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Publisher Geordie Wilson

Designer Anna Joyce

Sales Support Manager Noelle Hallman

Revenue Director Connie Hastings

Photographer Graham Cullen

Editor Anna Joyce

Contributing Writers Steve Bohnel Ryan Marshall Katryna Perera

Multimedia Marketing Consultants James Constantine Mike Santos Debra Tyson Talia Valencia

Calendar Editor Susan Guynn

Distributed monthly in The Frederick News-Post and through selected distribution outlets. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED BY COPYRIGHT. Prices, specials and descriptions are deemed accurate as of the time of publishing. This publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher. Advertising information has been provided by the advertisers. Opinions expressed in Prime Time Frederick are those of editors or contributors and do not necessarily reflect those of Ogden Newspapers of Maryland, LLC. All terms and conditions are subject to change. The cover, design, format and layout of this publication are trademarks of Ogden Newspapers of Maryland, LLC and published by The Frederick News-Post.

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What would you like to read? What would you like to read about in Prime Time Frederick? Email ajoyce@newspost.com with the subject line “Prime Time.�

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Living

Part-timers Meet ‘retired’ adults who remain in the workforce

F

By Steve Bohnel News-Post Staff

or 36 years, Bob O’Neel worked as a purchase manager at Random House in Westminster. Back then, in the 1960s, the RCA Corporation bought Random House, as both companies were jockeying for better positioning in the electronics market. And RCA had the largest color TV, O’Neel said—a sign of the technology at that point. O’Neel, 82, worked at Random House from 1964 until 2000, and then retired. But roughly 12 years ago, he decided to contact the owner of Glade Valley Golf Club in Walkersville. The golf club needed a part-time starter—someone who would confirm golfers paid for their round, and then make sure they teed off at the appropriate time. O’Neel applied for the job because he had golfed since his caddying days in Indiana at 8 years old, and also, through the years, had been unimpressed with starters at country clubs and golf courses. Given demand and the coronavirus pandemic, he tries to work Saturdays and Sundays, from about 6:45-7 a.m. until 5 p.m., or whenever the last tee time is. “If I could send them to the first tee laughing, then I had done my job … I look forward to the regulars each week,” O’Neel said. His job satisfaction is one many area seniors might have as they retire from their full-time careers and seek part-time work. Wes Leatherman, a business and employment consultant for Frederick County 4

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BILL GREEN

Frederick county resident Bob O’Neel works part time two days a week as a starter on the greens at Glade Valley Golf Club in Walkersville.

Workforce Services, said health concerns and the overall technological advances are challenges for seniors when they reenter the workforce. That said, older adults are willing to work part-time for a variety of reasons, according to Leatherman. “Many are no longer interested in taking on the full leadership or management roles they had in the past. Oftentimes, they seek out alternative positions like consulting, administrative assistance roles, or something more aligned with their passion,” Leatherman wrote in an email. “That said, there is no specific field or industry they limit themselves to.” Among the fields that seniors often find themselves working in part-time is education. Ernie O’Roark, 68, taught history and geography in Montgomery County Public Schools for 32 years, retiring in 2006.

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During his time teaching, he spent multiple years learning in San Diego from Professors Ross E. Dunn, David Christian and Edmund Burke, three of this country’s leading world history scholars. The objective was simple: Bring scholarship at the university level down to the secondary level, O’Roark said. After his teaching days, however, he had this whole knowledge base, but no students with whom to share it. Years ago, he found out about the Institute for Learning in Retirement (ILR) program at Frederick Community College. He now teaches three courses in that program. “When I retired I found myself with all this material and a relatively unique approach to history with no-one to share it with,” O’Roark wrote in an email. “Then I learned about ILR and the rest is history—pun intended.”

His reasons to keep teaching are simple, he added. “Part of the motivation is also simply that I enjoy teaching. I enjoy sharing the great stories that make up human history and I very much enjoy the people I’m sharing it with,” O’Roark said. “I do miss the kids, but these retired folks at ILR are a lot of fun too.” Karen Gray, 79, is also a professor for ILR. She worked for the Smithsonian Associates program developing and overseeing educational tours in the mid-Atlantic states area from 1981 to 2001. She moved to Hagerstown in 2001, and since has had several part-time jobs and has spent much of her time studying the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal’s history. Like O’Roark, she has taught older adults as an adjunct, first at Hagerstown Community College and then at Frederick Community College. Her courses focus on ancient philosophy and related subjects, ranging from classical Greek drama to the 18th-century Scottish enlightenment. Gray said she likes to keep busy—it’s just who she is. “Why do I fill my life so full—8 to 12 hours of all 7 days a week?” she wrote in an email. “Because that is my nature. I am an addictive learner and have to be learning, thinking, and writing. My retirement (and even this Covid-19 time of increased seclusion) is an idyllic time for me as it allows me to fill my days with what I enjoy most: learning and sharing what I learn.” O’Neel agreed, adding that staying active is key in one’s retirement years. He likes his job at Glade Valley. “I’m convinced that you’re better to wear out than rust out … I see a lot of people who go sit in a rocking chair and go to hell in a hand basket,” O’Neel wrote. “[Being a golf starter] is an activity I like to do, and I like seeing the people every week.”


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P EO P L E

‘Anchors Away’

Frederick man’s book examines his childhood as a ‘Navy brat’

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By Ryan Marshall News-Post Staff

erry Miller’s itinerant early life helped him learn a valuable lesson that he applied to his later life. His naval officer father’s career kept the family moving around when Miller was a child, and learning to fit in to new environments gave him skills he could use when he moved to Frederick about 20 years ago. Specifically, it gave him a valuable insight to life as a senior: Get involved and give as much as you can in the community, because that will help you adapt to new surroundings. Miller served on the Citizens Nursing Home Board at Citizen’s Care and Rehabilitation Center in Frederick, and as a battlefield tour guide at Gettysburg, among other activities. Volunteering can help make connections that can translate into other aspects of your life, he said. At 81, he has collected stories of his unusual childhood in a self-published memoir entitled “The Anchors Away Kid,” available at Curious Iguana bookstore in downtown Frederick and on Amazon. “Anchors Away Kids were called Navy brats, juniors or simply the sons and daughters of U.S. Navy sailors,” according to description of Miller’s book on Amazon.com. “….This book is a kids-eye-view of 20th century American history.” Miller sees the book as an effort to speak up for many people who grew up with parents in the military. “I hadn’t really ever come across anything that really talked about us,” he said. 6

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“Anchors Away Kids were called Navy brats, juniors or simply the sons and daughters of U.S. Navy sailors.”

BILL GREEN

Jerry Miller wrote “The Anchors Away Kid” so readers will know what it’s like to move frequently as a child with parents in the military.

Writing the book was a process of piecing together his childhood from family and Navy records, trying to get more insight into his own life and his father’s. Adolph J. Miller was a U. S. Naval Academy graduate who rose to become a fleet commander in the years after World War II. His career kept the family moving frequently, bouncing from Long Beach in Southern California to the Philippines, Hawaii, France and across Europe and the Far East.

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There was a stop at The Hill School, a tony prep school in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, and some relatively carefree high school years on the French Riviera. His high school in Frankfurt, Germany, had kids from all over Europe, creating a more worldly and cosmopolitan student body, as well as a common bond. But for kids like Miller and his generation, uncertainty was a way of life. Coming out of the horror of World

War II and the grinding tension of the Cold War, the Korean War, and the threat of the nuclear bomb, the potential for war “was just a presence,” Miller said. Amid the high school football games and dances of teenage life, the bomb and threat of war lingered in the background. He eventually joined the Navy himself at 18, going to boot camp in San Diego, in the area his father helped oversee as chief of staff for the Western Sea Frontier, according to his book. But much of “The Anchors Away Kid” focuses on his time growing up. He knows that military kids today still face the same issues of trying to fit in amid the continuous moves, adjusting to new schools and new friends. It’s important to stay in touch with old friends even after you move, and work to maintain the bonds you’ve formed, he said. As for new friends, “you really have to be flexible” in dealing with new groups and cliques, and figuring out where you belong. “People are fascinating, and if you’re going to adjust, you really have to perceive these groups,” he said.


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P EO P L E

Q&A: Life During the Pandemic malcy too quickly. As of early October, she was still teleworking and had not yet returned to eating out at restaurants. “Since I have a son that’s high risk, we don’t do much. We haven’t done any vacations, we haven’t done anything. We’re not even going to let him go back to school when they do a hybrid,” she said. The only thing she has done is try to do some sightseeing with some friends who were visiting from out of state. That was tough, though, as little was open, and it was hard to find even a restroom to use, she said.

By Katryna Perera News-Post Staff

Prime Time spoke with folks in downtown Frederick about how they are getting out of the house and resuming normal activities, if any, during the pandemic.

Tom Hamill

Samantha Ryals & Kelly Jordan

Samantha Ryals and Kelly Jordan think they both may have had the coronavirus at one point and are still being cautious. But they are slowly easing back into normal life by doing things like seeing a few friends and eating out at restaurants. Ryals and Jordan live in Washington, D.C., but decided to visit downtown Frederick on their day off. In order to start returning to daily activities, they said they take as many precautions as possible and have stocked up on masks and hand sanitizer. Ryals said she returned to working in her office a few weeks ago, and that it was that move that made them more comfortable to begin venturing out more. They’re not going crazy, though. “We’re not throwing parties,” Jordan said with a laugh. Ryals agreed and said they are careful even when visiting friends. “We only still go and see a few people at a time at most, and we’re quarantining and stuff like that if we think we’ve gotten in contact with anyone [who has the virus].” 8

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Photos by Katryna Perera

Tom Hamill is slowly trying to return to his normal daily life. The first step is getting back into the office he said. “I’m working from home and I’m trying to get back into the office once a week,” he said. He also has returned to the gym, where he chooses to swim so he doesn’t have to wear a mask. In terms of eating out, Hamil said he does visit restaurants, but tries to eat outside as much as possible. “Inside, I don’t feel as comfortable, so I loved that they opened up the streets for the restaurants [downtown]. It makes it a lot easier.”

Devon Andres

Devon Andres has a son who is high-risk and therefore has been trying to avoid returning to nor-

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Lorie Kennell & Amy Snider

Lori Kennell and Amy Snider said they have been making a slow return to daily life. They have both decided to continue when possible with outdoor activities such as camping, biking and walking. Kennell has returned to her local gym, but said it’s different. “The classes we used to just show up for we have to sign up for now, but that’s OK,” she said. Kennell said when visiting restaurants she prefers to eat outdoors, but is worried that option is going to dwindle as the weather gets colder. Snider is a kindergarten classroom aide in Fairfax, Virginia, and is back to work in-person. She still attends church online and said she is trying to do what she can while being cautious. “I’m in the higher risk category, but I’m not fearful. I just try to do what [experts] tell us to do,” she said.


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F INAN C E

Social Security Benefits Increase 2021 SOCIAL SECURITY CHANGES S ocial Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for approximately 70 million Americans will increase 1.3 percent in 2021, the Social Security Administration announced in mid-October. The 1.3 percent cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) will begin with benefits payable to more than 64 million Social Security beneficiaries in January 2021. Increased payments to more than 8 million SSI beneficiaries will begin on December 31, 2020. Note that some people receive both Social Security and SSI benefits. The Social Security Act ties the annual COLA to the increase in the Consumer Price Index as determined by the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. Some other adjustments that take effect in January of each year are based on the increase in average wages. Based on that increase, the maximum amount of earnings subject to the Social Security tax (taxable maximum) will increase to $142,800 from $137,700. Social Security and SSI beneficiaries are normally notified by mail starting in early December about their new benefit amount. Most people who receive Social Security payments will be able to view their COLA notice online through their personal my Social Security account. People may create or access their “my Social Security” account online at ww.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount. Information about Medicare changes for 2021, not available at press time, will be available at www.medicare.gov. Social Security will not be able to compute new benefit amounts for Social Security beneficiaries receiving Medicare until after the Medicare premium amounts for 2021 are announced. Final 2021 benefit amounts will be communicated to beneficiaries in December through the mailed COLA notice and my Social Security’s Message Center. The Social Security Act provides for how the COLA is calculated.To learn more, visit www. socialsecurity.gov/cola.

Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA):

Based on the increase in the Consumer Price Index (CPI-W) from the third quarter of 2019 through the third quarter of 2020, Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries will receive a 1.3 percent COLA for 2021. Other important 2021 Social Security information is as follows: Tax Rate

2020

2021

Employee

7.65%

7.65%

Self-Employed

15.30%

15.30%

NOTE: The 7.65% tax rate is the combined rate for Social Security and Medicare. The Social Security portion (OASDI) is 6.20% on earnings up to the applicable taxable maximum amount (see below). The Medicare portion (HI) is 1.45% on all earnings. Also, as of January 2013, individuals with earned income of more than $200,000 ($250,000 for married couples filing jointly) pay an additional 0.9 percent in Medicare taxes. The tax rates shown above do not include the 0.9 percent. Maximum Taxable Earnings

2020

2021

Social Security (OASDI only)

$137,700

$142,800

Medicare (HI only)

No Limit

No Limit

Quarter of Coverage 2020 $1,410

$1,470

Retirement Earnings Test Exempt Amounts

2020

2021

Under Full Retirement Age

$18,240/yr. $18,960/yr. ($1,520/mo.) ($1,580/mo.)

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Maximum Social Security Benefit at Full Retirement Age

2021

$3,011/mo. $3,148/mo.

Estimated Average Monthly Social Security Benefits Payable in January 2021

Before 1.3% COLA

After 1.3% COLA

All Retired Workers

$1,523

$1,543

Aged Couple, Both Receiving Benefits

$2,563

$2,596

Widowed Mother and Two Children

$2,962

$3,001

Aged Widow(er) Alone

$1,434

$1,453

Disabled Worker, Spouse and One or More Children

$2,195

$2,224

All Disabled Workers

$1,261

$1,277

–Social Security Administration

NOTE: One dollar in benefits will be withheld for every $2 in earnings above the limit.

–Social Security Administration

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YOU MIGHT BE MISSING OUT ON NEW CUSTOMERS! Prime Time’s 50,000 loyal, mature readers with disposable income need to know about your products and services, like: • Appliances • Remodeling • Plumbing • IT services • Auto repair • Landscaping • Financial • Furnishings • Roofing Contact us today so we can help you find the customers you’re missing: 301-662-1163 or advertising@newspost.com

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HEA L TH

A Harmless Habit?

Knuckle cracking might cause repetitive trauma to joints, cartilage

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by Katherine Ellison

gnoring generations of parents who’ve warned that knuckle cracking is bad for you, between 20 and 54% of Americans continue to engage in this annoying nervous habit. Many have been reassured by repeated clinical reports over the decades that there is no strong evidence that knuckle cracking causes arthritis. A 2018 Harvard Medical School blog went so far as to pronounce the practice “harmless.” “Harmless” is overstating it, however, argue experts who have studied the fine print of the research. Even as there’s no strong link to arthritis— specifically osteoarthritis, the degeneration of the cartilage cushioning the ends of bones—cracking knuckles, they conclude, may still harm your hands. Seattle neurosurgeon Rod Oskouian is the most recent researcher to jump into this small but lively tributary of mainstream science, as co-author of a 2018 review of knuckle-cracking studies in the journal Clinical Anatomy. Oskouian and his three colleagues pored over 26 sometimes contradictory papers regarding the mechanisms and effects of knuckle cracking, beginning with a 1911 German treatise titled “On the Dispute About Joint Pressure.” He did so, he said, after becoming fascinated by the universal inability of his students through the years to explain what makes that cracking noise. Modern scholars now agree that bones themselves aren’t cracking, but 12

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For perhaps as much as 10% of the population, who suffer from a preexisting problem such as rheumatoid arthritis, an inflammatory disorder, knuckle cracking is particularly ill-advised.

GETTY

rather that the movement creates a bubble of gas in the synovial fluid lubricating the joints. Researchers still don’t know if it is the bubble’s formation or subsequent pop that makes the noise, but Oskouian said the mechanics are similar to a chiropractor’s “adjustment” of the spine, which also elicits a cracking sound. Joining with several of their predecessors, Oskouian and his colleagues

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concluded that researchers have yet to show any reliable association between knuckle cracking and arthritis. A 2017 study of 30 knuckle crackers offered evidence that the habit even increased range of motion. But that still doesn’t give knuckle-crackers a pass—especially not if they do it a lot and for a long time, or have a preexisting problem. “Knuckle cracking over the years

will cause repetitive trauma to the joints and cartilage,” Oskouian said in a telephone interview. Studies he cited in his review suggest that long-term knuckle cracking can cause significant damage short of arthritis, stressing and ultimately degenerating cartilage. In 2017, a team of Turkish scientists who examined 35 people who cracked their knuckles more than five times a day found that while it didn’t appear to affect grip strength, it was associated with a thickening of the metacarpal cartilage, a potential early sign of damage that can lead to osteoarthritis. A more ambitious 1990 study of 300 participants over 45, including 74 habitual knuckle crackers, found that while, again, the crackers had no greater rates of arthritis, they were more likely to have swollen hands and, in this case at least, weaker grips. “Habitual knuckle cracking results in functional hand impairment,” conSee KNUCKLES, 21


HEA L TH

What Vaccines DoYou Need?

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A

s you get older, your doctor may recommend vaccinations—shots to help prevent certain illnesses and to keep you healthy. Talk with your doctor about which of the following shots you need, and make sure to protect yourself by keeping your vaccinations up to date.

begins. It takes at least two weeks for your shot to start working.There are special flu shots designed specifically for people 65 or older. Medicare will pay for the shot, and so will many private health insurance plans. The vaccine is the same wherever you receive it.

Flu

Pneumococcal disease is a serious infection that spreads from person to person by air. It often causes pneumonia in the lungs, and it can affect other parts of the body. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), part of the federal government, adults who are 65 or older should have two pneumococcal vaccinations to help prevent the disease. You can get either of the two pneumococcal vaccines (but not both) when you get the influenza (flu) vaccine.Talk with your health care professional to find out when you should return for the other pneumococcal vaccine.

Flu—short for influenza—is a virus that can cause fever, chills, sore throat, stuffy nose, headache and muscle aches. Flu is very serious when it gets in your lungs. Older adults are at a higher risk for developing serious complications from flu, such as pneumonia. The flu is easy to pass from person to person.The virus also changes over time, which means you can get it over and over again.When the virus changes, annual flu shot ingredients change. Also, the protection you get from a flu shot lessens with time, especially in older people. That’s why most people should get the flu shot each year. Ideally, you should get your shot between September and November.Then, you may be protected when the flu season

Pneumococcal Disease

Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

Tetanus (sometimes called lockjaw) is See VACCINES, 19 THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

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NOVEMBER CALENDAR Frederick County Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center live virtual fitness classes. Preregister. $60 fitness pass for October through December classes. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.FrederickCountyMD.gov/Virtual50 or VirtualSeniorCenter@FrederickCountyMD.gov Mondays, 1:30 p.m. Line Dance — Improve your balance, get moving and have fun! Mondays, 2:45 p.m. Floor Yoga — Focus on alignment of the muscular and skeletal structures, along with breathing techniques using both held and moving postures. Tuesdays, 9 a.m. Strength Training/Gentle Stretching — Using light weights (or soup cans or water bottles). Tuesdays, 10:30 a.m. Morning Flow Yoga — Incorporating traditional and non-traditional yoga 14

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moves to energize and awaken the body. These will include standing and sitting asanas (postures). Tuesdays, 1:30 p.m. Zumba Gold — Active cardio low-impact dance moves and energizing music. Wednesdays, 12:15 p.m. Zumba Gold — Active cardio low-impact dance moves and energizing music. Wednesdays, 3 p.m. Meditation and Movement (M&M) — Tai chi inspired seated exercise class. The focus is on releasing tension in the body through slow movement and deep breathing. Wednesdays, 4:30 p.m. SPARK! — Strength training mixed with simple cardiovascular movement and stretching. Using body weight and light hand-held weights. Class is primarily standing and a chair for some activity. Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Yoga Nidra (aka yogic sleep) — Helps induce a conscious meditative state

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BILL GREEN

between waking and sleeping. The practice reduces stress and improves sleep. You may lie on the floor, bed or recliner. Key is comfort. Thursdays, 9 a.m. Strength Training/Gentle Stretching — Using light weights (or soup cans or water bottles). Thursdays, 10:30 a.m. Morning Flow Yoga — Incorporating traditional and non-traditional yoga moves to energize and awaken the body. Thursdays, 1:30 p.m. Line Dance — Improve your balance, get moving, and have fun! Fridays, 9 a.m. Zumba Gold — Active cardio low-impact dance moves and fun music. Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. Yin Yang Yoga — Brings together the benefits of passively holding yoga poses with more active dynamic sequences and standing postures; working on the muscles and blood flow, building strength, stamina and flexibility.

Senior Recreation Council of Frederick County Open Duckpin Bowling — 1 to 3 p.m. Thursdays, Walkersville Lanes. Contact Gerald at 240-651-1865. Bicycling — Nov. 5, time and location TBD. Preregister by contacting Kathy at 301-606-0064.

Nov. 1 Daylight Saving Time Ends Turn clocks back one hour. Commemorating 156 Years of Emancipation in Maryland Join the National Park Service and community partners in reading the names of the enslaved people who lived and worked on the six historic properties of Monocacy National Battlefield, as well as the U.S. Colored Troops who enlisted at Monocacy Junction. Free. Time: 2 p.m. Location: Monocacy National Battlefield, 5201 Urbana Pike, Frederick


NOVEMBER CALENDAR Contact: 301-662-3515 or www. nps.gov/mono

Nov. 2 Genealogy — Online sessions Share basic research strategies and resources. Also meets Nov. 9, 16, 23 and 30. Time: 9:30 a.m. Location: Hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov Film Club Do you like moves? Discuss the film “Bringing Up Baby.” Free. Preregister. Time: 12:30 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov The Book Shelf Club Discuss the book “Two Much and Never Enough” by Mary I. Trump. Free. Preregister. Time: 2:30 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov Virtual Program: Cultural Competency and Unconscious Bias An ILR 55+ program series. Learn how to recognize implicit/unconscious bias, acknowledge it and overcome it by reflecting on your cultural perceptions and how they influence every aspect of life. Register online at frederick.edu/ILR and search for the course. Free. Time: 4 to 6 p.m. Location: Online Contact: www.fcpl.org

Nov. 4 Kitchen Kapers Live from their personal kitchens, staff members share some favorite recipes. This month’s program is “Grain Bowls,” led by Caitlyn. Free. Preregister. Time: 10:30 a.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov

Nov. 5 Knit/Crochet Socialize while working on your projects. Also meets Nov. 12 and 19. Preregister. Free. Time: 10:30 a.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov Taking Care of Your Emotional Health A discussion on strategies and activities you can do to help take care of your emotional health. Led by Fred A. Balius Jr., LCSW-C, BCD. Preregister. Free. Time: 2:30 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov

Nov. 7 Medicare Part D: Open Enrollment Do you have questions about your Medicare Part D plan? Is your current plan best for you? Do you need to find a new Medicare Part D plan? Join this virtual do-it-yourself seminar. Free. Preregister. Time: 9:30 a.m.

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NOVEMBER CALENDAR continued from 15 Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov First Saturday Support downtown businesses. Time: 3 to 9 p.m. Location: Downtown Frederick Contact: 301-698-8118

Nov. 8

Nov. 9 Film Club Do you like movies? Discuss the film “The African Queen.” Free. Preregister. Time: 12:30 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov

Nov. 10 TED Talk Watch a short video and discuss. Also Nov. 17, 24. Free. Preregister. Time: 3 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov Medicare Part D: Open Enrollment Do you have questions about your Medicare Part D plan? Is your current plan the best for you? Do you need to find a new Medicare Part D Plan? Join this virtual do-it-yourself seminar. Free. Preregister. Time: 7 p.m. |

NOVEMBER 2020

Nov. 11 17th Annual Echo Taps Time: 10:30 to 11 a.m. Location: Market and Second streets, Frederick Contact: 301-694-0829

Nov. 12

88th Annual Brunswick Veterans Day Parade Time: 1 to 3 p.m. Location: Potomac and Maple streets, Brunswick Contact: 240-344-4757

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Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov

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Good Stories Book Club Discuss books written by Anne Tyler. Preregister. Free. Time: 2:30 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov Ukulele Jam Session Learn and play a new song each month. Free. Preregister. Time: 3 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov Clustered Spires Quilt Guild Meeting For beginners to experts, all welcome. Time: 6 p.m. Location: Via Zoom Contact: www.clusteredspires quiltguild.org

Nov. 13 Craft and Conversation: Gratitude Jars Preregister. Free. Time: 1:30 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd.

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gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov Maryland Legal Aid: Essential Documents Part 1 Will cover information about wills, advance directives, medical and fiscal power of attorney, and considerations for naming POAs. Part 2 will be Dec. 11. Preregister. Free. Time: 1 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov

Nov. 14 Forest Therapy Walk Reconnect with nature. Meeting location instructions will be emailed once you register. $5. Time: 9 to 11 a.m. Location: TBA when you register Contact: 301-600-2936 or www.recreater.com

Nov. 15 Bird Walk With Wild Birds Unlimited. Must Preregister. Free, all ages. Time: 10 a.m. to noon Location: Wild Birds Unlimited, Frederick Contact: 301-600-2936 or www.recreater.com

Nov. 16 Film Club Do you like movies? Discuss the film “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.” Free. Preregister. Time: 12:30 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov

Nov. 17 Coping with the Holidays Learn how to cope with the holidays while grieving; practical ways

to deal with your feelings, ways to honor your loved ones. Presenter is Melissa Dolan, LCSW-C, bereavement counselor, Carroll Hospice. Free. Preregister. Time: 5:30 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov

Nov. 18 Craft and Conversation: Button Tree Preregister. Free. Time: 10:30 a.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov

Nov. 19 Medicare Part D: Open Enrollment Do you have questions about your Medicare Part D plan? Is your current plan the best for you? Do you need to find a new Medicare Part D Plan? Join this virtual do-it-yourself seminar. Preregister. Free. Time: 12:30 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov Maryland Access Point (MAP): ServingTogether Works in collaboration with public and nonprofit partners to streamline efforts connecting veterans, active duty, guard, reserve, caregivers and military spouses with a coordinated network of care for all of life's needs. From employment to benefits navigation, education to mental health and well-being supports, strategic partnerships


NOVEMBER CALENDAR are vital to serving the military-connected community and their families before, during and after service. Free. Preregister. Time: 2:30 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov

Nov. 20 Maryland Christmas Show Continues Nov. 21, 22, 27, 28 and 29. $8 adults, $4 ages 10 and under. Time: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday Location: Frederick Fairgrounds, 797 E. Patrick St., Frederick Contact: 301-845-0003 or marylandchristmasshow.com

Nov. 21 Frederick Coin & Currency Show 30-plus dealers. Free admission. Continues Nov. 22. Time: 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Location: Elks Lodge 684, 289 Willowdale Drive, Frederick Contact: 443-623-7025 or coinshows.com/frederick_co.html

Nov. 23 Film Club Do you like movies? Discuss the film “Lion in Winter.” Free. Preregister. Time: 12:30 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov Medicare Part D: Open Enrollment Do you have questions about your Medicare Part D plan? Is your current plan the best for you? Do you need to find a new Medicare Part D Plan? Join this virtual do-it-yourself seminar. Free. Preregister. Time: 2 p.m.

Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov

Nov. 24 Fun and Games Join some lively games. Preregister. Free. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov

Nov. 26 Frederick Turkey Trot Virtual 5K run and 1-mile fun run/ walk at time and place of your choosing between Nov. 26 and 29. Benefits Sheppard Pratt. $20 and up for 5K run; $10 for 1-mile run/ walk. Time: Any time between Nov. 26 and 29 Location: Your choice Contact: www.sheppardpratt.org/ turkey-trot

Nov. 27 Frosty Friday Special activities, caroling and live music, shopping. Time: 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Location: Historic Downtown Frederick Contact: 301-698-8118

Nov. 30 Film Club Do you like movies? Discuss the film “On Golden Pond.” Preregister. Free. Time: 12:30 p.m. Location: Online and hosted by Senior Services Division Virtual 50+ Center Contact: www.frederickcountymd. gov/virtual50 or virtualseniorcenter@frederickcountymd.gov THE FREDERICK NEWS-POST

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F OO D

10 Tips for Thanksgiving Dinner

A

Why: “Roast your turkey in the tallest-sided roasting pan you have, like a Swiss braiser.This shaves off significant cooking time because the walls of the pan help create a vortex of heat that cooks the bird much faster and helps crisp the skin.”

by Kate Krader

mericans consume around 46 million turkeys in late November, as well as 80 million pounds of cranberries and 50 million pumpkin pies. The holidays wreak havoc on the bestlaid plans, and professional chefs know that. Below, many of them share tips for how to salvage disasters and serve a delicious meal when there’s no time left.

8. Grab a Spray Bottle

tablespoons of baking soda per gallon of water for around two hours. Then let it dry thoroughly and pat it down so there is no moisture.”

the turkey, and the silky fat keeps it moist and adds a meaty depth of flavor to the bird.”

Who says: Eddie Huang, co-owner of Baohaus in New York, author of Fresh Off the Boat and director of the coming film Boogie Why: “I combine stock and my seasoning in a spray bottle and spray the turkey constantly to hydrate the skin and keep it from burning as it cooks. Also, every culture has their own way of seasoning poultry. My special poultry mix is just what me and my mom created. I never saw anyone else do it this way, and we stuck to it. It’s red pepper, Sichuan peppercorn, salt and white pepper, and we grind it up.We don’t have a special name for it; it’s just what we do at home.”

4. Give Turkey a Bacon Boost

6. When in Doubt, Shove in a Beer

Who says: Carlos Cruz, culinary director at 16” on Center restaurant group, Chicago Why: “Obviously this idea stems from beer-can chicken. I make it on a larger scale to keep the turkey nice and moist. I use a 24-ounce can of Old Milwaukee and dry rub my bird with a mix of cayenne, smoked paprika, onion powder, garlic powder, salt, mustard powder, cumin, granulated white sugar, and brown sugar. I put in a bouquet of thyme, rosemary, and sage inside the bird for another burst of flavor and roast it the same way as beer-can chicken, vertically.”

9. Combat Dry Turkey

1. Forget Appetizers

Who says: Alex Guarnaschelli, chef and partner of Butter Restaurant, New York Why: “Don’t waste your time and make appetizers. People get too stuffed by the time they get to the table. A cheese and charcuterie board is always the way to go. Buy presliced meats to make your life easier. Add leftover olives, jams or pickles to the platter, which helps clean out your fridge—you’ll need it for turkey leftovers.”

2. Break Out the Cooler for Prep

Who says: Clay Conley, chef-owner of Buccan, Imoto, the Sandwich Shop at Buccan, and Grato, Palm Beach, Florida Why: “Use a large cooler when brining your bird instead of taking up valuable refrigerator space. Hold back half of the liquid brine and replace with ice. Place the bird directly in the ice solution overnight.”

3. Create an Instant Brined Turkey Who says: Nahid Ahmed and Arjuna Bull, executive chefs and owners of Luthun, New York Why: “Every year we brine our turkeys in baking soda and water—no salt or sugar—to tenderize the meat. Use 4 18

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GETTY

Who says: Peter Lipson, executive chef of La Ventura, New York Why: “Top the turkey breast with bacon to help keep the white meat from drying out and add more flavor. You can either overlap the bacon across the breast or create a lattice basket weave. Uncover the turkey for the last 10 to 12 minutes and increase the temperature to 400F to crisp up the bacon and brown the skin.”

5. Or Try Country Ham

Who says: Katsuji Tanabe, chef-owner of High Horse, Raleigh, North Carolina Why: “To add extra flavor to the turkey meat, arrange thin slices of country ham over the breast, underneath the skin. The salty country ham seasons

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7. Go Big With a Roasting Pan

Who says: Steven Redzikowski, executive chef-partner at OAK at Fourteenth, Boulder, Colorado

Who says: Donatella Arpaia, chef-partner of Prova Pizzabar, New York Why: “If your turkey comes out too dry, soak it in chicken stock or broth. Slice it up and add it to a shallow pan of hot broth so the turkey bathes and steams.This keeps the meat juicy, warm, and moist.”

10. Health-ify Cranberry Sauce

Who says: Neal Fraser, chef-owner of Redbird, Los Angeles Why: “Make cranberry sauce with orange juice and dried cranberries mixed with fresh ones for a lower sugar content.” Who says: Hereford, of Turkey & the Wolf and Molly’s Rise & Shine Bonus hack: “Mix your cranberry sauce with mayo and a little creole mustard and every herb you have, especially dill.” –Bloomberg


VACCINES, continued from 13

caused by bacteria found in soil, dust, and manure. It enters the body through cuts in the skin. Diphtheria is also caused by bacteria. It is a serious illness that can affect the tonsils, throat, nose or skin. It can spread from person to person. Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is also caused by bacteria. It is a serious illness that causes uncontrollable, violent coughing fits that often make it hard to breathe. It can spread from person to person. Tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis can lead to death. Getting the shot is the best way to keep from getting tetanus and diphtheria, and most people get their first shots as children. The CDC says that every

adult should get the Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis) vaccine once if they did not receive it as a teen (first recommended in 2005) to protect against pertussis (whooping cough), and then a Td (tetanus, diphtheria) booster shot every 10 years to continue protection. Ask your doctor if and when you need a booster shot. Shingles

Shingles is caused by the same virus as chickenpox. If you had chickenpox, the virus is still in your body.The virus could become active again and cause shingles. Shingles affects the nerves. Common symptoms include burning, shooting pain, tingling and/or itching, as well as a rash and fluid-filled blisters. Even when the rash disappears, the pain can remain. The shingles vaccine may keep you from getting shingles and ongoing pain

called post-herpetic neuralgia, or PHN. Healthy adults 50 or older should get a shingles vaccine called Shingrix, which is given in two doses, two to six months apart. Shingrix is preferred over Zostavax, a previous shingles vaccine. Zostavax may still be used to prevent shingles in healthy adults 60 or older. For example, Zostavax may be used if a person is allergic to Shingrix, prefers Zostavax, or requests immediate vaccination and Shingrix is not available. You should try to get the second dose of Shingrix between two and six months after you get the first dose. If it has been more than six months since you got the first dose, you should get the second dose as soon as possible.You don’t need to get a first dose again. You should get a Shingrix shot even if you have already had shingles, received

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Zostavax, or don’t remember having had chickenpox. However, you should not get a Shingrix shot if you have a fever or illness, have a weakened immune system or have had an allergic reaction to Shingrix. Check with your doctor if you are not sure what to do. All Medicare Part D plans and most private health insurance plans will cover the cost. Measles, Mumps and Rubella

Measles, mumps and rubella are viruses that cause several flu-like symptoms and may lead to much more serious, longterm health problems, especially in adults. The vaccine given to children to prevent measles, mumps and rubella has made these diseases rare. If you don’t know if you’ve had the diseases or the shot, you can still get the vaccine. – National Institute on Aging (NIA)

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Boredom Busters

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

PRIME TIME FREDERICK

58. Idiom 59. Masa 60. Taw 61. Earls

11. Stop 12. Lens 13. OSS 16. Ethane 18. Aeon 22. TA 23. Blat 24. Santa 25. PMT 27. Nanak 28. Sudd 29. CPA 30. Hair 31. Hod 33. Kos 35. Reformat 36. Onyx

37. EEC 39. Resume 42. Remora 43. Hoya 44. IA 46. CMDR 47. Neva 48. Aces 49. Anew 50. Loir 51. Enol 52. Isms 53. Rom 54. ETA 55. Tie 56. Ida |

SOLUTIONS DOWN 1. Each 2. Anoa 3. Rung 4. ERG 5. DAR 6. Attar 7. Lout 8. Mil 9. Alacrity 10. Otiose

NOVEMBER 2020

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32. Auk 34. Pant 35. Rooty 37. Endo 38. Ait 39. Rend 40. Eads 41. Rarefy 43. Hick 45. Esox 46. COA 47. Namur 49. Amy 50. Lei 53. Recommendations 57. Overeater

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SOLUTIONS ACROSS 1. Eared 6. Alma 10. Oslo 14. Anura 15. Toilettes 17. Congratulations 19. Hag 20. Eat 21. Chops 22. Tor 23. Bras 24. Span 26. Linens 29. Cham 31. Hate

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CLUES ACROSS 1. Battered corners: dog-__ 6. __ Mater: one’s school 10. National capital 14. Frogs and toads order 15. Bathrooms (French) 17. Praise 19. Witch 20. Consume 21. Pork and lamb are two types 22. Rocky peak 23. Women’s undergarments 24. From end to end 26. Bed sheets 29. South Sudanese king 31. Dislike immensely 32. Diving seabird 34. Breathe noisily 35. Full of roots 37. Inside 38. Small island in a river 39. Tear into pieces 40. “CSI” actor George 41. Make less dense 43. Derogatory term for a country native 45. Pike and pickerel genus 46. Important in respiration and other biochemical reactions (abbr.) 47. Belgian city 49. “The Joy Luck Club” author 50. Essence of “Aloha” 53. Suggestions 57. One who overindulges 58. Expression 59. Maize dough 60. Make into leather 61. British noblemen CLUES DOWN 1. One of two or more people or things 2. Small, deerlike water buffalo 3. Part of a ladder

4. Unit of work 5. Patriotic women 6. Fragrant essential oil 7. A  ggressive, uncouth man 8. O  ne thousandth of an inch 9. B  risk and cheerful readiness 10. Serving no practical purpose 11. Prevent from going forward 12. Camera part 13. Former CIA 16. Colorless, odorless gas 18. Long division of time 22. Atomic #73 23. Make a bleating sound 24. The kids love him 25. Female condition prior to menstrual period 27. Founder of Sikhism 28. Sudanese swamp 29. H  e/she can help with your finances 30. P  art of the human body 31. Mortar trough 33. Greek island 35. Change pagination 36. Queens hip hop group 37. Precursor to the EU 39. A way to go on 42. Slender marine fish 43. Georgetown’s mascot 44. Farm state 46. Military leader (abbr.) 47. Russian river 48. Teams’ best pitchers 49. In a more positive way 50. Long French river 51. R  eactive structures in organic chemistry 52. Distinctive practices 53. Male gypsy 54. W  hen you hope to get there 55. M  en’s fashion accessory 56. Journalist Tarbell


KNUCKLES, continued from 12

cluded the two authors, based at the former Mount Carmel Mercy Hospital in Detroit. For good measure, they also noted that habitual knuckle crackers were also more likely to do manual labor, bite their nails, smoke and drink alcohol. Orthopedists vary in how seri-

ously they regard knuckle cracking as a health threat. Oskouian ventured that the habit is probably harmless for most people, adding that most of his patients seem to abandon the practice after a few years or so. Yet for perhaps as much as 10% of the population, who suffer from a preexisting problem such as rheumatoid arthritis, an inflammatory disorder, knuckle cracking is particularly ill-advised, warned Charles Kallina, an assistant professor of surgery at the Texas A&M College of Medicine who acknowledged that he cracks his own knuckles on occasion.

“I cannot in good faith recommend it as a rule,” Kallina said. Over the years, dogged researchers

have exposed knuckle crackers’ knuckles to grip-tests, X-rays and MRIs. In one of the more offbeat endeavors, in 2018, a Stanford chemical engineer collaborated with a researcher from the Hydrodynamics Laboratory in Palaiseau, France, to produce “A Mathematical Model for the Sounds Produced by Knuckle Cracking.” Kallina, the Texas hand-surgeon, agreed—up to a point. “This may be somewhat similar to how parents tell you not to cross your eyes or they’ll stay that way,” he said. In other words, as he suggested, sometimes elders intentionally hand down medical myths to try to scare their offspring into dropping an irritating habit. Still, Kallina maintained his warning for the general public: Unless you get a doctor to confirm you have no preexisting conditions, it would be a lot safer to twiddle your thumbs. –The Washington Post

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Boredom Busters

Sudoku

Here’s How It Works:

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

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Profile for Frederick News-Post

Prime Time - November 2020  

For adults 55 and older in Frederick County, Maryland

Prime Time - November 2020  

For adults 55 and older in Frederick County, Maryland