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Rough Guides

如何使用 此本參考手冊

How To Use

This Guide


Taipei, Taiwan

Rough Guides are designed to be good to read and easy to use. The book is divided into four sections. The tabs at the bottom of the guide show which section you are on.

Taipei literally means “North of Taiwan”. Its official name is Taipei City and is the capital city of Taiwan.

Situated at the northern tip of Taiwan, the city is located on an Exploring Taipei is designed ancient lakebed surrounded by to give you a feel for Taipei, the two valleys of the Keelung suggesting where to go and and Xindian rivers, which join to what not to miss, and includes form the Tamsui River along the information on accommodation, city’s western border. food and drink, getting around and getting help in emergencies. The city is home to an estimated population of 2.6 Taipei Districts covers the million, and the whole Taipei– Taipei region in depth, giving Keelung metropolitan area comprehensive information of has a total population of 7 all of the attractions in each million, making it the 40th area of the city. most-populous urban area in the world. The name “Taipei” Contexts fills you in on can refer either to the whole history, art, music and culture. metropolitan area or the city Information on Taipei’s many proper. festivals and national parks. Taipei is the political, economic, Language gives you enough educational, and cultural center Chinese to get by and an of Taiwan, and one of the major extensive menu reader. hubs of the Chinese-speaking world.


Rough Guides

內容目錄

Contents How To Use This Guide Exploring Taipei History & Facts.........................................6 Essential things not to miss...................10 Getting around.......................................14 Accomodation.......................................20 Food & Drink...........................................26 Health....................................................32 Festivals ................................................36 Shopping..............................................42 Sports & Outdoor activities...................50 Travel essentials....................................56

Taipei Districts Wanhua.................................................60 Datong...................................................72 Zhongzheng...........................................84 Zhongshan.............................................94 Daan....................................................106 Xinyi.....................................................112 Songshan.............................................126 Shilin...................................................138

Contexts

History.................................................144 Culture & Etiquette..............................150 Music...................................................156 Books...................................................162 Film.....................................................166

Language

Phrases................................................172 Menu Reader........................................180


Taipei, Taiwan


Rough Guides

Taipei 101

Shrimp Fishing

Shopping Malls


Taipei, Taiwan

千萬不要錯過

Essential Things

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Night Markets

Themed Restaurants


Rough Guides

最佳美食去處

The Best Places

To Eat

It’s not a Taipei foodie guide without a mention of beef noodle soup, practically the national dish.


Taipei, Taiwan

Taipei is the world’s greatest showcases for Chinese cuisine. Be adventurous; many places have English menus or at least photographs of food, and where one dish is the main feature, pointing will usually suffice. In addition to a vast array of restaurants, the city’s teahouses (cháguǎn) are atmospheric places to eat light meals and sip Chinese-style tea. For a cheaper, more local experience try Taipei’s vibrant night markets (yèshì), which offer a bewildering range of dishes and excellent value for money. Another budget favourite is the “Taiwan Buffets” (z自助餐 ìzhù cān), which you’ll see in every neighbourhood – these canteen-style places allow you to pile up as much food on your tray as you like, with each dish incurring a small charge (it’s rarely more than NT$120 for a huge plateful). In the summer make for a shaved ice stall (bào bn ī g or more commonly tsua bing in Taiwanese) – the sweet, tasty toppings make sumptuous desserts. If it’s too hot, almost every department store has an air-conditioned food court in the basement, with the biggest under Taipei 101.


Rough Guides

華山1914文化創意產業園區

Huashan 1914

Creative Park In 1997 members of the Golden Bough Theatre made a startling discovery. There, deep in the heart of Taipei and cordoned off from all visitors, stood an abandoned factory. The group described the factory as a city within a city, a place where nature was left to age with concrete for nearly a decade and they were intrigued.

Unfortunately it also caught the attention of local law enforcement and the group was promptly cited for trespassing. This minor act of excessive enthusiasm however, was just the beginning.

Local artists became drawn to the open spaces, high ceilings and abundant natural light. Soon art and literary While the young thespians did giants from across Taipei not know it at the time, they began using the factory as an had stumbled upon one of the inspirational work space, giving oldest and most well preserved performances and leaving structures in Taiwan. Built in their distinctive mark on the 1914, the factory was among structures themselves. Taiwan’s largest wine producers throughout the 1920’s. It Word about this unique had however, long since been environment spread further abandoned. and in 1999 the Association of Culture Environment Reform The brazen group “restored” Taiwan, a non profit NGO, was a small section of the factory established to oversee the and began staging plays in restoration of the factory the abandoned halls. Their into a full fledged arts center. experimental performances, The factory was renamed the and intriguing choice of venue, Huashan Creative Park and, quickly caught the attention of in 2005, the rebuilding of the the local community. Creative Park officially began.


Taipei, Taiwan

Huashan Creative Park is a fascinating cultural precinct with plenty to interest everyone.


Rough Guides

Shilin Night Market is often considered to be the largest and most famous night market in the city.


Taipei, Taiwan

士林市場

Shilin

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Rough Guides

城市文化

The Culture of

Taipei City Mainstream Taiwanese culture is a curious combination of traditional Chinese practices, modern commercialism and technological ingenuity, capped off with a palpable Japanese flavour left over from decades of colonial rule. Those expecting stereotypical “Chinese” experiences akin to what can be had in mainland China or even Hong Kong are likely to be surprised and enchanted by the striking behavioural differences between the Taiwanese and their fellow Chinese neighbours. For starters, Taiwanese people are unquestionably some of the friendliest in Asia, if not the entire world, and most foreign visitors are impressed by the often staggering level of hospitality from the moment they arrive. If you’re invited to someone’s home, it’s a good idea to bring a gift, usually something simple such as flowers, a tin of biscuits or cookies, or a box of chocolates. Before entering someone’s home, always remember first to remove your shoes, even if your host initially says it’s not necessary.


Taipei, Taiwan


Rough Guides

語言

Useful Phrases

Language The Official Language of Taiwan is the same as mainland China, Chinese Mandarin, commonly referred to as “guoyu” (“National language”). Although there are some differences in the word use, pronunciation and slang, Chinese spoken on the mainland is indistinguishable from that used in Taiwan. The major difference comes with written Chinese: Taiwan, (like Hong Kong) uses traditional characters while China follows the simplified system. The main distinguishing characteristic of Chinese languages is that they are tonal: each word must be pronounced not only with the right sound, but also the right tone. Mandarin has four tones, and in order to be understood it’s vital to get these as accurate as possible. Pinyin is a way of writing Chinese using the Roman alphabet. It is the best way to learn the correct tones, represented by accents above each syllable. Taiwanese don’t use the Pinyin system in schools like mainland China, They use a system called bopomofo to teach children pronunciation.


Taipei, Taiwan

English Hello Thank you You’re welcome Sorry No problem Goodbye I You We They I want I don’t want Have Have not Mr Mrs Miss I don’t speak Chinese Can you speak English? Please speak slowly I understand I don’t understand What does this mean? How much is it? How are you? What’s your name? My Name is... Good morning Good afternoon Good evening/night Where’s the toilet?

Trad. Chinese 哈囉/你好 謝謝 不客氣 對不起 沒問題 再見 我 你 我們 他們 我要/我想要 我不要/我不想要 有 沒有 先生 女士 小姐 我不會說中文 你會說英文嗎? 請說慢一點 我懂/我明白 我不懂/我不明白 這是什麼意思? 這個多少錢? 你好嗎? 你叫什麼名字? 我的名字是 早安 午安 晚安 (洗手間/廁所)在哪裡?

Pinyin Hello/Nín hǎo Xiè xiè Bù kèqì Duì bù qǐ Méi wèn tí Zài jiàn Wǒ Nǐ Wǒ men Tā men Wǒ yào/Wǒ xiǎng yào Wǒ bù yào/Wǒ bù xiǎng yào Yǒu Méi yǒu Xiān shēng Nǚ shì Xiǎo jiě Wǒ bù huì shuō zhōng wén Nǐ huì shuō yīng wén ma? Qǐng shuō màn yī diǎn Wǒ dǒng/Wǒ míngbái Wǒ bù dǒng/Wǒ bù míng bái Zhè shì shén me yì si Zhè ge duō shǎo qián? Nǐ hǎo ma? Nǐ jiào shén me míng zì? Wǒ de míng zì shì Zǎo ān Wǔ ān Wǎn’ān (Xǐ shǒu jiān/Cè suǒ) zài nǎ lǐ?


‘Gorgeous photography and waffle-free text, written by city insiders rather than bearded backpackers.’ - The Independent ‘Sophisticated but simple.’ - The New York Times ‘Packed with insider knowledge and eye-catching photography.’ - The Guardian

The new-look The Rough Guide to Taipei - now in full colour throughout - is the ultimate travel guide to one of Asia’s most exciting, yet often overlooked, destinations. Taiwanese culture preserves the best of ancient traditions, while embracing the newest in high-tech modernity, and nowhere is this better exemplified than in the country’s dynamic capital, Taipei. Whether you want to admire Taipei 101’s architecture, discover precious Chinese artefacts at the National Palace Museum or indulge in feast of street food at Shilin Nightmarket, Rough Guide to Taipei will ensure that you have the quintessential Taipei experience. Features by local writers delve into topics including the arts scene, Taipei residents’ love of sports and shopping, and traditional remedies, while evocative accounts of the city’s districts bring Taipei to life, from Ximending’s youth culture and Datong’s Chinese heritage to the east’s skyscrapers juxtaposed with hillside tea plantations. Fullcolour photography and maps help you navigate with ease and our detailed Travel Tips give you all the practical information you need to plan your trip. Discover this fascinating city with Rough Guide to Taipei.

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Rough Guide to Taipei