suddenly goes into cardiac arrest. Although she is otherwise healthy, she has a living will refusing all potentially lifesaving medical interventions. What would you do, he asked more than 700 physicians in an internet survey. Only 43 percent of those doctors said they would intervene to save her life — a troubling figure, Mirarchi said. Because this patient didn’t have a terminal condition, her living will didn’t apply to the situation at hand, and every physician should have been willing to offer aggressive treatment, he explained. Make sure you have ongoing discussions about your end-of-life pref-

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

Photo courtesy Metro

erences with your physician, your surrogate decision-maker if you have one, and your family, especially when your health status changes. Without these conversations, documents can be difficult to interpret. What follows are some basics about end-of-life documents.

Living wills

A living will expresses your preferences for end-of-life care but is not a binding medical order. Instead, medical staff will interpret it based on the situation at hand, with input from your family and your surrogate decision-maker. Living wills become activated only when a person is terminally ill and unconscious or in a permanent vegetative state. A terminal illness is one from which a person is not expected to recover, even with treatment — for instance, advanced metastatic cancer.

Bouts of illness that can be treated, such as worsening heart failure, are considered “critical” not “terminal” illness and should not activate a living will. To be activated, one or two doctors must certify that your living will should go into effect, depending on the state where you live.

DNRs

Do-not-resuscitate orders are binding medical orders signed by a physician. A DNR order applies specifically to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and directs medical personnel not to administer chest compressions, usually accompanied by mouth-tomouth resuscitation, if someone stops breathing or their heart stops beating. The section of a living will specifying that you don’t want CPR is a statement of a preference, not a DNR order. See LIVING WILL, 23


More Than Assisted Living

When Only

This home will surprise you!

the Best Will DO

• Exceptional care for life

• Unique financial security • Never outlive your funds • The support you need

with the independence you enjoy

To learn more, call 301-663-6822; speak to Kevin or Brenda. Live in beautiful downtown Frederick, near restaurants, shops, C. Burr Arts Library, Weinberg Center for the Arts, Carroll Creek, Baker Park. Why wait? When you need assisted living, you’ll already be home!

recordstreethome.org gm.rsh@comcast.net

Record Street Home

a lifetime home in historic downtown Frederick, Maryland Since 1892

VOTED BEST OF THE BEST – ASSISTED LIVING 2017 & 2018 • Five Star Dining Experience, featuring chef-prepared meals • Lifestyle360 activities for well-rounded days • Bridge to Rediscovery™ Memory Care Program • Celebrating 20 Years providing exceptional assisted living Call to schedule a tour of Frederick’s #1 Assisted Living Community 1820 Latham Drive Frederick, MD 21701

301-663-8800

www.HeartFieldsAtFrederickAssistedLiving.com ASSISTED LIVING MEMORY CARE • RESPITE STAYS ©2018 Five Star Senior Living

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

APRIL 2019

|

11


TRAVEL

Exploring Texas The Panhandle Plains offer hidden gems that are off the beaten path

Photo courtesy of Family Features

D

iscovering a region’s secret treasures is one of the greatest rewards of travel. When you embrace an adventurer’s spirit, there’s no telling just where you’ll go. From an uncharted journey back in time to new ways to appreciate unconventional art, a vacation that celebrates the unexpected is an ideal way to uncover hidden travel gems. Though it can be tempting to schedule every moment of your trip, a better way to capture the most exceptional travel experiences is to leave ample time for exploration and see what delightful sights you can happen upon by chance. A destination like the Texas Panhandle Plains offers a wealth of opportunities for excitement and adventure.

Great grapes

A growing movement of casual wine enthusiasts has wineries popping up all over the country. Regional variances in 12

|

APRIL 2019

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

climate and soil make for some tasty twists on your favorite varieties, so take time to explore and sample the local wine scene. World-class quality wine can be found from coast to coast, and a winery is the perfect place to relax and unwind while taking in the ambiance of a vacation destination.

History lesson

In a place like the Texas Panhandle Plains, history is as much a part of the landscape as the canyons and plains. Frontiersmen and settlers encountered the Comanche nation, which led to the rise of the Frontier Forts throughout the region. Later the area became home to a great part of the American ranching industry. For example, Frontier Texas!, the Texas Forts Trail, Fort Concho, The Texas Plains Trail and the National Ranching Heritage Center are a few places where history comes to life.

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

Off the beaten path

You may be surprised by what you can find when you venture away from more populated areas. In state parks, you can take adventure into your own hands and get up close and personal with a destination’s rugged natural beauty. The scenic outdoors are the perfect backdrop for you to marvel at the native wildlife, hike, ride horses or bikes, camp, geocache or take a scenic drive. Similarly, local parks or lakes might also offer opportunities for boating, fishing and swimming.

Local legends

Visiting a city with ties to an internationally acclaimed celebrity is almost like entering the screen of a self-directed documentary. You can see where he or she lived and ate and travel the same roads, marveling at the lifestyle and environment that shaped a bigger-than-life persona.

In Lubbock, Texas, visitors can do all that and more at the Buddy Holly Center, which pays tribute to the uniquely interesting life of the iconic music legend.

Artistic license

Art can be enjoyed in many places far removed from a traditional gallery or museum. You can even find artistic displays in an empty field, including one located on Route 66 west of Amarillo: Cadillac Ranch was created in the ’70s by a group of California hippies. Originally a tribute to the evolution of the Cadillac tail fin, today the 10 vehicles protruding from the earth are scarcely recognizable as automobiles. The iconic attraction is ever-changing, as visitors add their own interpretations to this piece of public art. Source: Texas Tourism Board


FOLLOW YOUR OWN PATH TO WELLNESS.

FINANCE

Social Security

EUPHORIA WELLNESS MEDICAL CANNABIS DISPENSARY

IS NOW OPEN.

What are a spouse’s benefits?

S

pouses who never worked or have low earnings can get up to half of a retired worker’s full benefit. If you’re eligible for both your own retirement benefits and spousal benefits, the Social Security Administration always pays your own benefits first. If your benefits as a spouse are higher than your own retirement benefit, you’ll get a combination of benefits equaling the higher spouse benefit. For example, Mary Ann qualifies for a retirement benefit of $250 and a spouse’s benefit of $400. At her full retirement age, she will get her own $250 retirement benefit. We also will add $150 from her spouse’s benefit, for a total of $400. If she takes her retirement benefit before her full retirement age, the administration will reduce both amounts. If you are at least full retirement age and qualify for your own retirement benefits and also a spouse’s (or divorced spouse) benefits, you can choose to restrict your application, apply for one of the benefits, and delay applying for the other until a later date. Under a law passed in 2015, people born on or after Jan. 2, 1954 no longer have this option. If they qualify for both their own retirement and spouse’s (or divorced spouse’s) benefits, they must apply for both benefits. This is called “deemed filing.” If you file for one benefit, you are “deemed” to file for the other one, too, even if you don’t become eligible for it until later. If you’re receiving a pension based on work for which you didn’t pay Social Security taxes, the administration may reduce your spouse’s benefit. If spouses get Social Security retire-

We offer a wide range of cannabis strains and products in a clean, safe environment. To put you on the road to wellness. JUST OFF I-70 at EXIT 62 | ASK ABOUT FREE DELIVERY! Mon-Sat 9am-8pm & Sun 10am-6pm

301.882.7910

11717 Old National Pike | New Market, MD 21774

www.EuphoriaWellnessMD.com

Green Shoot Media

ment benefits before they reach full retirement age, the administration reduces the benefit. The amount of that reduction depends on when the person reaches full retirement age. For example: • If full retirement age is 65, a spouse can get 37.5 percent of the worker’s unreduced benefit at age 62. • If full retirement age is 66, a spouse can get 35 percent of the worker’s unreduced benefit at age 62. • If full retirement age is 67, a spouse can get 32.5 percent of the worker’s unreduced benefit at age 62. The benefit increases at later ages up to the maximum of 50 percent at full retirement age. If full retirement age isn’t shown here, at age 62 the benefit will fall between 32.5 percent and 37.5 percent. Your spouse can get full benefits, regardless of age, if taking care of a child entitled on your record. The child must be under age 16, or disabled before age 22. Note that your current spouse can’t get spouse’s benefits until you file for retirement benefits. – Social Security Administration

NATURAL PAIN RELIEF

Be Smart.

®

Go Natural.

HELPS ALLEVIATE: Neuropathy Arthritis Fibromyalgia Muscle Aches Inflammation Nerve Pain Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

s in ! ta eric n Courm T

Noxicare.com • 888-386-9898

Save 10% - Code: EASTERSALE - Expires 4/30/19 THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

APRIL 2019

|

13


APRIL 2019 ONGOING SENIOR RECREATION COUNCIL PROGRAMS Thursday Bridge — 1 to 4 p.m., Spring Ridge Senior Apartments, Frederick; 301-360-9908, Jim.

Emmitsburg Senior Center Yarn & Fabric Arts — Stitching Post at Urbana center; Knitting Group and Quilt Group at Frederick center. Art, Painting, Adult Coloring — Emmitsburg, Frederick, Urbana and Brunswick centers

Open Duckpin Bowling — 1 to 3 p.m. Thursdays, Walkersville Lanes; 240-651-1865, Gerald.

Quilt Group — 9 a.m., drop-in for beginners to experienced, at Frederick center

Chorus Practice — 1:30 to 3 p.m. Mondays, Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick. 301-371-7533, Mary Ann.

Movie Matinee — 1 p.m., third Thursday of the month, Urbana Senior Center

SENIOR CENTER FITNESS AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Visit your local senior center for times and days. Most are ongoing activities.

Stitching Post — 10 a.m. to noon Mondays, 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesdays, come knit, crochet or just talk. Free, donations of yarn welcome.

Register for Tai Chi, Chair Yoga, Gentle Floor Yoga, Zumba Gold, Square Dance, Line Dance, Ballroom. $30 for 10-week sessions. Consult the Senior Center Calendar online for days/times of each class. Classes begin the week of second week of April.

Cards and Games — Mah Jong at Frederick and Urbana centers; Bridge at Frederick, Urbana and Emmitsburg centers; Card Party at Brunswick center; Pinochle, cards and games at Thurmont center; Canasta at Frederick center; Rummikub at Urbana and Frederick centers; Pinochle at Frederick Center

Circle of Friends Memory Cafe and More — third Friday of the month at the Frederick Senior Center, fourth Tuesday of the month 14

|

APRIL 2019

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

Strength Training — $3 per session, at Frederick and Brunswick centers, multiple days and times. Movement & Motion — $1 per session, at Frederick center Pickleball — free, donations accepted, drop in at the Emmitsburg center on Wednesdays and Wednesday and Friday at Frederick center Monocacy Gamers — meet at the Frederick center 12:30 p.m. first and third Wednesdays VITA Tax Preparation Service — Counselors are tentatively scheduled to be available 8:45 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday at the Senior Services Division office, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick. Free tax appointments are available for those age 55 and up and disabled adults of any age with income of $70,000 or less who are submitting basic returns. Counselors aren’t able to prepare returns for people with rental or farm income, self-employment income with a loss, or K1

Partnerships. Bring your social security card (or SSA-1099) and photo ID along with your financial statements. Call 301-600-1605 to schedule an appointment. APRIL 1 Zumba Gold (Senior Version) $24 for 8 sessions, $5 per session Time: 10:15 to 11 a.m. Location: Thurmont Senior Center, 806 E. Main St., Thurmont Contact: 301-271-7911 Needle Felting Workshop Use a simple felting needle and soft wool fleece. Instructor will guide you in “painting with wool.” $10, includes materials. Pre-registration required. Time: 2 to 4 p.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-3525 or online APRIL 2 Refugee & Global Migration — A Great Decisions presentation View a short video produced by the Foreign Policy Association and facilitated discussion on the topic.


CALENDAR Drop-in for coffee and conversation. Free. Time: 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-3525 or online Exercise with Alice Eyler Every Tuesday. By donation. Time: 9:30 to 10 a.m. Location: Thurmont Senior Center, 806 E. Main St., Thurmont Contact: 301-271-7911 Visionaries Low-Vision Support Group Speakers, supportive and compassionate group sharing about common vision challenges. Meets the first Tuesday of the month. RSVP. Time: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Location: Homewood at Frederick/ Crumland Farms, 7407 Willow Road, Frederick Contact: 301-644-5646 www.homewoodfrederick.com APRIL 2 Authors & Books: “We the Widows” and “I Didn’t See That Coming” Frederick County Homemakers invite the public to hear from two local authors who have written books about loss and how to cope. Karen Smith, author of “I Didn’t See That Coming” talks about her life event, and leads you through a four-step Life Event Advanced Planning Process to help you organize, review, and store your important documents. Trevella Foster will talk about Pati Redmond’s book, “We the Widows,” which will give you suggestions on how to deal with many things you may face as a grieving widow. Free. Time: 1 to 3 p.m. Location: UME Extension Office, 330 Montevue Lane, Frederick Contact: 301-600-1599 Scott Key Campers Local chapter of the Family Campers and RVers Association (FCRV). The group meets monthly to plan camping trips from May through November. Most locations within a 2-hour drive. All are welcome. The

group welcomes all — novices as well as experienced campers. Time: 7 to 8 p.m. Location: South End Baptist Church, 506 Carrollton Drive, Frederick Contact: 301-845-8696 APRIL 3 Seniors on the Go Expo Aging and disabilities expo. Time: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Location: Shipley Arena at the Carroll County Ag Center, 706 Agricultural Center Drive, Westminster Contact: 410-848-6704 Free Blood Pressure Checks By Right at Home. Time: 10:15 to 12:45 p.m. Location: Thurmont Senior Center, 806 E. Main St., Thurmont Contact: 301-271-7911 50/50 Bingo Open to public. Must be 18 or older to play. $5 plus specials, pickle jar; $1 coverall last game. Free snacks. Time: 1 to 3 p.m. Location: Thurmont Senior Center, 806 E. Main St., Thurmont Contact: 301-271-7911

APRIL 4 Safety Minute: Cold Facts About Food Safety Time: 11:15 a.m. Location: Urbana Senior Center, 9020 Amelung St., Urbana Contact: 301-600-7020 Memory Café Sponsored this month by St. Joseph’s Ministries. Free lunch and activity. Time: Noon to 2 p.m. Location: Thurmont Senior Center, 806 E. Main St., Thurmont Contact: 301-271-7911 Are You and Your Documents Ready? Post-lunch discussion on organizing your records. Drop-in, no charge. Time: 12:30 p.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-3525

STEM Program Fun and interactive with ReidAnn Sever, a Hood College student. Free. Time: 1 p.m. Location: Urbana Senior Center, 9020 Amelung St., Urbana Contact: 301-600-7020 Free Family Bingo Night Time: 6:30 to 7 p.m. Location: Brunswick Branch Library, 915 N. Maple Ave., Brunswick Contact: 301-600-7250 www.fcpl.org APRIL 5 Recovery Education Golf Classic The Phoenix Foundation of Maryland is a nonprofit with a founding plan to establish a state-recognized institution (recovery high school) for individuals who struggle with alcohol and drug abuse in Frederick and the surrounding areas by 2020. $150. Time: 8:20 a.m. to 2 p.m. Location: Musket Ridge Golf Club, 3555 Brethren Church Road, Myersville Contact: www.musketridge.com

OF

Powerful Tools for Caregivers Six-week class to help caregivers make the most of their skills in helping loved ones. RSVP. Time: 1 p.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-6001 Dementia Live Experiential workshop to learn what your friend or loved one may be experiencing. RSVP. Time: 5:30 p.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-6001 or online Evening GriefShare Support Group Support for those grieving the recent or past death of a loved one. Time: 7 p.m. Location: St. Ignatius of Loyola Catholic Church — Medica Center, 4103 Prices Distillery Road, Ijamsville Contact: 301-865-5983 or www.e-stignatius.org

FREE MONTHLY DOWNSIZING SEMINAR April 11th, 2019 • 11 am - 12 pm • Call for Details

Frederick County Association of Realtors • 478 Prospect Blvd. Frederick, MD Richard Leonard, Owner of Fox Mountain Property Inspections Learn the benefits of pre-home inspection to tackle items now while downsizing.

8 East 2nd Street, Suite 100 • Frederick, MD 21701 • 301-365-0664 Each office is independently owned and operated.

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

APRIL 2019

|

15


CALENDAR Lenten Fish Dinners Also on April 12. AYCE dinner, baked and fried, in the hall of the St. Margaret Bauer Evangelization Center. Take-out available with dedicated parking. Includes baked tilapia or fried white fish, served with dinner roll, soft drink and choices of sides: fries, mac & cheese, steamed vegetables, homemade soup, fresh garden salad or coleslaw. Ice cream sundaes sold by Boy Scout Troop 1274. Cash or check. $12. Time: 5 to 7:30 p.m. Location: St. John the Evangelist Church, Community Center, 114 E. Second St., Frederick Contact: 301-305-2127 or www.kofc1622.org Fish Frydays Also April 12. Menu includes fried fish, baked fish, mac & cheese, soup, vegetables, coleslaw, french fries, baked potatoes, baked sweet potatoes, rolls, desserts, iced tea, lemonade and coffee. Suggested donation is $11 adults, $8 ages over 62, kids $6, under age 5 free. Cash, check or credit cards. Large family and group rates available. Sponsored by KoC, Charles Carroll Council 15985. Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Location: St. Joseph on Carrollton Manor, 5843 Manor Woods Road, Frederick An Evening with Brooks Robinson Legendary third baseman for the Baltimore Orioles tells some stories from the Golden Age of baseball and talks about his 23 years with the Orioles, and Hall of Fame career. There will also be a question and answer period with the audience. $40 to $60. Time: 8 to 9:30 p.m. Location: The Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick Contact: 301-600-2828 or www.weinbergcenter.org APRIL 6 Indoor Winter Farmers Market Held in conjunction with the Lions Club of Myersville’s all-you-can-eat country breakfast. 16

|

APRIL 2019

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

Time: 7 to 10:30 a.m. Location: Myersville Fire Co. banquet hall, 301 Main St., Myersville Contact: 301-293-9817 Won by One, Local Chapter of Christian Motorcyclists Association Meets on the first Saturday each month for a fellowship breakfast. All visitors are welcome. Purchasing a meal is optional. Buffet costs approx. $10-$12. Chapter devotional starts at 8:30, breakfast starts at 9, meeting starts at 9:30. Time: 8:30 to 11 a.m. Location: Golden Corral, 5621 Spectrum Drive, Frederick Contact: 301-606-1893 or www.cmausa.org APRIL 7 Energy Healing Receive free energy healing in the Zen Room, offered by the healing practitioners of Unity’s Healing Ministry. Time: 9:30 to 10 a.m. Location: Unity in Frederick — A Spiritual Community, 5112 Pegasus Court, Suite E, Frederick Contact: 301-846-0868 or www.unityfrederick.org APRIL 8 Frederick County Senior Services Advisory Board Meeting Your comments and input welcome. Presenter’s topic is pain management for seniors, with a panel of speakers including Larry Doyle, of Euphoria Wellness, on medical cannabis; Dr. Larry Romane, on traditional medicine; Ryan Diener, acupuncture/holistic health; and Carla McAdams of Mountain Spirit Yoga, on yoga and mindfulness. Time: 1 to 3 p.m. Location: New Market Grange, 14 South Alley, New Market Contact: 301-600-1605 APRIL 9 Maryland Access Point Talk: Recycling Time: 11 a.m. Location: Emmitsburg Senior Center, 300 S. Seton Ave., Emmitsburg Contact: 301-600-6350

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

TED Talk: “The Refugee Crisis is a Test of Our Character” Short video and facilitated discussion on the topic. Drop in for coffee and conversation. Free. Time: 9 a.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-3525 or online “The 90s Club: Old Dogs, New Tricks” Have a good laugh with author Eileen Mcintire of “The 90s Club” mystery series as she discusses stereotypes and myths about aging. 90 years old is the new 50 years old. Hosted by the Walkersville Senior Citizens, presented by Walkersville Public Library. Free. Time: 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Location: Walkersville Town Hall, 21 W. Frederick St., Walkersville Contact: 301-600-8200 or fcpl.org Watercolor Class Learn about techniques, styles and artists. Taught by Urbana High School students. New session starts April 9. $10 for supplies. Time: 3 to 4:30 p.m. Location: Departs Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-7020 Tasty Tuesday Meets monthly. Celebrate good food either with a talk and/or cooking demonstration. Time: 6 p.m. Location: Departs Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-7020 APRIL 10 Pysanky: Egg Painting Pre-registration required. Pay online or in person at the senior center. $10, materials included. Time: 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-3525 or online Living Healthy, Living Well With Diabetes 30-minute workshop meets for six weeks for adults with diabetes, pre-diabetes or a caregiver or family member.

Time: 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Location: Mount Airy Senior Center, 703 Ridge Ave., Mount Airy Contact: 410-386-3960 Stepping On High-level, evidence-based program is proven to reduce falls and build confidence in older people at risk for falls. Seven-week program. Free. Time: 1 p.m. Location: Urbana Senior Center, 9020 Amelung St., Urbana Contact: 301-600-7020 Printmaking Explore printmaking with Kristin Bohlander. $10 fee includes materials. Time: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-3525 APRIL 11 More Than Just Trash: Why Recycling Matters A Chat with Joy, Maryland Access Point presentation. Drop-in, no charge. Optional lunch at noon by reservation. Time: 11 a.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-1048 Downsizing Seminar Hosted by Sharon Scarborough and Stacy Reno, The Staged and Sold Team of Century 21 Redwood Real Estate. Guest speaker Richard Leonard, owner of Fox Mountain Property Inspections, discusses the benefits of a pre-home inspection to tackle the items now while downsizing. Free. Time: 11 a.m. to noon Location: Frederick County Association of Realtors, 478 Prospect Blvd., Frederick Contact: 443-302-9701 Lunch with Nurse Steve: “Isn’t More Medication Better?” Talk on the correct use and dosage of medication. Talk at 12:30 is free; lunch is $5, RSVP by April 3. Time: Noon Location: Urbana Senior Center, 9020 Amelung St., Urbana Contact: 301-600-7020


CALENDAR U.S. Tax Reform: How It Could Affect You Learn about tax law changes that could impact you and your family. Get positive, professional guidance from a membership organization of Christians that has been helping its members be wise with money and live generously for more than 100 years. RSVP. Free. Time: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Location: Thrivent Financial, 208 E. Ridgeville Blvd., Suite 201, Mount Airy Contact: 443-576-0041 Small Space Herb Gardening Master Gardener Tiger Waddell will discuss how to start and keep an herb garden inside and out. Free. Time: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Location: Walkersville Public Library, 2 S. Glade Road, Walkersville Contact: 301-600-8200 or www.fcpl.org APRIL 12 AARP Driver Safety Course Also April 26. Classroom review of safe driving practices. $15 AARP members, $20 non-members. Optional lunch is $5. Time: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-3525 Day Trip: The Clay and Metal Loft In Leesburg, Va., make up to three wire wrap heart bracelets, one in silver, copper and brass. $60 per person, plus money for lunch. Registration closes April 5, limited to 9 participants. Time: 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Location: Departs Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-7020 Frederick Area Ostomy Support Group Meets the second Sunday of each month (except May). Use Entrance #4, free valet parking. Offers support to those individuals who have had or are scheduled to have diversive surgery. Feel free to bring spouse, family and/or caretaker. Time: 2 to 4 p.m. Location: FMH, Volunteer Conference Room, 400 W. Seventh St.

Contact: 301-663-1203 or www.frederickostomysupport. wordpress.com Bluegrass Jam Light refreshments available. Second Friday of the month, September through May. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Mount Pleasant Ruritan Club, 8101 Crum Road, Walkersville Contact: 301-898-3719 APRIL 13 Green Fest Learn about native habitats, environmental impacts, food sources, reuse, repurposing and recycling in fun ways, green living ideas, nature crafts, how to plant a tree, more. Free. Time: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Location: Thurmont Regional Library, 76 E. Moser St., Thurmont Contact: thurmontmainstreet.com Yoga for Knee Strength & Flexibility Are your knees giving you trouble? Are your knees clicking and popping? Is kneeling or moving your knees in certain directions completely out of the question? This workshop will lead you in movements to find more flexibility and strength in your knees so that you can continue to move and walk well as you age. $30. Time: 3 to 5 p.m. Location: Yogamour, 1 Wormans Mill Court, Frederick Contact: www.yogamour.org APRIL 15 SRC Talley Book Group Time: 10:15 a.m. Location: William R. Talley Rec Center, 121 N. Bentz St., Frederick Contact: Jane, 501-658-8680 APRIL 16 Ask Nurse Steve: “Isn’t More Medication Better?” And blood pressure screening. Time: 11 a.m. Location: Emmitsburg Senior Center, 300 S. Seton Ave., Emmitsburg Contact: 301-600-6350

The Inside Scoop: Reiki 101 Reiki is a Japanese stress reduction technique that promotes the body’s relaxation response and your own natural healing ability. Learn about the benefits of Reiki; self-care and healthcare; learn and experience your own natural healing energy. Presenter: Krista Hall, RN, Reiki Master, HTCP. Optional fried chicken supper at 5:15 p.m., $5 per person, reservations required. Time: 6 p.m. Location: Urbana Senior Center, 9020 Amelung St., Urbana Contact: 301-600-7020 Peer Support for Amputees Faith-based group open to anyone who would like to attend. The mission of the support group is to provide a safe place for amputees to come together and share their story with others who can relate to the challenges. Having peers who are there to listen, understand, and encourage you as you navigate your new normal is crucial. Free. Time: 6 to 7 p.m. Location: C. Burr Artz Library, 110 E. Patrick St., Frederick Contact: 443-432-5744 APRIL 17 DAV Service Officer at Fort Detrick VA Clinic Service Officer will be available to provide information and prepare VA claims to obtain benefits for military personnel, veterans, their spouse or dependents. Appointments preferred, Walk-ins also welcomed in time available between appointments. Bring a copy of your military discharge, DD 214 or other service record, VA claim number if one was issued and any correspondence or rating decision information. Time: 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location: Fort Detrick VA Outpatient Clinic, 1433 Porter St., Fort Detrick Contact: 301-842-2562 AARP Driver Safety Course A classroom review of safe driving strategies. Offered in partnership with AARP Frederick Chapter 636.

$15 for AARP members, $20 for non-members, cash only day of class; optional box lunch is $5 and you must register for lunch in advance. Pre-register for the class. Time: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location: Urbana Senior Center, 9020 Amelung St., Urbana Contact: 301-600-7020 Lunch and Learn: Maryland Relay Services Solutions for people who experience difficulties using regular telephone. Presenter is Jennifer Curran, from Md. Relay. Free. Time: 11:30 a.m. Location: Urbana Senior Center, 9020 Amelung St., Urbana Contact: 301-600-7020 Friends in Frederick Parkinson’s Disease Support Group Meets the third Wednesday of each month. Typically includes a guest speaker and a informal discussion. Time: 1 to 3 p.m. Location: Mount Pleasant Ruritan Club, 8101 Crum Road, Walkersville Contact: 301-703-1194 or www.fifpdsg.org Mount Airy Book Discussion Group: “American Fire: Love, Arson and Life in a Vanishing Land” By Monica Hesse. For adults, ages 18 and older. Free. Time: 1 p.m. Location: Mount Airy Branch Library, 705 Ridge Ave., Mount Airy Contact: ccpl.librarymarket.com APRIL 18 Easter Lunch By reservation only. Time: Noon Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-1048 Spring Luncheon Menu includes pork loin, green bean casserole, red-skinned potatoes, fruit and pie. $5, sign up by April 10. Time: Noon Location: Urbana Senior Center, 9020 Amelung St., Urbana Contact: 301-600-7020

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

APRIL 2019

|

17


CALENDAR Ask Nurse Steve: “Isn’t More Medication Better?” Free talk. Lunch by reservation only. Time: 12:30 p.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-3525 or online APRIL 19 Seated Massage By Marie Free. $1 per minute. No appointment needed. Time: 10:30 to 1 p.m. Location: Thurmont Senior Center, 806 E. Main St., Thurmont Contact: 301-271-7911 APRIL 20 50/50 Bingo Open to public. $5 to play, specials, pickle jar. $1 coverall last game. Free snacks. Time: 1 to 3 p.m. Location: Thurmont Senior Center, 806 E. Main St., Thurmont Contact: 301-271-7911 APRIL 23 Moderate Hike Gambrill State Park. Pre-registration required. Time: 8:30 a.m. Location: Gambrill State Park Contact: Ray, 301-662-6315 Talk on “Finding Purpose & Meaning While Aging” With Fred Balius, mental health department. Time: 11:15 a.m. to noon Location: Thurmont Senior Center, 806 E. Main St., Thurmont Contact: 301-271-7911 Kris Kristofferson & The Strangers His songs “Me and Bobby McGee,” “Help Me Make It Through the Night,” “Sunday Morning Coming Down” and “For the Good Times,” all chart-topping hits, helped redefine country songwriting. $56 & up. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown Contact: 301-790-2000 or www.mdtheatre.org

18

|

APRIL 2019

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

APRIL 24 Passover-style Lunch Pre-registration and payment required, online or in person. Time: 12:30 p.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-3525 Learn About Your Rights to An Affordable Funeral With the Consumers Funeral Alliance. Reservations required. Time: 6 p.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-6001 Wing Dings and Country Music $5 per person. Music by Iris Rodgers. Wings, sides and beverages. Time: 6 to 9 p.m. Location: Emmitsburg Senior Center, 300 S. Seton Ave., Emmitsburg Contact: 301-600-6350 Maryland Boater Education Course Continues 6:30 to 9 p.m. April 25 and 8 to 11 a.m. April 27. All course materials will be furnished. Register at least one week in advance of class. Call between 3 and 5 p.m. Maryland Natural Resources Police class. Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: Frederick IWLA, 4719 Reels Mill Road, Frederick Contact: 301-898-5030 APRIL 25 18th Century Market Fair Now in its 25th year, the fair features the best artisans, craftspeople and sutlers together with an 18th-century encampment. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. The event is sponsored by the Friends of Fort Frederick State Park. $5 adults, $2 ages 6 to 12, ages 5 and under free. Continues April 26 and 27. Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Location: Fort Frederick State Park, 11100 Fort Frederick Road, Big Pool Contact: 301-842-2155 or www.dnr.maryland.gov

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

AARP Driver Safety Course Classroom view of safe driving practices. $15 for AARP members, $20 for non-members; optional lunch is $5. Time: 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Location: Emmitsburg Senior Center, 300 S. Seton Ave., Emmitsburg Contact: 301-600-6350 Mount Airy Senior Book Discussion Group: “Code Girls” By Liza Mundy. For ages 18 & older. Time: 12:30 p.m. Location: Mount Airy Branch Library, 705 Ridge Ave., Mount Airy Contact: 410-386-4470 Frederick Speaker Series: LeVar Burton Still influencing new generations after more than three decades of groundbreaking work, advocacy and honors. $35 and up. Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick Contact: 301-600-2828 or www.weinbergcenter.org APRIL 26 Meet with Elly Williams With Senior Services Division. Free 30-minute meeting, by appointment. Time: Call to schedule appointment Location: Thurmont Senior Center, 806 E. Main St., Thurmont Contact: 301-271-7911 Dementia Live Real-life simulations of what it must be like to struggle and live with dementia. Pre-register. Time: 9:30 a.m. Location: Emmitsburg Senior Center, 300 S. Seton Ave., Emmitsburg Contact: 301-600-6350 Day Trip to DAR Museum: Quilt Exhibit and Period Rooms The museum, in Washington, D.C., collects furnishing, ceramics, glass, textiles and household items made and used in America through the early 20th century. Special quilt exhibit. Tour 31 period rooms, each depicting a different time and place in American history. $35 person, plus lunch money. $35 person, registration closes April 12.

Time: 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Location: Departs Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-7020 Classic Albums Live Presents The Beatles “Abbey Road” Some of the best Beatles songs every recorded, lovingly reproduced as true to the original recording as possible. $30 and up. Time: 8 p.m. Location: Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick Contact: 301-600-2828 or www.weinbergcenter.org APRIL 27 Electronic Recycle Day Rain or shine. Collecting any electronics except no TVs. Free. Time: 9 a.m. to noon Location: American Legion Auxiliary Gold Star Unit 191, 801 Prospect Road, Mount Airy Contact: 410-861-6118 or http://post191.com Bulldog Dash 5K Starting and finishing at MAMS, the 5K winds through Watkins Park, climbs “Bulldog Hill,” passes through historic Mount Airy along Main Street, and traverses Mount Airy’s Rails To Trails. Timed race, walkers welcome; strollers and pets not permissible due to some terrain. Awards. Register by April 1 to receive a race shirt. Online and onsite day of race registration. Proceeds benefit the school. $35 adults, $30 youth. Time: 9 a.m. Location: Mount Airy Middle School, 102 W. Watersville Road, Mount Airy Contact: www.imathlete.com/ events/bd5k or 301-829-1314 Fried Shrimp and Roast Beef Dinner Family-style. Church is handicapped accessible. Dine in or carryout. $20 for adults and $8 for ages 6 to 12. Time: 1 to 5 p.m. Location: Howard Chapel-Ridgeville UMC, 1970 Long Corner Road, Mount Airy Contact: 301-829-2391


CALENDAR APRIL 28 Spring Festival Celebrate agricultural heritage. Exhibits, hayrides, animals, demonstrations, food, crafts, children’s hands-on crafts and games. Sunday garden tractor pull. Carriage museum. Free; fees for food, hayrides, crafts, games and manor house. Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Location: Children’s Museum at Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick Contact: 301-600-1650 or www.recreater.com Music in the Library: ‘80s Acoustic Session Local guitarist Sam Vilcek will play an afternoon of ‘80s hits. Free. Time: 2 p.m. Location: Mount Airy Branch Library, 705 Ridge Ave., Mount Airy Contact: 410-386-4470

Book Talk: “Raising the White Flag — How Surrender Defined the Civil War” Hear historian David Silkenat discuss his upcoming book. No previous book has so thoroughly focused on the conflicting social, political, and cultural meanings of surrender in any United States war. Included with admission fee. Time: 2:30 p.m. Location: National Museum of Civil War Medicine, 48 E. Patrick St., Frederick Contact: 301-695-1864 or www.civilwarmed.org Romantic Melodies and American Rhythms With Cecylia Barczyk, cellist, and Elizabeth Borowsky, pianist. Free. Time: 3 to 4:30 p.m. Location: Calvary UMC, 131 W. Second St., Frederick Contact: 301-662-1464 or

APRIL 30

www.calvaryumc.org Open Bluegrass Jam with Claude Jones Bluegrass musicians are cordially invited to jam with other bluegrass lovers in this cozy family friendly venue. Great acoustics. Free. Time: 3 to 6 p.m. Location: Beans in the Belfry, 122 W. Potomac St., Brunswick Contact: 301-869-6610 or www.beansinthebelfry.com The Charlie Daniels Band Daniels brings his down-home, good-old boy attitude, mixed with hard-edged Southern rock boogie and blues to the Weinberg Center stage. $40 and up. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick Contact: 301-600-2828 or www.weinbergcenter.org

The American Revolution Four-week class. Pre-registration is required. $15. Time: 9:30 a.m. Location: Frederick Senior Center, 1440 Taney Ave., Frederick Contact: 301-600-3525 Ask Nurse Steve: Correct Use and Doses of Medication Vitals check at 10:30 a.m., lunch at noon, talk at 12:30 p.m. Time: 10:30 a.m. Location: Thurmont Senior Center, 806 E. Main St., Thurmont Contact: 301-271-7911 Dementia Live Real-life simulations of what it must be like to struggle and live with dementia. Pre-register. Time: 1:30 to 4 p.m. Location: Urbana Senior Center, 9020 Amelung St., Urbana Time: 301-600-7020

Advanced planning is available now. Ease the burden on your family and freeze costs at current prices. Call us at (301) 898-1577 to schedule your free consultation and cost comparison.

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

APRIL 2019

|

19


GAMES

RECIPE OF THE MONTH

CROSSWORDS

Solutions and/or answers on page 22

Pecans are a species of hickory native to northern Mexico and the southern United States. Pecan trees are cultivated for their edible nuts, and it can take 12 years for a tree to reach maturity and begin producing. The history of pecans, which are the only major tree nut that grows naturally in North America, can be traced to the 16th century. Pecans are frequently enjoyed in southern cooking, particularly in desserts.

Yields 64

Filling 3 cups pecan halves, divided 2 cups packed brown sugar 3 eggs 4 tablespoons butter, melted 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1⁄4 teaspoon salt Powdered sugar, optional

SUDOKU

How to Solve Sudoku Puzzles: Fill in the game board so that the numbers 1 through 9 occur exactly once in each row, column and 3x3 box. The numbers can appear in any order and diagonals are not considered. Your initial game board will consist of several numbers that are already placed. Those numbers cannot be changed.Your goal is to fill in the empty squares following the simple rule above.

Preheat oven to 350 F. For crust, combine flour, powdered sugar and baking soda in a batter bowl. Add butter; mix until crumbly. Lightly press crumb mixture over bottom of stoneware bar pan; roll lightly. Bake 15 minutes; remove from oven to a cooling rack. Meanwhile for filling, reserve 1 cup of the pecans for garnish; chop remaining pecans. Combine chopped pecans, brown sugar, eggs, butter, vanilla, and salt; mix well. Pour filling over warm crust,spreading to edges of pan. Arrange remaining pecan halves over filling. Bake 17 to 19 minutes, or until filling is set in center. Cool completely. Sprinkle with additional powdered sugar, if desired. Cut into 32 squares; cut each square in half diagonally. 20

|

APRIL 2019

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

1. Defense Department 4. Diminutive hoopster Webb 8. Cools 10. Chili con __ 11. Quantitative fact 12. Enliven 13. A woman of refinement 15. Where royalty live 16. Beverage made of oatmeal 17. Replaced 18. UK’s largest city 21. Obamacare 22. When you expect to get there 23. Deutschland

24. Consumed 25. Paddle 26. A way to consume 27. “Walter White” 34. The opera has one 35. Honk 36. Disorganization 37. Secret political clique 38. Recounted again 39. Converts to leather 40. Consisting of a single element or component 41. Therefore 42. Clownish 43. The habitat of wild animals

CLUES DOWN

Pecan Praline Cookie Triangles Crust 21⁄2 cups all-purpose flour 3⁄4 cups powdered sugar 1 teaspoon baking soda 3⁄4 cups butter or margarine, melted

CLUES ACROSS

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

1. Dreary 2. Book page size 3. Become less lively 4. Grassy plain 5. Attached a figure to 6. Hungry 7. NY-based department store 9. Pedestal 10. Single-celled animal 12. National capital 14. China’s chairman 15. Al Bundy’s wife 17. Acid in all living cells 19. Told 20. Displays heartbeat

23. Softly 24. Swiss river 25. Small chapel 26. Electronic countermeasures 27. Asian nation 28. Neither 29. Peacock network 30. List of candidates 31. Medieval garment 32. Type of juice 33. “Coach” actor 34. Puerto Rican dance music La __ 36. Texas politician Ted

GUESS WHO! I am a professional wrestler born in Massachusetts on April 23, 1977. I hold 16 WWE World Heavyweight Championships. I am also known for playing lead or supporting roles in a number of films.


Here’s

MY BUSINESS CARD Let Us Help You Get Where You’re Going ALWAYS ON TIME • HANDICAPACCESSIBLE • ADVANCE SCHEDULING • SHUTTLE SERVICES TO REGIONAL AIRPORTS

Bowie Taxi • 301-695-0333 Family Owned in Frederick for 30 Years

Find a Medicare plan ...that fits your needs and budget.

Let me help you with your Medicare Options! Medicare Supplement, Medicare Advantage, and Prescription Drug Coverage Shawn Meade, Licensed Insurance Agent 301-401-4507 Offices in Frederick & Silver Spring

It's time to get the kitchen or bathroom you've always wanted.

Professional Bathroom & Kitchen Remodeling Since 1987 301-865-3060 • 301-978-1733

Medicare can be difficult to navigate. Let me help you!

www.herrodbros.com MHIC #84803

April is Parkinson's Disease Awareness Month Over 700 people in Frederick County are living with Parkinson’s Disease.

Parkinson's Disease Support Group of Frederick Meetings: 3rd Saturday of each month at the YMCA of Frederick • 12pm

Friends In Frederick Parkinson's Disease Support Group Meetings: 3rd Wednesday of each month Mt. Pleasant Ruritan Club • 1pm For more information: visit www.FIFPDSG.org or Janet at 301-831-5609 or John at 301-703-1194

Support and information for those living with Parkinson's, their caregivers, families & friends.

Dawn Brown | 301-331-2378

We have some of the best rates in Maryland for Medicare supplements!

Medicare Specialist • Managing Rep 1800 Dual Highway, Suite #302, Hagerstown

Million Dollar Roundtable • Rotary Member • Chamber Member

HOME IMPROVEMENT SPECIALIST

Do you want your business to get noticed?

. C IN , N IO T C u R T S N O DELPHEy C

To get your business card included, call (301) 662-1163

301-271-4850 • 240-674-4596 Over 40 Years Experience. Licensed & Insured MHIC #10982 THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

APRIL 2019

|

21


GAMES Solutions and answers from page 20

OFFER EXPIRES 4/26/19

Answer: John Cena 22

|

APRIL 2019

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST


FASHION, continued from 23

LIVING WILL, continued from 10

A DNR order applies only to a person who has gone into cardiac arrest. It does not mean that person has refused other types of medical assistance, such as mechanical ventilation, defibrillation following CPR, intubation (the insertion of a breathing tube), medical tests or intravenous antibiotics, among other measures. Even so, DNR orders are often wrongly equated with “do not treat” at all, according to a 2011 review in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

POLST forms

Courtesy Photo

buying all of the clothes that they own and they trust you.” After Paris, Coffey Morin moved to Manhattan and became the fashion director of Singer Sewing Machine Company (now Singer Corporation). At the time, she was the only female executive, she said. This job took her all across America for fashion show tours, and also led to her weekly spot, Coffey Break, on The Dinah Shore Show. She met with celebrities each week to talk about all things sewing. Some of her experiences on the show are documented in her book, “Francine Coffey’s Celebrity Sewing Bee.” Published in 1974 by Harper & Row, it’s filled with photos of her teaching people like Barbara Walters and Carol Burnett, as well as drawings and tips for making clothes and ideas for home decorating. And she was the fabric buyer for department stores, which took her overseas, to India and Egypt and, most exciting to her, China, where she bought all the silk she could buy. “I cornered the market on silk,” she said, laughing. “I’d bring it back and dye it, and we could sell it for so much more here.”

Interior design was a natural progression in her career. When she got her first apartment in New York, she wanted to decorate it, but couldn’t afford to hire a decorator. She decided to do it herself. “I started covering walls with fabric, and what came out of it was a career,” she said. “I didn’t realize that people needed help.” She became so proficient at design work, she could just look at a sofa and know the dimensions to make a slip cover, she said. Her own lavish apartment in the Upper East Side was featured in a 2008 article in Architectural Digest magazine. The home, described by Coffey Morin as “nouveau federal,” was inside a pre-war mansion by Carrère & Hastings. Looking back on her career, her favorite thing to do were the fashion shows. “I was the machine behind it, and it was just exciting,” she said. It goes without saying, while living in the fashion capital of America, she liked attending fashion shows, too, just for fun. Fashion was always the through line in her life, and she’s still just as stylish as ever.

A POLST form is a set of medical orders for a seriously ill or frail patient who may die within a year, signed by a physician, physician assistant or nurse practitioner. These forms, which vary by state, are meant to be prepared after a detailed conversation about a patient’s prognosis, goals and values, and the potential benefits and harms of various treatment options. Problems have emerged with the in-

creased use of POLSTs. Some nursing homes are asking all patients to sign POLST forms, even those admitted for short-term rehabilitation or whose life expectancy exceeds a year, according to a recent article by Charlie Sabatino, director of the American Bar Association Commission on Law and Aging. Also, medical providers’ conversations with patients can be cursory, not comprehensive, and forms often aren’t updated, as recommended, when a patient’s medical condition changes. “The POLST form is still relatively new, and there’s education that needs to be done,” said Amy Vandenbroucke, executive director of the National POLST Paradigm, an organization that promotes use of the forms. In a policy statement issued last year and updated in April, it stated that completion of POLST forms should always be voluntary, made with a patient’s or surrogate decision-maker’s knowledge and consent, and offered only to people whose physician would not be surprised if they die within a year.

THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

|

SENIOR LIVING

|

APRIL 2019

|

23


Profile for Frederick News-Post

Senior Living, April 2019  

A publication specially for adults 55 and older

Senior Living, April 2019  

A publication specially for adults 55 and older