Page 1

A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

LESSON PLAN Course:

Investigation Officer Basic Course

Module:

PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 as Enhance by Chief, PNP’s Strategic Focus, CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond

Lesson Plan Number:

2

Target Audience:

Chiefs of Police and other PCOs

Target Number of Audience:

50 persons

Time Allocated:

4 hours

Logistical Support Requirement:

Laptop or PC Computer LCD Project Projector Screen Pre-assessment Test Questionnaire Post-assessment Test Questionnaire

Participant Equipment Required:

Ballpen/pencil Writing Pad PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 Manual

Training References Used: 1. Letter of Instruction 53/09 “Institutionalization of Performance Governance System (PGS) in the Philippine National Police” dated August 11, 2009; 2. Letter of Instruction 02/2012 (Communications Plan “PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030: “Peace and order Agenda for Transformation and upholding the RuleOf-Law”); 3. PNP NHQ CMC No. 12-13 “Communications Plan for the PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030: Peace and order Agenda for Transformation and upholding the Rule-Of-Law” with the incorporation of Chief, PNP’s Strategic Focus, “CODEP 2013 and Beyond” dated April 3, 2014; 4. Lecture Presentation of PSSUPT NOEL E BARACEROS, Deputy Director of Center for Police Strategy Management, dated December 3, 2013; 5. Center for Police Strategy Management (CPSM) website: www.cpsm.ph; 6. PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 Practical Guide Handbook; 7. Memorandum from TCDS/Chairman, TWG on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 re: Conduct and Schedule of PNP Unit Certification and Performance Governance Reporting (Compliance Stage) dated October 31, 2014; 8. Briefing Presentation on the Requirements for Compliance Stage during the 1st RPSMU Family Conference, CPSM Building, Camp Crame, Quezon City on November 28, 2014; 9. PNP Journal (4th Quarter 2012); 10. PNP Performance Governance Report (April 2014); Page 1 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

11. Fact Sheet of the Compact Agreement between the MCC and the Government of the Republic of the Philippines; and 12. MCC Press Release dated September 23, 2010 re: Philippines Receives $434 Million Poverty Reduction Compact Lesson Goals:

The purpose of this block of instruction is to enhance the knowledge of the participants on the PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 as enhanced by Chief, PNP’s Strategic Focus, CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond.

Lesson Performance Objectives (sequenced): After this block of instruction, the participants will be able to: 1. Outline the historical background of PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030; 2. Recite the new PNP Vision; 3. Name the six (6) National Government Agencies that are mandated to institutionalized the Performance Governance System (PGS); 4. List the three (3) reasons why the PNP was chosen to adopt the PGS; 5. List the four (4) stages of the Performance Governance System (PGS) Pathway; 6. Enumerate the four (4) Perspectives in the PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 Roadmap; and 7. List the five (5) strategic focus of the Chief, PNP. [] [] []

Page 2 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

LESSON I. Preparation A. Purpose 1. The PNP is now pursuing the Institutionalization Stage, the last and final stage in the Performance Governance System (PGS) Pathway. Critical to this endeavor is not only the awareness of its stakeholders, especially the internal stakeholders, but also their acceptance (buy-in) of the transformation program. 2. It is said that among the factors why a strategy failed in the implementation is the Vision Barrier, that is, only few or about five percent (5%) of the workforce understand the strategy. 3. To avoid from falling into the same pitfall, it is necessary that cascading on the strategy should be reiterated at any opportune time. The regular discussion on the transformation program of the PNP, therefore, is paramount in creating among PNP members a profound appreciation of the strategy and generating their commitment for the realization of its goal. B. Why is this important? (motivation) 1. Generating 100% ‘buy-in’ among PNP members is an essential component for the success of the PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030. 2. The requirements on the institutionalization of PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 are constantly changing and increasing. Thus, every member of the organization must keep abreast with the recent directives and issuances on the implementation of the strategy. 3. Among the measures in determining the acceptance (‘buy-in’) of the PNP members of the strategy is their familiarization of the basic concepts and principles being used in the implementation of the PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030. C. What will you learn? (Training Objectives) After this block of instruction, the participants will be able to: 1. Outline the historical background of PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030; 2. Recite the new PNP Vision; 3. Name the six (6) National Government Agencies that are mandated to institutionalized the Performance Governance System (PGS); 4. List the three (3) reasons why the PNP was chosen to adopt the PGS; 5. List the four (4) stages of the Performance Governance System (PGS) Pathway; 6. Enumerate the four (4) Perspectives in the PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 Roadmap; and 7. List the five (5) strategic focus of the Chief, PNP. Page 3 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

II. Historical Background of the PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 A. PNP as the National Police Force of the Republic of the Philippines Section 6, Article XVI of the 1987 Constitution mandates the State to establish and maintain one police force which shall be national in scope and civilian in character, to be administered and controlled by a National Police Commission. On December 13, 1990, Republic Act. No. 6975 entitled “An Act Establishing the Philippine National Police under a Reorganized Department of the Interior and Local Government and for Other Purposes” was enacted formally establishing and organizing the Philippine National Police, placing paramount emphasis to its national scope and civilian character; and ending the existence of the Philippine Constabulary and the Integrated National Police. Pursuant to RA 6975, the PNP is vested with the following powers and functions: 1. Enforce all laws and ordinances relative to the protection of lives and properties; 2. Maintain peace and order and take all necessary steps to ensure public safety; 3. Investigate and prevent crimes, effect the arrest of criminal offenders, bring offenders to justice and assist in their prosecution; 4. Exercise the general powers to make arrest, search and seizure in accordance with the Constitution and pertinent laws; 5. Detain an arrested person for a period not beyond what is prescribed by law, informing the person so detained of all his rights under the Constitution; 6. Issue licenses for the possession of firearms and explosives in accordance with law; and 7. Supervise and control the training and operations of security agencies and issue licenses to operate security agencies, and to security guards and private detectives, for the practice of their professions. On February 25, 1998, Republic Act No. 8551 entitled “The Philippine National Police Reform and Reorganization Act of 1998” was enacted mandating and envisioning the PNP as a community and service oriented agency responsible for the maintenance of peace and order and public safety. RA 8551 was further amended by RA 9708 signed on August 12, 2009. B. The PNP Integrated Transformation Program The PNP experienced lots of birth pains and by the turn of the millennium, various national perception surveys showed that the organization is among the most corrupt national government agencies.

Page 4 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

This became a series national concern resulting in the conduct of in-depth studies to identify the main causes of dysfunctions as basis for the development of proper and lasting solutions. The findings and recommendations of three intensive studies notably the “PNP Reform Commission study” under Former Justice Sedfrey Ordoñez; the Joint United Nations Development Program and Government of the Republic of the Philippines (UNDP-GRP) “Study on Transforming the PNP into a More Capable, Effective and Credible Force;” and the “Transformation Plan” developed by the PNP, became the basis for the development in 2005 of the ten (10) – year PNP Integrated Transformation Program (PNP-ITP) as the PNP’s roadmap for lasting reforms. The PNP-ITP has three (3) primary objectives: 1. To address organizational dysfunctions identified by the different studies and improve the quality of the delivery of police services; 2. To strengthen law enforcement capabilities, and 3. To enhance the welfare and benefits of PNP personnel and their dependents. The PNP-ITP has since been implemented by the succession of PNP Chiefs who implemented their respective program thrusts anchored on the twelve (12) key result areas (KRAs). The development and implementation of nineteen (19) priority projects achieved the gains and achievement after its 5 th year of implementation, it was realized in a thorough evaluation conducted that not much has been achieved, more reforms are still needed to be done and a lot are still expected from the police service. The PNP-ITP is a 10-year Program that is the product of three (3) studies undertaken - the PNP Reform Commission Report; the Joint Government of the Philippines-United Nations -UN Development Program (GOP-UNDP) Study on Transforming the Public; and the PNP Transformation Plan. The PNP-ITP aimed to address organizational dysfunctions, improve the quality of police service in the country, strengthen law enforcement capabilities, and enhance the welfare and benefits of PNP personnel and their dependents. C. The PNP’s Initiation to the Performance Governance System

Page 5 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

In December 2008, the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) 1 reselected the Philippines as Compact Eligible for FY 2009. In order for the Philippines to be considered for the Compact Agreement 2 that will provide the ‘anti-poverty’ financial grant, it should meet the MCC eligibility criteria in areas of ruling justly, investing in people, and economic freedom. Moreover, it should adopt the Performance Governance System (PGS) utilizing the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) framework ---adopted into local circumstances and setting ---with a view of providing a common reference and reform initiatives that should be undertaken to support national strategic priorities at various levels of the Philippine Government and the Filipino society. “…This compact is by and for the people of the Philippines to: reduce poverty, promote economic growth, and create new opportunities for the Philippine people.” – MCC CEO Daniel W. Yohannes’ Remarks during the Signing Ceremony of the Philippines Compact Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), a U.S. Government agency designed to work with developing countries, is based on the principle that aid is most effective when it reinforces sound political, economic and social policies that promote poverty reduction through economic growth. Created by the U.S. Congress in January 2004 with strong bipartisan support, MCC is delivering U.S. foreign assistance by focusing on good policies, country ownership, and results. MCC forms partnerships with some world’s poorest countries but only those committed to good governance, economic freedom, and investments in their citizens, as measured by the MCC Country Scorecard. MCC provides these well-performing countries with large-scale grants to fund country-led solutions for reducing poverty through sustainable economic growth. MCC has already approved not less than $8.4 billion in compact and threshold programs worldwide.(www.mcc.gov.) 1

MCC Chief Executive Officer Daniel Yohannes and Philippine Secretary of Finance Cesar Purisima signed on September 23, 2010 a five-year economic development compact grating $434 million to the Philippines for investments in roads, community development projects, and improvements to the country’s Bureau of Internal Revenue. The Philippines’ $434 million MCC compact provides funding for three (3) major projects. First, the compact provides $214.4 million to construct and repair 220 kilometers of Samar Road. This road, which passes through 15 municipalities, will improve access to markets and services for farmers, fishers, and small businesses in some of the poorest provinces in the Philippines. The compact also includes $120 million to expand Kalahi-CIDSS, a development project that empowers communities by encouraging their participation in poverty reducing activities. The project will provide community grants to support the building of critical infrastructure such as water systems, clinics, and schools. This innovative project design strengthens local accountability and allows poor communities to effectively design and transparently manage the projects they need to increase their incomes and improve their lives. Finally, the compact includes $54.3 million in investments to computerize and streamline business processes in the Bureau of Internal Revenue. This project will bolster the effectiveness of revenue collection and reduce opportunities for corruption. The compact includes approximately $37 million for administrative and oversight costs of the projects, including the cost of administration, management, and auditing as well as fiscal and procurement agent services and environmental and social oversight. The cost of monitoring and evaluation of the compact is budgeted at $8.26 million. (www.mcc.gov.) 2

The compact projects are expected to have robust and demonstrable impacts on income of Filipinos – particularly the poor – and on overall economic growth. The Kalahi-CIDDS project is expected to benefit over 5 million people by 2030 and the road project is expected to impact nearly 300,000 people. The Revenue Administration Reform Project is expected to have broad impacts throughout the economy, thus making nearly all citizens project beneficiaries. (Fact Sheet of the Compact Agreement between MCC and the Government of the Republic of the Philippines.) Page 6 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

The PGS gives much emphasis on public-private partnership (PPP) by considering ordinary citizens’ initiatives and their own governance programs that can contribute towards the pursuit of national strategic priorities. It aligns private and public portfolio of initiatives and action program with the long-term strategic needs of our country. In short, it invites public and private individuals and institutions to strengthen and contribute to the common good of the Philippines and the Filipino people. Through a Memorandum issued on July 9, 2009 by then Executive Secretary Eduardo Ermita, the PNP was mandated together with five (5) other national government agencies (NGAs): DPWH, DOH, DOTC, DepEd, and BIR, to participate in the MCC program requiring the institutionalization of PGS. Since then, the PNP supported by the its National Advisory Group for Police Transformation and Development (NAGPTD), has progressed in cascading PGS in all its offices and units. There are three (3) principal reasons for the selection of the PNP: namely, its development impact to the country and its perceived readiness for productive participation and involvement in good governance program. Also, the PNP is one government agency which performs services with regular face-to-face interaction with the ordinary citizens so that any improvement in its governance system will have immediate positive impact on the public/community it serves. Moreover, it has an existing Integrated Transformation Program (ITP) since 2005 capable of producing breakthrough results across all key activities of PNP administration and operations. The PNP ITP-PGS now known as the PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030: Peace and order Agenda for Transformation and upholding the Rule-Of-Law is the enhanced adaptation of the PNP ITP. It is the PNP’s Roadmap for strategic reforms that will transform the organization into a highly capable, effective and credible police service that is respected, trusted and loved by its personnel and the community with whom it works in partnership to bring about a safer environment to live, work and do business. The PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 is the PNP’s Change Agenda which is anchored on the principle of transparency, accountability and stakeholder participation through clear and well-defined systems and procedures that are realistic, easily understandable, measurable and time-bound. This defined the way how the PNP effectively and efficiently delivers its mandate through human rights-based and community-oriented policing. Crime prevention efforts are given premium in partnership with stakeholders, through the conduct of more extensive consultation, dialogue, inter-faith and multi-cultural mitigation. Similarly, the PNP exerts great emphasis on enhancing the competencies, skills and capability of units and personnel, improving and integrating its systems and procedures, and filling-up its required logistical and other enabling resources.

Page 7 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

Realizing, however, that it cannot absolutely prevent the commission of crimes, the PNP focuses on enhancing its investigative capabilities through progressive training and certification of its investigators, improving the collection, handling and processing of evidence utilizing scientific and modern technologies, and strengthening its coordination and collaboration with other pillars of the criminal justice system and other law enforcement agencies. With the initiation into PGS, the PNP transformed the organization’s mind-set from the traditional reactive perspective to a more proactive, focused and strategic thinking process. This gradually removed management barriers, encouraged more active personnel participation, and closed the communication gaps that pervade the organization’s bureaucratic system.. The old practice of rigid, exclusive and compartmentalized management system has been placed with the culture of inclusivity, promotion of participation and transparency in transactions and processes in the organization. Guided by clear and well-defined systems and procedures, ownership of initiatives are now clearly established and become the bases for the institutionalization of an effective accountability mechanism. The PGS is anchored on the BSC, a management tool for tracking performance developed at the Harvard University Business School and was locally adopted by the Institute for Solidarity in Asia (ISA), with its public partner, the Development Academy of the Philippines. It has four (4) stages with specific and distinct but inter-related activities that need to be satisfied – the Initiation, Compliance, Proficiency and Institutionalization. On September 24, 2009, the PNP successfully completed and was conferred the First Stage (Initiation) of the PGS. It was conferred Compliance status with the completion of requirements and delivery of the Revalida Report by the Chief, PNP on October 14, 2011. And it attained the Proficiency stage on September 26, 2012. The Proficiency stage is aimed at cascading the strategy and aligning the key activities of the organization to ensure successful strategy execution. It centers on the establishment of a strategy –focused organization through an intensive information campaign within the organization and to all its stakeholders. In the case of the PNP, the critical components of the ITP-PGS, or PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030, which include the Agency Charter Statement, Strategy Map, and the Governance Scorecard must be cascaded to and understood by every unit and personnel of the organization so that they all work together towards a common and shared vision and mission. In other words, a clear sense of commitment is established where individual scorecards are developed all aligned and in support of the agency scorecard. Before the year 2014 closes, it is hoped that the PNP will be able to achieve the Palladium Hall of Fame by attaining the Institutionalization stage in the PGS Pathway. D. Two Major Components of the PGS Page 8 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

The PGS has two major components – the strategy map and scorecard. The strategy map is a systematic representation of what the PNP will do to attain its vision while the scorecard is the means to monitor progress of implementation/execution towards attainment of the vision. The strategy map of the PNP is the graphical and logical representation of what the PNP will do to attain its vision. The linking and interconnection of the objective provides that the PNP needs first to optimize the use of available financial and logistical resources, which in turn will produce the objectives on learning and growth perspective of developing competent, motivated, disciplined and values-oriented personnel who will help develop a responsive police organization. The process excellence perspective pushes the PNP to excel on its critical internal core processes of crime prevention and solution and community safety awareness through community-oriented and rights-based policing. Finally, community perspective drives the PNP to the desired outcome for the people to have a safer place to live, work and do business. The governance scorecard shows how these strategic objectives will be attained. Under each objective, key performance indicators were identified, with corresponding targets that set how the PNP units will be gauged. The PNP revised and enhanced its budgeting process to ensure that the PNP budget corresponds to the requirement of the identified initiatives and provides for unforeseen contingencies. Fund resources are allocated based on the targets and initiatives identified and which will become the basis for the preparation of the Annual Operations Plans and Budget (AOPB). E. Formation of NAGPTD and the Creation of CPSM The NAGPTD, the PNP version of Multi-Sectoral Governance Council (MSGC), was organized to support the PNP in the successful implementation and monitoring of the PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030. Composed of high-profile personalities from government agencies, business sector, the academe and community who are known for their integrity, probity and leadership, the NAGPTD provides the PNP with much needed external perspectives and guidance on key issues and concerns pertaining to the PNP, and also acts as effective channel for networks to help the PNP find solutions to pressing issues. The NAGPTD was organized in September 2, 2011. It created the following Cluster Committees to work on specific areas: 1. Committee for Plans, Logistics, Comptrollership and Research and Development in support to respective D-Staff checks the inventory of all PNP assets and properties with the Commission on Audit’s (COA) involvement to maintain high level accountability; making the Directorate for Research and Development (DRD) an officer performing actual research and development operations; strengthening of the budget process by linking strategy into budget and the harmonization of the OPIF, Page 9 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

PMES and PGS pursuant to Administrative Order No. 25; and for DPL to ensure a responsive organizational structure. 2. Committee for Information and Communications Technology supported by the PNP Directorate for Information and Communications Technology Management (PNP-DICTM) embarks on realizing the establishment of the PNP information highway for the possible establishment of information systems in all PNP offices nationwide. 3. Committee for Intelligence, Operations, Investigation, Police Community Relations and Integrated Police Operations together with concerned D-Staff will work into Quad operations for the effective and efficient crime prevention and control and crime solution efficiency. 4. Committee for Personnel Management and Human Resource Development with respective D-Staff will discuss personnel concerns and issues in particular the improvement of systems and procedures on recruitment, training and enhancement of welfare and benefits provided. 5. Committee for Media will work closely with the Directorate for Police Community Relations (DPCR), PNP Public Information Office (PNP-PIO) and Police Community Relations Group (PCRG) for a more effective public information and awareness campaign aimed at enhancing public trust and confidence to the PNP. 6. Committee for Integrity that will work with concerned staff in finding ways to reduce PNP personnel involvement in crimes and other nefarious activities through the inculcation of PNP values/ethics, integrity development, professionalism and culture of excellence. The Cluster Committees are meeting on a ‘need-basis’ to address and tackle sectoral concerns and issues. Among the notable initiatives of the NAGPTD are the following: 1. Partnership with three (3) major shopping malls (Ayala, Robinsons and Shoemart) for the construction of about one hundred (100) police stations in the vicinity of their mall nationwide. 2. Support in the lobbying with the Senate and House of Representatives for the transfer of PNPA, PNTI and NPC from PPSC to the PNP. 3. Generation and mobilization of additional resources. 4. Engaging media and the general public in clarifying ‘sensational’ issues about the PNP. The establishment of an effective monitoring and feedback mechanism under the Center for Police Strategy Management (CPSM) ensures proper management and monitoring of the agency scorecard, the periodic review and evaluation, and initiates necessary adjustments and amendments to the strategy with the support of the PNP leadership and NAGPTD. The CPSM was formally established pursuant to NAPOLCOM Resolution No. 2012-318 issued on August 13, 2012. Page 10 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

The CPSM together with the TWG and the NAGPTD was instrumental for garnering a Silver Trailblazer Award during the conferment of the ‘Proficiency’ status by the ISA and NCC, on September 26, 2012 at the Philippine International Convention Center (PICC), Pasay City. The third Silver Trailblazer award was garnered on March 30, 2013 after the successful Public Governance Reporting at the PICC, Pasay City. F. The PNP Charter Statement/Roadmap

The PNP vision statement reflects its ‘bold and audacious goal’ which it commits to achieve within a given timeframe. The PNP vision states that: “Imploring the aid of the Almighty, by 2030, we shall be a highly capable, effective and credible police service, working in partnership with a responsive community towards the attainment of a safer place to live, work and do business.” In setting its goal of becoming a “highly capable, effective and credible police service,” the PNP also identifies the main pathway it shall travel in order to achieve it. Indeed, it proposes to be “working in partnership with a responsive community,” both at the national and local levels. Only when such partnerships, which need to be operational and fully functioning, would it be able to help the “attainment of a safer place to live, work and do business.” Hence, the PNP realize the need for reaching out and engaging the local and national communities so that a working partnership can be forged in attaining a “safer and more peaceful” environment. Without such partnership, the PNP cannot go very far towards realizing its vision. The PNP vision is fully aligned with its mission, which has been shaped by the enactment of the following three (3) Republic Acts or laws: RA 6975 as Page 11 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

amended by RA 8551 and as further amended by RA 9708. They gave a clear mandate to the PNP to “enforce the law, prevent and solve crimes, maintain peace and order, and ensure public safety and internal security with the active support of the community.” The PNP mission, lofty and noble but demanding and difficult, can be pursued only by an organization firmly grounded on core values and a clear philosophy. That philosophy is framed as: “Providing quality police service with honor and justice;” and the PNP Core Values which are: “makadiyos, makabaya, makatao, and makakalikasan.” These philosophy and core values provide a solid anchor for the PNP as it continuously develops and strengthens itself as a service-oriented organization, and keep it safely and soundly grounded as it goes through the vicissitudes of pursuing its mission in realizing its vision. The PNP has decided to put at the very top of its strategy map a one-line summary of its vision which is: “highly capable, effective and credible police service.” Also at the top of the PNP strategy map is the major outcome that the PNP intends to bring about in realizing its vision, which is: “a safer place to live, work and do business.” The PNP does not only refer places where people live and work, it also underscores the business and economic dimensions. For the bottom-line, the PNP envisions our country to be a safe place where everyone who wishes to invest could carry out economic activities and do business in a safe and conducive environment. G. The PNP Scorecard The PNP governance scorecard shows how these strategic objectives will be attained. Under each perspective, objectives and targets were identified, with corresponding measures and strategic initiatives. 1. Resource Management Perspective The first perspectives of ‘resource management’ serves as the solid foundation for the succeeding perspectives. Next are the two (2) objectives under the ‘learning and growth’ perspective which has the most number of measures. This is followed by the ‘process excellence’ perspective that focuses on the PNP’s core functions, which is its value proposition to the people, in terms of improving crime prevention and solution through better crime solution and crime clearance efficiencies and improvement on national crime index. The most important among the four (4) perspectives is the ‘community’ perspective, that is the beneficiary of the PNP’s improved police service. The objective of attaining a safer place to live, work and do business under this perspective will be measured utilizing the Global Peace Index (GPI). For the PNP to eventually realize its vision, the enabling resources provided in pursuit of its mission should be “adequate.” To help achieve Page 12 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

maximum utilization of resources, the PNP must observe high standards of “transparency and accountability” in all its “financial and logistical transactions.” 2. Learning and Growth Perspective Under the Learning and Growth perspective, the PNP considered two (2) objectives. It was realized that this is crucial for the PNP because it cannot keep doing the same things as in the past if it is to realize its vision. The PNP recognized that, ‘status quo’ and ‘doing business as usual’ is not a viable option anymore. The PNP has to look forward towards a future, in which it does things much better and more effective and efficient through more competent, capable and disciplined personnel and better performance of its core processes than in the past. Thus, the PNP has to invest in its human resources and processes so as it can earn “stakeholders’ support” and efficiently and effectively manage its resources.” Recognizing how crucial “learning and growth” is to the police organization, the PNP decided to put two (2) strategic priorities – closely related and tightly interconnected. The set of strategic priorities starts with developing competent, motivated and value-oriented police personnel. Upon the attainment, it will result to the development of a responsive police organization that is highly capable and ready to do well its mandated tasks. Without any doubt, all these strategic priorities within the second perspective of “learning and growth” depends upon the adequacy and timely provision of resources provided by the PNP and upon the commitment of the PNP to its philosophy framed by service, honor, and justice as well as to the four (4) core values it has chiseled into its governance charter. Resources, competencies and commitment need to go together for them to produce results. 3. Process Excellence Perspective “Learning and growth” perspective focuses on people but it must be complemented by strategies under the third perspective, “process excellence.” This refers to the different core operational process and practices the PNP uses in carrying out its mission. The four core process of “intelligence, investigation, operations and police community relations” are given top consideration. In addition, these concrete strategic objectives are highlighted, such as: “improvement on crime prevention; improvement on crime solution; and improvement on community safety awareness through community-oriented and human rights based policing.” It is important for the PNP personnel to reach out to the communities they serve to obtain their active support, cooperation and eventually, to gain a Page 13 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

higher level of trust and confidence. The good relationship between the police and the community is indeed contributory to the effectiveness and efficiency in the conduct of police operations and in the delivery of police services. The strategic initiatives under ‘process excellence’ are closely linked and interconnected with each other. Progress in pursuing them effectively and efficiently would result to a strengthened and wider base of police stakeholders that provide support to the PNP, in terms of cash and material donations, such as: mobility assets, investigation equipment, capacity building/trainings and other forms of cooperation essential to the attainment of the three (3) objectives under “process excellence” highlighted above. 4. Community Perspective The PNP strategy map makes it clear that this is to be done mainly through improving further the performance of the PNP, and undertaking a sustained public information program utilizing its amended Communications Plan (COMPLAN), with a view towards strengthening the partnership and cooperation with the communities it serves. Ultimately, the community is best served by highly capable and credible PNP personnel that effectively uphold the rule of law resulting in a safety place to live, work and do business. III. CODE-P: 2013 AND BEYOND A. Overview and Context Setting CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond is the PNP Strategic Focus towards the realization of the PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030. It clearly defines the direction of the PNP – where we are now, what resources we have, where we want to go and how we will face the challenges ahead. It takes off from the success realized at the National Capital Region Police Office(NCRPO) where service to the people, the community and the police organization above self was methodically implemented and greatly experienced. Results of previous visits and briefing conducted from the various PNP Directorial Staff and National Support Units also contributed to the development of this Strategic Focus. This Strategic Focus shall serve as a guide to get the job done, including the simplification of the systems and processes and removing of unnecessary functions inside the organization. In furtherance of this Strategic Focus, redefining the fundamental role of a policeman in attaining higher crime solution and by arresting more criminals. The successes attained by the NCRPO were made substantially possible by redefining the goals of the organization and the fundamental role of every policeman in the attainment of said goals. The NCRPO leadership painstakingly analyzed its operational functions, identified its weaknesses and integrated systems and processes that hamper its performance. Its goals were clearly defined – “TO BETTER SERVE AND PROTECT THE Page 14 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

COMMUNITY.” As such, the NCRPO had to reach out to the rank and file to solicit the commitment necessary to do a better job or simply knowing his/her job well in attaining the set goals. Before that, it redefined the role of the police officer according to the most popular perception of the majority of the people or citizens; i.e., one who solves crimes and arrests criminals and puts them behind bars. Research and studies (UNDP, Pulse Asia, ACRES, ISA, SWS, etc.) were even conducted on the way the people and the community view the quality of police service they expect on a 24/7 basis; on how the police contributes for a better quality of life to live, work and do business in the country; and on the way the police deliver results through its anti-crime strategies to enhance crime solution efficiency and improve crime convictions in courts. All these studies provide the basis for a better perception of the police officer as a professional public servant. Having clarified the goals of the NCRPO and the roles of its personnel, the concept of “My IP (Individual Performance) is the Key” was born. “MY IP is the Key” is both an internal campaign and a system that aimed to extract the best from the police officer on a 24/7 basis. It instilled in the police personnel the pride in their craftsmanship. The concept and system also called for every police officer to know by heart the job and the activities required to undertake and achieve the target. The system thus has a built in challenge for one to excel and contribute better to the organization’s success. On the other hand, the system also reflected the complacency of those who were merely contented with what they had achieved. Having created and put into place the internal system of “My IP is the Key,” it was then necessary to implement a strategy that would bring the community and the NCRPO together as partners in crime fighting. The PNP has always believed that success in fighting crime can only go as far as the extent of cooperation that the public will accord us giving importance to: Service to the Community, Service to the People, and Service to the Organization. With this in mind, the NCRPO launched the “Subukan N’yo Po Kami” campaign as a way of drawing active support from the people. This campaign platform is a 24/7 short messaging system (SMS) action and complaint center that served as the main facility of the NCRPO to receive notification from the public and for NCRPO to provide immediate police response and assistance. The campaign is a manifestation of NCRPO’s strong commitment to serve the public. It also served as a stern warning to criminals and would-be criminals to stop their nefarious activities or face the consequences of intensified police actions and interventions. The 60% increase of crime incidence in Metro Manila is a result of the NCRPO’s noble intention to reflect the true crime situation coupled with the active reporting of the community. In the eyes of an ordinary citizen, it meant that more police actions are needed to solve crimes and arrest more criminals. However, in our points of view, the increased crime rate depicted the true crime situation and served as a strategic management tool to guide Page 15 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

our police commanders in the proper deployment of personnel and utilization of resources. Hence, it clearly defined the PNP’s Serbisyong Makatotohanan to be better serve and protect the community. Believing that the job demands excellence and professionalism in thought, planning and execution, hence, there is a need to conduct series of training and refresher courses for the PNP personnel to enhance their skills and competence. Among these are: Criminal Investigation Course, Tactical Motorcycle Riding Course, PNP SCOUT, SWAT, and SAR Training Courses, Handgun/Firearm Proficiency Training, and Police Responders Course. These efforts resulted in significant breakthrough in the field of investigation and operations, with the NCRPO posting better crime solution efficiency ratings with the solving of petty street crimes to heinous and sensational cases and putting more criminals behind bars. Premised on the NCRPO’s success stories and result of the series of conferences and consultations with the different Directorial Staff and National Support Units, this PNP Strategic Focus will be fully implemented from the National Headquarters down to the lowest police stations. The PNP has developed this Strategic Focus in order to effectively meet its goals of better serving and protecting the public. To implement this PNP Strategic Focus, the following main objectives shall be accomplished: 1. To enhance the knowledge, skills and attitude (KSA) of policemen through constant quality training and education to achieve the desired COMPETENCE levels; 2. To institute ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT in the execution of the PNP Program Thrust; 3. To instill DISCIPLINE and inspire unwavering commitment in the execution of its mandated core functions without fear or favor; 4. To ensure EXCELLENCE in the performance of mandated tasks through the optimum use of resources; and 5. To cultivate personal commitment for PROFESSIONAL policing services. When everything is in place, this will bring into the fore a new breed of police officers and organization – professionals who share one vision and one common goal; professionals who are resolutely bonded on the core values and principles of the organization. In short, the community shall experience excellent police performance from the new breed of police heroes travelling the right path – the “Matuwid na Daan.” This will be a path of righteousness and a showcase of dedicated police service reflecting the PNP’s Serbisyong Makatotohanan. B. The CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond 1. Competence The foundation of a highly capable, effective and credible PNP is the human resource development and management because our personnel Page 16 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

are the most important component in helping our organization fulfill it mandate. Hence, upgrading and enhancing the competence (Knowledge, Skills and Attitude) of the police from basic to mandatory and specialized courses shall be a continuous process before they pursue their own field of expertise. To improve crime solution efficiency, policemen are mandated to solve more crimes, arrest more criminals and ensure a higher conviction rate. There is a need to enhance the current training of police personnel to be more effective and efficient in performing their core function, that is, protecting lives and properties. This includes police reform in training, particularly of the Field Training Program with emphasis on Field Training Exercise. There will also be emphasis in enhancing the investigative skills of current investigators and detectives in the organization. Among the objectives are: a. Intensify Policy Reform; b. Review and pursue legislative agenda; c. Improve the Field Training Program (FTP) with emphasis on Field Training Exercise (Patrol, Traffic and First Responder); d. Improvement of existing Non-Uniformed Personnel (NUP) courses and development of competency courses of NUP; and e. Enhance operational procedures and practices. 2. Organizational Development The basis step to achieve organizational development is by looking at the current structure of the organization and its basic mandate. To further enhance the PNP’s capability to solve more crimes and arrest more criminals, there is a need to create an organizational set-up that has the most efficient management team and staff to support its program thrust. The current structure of the PNP shows an intricate web of multiple tasks and functions (i.e. creation of DIPOs, Task Forces and Offices) which have resulted in the duplication of tasks of existing offices. Hence, identifying and eliminating unnecessary offices and task forces, beginning at the National Headquarters, shall be implemented. The organization shall be principally guided by its mandate of solving more crimes and arrest more criminals. With this in mind, more human resources shall be utilized on the streets. The NUP shall take over the basic administrative functions thereby allowing the employment and deployment of more uniformed personnel in the field. This major adjustment includes eliminating unnecessary systems and functions; streamlining of processes into a well understood manner; and realignment of systems and structures. From a culture of military-type policing, a more defined departmental role of solving crimes shall be applied. In this way, the roles and responsibilities of each personnel are simplified and understood. Among the objectives are: a. Streamline the organization; Page 17 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

b. Implement the concept of “My IP is the Key” at all levels nationwide; c. Standardize recruitment, selection and placement of police personnel; d. Instill leadership down to the lowest level to communicate and implement change; and e. Competent or support organizational development through efficient resource management. 3. Discipline Discipline for his purpose shall mean commitment to duty, law and order. Guided by the old principle of doing the right things for the right reasons at the right time, internal discipline shall be strictly instilled and practiced at all levels. All PNP personnel must have unwavering commitment in the execution of their mandated core functions, without fear or favor. Among the objectives are: a. Establish mechanism to determine the level of discipline of PNP personnel; b. Institutionalize reforms and mechanisms to fast track the resolution of admin cases against PNP personnel; and c. Enhance Counter-intelligence efforts against erring PNP personnel. 4. Excellence To achieve excellence in policing, a paradigm shift, from the traditional to a more scientific and ICT-assisted investigation of crimes and police operations, shall be adopted. With the successful implementation of the “Subukan N’yo Po Kami” SMS text facility in NCRPO, other PROs shall develop the same SMS campaign platform which shall bring the police closer to their respective communities. Trends in policing services today are far different from the past. Criminals have become more sophisticated and organized with the use of advanced technology and even to the extent of using the PNP uniforms and paraphernalia. Among the objectives are: a. Integrate the “Subukan N’yo Po Kami” SMS Center with the PNP Text 2920; b. Establish an effective feedback mechanism as the basis for evaluation and assessment on the performance of field units; c. Fully implement the adopted ICT-assisted based systems to support administrative functions, investigation and police operations; d. Redesign the PNP uniforms and institute safeguards against unauthorized manufacture and use; and e. Provide quality service to the people and the community. 5. Professionalism To cultivate personal commitment for effective police services, the Police Officer must be professional – competent, disciplined, and an excellent public servant. As such, he/she must perform his/her tasks that will earn Page 18 of 19


A Lecture on PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond By PO3 Francisco B. Lindero, Jr.

the admiration, respect and cooperation of the community. Hence, the PNP shall continue to educate its personnel to develop professionalism. The top management and Chiefs of Police must be able to orient and steer the organization towards a culture of excellence and professionalism. Among the objectives are: a. Standardize Placement and Promotion System based on merit and fitness, at all levels. b. Develop various levels of expert professionals in the organization; c. Rationalize Rewards and Incentives System and Enhance Morale and Welfare Program; d. Continuously review and update police operational procedures and other policy manuals; and e. Improve internal and external communications through proactive media program. IV. Summary During this block of instruction, you have refreshed your memory with the legal basis for the existence of the Philippine National Police. You have also learned the history of the organization’s transformation program and its evolution into PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 with Chief, PNP’s Strategic Focus, CODE-P: 2013 and Beyond. [] [] []

Page 19 of 19

PGS Made Easy (A Reader)  

This 29-page lesson plan provides an comprehensive discussion on the history of the PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P. The discussions...

PGS Made Easy (A Reader)  

This 29-page lesson plan provides an comprehensive discussion on the history of the PNP P.A.T.R.O.L. Plan 2030 and CODE-P. The discussions...

Advertisement