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Collecting Carnival Glass Marion Quintin-Baxendale

FJ Francis Joseph ISBN 1-870703-20-0


Dedication In memory of my dear parents and my friends Julia and Liliane, all now passed away, and with continuing thanks to my son and his family, my sister and her family, and all my friends for their support. With especial recognition to Gunnar Lersjo, glass historian and researcher.

Introduction This is a revised and extended version of Collecting Carnival Glass published in 1998 and contains more colour photographs as well as photographic examples of some 'New' (ie modern) collectable Carnival Glass from USA. This revised edition is still intended to serve primarily as a Pattern name identification book for collectors of 'Carnival Glass' (ie iridised pressed glassware) worldwide. It also offers an updated Price Guide for the patterns depicted. The author has collected Carnival Glass for over thirty years and has researched extensively at Factory sources throughout America, Australia, Northern Europe and Scandinavia. It is hoped that this revised edition will continue to bring much pleasure to its readers.

Š First and revised editions: M. Quintin-Baxendale under licence to Francis Joseph 1988 & 2002 Published in the UK by Francis Joseph Publications 5 Southbrook Mews, London SE12 8LG Production

Francis Salmon

Typesetting

John Folkard E J Folkard Computer Services 199 Station Road, Crayford, Kent DAI 3QF Red Design & Print Ltd

Printing

ISBN 1-870703-20-0 All the information and valuations have been compiled from reliable sources and every effort has been made to eliminate errors and questionable data. Nevertheless the possibility of error always exists. The publisher and author will not be held responsible for losses which may occur in the purchase, sale or other transaction of items because of information contained herein. Readers who feel they have discovered errors are invited to write and inform us so that these may be corrected in subsequent editions.


Contents Chapter One: The Origins of Carnival Glass Worldwide Basic questions answered

4

Chapter Two: The Shapes found in Carnival Glass

7

Chapter Three: Base-Glass Colours in Carnival Glass and the Various Iridisation Finishes

9

Chapter Four: American Producers of Carnival Glass Old, Reproduction and New Carnival Glassware

14

Chapter Five: Non-American Producer Countries In alphabetical order of country

24

Chapter Six: Photographic and Drawings Guide Single Shots Variations on COSMOS AND CANE pattern Group shots The Shades of Blue Rare Base Glass Pieces Modern Fenton (USA) from the 1978 Supplemental Catalogue Modern Fenton (USA) from the 1983-84 Catalogue Modern Fenton (USA) from the 1986-87 Catalogue Modern Fenton (USA) Red Carnival Glass Modern Indiana Glass (USA) and Fenton (USA) Carnival Glass Drawings and Sketches by Ron May

i'•>'>!

40 41 81 82 87 88 90 91 92 93 94 95

Combined Index and Price Guide

101

Chapter Seven: The Latest Discoveries in Carnival Glass

135

Standard Colour Shadings in Carnival Glass

137

A List of Rarer Shadings

138

About the Contributors

139

Acknowledgements Personal Professional

140 140

Bibliography

143

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Chapter One:

The Origins of Carnival Glass Worldwide Here is a list of the ten major questions that collectors ask themselves when they first decide to collect Carnival Glass: (1) What exactly is Carnival Glass? (2) What is reproduction Carnival Glass? (3) What is new Carnival Glass? (4) What brought about the production of Carnival Glass? (5) Which shapes were produced in Carnival Glass? (6) Which base-glass colours were used in production? (7) What is the iridisation overlay on Carnival Glass? (8) Where was Carnival Glass sold and why? (9) What sort of patterning, if any, appears on this ware? and (10) Why is this type of glassware called Carnival Glass? And now come the answers to these questions! WHAT EXACTLY IS CARNIVAL GLASS? It is, quite simply, iridised press-moulded glassware. It is not iridised blown glass, so it has mould lines, even though these can be heavily disguised by the intricate patterning that nearly always accompanies this ware. Although usually press-moulded, some blow-moulded pieces are also accepted by collectors as an extension of the Carnival Glass tradition. The earliest production (from cl905-1930s worldwide) is much sought after by collectors, either individually or through Carnival Glass Collectors Clubs, or private antique shops or auction purchases. Carnival Glassware was first produced in commercial quantities in America, followed by England and Australia and later by Glass Houses in the Scandinavian and Baltic areas and in Czechoslovakia. There was limited and prior experimental production in Czechoslovakia and in France and Belgium, but the opportunity to market was not followed up, except in old Czechoslovakia, and then not until after the established success of the American and other producer areas. This highly pattern-detailed and colourful domestic glassware glass was an inexpensive substitute for the more costly iridised art glass. It eventually fell from popularity as the Art Deco period dawned. This brought about artistic changes which influenced the buying public, so that this highly ornate iridised pressed ware fell out of fashion. Market forces also changed and deteriorated with the Great Depression. Thus by the mid 1930's only the later Scandinavian factories were still out-putting their own particular Carnival Glass. Here it was known as Pressed Lustre Ware. WHAT IS REPRODUCTION CARNIVAL GLASS? Over forty years after the demise of sales and production of the first Carnival Glass, there was an unexpected revival in the early 1960s in America. Imperial began reproducing Carnival Glass using some of the original moulds. This glass was marked with an "IG" on the base. A few original moulds from the earlier production lines were also acquired by various individuals or Companies and used to reproduce other of the earlier ware. Unfortunately these pieces were often placed on the market without even identifying the product as new. Carnival Glass from this era is now also collectable (it had a short life-span!) and is generally referred to as Reproduction Carnival Glass. Imperial eventually closed down for good in 1982. WHAT IS NEW CARNIVAL GLASS?,, There is a continuing and growing market for pieces produced far later than the original ware, (that is, as produced in modern times, but adhering closely to the traditional type of Carnival Glass). This latter production is of interest to lovers of Carnival Glass in its own right as it continues the manufacturing traditions of the past but uses new patterns and new colours and new techniques as well as those carried over from the earliest production period. This is called New Carnival Glass.


Fenton Art Glass USA (a prime early producer) carries on this tradition as one of the present day Major manufacturers. Its glass is clearly marked with the Company name on the base of each piece and this is marketed as NEW CARNIVAL. FAKE CARNIVAL GLASS Unfortunately for collectors of both old and new Carnival Glass there is yet another market emerging from Taiwan where iridised pressed glassware is produced and marketed abroad. Pieces are marketed faking the old American Carnival Glass. Patterns such as the American Peacocks on the Fence have been seen stacked a dozen or so high in one of the largest UK Antiques Markets - and herein lies the rub - the prices are as high as for the earlier genuine article - so watch out! To make matters worse, some pieces have a fake Northwood 'N' mark on the base!. Other pieces seen in UK are taken from the earlier Dugan, Fenton and Cambridge patterns - Grape and Cable, and Cherry and Cable being quite common. These pieces are all of much heavier and thicker base glass than the genuine article, with a rather overwhelming iridescence -"too good to be true", as the saying goes. The best guide to these fakes is that they look too new . So far only American pattern pieces are known to have been copied, though there are also other designs selling that do not follow the established early Carnival Glass patterns. WHAT BROUGHT ABOUT THE PRODUCTION OF CARNIVAL GLASS? Now why did this particular type of glassware come into being? What were the market forces that generated such an interesting and long-lasting production? In the early 1900s, iridised blown glassware was already available, following the Art nouveau design traditions, but this was quite expensive. Blow moulded and press-moulded iridised glassware could be produced much more inexpensively and so the Glasshouses attempted to develop a market for such ware. Pressed non iridised ware was already familiar to the public. Thus the concept of Carnival Glass (as it was later named) came into being. It bridged a gap in the market- providing a colourful alternative to the more usual pressed glassware, and it was less costly than the other options mentioned, so ideal for a mass market production. In an age when the average home was still not brilliantly lit, the coloured lustre glow of the Carnival Glass was a sure-fire winner for the buying public. It looked attractive and interesting, and it opened up the possibility of owning such ware quite inexpensively. This ware had, in effect, the essential "popular appeal of the moment". The various glass factories had found a new niche in their markets! WHICH SHAPES WERE PRODUCED IN CARNIVAL GLASS AND WHY? The reader will find a list of the majority of shapes produced in Chapter Two of this book. It suffices here simply to state that the glass was developed specifically for use on the domestic market. So it was was first made into simple bowls and vases, using designs that included flora and fauna patterns as well as geometric shapes. All of these had intricate patterning which cleverly disguised any mould join lines. Faults encountered either in the glass production technique or in using less costly raw materials for manufacture were well disguised by such complexities of colour and design. This permitted a considerable reduction in production costs, and offered a good value-for-money approach to the buying public. There were many skilled glassworkers on hand as well as the experienced mould workers needed to produce the intricate mould work required. It was after all, prior to the Great Depression era, and the glasshouses in America and elsewhere already produced vast quantities of pressed glassware, in non-iridised form, as well as iridised blown glassware. Production soon expanded since the required knowledge in using iridescence on coloured glass was already on hand from the Iridised Art Glass market (such as Steuben, with h i s ' Aurene' and Tiffany with his 'Favrile' and the production of such as Loetz and Daum ware.) The public was eager to obtain domestic glassware now it was offered at such a competitive price and with such a new and colourful presentation. The range of Carnival Glass on offer was expanded by the addition of water sets, table sets,


punch bowls, perfume and dressing table sets, liqueur bottles, lamps, paperweights, hatpin holders, - a myriad of possibilities were explored and taken up! Even Souvenir and Commemorative pieces were produced. WHICH BASE GLASS COLOURS WERE USED? There were many colours used and these are detailed in Chapter Three of this book. But as a general comment it can be noted that each producer vied strenuously with his competitors to try and secure a leader-role footing in this market. So as many variations in colour as were technically possible to produce at market- viable prices were introduced. WHAT IS MEANT BY TRIDISATION' UPON THE GLASS? The iridescence was applied to the glass as it came from the press-mould either by re-firing, or later, by the less expensive method of spraying. The iridescence is ESSENTIAL to Carnival Glass. The effect of the iridescence on the base glass is similar in effect to that of oil spread on watera rainbow like colouring seen on the surface of the glass, rather than as an integral part of the glass itself. WHERE WAS CARNIVAL GLASS SOLD? The short answer must surely be 'worldwide!' Under the chapter dealing with individual producercountries there will be detailed reply to this question. We simply note here that internal, as well as external, overseas markets were considered by all the producing companies, even where a limited option was available with Australian Carnival Glass. Opportunities were sought not only to enlarge markets and thereby sales, but sometimes in an effort to avoid punitive local restrictive trade tariffs (as was the case between Sweden and Norway). There was also considerable liaison (as well as competition) between Glasshouses on an international basis at the time in order to maximise sales. In this way many patterns crossedover International boundaries, (legitimately or quite the reverse!), following any sales opportunities. Distribution in America and elsewhere was through various means. Mail Order was popular, as was direct selling through general stores or speciality china outlets. There was even a market for using the ware to harbour such as pickles, jams (jellies) and the like! It even pre-dated the later Depression glass market where it was also offered in Sales Promotions, as prizes through such as furniture stores, sweet and biscuit companies. WHAT SORT OF PATTERNING, IF ANY, APPEARED ON THIS WARE? Flora, fauna, naturalistic and geometric patterns abounded! The more intricate, the more they disguised any mould lines or imperfections in the glass or in the manufacture. Favourite designs are discussed for each manufacturer in Chapter Five. WHY DO WE CALL THIS TYPE OF GLASS 'CARNIVAL GLASS'? Hereby, a sorry tale of woe! As the markets declined (when tastes and demand changed), the producers were left with large undepleted stock-piles of their iridised pressed glassware. In desperation it was then off-loaded to Fairs and Carnivals as cheap prizes - at considerable financial loss to the manufacturers, but simply to rid their factories and warehouses of the said stock-piles! A sad demise for such ware but luckily only of temporary duration since the capricious market forces have now turned full circle and we see prices rising daily for this now collectible original ware, as well as a growing popularity for the New Carnival that is being produced both in America and in the Far East. "Plus ca change, plus ga change pas" - as the French would wisely say!


Chapter Two:

Carnival Glass Shapes SHAPES FOUND IN CARNIVAL GLASS Carnival Glass was produced to fill a gap in the domestic market where iridised art glass was too expensive a purchase for the average household. Thus any shape that could be used in the home was introduced where practicable. The popularity and success of this ware resulted in a further expansion of design, where the purely decorative was allied to the basically functional possibilities. The majority production was for BOWL shapes, then PLATES of various sizes along with VASES. As its popularity grew, the ranges on offer by the various manufacturers were expanded in an effort to corner the markets. Pieces were then adapted to sell as storage containers for such as pickles and jams (jellies) or handed out, appropriately detailed, as advertising pieces or souvenir pieces. In fact, this list could well be practically endless! But here are the BASIC shapes found in this ware, regardless of country of production. The majority are depicted in this book. Ash-trays Bon-bon dishes (2 handles) Covered Butter dishes Candlesticks Car vases Celery Vases Compotes / coupes Cookie (biscuit) Jars Creamers (milk jugs) Cuspidors aka Spittoons Dressing table sets Floral baskets Epergnes Flower frogs Funeral rose bowls Fruit dessert sets Jam (Jelly) dishes Lampshades Muffin dishes with lid covers Mugs aka Beakers Oil Lamps Paperweights Pintrays Pickle dishes Punch bowl sets Plates various sizes Powder bowls with lids Spittoons / Cuspidors Rose bowls Sauce boats Toothpick holders Sugar bowls Tobacco Jars Water Sets Tumblers Vases and many one-off Whimsey shapes. PLATES NB. plates can be collar based or footed: Collar based: where ideally they are plain-rimmed, not fancy edged, with the edge of the plate standing not more than 2" above its collar base. The plate should be as FLAT as possible. Footed variety: here the plate surface should be FLAT (otherwise it becomes a footed bowl!). Here the 2" rule noted cannot apply, for obvious reasons. ICE CREAM BOWLS These are small, circa 5" diameter maximum and look like shallow bowls in that the edge is slightly and evenly upturned all around the edge. BASE OR FOOT SHAPES TO CARNIVAL GLASS There was much variation in the base or foot formation of Carnival glass pieces. We can EASILY find the following: Collar base - plain rimmed edge, no feet Knobbed feet - 3 short feet with knob endings Ball and claw feet - variation on above Spade/spatula feet - with 3 broad spade-effect feet. Stubby straight feet - varied in number of feet up to 8 Domed base - with hollow base collar about 1" deep. These are all depicted in this book.


EDGE SHAPES FOUND ON CARNIVAL GLASS Again there is a plethora of choice! Hand worked pieces allowed even more variation from the standard edges found on the various shapes. The more intricate or delicate the finish, then the more value can be attributed to the pattern piece. In handworking, the piece would be skillfully drawn out or extended, or crimped or pleated, whilst still hot and just released from the mould. Examples of the various hand-worked edges can be found in this book. Here are some of the most well known : Pie Crust - Ribbon Candy - Ruffled. The standard Scallop edge is also shown. This of course was not hand worked, The scallops can also sometimes also be interspersed with smaller raised points. WELL-KNOWN EDGE SHAPES ON CARNIVAL GLASS

Ribbon Candy edge.

Pie-crust edge.

Ruffled edge.

Scallop edge

Sketches by John Watson


Chapter Three:

Base Glass Colours in Carnival Glass It is very important to note that in describing the colour of Carnival Glass we refer to the colour of the Base Glass itself and NOT to the colours of the iridescent overlay. Establish the base-glass colour by holding the piece up to the light. It must also be realised that colours varied in production, and can also vary in the eye of the beholder, so familiarisation with as many colours as possible is the best way to get to know your Carnival Glass, and expand your collection wisely at the same time! But do not despair at the apparent complexity of it all! It is possible to separate the various colours into four major groupings as follows: Group One: Standard colours; Group Two: Pastel colours; Group Three: Opalescent edge colours; Group Four: Rarer base-glass colours To add to the confusion the names within these groups are not always those used by the original manufacturers but have been universally adopted by collectors. GROUP ONE: STANDARD COLOURS Most easily found is Marigold iridescence on clear base glass. Amber - Amethyst - Blue - Green and Red base glass follow on. The red base is by far the rarest and most costly to produce, and is greatly sought after by collectors. Marigold The most prolific production was in Marigold on clear flint base. Take care not to confuse this with marigold iridescence over Amber, Yellow or Pink base glass, these are much harder to find! Marigold iridescence is also found over Milk Glass and even over Green base glass (where it is called Alaskan). Amber Base Carnival Glass In America:- Imperial made many pieces in Amber. - Fenton made less, such as Dragon and Lotus, Vintage, Carnival Holly and Autumn Acorn. - Northwood pieces have been found in Grape and Cable, Finecut and Roses and Dandelion patterns. Pale Amber - from USA, Imperial were the main producers. Honey Amber- again from USA Deep Amber - from Finland The Northwood Amber based glass is sometimes called Horehound. where it is a fairly light shade of Amber. Amber to Red Base Carnival Glass i.e. Amberina An Amber variation where in the centre of the piece we find a true amber, turning red at the outer edges. These are extremely rare and bring in the highest prices. There is also a reverse in Red to Amber base Carnival Glass with Red base twirling to Amber. 1

Amethyst Here there is a more restricted colour range than with Blue or Green. Palest Amethyst is: Lavender Found (though rarely) at Eda Sweden. In USA, there are also rare examples from Dugan, Northwood, Imperial and Millersburg. This may well have been an experimental colour, or simply an off-balance mid amethyst. Slightly darker: Dugan (USA) produced a delicate, attractive Ribena (blackcurrant cordial colour). Mid Amethyst: This is the standard, most easily obtained shade.


Black Amethyst:

A very popular shade in Australian Production, vying for popularity with Marigold. This looks black until held under a strong light, when the amethyst will come through

Blue To date, here are the various shades of blue. More seem to be redefined every day! Mid blue is the least expensive and not hard to track down as it was produced in quantity. Palest blue is: Ice Blue Slightly darker: Celeste Blue Darker again: Sapphire Blue or a summer sky blue Teal Blue (similar to Sapphire Blue but with green overtones) then: Mid Blue aka Cobalt Blue thereafter: Persian Blue (this is actually Blue Moonstone) lastly (to date!): Renniger Blue akin to Teal but with stronger blue Teal Blue has been found with the Imperial Waffle Block pattern, also with Westmoreland's Scales and Coin Dot. Electric Blue Carnival is named after the Brilliance of the iridisation process. The term Electric with regard to carnival can therefore also be applied to other base-glass colours with a similar iridescence over. Green There are as many variations for Green as for Blue based Carnival Glass. Mid Green is the cheapest as most easily found. Palest green is: Ice Green and gentle iridescence slightly darker: Lime Green and a yellow tint darker again: Emerald Green (with a blue tinge) then: Mid Green (the most easy to find) next: Nile Green and Russet Green (with an olive tinge) Teal Green There is also a marigold iridescence over green from the American ware, called Alaska Care must be taken not to confuse the paler shades of green based ware with Vaseline Based Carnival Glass, which is smeared greeny-yellow, akin to Petroleum Jelly! Red Base Carnival Glass Up till now, this base glass colour has always attracted the highest prices, as so very rare and difficult to produce, with expensive selenium oxide used in the manufacturing process. But as awareness of rarities grows, red base glass now faces stiff competition as to value! There are already other competitors jostling for "Top Dollar" - namely the rarer-based iridised glass pieces: such as Jet Glass base/Crackle base /Slag and Custard base ware etc. These are often single or limited production experimental pieces and as such are very much sought after. It looks as if these are already competing for highest value with red and amberina based Carnival Glass. GROUP TWO - PASTELS IN CARNIVAL GLASS These were mainly produced by the American companies, though some examples exist in the various Continental, English and Scandinavian areas. Expect these to attain higher prices than the standard deeper colours, with a further increase in value where they also have opalescent edges. Apricot Just like the fruit! Butterscotch This is a very soft pale gold iridescence over clear base glass. Citrene pale lemon-yellow Champagne as the wine! Clear self explanatory Ice Blue see under Blue Ice Green see under Green Can also be found with a marigold iridescence over instead of the usual clear iridescent spray.

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Lavender

- N o r t h w o o d used this colour, though sparingly. There is a Northwood (USA) Good Luck Bowl as example. - Millersburg (USA) has a valuable Trout And Fly piece - Dugan pieces such as Dogwood Sprays, Wishbone and Leaf And Beads. - There is also a rare example of this delicate base colour with a Swedish Four Flowers Variant bowl. Pastel Horehound Pale Amber Pastel Marigold also called Butterscotch Pearl Carnival This is actually Iridised Custard where a clear iridescence over has been used. Pink A soft delicate pink. This is a rare-base- glass for Carnival. The Finnish Glasshouses used this base colour, naming it RIO. A marigold iridescence was used,(there is a Finnish exterior Crackle pattern Bowl with Four Flowers interior on RIO base). Smoke Light grey. Usually Imperial USA, but some pieces were produced in limited quantity by Northwood (such as Peacock on the Fence pattern) and some by Fenton as well. White (i) A frosted translucent white with a gentle iridescence over. (ii) Opaque white, Milk glass base, with iridesence over (clear or marigold). Yellow Often found on Four Flowers and Variants, some of these known to come from Sweden (EDA). EDA used yellow quite extensively as a base glass colour for pressed and blown ware. The patterns Poppy Show and Rose Show have also appeared in this base colour. It is thought these hail from Westmoreland USA but this has to be proven. These pastel shades are rarer than standard base colours, and were made mainly in America, though some are found in Sweden also in England and the then-named early Czechoslovakia. GROUP THREE - OPALESCENT EDGE This is glass that has been in part, re-heated to provide an opalescent ribbon-like edge to the piece whatever the basic glass colour or iridescent overlay. To date, examples have only been found on American production ware, Dugan producing the majority. Such an edging can appear on Standard base colour Carnival Glass and also, (though less frequently) on Pastel or the Rare-base-glass Carnival. This since we are dealing here not only with a base-glass, iridised over, but also with the effect of reheating the glass at the edge, which results in the opaque chalky-white ribbon band edge already explained. To date, only pieces produced in America have been found. Here are the best-known baseglass colours with opalescent edge: Amethyst Opalescent Milkglass Opalescent milk glass base Aqua Opalescent a soft sea-green base colour Peach Opalescent Blue Opalescent Pearl Opalescent Lime Opalescent Vaseline Opalescent Marigold Opalescent White Opalescent GROUP FOUR - RARER-BASE-GLASS COLOURS These occur where the iridisation process is applied to other than flint pressed glass,- to such as Milk Glass, Slag Glass, Jet Glass, Custard Glass, Moonstone Glass, Crackle Glass, Cranberry Glass and Vaseline Glass. These always attract premium prices and can supersede Red Base Carnival Glass in attracting the highest interest and value. Definition of the base glass type and colour is therefore an essential factor in determining rarity and value for any piece of Carnival Glass. Some pieces with rare base-glass can be found with Opalescent edge treatment as well, increasing their desirability even further amongst collectors! Such glass appeared in non-iridised form long before the Carnival Glass period and the pieces that have appeared iridised are RARE, possibly experimental as regards technique or were produced to test the market.

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The collector must also realise that growing awareness, coupled with the results of increased research as well as expanding interest in this ware, have together resulted in a quite complex listing and separation of the various shades of each base-glass colour. Many are found in the USA only. It is therefore essential to see and handle as much Carnival Glass as possible in order to familiarise oneself with all the various collectible colours (and shades of colour). Awareness of possible market price variations must also apply to all buying and selling of Carnival Glass. So, "Caveat Emptor" - 'Let the buyer beware' - colours and shapes and patterns can go out of fashion as easily as they become sought after! Here follows a detailed guide into the basic range of Carnival Glass base-colours and their relative values. The colours given are as named in America. Iridised Amberina and Reverse Amberina Glass Amberina is Red based glass with a colouring-off to yellow. The lighter shade tending to be found in the centre of the piece. With reverse amberina, we have the opposite colour play. This glass was the product of specific heating techniques. Iridised Black Amethyst Glass Outwardly this has the appearance of Iridised Jet Glass. But if held up to a very strong light, then a deep amethyst colour shows through the black base glass. This was very popular in Australian production, though rarer elsewhere. Iridised Chocolate Glass This is known only from American production to date. Iridised Crackle Glass There are a few examples of blow-moulded pressed crackle glassware with marigold iridescence over. These are extremely rare. See the example in this book: Enamelled Clematis. Fenton in USA has produced a recent range of Crackle Iridised ware each piece clearly marked on its base. Iridised Cranberry Glass Known in USA as Cranberry Flash. Iridised Custard Glass Standard custard glass (opaque and cream coloured glass) with iridescent overlay. The majority of this was made by Northwood but all pieces are rare and much sought after. Patterns such as Poppy, Grape and Cable, Tree Trunk Vase and Beaded Cable have all been found on such ware. It is also worth noting that the term Pearl Carnival relates to Iridised Custard Glass where a Clear overspray has been used instead of a marigold iridisation. Iridised Jet Glass Produced at Riihimaki, Finland(though rarely); Sowerby, England (extremely rare); and Dugan USA though not in great quantity. The only known Sowerby pattern to date on Iridised Jet Glass is the Cynthia Vase. This in an attractive Art Deco shape Vase, most probably experimental production since practically only a few examples found. A collector's dream! This Vase can have either a flared or a turned-in top rim. Expect to pay highest prices for such pieces, from whichever source. Iridised Milk Glass 1. Opaque, and either chalk-white or white with a blue tint. Both types with a clear iridescence over. Fenton produced many pieces in this glass. 2. There is also a marigold iridescence over milk glass, known as Iridised Marigold Milk Glass. 3. There is also a Smoke Iridised Milk Glass.

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Iridised Moonstone Glass Akin to Milk Glass but semi-opaque whereby light can shine through the base when held up to view. This was a favourite of Fenton, who clearly used the name on their products in this range. Patterns found with this glass base include Orange Tree Bowl, Dragon and Lotus, Peacock and Grape and also Peacock and Urn. Iridised blue moonstone pieces are sometimes called Persian Blue. Iridised Rio Glass (ie Pink based glass) This was used at the Finnish glassworks, usually with a strong marigold iridescence over. (Refer also to notes under Pastels) Iridised Slag Glass There is of course a variety of base glass colours for slag and some of these are iridised, though "one-offs". Iridised Stretch Glass Quite a few pieces appear in American production , such as Imperial's Jewels Vase, but Czechoslovakian manufacture appears the most prominent. Iridised Vaseline Glass This is a true greeny-yellow colour base glass with marigold iridised overlay and was produced in limited quantity by: - Northwood USA: with such as Concave Diamond Water Pitcher, Hearts and Flowers Plate. - Millersburg USA: with, for example, the Holly Sprig, Night Stars and Peacock and Urn patterns. - Fenton USA: the majority producer, with patterns such as the Peacock and Grape and Hat shape bowls appearing quite regularly. There is also a very rare and valuable Blackberry Block Water Pitcher. - Czechoslovakian manufacture: the rare and very large Art Deco style Pebble and Fan Vase is to be found on Vaseline base, with marigold iridescence over. - There appears to have been no production in UK or in Scandinavian countries. IRIDISATION FINISHES: (I-IV) The iridisation finish can be varied on Carnival Glass. The variations are usually grouped as follows and can affect the value of the ware: (i) Electric Finish A quite brilliant and spectacular finish, found on such as Blue, Amethyst, Green and Marigold base Carnival Glass. (ii) Satin Finish A soft finish, with a gentle all-over iridescence. There is often a metallic (silver or gold) effect introduced. A regular favourite with Northwood (USA) production. (iii) Radium A different iridescence in that, although brilliant and sparkling it is also Translucent allowing the base glass colour to show through in normal light. A good example on Green base is the Millersburg Mayan bowl. (iv) Alaskan Where Northwood used a Marigold iridescence over green base glass - an unusual rather bronze effect was produced. Patterns known with this iridescence include such as Daisy and Plume,and Wild Roses. NB Early producers often advertised their ware by describing the colour effect of the Iridisation rather than the colour of the Base Glass.

13


Chapter Four

A Brief History of American Carnival Glass Production 1920s early Carnival, 1960s Reproduction Carnival and New Carnival (Modern). Early Carnival Glass In the 1880s the American Glasshouses developed a hand operated mechanical manufacturing process that enabled them to produce glassware in vast quantities at an inexpensive price. This was through the introduction of hand operated press moulds, rather than from using the old established, but costly technique of hand blowing glass. This opened up a whole new era of glass production - the semi mechanised technique could now be used to imitate the far more costly crystal glass manufacturing procedures. It was expected that the general public would be only too pleased to be able to buy their domestic glassware at considerably less cost than previously possible. This glass followed the old traditional crystal glass in that it was clear (not coloured) and retained the heavy geometric designs. It was an immediate success. By the turn of the century however, it was realised that this market could be further expanded: 1) by applying iridisation to the surface of the glass 2) by offering various Base Colours in the glass itself (as opposed to the flint glass previously only available). The techniques for iridisation were already to hand following the iridised blown art glass from such established experts as Louis Comfort Tiffany 3) by applying naturalistic and geometric designs rather than remaining solely with the old crystal ware cuts. 4) by enlarging the product range to cover as many domestic table-ware or decorative items as possible. The manufacturers were also quick to realise that the semi-opacity of such ware would allow for cost savings in the manufacturing techniques, and that the many intricate patterns on offer would also camouflage any impurities or blemishes in the finished product. All these factors came together to provide a sure-fire commercial success. And these were further supported by the population explosion in America during the late nineteenth century, where every household sought to improve its standard of living, and where retail markets were booming Sales were instigated through cheap dime stores, such as Woolworths, as well as through upmarket china and glass ware sales outlets, and via mail-order catalogues. This ware was sold by the barrel load throughout USA and exported to England and Australia as well. Page 15 shows an article about Imperial Iridised pressed patterned ware in the UK which appeared in the Pottery Gazette (1st March 1911). As the reader will note, the names given to the various pieces do not equate to the description we would ally to these pieces nowadays though the term 'Helios' is still recognised. The description here relates to the iridescent finish, not to the base-glass shades. Unfortunately, this booming market came to a sudden end in the late 1920s when public taste veered in favour of the newly emerging Art deco design influences. Faced with huge stocks of unsold ware, the suppliers off-loaded their goods to such as Travelling Fairs and Amusement Arcades. Here it was offered as cheap prizes, earning the then rather derogatory title of Carnival Glass. This was a sad demise for a fine product. Since its inception it had played the role of honest broker in marrying together commercially both the old techniques of iridisation and hand working of glass with the most modern press moulding procedures available at the time. Carnival glass was produced in vast quantities, press-moulded, but often hand-worked at the edges or hand swung to extend the shape so it still retained individuality within the inexpensive mass production techniques. It was a brave experiment that has lasted the test of time, since nowadays such glass has become very collectable and admired worldwide.

14


The innovative techniques employed and the complexity of allying old with new remains as a prime example of the imaginative, industrious and skilled inventiveness of the glassmaker.

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The American methods for in i-e imprnveil Italy. Mr. Ktttiee heat nnte an e-tty ati-aer In ihf .It-Ite..!., |a.I impliry. " hate ton in ili.h .n e w t " fter htt cod kmlt round Uw -am;..-, and mft producing Carnival Glass • ' l ' - t see all liter." "I lm riitn I* a e l kimnn a- intnnineiumi!! all \intlr i t etniHl l i e t i n ! famhfiul . t i e . all This was not hand blown glass. It V lit.t-.. Bin) nn utWmtlog t i t t - y at font) was machine pressed, using hand operated press-moulds. This allowed for inexpensive production suitable for mass sale at low cost. Although made in the mould, a certain individuality could be applied where pieces could be hand-worked and varied in shape as they left the mould, and whilst still hot. According to the skill of the worker, we can find such as pieces with ruffled or pleated edges, Utito*' k* «nt> ; , , , ! . Tl'r..!..,....,'I.-U-Wi' turned over lips, pulled or stretched n i-tiikiiii; i r u l m i ! . . Ft. u rvjitttto <pf l t » •rn-. elliit ,t prodm -il •ni-tc •»•* •""•"I." in vases. fttUiie, in a n • " IrTiHVti WIIP " lliere It Hit 1. ili' anil gtMO, ni.i'r Ittllte *' Alulafiwy mm&. Tin- • to .1.V.-11:.- i- ii.- •• r.k'!-'i .,. ' V1.''"' ""1"."?.' Various-coloured base glass was appeaiine e i.t I. Ml] I MMOMOtl I't e r» ... l--t.Lt. pi,., used and there is now a r.-.^l^tl t i.'« k**r ••(nci:d»nl lifr in ilv !«• -land .... la-.le. complicated list of colours defined .',,.' ftjrrjfcd in nil ci.tnn foe u U o UW. |..ir-,.,.,. .•« ili.t.f.i'iiiii* -in- •l.iiiity .it.U Jtli-.rtc, i|.i-«-[v t,:;li Uw ttdUncM ••* the iran-. Tln-nby modern collectors of the ware. iif Jaw, jiliin OBtl Puled, In l-S -<•%'•• In OW il.iMlr.if.,,ii i i n n n) ikeonuvtl }'<?•'• In • ^" Prrtty EoHufihwiliCo,.. Each has its own value, some such < *M<1 ...iTo.- wta'wiui or .-.il.v.a ehlrn •Itenumi t n * H.11IO .Uiklfl- l!Tl|t (my, ntOKlniVti! 11 atlWrtiPO ric-fMl:•.:>. Tdc Htm In-." unduTad * ntn MOM "f COTOMlilMl ""IP " t i l l i-vi:l_lH t as Red or Jet being extremely rare •n. ± »,*' LucWMM "I .!•' r .M.ijfliv, '>:>! the i"ili and most sought after. The Red since it required selenium oxide in the manufacturing process, the Jet Pottery Gazette 1st March 1911: An article re USA Imperial iridised pressed glassware. because of its extreme rarity in the Carnival Glass world of colours (it came at the end of Carnival Glass era, entering the Art Deco World, and was mainly limited experimental production). The roles of mould maker, glass handler and worker operating the press were all crucial to production. The apparatus used demanded a changeable metal mould with a plunger above, which could be thrust down into the mould to control the flow of glass. The mould itself had to be of good quality for a clear impression to be produced. The iridisation essential to Carnival Glass was produced by coating the glass with metallic salts - these added after the initial firing. The ware was then 're-fired' - to set the iridescence. At some glasshouses, the iridisation was sprayed on, at others brushed. Each manufacturer sought to develop his own formulae for the various iridisation effects, and the ware was variously described as such as Taffeta Glass, Aurora Glass, New Venetian or Etruscan ware. Some such names were then variously redefined by Agents abroad and this adds to the confusion. Included in this chapter are an article and an advertisement from the English Pottery Gazette of 1st March 1911, relating to the marketing of Imperial USA ware through the agent Markt & Co. Since the modern collector collects by base-glass colour, not by colour effect of the applied iridescence, this has resulted in some confusion over the exact definition of colour in relation to the Manufacturers involved. As for the Patterns used in Carnival Glass production, these mainly followed the Art Nouveau artistic ideal. Flora and fauna, and indeed all naturalistic patterns abounded. Each pattern was extremely intricate and a test of skill for the mould maker. Some Manufacturers however, (and Imperial comes instantly to mind) preferred to remain with the detailed geometric m

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cuts reminiscent of more costly blown crystal ware. American producers of Early Carnival Glass Apart from the five major producers discussed later there were various limited producers of Carnival Glass in America in the early part of the century. The most well known are noted herewith: Cambridge Glass Co-Ohio Columbia Glass Co Fostoria of West Virginia Heisey of Newark Ohio Jenkins Glass Co of Kokomo Indiana: Mckee Jeanette of Jeanette Pennsylvania as well as US Glass of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Some examples of their production of Carnival Glassware are given in this book. We meanwhile turn to the history of the FIVE INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNISED MAJOR PRODUCERS OF CARNIVAL GLASS WARE IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA at the start of this century. These are Dugan, Fenton, Imperial, Millersburg and Northwood, and they will be discussed in some depth in this chapter. An outline of their production history is noted. These five major producers are described as follows:

Dugan The Dugan Glass Company actually began producing glass in Indiana Pennsylvania in 1892 (in a region with a tradition of fine glassmaking), when it traded under the name The Indiana Glass Company. This Company was short lived and closed down just one year later. It was then taken over on lease by Harry Northwood, already operating at Ellwood City PA as one of America's leading glassmakers of the era. He shared ownership of the Northwood Glass Company with his wife Clara and with Thomas and Anne Dugan (his Uncle and Aunt). The new site at Indiana produced until 1895, when Northwood moved out. He left the plant in the charge of the previous Managers W G Minnemeyer and his Uncle Thomas E Dugan. They changed the name to the Dugan Glass Company and continued to produce ware along the established Northwood lines. Harry Northwood had brought in many moulds and most of these were left to be re-worked. The Dugan ware was marked with a capital D inside a Diamond shape, often on old Northwood moulds. In 1913 the glass company changed its name to the Diamond Glass Company and Thomas Dugan continued to oversee the production. According to local newspapers and trade journals, Dugan began to produce a fine array of both domestic and decorative glassware. Items as various as lampshades, condiment sets, tableware sets, dressing table sets, as well as the standard bowls, water sets and storage syrups, were all made. Unfortunately the factory took fire in 1931 and was never rebuilt as any probable output was threatened by economic problems during the Great Depression. For Carnival Glass collectors, Dugan produced a vast quantity of iridised pressed ware with opalescent edges. The patterns listed below are all from this source, and reflect the excellence of design and workmanship found here in Indiana. Apple Blossom Twigs Beaded shell Beaded Panels Beauty Twig Vase Big Basketweave Vase Blossom & Band Car vase Border plants Butterfly and Tulip Cherry Cherry... Wreathed cherry Circled Scroll Coin Spot Cosmos Variant Dogwood Sprays Compass (ext pattern) Fan Double Stem Rose Crackle Car Vase Fanciful Farmyard Fisherman's Mug Fishnet Floral & Grape Floral and Wheat Flowers & Frames Flowers & Spades Folding Fan

16


Garden path vrnt Formal Four Flowers Heavy Grape Grape & Cable(Dugan version) Grapevine Lattice Jewelled Heart Heavy Webb Heavy Iris Water set Many Fruits Lined Lattice Leaf Rays Pastel Swans Nautilus Maple Leaf Persian Garden Peacock at the Fountain Peach and Pear Question Marks Puzzle Petals & Fans Round-up Raindrops Quill Water set Ski-star Six Petals Single Flower Starfish Stippled Spiralex Vase Soutache Target Vase Stork & Rushes Rambler Rose Vintage Vining Twigs Vineyard Wishbone and Spades Windflower The Windflower pattern is found quite frequently in the UK on basic bowls. Apple Blossom Twigs Punch cups and the Maple Leaf compote are also quite readily available, along with Double Stemmed Rose. All are found in marigold or amethyst.

Fenton Fenton was the first of the large scale American Carnival Glass producers and still continues the Carnival Glass tradition today, along with the production of other fine art glassware. The Fenton Art Glass Company was started up in 1906 by two brothers, Frank L Fenton and his brother John, at Martins Ferry Ohio, in the heart of the glass producing area. By 1907 a new plant had been designed and completed at Williamstown West Virginia and the complex, much extended, is still there today. Below is an early postcard photograph of the site.

From the outset Frank Fenton exhibited a natural flair for anticipating market forces, and this attribute, coupled with a considerable ability for design soon attracted buyers and general public to his glassworks. The iridised pressed ware was immensely popular and Frank Fenton also benefited from the assistance of Jacob Rosenthal, a glassmaking genius who came direct from the now defunct Indiana Tumbler and Goblet Company to assist in production. In 1908 the two brothers fell out and John departed to form the Millersburg Glass Company. The public clamoured for the Fenton Carnival Glassware, with its imaginative designs and quality product offered at a very low price. This happy state of affairs was to continue for 15

17


years - and the iridised ware output far exceeded any other production lines at Fenton. Over 150 patterns can definitely be attributed to Fenton over the Carnival Glass period, and doubtless more will be so defined as research continues. The glass was sold by the barrel load throughout the dime store, glass retail outlets and more up-market sales venues in the USA as well as exported far afield to UK and Australia. The Fenton Glass Company has continued to thrive over the years and still produces Carnival Glass today. This modern Carnival Glass is clearly named on the base of each piece with a Logo as depicted here. Such ware is collected worldwide and its popularity never appears to wane. Fenton has a superb Museum and a Retail Glass Sales Shop outlet and also produces special limited edition ware in pressed iridised form. Some designs reflect those of the earliest Carnival Glass ware, others are new- all are extremely collectable. Below is a photograph of the pot-setters at the early Fenton works, followed by a blue-print reproduction for a Tiger Lily mould.

â&#x20AC;˘HHHHhsiiiiftgssi A recent production has been for Iridised BlowMoulded Crackle Glass as depicted in the catalogue reprint on page 83. The crackle glass treatment is achieved by the hand blown process. Molten glass is gathered at the end of a hollow blow pipe. Then it is placed in cool water, to fracture the outer surface of Below: The author with Howard Seufer (Fenton Glass photographer for this book) at the Fenton Glass Museum in 1996; and right: the author with Frank Fenton at the same location.

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18


the glass. It is then re-heated to seal the cracks. This procedure can be repeated up to three times for larger pieces. The glass is then blown into the final forming mould and an iridised finish is applied. Whilst this is not strictly Carnival Glass (it lacks the traditional patterning and press moulding in toto) it is still of interest to collectors as it extends their collecting. Fenton continues the tradition of making pressed iridised glass for special orders. Here is a modern Loving Cup on iridised custard glass, made for the Heart of America Carnival Glass Association. Below follow some Fenton Catalogue entries from the recent production lines of New Carnival Glass. See Index under NEW CARNIVAL GLASS for further pieces.

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Imperial The principal glass-producing region of the United States at the start of this century was situated on either side of the Ohio River. Here Imperial set up a glasshouse in 1904, in direct competition with established glasshouses such as Northwood and the National Glass Factory. It obviously believed in the premise that competition attracts trade! From the outset it specialised in geometric and near-cut patterns rather than naturalistic patterns, and favoured useful practical glassware rather than decorative ware for its output. In this way it offered an alternative market from the other glasshouses such as Fenton. By 1909 it had realised the success of Fenton's iridised pressed ware and sought to enter this field as well. Such was the quality of its production that success was almost immediately assured, even though competitors such as Millersburg and Dugan were also taking up such lines. Fenton ware sold well throughout the United States and overseas in vast quantity at very low prices. Imperial also tapped overseas export markets, through such agents as Markt and Co Ltd of London. Sowerby of UK paid Imperial the ultimate compliment by copying the 'Scroll Emboss' Imperial pattern, and Eda Glassworks of Sweden copied and extended the Imperial range of the 'Tiger Lily' and 'Curved Star' patterns (as did Finnish and Estonian Glasshouses). Imperial ware also reached Central and South American countries and even Australia. For the sales of Imperial ware in Australia, there may have been a UK intermediary. A BRILLIANT AND UNUSUAL IRIDESCENCE WAS THE HALLMARK OF IMPERIAL'S SUCCESS. There was also the development of more unusual base glass colours such as Smoke and Clambroth. The smoke colour was originally referred to as Sapphire and no other producer

19


Imperial Reproduction Carnival Glass Catalogue Entries.

managed to make an equivalent shade. The Acanthus Plate is often found on Smoke base glass. Clambroth was a pale ginger-ale colour and is very much sought after by collectors of this old Imperial pressed iridised ware. Amber was another colour favoured by Imperial, though floral designs were mainly produced in this shade rather than geometric patterns. There were also three shades of green glass: Helios: where the light green base glass has a quite distinctive gold/silver metallic iridescence Emerald: an extremely hard-to find brilliant base glass colour Mid Green: with a rather metallic and multi-coloured iridescence. Imperial 'marigold' was produced in vast quantities and the Imperial 'purple' was strong and deep, and was never surpassed by any competitors. Red was produced only in minute quantities, possibly to special order, likewise White and Cobalt blue and the pastels (vaseline base, and olive, lavender, teal, ice blue and green, aqua and violet). In 1910 the Company introduced another innovation with its 'stretch' glass - often found iridised under the Imperial Jewels range. By 1922 a line of unusual hand blown crystal cased coloured glassware was in production, sometimes iridised. Glass artists had been brought from Europe to advise on this range and many such pieces reflect pieces produced at Eda in Sweden, during its own lustre ware production period. Unfortunately with the advent of the Great Depression, the glasshouses fell into financial difficulties. Imperial managed to soldier on by using many of the old Carnival Glass moulds to produce inexpensive Depression Ware glass in pink, blue and green. The struggle to survive was rewarded with expansion in 1940-1960 and moulds were supplemented with buying in from the now defunct Heisey and Cambridge Glass companies. In 1962 there was a nostalgic resurgence of interest in the old iridised pressed glassware of the 1920s and Imperial was not slow to realise the sales potential in this matter. It re-produced iridised pressed glass Carnival Ware from the old moulds, though usually, but not always, changing the base glass colours. This 1960s reproduction ware is now also very collectable as Imperial sank into a slow decline in the 1970s following a buy-out and several failed private ventures on the site. By 1985 all production had stopped, despite a late attempt at resuscitation by a group of four glass artisans trading under the short- lived name of The Pioneer Glass Company. The various Reproduction Carnival Glass lines came out between 1962 up to as late as 1981. Colour names were advertised as follows (actual colour follows after): Rubigold (marigold), Peacock (smoke), Helios Green Red: Pansy, Fieldflower, Robin Mug, Lustre Rose, Diamond Lace, Octagon patterns all feature in this base-glass colour. Azure (ice blue), Aurora Jewels (cobalt).

20


Wltite: Amber, Meadow Green (emerald), Pink. Horizon Blue, Amethyst. Imperial used several trademarks throughout its long working life and these are noted below covering the various ownerships over the two production periods for Carnival Glass.

Above: Trademarks used between 1951-1982. Left: 1951-1972. Centre: as IGC Liquidating Corporation, 1973-1981, and right Arthur Lorch ownership, 1981-1982. Left: Trademarks used between 1905-1921.

Some examples of the ware produced during this 1960s second period are shown here so that readers can familiarise themselves with the various patterns that identify Imperial Carnival Glass from this era. Specific orders were also made for such as the International Carnival Glass Association and the American Carnival Glass Association.

Millersburg Millersburg factory was started up by John Fenton, brother and partner of Frank Fenton of the Fenton Art Glass Company. John wanted to prove his own ability following the success of the joint venture at Fenton. This decision was to benefit later collectors with the output from Millerburg Glass. John set up a new factory site at Millersburg in Holmes County Ohio. The local people, including the Amish who lived in the area welcomed the stranger and adopted his plans as their own. The new Glasshouse offered work and the prospect of some security for them. By 1909 the new and purpose built factory was ready. The plant prospered for a good four years, but gradually the stiff competition was to overwhelm the genius, but weak, business sense of the owner. Artistic ability was insufficient to maintain a durable and viable economic status in such a competitive field. Financial disaster struck in the spring of 1911 when John finally faced the reality that expenditure did not balance with income. The factory was then sold to Samuel Fair who kept it running under the name of The Radium Glass Company. But this change of ownership did not prosper either, the factory finally closed down for good in 1913, the site sold to the Forrester Tire and Rubber Company. We are left with a legacy of superb workmanship, design and quality. John Fenton had designed his own moulds, including 'Ohio Star' and 'Hobstar and Feather' as his initial ventures. He had already designed the 'Goddess of the Harvest' bowl at Fenton Art Glass Company and this

21


remains one of the prime pieces in the Carnival Glass world even today. The glass produced at Millersburg was of top quality crystal and the iridised pressed ware included a soft marigold, an amethyst and a green base glass. The success of the new moulds lead to the introduction of more patterns including the Multi Fruits and Flowers design. By the start of 1910, Millerburg glasshouse was able to offer a new Radium finish to its pressed iridised ware. This was unique in its beauty, with a softer shade of colour in this finish than previously available. It also had a mirror like finish on the front of the glass. This was an immediate success, so much so that it was soon copied by rival Glasshouses such as Imperial. A now famous Commemorative Bowl was produced in 1910. It was named the Courthouse Bowl and was in effect a tribute to the workers who had laid the initial gas lines to the factory complex. Moulds from Hipkins Bros produced such as the Country Kitchen, Poppy, Diamond, Rosalind and Pipe Humidor patterns, and the Peacock patterns which remain firm favourites to this day.

Northwood Harry Northwood founded the Northwood Glass Company at Martins Ferry Ohio in 1887, at the early age of only 27 years. He was one of ten children of the renowned English glassmaker Jorin Northwood. Harry had served a traditional glassmaking apprenticeship in England. He arrived in the United States of America at the age of 21 years, probably in the company of his relative Thomas Dugan, who was also to become a major Carnival Glass producer later on. Harry worked for various glasshouses before starting up on his own. His Company was not slow to prosper, his glassmaking genius and artistic ability saw to that. By 1892 he had moved to a new purpose built factory in Ellwood City. But business in the glass trade was extremely competitive, and Harry was obliged to close down and move several times before he set up his final production base at the old Hobbs Brockunier factory in Wheeling W Virginia in 1902. Late in 1907 Fenton Art Glass astounded the markets with its newly introduced iridised coloured pressed glassware. Harry Northwood decided to enter the same field. Using moulds from earlier pressed glass he rushed out a line in marigold Carnival, naming it Golden Iris. Other base glass colours followed, purple green and cobalt blue were next on line. New patterns such as Fine Cut & Roses, Beaded Cable and Wild Rose all appeared at this juncture. In 1910 the Grape and Cable Design was introduced- to immense and immediate sales. By 1912 the pastel range followed- these we now refer to as White, Ice Green and Ice Blue. The output in new patterns was equally prolific, over 100 were developed with new moulds introduced. The Grape and Cable Design (which was to prove the biggest seller of all) was offered to a discerning public in around 70 shapes alone! This was later copied by both Dugan and Fenton- a true accolade for its popularity. All this expansion was costly and by 1912 Northwood settled for a period of consolidation. The new designs of Acorn Burrs, Nippon, Peacock and Urn and Peacock at the Fountain, amongst many others, enjoyed continuing success and sales. In 1915 a Custard glass iridised range appeared, followed two years after that by a line of iridised stretch glass. With the Iridised Custard Glass, patterns such as Fine cut and Roses, Singing Birds, Three Fruits, Grape Arbor (all bearing a light pastel iridescence) made their appearance. There was also experimental production of a deeper marigold iridescence on Custard Glass, but this was not followed up in any quantity. Unfortunately all this effort came to a sudden end when Harry developed a fatal illness, dying in 1918. His Company carried on, but without his genius for design and his flair for trade, slipped into a slow commercial decline till it finally closed in 1925. Northwood Trademarks The Northwood Glass Company employed the following trademark from 1905 and this regularly appears on Carnival Glass from this early period. Unfortunately, the trademark noted left has been somewhat abused in New Carnival Glass production. To clarify this point, we show two other similar trademarks and their origins on the following page (where they do not actually represent the earlier Northwood manufacture).

22


L G Wright Glass Co Used by L G Wright in the 1970s and applied to old Dugan/Diamond moulds purchased after the works was destroyed by fire in the 1930s. Its similarity to the old Northwood moulds mark caused great confusion with collectors and was eventually dropped. L G Wright now uses a W within a circle for its trademark for iridised pressed NEW Carnival glassware. Mosser Glass Co This mark appeared on Neiu Carnival Glass in the early 1980s and again was too close to the original Northwood Trademark for comfort! At the time the copyright to the Northwood original was owned by the American Carnival Glass Association who took legal action to suppress the use of this misleading trademark - and succeeded! Mosser now use a trademark of an "M" inside a circle for its New Carnival Glass. Rare colours in Northwood Carnival Glass Northwood produced no true Red Base Carnival Glass since development of this shade by Fenton and Imperial followed after Harry Northwood's demise. Vivid colours are quite abundant in Northwood production, the pastels (with their later production) less easily found and therefore more costly for modern day collectors. White is more easily found than Pastels Blue or Green, as is Amber. Colours such as Lavender, Black Amethyst, Teal, Renniger Blue, Vaseline and Horehound, Smoke, Aqua, Pearl (on custard glass), Olive and Lime Green are all very difficult to find and rare Peach Opalescent was an exploratory experimental colour and therefore extremely rare in the Northwood production. This is actually marigold Carnival with a white opalescent edge band. Dugan is the largest producer of this type of Carnival Glass. Northwood made more Aqua Opalescent than his competitors. Its rarity lies in the fact this formula was probably brought, or bought into Northwood Glass Company originally from outside. There are no trade references attributing its development to Northwood, despite the output. A few rare items appear with a Northwood signature - and these are the rarities to look out for. Perhaps Northwood turned to production of this colour WITHIN the works at some stage under his own name? Confusion over Dugan and Northwood Patterns It has been established by researchers such as the late Bill Heacock that when Northwood left his factory in Indiana he left many moulds behind. These were taken up with the Thomas Dugan Carnival Glass production lines after 1908. Patterns that can now be definitely attributed to Dugan/Diamond and not to Northwood are as follows: Butterfly and Tulip; Many Fruits; Farmyard Bowl; Fan; Jewelled Hearts; Victorian; S-Repeat; Nautilus; Maple Leaf; Grape Arbor Bowl; Wreathed Cherry Northwood use of moulds from Jefferson of Follansbee Research is still continuing in America by Carl O Burns and others into the use of some Jefferson moulds by Northwood. Jefferson patterns were made in Carnival Glass by Northwood: Finecut and Roses Footed Bowl; Meander as external pattern on Three Fruits, Sunflower, Grape & Cable; Vintage - external pattern found on Star of David and Bows, Octet and Three Fruits; Ruffles and Rings - external pattern to Wishbone and Rosette. Later production Carnival Glass in America Whilst it is quite impossible to cover the extensive history of Carnival Glass ware as reproduced after the 1920s, see pages 82 and 83 for some catalogue entries to give the reader a GENERAL idea as to the type of ware available from this period from L E Smith and from the Indiana Glass Company as well as the Fenton Art Glass Company.

23


Chapter Five

Non American Producer Countries In alphabetical order of Country. The major producer countries outside of America, as known to date: America, Argentina, Australia, Czechoslovakia, England, Estonia, Finland and Sweden. Research is also under way regarding possible Russian production. These countries all took up production of iridised pressed ware in their own glasshouses following the American success of its Carnival Glassware sales. They had already seen the effect of the American Carnival Glassware on their own internal markets and were determined to try and effect sales from their own output. New machinery had already been brought in to modernise the various Glassworks following invention of the steam presses, and pressed glass manufacture was well established. So it was not a great step to move on to iridised pressed ware, or pressed lustre ware as the Europeans called this glass. Patterns differed from the American, both for the chance to expand on any sales potential as well as to cater for localised preferences. All the works were familiar with iridisation techniques from earlier blown glass production. There was never the mass of manufacture as in USA, nor the development of the more exotic base-glass colours, but each country nevertheless managed to produce 'Carnival Glass' to compete on local markets with the influx of the American imported ware. We now move on to discuss these production outputs, in alphabetical order of country.

Argentina A limited production of some pieces of iridised pressed ware have surfaced in the United States of America and have been traced to the Regolleau Cristalleros Co of Buenos Aires. The Beetle Ashtray is one such pattern. Little further is known at this time.

Australia Carnival Glass was exported to Australia from America, Fenton being the major importer though some American Carnival Glass appears to have arrived indirectly via UK Agents. The Australian Company Crystal Glassworks of Sydney Australia initiated its own production in 1918, specialising in producing patterns that reflected the local native flora and fauna. Bowls and Water sets were the most usual production, though Cake plates, Float bowls and flower frogs, along with table items such as sugar and creamer sets were also introduced. The quality of design was excellent and this was often complemented by an unusual blackamethyst base glass. This was so dark as to appear black unless held up to a very strong light, when the amethyst then became obvious. Items were also made on clear (flint) with a marigold overlay. There does not appear to have been any persistent use of Pastel Shades in base glass, though the odd Emu bowl has surfaced in Aqua. Nor was any glass apparently produced with an opalescent edge finish as popular in America, especially with Dugan. Some rarer pieces appear in flint glass, with an iridised marigold spray applied to the base of the glass, intaglio set. The Diana bowl is one such highly collectable piece, the Australian Pansy another. These were supplied from Sweden (Eda Glasshouse) and were apparently iridised upon arrival in Australia. The original Diana bowl (non-iridised) is found in Sweden and appears in the Eda glass catalogues. The photograph at the top of the next page shows such a non-iridised Diana Bowl, taken from the Eda (Sweden) production range. This bowl was part of a set consisting of 6 small shallow bowls, with straight sides and a larger matching Master Bowl as portrayed here. The intaglio (ie recessed) design can be found on Australian ware in Marigold iridised form.

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The Australian Crystal Glassworks later amalgamated with the Australian Glass Manufacturers Company (AGM) via a series of mergers with other companies. Records still available through the AGM establish that Australian Carnival Glass ware was first manufactured circa 1922-23 and possibly a little later, was taken up by the Crystal Glassworks of Windham Street, Waterloo, Sydney. The Crystal Glass Company was founded in 1895 with a chief designer named Mr A G Walters. Iridised tumblers found in Australia with the initials " AGW" were, initially, erroneously attributed to the "Australian Glass Works", where they actually related to Mr Walters! Apparently only tumblers were ever initialled, owing to production difficulties. This Company was bought out in 1924/5 by the AGM Group and merged with another such amalgamation to become the Crown Crystal Glassworks and moved to a new address at Bourke Street, again in Waterloo, Sydney. Press ware manufacture continued from these premises. Right top shows the logo of the Crown Crystal Glass works, whilst below it the picture depicts a sketch of the CHERUB design that follows the iridised intaglio-set DIANA and PANSY bowls. Apparently the Australian buyers also delighted in the exported Sowerby (UK) range of iridised ware, advertised there under the description "Sunglo Range" and described in UK as "with Orange Flame Iridescence" (Pottery Gazette April 1931). Manufacturing processes for Carnival Glass ware in the Australian Glasshouse have been described to the author by former workers. It appears that items such as Bowls, vases, flower frogs, compotes and fruit sets were all produced on a side-lever press. After being mouldpressed, each item was then placed in a "gloriole" and shaped to the desired style. Then it was deposited in a booth and, whilst still hot, was sprayed with a chosen solution of mainly Spirits of Salts and Chrome Qxide. A temperature of 600째+F was sustained to ensure the successful adherence of the spray to the glass surface. This was a considerably higher temperature than was used in other producer countries, and maintained a lasting iridescence. Patterns in Australian Carnival Glassware The most well known patterns depict the local flora and fauna. We have The Swan, Emu, Kookaburra, Shrike, Kangaroo, Kiwi, Crow, Kingfisher and Butterfly & Bower bower. But these were complemented by other patterns less well-known overseas. There were the Swedish designs already mentioned as well as Pin-Ups, the Heavy Diamond Float Bowl, the elegant Beaded Spears Water Set (possibly from Sweden) as well as a Parrots & Pomegranates Compote and the Birds & Cherries Bowl. The latter two are shown in sketches left There is also a wide variety of Carnival Glass ware in Australia from both America and England, as well as the Swedish pieces that were

25


apparently iridised on the base for the Australian market, and arrived there via their UK Agents. Design Registration for Australian Carnival Glass Luckily, from the collector's point of view, many patterns in Australian Glassware were iridised and some Registrations appear on Carnival Glass manufactured there. There were Registered Numbers as well as Registered Designs (where the producer did not want his designs to carry a series of Registration Numbers - presumably for artistic reasons). Such registrations did not specify that the ware should be Carnival Glass and some of the Registrations were initiated prior to 1923 when iridised pressed ware was made. A Kangaroo bowl has surfaced in moulded ware, in citron shade, but non iridised with an earlier Registration Number. Several variations of design have appeared under the same Registration Number- whether because moulds were replaced and varied slightly, or whether there was a deliberate variation imposed, has not yet been established. The following design Registrations have been reproduced from Australian Glass of the Nineteenth and twentieth Century, with kind permission of the author Mrs Marjorie Graham. Date applied for Reg No Date published or period registered Motif 4184 4696 4697 403600 40361 40362 40363 40364 40547 44289

Kookaburra Kangaroo Swan Emu Kookaburra Lyre Bird Magpie Waratah Koala Kiwis

4 Jan 1923 15 Jan 1924 16 Jan 1924 14 Nov 1924 14 Nov 1924 14 Nov 1924 14 Nov 1924 14 Nov 1924 8 Dec 1924 19 Apr 1926

1 Apl-30 June 1923 1 Oct-31 Dec 1924 1 Oct-31 Dec 1924 19 June 1925 19 June 1925 27 Feb 1925 27 Feb 1925 13 Feb 1925 20 Feb 1925 13 Aug 1926

All except 44289 were originally applied for by Crystal Glass Ltd. The original applicant for KIWI motif was Crown Crystal Glass Co Ltd. The three numbers at the top of the list are Registered Designs and the corresponding number should be shown on the glassware. The remaining numbers are Registered Trade Marks. All marks and designs were first checked nationwide for possible infringements before granting applications. Finally, we note here that there are two patterns quite difficult to find in Australian Carnival Glass Ware, namely: (1) Eureka Floral Cross (Bowls) A set of one large and six small fruit bowls. Pattern intaglio iridised on the base exterior. The base glass is flint. The pattern shows a leafy cross motif with a stylised flower head at each point of the cross. (2) Eureka Flag Fruit set. Here the cross is composed of dual straight lines (not leafy) and at each cross point there is a geometric star instead of a flower head.

Czechoslovakia Modern political boundary changes have made the title Czechoslovakia obsolete, but we retain it for its general reference usage in the Carnival Glass world. Here we are strictly referring to the old Bohemia of Central Europe. This area sustained a tradition of glassmaking over many centuries and was the acknowledged leader in cut glass and art glass production throughout the European continent. In Southern Bohemia a series of glassworks were founded in the latter part of the eighteenth century and these took up the desire for cheaper pressed ware as well as continuing with their crystal glass tradition when the markets changed in the 19th century. Meanwhile in the North of the area, as early as 1836 the celebrated Joseph Lobmeyr turned to France to obtain new moulds, new machinery and a skilled workforce for the production of pressed glass. With this advent of mechanisation processes for manufacture in the mid 1800s, Bohemia also set up several Schools of Glassmaking so as to absorb the new techniques being introduced in America. By 1924 Bohemia was providing an extensive range of pressed and

26


Photograph taken between 3 900and World War II of the old and new furnaces at the j Rii-wdel complex at Unterpolaum (today called Desna). Here all the materials for use in the chain of glasshouses was produced. The old furnace was destroyed by fire in the 1950s.

coloured glassware for its European markets, as well as for export further afield. Prices were exceedingly low and the markets prospered and grew. The Harrachov Glassworks, (founded in the North of Bohemia in 1712) became the major producer for the new pressed table and decorative ware. In 1887 the works was acquired by Joseph Riedel who came from a famous Bohemian Glassmaking family and he set about a massive expansion, ending up with a whole chain of Glasshouses. Riedel eventually became known as one of the greatest producers of luxury glass in his time. Export played a large role, to central Europe, to England and far beyond. In England the Pottery Gazette of 1924 notes that a Mr Joseph Lohnert from Steinschonau and Gablonz in Bohemia was offering a wide range of crystal and coloured pressed glass for sale from his London showrooms. There was an attractive line of pressed coloured glass depicting Egyptian figures, intended to reflect the then current interest in the discoveries in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt. Could this notice in the Pottery Gazette of 1924 refer to the the Classic Arts and Eqyptian Queen patterns, source unknown, that we collect nowadays from the early Carnival Glass production period? It has been established that the majority of the coloured and iridised pressed glass from Bohemia was intended for export rather than the home market. Items such as necklaces and handbags were also made using iridised pressed glass beads. A non-iridised bowl with this SAME pattern was also produced at Riihimaki, Finland! Here are copies of various letterheads from correspondence with Riedel in 1902 by principal suppliers of minerals and materials for the glasshouses. §ilberwaarenfabrik

.(qEBR.UMB{|^l.HNi

d,s, „#'.„/„„• ;,„/,„ ,,Af.' .r;„^ ^..y^,.^ ^ i e V / c i * ,„,-/..„,//„<,-, £_. ZZ~ZZl ,e£_-'>S»

eZZs^ZZ.

Xfss ...

igyS^ _ _ _ - ^ a — &^y-~^ /pr. JrT Kirfser. oohn ~^ e-t-fC~»^.

27


The Riedel Glassworks continues its tradition of producing fine art glass and domestic pressed tableware today, and exports worldwide. It is still renowned for quality of design and production. Modern style iridised pressed ware, in the form of lampshades, giftware etc is found worldwide.

England Production of the English counterpart to the American Carnival Glasswasa possibility considered by several English Glasshouses such as Davidson of Gateshead, Henry Greener works of Sunderland, H G Richardson of Stourbridge and the Sowerby works. Sowerby turned out to be the major contributor to such production. Sowerby had set up business in 1765 but moved to its Ellison Glassworks in 1850. Here it rapidly became an established leader in the production of fine Art Glass as well as the more market orientated pressed glass tableware. So when, in 1911, the UK Trade Review The Pottery Gazette reported that the Fenton iridised pressed ware was selling extremely well in England, Sowerby was not slow to explore such a lucrative market circa the 1920s. Sowerby iridised by spraying the glass whilst still hot with a variety of chemical solutions that were then 'sealed on' with refiring. This process resulted in the 'Sunglo' and 'Rainbo' range (ie marigold and blue and amethyst). Some earlier pressed glass designs such as Rowboat and Pinwheel have been found iridised. Sowerby was obviously keen to enter this field and used moulds to hand in the first instance. Sowerby iridised pressed ware was marketed in direct competition with the various American producers ware. Fenton's range, described as being of 'Persian Gold' colour was selling through Fenton's local agent Mr C J Pratt of National Glass Company, Gamage Building, London. The Fenton USA green, blue and amethyst shades were the best sellers. Fenton also represented Imperial in England and an advertisement appears for the same in the Pottery Gazettes in 1911. Northwood ware was represented by Harry Northwood himself in 1908. The report of the death of his widowed mother Mrs John Northwood in 1908 (in the Pottery Gazettes) confirms this. Sowerby responded with individualistic designs influenced by the Art Decoratif Movement, such as the "Swan covered butter" and "Hen covered butter", and with domestic table ware including stemmed and collar base sugars, milk jugs as well as various celery and salt shapes. A few items have also turned up in 'English Carnival Ware' that have been attributed to Davidson of Gateshead (such as Illinois Daisy Jar). But Sowerby soon developed into the major UK producer developing a vast production range of iridised as well as non-iridised pressed glassware. The Pottery Gazette's of 1926 describe various Sowerby designs for sale, a boon for collectors where many of the Sowerby Catalogues were lost in Bombing raids during World War Two. Some still exist, so we can apply Catalogue Reference numbers in a few instances. A few (sadly incomplete) catalogue copies have even turned up at Eda Glassworks in Sweden, tucked away in the Production Manager's office! Whilst the Sowerby designs were of quite individual and artistic form, few of the English pieces attained the high quality or the mass production numbers of their American counterparts or even of the Swedish ware being produced at Eda. Hand working was rare, and there was little green based glass. The majority of this ware was marigold. Even amethyst and blue are hard to find, and pastels practically nonexistent apart from the odd aqua that has surfaced or the very rare Jet base glass. The latter two probably being of an experimental nature. Some Sowerby carries the Peacock Head Trademark in the base and this is depicted in a small Pin Dish shown in this book under the pattern Facets. A sketch of the same, along with a drawing of the delightful Covered Swan Butter is shown left. In the 1930s the iridised pressed glass line was re-vamped, new shapes appeared. The iridised bowls followed a 'squared-off shape rather than the usual rounds or ovals. The bowl sides were straight and the glass was clear (flint). Many of the Sowerby iridised line pieces were obviously adapted from

28


earlier moulds. So we find also the Wickerwork plate and its three legged stand in various non iridised colours such as opaque turquoise, opaque white (milk) and clear red, acid green, electric blue, and even a rather harsh pink. At one stage,in an effort to avoid restrictive trade tariffs, Sowerby entered into business with Eda in Sweden. Patterns such as Wickerwork were actually made at Eda and despatched to UK for sale on wards to the Colonies through Sowerby. There is a letter in the Eda files where an English Agent refers to the legal requirement for origin labels on each piece, and wishes this were not the case! Sowerby exported worldwide, particularly following the old Colonial trade routes to South Africa, India and Australia. Many pieces such as African Shield are also found in America and Marion Hartung found early examples of Lea and variant, Pineapple, Scroll Emboss and the Diving Dolphin Compote. A1915 Pottery Gazette notes a need for glass insulators. Apparently, during a survey of telegraph poles in a tropical rain forest, it had been noted that spiders sought shelter in the dark ceramic insulators and this caused the current to be deflected to the ground! Perhaps Sowerby read of this potential and made some Carnival Glass Insulators as well as its other designs so as to compete with the American versions! Like other glasshouses, Sowerby was greatly affected by market forces worldwide and at home, and during the depression years suffered badly. By the 1970s this once great firm was reduced to making car windscreens - a sad reflection on its past glories. The works were demolished in 1982.

Estonia The author has been able to establish proof of a limited production for iridised pressed ware in the 1930s at the Melesk Glasshouse in S Estonia. Unfortunately this factory burnt to the ground in 1992 and records were destroyed. However, local research instigated through private contacts and through the Museums in Estonia has elicited the following facts to date: The Melesk Glassworks worked in close cooperation with their sister works at Riihimaki Finland. Many glass workers came to Estonia from Finland to assist in setting up a production scheme for producing iridised pressed glassware. In this book several patterns made at Melesk are noted as similar to those produced at Riihimaki - note the beautiful Alexander Floral Water Set (aka Grand Thistle) and the Hobnail Banded Tumbler. We also find patterns previously of unknown origins such as Juliana, Stardust, and Starlight. Photograph from local archives showing the Melesk Glasshouse. Local collectors and leading Museums in Estonia have meanwhile kindly given pieces for photography in this book, and research is continuing apace. It is probable that a considerable quantity of the production was for distribution throughout Russia.

Holland Only one known producer of iridised pressed glassware circa 1920s has surfaced in this country to date. The author has established some production at the Royal Leerdam Works (now merged with the United Glassworks of Schiedam and operating as 'United Glassworks' (n.v.vereebigde glasfabrieken).

29


This glass blowing factory started way back in 1581 and as early as 1765 there was a bottle blowing plant at Leerdam. Clear and specially coloured household and decorative glassware as well as bottles was being produced by 1878. In 1915 a Design School was established and prestigious architects K P C de Bazel, C de Lorm and C Lannoy headed the new venture. This proved very successful, so much so that other designers were signed up as well. By 1938 there was a SOLE designer, Mr Andrew Copier and in 1953 the predicate "Royal" was awarded to Leerdam Glass.. The Design School still flourishes and in the 1980s the Manager for the Design Team was Mr Floris Meydam. The Meydam pattern illustrated in this book is named after him, in recognition of his assistance with regard to identifying pieces made at Leerdam. There was no original pattern name given by Leerdam, items were just supplied with catalogue numbers. Here is a copy of one of the Pages from the GEPERSTE MELKKANNEN. - CREMIERS MOULES. catalogue of the period covering pressed glass MOULDED CREAMS. (and iridised pressed glass) production. There is no specific catalogue for iridised ware. Plate XXIX depicts various Creamer Jugs. Carnival Glass collectors will no doubt recognise Catalogue Numbers 1935,2087,2127 (1 & 2) and there may well be the other creamers out there somewhere as export was important, particularly to the UK. The iridisation effect was particular to Leerdam, a mirror like surface often with a strong pink to the iridescence. This is referred to in the following from the UK Pottery Gazette: Iridised wares of considerable artistic interest were also being produced at the Leerdam Glassworks in Holland. Some of these pieces, covered first with selenium GEPERSTE BOTERVLOOTJES. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BEURRIERS MOULDS. and then having the surface iridised, were peculiarly MOULDED BUTTERS. brilliant to transmitted light. Pl-AAT X A I A .

In the Butter Dish entries for the 1906 Leerdam Catalogue we can recognise such as Beaded Swirl and Beaded Ovals. It would appear that such items were only iridised to order. A Punchbowl Set look-alike to the American Imperial Fashion set was made at Leerdam and this is often found in the UK. This is shown on a slide in the archives at the National Glass Museum at Leerdam, stating manufacture circa 1910 at Leerdam! Previous employees at Royal Leerdam confirm that production of iridised pressed ware was carried out as late as 1928 and shortly after, and that marigold, green, blue and amethyst base '^:tfyy.-i^e.v.:s?75r"' pressed ware was iridised to special order. The American Agents were Graham of New York (1906), Continuing production was noted in UK '-mS0 as late as 1931 (again in the trade gazette of the period). Since the Dutch showed a marked liking for specific patterns namely Heart, Greek Key, Oakleaf and Acorn patterns, many puzzle pieces known will probably tie in with Dutch manufacture. The Greek Key and Sunburst Vase being one such possibility. The fine detail in the designs presented by Leerdam were obviously intended to compensate for the fact that all the iridised pressed glass produced there was direct from the mould and there is no evidence of any hand-worked finish.

30


Scandinavia For various historical, political and economic reasons, there had been a considerable upsurge in glass production in this area from the 1880,s. The mechanisation of the industry had proved a great impetus for expansion. Fine art glass traditions were continued along with a desire to enter and exploit both the pressed glass, and the iridised pressed glass, markets. New moulds were produced, new machinery in place and a skilled workforce was readily available. Following after the American Glass houses, both Sweden and Finland were producers of their own iridised pressed ware, which they called Lustre Ware, although production was never major line. There appears to have been no production in Denmark or Norway. In Finland there were four glassfactories that made 'lustre ware', namely Iittala, Karhula, Kauklahti and Riihimaki. In Sweden, the Eda Glassworks was a major Scandinavian producer. The Scandinavian designs all retained the detail for flowers or geometries adopted by the American producers, but were quite distinctive in their own way both as regards production finishes, choice of design and colours of the base glass. Only a few pieces were adapted from the American patterns. These are shown right with sketches to illustrate. To date,very few pieces have surfaced with -Ti|tt Lily" USA Jul - Riihiniati N o Sll animal designs. Roses and tulips are prolific in (Foot Ftaoeet) USA ee.ert a Riiaiieaai R.ihiirati - No. 52B6-T No. aOOO-tMl the field of floral design. Production of the Scandinavian lustre ware took place between 1925 and the mid 1930s, though there was a short limited later production in the 1950s. The latter being easily recognised with more modern forms and design. We now discuss the major Scandinavian producers in more detail. Finland: Iittala Works This was a minor producer and it is believed lustre ware may have been produced for the sister company at Karhula. Both were owned by the glassmaking consortium A Ahlstrom Oy factory. Iittala began glass production in 1881 and blown household glass, pressed glass cut crystal, engraved glass as well as bottles were all manufactured. Iittala still exists today, making blown household glass and light fittings, Export was considerable to other Scandinavian countries, and to Canada as well as to America. There is a joint catalogue for Iittala works and Karhula works ware, this dated 1922. So far only one piece has been definitely attributed to Iittala. This is the pattern called Quilted Fans. It is catalogued as No 4800 Iittala. Finland: Karhula Works Karhula works was set up in 1888 and was renowned for fine art glass. From 1916 it was jointly owned with Karhula and Iittala Glasshouses by a private Company called A Ahlstrom Osakeyhtio and post 1941 took its own name as A. Ahlstrom Osakeyhtio Karhula. At the beginning of the 1900s Karhula ware carried both name and pattern number (there was a 1902-10 Catalogue). But only catalogue numbers were in use during the 'Lustre Ware' production period which took place between the 1920s to 1930s. The author has given pattern names for Indexing purposes, with the original catalogue number where pertinent for pieces shown in this book. It has been established through conversation with Master Blower Hugo Rask who was working at the factory in the 1926 period, that only pressed glassware was produced at Karhula during that period. Most of the work was of an experimental nature- new markets and new products were always the driving force behind such research. It is thought the lustre ware process appealed since it allowed the use of any molten glass that was slightly off the desired standard for quality

31


or colour. The RIO glass (pink based) that was used at the works was extremely difficult to stabilise in production colour-wise. Lustre ware production was therefore limited in scope and since difficulties were encountered in controlling the iridisation process, such efforts were soon abandoned. The catalogues make no mention of any specific iridised pressed ware - no doubts such pieces were taken from the pressed glass catalogue directly. Some of the Karhula iridised pressed glass was however shaped after it came from the mould. It was subject to shaping at the end of a blow-pipe, and this was often applied to the manufacture of vases and some bowls. The press-moulds used were either in three or four sections. Some catalogue entries are noted below. Such designs were not specifically original to Karhula since it operated closely with its sister Finnish glasshouses, exchanging work forces and designs. The Karhula Museum still retains some original moulds from the period. Colour Formulae at Karhula Base glass in use was either a light cobalt blue or 'antique rosa' (soft pink- named as Rio glass in the catalogues of the time). An old book of Formulae has been found at the Karhula works that gives a clear insight into the manufacture of such glass. There is a note to the effect that Karhula produced a slightly lighter blue than that in the Formula below (reducing the cobalt to 0.01 kg from the standard 0.3 kg as most probably in use at Kauklahti.)

Rio Glass Sand Soda Ash Limestone Lead Minimum Saltpetre Borax Arsenic Iron Oxide Sulphur Cadmium Selenium, Black Sulphur + Lead Crystal Cullets

Dark Blue Glass Sand Soda Ash Baryta Limestone Saltpetre Arsenic Feldspar Cobalt

130kg 48kg 15kg 6.5kg 5kg 1.6kg 1kg 0.8kg 0.8kg 0.4kg 0.1kg 25kg

130kg 55kg 2kg 151g 5kg 1kg 12kg 0.3kg

All the manufacturers closely guarded their EXACT formulae for the metallic salts used in the chosen iridisation processes. At Karhula the Museum carried out a costly and detailed spectographic analysis on a dissolved lustre-layer on one of the pieces of lustre ware from Karhula. The results indicated an absence of all noble metals and also surprisingly, a lack of arsenic. The use of the latter had lead to the derivation of the term POISON GLASS as applied to Lustre ware in Estonia and in other areas of Scandinavian manufacture. But the following were found to be present: Lead (100); Iron (2); Copper (1.5) and Chloride (1). The chloride is likely an indication of copper or iron oxide as a raw material in the mixture, the lead may be there as much as a binder than as a colourant. Karhula Works used the German text book by Springer called Die Glamakerei und Glasatzerei Insbesonders nach Ihr en Chemiseschen Grundlagen (Zweisel 1923) when setting up its colour formulae for the iridisation process. The same source also notes the complications in producing lustre colours and recommends the purchase of already established lustre colours to save cost in production. Whether Karhula followed this advice is unknown. Since the glasshouse carried out their annealing process in ovens heated by generator gas, this would have permitted some control over any oxidisation process should the Company have decided to experiment with their own colours.

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Springer's text relating to iridised ware, explains that the technique then available for obtaining a metal iridescence on glass with so-called 'lustre colours' differed from that previously described in the volume and that lustre colours were usually baked by means of an oxidisation fire without reduction. Thus obtained, such colour shades could not generally be modified by an altered atmosphere (i.e. by a reducing fire, not by increased temperature). It also stated that according to their composition lustre colours are organic metal compounds - so called resins and are soluble in volatile oils such as lavender oil etc. Many metals, apart from silver, copper and bismuth (rarely used) are freely employed. Such organic metal compounds are produced by either a dry method (dissolving the metal salt solution in colophony) or by a 'wet' method of separating the metal salt solution by the addition of a resinic acid metal, then treating it in various ways and finally dissolving it in oil. The lustre colours themselves are either simple resinic acid metals with resinuous lead or bismuth added for better adhesion, or mixtures of resinic acid metals. Frequently phosphated or boracic compounds are used and leaf brass added. This volume then goes on to give a list of some lustre colours as made up by R. Hohlbaum and these make interesting reading. Iron lustre a reddish brown lustre consisting of 1 part resinous iron, 1 part resinous lead, 2 parts oil. Cobalt lustre a grey lustre with little iridescence, consisting of 1 part resinous cobalt, 1 part resinous lead, 2 parts oil. Mother of Pearl lustre 1 part resinous iron, 1 part resinous uranium, 2 parts resinous lead, 4 parts oil. Pink Lustre pink lustre with gold reflections, 4 parts leaf brass, 1 part resinous lead, 4 parts oil. The text then adds that lustre is applied either evenly, in stripes, or mottled onto the article by means of a brush. It is then baked in an oxidising fire. Only very occasionally (as in the case of silver lustre) does a reducing fire need to be used. The organic substances burn up in the muffle and a thin skin like layer of metal remains on the glass giving it a unique iridescent glitter in various metallic shades. Whilst it is known that export was important to Karhula few records exist that detail such ventures as regards the lustre ware production lines, The glass photographed from Karhula in this book was all provided from the Museum of Glass at Karhula, with reference numbers as indicated. Finland: Kauklahti Between 1923 and 1952 there was a varied output from this factory, consisting of blown glass, pressed glass, cut crystal, engraved glass and bottles. The Company was owned by Riihimaki Lasi Oy (a private concern) between 1927-1952 and later specialised in its lampshade production ware. Between 1923-1927 it was in the ownership of one Claes Norstedt though there has been no indication of lustre ware production at this time. Since Riihimaki Lasi Oy only produced pressed glass at its Kauklahti outlet between the 1920s and the 1930s, it would appear that the lustre ware was made in the 1930s when the ownership had passed from Norstedt. Although owned by Riihimaki the factory retained its individuality as a manufacturing Company till as late as 1941. The designs for this Company follow those of Riihimaki and there is no separate catalogue. But according to local sources, the pattern named Fircones from Riihimaki (a pitcher and tumbler set) was also made at the Kauklahti works. Finland: Riihimaki This factory was set up in Southern Finland in 1910 and still exists as a major concern to this day. Now it is a fully automated bottle plant, though it has a fine history of production of blown household glass, pressed glass, cut crystal, engraved glass as well as bottles.

33


NYHETI

NYHETI

Dt uttramotttrn*j, bar flrut *j *tdd* LujtraHoli'to-gtatverorna. *om ikimra i atn unatroarojte fdrgtymfont, ara Riiktmakt gtasoruMw ttnatit vppjttnatuackaridt nyhrt. Genoa. »tt valja Lujtr*-Hok to-jUn i jufl a* ny*n*cr iom Ki.rmor.Jfr* mrd ovngu larger i rummer. L n Ni fa varje en»LJJ gUipje.* alt ytterlisarc fbrkoja nimmrtt eller bora4«ervi«cn< nclnet'vcrkan. Kitnimiki* tinnrua trant^aUningsmetooCT h i wfljuMJort oerhort moafrsti p m . .Tag i betraluanJe Lu*tra-Hoh to--gl«ien - Ae aco en (rojd for Ogat. D « Ile<la affarcr torn #»lj»

gla* #Uj* ocl«I Lu#tn»-HoJi'to-sU*. OT. RIIHIMAKI Translation from Swedish News! News!

Translation from Finnish

The ultramodern Lustra-Hoh'to glass products not seen here previously which glitter in a most wonderful symphony of colour are the latest novelty from the Riihimaki glass factory to attract attention. By choosing Lustra-Hoh'to glasses in just the shades which are in harmony with other colours of the room you can make each and every glass item further enhance the general effect of the room or table service. Riihimaki's ingenious manufacturing methods have enabled exceedingly low prices. Take Lustra-Hoh'to glasses into consideration - they are a pleasure for the eye. Most of the shops which sell glass will also sell Lustra-Hoh'to glass. O. Y. RIIHIMAKI

The astoundingly beautiful Hoh'to-Lustra glass products not previously seen here which glitter in a most wondrous symphony of colour are the most recent novelty from the Riihimaki glass factory to attract attention. By selecting just those Hoh'to-Lustra glasses which have the right shades of colour to match the other colours of the room you will be able to make each glass item enhance the general effect of the room or the table service. Riihimaki's ingenious manufacturing methods have made it possible to sell these new products at exceedingly low prices. You should go to take a look at Hoh'to-Lustra glasses. Most shops selling glass products will also sell Hoh'to-Lustra glasses. O. Y. RIIHIMAKI

Advertisements for iridised pressed glassware from Riihimaki.

It is believed that production of lustre ware did not take place till the 1930s. There is mention of lustre ware in a Riihimaki Catalogue of the era, relating to an iridised ashtray. We also have the advert (above) as released by Riihimaki in the early 1930s - it is in both Swedish and Finnish. The Riihimaki outlet also produced a brief later range of iridised pressed glass as we know from the catalogues in existence between 1954 and 1957. This was mainly for export and sold well in America. But it is understood that only the Rio base-colour glass (pink) was made at this time. All blue-based glass was from the earlier period. Like its sister factories, only Rio or Blue lustre ware appears to have been made in the 1930s period in Finland, though some one-off pieces in amethyst might be possible. Riihimaki adopted two known methods for producing iridised pressed glassware: 1. The object to be iridised was painted with metal oxide and fired at about 500°C (the same temperature as used in Australian production). 2. The object was held in metal oxide steam and fired in a de-oxidising (reducing) flame so that the oxide de-oxidised into an iridised surface. The steam was poisonous and in Finland the glass often bore the unfortunate designation of 'Poison Glass' since, in the second process noted, the mass of glass retained in it the same oxides as the steam (whereby the composition of iridised glass thus differs from that of ordinary pressed

34


glass). Furthermore there was always the dangerous lead content to contend with. Bismuth, silver, copper, platinum, gold and antimony were used in this process of iridisation. Both Riihimaki and Kauklahti used the second, and poisonous, method of iridisation, which was not employed at Karhula works. At Riihimaki it was also understood that the Russians used a third method of iridisation whereby a very thin sheet of metal (1 /1000 width) was employed. At Riihimaki a vast quantity of the lustre ware production was exported to Russia, as well as to Europe and Scandinavia. With regard to designs, it is interesting to note the similarity between some American and Riihimaki designs. Designs from the Riihimaki catalogues, show remarkable similarities with American patterns Tiger Lily (Imperial). Drapery Variant (Northwood), and Four Flowers (Northwood).

S w e d e n : EDA (1830-1953) Eda Glasbruk (Eda Glass Manufacturing Co) was established close to Charlottenberg on the Norwegian/ Swedish border in SW Sweden in 1830. Up until closure Eda manufactured all kinds of glass, from greenish windowpanes and bottles to deep cut crystal bowls and wineglasses, as well as the unique honey-coloured and palest blue pieces made in the modern Scandinavian style. There was even thin-blown glass in the Venetian tradition. Pressed glass also formed an important part of the production at Eda, from the first salts and tumblers made in 1845, then plates and candlesticks in the 1890s, and thereafter all sorts of bowls, vases and tumblers in various colours up till 1953. In the earlier days, at the turn of the century, Eda was one of the three most important glasshouses in Sweden, employing 300 men and managing an offshoot sister company with a new factory at Magnor Norway. The *? GEO e - ? V ' \ majority of the glass then produced at Eda (around 75%) was sold within Norway but there was some export to England, the USA, Drawing of the Eda Catalogue frontispiece of 1929. Canada and Australia. Throughout the period 1909-31 the pressed glass output consisted of more than 50% of the total Eda production and an attempt to export was made. Domestic items such as sugar bowls, creamers, fruit bowls, match holders and simple tumblers were all on offer. The Eda factory closed down for a few years after 1933, as following the period covering iridised pressed glass production, the markets were R. JOHNSTON &CO.. LIMITED. heavily depressed. But just prior to this period (1927.... « . .,.„, 33) a new modern 'Scandinavian Design' concept was introduced and production changed from cheap oppressed glass products to an exclusive and hand made style of crystal ware. Such pieces were either thin stfSDzn. blown and lightly coloured, or heavier weight bowls mainly in a panel design on soft honey, pale gray, a delicate light blue or a soft caramel brown. Such designs were the work of Gerda Stromberg who was married to the Eda Glass Company Manager Edward Stromberg. Some pieces from this period can be found in the Victoria •T.«7. ILo and Albert Museum in England. Eda Glassware was first introduced onto the UK as.rsar, market by agents R Johnston and later by Jules Wuidart, Bowman and Son, as well as Elfversson all of London, •ap^u and Doleman and Steward in Glasgow. Here is a letter from a director at R Johnston. At one time R Johnston held the sole selling rights for " " *" °"""" " " ' ° •Wfaal.

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35


Eda in Australia though there is also evidence of direct orders from the Aurora Glass Company, of Richmond Melbourne as well as from Melbourne Reindorffs of Brisbane. On the American market Eda was represented by J H Venon (New York) as well as by George Borgfelst & Co (New York USA and Toronto Canada). Eda Lustre Ware Production Photograph of the Workers at Eda at the time of iridised A few records exist concerning iridisation on blown lustre ware production. glass both from Eda and from the sister factory at Magnor in Norway. These relate to the start of the twentienth century. The production of Iridised Pressed Ware (ie Lustre ware / Carnival Glass) started early in 1925 and went on for some years. Production ceased when the factory closed temporarily in 1933 (in the Recession) and iridised pressed glass was never made again when the factory opened its doors again between 1935-1940 and 1943-1953. The traditional belief in the Eda area is that the Carnival Glass (as we call it) was introduced by the old Executive Leader, one Gustav Kessmeier and that he alone held the secret production formula for the iridisation. This he had apparently obtained from his son Arthur who worked for an American glass company!. Mr Kessmeier supervised the iridisation process himself on a daily basis, arriving with a small bottle dangling from a cord around his waist, the contents of which were used to control the iridisation process. Production reached as high as 900 pieces per day before the Great Depression. Then sales dropped radically and stocks were left in barrel-loads in local unlocked warehouses - it was realised no-one would bother to steal such an apparently unsaleable product. The local population was totally involved in the works - there was a strong Temperance Club Movement and in 1920 a group of workers from Eda went to work at Corning USA and formed The Top: Members of the Temperance Club movement at Eda Swedish Band there. The two photographs right in 1920. Bottom: The Swedish Eda Factory Band in the 1920s. show these groups. The export of Lustre Ware from Eda A few records exist concerning export in which Iceland as well as Norway were noted. We have already made reference to business with Australia and England. Possible export to Russia (as was carried out from the Finnish Glasshouses) has not been established. Agents records from abroad are not particularly detailed, pressed glass often included iridised pressed glass. But with the UK sales it has been found that certain agents took on the exclusive use of one design each from Eda. The patterns BERLIN and TOKYO were made in iridised form and were included in these agreements. A letter (right) from one of the UK Agents, namely Doleman and Steward of Glasgow is reproduced here.

36

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The presses, moulds and handling of lustre ware Fr.Wilhelm Kulzscher production Masch.nen.abrik und Eisengiefierei Presses and moulds were obtained from several •llasv.ii'i j r Charlotte places in Sweden, Germanu, the UK and USA. Many of the moulds made for Eda were from Germany via Wilhelm Kutzscher of Deubner Glasformenfabrik, Dresden. Here is a letter from the Company. enclosed a cosy oi eg ^uotitton U the var'.wj =ac.i< hln here at lila v lit tn ny factory -.0 jrow l.-t.r.d study ana good Mnrt Since there was a surplus of glass producers in add I should us vi •y j l s i , l* the or.e or tl s other of these therein quoted oioltot l «< ild f.r.d also youi great* at Interes t and t h e t you • Scandinavia (as elsewhere worldwide) during the •juaia be asle to 1 incur 317 representative,. Great Depression, many were forced into closure. ooatnis to Sviedon, jttli your valued orders. Eda was thus able to buy-out many moulds from these other factories. Likewise, when Eda was forced %JU~ to close in 1933 many of these moulds were then sold off to other Swedish factories and to Magnor in Norway and some to Karhula in Finland. It was Nils Hansson, the Executive Leader at Eda who moved on to work at Karhula who probably arranged for some of the sales from Eda to his new place of work. It is not know however whether these moulds, once sold, were ever again used for lustre ware production. Many of the moulds are still stored at Magnor and the photographs shown below depict those involved in lustre ware production at Eda. Right top: YORK pattern mould still at Magnor, Norway. Below: A piece of machinery as used at the Magnor factory. Right bottom: The FLEIIR DE LIS mould now on show at Magnor, Norway originally from Eda works. This is also a well-knozvn pattern in American production.

Base glass colours used at Eda during the lustre ware production Base glass colouring was an old tradition at Eda, starting with a strong blue base, and with brown and soft yellow base shades. There was also some limited production on opaque white (blanc-de lait / milk glass) and also on dark amethyst and jet. The latter was NOT black amethyst but actual jet glass. These base colours were introduced in the manufacture of chemists bottles as early as 1850. A series of new colours followed from 1880 till 1900 and these were light green opaque (called 'mallakitt' - malachite), along with several shades of blue and green, and even a version of the popular English Cranbery Red. During WW1 and after there was another set of colours introduced, mostly in soft 'juice' colours such as soft raspberry, soft apricot etc. A very few pieces

37


of iridised ware appear on a soft blue background with heavy marigold overlay. There are a few and exceedingly rare pieces on blanc-de -lait with a clear iridescence over. A single RED base glass has been found iridised as a Bonbonniere lid in the Lagerkrantz pattern. Some Eda ware has been found on pale lavender base, soft yellow base, pale pink (RIO) base, and even soft green or jet. But these are obviously one-off production and much sought after. Since Eda used its base glass colours indiscriminately for blown or pressed ware, this explains how the odd iridised pieces turn up in unusual base-glass shades as well. Mould Designs Designs were intricate and elaborate, well executed. Roses and CURVED STAR patterns (the latter imported and extended upon from Imperial USA) were much favoured. But many designs were also original to Eda. The two drawings on the right depict such patterns that appear only to emanate from Eda. The quality of Eda lustre ware Eda 'Carnival Glass' is of exceptional quality. A good base-glass is used in most cases, with a controlled iridescence over, often deep gunmetal in colour. There is superb mould work and the collar bases are ground-off Drawings by John Masters: Top: Orebro Bowl by fine stone-cutting. Boat shape (aka Northern Star in USA). Many Swedish collectors believe it is possible to Banana Bottom: Raudel Bowl. identify an Eda lustre ware piece by the STAR pattern appearing on the base of the ware. But this is not wholly accurate since there are various star base patterns at Eda, some not in the catalogues. But there may well be a basis for this idea since the Kutzscher mould production firm in Dresden that supplied Eda with some of its moulds often favoured various star designs in the base of their moulds. This is notified in the advertising text as 'stern in boden' ie 'star in base'. The tradition for so decorating the base of pressed glassware probably derived from that of working expensive blown and cut glass,where it was sought to conceal the pontil mark by an elaborate cut star. When we look at specific patterns from Eda, such as Tokio for example, we find a unique base design: a stylised version of the old Indo-European symbol for the sun- later reversed to form what we call a Swastika. This is an extremely rare piece to find from Eda and fetches a high price even where the base glass is standard deep blue. Some of the Eda floral patterns have base patterns as well, some have a traditional star, some are left plain. Some Eda lustre ware was also hand-worked after leaving the mould, but again such pieces are hard to find. Picture (right) shows a catalogue excerpt for the NANNA pattern range (mis-named by the advertiser as NANNY in this instance), and the next page shows three original blueprints from Eda: (i) the magnificent Rosor Vase (which is found in two sizes); (ii) Diamont Bonbonniere and (iii) Edstrom Plate. The Rosor Vase is also found on non-iridised red base glass in both sizes. The Eda lustre ware production took place in 1927 when the Great Depression occurred. A short time after a new Managing Director was called in, by name Edward Stromberg and he set about returning to the production of expensive blown art glass instead of pressed glass. The press teams were reduced from eight to two in a very short while and lustre ware from Eda was never a proposition from that moment on.

38


Left: Roscr blueprint. Right: Diamant Bonbonniere blueprint. Below: Edstrom plate.

We end this chapter on a personal note! Immediately below we show a drawing of Eda (now in postcard format), drawn by Sven Morfeldt (1991 postcard). Next follows an early photograph of the same Sven Morfeldt relaxing in front of his bicycle, reading a local journal. This was taken during the Eda Lustre Ware production era. For interested collectors it is worth noting that Magnor Glassworks in Norway has a superb Glass Museum relating to both Magnor and Eda glass making through the ages. There is also a fine retail sales outlet for current glass ware production. At Karlstad in Sweden there is also a most interesting display of Eda pressed glassware (iridised and non-iridised). Efforts are currently underway to try and rescue the old Eda Glassworks Production site and bring it into public display. Finally, we show two photographs, side by side. The author canbe seen in the first, researching with local Eda Glass collectors at Eda. In the second, we see Gunnar Lersjo (glass photographer for the majority of the ware shown in this book). He is taking a photograph of a piece of Eda pressed 'lustre ware' at an Eda Collectors' Club meeting.

39


Photographic and Drawings Guide All 'OLD' Carnival Glass refers to production up to late 1930s. 'NEW Carnival Glass refers to any production post late 1930s. 'OLD' Carnival Glass: all pieces shown in this book (whether under SINGLE/GROUP SHOT or DRAWING) are to be found by PATTERN NAME under the alphabetical INDEX / PRICE GUIDE. 'NEW Carnival Glass is to be found under the collective heading 'NEW CARNIVAL GLASS' in the combined INDEX/PRICE GUIDE. Since many 'new' pieces are not named but just carry Catalogue Year and Catalogue page and piece number. Pattern Name sources As established by Marion Hartung (USA) nomenclature, or named at production source, or though general usage by collectors. Photographic sources Photography by Gunnar Lersjo (Sweden) unless otherwise noted as: **Howard Seufer (USA) for Fenton Glassware; ***Courtesy Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney, Australia; tCourtesy the late Don Moore. Abbreviations used relating to production sources AUS BSL CZA ENG ESB EMK EUR FII FDK FDI

Australia Belgium: Val St Lambert Czechoslovakia England: manufacturer unknown England: Sowerby Estonia: Melesk European: manufacturer unknown Finland: Iittala Finland: Karhula Finland: Kauklahti

FRI Finland: Riihimaki HRL Holland: Royal Leerdam SWE Sweden: Eda USD USA: Duggan USDD USA: Dugan/Diamond USF USA: Fenton USI USA: Imperial USM USA: Millersburg USN USA: Northwood n/k not known

NB NOT ALL Scandinavian Source names relate SOLELY to pattern. They CAN relate to particular SHAPES. For example, a bowl and a pitcher in the same pattern might well bear DIFFERENT PATTER NAMES. Be aware

40


Ac-Ar

ACANTHUS (USD Pla £/$750.

moke,

ACORN (USF) Bowl. Blue, £/$250.

ACORN BURRS (USN)" Punch Boiol set: 8 pieces, Marigold, £/$1500.

_ _ _ _ _ _

(AUTUMN) ACORN (USF) 8" Bowl, Blue, EIS125 (+25% for 3/1 zvorked candy edge)

AUTUMN ACORN (USF) Bowl in Persian Blue, value not available. P/iufti courtesy the late Don Moore USA

ALEXANDER FLORAL (FRO, aka FIELD THISTLE, pattern also found in other countries. Blue Pitcher HS2250 and Tumbler E/S650.

AMERIKA (SWE). Stubby footed small Bowl. Extremely rare iridised Milk Glass, Marigold', £/$3000.

AFRICAN SHIELD (ESW) Mustard jar and Top, Marigold only known, £/$150.

APPLE BLOSSOM TWIGS (USDD)** 7Y," Bowl, circa 1910-15, Atnethyst, rare, value unknown. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Gloss Museum.

APPLE PANELS (USD) panelled Sugar, Marigold, £/$55. Same value for Creamer.

ARCS (USD Bowl, exterior pattern to STAR OF DAVID, £/$175.

41

ARGYLE (HRL) stemmed Cake Plate, Marigold only known, E/S110.


As-Be

ASTRID (SWE) Bo-wl, Marigold £l$350.

AUSTRALIAN PANELS (AUS, Crown Crystal Glassworks), Sugar, 2-handled, Black Amethyst, £/$450.

ATHENA (SWE) Bowl (shallow), external pattern, Blue base, £/$250.

AUSTRALIAN CRYSTAL CUT (AUS) Compote, Black Amethyst, £/$650.

BASKETWEAVE (USN) as exterior to WISHBONE Bowl on Green. £/$350 add25% for 3/1 ruffled edge. BEADED BASKET (USD) twohandled, Amethyst, £/$125.

NORTHWOOD BASKET (USN) off-beat colour, Sapphire Blue, £/$400. Photo courtesy the late Don Moore USA

BEADED CABLE (USN) footed Candy Bowl, Amethyst, exterior pattern, £/$100.

BEADED CRYSTAL AND RAYS (EUR) small Bold, Marigold only seen, £/$45. IMPERIAL BASKET(USI) off-beat colour, Clambroth Opal,£/$250. photo courtesy the late Don Moore USA

42

BEADED SPEARS (fain, India, though found in Australia) Tumbler, Marigold, £/$100.


Be-Bi

BEADS AND DIAMONDS (HRL) Butter Dish base only, Marigold only known on clear £/S65 with lid.

BEARDED BERRY (USF) exterior to PETER RABBIT BOWL. No valuation available.

BEARDED BERRY (USF)". Exterior to PETER RABBIT boivl. Photo courtcfiif Fenton Art Glass Museum

Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum

(FROLICKING) BEARS Spittoon. International Carnival Glass Association Souvenir (ICGA), Award reproduction Spittoon on red, Elkhart 1982, as noted on piece, t/%265. BEAUTY BUD (USD) Marigold on clear, £/$65.

BEAUTY BUD TWIGS (USD) Vase, very rare in miniature, Amethyst, £/$800.

Vase,

BELL AND ARCHES (USD) Bowl, Marigold, £/$265.

BERLIN (SWE) Bowl, blue base, £/$650. BIRDS AND CHERRIES (USF)* Bowl, Blue base, E/SSOO. Photo courtcsif of Fenton Art Gfoss Museum

Left: BIRD WITH GRAPES large Wall Vase, manufacturer not known. Marigold on clear, E/S145 (smaller version £/$95).

Right: SINGING BIRDS (USN) Tumbler, (shown with PASTEL SWAN). On rare Ice Green, £/$300 (Green E/S80).

43


Bl-Bu

BLACKBERRY (USN) Compote on three legs, Amethyst, £/$250.

(WILD) BLACKBERRY (USF) Bowl, Green £/$225 (+25% for crimped edge). BLACKBERRY BLOCK (USF)" Marigold, Pitcher £/$400, Tumbler £/$48. Photo courtesy of Fenton Art Class Museum

BLUEBERRY (USF)" Marigold, Pitcher £/$850, and Tumbler £/$75. BORDER PLANTS (USD)** Compote Bowl on short stem base, Peach Opal £/$275. Add 25% for ruffled edge. Photo courtesy the late Don Moore USA

BORDERED PENDANT (TDK) Tumbler. Catalogue No 4016, extremely rare, with 4 section mould, Blue £/$400. Photo courtesy Karhula laslmuseo.

BOULE & LEAVES (USN) aka BULLS EYE AND BEADS. Deep Bowl on collar base, Green, £/$250.

BOUQUET (USF)** Water Pitcher and Tumbler on blue base. Pitcher £/$500+, Tumbler £/$100+.

BOWMAN (SWE) Bowl, named at source. Deep Bowl in Marigold, £/$150. Known as NUTMEG GRATER in UK. .

Photo courtesy of Fenton Art Class Museum.

BROKEN ARCHES (USD Punch Bowl and base in Marigold. Punch set £/$300. Tumbler each £/$50.

BROOKLYN BRIDGE (USD) Bowl, Marigold, unlettered £/$250. For lettered version add 25%.

44

BUTTERFLIES (USF) Bou-Bon, two-handled, Green, £/$150.


BUTTERFLY & BERRY (USF) 10" footed Bowl, Green, £[$175. BUTTERFLY & BOWER (AUS)"*. Crown Crystal Glassworks with BROKEN CHAIN exterior, Deep Bowl in Marigold, £/$350. BUTTERFLY & BELLS (AUS) aka CHRISTMAS BELLS Compote, in Black Amethyst, £/$3000.

BUTTERFLY & TULIP (USD)". Master Bowl with internal pattern and squared-off shape. Purple £/$1000+. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Class Museum.

CANDLESTICKS OBSIDIAN on rare Jet base glass (not Black Amethyst), £/$200 each.

BUTTON & HOB (ESB) Bowl, on rare Ice Blue base. £/$200+.

CAROLINA DOGWOOD (US Westmoreland) Bowl, on rare Blue Opal £/S225. CAR VASE, manufacturer known, Marigold only, £/$50.

not

Photo courtesy the late Don Moore USA

CHARLIE (SWE) Urge Bowl, Blue £/$450, Marigold £/$250.

CHERRY (USM) Milk Pitcher, circa 1910, extremelyrare. Green, £/$2000. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum

CHATELAINE (USDD) Pitcher, Purple, £/$1000+

Water

Photo courtesy the late Don Moore USA

45

CHERRY (USD) Bowl, on three legs, Red base, £/$3000+.


Ch-Cl '~^~N^J.

4 _

CHERRY (USD) 8" Bowl, Peach Opalescent, £/$250. CHERRY (USM) Sugar and Creamer set. Green, £/$160 each.

CHERRIES AND BLOSSOM (USF)** Blue, Pitcher £/$250, Tumbler £/$85.

CHERRY CHAIN (USF) 6" Bowl, on very rare Red base, £/$3500+.

(ENAMELLED)CHERRIES (USF) Tumbler, on Blue base, £/S75.

CHRYSANTHEMUM (USF) footed Master bowl on Blue base £/$700.

CHRYSANTHEMUM (USF) Embroidered Mums 8" Bowl, ruffled, Blue, £/$700.

CHRISTMAS Compote, rare in Marigold £/$5000+ Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum

Plioto courtesy Fenton Art Class Museum

CHUNKY (ESW) shallow Bozvl, Blue (rare colour) £/$250. CHUNKY (ESW) tivo-tier Fruit Bowl on metal stand. Known only itt Marigold £/$200.

46

CLASSIC ARTS (CZA/FRD Rose Bozvl, Marigold only to date with green stained frieze. £/$450.


Cl-Cr

CLEVELAND (USM) Commemorative Memorial Tray, Amethyst. E/S8000+.

COBBLESTONES (USD 8" Bowl, Amethyst, £/$350.

COIN DOT (USF) Bozvl, on rare Pastel Green base, £/$350.

COOKIE (USD Plate with central handle, pattern akin to VINTAGE Smoke, E/S300. CONCORD LATTICE (USF)** Bowl, Amethyst. E/S400, add 25% for handworked edge. Picture courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

CORN VASE souvenir, HOACGA (USA).IceBlue,6"+,£/S80.

COSMOS & CANE, US Glass, (USA) 5" Bowl, Marigold. E/S45. Similar designs in Sweden and Germany.

COVERED HEN (ESW). Butter and Lid, Marigold, £/$125.

CORN VASE offbeat base colour rarity in Ice Green with Marigold overlay, E/S300+.

COVERED SWAN (ESW). Butter and Lid, Marigold, £/$150.

Photo courtesy the late Don Moore USA

CRACKLE (USD Water Set, Pitcher and 6 Tumblers. Set value E/S300.

47


Cr-Da

CROSS HATCH (England, probably ESW) stemmed Sugar Bowl, Marigold, E/S55.

CROW (AUS) Bowl aka MAGPIE, 8 scallop sides, on Black Amethyst, £/$450.

CRACKLE (USl/Scandinavia). single Epergne, Marigold only, £/$125.

CUT ARCHES (FRD Banana Boat Shape, Marigold, £/$275.

CROW (AUS) Bowl smaller size to above right, on Black Amethyst, £/$380.

DAGNY(SWE) Vase, aka CURVED STAR, Marigold, Plain rim £/$400, Flared rim, £/$480. CYNTHIA (ESW) Tall Vases. Prices per pair Turned in rim: fet Glass £/$3600 Flared top on fet Glass £/$3600

DAINTY Goblet (Indiana, USA) New Carnival Glass goblet, deep green-blue base, £/$45.

DAISY SPRAY (SWE) Vase, Blue, £/$460 (+25% for flared rim). DAISY & PLUME (USN/ USDD). Rose Bowl on 3 legs, external to BLACKBERRY, Amethyst £/$125 DAISY SPRAY (SWE), shallow Bowl, Wliite Pearl, £/$2500+.

48


De-Di

DECORATED CARNIVAL No 1 (USF)** Water Set, Catalogue No 1014, Blue, Pitcher and 6 Tumblers £/$3000+. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Class Museum

DECORATED CARNIVAL No 2 (USF)** Water Set, Catalogue No 1016, Pitcher and 6 Tumblers £/$3000+ (speculative).

DIAMANT (SWE) Bonbonniere with Lid, Blue, only one known. £/$5000+.

DIAMOND & WEDGES (SWE) large Bowl, Blue, E/S480. DIAMONDS (USM) Amethyst Water Pitcher, £/$350, Tumbler £/$100.

DIAMOND DAZZLER (EUR) stubby Pitcher, (no tumblers seen to date). Marigold, £/$65.

HEAVY DIAMONDS (AUS) large Float Bowl with Central Frog, Black Amethyst, E/S650+. DIAMOND LACE (USD small 5" Bowl, External pattern, Amethyst, £/$110.

MITRED DIAMONDS & PLEATS (ESB). Smalt two-handled Pin Dish, often found with Sowerby Peacock Head Trademark, Marie-old on Clear, £/$35.

DIAMOND PRISMS. (EUR) Compote on stem, Amber base £/$125.

DIANA (SWE/AUS) Crystal Bowl with Intaglio iridised base pattern, probably sent from Eda Sweden for later iridisation in Australia, £/$350. STIPPLED DIAMOND SWAG, (EUR), Compote on stem, Marigold, £/$55, aka SWATHE ' & DIAMONDS

49


Di-El

DIVING DOLPHINS (ESW) Bowl on 3 elaborate dolphin legs, flared top, Amethyst, £/$280. For straight sides (variant) add 25%. Interior shows SCROSS EMBOSS pattern.

DIVING DOLPHINS (ESW) Bowl as left, Internal scroll embossed pattern shown.

DRAGON AND LOTUS (USF)* Bowl on rare Red base, £/$2000+. ExFenton Art Glass Museum . DRAGON AND LOTUS (USF)** Ruffled edge Boivl as Butler Bros Catalogue 1913, on rare Topaz base, £/$2000+.

DOGWOOD SPRAYS (USD) Compote, crimped edge, domed base. Peach Opalescent, £/$180 (+25% for crimped rim).

DRAGON AND STRAWBERRY (USF) Bowl, Marigold, £/$650.

Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum

DRAPERY (USN) Rose Bowl, small Amethyst, £/$145.

DREIBUS (USN)** Advertising Dish with one side upturned as a grip. Amethyst, £/$450.

DRAGON'S TONGUES (USF) Lampshade, on Milk Glass base, Catalogue Number 230 Circa 1914, £/$75.

EGG AND DART (EUR) Stubby Candlestick/Fruit Dish,£/$35. EDSTROM (SWE). Banana Boat shape Bowl, Catalogue No 2411 (1929), Blue, £/$850.

50

(ATLANTIC CITY) ELK (USF)** Bowl, Blue, £/$2000+.Ex-Fenton Art Glass Museum.


El-Fa

EMU (AUS)*** Cake Dish on stem, Marigold on clear, E/S650. (TWO EYED) ELK (USM) Bowl, 1910, Amethyst, £/$1250.

EMU (AUS)*** Boiol on rare Aqua base, E/S2500+.

ENAMELLED CLEMATIS (CZA/ EUR) Wine Set, decanter and 6 small goblets partly decorated. £/$600 set.

ENGLISH HOBSTAR (EUR) oval Bowl in metal basket with handle over. Marigold on clear, £/$65.

FANLIGHT (EUR), Double Candlestick, Marigold, £/$65.

FAN (USD) Sauce Boat in Peach Opalescent, £j$175.

FACETS (ENG) large Fruit set Master Bowl with 6 small bowls. Marigold on Clear £/$150 Set.

FARMYARD (USD)** 10" Bowl, Amethyst, E/S8000+.

^-sB^ FANS (ENG) Water Set, the only known English Water Set to date. Pitcher and six tumblers, Marigold, £/$350.

FANTAIL(USF)**. Three-toed Bowl, Blue, E/S280+.

51


Fe-Fl

FEATHER AND HEART (L1SM)* Water Pitcher. Green,£/$2000+.

FILE (USD small Boiol, exterior pattern. Amethyst, £/$40.

FENTONIA (USF)** Water Set. Blue, Pitcher £1000/£/$1000, tumbler £/$75.

FILE (ESB) small Nappy with exterior FILE pattern with Sowerby Trademark Peacock. Marigold on Clear, £/$35.

FERN (USN) Compote on fine stem, Green, £/$85.

FINE CUT OVALS (USM)** Bowl, Green, exterior pattern here to WHIRLING LEAVES. £/$350. Photo courtesy the late Don Moore USA

FIRCONE (USF) Amethyst, £/$100.

small

Bowl,

(LITTLE) FISHES (USF) small 5" Bowl on three legs, Blue, £/$125.

FIRCONES (FRO Water Set, Blue. Rare limited production. Riihimaki Model No 5161. Pitcher £/$2060, Tumbler £/$100. Possibly also made at FD1, Finland.

FLORAL AND GRAPE (USF)** Water Set variant (NB: number of petals in daisies/direction of ribs in band) Blue, Pitcher £/$300 Tumbler £/$70. Add 25% for variant and 10% for crimped top. Picture courtesy Fenton Art Class Museum.

52

FISH BOWL (EUR) shallow Bowl with Intaglio Fish in base. Iridised all over £/$55, Fish only iridised, £/$45

(ENAMELLED)FLOWERS (USF) small Bowl, Marigold on Peach Opalescent, E/S425.


Fl-Fo

FLOWERS & FRAMES (LISDD) footed Bowl, Purple here, E/S450+.

(FOUR)FLOWERS (SWE). This is on very thin Pastel Blue glass, worked-edge. No THUMBPRINTS exterior, nor flowers between crab daws. E/S3000+.

(FORMAL) FLOWERS Creamer, origin not known, Marigold on clear, £/$65.

(FOUR) FLOWERS (LISA/Scand). This version from Eda Sweden. Shallow Bowl/Plate, Emerald Green base glass, THUMBPRINTS exterior and flowers between crab claws.

(FOUR) FLOWERS (SWE/poss FR1) Bowl with THUMBPRINTS exterior and flowers between crab claws on rare Pastel Yellow base £/$3000+.

(FOUR) FLOWERS (USD) small shallow Bowl on Peach Opalescent base. No exterior pattern, no flowers between crab claws. E/S200.

(LITTLE) FLOWERS (USF) 9" Bowl, Marigold, E/S125.

FOUR-SEVEN-FOUR Pitcher, Marigold, E/%225.

(TWO) FLOWERS (USF) Bowl on spat feet, Marigold, £/$130. FOOTED PRISMS (ESW?) Vase, found at Brockwitz, Germany, (1931 Catalogue), Blue, E/S800+.

53

(USD


Fo-Go

FREEHAND (Modern UK). Blue base glass, £/$160. FROSTED BLOCK (USD Compote and 6" Bowl, Clambroth, £/$85 each.

FOUR SIDED TREE TR LINK (EUR) Vase, Marigold on Clear, £/$160.

_

I

~*~1jf - . _ FRUITS & FLOWERS (USN). variant of THREE FRUITS, twin handled Bon-Bon, Blue, £/$400.

(TWO) FRUITS (USF). Divided Bowl (four sections), Amethyst, £/$280.

FRUIT SALAD (USA, Wesfmorc/(?»,,) Puwci. Bozo/ set and cups, rare Peach Opal, £/$6000+ (Bowl and 6 Mugs) speculative

GARLAND (USF) Deep Bowl on three legs, Green, £/$95. GAY NINETIES (USM) Tumbler, Marigold £/$200. Photo Courtesy the late Don Moore USA

GARDEN PATH (FRD Boivl with internal pattern on Rio (Pink) glass base with CRACKLE exterior. £/$400+.

GOOD LUCK(USN) Bowl on collar base, worked edge with STIPPLE RAYS, exterior, blue, £/$1800. GLADER (aka STAR AND FAN) (S WE), Bowl on collar base, Marigold £/$300.

GODDESS OF THE HARVEST (USF)** Bozol with edge frill. Very rare in USA. Amethyst, £/$10,000+ (speculative).

54


Go-Gr

GRAPE ARBOR (USD) Master Bowl, interior view. Northivood also made a pitcher with the same name.

GRAPE ARBOR (USD) Bowl, exterior view.

Master

GOLDEN HARVEST (USD Decanter and Stopper, Marigold on clear, £/$100.

GRAPE & CABLE (USN) 3-Toed Bowl, on rare Celeste Blue, £/$1500+

GRAPE & CABLE (USN). Fernery shape Bowl, 3 curled legs, Marigold, E/S150. Add 25% for straight sided

Photo courtesy the tale Don Moore USA

GRAPE & CABLE (USN) Butter and Lid, Purple, £/$175.

(HEAVY) GRAPE (USD. Plate, Helios Green, £/$125.

small

(HELIOS) GRAPE Helios Green, E/S85.

(USD

GRAPEVINE LATTICE (USD) small Bowl, Clear on frosted glass, £/$200.

(VINTAGE) GRAPE (USD) i Bozvl on rare Red base, £/$2000+.

(IMPERIAL) GRAPE (USD Punch Bowl Set, Helios Green, £/$600.

55

GRAVEYARD SPHERE (ESW). Not for public sale. Commemorates a death in 1918. Made before era of Eda Lustre Ware Production. Not on sale market.


Gr-Ha

GREEK KEY (USN) Bowl, with Bronze iridescence over Green, £/$200. Add 25% for frilled pie-crust edge.

GREEK KEY AND SCALES (USN). Compote on short stem here as exterior pattern, plain interior, Green, £/$190. GREEK KEY & SUNBURST (poss Dutch) Vase with pedestal base and tzoo handles. Marigold, £/$150.

HAMBURG (SWE). Named at source, aka RANDEL VARIANT. Banana Boat shape Boiol, Blue, £/$4000.

GRETA (HRL) Milk fug from Royal Leerdam Catalogue, Marigold on clear, £/$35.

HAND VASE (EUR). Pair of Vases with watch on hand, Marigold on clear, £/$450-£500 each. Also similar by JAIN, India

V-atl*, ^ * ^ e * * t - . > e _ ^

HANS (probably HRL) small Compote on stem, mirror-like high Selenium finish.Pale Gold on clear, £/$85.

HAZEL Vase, manufacturer not knoion, though found at Eda Sweden, Marigold on clear, £/$350.

HAND VASE (CZA). on Camphor Glass iridised all over Green base, no watch on wrist of hand. £/$600.

HEARTS & FLOWERS (USN) Bowl, rare Ice Blue, £/$1200.

56


He-Ho

HEARTS & FLOWERS (USN) Plate, very rare in this colour, Green, £/$2500+. HEADDRESS (SWE). large Bowl interior pattern to CURVED STAR, ground edge to collar base, also used inverted as Punch bowl top to Inverted stemmed sugar. Blue E/S225.

HEARTS & FLOWERS (USN)**. Tall-footed compote, on very rare Ice Blue, £/$1200. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

HEARTS & TREES (USF)". Master Bozvl on three knob feet, internal pattern with BUTTERFLY & BERRY, Marigold, £/$600. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum

HEARTS & HORSESHOES (USF) Bowl, Green, very rare, £/$2000+.

HEART & VINE (USF)** 9" Plate, with central space for advertising. If centre has a Horseshoe then it becomes the rare HEARTS & HORSESHOES pattern. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Class Museum

(JEWELLED) HEART (USD) aka LATTICE & HEART Wltiinsey Plate with 8 steeeply raised delicate points to bowl edge. External pattern only to this bozvl, E/S3000+.

(STREAM OF) HEARTS (USF)** Compote on clear stem with double crimped edge and PERSIAN MEDALLIONS exterior, Marigold, £/$3000+.

HEAVY CUT (FRI) Giant Orange Bowl, Marigold, £/$125.

Photo courtesy of Fenton Art Glass Museum

HOBNAIL BANDED (EMK) Tumblers, Marigold E/S200, Blue £/$400.

HERRINGBONE & IRIS, (Jeanette USA) Water Set, Depression Ware, Marigold on Clear. Pitcher £/$200, Tumblers £/S75 each.

HOBNAIL (USM) Rose Bowl, Amethyst, E/S400.

57


Ho-Il

(SWIRLED) HOBNAIL (USM)* Rose Bowl, Amethyst, £/$500.

HOBSTAR & CUT TRIANGLES (ESW) large shallow Bowl, Amethyst, £/$265.

HOBSTAR & TASSELS (USD small Bowl, Amethyst, E/S280.

(CARNIVAL) HOLLY (USF) Bozvl on rare Red base £/$1500+. HOBSTAR & FEATHERS(USM)** Giant Rose Bowl, 8'/" high, Amethyst, £/$3500+.

HOBSTAR FLOWERS (USN) Compote, Lime Green, £/$450.

Photo courtesy Fenton Art Class Museum

HONEYCOMBE & CLOVER (USF) 10" Bowl exterior to FEATHERED SERPENT, Marigold, £/$150, Blue £/$180. HOLLY SPRIG (USF) small Hat shape Bowl, Green, E/S200. HOLLY & BERRY (USD) small bowl, Amethyst, £/$165.

ILLUSION (USF). Bon-Bon, £/$125.

HORSES HEADS (USF) (close up) aka HORSES MEDALLIONS, footed Bowl, Blue, £/$250.

IDYLL (USF)** vase with WATERL1LY & CATTAILS. Rare to find, Marigold, £/$850. Photo courtesy of Fenton Art Glass Museum

58

two-handled


In-Ko

IRIS (USF) Compote on stent, Green, £/$85.

JET BLACK BEAUTY (FRI) shallow bowl/plate zvith two open handles, eight-sided on rare Jet base, Art Deco style, akin to Fostoria (USA) design, E/S2600+.

INGA (SWE) Vase fine blowmoulded and acid etched, Marigold, £/$400. _ _ _ _ _ i KANGAROO (AUS) 5" Bozvl, frilled edge zvork, Marigold, £/$325. JULIANA (EMK) Vase zvith flared top, on Blue-base, E/S800+.

KAREN (S WE) deep Bozvl, Pale Blue base, £/$650+.

KINGFISHER (AUS). Crown Crystal Glass Co Sydney, 11" Bowl, Mould No Rd418.4~ Marigold, £/$550. Photo courtcsu Museum Applied Arts & Sciences Sydney.

/ETTA (FRI) tall Vase, Art Deco style on Jet base glass, E/S2000+. KITTENS (USF) Saucer. Marigold, E/S225 for Cup with Saucer.

KINGFISHER (AUS)*** 9" Bozvl, variant of Kookaburra, on Black Amethyst zvith handworked edge, E/S650+. This has a ruffled edge.

KOHINOOR (ENG)akaBEVELLED DIAMONDS & BEADS shallow Bozvl Marigold, E/S35.

59

KIWI (AUS)***. 2 small Compotes with SCROLL & DAISY exterior. Black Amethyst £/$450, Marigold E/S350.


Ko-Lo

KOKOMO (ENG) shallow thre footed Bozvl, Marigold, £/$40.

KOOKABURRA (AUS)*" Bozol 9" with stippled centre, on Black Amethyst, £/$850. KULOR(SWE)Vase,extremelyrarc on Milk Glass E/S3000+. Add 25% for flared out top.

LAGERKRANTZ (SWE). Excatalogue source, Bonbonniere zoith lid, very rare piece, Blue, £/$4000+.

LATTICE AND GRAPE (USF)** Water Set, Catalogue 1912, Blue, value not known very rare. LEAF AND BEADS (USN/USD) Rose Bozvl on le^s, Ice Green Opal, £/$2500.

LEAF CHAIN (USF) 7" Bozvl, soft pale Marigold zvith collar base, E/S125. LEAF CHAIN (USF) Bozol, Blue, £/$125.

LILY OF THE VALLEY (USF)* Water Pitcher, Blue, £/$8000+. Picture courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

LION (USF) 7" Bowl, Blue zvith BERRY &LEAF CIRCLE exterior pattern, £/$400. LONDON (SWE). named at source, aka QUILLS & PANELS, Bozvl, Marigold, £/$165.

60


Lo-Me

LONG HOBSTAR (USD Punch Bozvl and Base, Marigold, £/$400.

LOTUS & GRAPE (USF) Bonbonniere zvith tzvo handles Marie/old, £/$85.

LOUISA, (Jeanette, USA, Floragold range) Water Set, Depression Ware, set 7 pieces, Marigold, E/S350.

MARTHA (UK) Marigold, £/$75.

Compote,

MAPLE LEAF (USD), 4" short stemmed Compote, Amethyst, £/$55. MAGDA (FRI) pair of Candlesticks, blozv moulded, rare Ice Blue, pair E/S1600.

MARY ANN (USD) 3 twin-handled Vases, Marigold £100/£/$100, Amethyst £250/£/S250. A very rare three-handled version zvas also made. See Loving Cup page 19 for a similar type of vase

MARILYN (USM)** Water Pitcher, Amethyst, highly prized in USA, E/S3000+.

MATCHBOX HOLDER Marigold, £J$85, rare.

(FRL)

MAUD (SWE) shallow Bozvl, ex Eda catalogue, Blue, E/S800.

MAYAN (USM) shallow Green, £/$200. MEMPHIS (USN) Punch Bozvl and Base, Marigold, E/S500 (including 6 cups).

Bozol,

MEYDAM (HRL) Cake Plate on central stem, Marigold only known, high iridescence E/S165.

61


Mi-Ni

MIKADO (USF) massive Cherry Compoite, Marigold, £/$700. MILADY (USF)** Water Set, Catalogue No 1110, in Marigold, Pitcher £/$1250, Tumbler E/S85.

MITRED DIAMONDS & PLEATS (ESB) Bozol, Marigold £/$45: (and see small pin tray under DIAMONDS & PLEATS):

MOLLER (S WE) named ex catalogue, large Bozol, Blue, £/$800. Flared out shape to rim +25%

MORNING GLORY (USM)" Water Set, Marigold, Pitcher £/$10,000+, Tumbler £/$l 000+. One of the rarest sets. MOONPRINT (Scaud) Creamer/ Sugar, Marigold, £/$65. Also manufactured as a pattern in USA/UK/ URL/Germany.

MY LADY (possibly Davidsons, England) Powder Bozvl, and Lid, Marigold on Clear, £/$85. NAUTILUS (USD) Shell Shaped Bozol using old Northwood mould. Peach Opalescent, £/$300.

NANTIA (SWE) small Plate, in Eda catalogue, Marigold on clear, £/$300.

NIPPON (USN) shallow Bozvl, zvith PEACOCKS TAILS as interior pattern, clearfrosted (White),£/$250.

NANNA (SWE) Vase, named at source. Marigold on Clear, £/$300.

62


No-Ow

NUTMEG GRATER SET (SWE/& others), Marigold, Butter and lid £43/£/$65, stemmed Creamer £/$30, stemmed Sugar £/$45. NORA (EMK), Vase, £/$145. Courtesy

OCTET (USN) 8" Bozvl, zvith exterior pattern NORTHWOOD VINTAGE, Amethyst, E/S250.

Estonian sources, see acknowledgements.

OLIVIA (possibly Val St Lambert Belgium), Giant 22" Bozvl, zoith wide open tulip edge on fine glass, Marigold on Clear, £350/£/$350. Akin to COLUMBIA pattern, USA OLGA (SWE) Bozvl, zvith Ground Collar base, Marigold on clear, £/$200.

ORANGETREE (USF) Punch Bozvl and base, Amethyst. £/$450.

ORANGE TREE (USF) Hatpin Holder, Blue based, £/$400.

ORANGE TREE (USF)** Water Set variant, ex 1911 catalogue, Deep Blue, Pitcher £/$1000+, Tumbler E/S150.

ORANGE TREE ORCHARD (USF)** Water Pitcher, Blue,£/$350.

ORNATE BEADS (FDK). Tzvo Candlesticks, four-section mould, Catalogue No 4863. Blue base, £/$800 each. Photo courtesy Karluilii Museum, Finland.

ORIENTAL (Far East Reproduction Carnival from China). Ginger Jar zoith lid, blozvn iridised Marigold on clear, £j$45.

OWL (EUR) Money Box. Marigold on Clear, £/$85.

63


Pa-Pe • .'•:

• • • ' •• ::

PALM BEACH (USD) Rose Bozvl, zvith turned in lip, Marigold, E/S100, (£/$200 zvith internal pattern GOOSEBERRY). PANELLED SUGAR (AUS)***. Crown Crystal Glass Sydney, left: Black Amethyst zvith diamond pancllinv,,£/S200; right: Marigold on Clear, zvith oblong pannelling E/S100.

PANELLED DANDELION (USF)** Water Set, Butler Bros Cat 1910, Amethyst, Price not known as rare but over £/$l000 set.

PANELS & THUMBPRINTS (USD) Compote, Amethyst, £/$85.

Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

(AUSTRALIAN) PANSY (AUS)"* small crystal Bozvl inset iridised base, believed sent from Eda Szoeden to Australia where base zvas iridised. Iridised only in base, zvith INTAGLIO zvith Pansy, £/$450.

PANTHER (USF). 10" Master Bozvl on three knob legs, blue, E/S1500+. PEACH & PEAR (USD) Banana Boat Shape, Amethyst, £/$145.

PANSY (USD Nappy, on Clear White, frosted. This is an Imperial later reproduction colour, £/S85 zvith QUILT exterior pattern.

PEACOCK & DAHLIA (USF) Bozvl, reverse side shozon, rare Ice Blue, £/$2500+. PEACOCK & GRAPE (USF) Bozvl zvith spatula feet, on rare Amberina base, £/$1250. PEACOCK & DAHLIA (USF) Bozvl, rare Ice Blue, £/$2500+.

64


Pe

PEACOCK & GRAPE (USF) Bozvl on rare Vaseline base, Marigold iridescence, E/S800+.

PEACOCK & URN (USF)" Compote, crimped edge, 1915 catalogue, Marigold on rare Aqua. Price not known. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

PEACOCK & URN (USF) Bozol, on Collar base. A one-off experimental piece. Marigold iridescence on reverse, over external BEARDED BERRY pattern. On rare Moonstone (semi opaque white) E/S5000+. Owned by the author.

PEACOCK & URN (USN) Ice Cream Bozvl, marked 'N', in circle, Cobalt Blue, £/$250. PEACOCK & URN (USF) Plate on rare Persian Blue base. Value not known.

PEACOCK AT THE FOUNTAIN (USN) Tumbler, blue, £/$150.

Photo courtesy the late Don Moore USA

PEACOCK ON THE FENCE (USN)** Plate, rare Ice Blue, Price not known Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

PEACOCK ON THE FENCE (USN) Bozvl, Pastel Frosted on Clear, £/$1400.

PEACOCK ON THE FENCE (USN) Plate, Blue base, £/$850. Photo courtesy the late Don Moor

(STRUTTING)PEACOCK, (Westmoreland USA), Creamer or Sugar, Amethyst, £/$125.

65

PEACOCK ON THE FENCE (USN)" 8" Bozvl, , Marigold on Aqua, £/$2300+. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

PEACOCK TAILS (USF) Bon-Bon with 2 handles, Amethyst, £/$125.


Pe-Pi

PERSIAN GARDEN (USF) Plate, Crimped edge, Blue, £/$2500+. Photo courtesy the late Don Moore (USA).

PERSIAN MEDALLIONS (USF) 8" Bozol, handzoorked edge, Green, £/$450.

PEBBLE & FAN (CZA) Giant 13 " Vase, blozv moulded on Vaseline base £/$2000.

PERSIAN MEDALLIONS (USF)*' Punch Bozol top, value no known. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

PERSIAN MEDALLIONS (USF). 2 stemmed Compotes, Marigold £/$325; Blue £/$425.

PETER RABBIT (USF)" Plate, Cat No 102, circa 1912, on Blue, Bearded Berry exterior, £/$5250. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

PINCHED SWIRL (USD) small Vase, with handzoorked top, Peach oplaescent, £/$300.

PETER RABBIT (USF)". Close up of Plate. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

PIN-UPS (AUS)*** wide flared Bowl, Marigold on clear, here as interior pattern, £/$150. Photo eourtesi/ Fenton Art Glass Museum.

PINEAPPLE ROYAL (EUR) large Vase, Marigold on Clear, £/$45.

PINECONE (USF), 6" Bowl, on Marigold, £/$65, aka FIRCONE (see page 52).

66


Pi-Qu

PLAID (USF) 8" Bozvl, rare Celeste Blue, £/$3000+.

POINSETTIA (USN)** 9" threetoed Bozvl, Blue, base E/S100; aka POINSETTIA & LATTICE. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

PINWHEEL (ESB): small Marigold Vase (6'A"), E/S100; large Amethyst Vase(8"),£/S150.

POND LILY (USF) Bon Bon, clear frosted, E/S85.

POND LILY (USF)** Bon Bon, tzvo handled, ex Cat circa 1923, No 1414, on rare Opaque Blue, E/S4000+. Loaned to Fenton Art Class Museum In/ Mr and Mrs M E Cain.

POINSETTIA (USN) Amethyst E/S1000.

Bozol.

PONY (USD) Bozol, exterior view showing Aqua to picture on left. POPPY SHOW (USN) Plate, Yellozv base glass zvith BASKETWEAVE exterior, E/S3000+.

PONY (USD) Bozvl, very rare Marigold over Aqua, a one-off. E/S2000.

PRISMA (SWE) shallow Bowl, exLyster catalgoue circa 1925, Blue, E/S400.

POWDER BOWL (Bambi) (EUR) zoith lid, Marigold on Clear, £/$85. Similar seen zvith Scottie Dog/My Lady

QUANTUM (SWE) Vase, zoith pinched in top, rare Blue, £/$1000.

67


Qu-Ri

QUARTER BLOCK (ESW) all in Marigold, Creamer, £/$35; Sugar, £/$35; Butter and lid, £/$65. QUANDRY £/$450.

(SWE)

QUATTRO (SWE), Bozvl, named in Sweden, Marigold, E/S300.

Bowl,

QUILTED FANS (FRI), oblong shallow Dish, Iittala Catalogue No 4800, Blue base, rare £/$1500. QUESTION MARKS (USD Compote on short stem, Amethyst, £/$75.

Photo courtesy Suonten Uisimuseo.

QUEENIE (SWE) Bozol akin to QUANDRY but zvith small pattern betzoeen panels, Blue £/$450.

I P

I. .

QUIVER (SWE) Bozol, note star in base, Blue £/$450. Variation on QUANDRY and QUEENIE.

(STIPPLED) RAYS (USN) Bozvl, "N" mark in circle zvithin centre of bozvl. Deep Purple, £/$235. +15% for Northzvood trade mark.

QUINCE (SWE) Water Pitcher, blow moulded, pale iridisation, £/$185. RIBBON SWAGS (USN) Bozol on three legs, WISHBONE exterior, Amethyst, £/$350. +35% for worked RIBBONS & LEAVES (ENG) Dish straight sided with tzvo handles, unusual base pattern, Marigold, £/$65.

REX (SWE) Vase, named at source, rare Milk glass base, E/S5000+. Very rare in Szveden.

68


Ri-Ro

RLBBON SWIRL, giant Cake Plate on short stem .often found in Belgium, (possibly Val St lambert) production. Pattern possibly copy adaptation of COLUMBIA (USD design. Marigold E/S200.

RIBBON TIE (USF) Bozvl, zvith crimped edge, circa 1911, Blue, £/$600.

RIIHIMAKI (FRI) Tumbler with name Riihimaki set proud in the base, exceptionally rare, Blue, E/S3000.

Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

ROSALIND (USM)" 9" 110" Compote, on Diving Dolphins feet, Amethyst £/$450.

RIIHIMAKI (FRI) Tmbler showing base zvith raised name.

Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

ROCCOCO WAVES (USA) Oil Lamp on metal base. Lilac base, soft smoke iridescence over. £/$750

(BASKET OF) ROSES (USD) Bon Bon zoith 2 handles, named by Tom Sprain USA zoith rare stipple worked background, Amethyst, £/$500.

(CAPTIVE) ROSE (USF) Bon Bon, 2 handled, Blue, £/$145.

(CAPTIVE)ROSE (USF) 10" Plate on Blue, £/$850+.

(CIRCLED) ROSE (AUS)*' Crystal Bozvl zvith Intaglio iridised rose in base. Shozvn zvith similar Pansy/Golden Cupid, designs, £/$450+ each.

(OPEN) ROSE (USD footed Bozvl, Amethyst, £/$200.

(FINE CUT AND) ROSES (USN) footed Candy Dish, showing pattern on reverse. Three stubby legs. Amethyst, £/$300.

69


Ro-Sa

(QUILTED)ROSE (EUR), Bozvl on collar base zoith Intaglio rose set in base and Quilt exterior pattern. Marigold on Clear, £/$85

ROSE PANELS (EUR), extra large stemmed Compote, hollow domed, Marigold only known, E/S450.

ROSE SHOW (USN)" Bozvl zvith REEDED BASKETWEAVE exterior, on Aqua Opal, £/$2000+. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum

ROSE WREATH (USD) Rose Bozvl, Marigold, £/$65.

TEXAS ROSE (USD) Bozol zoith domed base, aka Double Stemmed Rose, Amethyst £/$275.

ROSOR (SWE) Vase, named at source, aka Rose Garden/Rose & Diamond (USA) found in 2 sizes (large pictured), Blue base £/$5000. Also found in rare Red non-iridised form.

(WILD) ROSE (USN) footed Bozvl on 3 knob feet, superb tulip open splayed petal edge. There is a variant zvith petal tulipedge upright, not splayed. Amethyst, E/S365.

ROSOR (SWE) large handled Pitcher, Blue, rare, E/S2500+. There is also a Rose Bozol zoith metal grid top.

(WREATH OF) ROSES (USF)** Punch Set zoith PERSIAN MEDALLIONS interior, Blue, rare, £/$1000+ set.

ROWBOAT(ESB) Celery Dish, aka Daisy Block Rozvboat, rare Marigold on Aqua, £/$450. ROUND-UP (USDD) 9" Plate, zoith BIG BASKETWEAVE exterior, Amethyst £/$850. SAILBOATS (USF) small 6" Bozol, Green, £/$85.

70


Sa-Sm

SAILBOATS (USF) Goblet, Marigold, E/S80: Wine Glass, Marigold, £/$60.

SEACOAST Spittoon (USM), here as souvenir repro piece for American Carnh'al Glass Association. Peach Opalescent, £/$125.

SCALE BAND (USF)** Pitcher No 212 circa 1908, Blue, £/$225.

SCROLL EMBOSS (USDS" Bozol, Amethyst, £/$325. This pattern also adopted by Sozoerby UK, and often carries Pineapple as exterior pattern in Marigold only.

SEAWEED (USM)** 10" Bozol, zvith crimped edge, circa 1910, Green £/$500. Add 25% for frilled/ruffled/ piecrust edge. Pliolo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

SEAWEED & CORAL (CZA?) rare Vase on small knob feet, 4 sided blow moulded. On rare Crackle base and decorated zuith Seazoeed, Marigold on Clear, £/$3500+.

(FEATHERED) SERPENT (USF) 10" Bozvl, zvith handzoorked edge, Amethyst, E/S200.

SHELL (USD 9" Bozvl, Amethyst, E/S250, aka SHELL & SAND.

SHRIKE (AUS)*" 6" Bozol, named in Australia, aka THUNDERBIRD, here zvith handzoorked crimped edge, Black Amethyst, E/S300+.

SIX PETALS (USD)" 8" Bozvl, crimped edge, circa 1912, Purple E/S400.

SMALL RIB (USD) fine Rose Bozvl, on clear stem, frilled top. Marigold E/S125.

Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Mu.

71


Sm-St

SMOCKING (Indiana Glass Co, USA). Powder Bozol and Lid, Modern Carnival Glass, . named by Lorna Payne (UK), on Deep Petrel Blue,£/$165.

SMOOTH RAYS PANELS (USD Plate, eight-sided, on Clatnbroth, £/$500+.

SOLDIERS & SAILORS (USF)" Commemorative Tray/Plate 7'/", Blue base, £/$3000+.

SNOW FANCY (McKee, USA) Creamer Set, extra large size Creamer/Sugar, Marigold, £/$125 each.

SONYA (SWE) Bozol on collar base, Rio (Pink) base, £/$325.

SPRINGTIME (USN)", Tea Time Set, all Amethyst, Creamer E/S250, Sugar £/$250, Butter £/$300,

Pitcher E/S880.

Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

SOPHIA (SWE) Vase on 4-sided pedestal based, on soft Amber base, £/$600+.

SPRINGTIME (USN)" Water Set, value not known. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

STAG & HOLLY (USF)" 13" Master Bowl, Green, rare, £/$680. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

SPIRIT OF 76 (USF). Commemorative Plate on Yellozo base, £/$85.

72


St

STAG & HOLLY (USF) small Bozvl on spat feet, rare Red Base, E/S1500+. (CURVED)STAR (SWE), Bozol and inverted Sugar as Punch set, ground base to Sugar, Blue, £/$650.

(DOUBLE) STAR (FDK) small Bozol, interior plain, Blue, £/$425.

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STAR & HOBS (SWE) aka NORTHERN LIGHTS/OREBRO large Banana Boat bozol, Blue, E/S1100.

(MANY)STARS (USM), 10" Bozol zoith crimped edge, cl910, Marigold, E/S350 + 25% for ivorked edge.

(EASTERN) STAR (USD Compote on stem, zoith SODA GOLD interior pattern. £/S325. Riihimaki Finland also used this pattern on Rio (Pink) base.

(CURVED) STAR (SWE), here as DAGNYvase, (factory source), Blue, £/$1200+.

STAR & OVALS (FRI) Creamer, in Riihimaki 1930s Catalogue, Marigold E/S65.

Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum

STAR & FAN (SWE) tall Vase, aka GLADER for some shapes, Blue E/S1200.

(SPINNING) STAR (FDK). Three Vases, flared or turned in lip add 25%. Catalogue Nos 4888/4889. Value Blue E/S850 each.

73


So-St

STAR & STUDS (ESS) Bowl on 3 legs, shallow, splayed on three ,e<;s, Marigold, £/$45.

STARS & PENDANTS (EMK) Compote on stem, Marigold, £/$185. Photo courtesy of an Estonian collector

STARBURST(FRI) Sugar and Milk, Riihimaki Nos 5682/5683. Blue, £/S225 each. STAR & FILE (USD Decanter and Stopper, Marigold, £/$125.

STARBURST MEDALLIONS (EMU Bozvl, Blue, £/$850. Photo courtesy Estonian sources, see acknowledgements.

STARDUST (EMK) small straight sided Bozol, Marigold, £/$185. Photo courtesy Estonian sources, see acknowledgements.

STARBURST & CROWN (EMK) long-stem Compote, Blue, £/$1300. Photo courtesy Estonian sources, sec acknowledgements.

STARFLOWER (USF)** Water Pitcher, three pint, Marigold price not known Photo courtesy Fenton Art Class Museum.

STAR OF DAVID (USD Bowl, Amethyst zoith ARCS exterior. £/$350.

STARLIGHT(EMK)Vase, Marigold, £/$365. Photo courtesy Estonian sources, see acknowledgements.

STAR OF DAVID & BOWS (USN) Bozol, Amethyst, £/$385. STARSTRUCK (SWE) small Bozvl, splayed sides zvith exterior pattern, often ground base. See unusual base star, Blue, £/$750.

74


St-Su

(VERTICAL) STAR PANELS (FDK), Bonbonniere zvith lid, very rare, Blue, E/S3000+.

STORK & RUSHES (USD) Punch Bozvlandbase,akaVASE SUMMERS DAY, Marigold, E/S250 2 piece set.

STIPPLED RAYS (USF) 11" extra large Bozol, squared-off deep pleated sides and deep frilled, Green, £/$1200+.

STJARNA (SWE) Bonbonniere, named at source, extremely rare, Blue, E/S3000+.

STRAWBERRY (USN)** Bi handzoorked piecrust edge, Marigold, £/$285 add 25% for zoorked-ed STRAWBERRY SCROLL (USF) Tumbler No 902, Blue, E/S150.

(WED) STRAWBERRY (USN) small 6" Bozol, one side upturned to handle, amethyst, E/S350. SUMMERS DAY (USD) Vase, see Stork & Rushes Punch Set for details as actually base to Punch Set.

SUNFLOWER (USN) 8" Bozol on spat feet, Green zvith MEANDER as external pattern £/$300.

SUNGOLD (EUR) Plate, shallow zvith ruffled edge and thin glass. Marigold iridised. Described as Siingold by M Hartttng. £/$485.

SUNGOLD FLORAL (EUR) Bozvl handworked frilled edge on very thin glass zvith excellent iridescence, note intricate base star, Marigold, £/$285.

SUNFLOWER & DIAMONDS (SWE) aka SOLOROS: tzoo Vases, each on blue base £/$850.

75


Su-Th

SUNSPRAY Epergne, (origin not knozvn but European), Bozol zoith single eperge, all on a metal base. Bozvl handzoorked, frilled as is Epergne, Marigold. E/S325. Not Sungold Epergne as per Bill Edivards USA.

(NESTING) SWAN (USM) large Bozvl, with DIAMOND AND FAN exterior, Marigold, £/$450.

TEN MUMS (USF)" Water Set, circa 1912, Blue, Pitcher E/S2500, Tumbler £/$30.

SVEA (SWE). Group all Marigold: small Bozvl £/$70, Vase E/S85, small Pin Dish £j$35, oblong shallow Celery £/$65.

SWATHE (EUR) Funeral vase and grid, Iridised on Clear, £/$45.

THISTLE (EUR) Vase, Marie-old on Clear, £/$65.

SWEDISH CROWN (SWE) small Bozol, straight sided, exterior pattern, Blue, £/$650

THISTLE (USF) Bozvl on three feet, Amethyst, £/$275. Add 25% for handzoorked 3/1 ruffled edge.

Photo courtesy Fenton Art Class Museum.

THISTLE (USF) 9" Bozol zvith collar base, Green, E/%255

THISTLE (USF) Banana Boat Shape Bozol on legs, shown here in scarce Blue, £/$850. Interior pattern WATERLILY b CATTAILS.

76

(GOLDEN)THISTLE (SWE?) Pin Tray, square, crystal with iridised intaglio thistle, £/$475.


Variations on Tornado Vases

Large ÂŁ/$825; small ÂŁ/$525. Photo courtesy the late Don Moore USA

Left, rare Pastel Blue zoith stretch finish from a small size vase, value not known - one off. Right, note different top from standard vase, add 25% above standard vases previously noted.

77


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THREE FRUITS (USN). Bon-Bon, twin-handles, Green E/S365.

TIGER LILY (EMK) Water Pitcher. Piece confirmed from Estonia, Melesk factory. Blue £/$2000+. Similar also produced in USA (USD and Szveden (EDA) and in Finnish factories often on RIO base glass. TREE TRUNK (USN) Vase, mid size, shozon here in Amethyst £/$425. TOFFEE BLOCK Pitcher, source not known, Marigold, large size £/$150, small size £/$100.

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TROUT AND FLY (USM) Bozvl, highly sought after, Green £/$850.

TOKYO (SWE) Bozvl zvith reverse Szoastika (symbol of Spring) found in base, blue £/$3500.

TRIO (S WE ill Eda Catalogue) Large Shallozo Bozvl, exterior pattern, note Star in base, Blue £/$650.

TURKU (FRI) early Commemorative Ashtray on Rio (Pink) base glass. Inscription reads: 'Jubilee of 1229-1929 of the City of Turku. A souvenir made by O. Y. Riihimaki', £/$800 (speculative). TULIP AND CORD (FRD Mug zvith handle, superb mould zoork, ExRiihimaki Cat No 5150, Marigold, £/$2000+. Photo courtesy Suomen Ijisimuseo. rr.s.

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UNA (S WE, in EDA catalogue) Deep Bowl, external geometric pattern, Marigold, £/$300. (REGAL) TULIP (EUR) Vase on 6sided Pedestal base, highly iridised Marigold, £/$285. TWINS (USD 5" Bowl (small), Marigold on Clear, £/$35.

78


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VINLOV (SWE, named at source) Banana Boat Shape Large Bozvl, often partly iridised only, Amethyst, £/$3000+.

VERA (SWE) Vase, round collared pedestal base, Blue, £/$1250+.

VINING LEAF, origin not known, Perfume Bottle and stopper zvith 6 sided pedestal base, Marigold on Clear, E/S265.

VINTAGE (USF) Bozol on rare Red base, £/$2250+.

VINTAGE (USF) Bozol on rare Celeste Blue base, value not known. Photo courtesy the late Don Moore USA

VINTAGE LEAF (USF) 8 " Bozol on collar base, external pattern, Amethyst, E/S125.

WATER LILY (USF)" 6" footed Bozvl, No 1807 from 1915 catalogue, on rare Amber base, value unknown. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Class Museum.

WATERL1LY & CATTAILS (USF) Banana Boat Shape Bozol, exterior to THISTLE. Refer to latter for values.

WAFFLE BLOCK (USD Punch Bozol top and base, Marigold, E/S200 set.

WATERLILY ty DRAGONFLY (AUS)** shallow 10" Bozvl, Marigold on Clear, E/S650. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum

WHIRLING LEAVES (USM)** 9" Bozvl, here on frosted zohite base, exterior pattern to Fine Cut & Ovals, £/$400.

WHITE PITCHER (USDD)* Crystal Pitcher, circa 1912, rare, value not known. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Museum.

79

WICKERWORK (ESB) Tripod Base and Plate with Peacock head trademark. Iridised Marigold, £/$500


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WICKERWORK (SWE). Group: 3 tripod bases and a non-iridised blanc-de-lait set of base and plate. Marigold base and plate (straight or curved edge) £/$400; blanc-de-lait non-iridised (base and top) both bear the EDA Eagle mark £/$6000.

WINDFLOWER Blue, £/S225.

(USD)

WIDE PANELS (USD Punch Bozvl set, here as exterior pattern to HEAVY GRAPE. Also found as exterior pattern to BLACKBERRY WREATH, Amethyst, £/$425.

Bozvl, WINDMILL (Variant) aka DOUBLE DUTCH (USD Bozol zvith collar base, Clambroth, £/$85.

ZIG-ZAG (USM) Bozvl, three cornered with 3/1 handzoorked edge, Amethyst, £/$1000.

YORK (SWE, named at source, and in EDA catalogue) tall Vase zoith flared top. Marigold on Clear, £/$425.

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WILLS GOLD FLAKE (ENG) Ashtray. The only knoion advertising piece for the English market, rare, Marigold on Clear, £/$225.

WISHBONE (USN) Bozvl on three legs, zvith RIBBON SWAGS exterior, Green, £/$350. Add 25% for handworked edge.


Tall size Compote

Water Pitcher and Tumbler

81


QUILT,&STAR(shortcrvase)oftwo Vases) Blue base £/$850, from Riihimaki Finland No 5934. STIPPLE & STAR, (taller vase), No 5911. E/S1250.

FOUR CROWNS plate, Pale Marigold, Karhula Finland, Catalogue No 4268 £/$300. QUILTED PANELS tumbler, beaker in Marigold, three mould sections No 4020 (1926) £/$330.

Photo courtesy Suomen Lasimuseo

Photo courtesy Suomen htsimuseo

iz0*% STORK & RUSHES Tumbler (USD), £/$38. GRAPE & CABLE Tumbler, £/$75. SODA GOLD Tumbler (USD, £/$85; TIGER LILY (USD, £/$75. SINGING BIRDS (USN), £/$50; all in Marigold. RIIHIMAKI Tumbler (FRI) Blue, £/$3000. CHERRY WREATH Wliimsey, Amethyst 3" Black Amethyst, £/$400.

ENAMELLED CHERRIES (USF) Tumbler, Blue, £/$75. FISHERMAN (USDD) Mug, Blue, £/$250.

APPLE BLOSSOM (USD) Bozvl, Amethyst, £/$40. BLACKBERRY WREATH (USM) small Bowl £/$75.

ZEPHYR Decanter and handle, E/%225. ZERO Vase (SWE), £/$85. ZINNIA Decanter, no handle, £/$200; all in Marigold. All blow moulded

82


INTAGLIO STRAWBERRY, (USA). Souvenir Mug, Modern. Vaseline Opalescent, £/$125. BEADED SHELL, American Carnival Glass Association Souvenir Mug on Vaseline Base E/S125. Motto: 'In God We Trust' inscribed on mug.

STARBURST & CROWN (FRI) Tumbler, model 5047, Marigold, £/$300. FLOWERSPRAY &• DIAMONDS (FRI) Tumbler model 5040 on Rio Glass, Marigold, £/$300. Photo courtesy Suomen Uisimusco Finland

BEADED PANELS (L1SDD) Compote, Peach Opalescent, £/$165. COMPASS (USD) exterior pattern Compote on Peach Opalescent E/S135.

SWAN & CATTAILS Modem toothpick Holder. Blue, £/$85. ELEPHANT mug, Modem, Blue, £/S55.

INTAGLIO STRAWBERRY, repro American Carnival Glass Association piece. Blue, made by Fenton USA, £/Sl 05. BUTTERFLY three-sided crimped'Dish, Modern, Blue, made by Fenton, USA, £/$85.

TOOLS (SWE) from local collection, tools used in glass manufacture from Eda.

PANELLED DANDELION (USF) Tumbler, Amethyst, £/$85. PEACH Tumbler (USN), Blue (rare), E/S130, BUTTERFLY (USF) Tumbler, Marigold, £/S80.

WILD ROSE (USN) Compote, open edge Green on 3 knob feet, £/S365. FINE RIB (USN) Compote Green, E/S85.

83


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WINDMILL Tumbler (USN), £/$65. RANGER variant Tumbler, origin not known, £/$60. GRAPE ARBOR Tumbler (USN), E/S65. INVERTED BLOCKS (EUR), £/$65. FOUR-SEVEN-FOUR tumbler (USD, E/S45. ROBIN (USD, scarce £/$150. All Marigold.

JACK IN THE PULPIT (CZA?) Vase, Marigold, £/$70. HAND VASE zvith zvatch on zvrist, manufactured EUR + JAIN, India, Marigold, £/$450-£/$500. DIAMOND POINTS vase (USN), Frosted While, £/$200.

DIAMOND WEDGES (SWE), small bozvl, Blue, £/$450. SALAD PANELS (SWE), larger bowl, Blue, £/$600 Catalogue No 2229.

TOWN PUMP Souvenir, Purple ICGA (USA) 1979, £/$125. Dugan MANY FRUITS punch cup (USD), Amethyst, £/$68.

Punch Cups: WHIRLING STAR (EUR & USD,Marigold, E/S65, BROKEN ARCHES (AUS), Marigold, £/$50. WREATH OF ROSES (USF), £/$30. QUESTION MARKS (USD) Peach Opalescent Compote £/$85. STARFISH (USD), Peach Oplaescent Compote, £/$150.

BUTTERFLY (CZA?) pin tray, Marigold, £/$30. BUTTERFLY Perfume Bottle, Modern Avon Glass, £/$35.

FINE CUT RINGS, Guggenheim Celery, produced under licence for UK market. Marigold, £/$55. FINE BAND Celery vase, Marigold, £/$55.

85


All Punch Cups: BROKEN ARCHES (USD, £/$50; WAFFLE BLOCK (USD, £/$50; ORANGE TREE (USF), £/$28; MEMPHIS (USD, £/$50, all Marigold.

HEAVY GRAPE Goblet (USD, Marigold, £/$85. COLONIAL (USD, one-handled Punch Cup, Marigold, £/$60. GRAPE & CABLE (USF) Tumbler, Amethyst, £/$75. Z1LLERTAL Beer Bottle, Modern, Amber based, £/$70. BANDED GRAPE & FLOWERS (USF), Tumbler, Amethyst, £/$78.

Carnival Qlass

GRAPE & GOTHIC ARCHES (USN), Tumbler, Blue, £/$90. PEACOCKATTHEFOUNTAIN(USD&USN), Tumbler, Blue, £/$150.

BAVARIA Caraffe (EUR), Marigold, £/$125. INVERTED BLOCKS CARAFFE (EUR) Marigold, £/$65.

Later production American Carnival Glass from L. E. Smith and Indiana Glass Co. catalogues.

86


The Various Shades of Blue CELESTE BLUE

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; ORANGE TREE Bozvl on Celeste Blue base, £/$1600+ ICE BLUE GRAPE & CABLE (USN) Plate zvith ruffled edge, rare Ice Blue E/S1300.

VINTAGE (USF) Bozol on rare Celeste Blue base, £/$850+. PERSIAN BLUE

SAPPHIRE BLUE NORTHWOOD BASKET (USN) off-beat colour, Sapphire Blue, E/S400.

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LOTUS & GRAPE (USF) Bozvl, here on Persian Blue base, £/$850. Reverse pictured belozv.

All photographs courtesy the late Don Moore USA

87


Rare Base Glass Pieces

ACORN BURRS (USN) Punch Bozvl Set, extremely rare, Aqua Opal, price not available.

HEAVY WEB (USD) Bowl zvith Scallop edge, Peach Opal, £/$125.

DAISY WREATH (USA Westmoreland), Iridised Marigold on Milk Glass, £/$300.

DRAGON & LOTUS Bozvl, on rare Lime Green Opal £/$1800.

(CARNIVAL) HOLLY Bozvl on Iridised Milk Glass, E/S2000+.

(CARNIVAL) HOLLY Bozvl on Cobalt Blue Opal, £/$3000+.

ORANGE TREE Bozvl, Marigold on very rare Moonstone base glass. Value not known.

PEACOCK & GRAPE (USF) Bozvl 3/1 frilled edge, on Peach Opal, value not knozun.

IMPERIAL BASKET (USD off-beat colour, Clambroth Opal, £/$250.

All photographs courtesy the late Don Moore USA

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ROSE SHOW Plate on iridised Custard glass, £/$4000+ (speculative).

SMOOTH RAYS PANELS (USF) Bozol, here on iridised Blue Milk Glass, very rare, value unknown.

STRAWBERRY (USN) Bonbon Dish, 2-handled, on Lime Green Opal base, very rare, £/$3000+ (speculative).

SCALES(USA Westmoreland) Bowl on rare Clambroth Opal. Value not known.

RUSTIC (USF) Vase, on Lime Green Opal, rare, value unknown.

VICTORIAN Bozol, one of the most highly prized patterns, on Green base, value £/$12,000+

WISHBONE b SPADES (USD) Bowl on Peach Opal, value £/$450.

SOUTACHE (USD) Bozol on Peach Opal, rare. Value not known.

WISHBONE (USN) 10" Bozvl on Pastel White. Value not known.

All photographs courtesy the late Don Moore USA

89


Nezo Carnival Glass, Fenton Catalogue 1978 page 35.

90


Nezo Carnival Glass, Fenton Catalogue 1983-84 page 52.

91


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Carnival Iridescent glass, the original name for Carnival glass, was The Fenton Art Glass Company's major product from its inception in 1907 until 1920. This unique glass was first introduced nationally by Louis Comfort Tiffany in the 1890's. It is produced by spraying various shades of glass with a metallic salt mixture while the glass is still very hot, creating a permanent rainbow across the surface of each piece. Carnival glass authorities have acclaimed Fenton's reproduction of this treatment as the best representation of the antique iridescent formula ever produced. Most people would be unable to distinguish the difference were it not for the Fenton hallmark identifying the current pieces. Fenton Carnival—another example of superb handcraftsmanship for those who look for the unusual in fine glass. Your customer will recognize it as an investment in "the antiques of tomorrow." 9658 NK Vase, Dogwood, 8" h.

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9269 NK Pitcher, Quintec

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Carnival New Carnival Glass, Fenton Catalogue 1986-87 page 39.

92

9292 NK Votive, toothpick Button & Arch

Cobalt Marigold Carnival

8361 NK Bell, Barred Oval


12

Modern Carnival Glass from Fenton Art Glass Company: all on Red Base Glass: Fenton 1996 Catalogue page 12. Photo courtesy Fenton Art Glass Company

93


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Later production Carnival Glass from Indiana Glass Co.

Modern Fenton Art Glass under recent production - iridised crackle range.

94


Sketches and Drawings by Ron May

BUTTON Sandwich Bozol, squared off sides exterior pattern, Marigold on Clear, akin to Crosshatch, three mould marks, £/$45.

BEADED OVAL Bowl zvith Tulip-shape edge, Marigold on Clear E/S85.

CORNFLOWERS, deep Bowl on short legs, often seen rnon-iridised in acid Etched Green or Pink Depression Ware Glass. This bowl has external pattern and good iridisation, £/$60. Marigold on Clear.

CLAIRE (EUR) plate zvith underside clear iridised. Cut out. pointed shape edge to plate, £/$65. Named by Ron May

95


DIAMOND OVALS AND BEADS, Cake Stand on shaped column leg. Three mould marks, exterior pattern only, probably Dutch £/$65. Excellent mirror-like iridisation.

CROSS SECTION, small Bozol, Marigold on Clear, £/$35.

DIAMOND SPEARS Bozvl, 9" approx, Marigold, £/$65.

FRILLS & DIAMONDS Bozvl 9", Marigold, £/$50.

96


FACET BAND small deep Rose Bowl turned in lop, £/$35. Marigold on Clear. DUCHESSE Fleur de Lis pattern on upper side of English Basket shape. Slightly curved plate with arched handle running from one side to another. Very elaborate pattern and cut away design on handle, good iridescence, £/$55.

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FORTY-FIVE shallow Bowl, stubby feet, Marigold on Clear, £/$30.

97


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PLEATS shallow Bozol, Pale Marigold iridescence on Clear, £/$35.

ORBIT, Marigold iridised Cake Stand on a Ribbon column stand Registration No 704493 (not Sowerby UK whose registration numbers are prefixed RD and only up to 520894), £/$63.

LEAFY TRIANGLE, small Bozvl, zvith unusual leafy triangle pattern in base (akin to Pillar Flute in some respects) £/$65. Marigold.

ORIGAMI shallozo Fruit Bozol, Depression Ware, Marigold £/S45.

98


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PARQUET small Creamer, often poorly iridised, four mould marks, Intaglio cut out design, £/$30, Marigold.

-2".

PETALS AND PRISMS small Bowl, pattern of Crossed Petals and Small Dots and vertical prism bands, Pale Marigold on Clear, £/$65. SPEARS & CHEVRONS Vase, Marigold on Clear £/$65.

99


SERPENTINE ROSE deep bozvl on short legs, pattern external and stippled background, Soft Marigold over Clear £/$165.

SPEARS & DIAMONDS Bands Vase, flared or straight top found, akin to Triands in form, Marigold, £/$75.

V\^XUt^A/Wv~"^\.V,/\/ayy •>*yff

ZIPPER-ROUND aka ZIP-A-ROUND and CHECKERBOARD large shallow Bozvl, English, Marigold on Clear, very intricate design, £/$65.

STIPPLED RAYS & STARS, small Marigold, rather hatshaped star with 16 points in base £/$35.

100


Combined Index and Price Guide

NOTES FOR THE INDEX All Pre late-1930s production is to be found by PATTERN Name. All post late-1930s production is found under the heading NEW CARNIVAL GLASS. INDEX USAGE The alphabetical sequence is arranged LETTER BY LETTER (not WORD BY WORD). NOTES FOR THE PRICE GUIDE All values quoted in US$ as the majority of production came from this source. Carnival Glass outside the USA usually trades at £1 sterling per US$ (as the market is so USA dominated). But note that prices CAN vary widely following the supply and demand and even current fashion in collecting. Collectors often particularly value their OWN country's production above others. ACANTHUS Manufactured by USI Bowl 8"+ Marigold £/$250; Green £/$90 Plate 10" Marigold £/$105; Smoke £/$750 Vase 9" Marigold £/$275

Plate (extremely rare) Marigold £/$nk; Amethyst £/$680; Green £/$680; +25% for ruffled/candy edges Picture page 41

ADVERTISING PIECES: See DREIBUS/TURKU/WILLS GOLD FLAKE AFRICAN SHIELD Manufactured by ESW** Mustard Jar and Top Marigold (only known) £/$150

ACORN...

ACORN Manufactured by USF Bowl 8" Picture page 41 Marigold £/$150; Amber £/$300; Red £/$600; Blue £/$250 ACORN BURRS Manufactured by USNt Punch Bowl Set (8 pieces) Picture page 41,88 Marigold £/$1500+; Green £/$2000+; Aqua Opal (extremely rare): Value not known Bowl 5" Marigold £/$35; Amethyst £/$50; Green £/$65 Water Pitcher Marigold £/$1500; Purple £/$750; Green £/$600; Amethyst £/$400 Tumbler Picture page 84 (AUTUMN) ACORN Manufactured by USF Bowl 8" Picture page 41 Marigold £/$85; Blue £/$125; Amethyst £/$125; Green £/$85; Perisan Blue Value not known;+25% for 3/1 worked candy edge

Picture page 41

ALEXANDER FLORAL (MQB) aka GRAND THISTLE Manufactured by FRI Pattern also found in other countries Pitcher Picture page 41 Marigold £/$1250; Blue £/$2250 Tumbler Picture page 41 Marigold £/$350; Blue £/$650 AMERIKA Manufactured by SWE. Named at source Similar pattern USA as Sunk Daisy Bowl on stub feet Picture page 41 Irid Milk Glass £/$3000 (extremely rare); Marigold £/$300+; Blue £/$450; Rose bowl on stub feet Marigold £/$270-£/$360; Blue £/$360-£/$540; Milk Irid £/$1620 APPLE . . .

APPLE BLOSSOM Manufactured by USD Bowl 4" Marigold £/$25; Amethyst £/$40 Bowl 5" Marigold £/$50; Amethyst £/$50

101

Picture page 82


Bowl 7"+ Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$100 Plate 8"+ Marigold £/$150; Amethyst £/$170; Blue £/$180

BANDED GRAPE & FLOWERS Manufactured by USF Tumbler Amethyst £/$250+

APPLE BLOSSOM TWIGS Manufactured by USDD** Bowl 7V Picture page 41 Amethyst (1910-15) Value not known - very rare

BAROQUE See NEW CARNIVAL GLASS

APPLE PANELS Manufactured by USD Panelled Sugar Marigold £/$35 Creamer Marigold £/$35

Picture page 41

ARCS Manufactured by US1 Exterior pattern to STAR OF DAVID Bowl Picture page 41 Marigold £/$70; Amethyst £/$250; Green £/$180; Purple £/$175 ARGYLE aka TARTAN Manufactured by HRL For other producer countries see page 134 Cake Plate on stem Picture page 41 Marigold (only known) £/$110

BASKET...

BASKET OF ROSES (Tom Sprain, USA) See ROSE Z..BAS^ BASKETWEAVE Manufactured by USN External pattern to WISHBONE Large Bowl Picture page 42 Green £/$350; Marigold £/$200; Purple £/$500; +25% for 3/1 ruffled edge

BIG BASKETWEAVE Manufactured by USD External[patterntoROUNDUP BEADED BASKET Manufactured by USD Picture page 42 Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$125 Green £/$85; Blue £/$60

ASHTRAY See TURKU See WILLS GOLD FLAKE

IMPERIAL BASKET Manufactured by USI t Picture page 42,88 See also BIG BASKETWEAVE as exterior to ROUND-UP (USD) Marigold £/$150; Blue £/$200; Cambroth Opal £/$250

ASTRID (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Bowl Marigold £/$350; Blue £/$450

NORTHWOOD BASKET Manufactured by USN t Picture page 42,87 Marigold £/$200; Celeste Blue £/$450; Sapphire Blue £/$400; Red £/$500

Picture page 42

BAVARIA (Frank Horn) Manufactured in EUR Caraffe Marigold £/$125

ATLANTIC CITY ELK See ELK... ATLANTIC CITY ELK ATHENA (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Shallow Bowl Marigold £/$200; Blue £/$250

Picture page 42

AUSTRALIAN CRYSTAL CUT (AUS) Compote on short stem Picture page 42 Black Amethyst £/$650; Marigold £/$450 AUSTRALIAN PANELS (AUS) Crown Crystal Glassworks Creamer Marigold £/$145; Black Amethyst £/$450 Sugar Picture page 42 Marigold £/$145; Black Amethyst £/$450 AUSTRALIAN PANSY See PANSY... (AUSTRALIAN) PANSY AUSTRALIAN SWAN See SWAN ... (AUSTRALIAN) SWAN AUTUMN ACORN See ACORN... (AUTUMN) ACORN BAMBI POWDER BOWL (EUR) See POWDER BOWL BAMBI

Picture page 86

BEADED BULLS EYE Manufactured by USI Vase Picture page 84 Marigold £/$80; Amethyst £/$125; Green £/$80 BEADED CABLE Manufactured by USN Exterior pattern Footed Candy Bowl Picture page 42 Marigold £/$85; Blue £/$150; Ice Blue £/$400; Green £/$150; Amethyst £/$100 BEADED CRYSTAL & RAYS (Lorna Payne) Manufactured in EUR Bowl - small Picture page 42 Marigold (only seen) £/$45 BEADED FAIRY LIGHT See NEW CARNIVAL GLASS BEADED OVAL (Ron May) Manufactured in EUR 2 Bowl - tulip edged Drawing by Ron May page 95 Marigold on clear £/$85

102


BEADED PANELS Manufactured by USDD Compote Peach Opalescent £/$165

Picture page 83

BIRDS . . . BIRDS B Q W J _ g„ Marigold £/$380; Amethyst £/$540; Blue £/$685

BEADED SHELL BIRDS & CHERRIES See Shell... Beaded Shell Manufactured by USF*" BEADED SPEARS Two-handled Bon-Bon Now knozon to be manufactured by JAIN India though Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$80; Green £/$95; found in Australia. See page 134 Blue £/$95 Pitcher Plate -10" Marigold £/$350; Amethyst £/$830 Marigold £/$1000; Green £/$1500; Blue £/$1500 Tumbler Picture page 42, 84 Bowl Drawing page 25; Picture page 43 Marigold £/$100; Amethyst £/$290; Blue base £/$800; Marigold £/$500 Straight sided / flared £/$155 BIRD WITH GRAPES BEADS AND DIAMONDS Manufacturer not knozon Manufactured by HRL Wall Vase - Small Butter Dish ' Picture page 43 Marigold £/$95 Marigold only on Clear £/$65 Wall Vase - Large Picture page 43 BEARDEDBERRY M™&™11$™> Manufactured by USF** SINGING BIRDS Exterior pattern to PETER RABBIT Bowl Picture page 43 Manufactured by USN Value not knozon Bowl -10" Exterior pattern to PEACOCK & URN Picture page 43 Marigold £/$60; Amethyst £/$70; Green £/$70 ~

(FROLICKING) BEARS ICGA Award Reproduction Spittoon Red£/$265 BEAUTY . . . BEAUTY BUD Manufactured by USD Vase Marigold on Clear£/$65 BEAUTY BUD TWIGS Manufactured by USD Vase Regular size Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$85 Vase Miniature size Marigold £/$385; Amethyst £/$800

Rnwl — 5"

Picture page 43

5 , Ul lee£r (/ Sc $ 1 9 °/ ^ r e a m e r " "8" fn Picture page 43 Mangold £/$60 M ^ o T d £/$50 Pitcher Marigold £ / $350; Amethyst £ / $450; Green £ / $750 Tumbler Picture page 43, 84 Marigold £/$50; Amethyst £/$65; Green £/$80; Picture page 43 Aqua Opal (Ice Green) £/$300 BLACKBERRY B

BELI

BELL & ARCHES Manufactured by USD Bowl Marigold £/$265; Blue £/$365

Picture page 43

SYDENHAM BELL See NEW CARNIVAL WHITTON BELL See NEW CARNIVAL GLASS BERLIN Manufactured by SWE Bowl Marigold £/$400; Blue £/$650

Marigold £/$25; Amethyst £/$35; Green £/$45; „ , 7-/<t7n Mug Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$190; Green £/$380;

BLACKBERRY Manufactured by USN Compote - 3 legs Picture page 44 Marigold £/$185; Amethyst £/$250; Green £/$250 Bowl-footed

}/I^W^LiI^lJf^^A§J^. GLASS

BLACKBERRY BLOCK Manufactured by USF ™ g j £ / ^ ^ ^

Picture page 44

BERRY & LEAF CIRCLE Manufactured by USF Exterior to LION bowl BICENTENNIAL PLATE SOUVENIR - SPIRIT OF 76 See SPIRIT OF 76

^

^

QJ^ff^t

Pastel £/$6000 Tumbler** Picture page 44 Marigold £/$48; Amethyst £/$150; Green £/$150; Blue £/$270 WILD BLACKBERRY Manufactured by USF Bowl Picture page 44 Marigold £ / $100; Amethyst £ / $150; Blue £ / $225; 5.S!^..^/.?.^^..^i.?.E™l¥i?ife

BIG BASKETWEAVE Exterior pattern see BASKETWEAVE...

103


BLACKBERRY WREATH Manufactured by USM Small Bowl Amethyst £/$75

BUTTERFLY Manufactured by USF Picture page 82 Tumbler

BLOCKS & ARCHES aka RANGER See RANGER BLUEBERRY ** Manufactured by USF Pitcher Marigold £/$850+ Tumbler Marigold £/$75; Blue £/$135 BORDERED PENDANT (MQB) Manufactured by FDK Tumbler Blue £/$400; Marigold £/$300

Picture page 83

MarigoldJj7$8g BUTTERFLY Manufactured by CZA? Pin Tray Marigold £/$30 BUTTERFLY Manufactured by Avon USA (Modern) Picture page 44, 84 Perfume Bottle Marigold £/$35

Picture page 85

Picture page 44

Picture page 85

BUTTERFLIES Manufactured by USF Picture page 44 Bon Bon Dish - 2 handled Picture page 44 Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$160; Green £/$150; Blue£/$150

BORDER PLANTS Manufactured by USD BUTTERFLY & BELLS aka CHRISTMAS BELLS (AUS) Compote Bowl Picture page 44 Manufactured in Australia Peach Opal £/$275; +25% for ruffled edge Compote Picture page 45 BOULE & LEAVES aka BULLS EYE & BEADS ^ l a c k A m e t h y s t £/$3(X>0

M^byUSN

Sold^OO

u

Green £/$250; Marigold £/$100; Blue £/$150; Amethyst £/$150 ROIJnTTFT** Manufactured by USF Pitcher Picture page 4 4 Marigold £/$250; Blue £/$500; White £/$600 Tumbler Marigold £/$75; Amethyst £/$100; Blue £/$100; White £/$150 BOWMAN aka NUTMEG GRATER (UK) Named in Sweden (Source) Deep Bowl Picture page 44

BUTTERFLY & BERRY Manufactured by USF Bowl - footed 10" Picture page 45 Blue £/$200; Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$175; ^ T ^ S i f ° w l , °° ,,»* » _ * _ _ _ BUTTERFLY & BOWER Manufactured by Crown Crystal Glassworks, Australia Exterior pattern to BROKEN CHAIN C UrepaSe45 »"?B™* .A ., m tcl«aJ' ' Mango d£/$350; Black Amethyst £/$850

Marigold £/$150; Blue £/$250 BROKEN ARCHES Manufactured by USI Punch Bowl & Base Marigold £/$300 Punch Cup Marigold £/$50 Bowl 8"+ Marigold £/$25

Marigold £/$400 BUTTERFLY & TULIP Picture page 44 **?**"* * " S ? . r ° Internal pattern to bowl Picture page 85,86 ^ M S ^ T Square shaped bowl Purple £/$1000+

BROKMN CHAIN External Pattern See BUTTERFLY ... BUTTERFLY & BOWER BROOKLYN BRIDGE Manufactured by USD Bowl Picture page 44 r ° Marigold £/$250; +25% for lettered bowl BUTTERFLY/BUTTERFLIES . . .

BUTTERFLY Modern Fenton Glass Dish - 3 sided crimped Blue£/$85

Picture page 45

« U T T ° N < R ° n **& Manufactured by ESW Exterior patternDrazmng by Ron May page 91 Sandwich Bowl - Squared-off Marigold £/$45

Manufactured by ESB Bowl Picture page 45 Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$115; Ice Blue £/$200+ Cake stand - 2 tier Marigold £/$155 Picture page 83 ?late ,, ,„ y 5 Marigold £/$20; Amethyst £/$65

104


CANDLESTICKS...

CHERRY/CHERRIES...

FLORENTINE Manufactured by ESW Acid etched Marigold on clear £/$110

See also BIRDS & CHERRIES

OBSIDIAN Manufacturer unknown Picture page 45 and see FLORENTINE/PREMIUM/FANLIGHT/ MAGDA and ORNATE BEADS Rare Jet Base Glass (NOT black amethyst) £/$200 each ORNATE BEADS Manufactured by FDK W«eBaaeGljaM£/$8MiBair PREMIUM Manufactured by USI Blue Base Glass £/$460 pair CAROLINA DOGWOOD Manufactured by US Westmoreland t and see FLORENTINE/PREMIUM/FANLIGHT/MAGDA and ORNATE BEADS Bowl Picture page 45 Rare Blue Opal £/$225+; Peach Opal £/$100; Marigold on Milk Glass £/$200+ CANNON BALL See CHERRY... ENAMELLED CHERRIES CAPTIVE ROSE See ROSE ... CAPTIVE ROSE CARAFFE... See BAVARIA See INVERTED BLOCKS CARNIVAL HOLLY See HOLLY ... CARNIVAL HOLLY CAR VASE (MQB) Manufacturer unknown Marigold £/$50

Picture page 45

CATHEDRAL CHALICE aka CURVED STAR See STAR ... CURVED STAR CELIA (MQB) Manufactured by FRI Tumbler Marigold £/$20 CHARLIE (Source) Manufactured by SWE Bowl - Large Marigold £/$250; Blue £/$450 CHATELAINE Manufactured by USDD Water Pitcher Purple £/$1000+ Tumbler Purple £/$300

Picture page 45

Picture page 45

CHERRY** Manufactured by USM Water Pitcher** Marigold £/$800; Amethyst £/$750; Green £/$1600 Tumbler Marigold £/$80; Amethyst £/$95; Green £/$110 Bowl - 4" Marigold £/$50; Amethyst £/$65; Green £/$75 Bowl - 7" Marigold £/$50; Amethyst £/$65; Green £/$75 Bowl - 1 0 " Marigold £/$60; Amethyst £/$105; Green £/$125 Milk Pitcher Picture page 45 Marigold £/$1200 Green £/$2000 Plate - 6" Marigold £/$750 Sugar/Creamer Picture page 46 Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$135; Green £/$160 each CHERRY Manufactured by USD Bowl - 5" Marigold £/$40; Amethyst £/$55; Peach Opal £/$125; Red £/$650 Bowl - 8" Picture page 46 Marigold £/$50; Amethyst £/$65; Peach Opal £/$250 Bowl - 3-footed (scarce) Picture page 45 Marigold £/$180; Amethyst £/$265; Peach Opal £/$300; Red £/$3000+ Plate - 6" Amethyst £/$320 Peach Opal £/$320 Whimsey Black Amethyst £/$650 CHERRIES & BLOSSOM** aka ENAMELLED CHERRIES Manufactured by USF Pitcher Picture page 46 Marigold £/$280; Blue £/$250 Tumbler Marigold £/$85; Blue £/$85 CHERRY CHAIN Manufactured by USF Bon Bon Marigold £/$40; Amethyst £/$65; Green £/$65; Blue£/$145 Bowl 6", 10" Picture page 46 Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$75; Green £/$65; Blue £/$65; Red (rare) £/$3500+ Plate 7", 9" (rare) Marigold £/$550; Blue £/$225 ENAMELLED CHERRIES aka CHERRIES & BLOSSOM

CHECKERBOARD aka ZIPPER ROUND Manufactured by ESW Drawing by Ron May page 100 Bowl - Large shallow Marigold £/$45

Manufactured by USF Tumbler Picture page 46, 82 Marigold £/$50; Blue £/$75; Green £/$65; Amethyst £/$75

Pitcher Blue £/$180

105


CHERRY WREATH Manufactured by USD t Whimsey Black Amethyst £/$400

Picture page 82

CHERUB see ROSE... CIRCLED ROSE Manufactured in Australia See AUSTRALIAN PANSY (similar) CHRISTMAS BELLS See BUTTERFLY & BELLS CHRISTMAS Manufacturer unknown Compote Marigold (rare) £/$5000+

Picture page 46

CHRYSANTHEMUM

CHRYSANTHEMUM Manufactured by USF Master Bowl -10" footed Picture page 46 Marigold £/$180; Blue £/$700 Chop Plate Smoke £/$2000; White £/M^99.lf^.trcrB.l^..?M CHRYSANTHEMUM EMBROIDERED MUMS Manufactured by USF also see NEW ART CHRYSANTHEMUM Bowl - 8" Picture page 46 Marigold £/$500; Blue £/$700; +25% for imrkededge Plate Ice Green £/$800+ CHUNKY (MQB) aka ENGLISH HOB & BUTTON Manufactured by ESW Shallow Bowl Picture page 46 Marigold £/$50; Blue £/$250 Fruit Bowl - 2 tier on metal stand Picture page 46 Marigold (only known) £/$200 CIRCLED ROSE see ROSE ... CIRCLED ROSE CLAIRE (Ron May) Manufactured in EUR Plate - edge 3k" high Marigold £/$65

COBBLESTONES Manufactured by USI See also ARCS exterior pattern Bowl 5" Marigold £/$28; Amethyst £/$35; Green £/$40 Bowl 8"+ Picture page 47 Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$350; Blue £/$300; Green £/$300 Bon Bon Marigold £/$48; Amethyst £/$68; Green £/$68 Plate Amethyst £/$1000 COIN DOT Manufactured by USF Bowl Picture page 47 Marigold £/$150; Amethyst £/$55; Green £/$55; Blue £/$65; Pastel Green £/$350; Red £/$1200; on Aqua £/$260 Plate Marigold £/$160; Amethyst £/$200; Green £/$220; Blue£/$210 Pitcher Marigold £/$450; Amethyst £/$720; Green £/$720; Blue£/$720 Tumbler Marigold £/$180; Amethyst £/$270; Green £/$270; Blue£/$270 Rose Bowl Marigold £/$100 COLONIAL Manufactured by USI Punch Cup - single handle Marigold £/$60

Picture page 86

COLUMBIA Manufactured in USA Akin to OLIVIA, see page 63 COMMEMORATIVE PLATES See SOLDIERS AND SAILORS See SPIRIT OF '76

COMPASS Manufactured by USD SKI STAR exterior to compote Compote - 3 sided Picture page 83 CLASSIC ARTS Marigold £/$30; Amethyst £/$60; Green £/$60; Manufactured in Czechoslovakia/Fri Similar to EGYPTIAN QUEEN deisgn also found in Carnival Peach Opal £/$135 Glass. The author has a non-iridised celery in CLASSIC ARTS,Bowl -10" on Amethyst, signed MOSER (Czech) and found in Prague Marigold £/$60; Amethyst £/$85; Blue £/$160; Peach Opal £/$130 Vase 7" Marigold £/$585 CONCORD LATTICE Rose Bowl Picture page 46 Manufactured by USF Marigold (only known) £/$450 Bowl** Picture page 47 Powder Jar & Lid Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$400; Green £/$325; Marigold £/$720 Blue £ / $225; +25% for Imndzmrked edge Celery Vase 10" Plate Marigold £/$4 Marigold £/$1000; Amethyst £/$3000+; Green £/$5000+ CLEMATIS See ENAMELLED CLEMATIS COOKIE JAR & LID see STAR . . . VERTICAL STAR PANELS CLEVELAND Memorial Tray Picture page 47 Marigold £/$600+; Amethyst £/$8000+ Drawing by Ron May page 95

106


COOKIE PLATE Manufactured by USI Pattern akin VINTAGE Plate - with a central grip handle Smoke £/$300

Picture page 47

CROSS SECTION (Ron May) Manufactured in EUR Bowl - small Drawing by Ron May page 96 Marigold £/$35

CORAL...

CORAL & SEAWEED see SEAWEED & CORAL CORN VASE HOACGA souvenirRepro piece Vase Picture page 47 Ice Blue £/$80 Vase t Picture page 47 Ice Green with Marigold overlay £/$300+ CORNFLOWERS Manufactured in EUR Bowl - deep - 3 scroll feet Drawing by Ron May page 95 Often seen non-iridised in UK on acid-etched Green or Pink Depression ware. External pattern and good iridisation. Marigold £/$60 COSMOS AND CANE Manufactured by US Glass There is a similar design from Sweden and Germany. See page 81. Bowl - 5" Picture page 47 Marigold £/$45 COVERED HEN Manufactured by ESW Butter and Lid Marigold £/$125; Rare Blue £/$240 COVERED SWAN Manufactured by ESW Butter and Lid Marigold £/$150

CROSS HATCH Manufactured in England (probably ESW) Sugar on stem Picture page 48 Marigold £/$55

CROW aka MAGPIE Manufactured in Australia Bowl - small Picture page 48 Marigold £/$210; Black Amethyst £/$380 Bowl Picture page 48 Marigold £/$250; Black Amethyst £/$450 Bowl variants Marigold £/$335 CURTAIN See NEW CARNIVAL GLASS CRYSTAL CUT See AUSTRALIAN CRYSTAL CUT CUPID See GOLDEN CUPID CURVED STAR Manufactured by SWE See STAR . . . CURVED STAR Some shapes aka DAGNY/LASSE/CATHEDRAL CHALICE CUSPIDOR See SPITTOON

Picture page 47

Picture page 47

CRACKLE Manufactured by USI Car Vase Marigold £/$75; Amethyst £/$80; Green £/$80 Single Epergne Picture page 48 Marigold £/$125 Bowl Marigold £/$25; Amethyst £/$30; Green £/$30 Pitcher Marigold £/$160; Amethyst £/$215; Green £/$215 Tumbler Marigold £/$55; Amethyst £/$65; Green £/$65 Punch Bowl (top & base) Marigold £/$150 Punch Cup Marigold £/$35 Water Set (Pitcher and 6 Tumblers) Picture page 47 Marigold £/$300 CRACKLE Manufactured by FRI Bowl On pink base & FOUR FLOWERS internal Rio £/$155 as exterior to GARDEN PATH with CRACKLE and SODA GOLD

CUT ARCHES Manufactured by FRI Banana Boat Shape Bowl Marigold £/$275; Blue £/$375

Picture page 48

CYNTHIA Manufactured by ESW Vase - turned in rim short Picture page 48 Marigold £/$155; Jet£/$1500 Marigold (pair) £/$1600; Jet (pair) £/$3600 Flared rim taller vase Marigold £/$155; Jet £/$1550 Marigold (pair) £/$600; Jet (pair) £/$3600 DAGNY VASE aka CURVED STAR Manufactured by SWE See also STAR .'.. CURVED STAR Plain rim Marigold £/$400; Blue £/$650 Flared rim Marigold £/$480; Blue £/$725 DAINTY (MQB) aka GARLAND Indiana USA modern production. Goblet Green-Blue £/$45

Picture page 48

Picture page 48

DAISY...

DAISY & PLUME Manufactured by USN/USDD Exterior pattern to BLACKBERRY Rosebowl - 3 legs Picture page 48 Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$125; Blue £/$125; Green £/$125

107


DAISY BLOCK ROWBOAT SeeROWBOAT DAISY SPRAY (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Vase Picture page 48 Marigold £/$360; Blue £/$460; +25% for flared rim Bowl - shallow Picture page 48 Marigold £/$1500; White Pearl fi/$2500+ DAISY WREATH Manufactured by USA Westmoreland Picture page 88 Iridised Marigold on Milk Glass £/$300+ DANDELION...

Manufactured by USF See also PANELLED DANDELION Tumbler Amethyst £/$175 Pitcher Amethyst £/$375 DECORATED CARNIVAL . . . Manufactured by USF Catalogue Number 1014 Water Set (Pitcher + 6 Tumblers) Blue £/$3000 Pitcher Blue£/$2500 Tumbler Blue£/$100 Catalogue Number 1016 Water Set (Pitcher + 6 Tumblers) Blue £/$3000 (Spec)

Spittoon Marigold £/$7000 DIAMONDS aka DIAMANT See DIAMANT DIAMOND & SUNFLOWER aka SOLROS See SUNFLOWER ... SUNFLOWER & DIAMONDS DIAMOND & WEDGES (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Bowl - Small Marigold £/$155; Blue £/$300 Bowl - Large MH.ig.9!.d.£ / $170;.Blue £ / $480 DIAMOND DAZZLER Manufactured by EUR Pitcher - Stubby Marigold £/$65

Picture page 49

Picture page 49

DIAMOND FRILLS AND DIAMONDS Manufactured by EUR Bowl Draiving by Ron May page 96 Marigold £/$50 Picture page 49

Picture page 49

DERBY See PINWHEEL

DIAMOND LACE Manufactured in USA by Heisey Bowl 5" Marigold £/$40; Amethyst £/$110 Bowl 10"+ Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$65 Pitcher Amethyst £/$300 Tumbler Marigold £/$170; Amethyst £/$65

Picture page 49

DIAMOND OVALS & BEADS (Ron May) Manufactured by EUR Exterior pattern only Drawing by Ron May page 96 Cake Stand on central column 3 mould marks Marigold £/$65 DIAMOND PANES (MQB) Manufactured in Scandinavia Tumbler Picture page 84 Marigold £/$75

DIAMOND/DIAMONDS...

BANDED DIAMONDS Manufactured in Australia Water Pitcher (rare) Marigold £/$1350 Tumbler (rare) Marigold £/$720 Bowl 10" Marigold £/$100; Amethyst £/$115 Bowl 5" Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$80 DIAMANT (MQB) aka DIAMONDS Manufactured by SWE Bonbonniere Picture page 49 Blue £/$5000+ (only one known) Vase - Plain lip Marigold £/$350, Blue £/$500; +25% for flared lip DIAMOND/DIAMONDS Manufactured by USM Water Pitcher ** Picture page 49 Marigold £/$350; Amethyst £/$380; Green £/$380; Aqua£/$500 Tumbler ** Picture page 49 Marigold £/$70; Amethyst £/$100; Green £/$100 Water Set (Pitcher + 6 Tumblers) Amethyst £/$900 Punch Bowl Set Marigold £/$3000; Amethyst £/$2000; Green £/$2000

DIAMOND POINTS Manufactured by USN Vase 10" Marigold £/$30; Amethyst £/$125; Green £/$135; Sapphire Blue (rare) £/$1000+ Vase 11" Picture page 85 Frosted White £/$200 DIAMOND PRISMS Manufactured in EUR Compote on stem Marigold £/$55; Amber £/$125

Picture page 49

DIAMOND SPEARS (Derek White) Manufactured in EUR Bowl 9" Drawing by Ron May page 96 Marigold £/$65 DIAMOND WEDGES Manufactured in SWE Small bowl Marigold £/$165; Blue £/$450

108

Picture page 85


FLOWER SPRAY & DIAMONDS (MQB) Manufactured by FRI Tumbler Marigold £/$300

DOUBLE DUTCH Manufactured by USI see WINDMILL (variant)

FRILLS & DIAMONDS (Ron May) Manufactured by USI Bowl 9" Drawing by Ron May page 96 Marigold £/$28 HEAVY DIAMONDS Manufactured in Australia Float Bowl with Central Frog Black Amethyst £/$650

Picture page 49

MITRED DIAMONDS & PLEATS Manufactured by ESB Pin Dish - Small 2 handled Picture page 49 Often found with Sowerby Peacock head trademark Marigold £/$35 Bowl Picture page 62 Marigold £/$45 PANELLED DIAMONDS Manufactured by AUS Sugar - 2 handles Black Amethyst base £/$115 PANELLED DIAMONDS Manufactured by USF Tumbler Amethyst £/$88; Marigold £/$28

Picture page 84

STIPPLE DIAMOND SWAGS aka SWATHE & DIAMONDS Manufactured in EUR Compote on Stem Picture page 49 Marigold £/$55 Creamer Marigold £/$50 SUNFLOWER & DIAMONDS aka SOLROS (Sweden) Manufactured by SWE See SUNFLOWER . . . SUNFLOWER & DIAMONDS DIANA Manufactured in Sweden/Australia Crystal Bowl Picture page 49 With intaglio iridised base pattern. Sent from Eda Sweden for later iridisation Marigold £/$350 DIVING DOLPHINS Manufactured by ESW As exterior pattern Bowl on 3 elaborate Dolphin legs Picture page 50 Amethyst £/$280; Marigold £/$150; with staight sides (variant) +25% Also internal pattern to SCROLL EMBOSS DOGWOOD SPRAYS Manufactured by USD Compote Picture page 50 Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$250; Aqua Opal £/$300; Peach Opal £/$180; +25% for crimped rim

DOLPHINS see DPVING DOLPHINS

DOUBLE STEMMED ROSE Manufactured by USD See ROSE ... TEXAS ROSE DRAGON...

DRAGON & LOTUS Manufactured by USF Bowl - 9"** Flat Picture page 50 Marigold £/$165; Amethyst £/$195; Green £/$195; Blue £/$195; Peach Opal £/$350; Topaz £/$2000+ Bowl Picture page 50, 88 Red £/$2000; Lime Green Opal £/$1800 Bowl footed Marigold £/$185; Amethyst £/$215; Green £/$215; Blue £/$215; Peach Opal £/$215 Plate 9"+ Marigold £/$2000 DRAGON & STRAWBERRY Manufactured by USF Bowl flat 9" ' Picture page 50 Marigold £/$650; Amethyst £/$800; Green £/$1500; Blue £/$1200; Aqua Opal £/$2300 Bowl footed 9" Marigold £/$450; Green £/$1500; Blue £/$600+ Plate (aka Absentee Dragon) Marigold £/$5400 DRAGON'S TONGUES Manufactured by USF Lampshade ** Catlogue Number 230, circa 1914 Milk Glass base £/$75

Picture page 50

DRAPERY Manufactured by USN Vase Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$165; Green £/$85; Pastel £/$250 Rose Bowl Picture page 50 Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$145; Green £/$95; Blue £/$200; Aqua Opal £/$250+ Candy Dish Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$85; Green £/$120; Blue£/$80 DREIBUS ADVERTISING PIECE** Manufactured in USN Dish with one side upturned as a grip Picture page 50 Amethyst £/$450 DUCHESSE (Derek White) Manufactured in EUR Basket Drawing by Ron May on page 97 Fleur de lis pattern on upperside of English basket shape Marigold £/$55 EDSTROM (Source) aka STAR & HOBS Manufactured by SWE Bowl - Large Marigold £/$350; Blue £/$450

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Banana Boat shape Cat No 24111929 Eda Marigold £/$450; Blue £/$850 EGG & DART Manufactured in EUR Stubby Candlestick/ Fruit Bowl Marigold £/$35 ELEPHANT MUG Manufactured by USF Nezo Carnival Glass Mug Blue£/$55

Picture page 50

Picture page 50

FACETS (MQB) Manufactured in ENG Fruit Set (Master Bowl + 6 small) Marigold £/$150 Picture page 83 F A N / F A N S . . .

TWO EYED ELK Manufactured by USM Bowl - Two eyed elk Amethyst £/$1250

Picture page 50

Picture page 51

EMBROIDERED MUMS see CHRYSANTHEMUM . . EMBROIDERED EMU Named in Australia Picture page 51 Bowl - on Aqua Marigold £/$2500+ Picture page 51 Cake Dish on stem Marigold £/$650 ENAMELLED CHERRIES See CHERRY... ENAMELLED CHERRY ENAMELLED CLEMATIS (MQB) Manufactured in EUR/CZA Wine set (Decanter & 6 small goblets) Picture page 51 Partly decorated Marigold £/$600 ENAMELLED IRIS See IRJS . . . ENAMELLED IRIS ENGLISH HOB & BUTTON aka CHUNKY Manufactured in ENG Bowl Marigold £/$55; Blue £/$110 Cake plate - 2 tier with stand Marigold £/$160 Epergne - 2 bowl Marigold £/$200 ENGLISH HOBSTAR Manufactured in EUR*** Picture page 51 Bowl and metal holding basket Marigold £/$65 EROS aka GOLDEN CUPID See GOLDEN CUPID Named in Australia EUREKA FLAG See chapter on Australian production EUREKA FLORAL CROSS See chapter on Australian production

Picture page 51

Also see QUILTED FANS

ELK...

ATLANTIC CITY ELK Manufactured by USF Bowl** Blue £/$2000+

FABERGE See NEW CARNIVAL GLASS FACET BAND (Ron May) Manufactured in EUR Rose Bowl - small Drawing by Ron May page 97 Marigold £/$35

FAN Manufactured by USD Sauce Boat Peach Opal £/$175 FANLIGHT (MQB) Manufactured in EUR Double Candlestick Marigold £/$65; Green £/$170

Picture page 51

Picture page 51

FANS aka DOUBLE FANS Manufactured by ENG Water Set (Pitcher +6 Tumblers) Picture page 51 Marigold £ / $350 Only known English Water Set to date Pitcher Marigold £/$330 Tumbler Marigold £/$30 FANTAIL Manufactured by USF Bowl 5" - footed Marigold £/$45; Blue £/$185 Bowl 9" - footed ** Marigold £/$85; Blue £/$280+ Compote Marigold £/$70; Blue £/$195

Picture page 51

FARMYARD Manufactured by USD Bowl -10"** Picture page 51 Amethyst £/$8000+; Green £/$10,000+; Peach Opal £/$10,000+ Plate 10" (very rare) Amethyst £/$3240+ FEATHER...

FEATHER & HEART Manufactured by USM Water Pitcher** Picture page 52 Marigold £ / $500+; Amethyst £ / $700+; Green £/$2000+ Water Set (7 piece) Marigold £/$900+ FEATHERS Manufactured by USN Picture page 84 Vase Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$85; Green £/ $50; Blue£/$105

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FENTONIA Manufactured by USF Bowl - footed 9"+ Marigold £/$85; Blue £/$135 Bowl - footed 5" Marigold £/$38; Blue £/$48 Bowl - fruit 10" Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$85; Blue £/$95 Butter Marigold £/$100; Blue £/$135 Pitcher** Picture page 52 Marigold £/$450+; Blue £/$1000+ Tumbler Picture page 52 Marigold £/$50; Blue £/$75 FERN . . .

FERN Manufactured by USF Bowl 7"-9"

FIELD THISTLE See ALEXANDER FLORAL

Picture page 52

FILE Manufactured by ESB - European variants Pin Bowl (exterior pattern) Picture page 52 with SOWERBY mark Marigold £/$35 FINE BAND Manufactured in EUR Celery Vase Marigold £/$55

Picture page 85

FINE CUT OVALS Manufactured by USM Exterior to WHIRLING LEAVES This pattern also found in EUR Bowl** Picture page 52 Marigold £/$75; Amethyst £/$180; Green £/$350 FINE CUT RINGS Manufactured by HRL Marigold £/$115 FINE CUT RINGS Manufactured in UK Made for Guggenheim 1925 Celery Vase Marigold £/$55 FINE ETCHED FERN (MQB) See FERN . .. FINE ETCHED FERN

Picture page 83

FIRCONE aka PINECONE Manufactured by USF Also see PINECONE Bowl - Small Picture page 52 Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$100; Blue £ / $100 FIRCONES (MQB) Manufactured by FRI. Possibly manufactured by FDl Riikimaki model no 5161. Pitcher Picture page 52 Blue £/$2000; Marigold £/$1500 Tumbler Picture page 52 Blue £/$100; Marigold £/$60 FISH . . .

FERN Manufactured by USN Bowl - 6", 9" Marigold £/$35; Amethyst £/$45; Green £/$45 Compote Picture page 52 Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$95; Green £/$85; Blue £/$85 Hat Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$95; Green £/$105

FILE Manufactured by USI Exterior pattern Bowl - small

FINE RIB Manufactured by USN Compote Marigold £/$38; Green £/$85

Also see TROUT AND FLY FISH Manufactured in EUR Shallow Bowl Intaglio fish in base All iridised Marigd

Picture page 52

FISHERMAN Manufactured by USDD Picture page 84 Mug Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$125; Blue £/$250; Peach Opal £/$350; Pastel £/$400+ (LITTLE) FISHES Picture page 52 Manufactured by USF Bowl - flat or footed 5"+ Marigold £/$85; Green £/$225; Blue £/$125; Peach Opal £/$200 Bowl - flat or footed 10" Marigold £/$250; Green £/$250; Blue £/$400; Amethyst £/$400 Plate 10"+ (rare) Blue £/$800 FLOAT BOWL & FROG Manufactured in Australia See DIAMONDS ... HEAVY DIAMONDS FLORAL & GRAPE** Manufactured by USF Pitcher Picture page 52 Marigold £/$165; Amethyst £/$225; Blue £/$300; +25% for variant set on blue and 10% for crimped top

Tumbler Picture page 52 Marigold £/$48; Amethyst £/$98; Blue £/$70; +25% for variant set on blue and 10% for crimped top

FLORENTINE Manufactured by USI Candlestick Marigold £/$45

Picture page 84

FLOWERS...

Picture page 85

(ENAMELLED) FLOWERS Manufactured by USF Bowl - small Marigold on Peach Opal £/$425

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Picture page 52


FLOWERS & FRAMES Manufactured by USDD Bowl** - footed Picture page 53 Marigold £/$35; Amethyst £/$200; Green £/$200; Peach Opal £/$250; Purple £/$450 FLOWERSPRAY & DIAMONDS (MQB) Picture page 83 Tumbler Marigold £/$300 (FORMAL) FLOWERS (MQB) Manufacturer not known Picture page 53 Creamer

Marigold £/$65

(FOUR) FLOWERS aka OHLSON (Sweden) and PODS & POSIES (USA) Manufactured by SWE and others USA & VARIANTS Scandinavia. Can have THUMBPRINTS exterior Bowl - large Emerald base Emerald Green £/$265 Bowl - Eda, thin glass & no Thumbprints on exterior Pastel Blue £/$3000+ Picture page 53 Bowl - yellow base Picture page 53 Pastel £/$3000+ Picture page 53 Small Shallow Bowl (Dugan USA) Peach Opal £/$200 Shallow Bowl/Plate (Eda Sweden) Picture page 53 Emerald Green £/$800 (LITTLE) FLOWERS Manufactured by USF Bowl 5"+ Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$85; Green £/$85; Blue £/$80 Bowl 9"+ Picture page 53 Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$225; Green £/$250; Blue £/$100; Red £/$2000 Plate 6" (rare) Marigold £/$150 Plate 7" (rare) Marigold £/$180 Plate 10" (extremely rare) Marigold value not known (TWO) FLOWERS Manufactured by USF Bowl on spat feet Picture page 53 Marigold £/$130; Amethyst £/$68; Green £/$250; Blue £/$150 Chop Plate 13" Marigold £/$500; +25% for footed plate FOOTED PRISMS Manufactured by ESW? Also found at Brockwitz (1931 cat) Germany Vase Picture page 53 Marigold £/$600; Blue £/$800+ FORTY-FIVE (Ron May) Manufactured in EUR Bowl - shallow, stubby feet Drawing by Ron May page 97 Marigold £/$30

FOUR CROWNS (MQB) aka PINEAPPLE CROWN Manufactured by FRI Plate 5" Picture page 82 Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$400 FOUR-SEVEN-FOUR Manufactured by USI Pitcher Picture page 53 Marigold £/$225; Amethyst £/$400; Green £/$285; Pastel £/$500 Tumbler Picture page 85 Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$120; Green £/$100 FOUR SIDED TREE TRUNK (MQB) Manufactured in EUR Vase Marigold £/$160 FREEHAND (MQB) Manufactured in ENG Modern UK Blue£/$160

Picture page 54

Picture page 54

FRILLS & DIAMONDS (Ron May) Manufactured in ENG See DIAMOND . . . FRILLS & DIAMONDS FROLICKING BEARS SPITOON See BEARS . . .FROLICKING FROSTED BLOCK Manufactured by USI Bowl - 6" Picture page 54 Marigold £/$55; Clear £/$45; Clambroth £/$85 Butter Dish Marigold £/$65; Clear £/$60; Clambroth £/$95 Sugar/Creamer Marigold £/$45; Clear £/$70; Clambroth £/$65 Rose Bowl Marigold £/$45; Clear £/$90 Compote Picture page 54 Marigold£/$60;Clear£/$60 Pickle Dish Marigold £/$45; Clambroth £/$65 FRUITS . . .

FRUIT SALAD Manufactured by Westmoreland USA Punch Bowl and 6 Cups Peach Opal £/$6000+ (spec)

Picture page 54

FRUITS & FLOWERS Manufactured by USN Variant of THREE FRUITS Bon Bon Picture page 54 Marigold £/$150; Amethyst £/$250; Blue £/$400; Gre^n£_/S300;ilxJBhxjEjS4SOij^^iCn^£/S^ MANY FRUITS Manufactured by USD Punch Cup Amethyst £/$65

Picture page 85

THREE FRUITS Manufactured by USN Bowl 5" Marigold £/$28; Amethyst £/$45; Green £/$45

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Bowl 9" Picture page 78 Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$125; Green £/$125; Blue £/$145; Aqua Opal £/$800 Bon-Bon Marigold £/$40; Amethyst £/$60; Green £/$65; Blue £/$75; Aqua Opal £/$800 (TWO) FRUITS Manufactured by USF Bowl - divided - scarce Picture page 54 Marigold £/$280; Amethyst £/$280; Green £/$165; Blue £/$165 GARDEN PATH Manufactured by USD and FRI Bowl Picture page 54 Interior on Rio base CRACKLE exterior Pink £/$400 GARLAND aka DAINTY GOBLET* Manufactured by USF Deep Bowl on 3 legs Picture page 54 Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$95; Green £/$95;

Blue£/$95

GARLAND Manufactured by Indiana USA Repro ware piece Blue £/$125 GAY NINETIES Manufactured by USM Tumbler + Marigold £/$200

Picture page 54

GEOMETRICS (MQB) Manufactured in ENG? See KOKOMO GLADER aka STAR & FAN (MQB) Named in Sweden (SWE) Bowl on collar base Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$400 GODDESS OF THE HARVEST Manufactured by USF Bowl 9"+** Amethyst £/$10,000+ (spec) Plate Amethyst £/$3890

Picture page 54

Picture page 54

GRAND THISTLE aka WIDE PANELLED THISTLE Manufactured by FRI Also see ALEXANDER FLORAL GRAPE...

CENTRAL GRAPE & LEAVES Manufactured in ENG Bowl Marigold £/$50 GRAPE & CABLE Manufactured by USN Fernery - rare Picture page 55 Marigold £/$150; Amethyst £/$200; Green £/$200; White £/$1000; Blue £/$200; Ice Blue £/$1500+; for straight sided version add 25% Butter & Lid Picture page 55 Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$220; Green £/$185; Purple £/$175 Bowl 10" Marigold £/$150; Amethyst £/$75; Green £/$80; Blue £/$80; Aqua Opal £/$3000 Bowl - 3 toed Picture page 55 Celeste Blue £/$1500+ Nappy Marigold £/$75; Amethyst £/$150; Green £/$100; Blue £/$150 Pitcher Marigold £/$250; Amethyst £/$275; Green £/$275 Tumbler Picture page 86 Marigold £/$75; Amethyst £/$95; Green £/$85; Blue£/$95 Punch Set (8 pieces) Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$4750; Green £/$1000; Blue £/$1500 Punch Cup Marigold £/$50; Amethyst £/$48; Green £/$48; Blue £/$60 Plate - Ruffled edge Picture page 87 !«Eue£./$1300 GRAPE & FLOWERS aka BANDED FLORAL & GRAPE Manufactured by USF and USD Picture page 86 Tumbler Marigold £/$38; Amethyst £/$78; Blue £/$78

GOLDEN CUPID Manufactured in Australia GOLDEN HARVEST Manufactured by USI Decanter and Stopper Marigold £/$100; Amethyst £/$150

Variant Bowl 8"+ Marigold £/$250; Amethyst £/$350; Green £/$400 GOTHIC ARCHES aka GRAPE & GOTHIC ARCHES Manufactured by USF

Picture page 55

GOLDEN THISTLE See THISTLE . .. GOLDEN THISTLE GOOD LUCK Manufactured by USN And with Variant. And with STIPPLE RAYS exterior Bowl 8"+ Picture page 54 Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$2000; Green £/$800; Blue £/$1800; Aqua Opal £/$5000+ Plate 9" Marigold £/$2000; Amethyst £/$600; Green £/$700; Blue £/$900; Ice Blue £/$4000+

GRAPE & GOTHIC ARCHES Manufactured by USN Creamer/Sugar GRAPE & GOTHIC ARCHES Manufactured by USF Tumbler Picture page 86 Marigold £/$70; Amethyst £/$80; Green £/$90; BIue£/$90 GRAPE ARBOR Manufactured by USD Northzvood USA also made a Pitcher with this name Master Bowl Picture page 55 Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$2000; Blue £/$250

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Tankard Marigold £/$350; Amethyst £/$600; White £/$100 GRAPE ARBOR Manufactured by USN Tumbler Picture page 85 .M.arigoid£/.?.65. GRAPEVINE LATTICE Manufactured by USF Pitcher Tumbler GRAPEVINE LATTICE Manufactured by USD Bowl - shallow Picture page 55 Marigold £/$100; Amethyst £/$150; Blue £/$125; Green £/$125; White £/$80; Clear Frosted £/$200 Plate Marigold £/$300; Amethyst £/$500; Blue £/$400; White £/$250; Clear Frosted £/$600 Hat Shape Marigold £/$60 (HEAVY) GRAPE Manufactured by USI Plate 6" Picture page 55 Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$185; Helios Green £/$125 Bowl 9" Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$655; Green £/$65 Punch bowl and top Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$500; Green £/$500 Punch Cup Marigold £/$50; Amethyst £/$60; Green £/$60 Wine Goblet Picture page 86 Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$48; Green £/$48 (HELIOS) GRAPE Manufactured by USI Bowl Green £/$45; Helios Green £/$85

Picture page 55

IMPERIAL GRAPE Manufactured by USI Bowl Marigold £/$100; Amethyst £/$40; Green £/$40; Purple £/$150 Punch Bowl Set Picture page 55 Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$350; Green £/$300; Helios Green £/$600 Punch Cup Marigold £/$50; Green £/$60; Purple £/$60; Helios Green £/$600 Decanter and Stopper- Repro 1970s Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$48; Purple £/$350 LOTUS & GRAPE See LOTUS .. .LOTUS & GRAPE PEACOCK & GRAPE See PEACOCK & GRAPE VINTAGE GRAPE Manufactured by USD Powder Bowl & Lid Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$100; Blue £/$130; Purple £/$165

Rose bowl Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$65; Green £/$55; Blue£/$55 Bowl 8" Picture page 55 Red£/$2000+ VINTAGE GRAPE Manufactured by USF Epergne Marigold £/$175; Amethyst £/$100; Green £/$225; Blue £/$225 Fernery Marigold £/$38; Amethyst £/$55; Green £/$75; Blue £/$65 Bowls 8", 10" Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$100; Green £/$125; Blue £/$65; Amber £/$130; Red £/$2000+ Plate T Marigold £/$75; Amethyst £/$400; Blue £/$85; Green £/$85+; Purple £/$85 Rose Bowl Marigold £/$125; Green £/$145; Blue £/$55; Amethyst £/$125 VINTAGE GRAPE Manufactured by USM Bowl - 5" Extremly rare Bowl - 9" Extremly rare GRAVEYARD SPHERE (MQB) Manufactured by ESW Picture page 55 Not for public sale. Commemorates a death in 1918. Made before the era of Eda Lustre ware production. Not on sale market. GREEK KEY...

GREEK KEY Manufactured by USN Bowl Picture page 56 Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$220; Blue £/$240; Green £/$240; Bronze iridescence over Green £/$200; +25% for frilled edge. Dome-based bowl similar values

GREEK KEY & SCALES Manufactured by USN External pattern Compote on short stem Picture page 56 Marigold £/$150; Amethyst £/$170; Green £/$190; Blue£/$190 GREEK KEY & SUNBURST Possibly Dutch Vase - 2 handles (with Pedestal base) Marigold £/$150 GRETA (MQB) Manufactured by HRL Milk Jug Marigold £/$35

Picture page 56

Picture page 56

HAMBURG aka RANDEL VARIANT Manufactured by SWE. Named in Sweden (source) Bowl - Banana Boat shape Picture page 56 Marigold £/$3000; Blue £/$4000

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HAND VASE HEARTS & TREES Now traced to Jain Glasszvorks (P) Ltd, Indian manufacture Manufactured by USF though also made in Czechoslovakia, iridised and non iridisedInternal pattern with BUTTERFLY & BERRY without the zvatch around the zvrist Master Bowl** Picture page 57 With Watch Picture page 56,85 Marigold £/$600; Green £/$900 Marigold £/$450-£/$500 HEART & VINE Variation with flowers above the hand £/$600 Manufactured by USF Vase on Green Iridised acid etched Bowl Camphor glass Picture page 56 Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$98; Green £/$78; Green £/$600; Yellow base £/$155 (no watch on wrist) Blue£/$98 HANS (MQB) Probably manufactured by HRL Compote - small on stem Marigold £/$70; Pale Gold £/$85

Picture page 56

HATTIE aka BUSY LIZZIE Manufactured by USI Bowl Marigold £/$35; Amethyst £/$85 Rose Bowl Marigold £/$80; Pastel - Amber £/$180 Plate - rare Marigold £/$750; Amethyst £/$900 HAZEL (MQB) Manufacture not known though found at EDA Szveden Vase Picture page 56 Marigold £/$350 HEADDRESS Interior pattern to CURVED STAR Large Bowl Picture page 57 Marigold £/$125; Blue £/$255 Often used as Punch Bowl top to inverted stemmed sugar. Not found in Eda catalogue but workers recall the pattern usage. Also believed used in Finnish factories. HEART/HEARTS...

HEARTS & FLOWERS Manufactured by USN Compote** Picture page 57 Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$375; Green £/$1600; Blue £/$375; Purple £/$750; Ice Blue £/$1200; Ice Green £/$2000; Reniger Blue £/$2000+; White £/$400 Bowl 8" Picture page 56 Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$230; Green £/$500; Blue £/$600; Aqua Opal £/$700; Ice Blue £/$1200; Ice Green £/$800; White £/$350; Purple £/$700; Lime Green Value not known; Marigold on custard £/$3000 Plate 9" Picture page 57 Marigold £/$800; Amethyst £/$950; Blue £/$450; Green £/$2500+; Purple £/$1200; Aqua Opal £/$2000; Ice Blue £/$1500; Lime Green £/$3000; While £/$1800 HEARTS & HORSESHOES Manufactured by USF Bowl 8"+ Marigold £/$750; Green £/$2000+ Plate 9" rare Marigold £/$100; Green £/$850

Picture page 57

Plate** - 8" Picture page 57 Marigold £/$250; Amethyst £/$350; Green £/$265; Blue £/$480; Has a central space for advertising. If centre has a HORSESHOE then it becomes the rare HEARTS AND HORSESHOES pattern (JEWELLED) HEART aka LATTICE & HEART Manufactured by USD Bowl 5" Amethyst £/$40; Peach Opal £/$85 Bowl 10" Amethyst £/$75; Peach Opal £/$105 Pitcher Marigold £/$2000+ Tumbler Marigold £/$175 Plate 6" Marigold £/$175; Peach Opal £/$185 Plate - Whimsey Picture page 57 Turned up tulip edge all round on exterior pattern Amethyst £/$3000+ (STREAM OF) HEARTS Manufactured by USF Bowl 10" footed Goblet Marigold £/$150 Compote Picture page 57 With double crimped edge and Persian Medallion** interior Marigold £/$3000+ HEAVY CUT (MQB) Manufactured by FRI Orange Bowl - Giant Marigold £/$125

Picture page 57

HEAVY DIAMONDS Australian See DIAMONDS .. . HEAVY DIAMONDS HEAVY WEB Manufactured by USD Bowl - scalloped edge Peach Opal £/$125

Picture page 88

HEN Manufactured by ESW See... COVERED HEN HERRINGBONE & IRIS Manufactured in USA by Jeanette Depression Ware Pitcher Marigold £/$200 Tumbler Marigold £/$75

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Picture page 57


HOBNAIL...

HOBNAIL Manufactured by USM Pitcher Marigold £/$1500; Amethyst £/$1600; Green £/$1800 Blue£/$1200 Tumbler Marigold £/$650; Amethyst £/$350; Green £/$850; Blue £/$750 Rose Bowl Picture page 57 Marigold £/$300; Amethyst £/$400; Green £/$450 Spittoon Marigold £/$600; Amethyst £/$1200; Green £/$1300 Butter - rare Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$500; Green £/$525; Blue£/$700 Creamer/Sugar Marigold £/$210; Amethyst £/$310; Green £/$410; Blue£/$480 HOBNAIL BANDED Manufactured by EMK rare Tumbler Marigold £/$200; Blue £/$400

Picture page 57

(SWIRLED) HOBNAIL Manufactured by USM Rose Bowl** Picture page 58 Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$500; Green £/$480 HOBSTAR...

HOBSTAR & CUT TRIANGLES Manufactured by ESW Bowl Marigold £/$55; Amethyst £/$135 Picture page 58 Bowl - Large shallow Marigold £/$185; Amethyst £/$265 Rose Bowl Marigold £/$55; Amethyst £/$70; Green £/$90 Plate Marigold £/$90; Amethyst £/$155; Green £/$170 HOBSTAR & FEATHERS Manufactured by USM Punch Bowl set (2 pieces) Marigold £/$900+; Green £/$3500; Blue £/$1200+ Punch Cup Marigold £/$30; Amethyst £/$40; Blue £/$50 Rose Bowl Giant size S'k" Picture page 58 Marigold £/$3000; Amethyst £/$3500+; Green £/$2000 Compote 6" rare Marigold £/$1400 HOBSTAR & TASSELS Manufactured by USI Bowl - Small Marigold £/$165; Amethyst £/$280

Picture page 58

HOBSTAR FLOWERS Manufactured by USN Compote - scarce Picture page 58 Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$150; Green £/$250; Blue £/$260; Lime Green £/$450; Purple £/$145; Lavendar Pastel £ / $250

HOBSTAR See also LONG HOBSTAR HOLLY...

(CARNIVAL) HOLLY aka HOLLY Manufactured by USF Add 25% for any handzoorked edges to any of the follozoing Bowl Picture page 58, 88 Marigold £/$95; Amethyst £/$85; Green £/$145; Blue £/$145; Red £/$1500+; Cobalt Blue Opal £/$3000+; Milk Glass iridised £/$2000+ Compote 5" Marigold £/$170; Amethyst £/$250; Green £/$220; Blue£/$50 Hat Marigold £/$35; Amethyst £/$48; Green £/$95; Blue £/$90; Red £/$500; Moonstone £/$400 Goblet Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$80; Green £/$170; Blue £/$210; Red £/$1000 Plate 9" Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$800+; Green £/$800+; Blueif/$800; Red.£/$2000+ HOLLY & BERRY Manufactured by USD Bowl Picture page 58 Marigold £/$125 Amethyst £/$165; Green £/$175; Blue £/$80; Red £/$2000; White £/$100; Peach Opal £/$165 Nappy Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$50; Green £/$175; Blue £/$60; Peach Opal £/$185 Sauce Boat - single handle Amethyst £/$65; Blue £/$65; Peach Opal £/$140 HOLLY SPRIG Manufactured by USF Hat shape Bowl - small Picture page 58 Marigold £/$145; Amethyst £/$200; Green £/$200; Blue £/$215; Red £/$1350 HONEYCOMBE & CLOVER Exterior pattern to FEATHERED SERPENT Bowl 5" Marigold £/$65; Green £/$85; Blue £/$85 Bowl 10" Picture page 58 Marigold £/$150; Green £/$180; Blue £/$180; Amethyst £/$225 HORSES aka HORSES HEADS or HORSES MEDALLIONS Manufactured by USF Also see PONY Footed Bowl Picture page 58 Marigold £/$165; Green £/$285; Blue £/$250; Red £/$900; White £/$220; Vaseline £/$320 IDYLL ** Manufactured by USF Waterlily & Cattail pattern Vase Picture page 58 Marigold £/$850; Amethyst £/$600+; Blue £/$700

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ILLUSION Manufactured by USF Bon-Bon Marigold £/$65; Blue £/$125 Bowl Marigold £/$55; Blue £/$85 INGA (MQB) Manufactured in SWE Vase Marigold £/$400

Picture page 58

Picture page 59

INNOVATION (MQB) See NEW CARNIVAL GLASS INTAGLIO STRAWBERRY See STRAWBERRY . . . (INTAGLIO) STRAWBERRY INVERTED BLOCKS Manufactured in EUR Tumbler Picture page 85,86 Marigold £/$65 IRIS . . .

(ENAMELLED) IRIS Manufactured by USF Tumbler aka Enamelled Prism Band Picture page 84 Marigold £/$140; Green £/$70; Blue £/$300 HERRINGBONE & IRIS Manufactured in USA by Jeanette Depression ware water set Pitcher Marigold on clear £/$125 Tumbler Marigold on clear £/$65 each IRIS Manufactured by USF See ENAMELLED IRIS and HERRINGBONE & IRIS Compote on stem Picture page 59 Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$48; Green £/$85; Blue £/$125; White £/$165 JACK-IN-THE-PULPIT Manufactured in Europe Vase - Small Picture page 85 Marigold £/$70; Amethyst £/$110; Blue £/$110; Peach Opal £/$140 JET BLACK BEAUTY (MQB) Manufactured by FRI Akin to Fostoria (USA) design Shallow Bowl cum Plate Jet £/$2600 JETTA (MQB) Scandinavian or European (FRI) Vase Jet£/$2000 JEWELLED HEART See HEART. JEWELLED HEART JULIANA (MQB) Manufactured by EMK Vase Blue £/$800; Marigold £/$550+

KANGAROO Named in Australia Bowl 5" Picture page 59 Marigold £/$325; Black Amethyst £/$650 Bowl 10" Marigold £/$525; Black Amethyst £/$950+ KAREN (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Bowl - deep Picture page 59 Green (pale) £/$335; Marigold £/$355; Blue £/$650+ KINGFISHER Named in Australia Bowl 5" Marigold £/$250; Black Amethyst £/$450 Bowl 9" Picture page 59 Marigold £/$450; Black Amethyst £/$650; +25% for hand zvorked edge Bowl 11" Picture page 59 Marigold £/$550; Black Amethyst £/$750 Sauce Boat 5" Marigold £/$350; Black Amethyst £/$550 KITTENS Manufactured by USF Bowl - 4" Scarce Blue £/$700 Cup and Saucer Marigold £/$225; Blue £/$1600 Spooner 2"+ Marigold £/$125 Plate 4"+ Marigold £/$125; Blue £/$400 Vase 3" Marigold £/$125

Picture page 59

KIWI Named in Australia With SCROLL & DAISY as exterior pattern Compote - small Picture page 59 Marigold £/$350; Black Amethyst £/$450 KNOTTED BEADS Manufactured by USF Vase (scarce in UK) Picture page 84 Marigold £/$38; Green £/$85; Blue £/$68

Picture page 59

KOHINOOR aka BEVELLED DIAMONDS & RAYS (A Hallam) European manufacture Bowl - shallow Picture page 59 Marigold £/$35

Picture page 59

KOKOMO aka GEOMETRICS Manufactured in ENG Bowl - 3 footed Marigold £/$40; Amethyst £/$100

Picture page 59

Picture page 60

KOOKABURRA Manufactured in Australia See also KIWI variation Bowl 5" Marigold £/$300; Black Amethyst £/$480 Bowl 9" Picture page 60 Marigold £/$650; Black Amethyst £/$850

117


KULOR (Source) Manufactured by SWE See also MOONPRINT & INVERTED THUMBPRINTS (USA/UK) Vase Picture page 60 Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$480; Milk Glass £/$3000+; +25% for flared out top Bowl Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$480 Muffin Dish and Lid Marigold £/$335; Blue £/$515 Butter and Lid Marigold £/$335; Blue £/$515 Compote Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$480 Creamer/Sugar LAGERKRANTZ Manufactured by SWE (ex-catalogue Source) Bonbonniere + Lid Picture page 60 Marigold not known; Blue £/$4000 LASSE (Source) See CURVED STAR alternative name LATTICE & GRAPE Manufactured by USF Water Set - 8 pieces Picture page 60 Blue (v rare) Value not known; Marigold £/$500 Pitcher** Marigold £/$250; Amethyst £/$385; Green £/$425; Blue £/$600; Purple £/$350; Peach Opal £/$2000; White £/$800 Tumbler** Marigold £/$75; Amethyst £/$85; Green £/$85; Blue £/$125; Purple £/$100; Peach Opal £/$500; White £/$200 LAUREL WREATH (Ron May) Manufactured in EUR Compote - stemmed Drawing by Ron May page 97 Marigold £/$65 LEAF...

LEAF & BEADS Manufactured by USN and USD Plate Whimsey Marigold £/$210; Amethyst £/$220; Green £/$500+; Aqua Opal £/$200; Pastel £/$400 Candy Dish Footed Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$85; Green £/$95 Rose Bowl on Legs Picture page 60 Marigold £/$165; Amethyst £/$85; Green £/$265; Blue £/$265; Purple £/$265; Ice Blue £/$1500; Ice Green £/$2500; Aqua Opal £/$400; +25% for patterned interior

Nut Bowl LEAF CHAIN Manufactured by USF Bowl 7" Picture page 60 Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$65; Green £/$65; Blue £/$125; Aqua Opal £/$1000; Pastel £/$100; Red £/$1000+; Ice Green £/$1200 Bon Bon Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$55; Green £/$55; Blue£/$135

Plate Marigold £/$700; Amethyst £/$100; Green £/$1500+; Blue £/$2000; Aqua Opal £/$4000+; White £/$220 LEAF TIERS Manufactured by USF Vase Marigold £/$75; Amethyst £/$125

Picture page 84

LEAFY TRIANGLE (Ron May) Manufactured in EUR Bowl - shallow Drawing by Ron May page 98 Marigold £/$65 LILY OF THE VALLEY Manufactured by USF Water Pitcher** Blue £/$8000+ Tumbler Marigold £/$1100; Blue £/$360

Picture page 60

LION Manufactured by USF with BERRY & LEAF CIRCLE as exterior pattern Bowl 7" Picture page 60 Marigold £/$250; Blue £/$400 Plate 7"+ Marigold £/$1600+ LITTLE FISHES See FISH ... LITTLE FISHES LITTLE FLOWERS See FLOWERS . .. LITTLE FLOWERS LONDON aka QUILLS & PANELS (MQB) Named in Sweden (SWE) Bowl Picture page 60 Marigold £/$165; Blue £/$265 LONG HOBSTAR Manufactured by USI Also see HOBSTAR pattern Punch Bowl Top & Base Picture page 61 Marigold £/$400 LONG THUMBPRINT Manufactured by USD Vase Green £/$28

Picture page 84

LOTUS...

LOTUS & DRAGON See DRAGON & LOTUS LOTUS & GRAPE Manufactured by USF Bonboniere - 2 handles Picture page 61 Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$125; Green £/$125; Blue £/$125; Red £/$2000 Aqua £/$180; Vaseline £/$165 Absentee Bowl - rare Blue £/$1500 Bowl - flat 7" Marigold £/$40; Amethyst £/$48; Green £/$48; Blue £/$68 Bowl footed 7" Picture page 87 Marigold £/$48; Amethyst £/$55; Green £/$55; Blue £/$68; Persian Blue £/$850

118


MARY ANN VASE Manufactured by USD See under LOVING CUPS for 3 handled version Vase - 2 handled Picture page 61 Marigold £/$100; Amethyst £/$250

Plate 9" rare Marigold £/$2000; Amethyst £/$2200; Green £/$2500; Blue £/$2600 LOUISA Part of USA jeanette Floragold range Depression era ware Water Set (7 pieces) Marigold £/$350 Ash Tray Marigold £/$85 Pitcher Marigold £/$125 Tumbler Marigold £/$38 Tray Marigold £/$165 Manufactured by Westmoreland USA

Picture page 61

MAYAN Manufactured by USM Bowl - shallow Green £/$200

LUCILLE See NEW CARNIVAL GLASS

Picture page 61

MAGPIE (Australian) See CROW MANY FRUITS Manufactured by USD Punch Cup Picture page 85 Marigold £/$28; Amethyst £/$35; Green £/$35; Blue £/$40 MANY STARS See STARS ... MANY STARS MAPLE LEAF Manufactured by USD Compote 4" short stemmed Picture page 61 Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$55; Green £/$55; Blue £/$45 Butter Dish Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$95; Blue £/$95 Sugar/Creamer Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$55; Blue £/$55 Pitcher Marigold £/$160; Amethyst £/$265; Blue £/$200 Tumbler Marigold £/$28; Amethyst £/$48; Blue £/$48 Water Set (6 pieces) Purple £/$300 MARILYN Manufactured by USM Picture page 61 Water Pitcher** Marigold £/$750; Amethyst £/$3000+;: Green £/$1300 MARTHA Manufactured by ENG Compote 7" Marigold £/$75

Picture page 61

MAUD Manufactured by SWE (ex-1930s catalogue) Bowl - shallow Picture page 62 Marigold £/$480; Blue £/$800

LOVING CUP See MARY ANN VASE See REPRO LOVING CUP (page 19)

MAGDA (MQB) Manufactured by FRI Candlestick (pair) Ice Blue £/$1600; Marigold £/$850

MATCHBOX HOLDER Manufactured by FRI Marigold £/$85

Picture page 61

Picture page 61

MEMPHIS Manufactured by USI Bowl 5" Marigold £/$28; Amethyst £/$38; Green £/$38 Bowl 10" Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$280; Green £/$250 Punch Bowl set (6 Cups) Picture page 61 Marigold £/$500; Amethyst £/$700; Green £/$750; Ice Green £/$3000+; Ice Blue £/$5000 Punch Cup Picture page 86 Marigold £/$50; Amethyst £/$50; Green £/$50; Ice Blue £/$100 MEYDAM (MQB) Manufactured by HRL Cake Plate on stem Marigold £/$165 (only knozon colour) Compote on stem Marigold £/$125 Butter and Lid Marigold £/$145 Sugar/Creamer Marigold £/$65

Picture page 61

MIKADO Manufactured by USF Cherry Compote - Large Picture page 62 Marigold £/$700; Amethyst £/$2500; Green £/$2500; Blue £/$1750; Pastel (White) £/$600; Red £/$600 MILADY WATER SET Manufactured by USF Water Pitcher** Picture page 62 Marigold £/$1250; Amethyst £/$2250+; Green £/$2250+; Blue £/$2250+ Tumbler** Picture page 62 Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$100; Green £/$110; Blue£/$100 MITRED DIAMONDS & PLEATS See DIAMONDS ... MITRED DIAMONDS & PLEATS MOLLER Manufactured by SWE (ex catalogue) Bowl - large Picture page 62 Marigold £/$480; Blue £/$800; +25% for flared out shape to rim MONEY BOXES See OWL MONEY BOX

119


MOONPRINT Manufactured by ENG/SWE/HRL/USA Bowl - large 10"+*** Marigold £/$350 Creamer/Sugar Marigold £/$65

Creamer Marigold £/$30 Picture page 62

MORNING GLORY Manufactured by USM Pitcher** Picture page 62 Marigold £/$10,000+; Amethyst £/$8000; Green £/$9000 Tumbler** Picture page 62 Marigold £/$1000; Amethyst £/$1350+; Green £/$900 MY LADY Possibly manufactured by Davisons England Powder Bowl Picture page 62 Marigold £/$85 NANNA (Source) Manufactured by SWE (ex catalogue) Vase Picture page 62 Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$480 NANTIA (MQB) Manufactured by SWE (ex catalogue) Plate Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$480

Picture page 62

NAUTILUS Manufactured by USD using old Northwood mould Bowl - Shell shape Picture page 62 Marigold £/$250; Amethyst £/$280; Purple £/$280; Peach Opal £/$300 NESTING SWAN See SWAN... NESTING SWAN NEW CARNIVAL GLASS Pictures pages: 19,20,21,48,63, 72,83,86,90,91,92,93,94 NIPPON Manufactured by USN With PEACOCKS TAILS as interior pattern Bowl 8"+ Picture page 62 Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$225; Green £/$225; Blue £/$225; White £/$250 Plate 9" Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$450; Blue £/$600; Green £/$2000+; White £/$1000+

Picture page 63

OBSIDIAN (MQB) See CANDLESTICKS . . OBSIDIAN OCTET Manufactured by USN With exterior pattern NORTHWOOD VINTAGE Bowl Picture page 63 Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$250; White £/$160 OHLSON (Source) See FLOWERS . . . FOUR FLOWERS OIL LAMP see ROCCOCO WAVES OLGA (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Bowl Marigold £/$200; Blue £/$300

Picture page 63

OLIVIA (MQB) Possibly Val St Lambert, often seen in Belgium akin to COLUMBIA in USA Giant Bowl - open edged, 12"+ Picture page 63 Marigold £/$350 OPAL ROCCOCO WAVES (Frank Horn) See ROCCOCO WAVES OPEN EDGE BASKETWEAVE Manufactured by USF Group Bowls - 5" Marigold £/$48; Amethyst £/$58; Green £/$58; Blue £/$58; Ice Green £/$220 Bowl - Ice Blue, shallow 8" Marigold £/$68; Amethyst £/$88; Green £/$88; Blue £/$88; Ice Blue £/$250 Bowl - 5" Ice Blue £/$220 Bowl - 8" Ice Green £/$280 OPEN ROSE See ROSE . .. OPEN ROSE ORANGE TREE...

ORANGE TREE Manufactured by USF Hatpin Holder Picture page 63 NORA (MQB) Marigold £/$250; Green £/$380; Blue £/$400; Manufactured by EMK Pastel (White) £/$400 Picture page 63 Bowl - flat, 8", 10" Vase Picture page 87, 88 Marigold £/$145; Blue £/$245 Marigold £/$45; Green £/$275; Blue £/$125; Celeste Blue £/$1600; Moonstone not known NORTHERN LIGHTS Bowl - footed 9", 11" See STAR & HOBS ... NORTHERN LIGHTS Marigold £/$105; Green £/$115; Blue £/$115 NUTMEG GRATER Ice cream - small, stemmed Manufactured by SWE & others Marigold £/$25; Blue £/$35 Bowl Powder Jar and lid Marigold £/$155 Marigold £/$125; Green £/$400; Blue £/$165 Compote - stemmed Loving Cup Marigold £/$70 See also under LOVING CUP Butter & Lid Picture page 63 Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$375; Green £/$450; Marigold £/$65 Blue £/$450; Peach Opal £/$4000; Aqua Opal £/$5000; Sugar Picture page 63 Pastel (White) £/$400 Marigold £/$45

120


Punch set - top and base Picture page 63 Marigold £/$130; Amethyst £/$450; Green £/$200; Blue £/$200 Punch Cup Picture page 86 Marigold £/$28; Green £/$38; Blue £/$38 Goblet - large Picture page 84 Marigold £/$75 Wine Marigold £/$38; Blue £/$58 Sugar/Creamer Marigold £/$28; Blue £/$48 Butter Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$275 Pitcher Picture page 63 Marigold £/$185; Blue £/$265; Deep Blue £/$IO00 Tumbler Picture page 63 Marigold £/$75; Blue £/$400+; Deep Blue £/$150 ORANGE TREE ORCHARD Manufactured by USF Orange Tree was a vast range of pieces including variants in Bowls (large and small), Butter Dish, Creamer, Goblet, Loving Cup, Powder Jar and Lid and Sugar Bowl Pitcher** Picture page 63 Marigold £/$225; Amethyst £/$400; Green £/$400; Blue £/$350; White £/$450 Tumbler Marigold £/$48; Amethyst £/$105; Green £/$105; Blue £/$105 ORANGE TREE VARIANT Manufactured by USF Pitcher** Blue£/$400 Tumbler** Blue £/$150

ORCHID See WISHBONE (Variant) OREBRO aka NORTHERN LIGHTS See STAR & HOBS (alternative name)

ORIGAMI (Ron May) Manufactured in EUR UK Depression ware Bowl - shallow Marigold £/$45

Picture page 63

PALM BEACH Manufactured by USD Picture page 64 Rose Bowl - turned in lip Marigold £/$100; Amethyst £/$48 With internal pattern GOOSEBERRY Marigold £/$200 Whimsey Price not known but approx £/$100 PANELLED DANDELION Manufactured by USF Water Set Picture page 64 Butler Bros catalogue 1910. Price not known as rare but £/$1000+. Found in Amethyst, Blue and Green. Pitcher Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$600; Blue £/$70; Green £/$70 Tumbler Picture page 83 Marigold £/$48; Amethyst £/$85; Green £/$85; Blue £/$95 PANELLED Manufactured in AUS by Crozvn Crystal Glass Co Sugar Bowl Picture page 64 Black Amethyst £/$200, with diamond panelling Marigold £/$100, with oblong panelling PANELLED THISTLE See ALEXANDER FLORAL

ORBIT (Ron May) Manufactured in EUR Cake Stand Drawing by Ron May page 98 On central stem (ribbon column style), Reg No 704493, (not a Sowerby Registration as would be prefixed by RD and only up to 520894) Marigold £/$65

ORIENTAL (MQB) Far East Reproduction Carnival Glass Ginger Jar with Lid and Box Marigold £/$45

OSTRICH See EMU OWL Manufactured by EUR Money Box Marigold £/$85

Picture page 63

Drawing by Ron May page 98

ORNATE BEADS (MQB) Manufactured by FDK Candlesticks Picture page 63 Four section mould. Catalogue No 4863 Blue £/$800

PANELS & THUMBPRINTS Manufactured by USD See also THUMBPRINTS Compote Marigold £/$55; Amethyst £/$85

Picture page 64

PANSY...

(AUSTRALIAN) PANSY Bowl Picture page 64 Small Crystal bowl inset iridised base, believed sent from EDA Sweden to Australia where base was iridised. Other patterns such as Diana, Cherub, Circled Rose also found with iridised base. Iridised ONLY in b a ^ PANSY Manufactured by USI Imperial Repro Nappy Picture page 64 This is an Imperial later reproduction with QUILT exterior pattern. £/$85 Early manufacture: Bowl 8"+ Marigold £/$55; Amethyst £/$165; Green £/$125; Blue£/$165 Creamer/Sugar Marigold £/$50; Amethyst £/$60; Blue £/$60; Smoke £/$70; Green £/$60 Dresser Tray Marigold £/$90; Amethyst £/$125; Green £/$125; Smoke £/$150; Amber £/$150

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Pickle Dish - oval Marigold £/$60; Amethyst £/$80; Green £/$80; Blue £/$270; Smoke £/$125 Nappy (old only) Marigold £/$50; Green £/$85 Plate - rare Marigold £/$145; Amethyst £/$360; Green £/$180; Smoke £/$270

PEACOCK & URN Manufactured by USF Compote Marigold on Aqua Value not known Plate Perisan Blue Value not known Bowl 8"+ Bearded Berry Exterior

PANTHER Manufactured by USF Bowl 5" - 3 footed Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$225; Blue £/$125; Green £/$400; Pastel (Red) £/$700; White £/$350; Aqua £/$200 Bowl 10" - 3 footed Picture page 64 Marigold £/$1250; Amethyst £/$275; Green £/$800; Blue £/$1500+; White £/$780 PARQUET (Ron May) Manufactured in EUR Creamer Marigold £/$30

Drawing by Ron May page 99

PARROTS & POMEGRANATES Named in Australia Bowl Value not known

Draiuing page 25

PASTEL SWAN see SWAN . . .PASTEL SWAN PEACH . . .

PEACH Manufactured by USN Bowl 5" White £/$85 Bowl 9" White £/$95 Sugar/Creamer White £/$150 Tumbler Blue £/$130 PEACH & PEAR Manufactured by USD Banana Boat shape bowl Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$145

Picture page 64

PEACOCK...

PEACOCK & DAHLIA Manufactured by USF Bowl 7"+ Picture page 64 Marigold £/$38; Green £/$100; Blue £/$100; Ice Blue £/$2500+ Plate - 8", rare Marigold £/$400; Blue £/$500 PEACOCK & GRAPE Manufactured by USF Bowl - flat/footed Picture page 64, 65, 89 Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$300; Red £/$1000; Green £/$200; Blue £/$200; Peach Opal £/$70; Amberina £/$1250; Lime Green Opal £/$600; Vaseline £/$800+ Plate - flat/footed, rare Marigold £/$450; Amethyst £/$350; Green £/$1000; Blue £/$1500; Pastel £/$400

Picture page 65 Picture page 65

A one-off experimental piece. Marigold iridised on reverse over exterior pattern Bearded Berry. Moonstone (semi opaque white) £/$5000+ This has been seen in UK zoith reverse iridisation on the interior (not exterior) of the bozvl

PEACOCK & URN Manufactured by USN Ice Cream Bowl Marked N in circle Cobalt Blue £/$250

Picture page 65

PEACOCK AT THE FOUNTAIN Manufactured by USN and USD Tumbler Picture page 65,86 Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$90; Green £/$300; Blue £/$150; White £/$350; Ice Blue £/$180 PEACOCK ON THE FENCE aka PEACOCKS Manufactured by USN Bowl 8"+ Picture page 65 Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$325; White £/$ not known; Blue £/$850+; Green £/$750; Frosted £/$1400; Pastel (Ice Green) £/$1000+; Marigold on Aqua £/$2300+ Plate 9" Picture page 65 Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$600; Green £/$1000+; Blue £/$850; Marigold on Aqua Opal £/$4000; Ice Blue Value not known (STRUTTING) PEACOCK Manufactured by Westmoreland USA Creamer or Sugar with lid Amethyst £/$125; Green £/$85

Picture page 83

Picture page 65

Picture page 65

PEACOCK TAILS Manufactured by USF Bon Bon - 2 handles Picture page 65 Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$125; Green £/$125; Blue£/$125 Bowls 4"-10" Marigold £/$40; Amethyst £/$48; Green (rare) £/$240; Blue £/$48; Peach Opal £/$500; Red £/$1500 Compote Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$85; Green £/$85; Blue £/$85 Hat Marigold £/$95; Amethyst £/$135; Green £/$135; Blue£/$135 Plate 6" Marigold £/$1000; Amethyst £/$70 Plate 9" Marigold £/$800; Amethyst £/$200; Blue £/$1500 PEBBLE & FAN Manufactured by CZA Vase 11"+ Picture page 66 Marigold £/$1000; Blue £/$1400; Vaseline £/$2000 PERFECTION Manufactured by USM Tumbler Marigold £/$1000; Amethyst £/$1200

122

Picture page 66


PERSIAN GARDEN Manufactured by USF Plate - crimped edge Blue£/$2000+

PINEAPPLE...

Picture page 66

PERSIAN MEDALLIONS Manufactured by USF Bon-Bon Picture page 66,87 Marigold £/$95; Amethyst £/$75; Green £/$165; Blue £/$165; Red £/$1000; Aqua £/$200; Amberina £/$350; Aqua £/$165; Vaseline £/$300 Celeste Blue (rare) £/$ not known; Ice Blue £/$ not known; Compote Picture page 66 Marigold £/$325; Green £/$400; Blue £/$425; White £/$650; Red £/$1100; Aqua £/$800; Red £/$800 Bowl 5"-8" Picture page 66 Marigold £/$100; Amethyst £/$300; Green £/$450; Blue £/$400; Red £/$U00 Bowl 10"** Marigold £/$150; Amethyst £/$300; Green £/$450; Blue £/$400; +25% for handworked edge Orange Bowl Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$175; Green £/$2000; Blue £/$175 Rose Bowl Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$65; Green £/$65; Blue£/$65 Plate T, 9" Marigold £/$100; Amethyst £/$425; Green £/$500+; Blue £/$400; White £/$750+ Punch Bowl - top and base Picture page 66 Marigold £/$220; Amethyst £/$320; Green £/$360; Blue£/$360

PINEAPPLE & BOWS Manufactured by ESW Sowerby UK Bowl 4" Marigold £/$50; Amethyst Bowl 7" Marigold £/$70; Amethyst Creamer/Sugar Marigold £/$50; Amethyst Compote - stemmed Marigold £/$85; Amethyst Butter Marigold £/$105 Rose Bowl Marigold £ / $225

£/$70 £/$105 £/$70 £/$120

PINEAPPLE CROWN (MQB) aka FOUR CROWNS Manufactured by FRI Plate Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$450 PINEAPPLE ROYAL Manufactured in EUR Vase - large Marigold £/$45

Picture page 66

PINECONE Manufactured by USF See also FIRCONE Picture page 66 Bowl 6" Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$65 Plate 6" Marigold £/$180; Green £/$300; Blue £/$400; Amethyst £/$300 Sauce Marigold £/$100; Blue £/$125; Amethyst £/$125

PETALS & PRISMS (Derek White) Manufactured in EUR Fruit Bowl Drazving by Ron May page 99 PIN-UPS Marigold £/$65 Manufactured in AUS. Named in Australia Picture page 66 PETER RABBIT Bowl 8"+ Manufactured by USF Marigold £/$150 Exterior pattern to PEACOCK & URN PINWHEEL Exterior pattern to LEAF CHAIN/ORANGE TREE Manufactured by ESB Bowl - rare (part of the DERBY range NOT the USA (re Hartung) Marigold 1250; Green £/$1200; Blue £/$2000 PINWHEEL pattern) Plate -10" Pi'ef lire page 66 Vase 6"+ Picture page 67 Marigold £/$750; Green £/$6250; Blue £/$5250 Marigold £/$100; Amethyst £/$200 Picture page 67 Vase 8" PILLARS & FLUTE Marigold £/$150; Amethyst £/$150 Manufactured by USI Bowl 8" Often confused with LUSTRE & CLEAR Compote PLAID Marigold £/$30 Manufactured by USF Rose Bowl Bowl 8"+ Picture page 67 Marigold £/$30 Marigold £/$160; Green £/$300; Blue £/$800; Creamer/Sugar Celeste Blue £/$3000; Pastel (Ice Blue) £/$1200; Marigold £/$25 Teal (rare) £/$ Value not known Celery Vase Plate 9" Marigold £/$28 Marigold £/$360; Amethyst £/$400 PINCHED SWIRL PLEATS (Ron May) Manufactured by USD Manufactured by ESW Vase with handworked top Picture page 66 Shallow Bowl/Plate Drawing by Ron May page 98 Peach opalescent £/$300 Marigold £/$35

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PODS & POSIES See FLOWERS .. . FOUR FLOWERS POINSETTIA aka POINSETTIA & LATTICE Manufactured by USN Bowl - 3 toed Picture page 67 Marigold £/$600; Amethyst £/$1000; Green £/$600; Blue £/$1000; Aqua Opal £/$4000; Ice Blue £/$2000 Bowl - flat Picture page 67 Marigold £/$1000 POND LILY Manufactured by USF Bon Bon - 2 handled Picture page 67 Clear £/$85; Green £/$85; Opaque Blue** £/$4000+ (spec) PONY Manufactured by USD See also HORSES Bowl 8"+ - internal or exterior Picture page 67 Marigold £/$80; Amethyst £/$250; Purple £/$750; Ice Green £/$1800; Marigold on Aqua £/$2000 (one-off) POPPY SHOW Manufactured by USN BASKETWEAVE exterior Plate 9" Picture page 67 Marigold £/$1000; Amethyst £/$1400; Green £/$2000; Blue £/$2000; Purple £/$1500; Ice Blue £/$1500; Yellow base £/$3000+

QUARTER BLOCK Manufactured by ESW Creamer/Sugar Marigold £/$35 Butter and Lid Marigold £/$65 QUATTRO Named in Sweden (Source) Bowl Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$480

Picture page 68 Picture page 68

Picture page 68

QUEENIE (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Picture page 68 akin to QUANDRY but with a small pattern between panels Bowl Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$450 QUESTION MARKS Manufactured by USI Compote - short stem Picture page 68, 85 Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$75; Peach Opal £/$85 Cake Plate Marigold £/$100; Amethyst £/$100; Peach Opal £/$68 QUILT... Exterior pattern to PANSY QUILT & STAR Manufactured by FRI Short Stubby Vase Blue base £/$850

Picture page 82

POWDER BOWL (BAMBI) Manufactured in EUR Powder Bowl with lid Picture page 67 Similar seen with SCOTT1E DOG/MY LADY for lids Marigold £/$85

QUILTED FANS (MQB) Manufactured by FRI Shallow Oblong Dish Blue base (rare) £/$1500

PREMIUM Manufactured by USI Candlestick Marigold £/$175 Each

QUILTED PANELS (MQB) Manufactured by FDK Picture page 82 Tumbler Catalogue No 4020 (1926). Three section mould Marigold £/$330; Blue £/$515

PRISMA Manufactured by SWE Ex Lyster cat circa 1925 Bowl Marigold £/$200; Blue £/$400

Picture page 84

QUILTED ROSE (MQB) See ROSE .. .QUILTED ROSE Picture page 67

PULLED LOOP Manufactured by USD Vase Picture page 84 Peach Opalescent £/$250; Marigold £/$100; Blue £/$150 PUMP See TOWN PUMP PURITAN See NEW CARNIVAL GLASS QUANDRY (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Bowl Blue £/$300; Blue £/$450 QUANTUM (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Vase Marigold £/$450; Blue (rare) £/$1000

Picture page 68

QUINCE (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Water Pitcher Blow moulded, pale iridisation Clear £/$185

Picture page 68

QUINTET See NEW CARNIVAL GLASS

Picture page 68

QUIVER (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Variation on QUANDRY & QUEENIE Bowl Marigold £/$350; Blue £/$450 RABBIT... see PETER RABBIT

Picture page 67

RANDEL aka HAMBURG Manufactured by SWE (ex catalogue) Bowl - Extra large Drawing by John Masters page 38 Blue£/$2000+

124

Picture page 68


RANGER aka BLOCKS & ARCHES Manufactured in AUS Tumbler Marigold £/$60

Picture page 85

RAYS...

handzoorked ruffled edge

(STIPPLED) RAYS Manufactured by USI Creamer/Sugar Marigold £/$30; Green £/$45

Plate 9" Marigold £/$185; Blue £/$285

(STIPPLED) RAYS Manufactured by USN Bowl 8", 10"+ Picture page 68 N Mark in a circle on base of bowl Marigold £/$35; Amethyst £/$48; Green £/$58; Deep Purple £/$235; +15% for Northwood trademarkon base Compote Marigold £/$48; Amethyst £/$58; Green £/$58 (STIPPLED) RAYS Manufactured by USF Bon Bon Marigold £/$28; Amethyst £/$38; Blue £/$48 Bowl 5", 10" Marigold £/$38; Amethyst £/$48; Blue£/$48 Compote Marigold £/$28; Amethyst £/$38; Blue£/$38 Creamer/Sugar Marigold £/$28; Amethyst £/$38; Blue£/$38

RIIHIMAKI (MQB) Manufactured by FRI named on base Tumbler Picture page 69, 82 With RIIHIMAKI set proud in the base. Exceptionally rare. Blue £/$3000; Marigold £/$1500 ROBIN Manufactured by USI Tumbler Marigold £/$150; Smoke £/$400

Picture page 85

ROCCOCO WAVES (Frank Horn) Manufactured in USA Oil Lamp - metal base stand Picture page 69 Lilac base, soft smoke iridescence over £/$750 Vase Marigold £/$150; Smoke £/$250

Green £/$38; Green £/$48;

ROSALIND Manufactured by USM Bowl 5" - rare Marigold £/$1200; Amethyst £/$250; Green £/$475 Bowl 10"** Marigold £/$300; Amethyst £/$450; Green £/$450; Pastel (Aqua) £/$400+

Green £/$38; Green £/$38;

REX Named in Szoeden (Source) Vase - turned top Marigold £/$2000+; Blue £/$3000+; Milk Irid (ex rare) £/$5000 Vase - plain top Marigold £/$1500+; Blue £/$2500+; Milk Irid (ex rare) £/$5000

Picture page 68

ROSALIND WITH DIVING DOLPHIN FEET** aka DOLPHINS Compote 9" 10" Picture page 69 Amethyst £/$450; Blue £/$900 ROSE/ROSES...

(BASKET OF) ROSES Named by Tom Sprain USA (USD) Picture page 69 Bon Bon - 2 handled Marigold £/$275; Amethyst £/$500; +25% for stippled

RIBBON

RIBBON AND LEAVES Manufactured by ENG Dish Marigold £/$65

RIBBON TIE aka COMET Manufactured by USF Bowl** 9" Picture page 69 Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$190; Green £/$200; Blue £/$600; Red £/$5000; Purple £/$600; +25% for

background

Picture page 68

RIBBON SWAGS Manufactured by USN Exterior pattern to WISHBONE Bowl on 3 legs Picture page 68 Marigold £/$250; Amethust £/$350; Green £/$350; Blue £/$600; White £/$500; Ice Green £/$1250; +15% for worked edge

RIBBON SWIRL (MQB) Manufacturer not knozon Often found in Belgium, possibly Vol St Lambert. Pattern possibly copy adaption of COLUMBIA (USI) design Giant Cake Plate on short stem Picture page 69 Marigold £/$200

(CAPTIVE) ROSE Manufactured by USF Bon Bon Picture page 69 Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$125; Green £/$65; Blue£/$145 Bowl 8"-10" Marigold £/$75; Amethyst £/$85; Green £/$85; Blue £/$85; Black Amethyst £/$250 Compote Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$55; Green £/$55; Blue £/$145; White £/$145 Plate 7" Marigold £/$650; Amethyst £/$1200; Green £/$1500+; Blue£/$850+ Plate 10" Picture page 69 Marigold £/$335; Amethyst £/$650; Green £/$685; Blue £/$850

125


(CIRCLED) ROSE Manufactured in AUS*** Bowl Picture page 69 Crystal bowl with intaglio rose in base £/$450 (FINE CUT &) ROSES Manufactured by USN Candy Dish - footed Picture page 69 Marigold £/$150; Amethyst £/$300; Green £/$140; Blue £/$155; Aqua Opal £/$375 Rose Bowl - footed Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$125; Green £/$125; Blue £/$125; Ice Blue £/$400; White £/$200 LARGE ROSE aka Rose Tumbler Manufactured in EUR Tumbler

Marigold £/$65

Picture page 84

(OPEN) ROSE Manufactured by USI Bowl - footed 9" Picture page 69 Marigold £/$150; Amethyst £/$200; Green £/$200 Fruit Bowl 7", 10" Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$55; Green £/$55 Plate 9" Marigold £/$185; Amethyst (rare) £/$1800; Green £/$225 Rose Bowl Marigold £/$155; Amethyst £/$300; Green £/$48; Smoke £/$150 (QUILTED) ROSE (MQB) Manufactured in EUR Bowl with intaglio base pattern Rose Picture page 70 Marigold £/$85 ROSE & DIAMOND USA name for ROSE GARDEN/ROSOR from Sweden ROSE PANELS Possibly Scandinavian (EUR) Stemmed Compote - Extra Large Marigold £/$450 (only known colour)

Picture page 70

ROSE SHOW Manufactured by USN Bowl 8"+ Picture page 70 Marigold £/$700; Dark Amethyst £/$900+; Ice Green £/$1400; Ice Blue £/$1400; Ice Blue £/$1800; Aqua Opal £/$2000+ Plate Picture page 89 Marigold £/$1500; Amethyst £/$2000; Ice Green £/$3000+; Blue £/$1750; White £/$600; Aqua Opal £/$6000; Custard Glass £/$4000+ ROSE WREATH Manufactured by USD Rose Bowl Marigold £/$65

Picture page 70

ROSOR aka ROSE GARDEN or ROSE & DIAMOND (USA) Manufactured in SWE Letter Vase - large, extremely rare Picture page 70 Marigold £/$3000; Blue £/$5000; also found in rare noniridised form

Letter Vase - small, 5"+ Marigold £/$2000; Blue £/$4000; also found in rare noniridised form

Pitcher - large Blue £/$2500+ Bowl

Picture page 70

Has metal grid top zohen knozon as FLOWER BLOCK

Blue£/$115 Banana Boat Bowl - extra large Marigold £/$480; Blue £/$660 SERPENTINE ROSE Manufactered in EUR Bowl - large, deep, footed Drawing by Ron May page 100 Marigold £/$165 TEXAS ROSE aka DOUBLE STEMMED ROSE Manufactured by Dugan USD Bowl Picture page 70 Marigold £/$175; Amethyst £/$275; Green £/$115; Blue £/$135; White £/$250; Peach Opal £/$225; Pastel (Celeste) £/$900 (WILD) ROSE Manufactured by USN Bowl - footed, open splayed petal edge Picture page 70, 83 There is a variant with petal tulip upright not splayed

Marigold

ilS^i^?^ystEl^^,Ca^m£lt06S

(WREATH OF) ROSES Manufactured by USF Punch Set (Bowl, Top + 6 Cups) Picture page 70 with Person Medallions interior ** Marigold £/$2000; Amethyst £/$275; Green £/$375; Blue £/$1000+; Peach Opal £/$2000 Punch Cup Picture page 85 Marigold £/$30; Amethyst £/$38; Green £/$38; Blue £/$45 ROUND-UP Manufactured by USDD Same exterior as APPLE BLOSSOMS & FANCIFUL. Interior to BIG BASKETWEAVE Bowl 8"+** Marigold £/$60; Amethyst £/$500; Blue £/$200; Peach Opal £/$300; White £/$350 Plate 9" Picture page 70 Marigold £/$180; Amethyst £/$850; Blue £/$800; White £/$350; Peach Opal £/$600 ROWBOAT aka DAISY BLOCK ROWBOAT Manufactured by Sowerby UK Celery Picture page 70 Marigold £/$250; Blue £/$350; Aqua £/$450 RUSTIC Manufactured by USF Vase 18" Picture page 89 Marigold £/$500; Amethyst £/$800; Blue £/$700; Green £/$700; Lime Green Opal (rare) £/$ not known SAILBOATS Manufactured by USF Bowl 6" Marigold £/$38; Green £/$85; Blue £/$75; Red £/$500 Goblet Picture page 70 Marigold £/$80; Amethyst £/$120; Green£/$120; Blue£/$120

126


Wine Glass Marigold £/$60; Blue £/$100 Compote Marigold £ / $ 6 5 ; Blue £/$125 Plate Marigold £/$600; Blue £/$400 SALAD PANELS (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Bowl - large Marigold £/$400; Blue £/$600

Picture page 70

SEACOAST Souvenir Spittoon Picture page 71 Repro souvenir piece for Carnival Glass Association Peach Opal £/$125 SEAWEED . . .

Picture page 85

S-BAND See BROKEN CHAIN SCALE B A N D Manufactured by USF Bowl 6" Marigold £/$30; Peach Opal £ / $ 7 5 ; White £ / $ 8 0 Plate 6"+ Marigold £/$45; Red £/$500 Plate - 7" plus domed base Marigold £/$45; Red £/$500 Pitcher** Picture page 71 Marigold £/$125; Peach Opal £/$350; Blue £/$225 Tumbler Marigold £/$125; Peach Opal £/$350; Blue £/$225 SCALES Manufactured by Westmoreland (USA) Bowl Picture page 89 Clambroth Opal (rare) Value not k n o w n Plate 8" Peach Opal £/$175; Marigold on Milk £/$200 SCROLL Manufactured by USF Tumbler Blue£/$150

+25% for frilled/ruffled/piecrust edge

SEAWEED & CORAL (MQB) Probably manufacted by CZA on Crackle Vase Picture page 71 Rare (only 1 k n o w n ) vase on small knob feet. 4 sided blow moulded. On CRACKLE base and decorated with SEAWEED pattern Marigold £/$3500+ (FEATHERED) SERPENT Manufactured by USF Bowl 5" Marigold £/$70; Amethyst £/$110; Green £/$48; B l u e £ / $ 4 8 ; +25% for hand worked edge

Bowl 10" Picture page 71 Marigold £/$55; Amethyst £/$200; Green £ / $ 9 5 ; Blue £ / $95; +25% for hand zoorked edge Spittoon Amethyst £/$3500 SERPENTINE ROSE

SCROLL & DAISY Manufactured in Australia Exterior pattern to KIWI

See ROSE ... SERPENTINE ROSE SHELL...

SCROLL EMBOSS Manufactured by ESW Internal pattern to PINEAPPLE Plate 7" SCROLL EMBOSS Manufactured by USI Internal pattern to DIVING DOLPHINS and EASTERN STAR Bowl 8"+ Picture page 71 Marigold £ / $ 8 5 ; Amethyst £/$125 Plate 9" Marigold £/$335; Amethyst £/$480; Green £/$380; Purple £/$300-£/$400+ Compote - large & small Marigold £/$70; Purple £/$100; Green £/$150 Sauce Marigold £ / $ 5 5 ; Amethyst £/$200 SCROLL EMBOSS Manufactured by Sowerby UK (ESB). Adpatedfrom USI pattern Often carries PINEAPPLE as exterior pattern. Known in Marigold only and found on small Pin Trays and Small Bowls £ / $ 4 5 each

SEAWEED Manufactured by USM Bowl 5" - rare Marigold £/$300; Green £/$350 Bowl 9"** Marigold £/$350; Green £/$500; Blue £/$1200; Amethyst £/$500 Plate 9710" Marigold £/$1450; Amethyst £/$1450; Green £/$3000 Ice Cream Bowl - 1 0 " + Picture page 71 Marigold £/$300; Amethyst £/$1200; Green £/$500;

BEADED SHELL Reproduction for American Carnival Glass Association with motto inscribed "IN G O D WE TRUST" American Carnival Glass Association Souvenir 1981 Mug Picture page 83 Vaseline Opal £ / $ 1 6 5 SHELL Manufactured by USI Bowl 7", 9" Piefiire page 71 Marigold £/$175; Amethyst £/$250; Green £/$250 Plate 7"-9" aka SHELL AND SAND Marigold £/$600; Amethyst £/$750; Green £ / $ 7 5 0 SHRIKE aka THUNDERBIRD Named in Australia Bowl - 6" Picture page 71 Marigold £/$200; Black Amethyst £/$300+ Bowl - 9" Marigold £/$300; Black Amethyst £/$500; +25% worked edge SINGING BIRDS See BIRDS... SINGING BIRDS

127


SIX PETALS Manufactured by USD Bowl 8"+** Picture page 71 Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$85; Green £/$400; Blue £/$85; Pastel £/$85; Purple £/$400; Peach Opal £/$600 Plate Marigold £/$80; Amethyst £/$120; Green £/$130; Peach Opal £/$165 Hat Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$65; Green £/$65 SMALL RIB Manufactured by USD Compote Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$75; Green £/$75 Rose Bowl on stem Picture page 71 Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$165; Green £/$165 SMOCKING (Lorna Payne) Modern Indiana Glass Co (USA) See also POWDER BOWL (BAMBI) Powder Bowl and Lid Petrel Blue £/$165 SMOOTH RAYS PANELS Manufactured by USI Plate - 8 sided Smoke £/$500+ SMOOTH RAYS PANELS Manufactured by USF Bowl Blue (rare) Value not known SNOW FANCY Manufactured by McKee USA Bowl 5" Marigold £/$125 Creamer/Sugar - large Marigold £/$125

Picture page 72

SOUTACHE Manufactured by USD Bowl Peach Opal (rare) Value not known

Picture page 89

SPEARS & CHEVRONS (Ron May) Manufactured in EUR Compote Drawing by Ron May page 99 Deep bowl with flared sides with stub legs Marigold £/$65 SPEARS & DIAMOND BANDS (Ron May) Manufactured by ENG Vase Drawing by Ron May page 100 Flared or straight top Marigold £/$75 SPINNING STAR See STAR . . . SPINNING STAR SPIRIT OF '76 Manufactured by USF Commemorative Plate Marigold £/$85

Picture page 72

SPITTOON See SEACOAST See (FROCKLING) BEARS Picture page 72

Picture page 72,89

Picture page 72

SODA GOLD Manufactured by USI and FRI Similarities with CRACKLE pattern. This pattern also used on RIO (Pink base glass) in Finland Water Set (Pitcher + 6 Tumblers) Marigold £/$425; Smoke £/$900+; Rio" £/$300 Tumbler Picture page 82 Marigold £/$85; Smoke £/$125 SOLDIERS & SAILORS Manufactured by USF Commemorative Tray/Plate TA" Picture page 72 Marigold £/$2500+; Amethyst £/$1450; Blue £/$3000+ SOLROS (Source) aka SUNFLOWER & DIAMONDS See DIAMONDS . . .SOLROS SONYA (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Bowl Picture page 72 Marigold £/$335 "Rio" base/Marigold irid £/$325 SOPHIA (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Vase on 4 sided pedestal base Picture page 72 Marigold £/$225; Pale Amber base £/$600

SPRINGTIME Manufactured by USN Butter Picture page 72 Marigold £/$300; Amethyst £/$300; Green £/$400 Sugar/Creamer Picture page 72 Marigold £/$150; Amethyst £/$250; Green £/$3350 Pitcher ** Picture page 72 Marigold £/$900; Amethyst £/$880+; Green £/$1500 Tumbler - rare Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$200; Green £/$400; Pastel £/$300 S-REPEAT Manufactured by USD Exterior pattern only STAG & HOLLY Manufactured by USF Bowl 9", 13" " Picture page 72 Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$275; Green £/$680; Blue £/$350; Smoke £/$350; Peach Opal £/$1400; Amberina £/$1500+ Rose Bowl - footed Marigold £/$280; Blue £/$850 Plate - footed 9" Marigold £/$880; Amethyst £/$3000; Blue £/$1600 Plate - footed 13" Marigold £/$900 Bowl - spat feet Picture page 73 Red £/$1500+ STAR/STARS . . .

(CURVED) STAR Manufactured by SWE Pattern name often differed for SHAPE at Eda Sweden. See Chapter 7 for other newly sourced manufacturers regarding this pattern Sugar - stemmed Marigold £/$115; Blue £/$300

128


Creamer Bowl - large Marigold £/$115; Blue £/$360 Punch Top & Base set Marigold £ / $450; Blue £ / $650 Vase (aka DAGNY/LASSE) Marigold £/$600; Blue £/$1200+ Chalice (aka CATHEDRAL CHALICE) Marigold £/$225; Blue £/$480 Rose Bowl - with metal grid Marigold £/$350; Blue £/$450 Plate - 1 1 " Marigold £/$1500;^B (DOUBLE) STAR (MQB) Manufactured by FDK Bowl - small Marigold £/.$225; Blue;_£/$425

Picture page 73 Picture page 73

Picture page 73

(EASTERN) STAR Manufactured by SWE/USI With SODA GOLD exterior pattern in USA Riihimaki Finland also used this patern on Rio (Pink) base Compote on stem Picture page 73 Marigold £/$125 (MANY) STARS Manufactured by USM Bowl** 10" Picture page 73 Marigold £/$350; Amethyst £/$850; Green £/$650; Ice Cream Bowl Amethyst £/$1000; Green £/$1000

Picture page 82

STAR & STUDS (MQB) Manufactured by ESW Often found very worn mould work on splayed bowls in UK Bowl on 3 legs Picture page 74 Marigold £/$45 STARBURST (MQB) Manufactured by FRI Creamer/Sugar (each)

Marigold £/$550; Blue £/$1100

Picture page 74

d

M.sg^ .I/.$i65;..?![ye.£./$225 STARBURST & CROWN (MQB) Manufactured by EML Same design also used in sister factory in Finland Tumbler Picture page 83 Marigold £ / $300; Blue £ / $480 Compote - long stem Picture page 74 Marigold £/$650; Blue£/$13q0

STARDUST (MQB) Manufactured by EMK Bowl - small Marigold £/$185; Blue £/$265

(SPINNING) STAR (MQB) STARFISH Manufactured by FDK Vase Picture page 73 Manufactured by USD Marigold £/$550; Blue £/$850; +259!,for flared or turned in lip Compote Peach Opal £/$150 STAR & FAN (MQB) STARFLOWER Manufactured by SWE Manufactured by USF Also known as GLADER on some shapes Vase - tall Picture page 73 Water Pitcher** - 3 pint Marigold £/$ Value not known; Marigold £/$600; Blue £/$1200 Peach £/$Ojpal Value not known STAR & FILE STARLIGHT Manufactured by USI Decanter and Stopper Picture page 74 Manufactured by EMK Marigold £/$125 Vase STAR & HOBS (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Also known as OREBRO (Sweden) and NORTHERN LIGHTS on some shapes. Pattern name can change with product SHAPE at Eda (SWE). Oval Bowl Marigold £/$335; Blue £/$515 Banana Boat Picture page 73

Picture page 73

STARS & PENDANTS (MQB) Manufactured by EMK Compote on stem Picture page 74 .Mangold £/$185; Blue n 5Lf?ffidJ^date^

STARBURST MEDALLIONS (MQB) Manufactured by EML Bowl Marigold £/$550; Blue £/$850

Blue £/$2200; +25% worked edge

QUILT & STAR (MQB) Manufactured by FRI Short Stubby Vase Marigold £/$650; Blue £/$850+

STAR & OVALS (MQB) Manufactured by FRI In Riihimaki 1930s catalogue Creamer Marigold £/$65

Picture page 74

Picture page 74

Picture page 85

Picture page 74

Picture page 74

Marigold £/$365; Blue £/$800

STAR OF DAVID Manufactured by USI with ARCS exterior Bowl Picture page 74 Marigold.£/$200|Amethyst £/$350; Green £/$180 STAR OF DAVID & BOWS Manufactured by USN Bowl 8"+ Picture page 74 Marigold £/$285; Amethyst £/$385; Green £/$180; Red £/$4500+

129


STARSTRUCK (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Small Bowl Marigold £/$350; Blue £/$750 STIPPLE &: STAR (MQB) Manufactured by FRI Vase Marigold £/$650; Blue £/$1250

Picture page 74

Picture page 82

STIPPLED RAYS & STARS (Ron May) Manufactured in EUR Hat Shape Bowl - small Drawing by Ron May page 100 Marigold £/$35

STJARNA (Source) Manufactured by SWE Bonbonniere and Lid Blue (extr rare) £/$3000+ (VERTICAL) STAR PANELS (MQB) Manufactured by FDK Bonbonniere and Lid Blue £/$3000+ WHIRLING STAR Manufactured in Europe and by USI Punch Cup Marigold £/$65

STRAWBERRY Manufactured by USN Bon-Bon Picture page 89 Blue £/$125; Green £/$175; Amberina £/$250; Lime Green Opal £/$3000+; +25% for handzoorked piecrust edge Bowl 5" Marigold £/$35; Amethyst £/$45; Green £/$45; Blue £/$55 Bowl 8"-10" Picture page 75 Marigold £/$285; Amethyst £/$310; Green £/$225; Blue £/$310; Pastel £/$1000; Aqua Opal £/$2000; +25% for Itandworked piecrust edge

Plate 9" Marigold £/$245; Dark Amethyst £/$350; Green £/$350; Blue £/$310; Aqua Opal £/$2500; +25%

Picture page 75 for handworked piecrust edge Plate - handgrip edge Marigold £/$160; Amethyst £/$175; Green £/$175; Blue£/$180 Picture page 75

Picture page 85

STIPPLED RAYS Manufactured by USF Bowl - 1 1 " Picture page 75 Squared off deep pleated sides and deep frilled Green £/$1200+ STORK & RUSHES Manufactured by USD Punch Bowl top and base Picture page 75 Marigold £/$250; Amethyst £/$350; Blue £/$240 Hat Shape Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$165; Blue £/$55 Pitcher Marigold £/$250; Amethyst £/$500; Blue £/$550 Tumbler Picture page 82 Marigold £/$35; Amethyst £/$38; Blue £/$85 STRAWBERRY...

(INTAGLIO) STRAWBERRY Souvenir 88 Mug - Modern Picture page 83 Blue £/$125; Vaseline opalescent £/$125 STRAWBERRY Manufactured by USF Bon-Bon Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$50; Green £/$50; Blue£/$100 STRAWBERRY Manufactured by USM Bowl 6"+ Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$100; Green £/$90 Bowl 8", 10" - scarce Marigold £/$210; Amethyst £/$375; Green £/$375 Compote - rare Marigold £/$430; Amethyst £/$375; Green £/$375 Banana Boat - extremely rare

STRAWBERRY SCROLL Manufactured by USF Pitcher Marigold £/$3750; Blue £/$3200 Tumbler** Marigold £/$250; Blue £/$150

Picture page 75

(WILD) STRAWBERRY Manufactured by USN Bowl - large Marigold £/$165; Amethyst £/$260; Green £/$260; Peach Opal £/$300+ Bowl - small 6" Picture page 75 Marigold £/$350; Amethyst £/$350; Blue £/$140; +25% for upturned side

Plate (a larger variation on STRAWBERRY) Marigold £/$165; Amethyst £/$325 STRETCH Manufactured in EUR Tumbler Marigold £/$65

Picture page 84

SUNBURST See NEW CARNIVAL GLASS SUMMERS DAY VASE See Stork & Rushes Punch set SUNFLOWER . . .

SUNFLOWER Manufactured by USN With MEANDER exterior pattern Bowl 8"+ - spat feet Picture page 75 Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$65; Green £/$300 Plate Marigold £/$200; Green £/$400 Pin Tray Green £/$325; .Amethyst £/$750 SUNFLOWER & DIAMONDS aka SOLROS Manufactured by SWE This pattern also found in the Brockwitz Catalogue (Germany) early 1900s and used in lustre ware production Vase Picture page 75 Marigold £/$450; Green £/$685; Blue £/$850

130


SUNGOLD Origin unknown Described as SUNGOLD by Marion Hartung. Different from the SUNGOLD EPERGNE by Bill Edwards. Plate Picture page 75 Shallow with ruffled edge and thin glass iridised Mangold £/$485 SUNGOLD FLORAL (MQB) Manufactured by EUR Bowl Picture page 75 Very thin glass with excellent iridescence. Note intricate base star Marigold £/$285 CTiwcPBAVfu/inn, SffSSoXS European This as described by Marion Hartung and varies from the SUNGOLD EPERGNE by Bill Edwards. Epergne Picture page 76 Bowl with single epergne, all on a metal base. Bowl handworked frilled, as is epergne. Marigold £/$325 SVEA (Source) Named in Sweden Eda Celery - Oblong shallow Marigold £/$65; Blue £/$120 Bowl Marigold £/$70; Blue £/$120 Vase Marigold £/$85 Pickle Marigold £/$85 Pin Dish Marigold £/$35; Blue £/$85 SWAN . . .

(AUSTRALIAN) SWAN Bowl Black Amethyst £/$425

SWIRLED HOBNAIL See HOBNAIL . . . SWIRLED HOBNAIL T F N MUMS Manufactured by USF Bowl'_8» Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$95; Green £/$160; Blue£/$285 Bowl - 9" footed, rare Marigold £ / $450 Plate 10" Blue £/$800 Pitcher Picture page 76 Marigold £/$500; Blue £/$2500+ Tumbler Picture page 76 Marigold £/$70; Blue £/$30; White £/$300 TEXAS ROSE aka DOUBLE STEMMED ROSE See ROSE ... TEXAS ROSE TH|STLE GOLDEN THISTLE Manufacturer not known possibly SWE Pin Tray - 5" On "Rio"(Pink) Base glass £/$475

Picture page 76

THISTLE Manufactured by USF Picture page 76 Banana Boat Picture page 76 Marigold £/$350; Amethyst £/$400; Green £/$550; Picture page 76 Blue £/$850 Bowl 9" - Collar feet, scalloped edge Picture page 76 Marigold £/$155; Amethyst £/$255; Green £/$255; Blue £/$255 Picture page 76 Bowl - 3 feet Picture page 76 Amethyst £/$275; +25% for 3/1 ruffled edge THISTLE Manufactured in EUR Vase Marigold £/$65

(NESTING) SWAN

THREE FRUITS Manufactured by USN Bon Bon - 2 handles Green £/$365

^ n ' l f f , • DIAMOND & FAN exterior

THREE TOED GRAPE VASE

COVERED SWAN See COVERED SWAN

Picture page 76

Picture page 76

Picture page 78

. , n • , ~, c „ , „„ „. , , , See New Carnival Glass Bowl - 9 Picture page 76 Marigold £/$450; Amethyst £/$300; Green £/$400; THUNDERBIRD Blue £/$2000 Manufactured in Australia See alternative name SHRIKE SWAN & CATTAILS TIGER LILY Manufactured by USF Picture page 83 Manufactured in Estonia at Melesk. Similar also produced Toothpick Holder repro Blue £/$85 in USA (USI) and EDA Sweden and in Finnish factories, SWATHE & DIAMONDS*** ^.^ten used mq base glass _ See DIAMONDS ... SWATHE & DIAMONDS TIGER LILY Manufactured by FRI SWATHE Pitcher Manufactured in EUR , Blue £/$755 Funeral Vase and Grid Picture pageT76 •• TIGER LILY Iridised on Clear £/$45 Manufactured by EMK SWEDISH CROWN (MQB) -r Tumbler Picture page 78 n. . Manufactured SWE Picture page 76 Marigold £/$155;Bhie£/$2TO+ _ Bowl - small Blue£/$650

131


TIGER LILY Manufactured by USI Tumbler Marigold £/$75 TOFFEE BLOCK Source not known Pitcher - small Marigold £/$100 Pitcher - large Marigold £/$150

Picture page 82

Picture page 78

TOKYO (MQB) aka TOKIO Manufactured by SWE (ex catalogue) Bowl - deep Picture page 78 With reverse swastika (symbol of Spring) found in base Blue £/$3500 TOOTHPICK HOLDERS See AFRICAN SHIELD See SWAN & CATTAILS TOOLS From Eda Sweden TORNADO Vase - small Green £/$525;+25% for variant top Vase - large Green £/$825; +25% for variant top Whimsey Vase Pastel Blue (one-off) Value not known TOWN PUMP Repro award Souvenir piece for ICGA1979 Blue £/$125

Picture page 83 Picture page 77 Picture page 77 Picture page 77

Picture page 85

TREE TRUNK Manufactured by USN Vase - small Aqua Opal £/$700; Green £/$225; Ice Green £/$425 Vase - Mid size Picture page 78 Marigold (rare) £ / $600; Amethyst £ / $425; Green £/$425; Blue £/$325; Aqua Opal £/$1200 TRIO Manufactured by SWE In Eda catalogue. Exterior pattern Bowl - large shallow Marigold £/$350; Blue £/$650

Picture page 78

TROUT & FLY Manufactured by USM Highly sought after pattern. See also FISH Bowl** Picture page 78 Marigold £/$325; Amethyst £/$800; Green £/$850 TULIP. . .

BUTTERFLY & TULIP See BUTTERFLY. •• BUTTERFLY & TULIP (REGAL) TULIP (Lorna Payne) Manufactured in EUR possibly Dutch who favoured ROSE/TULIP/ACORN designs Vase - on 6-sided pedestal base Picture page 78 Marigold £/$285

TULIP & CORD (MQB) Manufactured by FRI Mug with handle Marigold £/$2000+

Picture page 78

TURKU (Source) Manufactured by FRI Picture page 78 Commemorative Ash Tray On Rio (Pink) base glass. Inscription reads Jubilee of 1229-1929 of the City of Turku. A souvenir made by O. Y. Riihimaki £/$800 (spec) TWIN LILIES See WINDFLOWER . TWIN LILIES TWINS Manufactured by USI Bowl-5" Marigold £/$35; Green £/$45 Bowl - 9" Marigold £/$25; Green £/$45 TWO EYED ELK See ELK... TWO EYED ELK UNA (MQB) Manufactured by SWE In EDA catalogue Bowl - deep Marigold £/$300 VERA (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Vase on pedestal base Blue £/$1250+

Picture page 78

Picture page 78

Picture page 79

VERTICAL STAR PANELS See STAR .. . VERTICAL STAR PANELS VICTORIAN One of the most highly prized patterns Picture page 89 Bowl Green £/$12,000+ VINING LEAF . . .

VINING LEAF Possibly Dutch or Czechoslovakian Perfume Bottle and Stopper Picture page 79 Marigold on clear £ / $265 Vase NB. There is a Variant which has small leaves to the pattern Marigold £/$U5 VINLOV (Source) Manufactured by SWE (ex catalogue) Named at source. Often partly iridised. Banana Boat Picture on page 79 a^methyst£/$3000+ VINTAGE...

VINTAGE Manufactured by USM Bowl 5" Marigold £/$650; Green £/$850; Blue £/$1650 Bowl 9" Marigold £/$850; Amethyst £/$1370; Green £/$680; Blue£/$3000

132


VINTAGE Manufactured by US Perfume & Stopper Marigold £/$295; Amethyst £/$485 Powder Bowl

Marigold £/$50; Amethyst £/$85; Blue £/$95 VINTAGE Manufactured by USF Bowl 4" Marigold £/$30; Amethyst £/$38; Green £/$38; Blue£/$38 Bowl - 7"/8" Picture page 79, 87 Red £/$2250; Amber £/$200; Celeste Blue £/$850; Persian Blue Value not known; Compote Marigold £/$38; Amethyst £/$48; Green £/$48; Blue£/$48 Fernery - 9" bowl Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$55; Green £/$65; Blue£/$65 Epergne Marigold £/$85; Amethyst £/$110; Green £/$125; Blue£/$125 Plate TA"+ Marigold £/$200; Amethyst £/$400; Green £/$300; Blue£/$350 Plate 9" Marigold (rare) £/$2200 Plate 11" Marigold £/$175; Green £/$210; Blue £/$220 Punch Bowl set Marigold £/$225; Amethyst £/$310; Green £/$365; Blue £/$385 Punch Cup Marigold £/$55; Amethyst £/$65; Green £/$65; Blue£/$65 Rose Bowl Marigold £/$45; Blue £/$35 Spittoon Marigold £/$6000 VINTAGE BANDED Manufactured by USD Tumbler Marigold .£#i$ipi);Green£/$250+..

Picture page 84

VINTAGE LEAF Manufactured by USF See GRAPE ... VINTAGE for variants Bowl - 8" Picture page 79 Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$125; Green £/$65; Blue£/$65 WAFFLE BLOCK Manufactured by USI Basket -10" Marigold £/$75; Smoke £/$125 Bowl Marigold £/$38 Creamer/Sugar Marigold £/$28 Vase Marigold £/$38 Pitcher Marigold £/$120

Tumbler Marigold £/$200 Rose Bowl Marigold £/$65 Punch Base & Top Marigold £/$200 Punch Cup Marigold £/$50

Picture page 79 Picture page 86

WARRIOR See similar pattern: STAR . .. SHOOTING STAR WATER LILY

WATER LILY Manufactured by USF Bowl - footed 6" Picture page 79 Marigold £/$40; Amethyst £/$55; Green £/$250; Blue £/$100; Marbled base £/$125; Amber £/$ Value not known Bowl - footed 10" Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$95; Green £/$320; Blue£/$180 WATER LILY & CATTAILS Manufactured by USF Picture page 79 Banana Boat As exterior pattern to THISTLE BOWL Marigold £/$350; Amethyst £/$400; Green £/$550; Blue£/$850 Bon Bon Marigold £/$45; Amethyst £/$70; Blue £/$80 Pitcher Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$5000 Tumbler Marigold £/$80 WATER LILY & DRAGONFLY**** Named in Australia Bowl - shallow 10" Marigold £/$650

Picture page 79

WHIRLING LEAVES Manufactured by USM Exterior pattern to FINE CUT OVALS Bowl 9", 11"** PicJi.re page 79 Marigold £/$75; Amethyst £/$280; Green £/$280; White £ / $400 WHITE PITCHER** Manufactured by USDD Value not known

Picture page 79

WICKERWORK Manufactured by ESB and SWE Tripod Base and upturned edge Plate Pi'cfiire page 79,80 Marigold £/$400; Amethyst £/$660 Plate flat Marigold £/$215 Blanc-de-lait Non-iridised with EDA mark £/$6000 WIDE PANELS Manufactured by USF & and USI Punch Bowl Top Picture page 80 As exterior pattern to HEAVY GRAPE. Also found as exterior pattern to BLACKBERRY WREATH Amethyst £/$425

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WILD BLACKBERRY Manufactured by USF See BLACKBERRY.. . WILD BLACKBERRY

WISHBONE AND SPADES Manufactured by USD Bowl Peach Opal £/$450+

WILD ROSE see ROSE. . .WILD ROSE WILLS GOLD FLAKE Manufactured in ENG The only known advertising piece for the English market Ash Tray Picture page 80 Marigold (rare) £/$225 WINDFLOWER aka TWIN LILIES Manufactured by USD Bowl 9"+ Picture page 80 Marigold £/$125; Blue £/$225; Amber £/$165; Vaseline £/$450 Plate 9"+ Marigold £/$125; Blue £/$350 Nappy Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$75; Blue £/$135 WINDMILL Manufactured by USI Bowl 5" Marigold £/$18; Amethyst £/$25; Green £/$25 Bowl 9" Marigold £/$30; Amethyst £/$58; Green £/$58 Fruit Bowl 10"+ Marigold £/$40; Green £/$40 Pickle Dish Marigold £/$28; Green £/$38 Water Jug/Milk Marigold £/$48; Amethyst £/$120; Blue £/$80; Pastel £/$110 Pitcher Marigold £/$125; Amethyst £/$300; Green £/$95; Pastel £/$425 Tumbler Picture page 85 Marigold £/$65; Amethyst £/$175; Green £/$38; variant DOUBLE DUTCH

Bowl Clambroth £/$85

Picture page 80

WISHBONE Manufactured by USN See also RIBBON SWAGS as exterior pattern Bowl 8", 10" Picture page 89 Marigold £/$75; Amethyst £/$100; Green £/$100; Blue £/$110; Peach Opal £/$160; Pastel White £/$ Value not known Bowl footed Picture page 80 Marigold £/$150; Amethyst £/$350; Green £/$350;

Picture page 89

WREATHED CHERRY See CHERRY... WREATHED CHERRY WREATH OF ROSES see ROSES ... WREATH OF ROSES YORK (Source) Manufactured by SWE (ex catalogue) Bowl - deep, large Marigold £/$300; Blue £/$480 Vase - tall Marigold £/$425; Blue £/$480

Picture page 80

ZEPHYR (MQB) Origin unknown Decanter Picture page 82 Blow moulded with handle and hollow stopper Marigold £/$225 ZERO (MQB) Manufactured by SWE Vase Blow moulded Marigold £/$125

Picture page 82

ZIG-ZAG Manufactured by USM Bowl Marigold £/$220; Amethyst £/$360; Green £/$295 Bowl Tri-cornered** -10" Picture page 80 Marigold £/$380; Amethyst £/$1000; Green £/$465 ZILLERTAL (MQB) Modern Austrian iridised beer bottle Amber base £/$70 ZINNIA (MQB) Origin unknown Decanter and stopper Blow moulded, partly iridised Marigold £/$200

Picture page 86

Picture page 82

ZIPPER ROUND (Ron May) aka CHECKERBOARD PANELS (USA) and ZIP-A-ROUND Manufactured in EUR Bowl, large, shallow Drawing by Ron May page 100 Marigold £/$65

+25% for handworked edge

Epergne Marigold £/$720; Amethyst £/$2700; Green £/$3600 Plate - flat, rare Marigold £/$3600; Amethyst £/$1080 Plate footed - rare Marigold £/$2500; Dark Amethyst £/$600; Green £/$7200; Pastel £/$1500 Pitcher - rare Marigold £/$1350; Amethyst £/$1350; Green £/$1550 Tumbler Marigold £/$180; Amethyst £/$250; Green £/$2500; Blue £/$270; Peach Opal £/$360

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Chapter Seven:

The Latest Discoveries in Carnival Glass Research is always ongoing in the Carnival Glass collecting world and there have been many more discoveries to tempt collectors' interest since my first book was published. Here follows a brief up-date: GERMANY It is now established that in Germany a company called Brockwitz, situated in the area known as Saxony, was a producer of fine iridised lustre ware (ie Carnival Glass). This was in the 1920-30 era. Several patterns that are already known to collectors in America, England and in Scandinavia also, came from this source: CURVED STAR, ROSOR (Rose Garden), SUNFLOWER & DIAMONDS, TARTAN aka in USA as DAISY & CANE as well as MOONPRINT. This Company produced their own moulds in many instances and there are slight variations whereby the actual country of origin can be determined. Patterns such as LATTICE & LEAVES, SUPERSTAR appear to herald directly from Brockwitz as does the FOOTED PRISMS Vase and the pattern we know as ROSE BAND. The latter appears in the Brockwitz Catalogue as "ARIADNE". CZECHOSLOVAKIA Joseph Inwald A.G. was one of the producers of Carnival Ware post 1918. An attractive Art Deco style Dressing Table set named NOLA exists in Marigold Carnival, from this source. It is also thought that the CLASSIC ARTS pattern might have been produced here, as well as at Riihimaki Finland (where the State Glass Museum has a non-iridised Rose Bowl in this design as coming from Rihimaki). The author has a non-iridised Vase on Amethyst in CLASSIC ARTS design that is signed MOSER in the base. This of course relates to a prestigious fine cut glass manufacturer of that name which still operates in the area close to Prague. J Inwald also produced a FLEUR DE LIS pattern as did EDA in Sweden. The mould for this pattern can be seen in this book. ENGLAND Sowerby was the major English producer, but there were also other smaller companies producing Carnival Glassware at the same period. (a) CANNING TOWN GLASSWORKS, London (Isle of Sheppy) made such as the THISTLE Vase, easily found in the UK. This research established from moulds/parts of moulds found on site. (b) MOLINEUX WEBB in Manchester (who traded until 1927) also made some such ware, often on Amber base. (c) SOHO GLASSWORKS Birmingham produced similar ware between the late 1920s and the early 1930s. Their designs were simple, often presented in EPNS (metal) basket bases. INDIA The mysterious origin of BEADED SPEARS pattern, found in Australia, has finally been tracked down to the JAIN GLASS WORKS (P) Ltd of Firozobad, India. The other patterns identified (to date) as from this source are: THE FISH, THE SERPENT and the HAND Vases. The last named was also a popular design in many various European factories, often on acid etched non iridised

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ware. This research was established by Bob Smith in America and confirmed by John and Margaret McGrath as to the arrival of such ware for sale in far off Australia! The Indian BEADED SPEARS TUMBLERS are on very thin glass, and other patterns are expected to join the JAIN FACTORY manufacturing list in the near future, as they display similar characteristics of production. ARGENTINA Argentina likewise produced its own Carnival Glassware and often manufactured its own moulds as well as buying-in from America and Europe. Glass was sent from Eda (Sweden) to England and then onto Argentina by the English Agents in many cases. CRISTALERIAS RIGOLLEAU produced such as the BEETLE Ashtray. CRISTALERIAS PICCARDO (1934) offered a range of patterns for such as Beer /Water sets. This Company also produced the pattern known in UK /USA as BAND OF ROSES, and found on Decanters and Tumblers in marigold only. MEXICO There was a limited production as late as 1950s at the CRISTALES MEXICANA S.A. CHINA China produces modern Carnival Glass ware, as can be seen in this book where a Ginger Jar and Lid is shown from here. It was found complete with box showing MADE IN CHINA logo.

No doubt other sources are bing investigated worldwide and as time progresses more information will come to light.

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Standard Colour Shadings in Carnival Glass

Most well known colours Marigold; Amethyst; Green; Blue; Pastels; Purple; Black; Amethyst; Red; Amberina; Peach Opalescent; Aqua Opalescent Shades of Blue: light to dark NB The Scandinavian Blue is lighter than standard USA Blue Ice Blue: mainly from Northwood - a hint of frosty blue Ice Blue Opalescent: as Ice Blue but with light opal edge Persian Blue: often with marigold iridescence, semi-opaque Celeste Blue: a scarce shade of blue. Frosty iridescence Sapphire Blue: a Northwood production shade. Summer-sky shade Reniger Blue: a deep Teal green/blue mix Iridised Blue Milk: solid blue milk-glass base. See Westmoreland Carolina Dogwood in this book Aqua Blue: as the name implies, a mix of blue and green Aqua Opalescent: as above, with an opaque edge Shades of Green: light to dark Ice Green: mostly from Northwood, though Dugan/Diamond also Lime Green: no frost effect as with Ice Green Vaseline: various green-yellow shadings mainly with Marigold over Helios: a bright sparky green with silver /gold iridescence from the USA Imperial factory Emerald: a brilliant shade. In Scandinavian pieces a true Medici dark blue-green Olive Green: with yellow, an autumnal shade Shades of Purple: light to dark Lavender: a soft delicate whisper of colour. Found in Scandinavian lustre ware as well as in USA Amethyst: a mid-shade. In Sowerby UK glass a pale Ribena shade Purple: equal shades blue and red Violet: as purple but with more enhanced blue in the composition Black Amethyst: made by Crown Crystal Australia, Dugan/Diamond and Fenton (USA) as well as Sowerby (UK) produced some rare examples. Shine a light to see the amethyst contained therein Jet: black glass, quite imperious to any light. The Finnish Glassworks used this, though again rarely as did Sowerby (UK). A true rarity for any collector Shades of Red: light to dark Highly sought after and produced in the 1920s in USA. Fenton was the prime source, Imperial made a little. There is only one Bonbonniere known in the Scandinavian factories in red. Red: varies in depth of colour, as would a bunch of cherries! Pieces with a lighter iridescence over are preferred Amberina: has a shading off into yellow tones into the centre Reverse Amberina: here the yellow shading is towards the edges

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Shades of White: palest first Clear: with a pastel non-frosty iridescence over Clambroth: a smoke effect over clear. Favoured by Imperial USA Pearl: actually iridised Custard Glass. In UK also known as blanc-de-lait with iridisation over Custard: iridised Marigold overlay on Custard Glass Shades of Gray/Yellow used in Eda Sweden and other Scandinavian factories. Also used (rare) Pale Yellow: at Westmoreland USA Amber: favoured by Imperial USA and Scandinavian factories Imperial used this, as did Northwood and Fenton the latter two only in Smoke: small quantities. Again found on some European (unknown origin) ware. Shades of Marigold: light to dark Pale Marigold: a delicate pastel Clambroth: The shade most found on Imperial pieces. A root beer/deep cider shade Peach Opalescent: This is Marigold glass but with an opaque white edging

A List of Rarer Shadings Amber Amberina Alaskan Green Amethyst Amethyst Opalescent Apricot Aqua Aqua Opalescent Black Amethyst Blue Blue Opalescent Celeste Blue B Champagne Citrene Clambroth Clear Cranberry Electric Blue Emerald Green Horehound Ice Blue Ice Green Iridised Chocolate Iridised Crackle Iridised Custard Iridised Milkglass Iridised Moonstone Iridised Slag

Iridised Stretch Lavender Lime Green Lime Opalescent Marigold Marigold Custard Marigold Milk Glass Marigold Opalescent Milkglass Opalescent Nile Green Pastel Marigold Peach Opalescent Pearl Opalescent Persian Blue Pink Renniger Blue Reverse Amberina Russet Green Sapphire Smoke Smoke Milkglass Teal Vaseline Vaseline Opalescent White White Opalescent = Wisteria Yellow

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About the Contributors

Author: Marion Quintin-Baxendale B.A.(Hons), TEFL Cert. Born Bath, Somerset, educated: City Bath Girls' Grammar School, Buckingham University (BA Hons European Studies), London University TEFL Certificate. Extensively travelled worldwide, and has lived for several years each in France, Italy, Singapore, and Malta. Fluent in French and Italian. Studying Spanish and Rumanian. Interests: Travel. Languages, Poetry, Genealogy, Antiques, Yoga, Gardening, Cooking. Author of Carnival Glass Worldwide in 1983. Published poet and recipient of several awards for poetry with International Society of Poets. Currently working on two volumes of Poetry for publication. A collector of Carnival Glass, as well as other antiques, for over 30 years. Interested in the history of artefacts as well as in their aesthetic and artistic appeal. Has travelled to Scandinavia, Australia and America for Carnival Glass studies and researched at major production sources worldwide. Principal Photographer: Gunnar Lersjo of Sweden Former Secondary School Headmaster. Field: Economic History and Art, now retired. An established historical researcher and author producing books and Exhibitions on early local photographers and their work. Since 1977 has had many books on glass history published in Sweden. And from the 1960's has specialised as a Glass Photographer. Photography in this book was voluntarily provided. Principal Artist: Ron May Enjoyed a creative career as a Visualiser in Advertising and later, as a journalist and Commercial artist in publishing for over 40 years. Now retired, formerly held positions of Art Editor and Studio Manager within the National Magazine Company, the International Publishing Company and the Thomson Group Publications company. A keen collector of Carnival Glass and previous Vice President of the early Carnival Club of Great Britain. Drawings in this book were voluntarily provided. Fenton Museum Glass: Photography Permission to photograph kindly given by Frank Fenton of Fenton Art Glass Co. Photography undertaken, voluntarily, by Mr Howard Seufer of West Virginia, former Quality Control Manager at Fenton Art Glass Co and an avid amateur photographer. Fenton Art Glass Museum Catalogues Permission to reproduce the Fenton Glass Catalogue entries in this book was kindly given by Mr Frank Fenton, Fenton Art Glass Co. Photography The late Don Moore (USA) who provided photographs of rare pieces from his own collection.

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Acknowledgements Personal and professional

Personal acknowledgements to: Mr Gunnar Lersjo of Arvika Sweden, Glass Historian and Principal Photographer of the majority of the glass in this book and without whose assistance this work would never have appeared. His assistance carried out on a purely voluntary basis and entailing many, many hours of dedicated research as well as photography. Where photographed by other sources, then so noted. See page 00. Mr and Mrs Shirley Horn of Frank and Shirley Fairs and Auctions of UK, who kindly lent their assistance to the compiling of the Price List in this book and who freely presented much glass for photography as well. Mr Frank Fenton of Fenton Art Glass USA for his personal and professional assistance in making much information available to me on a visit to the Fenton Factory, and to all his staff. Mr Howard Seufer (USA) who voluntarily offered to photograph the Fenton Museum pieces that appear in this book. And at very short notice too! Mr Ron May, of Hadleigh Essex UK, Principal Artist for this book, who produced his drawings on a purely voluntary basis. These generously and freely offered from his extensive collection of Carnival Glass drawings, the result of many years of study concerning this ware. Mr and Mrs Ian Payne for assistance in pattern identification. Mr Alan Woodgate for offering glass for photography. For my family - Polly, Julia and Iram, Alexander and Helen, And to my special friends Cindy and Mick, Jo and Dave, Lorna and family, Lynn and Gary, Mary Jo and Bob, Pat, Ruth and Trevor, and Sylvia in Italy for their invaluable encouragement. And last, but not least, to all those friends and collectors too numerous to name individually (but who know who they are!) who assisted me so ably in tracking down glass facts and figures, for this work. Professional acknowledgements (in alphabetical order of country) These appertain to research over a long period of years, both for this book and for the earlier Carnival Glass Worldwide. Australia A.C.I. Australian Glass Manufacturers Co, Sydney, and the Community Services Manager Mr P K Harris. Australian Carnival Enthusiasts Club for kind permission to refer to drawings and articles in the club newsletters Australian Glass Workers Union, Sydney Australia and earlier Secretary Mr Jim Gibson Mr Jack Burchmore of Bexley, N.S.W. for technical information Mrs Pat Cubeta and Mrs M Dickinson for kind assistance Mrs Marjorie Graham for kind permission to quote from her book Australian Glass of the Nineteenth and early Twentieth Century (see Bibliography) Mr G Kirby of Canberra for practical assistance Mr Eric Lockwood and the late Mr G Pomeroy for invaluable help with slides Members of the Plate Sheet And Ornamental Glassworkers Union, Sydney Mrs Triplett and the late Mr Triplett for kind assistance with slides. Czechoslovakia Bohemia Glassexport Co Ltd of England and Dr F Vacek Museum of Arts and Industry and past and present Curators

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Denmark Holmegaards Glasvaerkers, Copenhagen and workers England Mr M V Arnold who kindly arranged contact with Australian collectors for slides used in this book Mr R J Barry for provision of slide Mrs Freck-Hagendorf for free translation of a difficult and technical German text Mr Ron May, Principal (and voluntary) artist for the pattern drawings in this book Shipley Art Gallery, Gateshead and Curator for permission to reprint a photograph of a Sowerby mould, through the Tyne and Wear County Museums. Mrs M Spurrell for ink drawings Mr John Watson for pencil drawings Estonia Tallinna Museum, Tallinn Estonia: Director M Varrak and Keeper of Glass Urve Mankin Glass Artist Maare Saare of Tallinn Estonia Tartu City Museum Tartu Estonia: especially to Mrs Pullerits. Voru Museum and staff, Voru, Estonia Rakvere Museum Rakvere Estonia: Director Olave Mae Estonia History Museum, Estonia: Director Toomas Tamla also to Rein Laur, Aino Lepp, Maie Raun, Aita Raik and Mau Parmas for photographs of their glass. Finland A. Ahlstrom Osakeyhtio of Karhula and Mr Eero Kojonen who provided details of a spectographic analysis of Karhula Lustre Ware Karhula Lasimuseo and Curators past and present, particularly Mrs Inkeri Nyholm Iittala Lasimuseo and Curators, especially Ms Marketa Kiemola Suomen Lasimuseo, Riihimaki and Curators past and present, particularly Mrs Kaisa Koivisto Mr Erkki Vaalle of Riihimaki for professional photography Wartsila-Nuutajarvi Glass and early PR Manager Mrs Marjut Kumela France and Belgium Baccarat, S.A., NE France Compagnie des Cristalleries de St Louis, Lemberg Musee du Verre, Liege, Belgium, and Curators past and present. Dr Giuseppe Cappa of Luxembourg Musee du Verre 'art et technique', Charleroi N France and to M. Claude Boland. Germany Bundesverband der Glasindustrie, Dusseldorf Kungstggewerbe Museum, Berlin and Curators, especially Dr Walter Neuwirth. Osterreichisches Museum fur angewandte Kunst, especially to Dr Waltrand Neuwirth Holland Museum Bergmans-var-Benningen, Rotterdam, and Curators, especially Ms Doris KukyenSchneider and Mr A Copier previous Chief Designer for Royal Leerdam Glassworks. Royal Leerdam Glass and the late Mr Floris Meydam a previous Chief Designer for Royal Leerdam. Mrs M J H Singelenburg-Van der Mer of Utrecht. Mr W F Tonnekreek, Heideland

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Norway Magnor Glassworks, for permission to photograph moulds and glassmaking from its stores and Museum Shop. Kunstindustrimuseet, Oslo and Curators, especially Ms Inger-Marie Lie. Sweden All those collectors who allowed pieces from Eda to be photographed for this book, especially the following: Mr David Bergman for permission to use slides of Eda ware from his own collection. Mr Gunnar Lersjo Glass Historian and Author who voluntarily undertook to photograph the majority of glass that appears in this Collectors' Guide, as well as researching the EDA records for requested information. Swedish Workers Educational Authority (ABF Vastra Varmlands), who provided, free of charge and with the help of Mr G Lersjo, much detailed research information and photographic material relating to Eda Glassworks Nordiska Museet, Stockhom and Curators, especially Mrs Inger Bonge-Bergrengren. Stiftelsen Smalands Museum and Curators, especially Mr Lars Thor. Varmlands Museum, Karlstad and Curators, especially Ms Helene Sjunneson. United States of America Fenton Art Glass Company of Williamstown Ohio and to Mr Frank Fenton personally and to all the staff for wonderful hospitality and invaluable assistance with regards to Fenton Carnival Glass production. Particular thanks to Bob Hill, Supervisor of the Mould Shops, and to Tom Meiser and Alan Van Dyke, skilled mould Makers at Fenton Art Glass Company. Also for kind permission to photograph many rare pieces from the Fenton Glass Museum, with the voluntary aid of Photographer Mr Howard Seufer.

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Bibliography

Glass John A Brooks, Sampson Low Collectors Library Imperial Carnival Glass Carl O Burns, Collector Books USA, 1996 The Early Victorian Period 1830-1860 The Connoisseur Period Guides, London. Carnival Glass Standard Encyclopedia Bill Edwards,1995 Rarities in Carnival Glass" Bill Edwards, Collector Books USA, 1978 English Table Glass E. M. Elville, London Country Life Ltd Australian Glass of the Nineteenth century and early Twentieth Century Marjorie Graham, David Ell Press, Sydney, Australia Carnival in Lights Helen D Greguire, USA 1975 British Glass 1800-1914 Charles Hajdamach, Antique Collectors' Club 1991 Carnival Glass and Carnival Club of Great Britain Angela Hallam, articles. Carnival Glass: the Magic and the Mystery Glen and Stephen Thistlewood, Schiffer Books, USA Colors in Carnival Glass Sherman Hand, 1-1V USA 1972 The Collectors Encyclopedia of Carnival Glass Sherman Hand, 1-1V USA 1978 Carnival Glass Pattern Books 1-10 Marion Hartung, 1964-73 Glass through the age E.B. Haynes, Penguin, Harmondsworth, 1959 Encyclopedia of Victorian Coloured Glass William Heacock, various volumes, Peacock Publications, Columbus Ohio USA The Glass Collector, and Dugan/Diamond William Heacock, James Measell & Berry Wiggins, Antique Publications, USA. Glass W. B. Honey, Victoria and Albert Museum Publications, London The Collector's Guide to Carnival Glass Marion Klamkin, USA 1976 Eda Glasbruk Lersjo and Fogelberg, Karlstad, Sweden 1977 The Shape of Things in Carnival Glass Donald E Moore, USA 1975 Victorian Table Glass & Ornaments Barbara Morris, London 1978 Carnival Glass Tumblesr Richard E Owens, USA 1973 Curiosities of Glassmaking A PELLATT, London 1849 Le Val-Saint-Lambert, ses Cristalleries et Tart du verre en Belgique Joseph Philippe, Liege. Edition Eugene Wahle, 1980 Glass- its traditions and its makers Ada Polak, G P Putnam, N York 1975 Pottery Gazettes London Victoria and Albert Museum Glassmaking in England H, J. Powell, Cambridge University Press 1923 Carnival & Iridescent Glass Rose M Presznick, 4 vols 1964-67 Nineteenth Century Glass: its Genesis & Development Albert Christian Revi, USA 1967 American and European Pressed Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass Jane Shadel Spillman, USA 1981 Die Glasmakerei und Glasatzerei insbesonders nach ihrer chemischen Grundlagen L Springer, Zwiesel 1923 Pressing Glass Roy E Swaine. Glass Industry 1930 Vol 11, pp 204, Journal of the Society of Glass Technology 1930 vol 14, abs 368 English Glass W A. Thorpe, A. & C Black 1949 Le Verre Geoffrey Wills, Grange Bateliere, Paris 1973

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Collecting Carnival Glass  

2014 Edition of our hugely popular book with market analysis and 2014 prices

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