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FIVE-SPOKE WHEEL RESTORATION

ISSUE 8 5.95

LIMITED EDITION FOX FEATURE CARS

DIY

POWER: ETHANOL IN YOUR ENGINE RESTO: INTERIOR RECOLOR | DE-RATTLE YOUR DOORS


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Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 3


ISSUE 8 TABLE OF CONTENTS

8

24

70

RESTORATION FIVE-SPOKE WHEEL

ISSUE 8 5.95

DEPARTMENTS

EDITION LIMITED FEATURE CARS FOX

6 EDITORIAL

24 EVENTS

8 YOU GOTTA SEE THIS #1

30 NEW PARTS

10 YOU GOTTA SEE THIS #2

32 MUSTANG NATION

14 ORIGINALITY

88 FIX MY FOX

20 FOX NEWS

92 FROM THE ARCHIVES

DIY

ON THE COVER One of the great things about Fox Mustang production was the many special, promotional, and Limited Edition models created. Standing tall on the cover is Mike Pittsley’s '92 Summer Special convertible. Mike, a firefighter, knows a thing or two about hot, and his Limited Edition Mustang sizzles. Photography by Tom Shaw

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ENGINE

POWER: ETHANOL IN YOUR | DE-RATTLE YOUR DOORS R RESTO: INTERIOR RECOLO


COVER STORY 42 SUMMERTIME SPECIAL Mike Pittsley’s ’92 “Summer Special” convertible

48 POSTER ’92 Limited Edition

FEATURES

58

24 A SORT OF HOMECOMING Fox Mustangs gather in the shadow of their birthplace 58 REGENERATED GT Kim Adkins bought his ’82 GT new, then renewed it 70 INSTALLMENT PLAN Jim Walrod installed a few things on his high-flyin’ ’91 5.0 LX

PERFORMANCE 78 ETHANOL IN YOUR FUEL INJECTED ENGINE How does it affect performance and reliability?

RESTORATION

82

36 DYEING FOR A RECOLOR How to properly dye interior plastics, vinyl, and leather 50 FOX FIVE-SPOKE WHEEL RESTORATION Rehab for the ’91-’93 cast-aluminum wheels 66 DOOR AND HATCH RATTLE REPAIR Turns out the solutions to the hard-to-close hatch and aggravating vibration are two of our favorite things: cheap and easy 82 EASTWOOD COMPANY’S SMALL JOB SODA BLASTER Less is more in this affordable, easy-to-use system

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 5


FROM THE EDITOR

CORPS OF DISCOVERY by Tom Shaw

I

f you actually paid attention in history class enthusiast magazines. I remember seeing a Mustang history. Ford authority Kevin Marti’s and weren’t dreaming of girls or doodling dressy black Capri at a dealer’s lot in the early regular column is loaded with insights from the cars, you may remember that the Corps ’80s, but 20 years later, I didn’t recall its name or actual Ford database — an amazing resource. of Discovery was the 33-member group any of the details about the car’s content, much Beginning this issue, we’re going to ease Kevin’s commanded by Meriwether Lewis and William less the story behind its creation or the memoirs workload a bit by rotating his Marti Report Clark to have a first look at whatever waited to of its designers. By buying dealer lit online, I column with From the Archives, a multipage be discovered west of the Mississippi River in found it in an ’81 Mercury dealer book. It was feature reprinting rare Ford literature of special the early 1800s. It was uncharted wilderness the Black Magic option, with gold stripes and interest to the Fox Mustang enthusiast. until Lewis and Clark blazed that trail. gold anodized TRX wheels — quite a looker and So as we sail our own Corps of Discovery On a slightly less impressive and magnificent an obscure chapter in Fox Mustang history. (A keel boat up the river of fuzzy Fox history, we level, I feel like we’re blazing a trail and making pic and synopsis ran in last issue’s You Gotta See gather all the info we can and put it right here some discoveries of our own here at in these pages. We’re still very early into FOX Mustang Magazine. Fox Mustangs the mission — so early we frequently were but appliances of transportation. aren’t sure what questions to ask. But at ENTHUSIASTS LIKE YOU Almost no one regarded them as the FOX Mustang Magazine tent at any AND ME HAVE NOW BECOME collectibles in their own right. They Mustang show, discussions with readers were hot rodded, driven, crashed, used CUSTODIANS OF THE HISTORY. who stop by usually produce plenty of up, parted out, and hauled off with no good questions and even a few answers. regard, like the can your pork and beans Sometimes they want to share the results came in. This.) Call a Lincoln-Mercury dealer — if there of research they’ve already done. Sometimes Thankfully, Ford has some understanding of are any Mercury dealers still around — ask them they have a probing question that needs the importance of its heritage, how enthusiasts about a Black Magic Capri, and unless you get answering. Either way, rather than retelling old value the history of a model like the Mustang, and a rare old-timer with extraordinary recall, they tales retold zillions of times already, uncovering how celebrating that history and drawing from it won’t know a thing about it. Enthusiasts like Fox info is fresh, challenging, and interesting for can endear its new models to the legions of fans you and me have now become custodians of the me as an editor, and it results in stories that I who buy their share of new Mustangs. history. think you’ll find interesting, too. But even a company aware of the value of its In this issue, Terry McCoy — for my Maybe one day future seekers of Mustang history cannot devote the kind of effort to it that money the foremost visionary of Foxes’ future knowledge will stumble upon a dusty stack of enthusiasts like us would like to see. A company collectability — shares in-depth info about the FOX Mustang Magazines and learn things they depends on sales, and once the model year ’90 7-Up Limited Edition Mustang. Terry’s done didn’t know. Maybe they’ll share them with closes, the light dims quickly for that 12-month his homework and has gathered an impressive fellow seekers through means not yet conceived segment of Mustang history. Papers are filed or library of not-for-the-public documentation, of. But for now, with Issue 8 finished and in tossed, people are shuffled, and the company supplementing the interview he did with Mustang your hands, we press on to the next issue. begins focusing on next year’s products and Planner Joe Laura [Originality, Issue 7]. marketing. The kind of deep, insider, nitty-gritty Also in this issue, we examine another Fox detail we like fades away quickly. Limited Edition, the ’92 Feature Car, our cover What survives is the factory literature story; along with a first-year ’82 GT. As always, distributed to the public, to dealers, to the we’ve packed the issue full of restoration articles, press, and whatever stories made it to print in too, to help you preserve your own slice of Fox

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Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 7


YOU GOTTA SEE THIS Into the High Country Ron Wheeler stretches the legs of his ’89 GT as it cruises Route 395, climbing through northern Nevada’s high country into the High Sierras. The run from Reno to Carson City is spectacular — the road is fast (80+ mph is typical), and bald eagles share the big blue Western sky. Does time behind the wheel get any better than this? Ron’s GT was on the cover of Issue 3. — photography by Austin Price

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YOU GOTTA SEE THIS Blast Off Charles Potter and his Fox Mustang blast down the Darlington Dragway during Mustang Week 2012 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Mustang Week’s Night at the Drags is a fun, run-what-you-brung event, without the pressure of eliminations. The sharp four-eyed Fox looks as good as it runs. — photography by Keith Keplinger

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PUBLISHER

CURT PATTERSON curt@pattersonpublishing.com

EDITOR

TOM SHAW tom@themustangmagazine.com

MANAGING EDITOR

BRANDON PATTERSON brandon@pattersonpublishing.com

COPY EDITOR

LAURA BURKE

ART DIRECTOR PHILIP PIETRI

GRAPHIC DESIGNER DANIEL BARCELO

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

JASON JACOBS jason@pattersonpublishing.com

MUSTANG NATION / EVENTS DIRECTOR JASON JACOBS jason@pattersonpublishing.com

WEB MARKETING

BRANDON PATTERSON brandon@pattersonpublishing.com

ADVERTISING SALES TEAM

CURT PATTERSON JASON JACOBS BRANDON PATTERSON

OFFICE MANAGER DEB PATTERSON

COLUMNISTS

MATT HIGHLEY KEVIN MARTI TERRY McCOYY

CONTRIBUTORS

DIGITAL EDITIONS #1-#7 OF FOX MUSTANG MAGAZINE NOW AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING AND FOR PURCHASE!

VISIT

WWW.FOXMUSTANGMAGAZINE.COM

PETER GEISLER BARRY KLUCZYK JIM KREUZ DANIELLE PANDELINE JAMES RITZMAN JASON SMITH CHRISTINE WILSON

FOX Mustang Magazine is published bimonthly by Patterson Publishing, P.O. Box 41, Lakeland, FL 33802. Subscription Rates (bimonthly frequency): U.S. 6 issues $20.00; Canada add $15 per year for postage. All other countries add $25 per year for postage. U.S. Funds only. Allow 6-8 weeks for new subscriptions. Send address change to FOX Mustang Magazine, Customer Service, P.O. Box 41, Lakeland, Florida 33802. Customer Service (877) 279-3010. Patterson Publishing, Lakeland, Florida Phone (863) 701-2707 “Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will direct your paths.” -Proverbs 3:5-6

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|| Satisfaction Guaranteed! || Exciting variety of interior & exterior styling upgrades! || Over 30 years of automotive manufacturing excellence. || Unrivalled quality, engineering & fit for 1979-1993 Fox Body Mustangs.

Call Toll-Free For a Dealer Near You:

1-855-372-5362 www.DrakeMusclecars.com

A Division of

130 CASSIA WAY • HENDERSON, NV • 89014

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 13


ORIGINALITY

’90 LIMITED EDITION — PART 2 by Terry McCoy

L

ast issue, we began a two-part article about the ’90 Limited Edition LX 5.0 convertible. This car was a first in a series of Limited Edition Mustangs. The design center worked very closely with Joe Laura and the Mustang Team during development to distinguish the car from a mainstream Mustang. This time, we’ll look at some specific points about the ’90 Limited Edition LX 5.0 convertible. 7-Up chose this car as a prize in a $20 million contest. Thirty ’90 Limited Edition Mustangs were to be given away after the NCAA Basketball Championship Finals. The contest was to run from February 26 to April 21, 1990. There was to be extensive coverage on television and radio commercials. The stores displayed 7-Up promotional items describing the contest, such as two-liter bottles of 7-Up and Diet 7-Up, pole toppers, posters, and a shelf talker. Even though there was a lot of hype, TV and radio coverage, and promotional items at the stores, the contest never materialized. It has been said that 7-Up had a contest within the company and gave away 30 of these gems at a company picnic. The ordering code for the Limited Edition Package was (562), which included Emerald Green CC Metallic (PA) for the exterior color,

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along with the mirrors, body side moldings, and fascia, which were also painted the same color. This package also included the black-and white dash, white leather seats (CZ), and matching white convertible roof. Last on the list were the 15-inch turbine wheels borrowed from the GT. These cars were ordered with the (245A) value package, which included options such as air conditioning, cruise control, and AMFM stereo cassette with clock and premium sound. Even though air conditioning was standard with the value package (245A), that option could have been deleted. Pictured (with the captions) is an example of one without air conditioning, which was very rare. Three options available included front license-plate bracket (153), engine-block heater (13H), and automatic overdrive transmission (44T). Production of the ’90 Limited Edition LX 5.0 convertibles started on December 1, 1989, and ended on May 29, 1990. The total number built was 4,103. Of those, 261 were exported. There were 2,743 optioned with automatics, while a mere 1,360 were five-speed manuals. Next month, we continue our series on Feature Cars and introduce John Jones from www.triplewhitefox.com. John is a long-time Mustang enthusiast and has a lot of knowledge to share.


Close-up of options on window sticker, showing no air conditioning '90 Limited Edition window sticker

As you can see, no air conditioning was ever installed from Dearborn Assembly Plant (D.A.P.).

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 15


These were the 7-Up bottles that promoted the contest.

These were the pages of the Promotional Guide.

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Close-up showing the paint code (PA)

Showing the GT wheel is also standard on Limited Edition Showing Limited Edition interior as white leather (CZ)

Showing paint was exclusive to ’90 Limited Edition This is the 7-Up basketball.

NEXT ISSUE The ’92 Feature Car — Part 1

Terry McCoy is a collector and researcher of Fox Mustangs, having owned and studied original low-mile and no-mile cars. He shares his knowledge exclusively in FOX Mustang Magazine.

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 17


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Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 19


FOX NEWS

Limited Editions Online

Given that this issue is heavy on the Limited Editions (cover story, poster, expanded Originality column), we thought this would be a logical place to mention the www.triplewhitefox.com website, developed and run by John Jones. It’s dedicated to owners and enthusiasts of ’92 and ’93 Limited Edition Mustang LX 5.0 convertibles, and has a nice cache of Limited Edition Mustang info, including photos, decoding, forums, production numbers, feature articles, and plenty more. If you’re into the Feature Cars, a.k.a. Limited Editions, you may know about it already, but if not, browse on by.

New Item! MCA Update John Dettori, New York-based member of the board of the Mustang Club of America, will be providing regular news from the MCA. While many readers are MCA members, many are not, and this regular update will keep us all up to speed on what’s going on with the world’s largest Mustang club. Mustang 50th Celebration: By now you’ve heard that two simultaneous shows, East and West, have been announced for the Mustang’s 50th birthday celebration, scheduled for April 15-20, 2014, and hosted by the Mustang Club of America. All Mustang enthusiasts are welcome and can come to the event of their choice.

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Here are the facts: • P  ony Drives: April 12-15, 2014: Mustang, Oklahoma, to both Concord, North Carolina, and Las Vegas, Nevada •E  ast Show: April 16-20, 2014: Concord, North Carolina, at Charlotte Motor Speedway (vendor setup 4/15) •W  est Show: April 16-20, 2014: Las Vegas, Nevada, at Las Vegas Motor Speedway (vendor setup 4/15) In addition to a Grand National car show, swap and vendor presence, and performance

events, optional cross-country Mustang Pony Drives are being organized the week before from several areas of the country to meet up in Mustang, Oklahoma, where an event is being organized (details TBD). Mustang, Oklahoma, is equidistant between Charlotte and Las Vegas Motor Speedway, about 1,100 miles to either show. Working with local clubs, Ford dealers, and Mustang related business, the Pony Drives cover 300-400 miles per day, picking up Mustang enthusiasts en route. Check the MCA website (www.mustang.org) for more information as the event draws near. Start making your plans now! — John Dettori


Royal Purple’s Upgrade and Expansion

Marti Auto Works Service Center Museum Grand Opening

There’s no shortage of motor oil brands these days. So why use Royal Purple instead of one of the bigger name brands? Because Royal Purple is formulated as a super premium oil with a racing background. It includes protective compounds that older (designed before 1996) engines need but don’t get from today’s major brands. It’s all about preventing cam and lifter wear, and bearing failure. Royal Purple is formulated with its own proprietary additive package to protect older engines and high-performance engines. Royal Purple is now widely available at retailers like Pep Boys, O’Reilly’s, and more.

Talk about a good day at the office. Kevin Marti, columnist for this magazine and the man behind Marti Auto Works, recently unveiled his company’s new Service Center Museum and corporate offices — a replica of a Ford dealership’s Parts and Service Department, 1960s’ style. “The idea for a Ford dealership service and part museum started when I was 17 and collected my first Ford banner,” Kevin says. “Through the years, I have traveled the country collecting Philco-Ford, Rotunda, Autolite, and FoMoCo products, parts, parts counters, equipment, signage, and literature from the 1960-1970 years.” Also featured is a 1960s’ Coke machine that, like all the other equipment, is in working order. For the grand opening, Kevin and Shelli Marti invited guests from all over the country for a tour and luncheon. The Marti Service Center Museum is part of a new home for Marti Auto Works that will eventually house all departments of the company.

More info: (888) 382-6300; www.royalpurple.com

More info: www.martiauto.com

Meet Motorcraft Mike

Motorcraft Mike is the name of the new guy who will be representing Ford online in web vids, Facebook pages, and DIY appearances. Mike Sanom is his real name, and he’s Ford’s technical training manager. Motorcraft Mike will appear in monthly videos aimed at do-it-yourselfers via the FordParts. com Facebook page. He will use his extensive experience and educational methods to inform consumers of things they should watch out for, how to handle certain situations, and educate them on the benefits of using genuine Ford and Motorcraft parts on their vehicles.

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 21


FOX NEWS Coming Soon

In our travels, we visited the owner of a perfectly preserved ’88 GT convertible that has not had so much as an oil change, never been dealer-prepped, and never even licensed. It’s been in careful climate-controlled storage since new, and the owner generously allowed us to go over it top to bottom with our cameras. We’re putting together something special. Stay tuned.

New Trans Kits

Performance Automatic has just introduced a line of Max Performance rebuild kits for Ford cars and trucks equipped with these transmissions: • C4 • C6 • AOD • AODE or • 4R70W All Max Performance kits come complete with all seals, gaskets, and Raybestos Performance clutches. More info: Performance Automatic (240) 439-4650 www.performanceautomatic.com

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Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 23


SHOW COVERAGE & EVENTS

A SORT OF HOMECOMING Fox Mustangs gather in the shadow of their birthplace story and photography by Barry Kluczyk

F

ord Motor Company is gracious enough to lend the parking lots at its World Headquarters complex in Dearborn, Michigan, for a few events each year, but none compares to the ever-expanding show put on by the Mustang Owners of Southeast Michigan club. Last year’s event drew about 900 Mustangs and Fords of all years and descriptions. Of course, we were laser-focused on the Fox-bodies in attendance, and there was something almost spiritual about such a “homecoming” event, viewing the cars on the grounds on which they were designed more than two decades ago, and more than three decades ago for the early “four-eyes.” The Dearborn assembly plant where these cars were built was located only a few miles away, too. It currently builds the F-150. Admittedly, we would’ve liked to have seen a few more Foxes at the show, but the quality more than made up for the quantity. Check out the photos for the highlights.

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Michael Grudnicki bought this ’92 LX notchback brand-new, intending to modify it. The mods didn’t happen, but he didn’t drive it either. It has 68 original miles. Not 6,800 or 680 — 68 miles. The antenna and wheel center caps have never been installed, and the assembly line stickers and protective plastic steering wheel cover are still in place. Wow.


A trio of the 107 ’93 Cobra R models were on hand. The cars, all in Vibrant Red, were intended for racing and came without air conditioning, a heater, or a warranty. The 17-inch black five-lug wheels were pull-ahead versions of the SN-95 Mustang GT wheel, and they covered 13-inch front/10.5-inch rear brakes.

David Calibeo’s ’93 Canary Yellow Feature Car is one of 1,119 built with a black top and interior, and only 452 them like his came with a five-speed. Another 384 yellow Feature Cars had white tops and interiors (271 automatics and 113 five-speeds).

Mike Patterson’s restored ’92 Michigan State Police (MSP) car is one the most authentic SSP Mustangs out there. A recent feature vehicle on our pages, Mike’s car is one of only 20 cars the department purchased in 1992. MSP also bought 14 SSPs in 1989.

Retired From Duty

Mustang ntically restored SSP Mike Patterson’s authe State Police history preserves Michigan story and photography

by Barry Kluczyk

Roger Niemiec’s 351-powered, nitrous-fed ’93 Cobra drag car looks as good as it runs, with a show-winning level of detail. It’s a survivor of the Fox-body shootouts that raged through the 1990s and 2000s.

EVENTS Magazine 71 Issue 6 FOX Mustang

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8.17 KENT, WA CLASSIC FORD SHOW AND MUSTANG ROUNDUP Mark Palmore; 253.852.1480 www.pcmc.cc 8.17 ELKHART, IN MUSTANG & FORD SHOW Carl Kindig; 574.256.2173 www.michianamustangs.com

8.17 SCHENECTADY, NY 22ND ANNUAL DEALER DAY CAR SHOW Walt Dugan; 518.279.3791 www.nyasmc.com

8.18 COOPERSBURG, PA COLLECTOR CAR SHOW Denise; 215.892.6758 www.1st-pa-mustang.org

8.18 AUBURN, MA ALL FORDS & AMERICAN IRON CAR SHOW Info Line; 508.674.5462 www.mccne.com

8.18 SPRINGFIELD, IL 35TH ANNUAL MUSTANG AND ALL FORD SHOW Susie Lonzerotti; 217.415.9061 www.cimclub.com

8.24 DUNN, NC ALL FORD SHOW www.stangs-r-us.com 8.25 COLUMBIS, OH ALL MUSTANG SHOW Seamus Nicholson; 614.973.8384 www.mustangclubofohio.com

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Thomas Price’s ’84 Dark Charcoal GT is a well-optioned coupe, including the articulating sport seats, which added $366 to the car’s $12,184 total sticker price. The cassette-player stereo added $204, while the premium sound system — with that “AMP” pull switch — was another $151.

Philip Smith’s ’90 Wild Strawberry GT is well preserved (no pun intended) wearing even the original, date-coded spark plug wires. Only about 10 percent of the 33,000 GT hatches were sprayed that color in 1990.

Although it’s not a Mustang, the ’81 Durango is still an interesting Fox-body. A Fordblessed project taken on by the National Coach Corporation, perhaps 300 were built using the Fairmont as its foundation. All were powered by the 300 straight-six engine.

The swap meet wasn’t large, but this collection of taillights shows a few finds for Fox fans.

EVENTS 8.25 LANGLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA MUSTANG ROUND-UP AND ALL FORD SHOW Peter; 604.858.6763 8.30 – 9.1 ORLANDO, FL MCA 2013 NATIONAL SHOW www.mustangsatthemickyard.com 8.31 – 9.2 BOZEMAN, MT 34TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL MUSTANG MEET Lyle; 406.587.9956 www.fordmt.com

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SEPTEMBER 9.1 CARLISLE, PA MUSTANG ROUND-UP Kevin; 717.433.1094 9.6 – 9.7 LOUISVILLE, KY SEPTEMBER STAMPEDE Ron Kinberger; 502.314.8776 www.derbycitymustangclub.com 9.7 STAMPEDE 2013 MUSTANG, OK www.okmustangs.com

9.7 SUMNER, WA ALL FORD SHOW AND SHINE 253.863.2211 9.8 MANCHESTER, CT MUSTANG POWER SHOW Info Line; 598.674.5462 www.mccne.com 9.8 SOUTHOLD, NY MUSTANG STAMPEDE & CLASSIC FORD SHOW Dennis Healy; 516.398.7793 www.mscli.com

9.8 MAPLE SHADE, NJ MUSTANG & FORD FALL CAR SHOW Marvin Askins; 856.697.6306 www.southjerseymustangclub.net 9.14-9.15 YAKIMA, WA 22ND ANNUAL PONIES IN THE SUN ALL-FORD SHOW www.suncountrymustang.com 9.15 FREEHOLD, NJ 16TH ANNUAL FREEHOLD FORD CAR SHOW Bob Barrenger; 908.451.5801 barranger@cornerstoneag.com


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Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 29


NEW PARTS

PRODUCT SHOWCASE FUEL INJECTION HARNESS This Painless Performance Fuel Injection Harness takes the hassle out of an EFI conversion. Designed for retrofits and full engine swaps, each kit includes everything needed to complete the electrical installation of modern fuel injection systems. Fits ’86-’93 Fox-bodies. Summit Racing www.summitracing.com (800) 230-3030

MANUAL-TRANSMISSION TUNNEL HUMP KIT

AOD PRO SHIFT SUPER SERVO

Now you can finish your ’79-’93 Fox-body five-speed swap with this Tunnel Hump kit from Latemodel Restoration. The kit comes with all of the parts needed to modify the floor for a five-speed conversion.

The AOD Pro Shift Super Servo is Performance Automatic’s latest addition to its Ford Performance transmission line. It fits all Ford AOD transmissions. Made for high-performance applications, it’s designed to increase holding capacity and boost performance.

Latemodel Restoration www.latemodelrestoration.com (866) 507-3786

Performance Automatic www.performanceautomatic.com (240) 439-4650

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MASS AIR MODIFIER The JMS Mass Air Modifier is designed to accurately scale and filter your mass air signal. It allows you to adjust the scale of the mass air signal, extend sensor range, and eliminate “pegging.” Available for ’88’93 Fox-bodies. JMS Chip & Performance www.jms-mam.com (601) 766-9424

SERPENTINE SYSTEM March Performance’s new Revolver serpentine system is designed for high style at a low price. The bright, one-piece alternator and air conditioning bracket provide a rigid support for the alternator and A/C compressor; a separate bracket allows optional power steering or no power steering. And March’s new Style Track bracket kit costs $500 less than other similar units on the market. March Performance www.marchperformance.com (888) 729-9070

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 31


TRAVEL

1 FABULOUS FORDS FOREVER AT KNOTT’S BERRY FARM

Costa Mesa, CA October

Buena Park, CA April

2 DIABLO VALLEY MUSTANG ASSOCIATION CAR SHOW Antioch, CA May

3 GOLDEN HILLS MUSTANG CLUB CAR SHOW Suisun, CA May

4 PONIES & SNAKES CAR SHOW Danville, CA June

5 VINTAGE MUSTANG OWNERS ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CAR SHOW Cupertino, CA June

6 ALL-FORD SHOW Yorba Linda, CA August

7 MUSTANGS AT QUEEN MARY Long Beach, CA September

8 MUSTANGS AT THE AIRTEL PLAZA HOTEL Van Nuys, CA September

Welcome to FOX Mustang Magazine’s regional directory of the Mustang world, which includes parts vendors, restoration and mechanical shops, shows and events, great diners and restaurants, roadside attractions, races, drive-ins, and just plain old neat things.

11 THE MUSTANG MADNESS CAR SHOW

ATTRACTIONS

ANNUAL EVENTS

NATION

California Edition

12 CALIFORNIA AUTO MUSEUM

Sacramento, CA (916) 442-6802

13 DISNEYLAND Anaheim, CA (714) 781-4565

14 FLIGHTDECK AIR COMBAT CENTER FLIGHT SIMULATOR Anaheim, CA (714) 937-1511

15 GETTY CENTER ART MUSEUM Los Angeles, CA (310) 440-7300

16 GIANT REDWOODS TOUR BY STEAM TRAIN Felton, CA (831) 335-4484

17 GOLDEN GATE PARK San Francisco, CA (415) 831-2700

18 INYO NATIONAL FOREST Bishop, CA (760) 873-2400

19 JELLY BELLY FACTORY TOUR Fairfield, CA (707) 428-2838

9 MUSTANGS BY THE BAY CHARITY CAR SHOW

20 MARITIME MUSEUM

10 PONIES BY THE SEA

21 MERCER CAVERNS

San Diego, CA October

Ventura, CA October

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San Francisco, CA (415) 561-7100

Murphys, CA (209) 728-2101

22 MT. SHASTA

28 USS PAMPANITO SUBMARINE MUSEUM

Mt. Shasta, CA (800) 926-4865

San Francisco, CA (415) 561-6662

23 OLD FAITHFUL GEYSER OF CALIFORNIA

29 WALLY PARKS NHRA MUSEUM

Calistoga, CA (707) 942-6463

Pomona, CA (909) 622-1206

24 PETERSEN AUTOMOTIVE MUSEUM Los Angeles, CA (323) 930-2277

25 ROUTE 66 MOTHER ROAD MUSEUM Barstow, CA (760) 255-1890

26 SAFARI WEST Santa Rosa, CA (800) 616-2695

27 SUPER-SWANK BLACKHAWK AUTOMOBILE MUSEUM Danville, CA (925) 736-2280

JELLY BELLY FACTORY TOUR, Fairfield, CA

RESTAURANTS

MUSTANG

30 ANDY’S BAR-B-QUE Santa Clara, CA (408) 249-8158

31 AT LAST CAFE Long Beach, CA (562) 437-4837

32 BETTE’S OCEANVIEW DINER Berkeley, CA (510) 644-3230

33 BRUNO’S BBQ Scotts Valley, CA (831) 438-2227


22

69 68 49 39 23 26 19 12 51 48 3 74 17 20 41 28 42

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21

32

2 66 79 46 4 27 63 64

77 30

65 18

5 50 16 33 47

70

34 BUBBA’S DINER San Anselmo, CA (415) 459-6862

35 EMMA JEAN’S HOLLAND BURGER CAFE Victorville, CA (760) 243-9938

36 GAFFEY STREET DINER San Pedro, CA (310) 548-6724

60

37 HIGHWAY 101 CAFE AND MUSEUM

72 59

Oceanside, CA (760) 722-5220

38 IN-N-OUT BURGER Costa Mesa, CA (and throughout California) (800) 786-1999

39 JAMIE’S BROADWAY GRILLE Sacramento, CA (916) 442-4044

67 10

15 24

78 73 8 61

43

4425 35

55 71

57 40 36

52 13 14

1 29

7 75 31 11

56 6 58 62 53

38

54 45 37 76 9


TRAVEL Gardena, CA (310) 532-1064

41 JOE’S CABLE CAR RESTAURANT San Francisco, CA (415) 334-6699

Escondido, CA (877) 471-2400

55 CALIFORNIA MUSTANG City of Industry, CA (800) 775-0101

42 MEL’S DRIVE-IN

56 CALIFORNIA PONY CARS

43 THE OINKSTER

57 CARROLL SHELBY ENGINE CO.

San Francisco, CA (415) 387-2255

Eagle Rock, CA (323) 255-OINK

44 PEGGY SUE’S DINER Yermo,CA (760) 254-3370

45 RAMONA CAFE Ramona, CA (760) 789-8656

46 RUDY’S CAN’T-FAIL CAFE Emeryville, CA (510) 594-1221

47 SANTA CRUZ DINER Santa Cruz, CA (831) 426-7151

48 SCHELLVILLE GRILL Sonoma, CA (707) 996-5151

49 THE SQUEEZE INN Sacramento, CA (916) 386-8599

50 TRAIL DUST BBQ Morgan Hill, CA (408) 776-9072

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54 C & G EARLY FORD PARTS

51 AMERICAN MUSTANG PARTS Rancho Cordova, CA (800) 824-6026

52 BASSANI

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53 BROTHERS PERFORMANCE Temecula, CA (800) 486-2681

34 FOXMustangMagazine.com

Ontario, CA (888) 225-7669

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58 CLASSIC AUTOMOTIVE INTERIORS Corona, CA (800) 624-7960

59 COAST HIGH PERFORMANCE Torrance, CA (866) 249-9143

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60 EGGE MACHINE AND SPEED SHOP Santa Fe Springs, CA (800) 866-3443

61 LA MUSTANG PARTS

67 NATIONAL PARTS DEPOT

62 LARRY’S THUNDERBIRD AND MUSTANG PARTS

68 SACRAMENTO MUSTANG

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63 MAIER RACING Hayward, CA (510) 581-7600

64 MUSTANG MAGIC Fremont, CA (510) 793-2221

65 MUSTANG PARTS HOUSE Turlock, CA (800) 956-8782

66 MUSTANGS PLUS Stockton, CA (800) 999-4289

Ventura, CA (800) 235-3445

Sacramento, CA (800) 442-8333

69 TOTAL CONTROL PRODUCTS Sacramento, CA (888) 388-0298

70 VINTAGE MUSTANG San Luis Obispo, CA (805) 547-0289

71 WYSCO PRODUCTS Baldwin Park, CA (800) 731-9972

72 AFFORDABLE CLASSICS Torrance, CA (310) 542-5428

MUSTANG RESTORATION SHOPS

40 JAY BEE’S BBQ

73 GALPIN AUTO SPORTS Van Nuys, CA (877) GO-GAS-GO

74 MOSTLY MUSTANGS Oakland, CA (510) 893-2113

75 MUSTANG & FAST FORDS O.C. Santa Ana, CA (714) 850-1500

76 MUSTANG AUTO El Cajon, CA (619) 440-3673

77 MUSTANG RANCH

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78 MUSTANGS ETC. Van Nuys, CA (818) 787-7634

79 THE RESTOMOD SHOP Stockton, CA (209) 942-3013


Big Bad Baer 602-233-1411 WWW.BAER.COM

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 35


RESTORATION

r nterio i e y d perly d leather o r p o n t How s, vinyl, a Matt Highley c by plasti graphy nd story a

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photo


M

ustang enthusiasts aren’t crazy about dyeing their cars’ interiors. They worry about the color flaking off or scratching through. What most enthusiasts don’t realize is that some of all Mustang interiors are dyes from the factory. For example, most ’87’93 dashes are two-tone — black above the glovebox while the rest of the dash is grey, red, blue, etc. The black portion is dyed, and all of the ’79-’86 dashes were dyed. So it’s not as bad as some might think. TOOLS AND SUPPLIES The keys to a successful dye job are proper technique and equipment. We’ll walk you through the steps, but before we do, let’s define a few terms we’ll use in this article. Flash or Flash Time: Time needed to allow the solvents in the dye or cleaner to evaporate off of the part Fisheyes: Round, ring-like craters in the dye caused by contamination in the dye or on the part Plasticizer Migration: The movement of plasticizers moving out of the plastic and onto the surface, usually caused by time and/or heat exposure. Plasticizers help to make plastics flexible Dusting: Spraying paint or primer on very thin, allowing you to partially see through it Wet Coat: Spraying paint or primer thick enough to appear wet for a short time, until drying begins Next, let’s cover the materials and tools we’ll use. I’m not a fan of aerosol paints or dyes. You can achieve a much nicer finish and have better control of color with a good-quality paint gun or air brush. At Fox Mustang Restoration, we use the SEM color-coat system. All of our colors are custom mixed in-house for the best color match. You will also need: • MEK (methyl ethyl ketone) • high-quality, lint-free rags • chemical-resistant gloves • Bulldog adhesion promoter • lacquer thinner • a good, filtered, painter’s respirator mask Do not use a cheap paper and rubber band mask. They do not do a sufficient job of filtering fumes. Also, do not use MEK on vinyl or leather — only on plastic. Ok, we’re almost ready to get to work, but we need to know which plastic is best to dye. The harder the plastic, the less plasticizer it has. Dashes and center consoles can be dyed with no issues. You can easily dye these components any color or even change from the original color. Kick panels, rear interior quarter-panels, seatbelt sleeves, armrests, and sill plates are very difficult to dye. Extra coats of adhesion promoter are recommended for these parts. It is not recommended to change the color on these pieces. For

the best results, acquire these pieces in the desired color, and if necessary shoot a fresh coat of dye on them to freshen up the color. HOW TO DYE To get started, clean the parts thoroughly with a degreaser (Simple Green works well) and a plastic bristle brush. Rinse the part and let it completely dry. Hitting it with compressed air is not a good idea because there may be compressor oil and moisture in the air. Any soap residue, dirt, oil, or water will cause fisheyes in your work, so be careful. Make sure to remove any brackets, bumpers, bezels, or any other parts that attach to the dash. You want to dye under these parts so you will not have any lines. I use two different paint guns for all of my dye work. I have a large primer gun for applying the adhesion promoter and a smaller detail gun to spray the dye. On my detail gun I run the needle in the full back (open) position and the fan at full pressure. The air pressure regulator is set at 25 psi. Before applying the dye, you need to prep the plastic by applying the MEK. At this point, make sure to use your respirator mask and chemical-resistant gloves. You may need to change the gloves frequently because the MEK will attack and break down the gloves. This is also why we want to use it — the MEK will do the last of the cleaning on the part and will also loosen up the plastic molecules to allow the dye and adhesion promoter to soak into the top layer of plastic. Take a lint-free rag and fold it or layer multiple rags in three to five layers. Soak the rags in MEK and wipe the entire part down, trying to wipe in one direction. Shortly after the MEK makes contact, the plastic will start to become tacky and grab the rag. Do not wipe any more at this point. Do not let the MEK pool up on your parts because it can swell and damage the plastic. At this point you need to move quickly. Before the MEK completely flashes, spray on your adhesion promoter. Spray a wet coat but do not allow runs. The adhesion promoter helps prevent plasticizer migration. Plasticizer migration is what keeps dye, paint, or adhesive from sticking to plastics or vinyl. Still moving quickly, switch to the detail gun and apply a dusting coat of dye. Spray once in a side-to-side motion and then up and down. This ensures full coverage. Now you can relax because you have your base coat down. You can spray on additional wet coats of dye as needed to achieve a satisfactory color. Let the part sit for 48 hours before handling or installing to allow the dye to cure. It will be dry to the touch in about 10 minutes, but it can be scratched before it has a chance to cure. Your spray equipment cleans up in lacquer thinner. Now sit back and admire your new interior.

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 37


1

2

We will take this ’83 light-blue dash and change the color to the ’84-’86 Charcoal Gray, to install into an ’84 GT.

Here is what you’ll need for a successful dye job.

3

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Make sure to remove anything attached to the dash, like these small rubber glovebox door bumpers. Even if you want a part dyed the same color, it’s best to remove the part and dye it separately.

38 FOXMustangMagazine.com

After a deep cleaning, the dash surface is prepped with an application of MEK. Be sure to use chemical-resistant gloves. Pour the MEK onto the lint-free rag.


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5

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When wiping down the dash, make sure to get into all of the nooks and crannies. Any spot you miss can fisheye. Just wipe once; don’t go back and forth. You can also see how the MEK has removed some of the factory dye.

7

Before the MEK has completely flashed, Matt Highley applies the adhesion promoter using a primer spray gun.

8

Before spaying the dye, set your pressure regulator to around 25 psi.

40 FOXMustangMagazine.com

A light dusting of color goes on first.


9

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Now we’re ready to apply the wet color coats. The surface is shiny due to the wet dye, but it will dry without the gloss.

Make sure to get all of the angles. Here we have to spray from the back side to ensure the glovebox hinge area is covered.

SOURCE FOX MUSTANG RESTORATION 105 Pine Forest Dr. Locust, NC 28097 (704) 888-1278

11

It’s time to sit back and admire the job. It looks great and will be a big plus on the interior of our ’84 GT.

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 41


SUMMERTIME SPECIAL Mike Pittsley’s ’92 ”Summer Special” convertible

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story and photography by Tom Shaw

M

ustang is unique as the original ponycar. It’s unique in its uninterrupted production for almost 50 years and in its unequalled number of special editions produced. There are dozens if not hundreds of models, submodels, spin-offs, dealer conversions, regional promotions, tuner specials, and limited editions. It’s a tradition that Mustangers have loved and embraced, going back to its earliest days.

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 43


When something works, the smart executive stays with it. Towards the end of Fox Mustang production, Ford released a series of special editions with distinctive cosmetic treatments. It began in 1990 with the Emerald Green Limited Edition, commonly known as the 7-Up car. For 1992, the recipe had changed. Green was out and red was in. “Start with the fabulous Performance Red exterior,” invited the April ’92 Hot Sheet, a product bulletin that went to Ford dealers. “Red Hot” was the marketing theme, and the Special Edition Mustang played up the red to the max with its monocolor treatment extending to the windshield frame, side mirrors, trunk hinges, rear spoiler, and upper door and passenger compartment trim. The convertible top and interior were done in solid white, making for an appealing contrast. Wheels, often referred to as just white, were officially Opal Pearlescent. Seats featured leather surfaces with black piping, and overhead was a headliner, Mustang’s first fitted to a convertible top. It would become standard on convertibles for 1993, but for 1992, it was a Special Edition exclusive. White door panels and Ebony dash, floors, seat belts, and console finished out the interior. Emissions regulations being what they are, the

44 FOXMustangMagazine.com

engine/driveline was left intact, preserving the 5.0 H.O.’s generous 225hp rating and its certified emissions compliance. Prices for the Limited Edition started at $19,644 for the basic LX convertible 5.0, then added $850, totaling $20,494 before options. That put the Limited Edition package close to the top-of-the-line GT convertible. But spending the extra cash rewarded the buyer with a much rarer Mustang. Production stopped at 2,193. Mike Pittsley, a firefighter in Taunton, Massachusetts [Boston area], knows a thing or two about what’s hot. He started out with a new ’87 GT, then got married, had kids, and sold the GT. It was gone but not forgotten. In 2004, Mike began searching for another Mustang. This time he wanted a convertible, but not just any convertible. He was after one of the Limited Editions. They don’t exactly grow on trees, so the search went past New Year’s, then past it again, and again. Finally in 2007, he spotted a Vibrant Red Feature Car convertible that looked promising. It was an automatic transmission version (five-speeds were offered, too) in good condition with 86,435 miles. Better still, it was in a nearby town just a couple of hours’ drive away. “The owner said he had just bought the car for his wife,” Mike recalls, “but he wanted to buy another house, so he was going to have to sell it.”


Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 45


It was wintertime, but the roads were clear, so Mike took it for a spin. “I liked the car, but it needed a few things,” he says. He left, telling the seller he would let him know and was still on the fence when his wife cast the deciding vote. “When I got home, my wife said, ‘You’ve been looking for a long time — just buy it.” Mike called back and began negotiating. “There aren’t many people looking for convertibles in Massachusetts in February,” he observes. With the good deal on a great car hammered out, Mike rented a trailer and brought the Mustang home. Researching his new buy, he learned that it was first registered in Columbus, Ohio; then went to Kittery, Maine, in 2005; then to Massachusetts. It was built on May 12, 1992, the 11th of 54 Limited Editions built that day. Overall, it’s number 342 of the 2,193 production run. Restoration was not needed, but Mike does a spruce up here and there as needed — the seats have been reupholstered, rear axle rebuilt, air conditioner updated, and wheels repainted. Mike has connected with other Fox Mustangers in New England, and the group now convoys to Carlisle in June for the big Ford Nationals. “We all get together with our other Fox friends and talk about our cars,” he says. “It’s nice to get some pointers from people who fix and restore these cars. When I’m at Carlisle, it feels like a family reunion.” It’s just one of the things that make summertime special when you drive a Summer Special.

46 FOXMustangMagazine.com


WHY THE DISCREPANCY IN PRODUCTION FIGURES? Through the years, many statistics have been quoted about how many of a particular model or specialproduction run were built. Where did these numbers come from? In many cases, people surreptitiously accessed the Ford records. The trouble is, they didn’t always know how to do it properly and often wound up with erroneous results. These numbers get reported and then assumed to be correct by the reader. Marti Auto Works is the only company that has ever been given permission to access these records. As such, since this is our area of expertise, we know how to correctly derive accurate statistics. — Kevin Marti


48 FOXMustangMagazine.com


1992 LIMITED EDITION OWNER: MIKE PITTSLEY Dighton, Massachusetts photography by Tom Shaw

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 49


F O X

F I V E - S P O K E

R E S T O R A T I O N BY PETER GEISLER & TOM SHAW PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER GEISLER & DANIELLE PANDELINE

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The OEM finish is a tough, baked-on paint that acts like powdercoat, but it can still be damaged, as can the soft aluminum it’s covering.

othing makes your tuxedo look bad like ratty shoes. The same goes for your Mustang’s wheels. After a lot of year and miles, they can’t help but accumulate their fair share of trauma. Stone chips, debris, sand, mystery chemicals, and of course, the neighborhood dogs that use your wheels as their social media site. The 16x7-inch five-spoke cast-aluminum wheels, standard on ’91-’93 Mustang GTs and 5.0 LXs, are painted, unlike the 10-hole and earlier turbine wheels. Restoring them to their like-new appearance isn’t difficult, but it does take time and a bit of painting technique. The time, as in most every other job involving painting, is in the prep, fixing pry marks, wheel-weight scars, curb damage, etc. Peter Geisler of Orlando Mustang did the heavy lifting on this job, and tells us that unless you’re doing the job yourself, you’re almost always money ahead to just replace the wheels. Restoration soaks up lots of chargeable shop

time, and you still have to replace the wheel centers which are around $50 apiece. Late Model Restoration has new wheels and center cap for $139.99 with free shipping. You see what we mean. The only thing is that you’re giving up your wheels’ original date codes forever. You decide what’s best for you. If you go the DIY route, you’ll save a few hundred dollars. The biggest catch is that you’ll have to work around the replacement center caps. The wheels will have to be painted to match the new, reproduction centers. Any difference in color tone between the cap and wheel will stand out like a sore thumb. The color is Ford Silver Argent, commonly available in spray cans from restoration suppliers and auto parts stores for around $10 per can, or as special mixed paint for the more advanced among us. Peter walks us through the steps for doing it yourself.


1

With as much gentleness as possible, remove the center caps using a minimum of force. The plastic is old and brittle, so if you intend to preserve them (which may not be possible) and reuse the center caps, handle with maximum TLC.

2

3

They’re dirty and scratched, but Peter tells us that, cosmetics aside, the wheels are in surprisingly good shape. There’s very little curb rash and only minor pry damage. A nearby tire store will break down the tires. Ours were old, mismatched dry-rotted rubber, so they were discarded. Wheel weights, inner and outer, were removed.

52 FOXMustangMagazine.com

With the wheels stripped, cleanup begins. There’s lots of brake dust, dirt grit, and general funk. Break out the heavyduty cleaners and stiff brushes. All the crud has to go. Bleche-Wite and a red Scotch Brite pad work well.


4

Peter mentions that muriatic acid is also a powerful cleaner for the backside, but that’s getting into haz-mat territory, requiring special gloves and eye protection, special handling and disposal, and protective clothing. It’ll also discolor the spokes. User beware! Better to stick with strong detergents. Spray generously and let the cleaners soak for a bit before hitting it with the brush or Scotch Brite pad.

WHEEL DATE CODES Replacing the wheels is probably the most cost-effective way to get a like-new look in your car’s wheelwells. But if you’re trying to conserve an original Mustang, you’ll be tossing out a piece of originality. Wheels are date coded and should precede the car’s build date by at least a couple of weeks or so. Stamped inside this box between the lug nuts is the date code “070992 2.” A check of the other wheels revealed this data:

5

It won’t all come off the first time. You’ll have to keep working it until it comes clean. This wheel isn’t ready for the next step yet, but you can see we’re busting the crud and making progress. Peter says don’t be afraid to bear down. That factory paint is tough stuff, and the Scotch Brite pad, which is roughly equivalent to 320- or 400-grit sandpaper, won’t hurt it. Clean and rinse, clean and rinse, clean and rinse — that’s the routine.

Wheel 1

Wheel 2

07 09 92 2

07 15 92 1

July 9th day 1992 2nd Shift

July 15th day 1992 1st Shift

Wheel 3

Wheel 4

08 28 92 1

07 9 92 2

August 28th day 1992 1st Shift

July 9th day 1992 2nd Shift

Not everyone is trying to preserve originality, but whether or not you are, at least you now know what to look for and how to decode it.

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 53


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With the back handled, we turn our attention toward the spokes. Scratches and pits are smoothed out with a gray Scotch Brite pad. It’s equivalent to around 1,000-grit sandpaper. Wet-sand all surfaces, and be thorough. Those replacement wheels are looking better all the time.

8

Be on the lookout for damage like chipped paint and pry marks caused by removing the center caps with improper pry tools. They have to be smoothed out. Careful prep is what makes the difference between a good job and a great job.

9

Here’s the goal: all visible damage is corrected, and all surfaces have been cleaned, wet sanded, and rinsed. Some curb rash was sanded smooth. It’s OK to dry off the wheel with clean compressed air. For the priming stage, the lug nut area is taped off.

54 FOXMustangMagazine.com

The inner flange is also taped off with 6-inch paper. Areas that will not be seen don’t need the same meticulous prep. Even though it won’t show, the bead area needs cleaning, too, to make a good seal with the tire.


Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 55


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The wheels are finally ready for their first coat of primer. Peter uses sandable filler primer, PPG DPS3055 Gray, and DCX3030 Catalyst Hardener, that’s good for filling in small holes, and the remains of scrapes and scratches. When dry, sand the primed areas with 320- or 400-grit sandpaper, then follow up with a gray Scotch Brite pad. Now, preparation for paint: clean the wheel with wax/grease remover and dry completely with compressed air.

12

Now comes the moment of truth — applying the color. Remove the masking applied to the inner flange and lug nut areas earlier. We’re using Ford Silver Argent (PPG 932), but it’s also widely available in spray cans. “Spraying silver and gray colors takes a certain touch,” Peter says. They’re prone to looking mottled or blotchy if applied too heavily. It’s a good idea to practice on a test part to get the feel of the paint.

13

Most of your automotive base coats will cover in two to three coats, with drying time in between. Apply the last coat with a delicate touch, paying special attention to a smooth, even flow of the metallic content. Don’t get it on too heavy or wet, or the paint will pool in the low areas and look mottled.

56 FOXMustangMagazine.com

With color drying, the wheels are definitely looking better. This is where all of the prep starts to really pay off. Because they cleaned up so well, we’re not repainting the back side, so that is still masked off.


YOUR OPTIONS FOR HEAVIER DAMAGE Hit a whoppin’ pothole? Curb? Big, ugly metal thing in the middle of the road? It doesn’t take much to knock an aluminum wheel out of round. If you need that kind of service, it’s probably time to call Stockton Wheel Service in Northern California. They’ve been building and repairing wheels since the stage coach days. Stockton Wheel Service closed for a time when the owner passed away, but it’s back, under new ownership. Straightening an aluminum wheel is in the $125 range, while steel wheels are around $65. Florida-based Turbax Wheel Corp. also specializes in wheel repair for OEM and aftermarket wheels. They offer a complete wheel restoration service with a quick turnaround time.

14

Once the last base coat is drying, it’s time to apply the clear coat. We’re using PPG Rapid Clear 2042. To reduce the gloss to look like the factory finish, Peters adds flattening agent PPG DX995 to achieve a 35-40 percent reduction in gloss, substantially more than what’s commonly used to create semigloss black. The final finish on the wheels must match the new center cap for correct color and gloss.

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After the paint is completely dry, the wheels head back to the tire store for a fresh set of BFGoodrich gForce Super Sport A/S 225/55ZR16 radials, the GT’s factory tire size. The wheels ride atop the tires for protection.

58 FOXMustangMagazine.com

The inside of our wheels cleaned up nicely and were not repainted. Peter is particular about how the tires are mounted and balanced. He prefers static (non-spinning) balancing, with the weights applied to the inner bead, or taped to the wheel. This correctly balances the wheel, and keeps outer, visible edges free of weights and the marks they leave.


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Install the wheels with standard 1/2 by 20 lug nuts torqued down to the factory spec — this is important. Aluminum is soft. Too little torque and you risk losing a wheel. Too much and you risk distorting the wheel. Replacement lug nuts, if needed, are available at auto parts stores.

The road is a hostile place for plastic center caps. Age and heat turn the plastic brittle, so the caps’ retainers crack and break upon removal. This original (left) has lost a lot of paint, and has chips and pry damage. Fox Mustang Restoration (www.foxresto.com; (704) 888-1278) has the repro center caps.

SOURCES FOX MUSTANG RESTORATION 105 Pine Forest Dr. Locust, NC 28097 (704) 888-1278 (866) 496-7320 toll-free

19

ORLANDO MUSTANG 2475 Reed Ellis Rd. Osteen, FL 32764 (407) 688-1966 www.orlandomustang.com STOCKTON WHEEL SERVICE 648 W. Fremont St. Stockton, CA (800) 395-9433 www.stocktonwheel.com

Sixteen inches of restored, rotational wonderfulness. From now on, use a plastic tool to remove the center caps. They’re not hard to find online.

TURBAX WHEEL CORPORATION 14150 SW 119th Ave., Suite 101 Miami, FL 33186 (800) 395-4914 www.turbax.com

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 59


Regenerated GT

Kim Adkins bought his ’82 GT new, then renewed it story and photography by Tom Shaw

“I

t was the summer of 1982,” Kim Adkins remembers. “I was 26 years old, three years into a new job that turned out to be a 35-year career with one of the largest tobacco companies in the South. It was time to buy a new car.” Hey, that’s a great moment in the life of a hard-working man. Now the shopping begins. Kim wanted something with power and had his eye on either a Mustang or a Camaro. “I test drove several,” he says, “including the new Chevy Z/28.” Remember the rivalry between the two back then? Camaro was all new that year, too. “My mind was made up, though, when I test drove the new ’82 Mustang GT.”

>>>

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 61


Ford had just rolled out a new model with traditional performance features like High Output V-8, four-speed manual transmission, and rear-wheel drive. In a world suddenly flush with weak front-wheel-drive four-bangers and homely econo-boxes, the new Mustang GT hit the spot. Kim was one of those original GT buyers. “It was just what I was looking for: fast, handled like a dream, and it was some kind of eye-catcher — going down the road, people waving at me as if I were riding a Harley. ‘Man I gotta have this one,’ I said to myself.” The car Kim was driving was black with T-tops, black interior, and four-speed transmission. Black was one of only three colors available for the GT, the other two being Medium Red and Silver Metallic. Though he was still out on the test drive, his imagination was already miles away. “In my mind, I was cruising down the boulevard at Myrtle Beach with the wind blowing in my hair,” Kim remembers. “The chicks are gonna love this.” Kim was hooked, and there was no point denying it.

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“I finished up the test drive, and on August 17, 1982, signed the papers.” One more jet-black GT was on the streets, getting noticed and — after eight years of Mustang IIs and underpowered but smog-compliant 255 V-8s, straight sixes, and 2.3 four-cylinders — rebuilding popular opinion about what the Mustang was all about. Kim, a young guy with a serious Mustang affection, put thousands of miles on it and became a regular at the beach. “I made many trips to that fun-in-the-sun paradise,” he says with a smile. Being young and kicking up your heels in a new Mustang. Is there anything more American? “It was kind of funny going down the road at times. Sometimes people thought I was the Highway Patrol. It was not funny, though, when the real Highway Patrol realized I was not one of them. The first lesson I learned is that you can’t outrun a Motorola radio.” OK, we won’t ask. But if it sounds like Kim had a blast in his first-year, Boss-Is-Back Mustang GT, he did.


“Over the years I’ve had a lot of fun in that Pony. I guess it’s one of the main reasons I decided to keep her,” he says. As the years wore on, the miles began to add up, along with the effects of that unrelenting Southern sun. “When I first bought the car, I did not have a garage to put it in. Being exposed to the elements and the hot sun took a toll on her. The interior especially needed attention. The black color really absorbed the heat,” Kim says. We know what that means: cracks, splits, warps, fades — that whole package of use and aging issues. And that just wouldn’t do for his old friend. “I had already made my mind up to keep the car, and being the original owner, I made it my mission to restore the car back to stock condition, with just a few changes.” He tackled the engine first. It had developed some oil leaks after sitting unused, and while it was apart for that, the mechanic informed him that the main bearings had a lot of wear. That’s when he decided

64 FOXMustangMagazine.com


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to fully rebuild the 5.0 engine. It got a mildly updated cam, and true dual exhaust, too, but the original 2V carb and exhaust manifolds were retained. “That made it sound better and pepped it up,” Kim says. He also added an MSD 6A ignition box and converted the air conditioner to R134A which Kim says cools better than the original R12. The worn front-end got new springs, bushings, and joints, and Kim added camber plates for more precise alignment. The TRX wheels were removed and stored away, and replaced with a set of Borbet five-spokes that mount Michelin P215/60R15 Harmony radials. Roger Stevens of Stevens Restoration and Refinish in Westfield, North Carolina, applied a fresh coat of black over the original, collision- and rust-free sheetmetal. The interior needed everything, and for that, Kim turned his car over to Matt Highley of Fox Mustang Restoration, in Locust, North Carolina. Matt replaced the seat foam and upholstery, carpet, and headliner, redyed the interior panels, and replaced the weatherstripping. Kim points out that his T-tops don’t leak a drop. Matt also supplied many hard-to-find parts. While the interior was apart, they found the build sheet under the rear seat. It goes nicely with the original window sticker which Kim saved. Once again, the ’82 is standing tall, and Kim’s still having a blast with his GT. He’s back at Myrtle Beach, but this time it’s for Mustang Week. Don’t you just love a story with a happy ending?

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DANIEL CARPENTER MUSTANG REPRODUCTIONS


RESTORATION

DOOR AND HATCH RATTLE REPAIR Turns out the solutions to the hard-to-close hatch and aggravating vibration are two of our favorite things: cheap and easy story and photography by Jason Smith

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t some point, just about every Fox Mustang has had doors and/or a hatchback that were difficult to fully close and rattled like crazy. Usually we learned to live with it and carry on. With my ’82 GT having optional rear louvers, I just attributed it to the extra weight. Then I got an ’83 GT, and its rattling hatch became really annoying. It was nearly impossible to close compared to the one on my ’82, and the doors were pretty stubborn, too. The search for a fix was on, and with the help of a fellow Fox Saleen owner, the solution was obvious, and the fix was quite simple. Many people will start by making adjustments to the latch or striker bolt, or even lubricating or replacing the latches. But the majority of the time, the problem lies in the disappearance of the hard plastic bushing from the bolt. These bushings make a world of difference in how your doors and hatch close, and are also the difference in your Fox sounding new and solid or like a 100,000-mile rattle trap. Take a look at the striker bolts on your car now and compare them to the pictures shown. As you’ll see, the fix is quite simple and can be achieved with new strikers (bushings included) or by replacing the bushings on your existing striker bolts. Complete, new reproduction strikers are available from all of the usual online sites and your local parts store for about $12 apiece, and pairs of bushings can be purchased for around $7.

A quick word about the striker bolts. Retailers say that there are two types — one for the ’79-’82 strikers, and one for the ’83-’93. But I have found no evidence that these can’t be interchanged. From 1979 to 1986 they used a simple bolt striker. In 1987 they added a hook/guard running behind the bolt toward the cabin. I’ve heard theories as to why, but so far, no evidence about why the “guard” was added. If you’re into concours correctness, you may want to purchase the bolt-only style for your four-eyed Mustang. If you’re buying the bushings only, be aware that in most cases the thick washer that is mated to the striker bolt will not come off. Therefore you’ll have to cut the bushing to slip it on. I made a simple side cut, followed by a bead of Super Glue to the seam to bond it to the striker. I’ve also read that a spiral cut is good practice for getting the bushing on the strikers with captive washers. Some may question the longevity of the bushing with this method, but so far mine have held nicely. Plus, with this method (in addition to the cost savings), you don’t have to remove the striker bolt, meaning no alignment adjustments are necessary. Once the strikers and/or bushings are replaced, you will immediately notice how quietly and effortlessly the doors and hatch will close. Now take your car out for a cruise on the bumpiest of roads and enjoy the rattle-free ride. Suddenly the loose change and other junk in your console seem so loud.

Mustang owners rejoice — there’s a simple fix for those rattle-ridden, hard-to-close doors and hatchbacks. Who would have thought the simple fix could be found with just a piece of plastic?

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Common household tools required include: masking tape, No. 2 Phillips screwdriver, T-50 bit and ratchet, side-cutters, and Super Glue.

Here is the common culprit on the hatch (and door) — a striker bolt missing its nylon sleeve. The bolt is 1/2-inch thick with no plastic bushing around it.

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To get a T-50 bit into the striker bolt, first remove the two Phillips-head screws on the rear panel and carefully pull the panel toward the front of the cabin for access.

Using a good pair of side-cutters, split the new bushing lengthwise, allowing it to be spread open slightly and slid into place. If you have access to a small-blade hand-saw and a vise, a spiral cut would be better.

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RESTORATION 5

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So the captive nut slid down on you, huh? Not to worry as it can easily be retrieved by removing a few screws on the sill plate and the lower section of the interior panel for easy access with your hand. If you’re replacing the whole striker, mark its position before removing the original. Masking tape marks the left/right and up/down position during the removal and installation process to help you maintain the proper striker bolt alignment, and it doesn’t leave scratches.

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Newer

Here’s the newer-style striker with the “hook/guard” used on ’87-’93 Fox Mustangs. Presumably, this cages the latch, reducing the possibility of the door or hatch coming open in a collision.

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The hard plastic bushings can be purchased in pairs and measure 7/8 inch in length, with an I.D. of 1/2 inch and O.D. of 11/16 inch.


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The masking tape marks the position of the hatch striker, too. If you’re installing new strikers (or if you installed new weatherstripping), don’t be surprised if some adjustment is required. If you like to attend cruise-ins or car shows with the hatch open, now would also be a good time to disconnect the dome-light switch to eliminate battery drain.

Glue the bushing’s seam back together with a thin bead of Super Glue. But first, rotate it so that the seam will be less visible when the glue dries.

Jason Smith, avid Fox Mustang fan from Greenwood, Indiana, can be found on internet forums as “sowaxeman.” He has owned nine Fox Mustangs (and a Capri). His current stable includes ’82, ’83, and ’85 GTs — all low-mile and original-condition examples. A long-time member of the Saleen Club of America, Jason also is editor for their monthly newsletter, PoweRRR.

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Once you’ve replaced the striker/bushing and the hatch is closing properly, give the upper hatch bumpers (arrow) a half twist or so to help provide an even more snug fit. Don’t overdo it, as you want the hatch to seal properly against the weatherstripping.

SOURCES CJ PONY PARTS 7461 Allentown Blvd. Harrisburg, PA 17112 (800) 888-6473 www.cjponyparts.com

MUSTANGS UNLIMITED (GEORGIA LOCATION) 2505 Newpoint Pkwy. Lawrenceville, GA 30043 (888) 229-2929 www.mustangsunlimited.com

FOX MUSTANG RESTORATION 105 Pine Forest Dr. Locust, NC 28097 (704) 888-1278 (866) 496-7320 toll-free

NPD (FLORIDA LOCATION) 900 SW 38th Ave. Ocala, FL 34474 (800) 874-7595 www.npdlink.com

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 71


INSTALLMENT PLAN Jim Walrod installed a few things on his high-flyin’ ’91 5.0 LX by Tom Shaw | photography by James Ritzman

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Like a lot of younger guys, Jim Walrod’s automotive interests originally led him toward imports — high-revving, noise-making, slow-moving imports. It wasn’t long before reality set it and Jim had a change of heart. “I realized I wanted more power and performance,” he says. Whoever didn’t see that coming, raise your hand. Jim considered a Thunderbird Super Coupe since they were factory supercharged, but those plans took a sharp left turn when a friend with a strong Mustang stopped by. “He intervened and offered up his ’89 LX for a test drive,” Jim says. That’s all it took. “After driving the car around my neighborhood, I immediately knew this was the car I had to have.” Jim began scanning the ads for the right 5.0 Mustang. Eight months later, he found just what he was looking for. He made the phone call, and the next day made the deal. That was in August 1995. He came home with a nice find.


“A ’91 Titanium Frost LX, 39,000-original-mile, bone-stock in immaculate condition,” he says. Sounds good, huh? Jim drove it a while, enjoying that famous 5.0 punch. But his inner hot-rodder wouldn’t rest. “I decided it was time to upgrade the suspension,” Jim says. He met Brad from Brad’s Custom Auto who laid out a plan for the upgrade, and they weren’t messing around. Jim went full-tilt and installed a Griggs GR-40 suspension with tubular control arms, coilover shocks all around, and Maximum Motorsports adjustable camber plates. The rearend got Ford Motorsport 3.27 gears, a torque arm, Panhard bar, Griggs control arms, and antisway bar. Now the chassis was state-of-the-art, and you know how that can get the snowball rolling. “Once the handling was upgraded, it exposed just how bad the factory brakes were, so a Cobra brake kit conversion was in order,” Jim says. “The four-lug pony wheels were replaced with M179 Cobra R 17x9-inch wheels along with 255/40s on the front and 275/40s on the rear.” Next in line for a big upgrade was the engine, which got BBK equal-length shorty headers, H-pipe, Flowmaster exhaust, GT40 intake, Accufab 70mm throttle body, and a larger mass air meter. But that wasn’t good enough, so Jim upgraded the upgrade with a ProCharger blower set for a bolt-busting 17 pounds of boost. Just

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for reference, factory superchargers run maybe 5-6 pounds, and more aggressive systems might do 8 or so. Not surprisingly, it didn’t take long to run into problems. “It proved too much for the head gaskets,” Jim says, “and out came the engine.” While the engine was out, Jim took the opportunity to install Kenny Brown Matrix braces, jacking rails, and a Super Street cage with BBK in-car subframe connectors, Sparco seats, and Schroth four-point harnesses. Meanwhile, the engine was taken to Dave Bliss of Bliss Performance, who opened it up to 306 ci and installed Trick Flow Twisted Wedge heads, a stud girdle, and an Anderson Motorsports B-3 cam. The stock and breakable T-5 transmission was replaced with a Tremec TKO and a McLeod scattershield. These mods culminated in engine failure Number Two, with a busted crank and a cracked block. Back to the drawing board. Jim sold the ProCharger in favor of a Motorsport R302 block, Eagle stroker crank (made of forged steel), forged H-beam rods, and a fresh port job on the TFS heads. Displacement was bumped again, this time to 331 ci. He also upgraded his Anderson computerized engine-management system with an Accel Gen 7 digital fuel-injection system.

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“The Gen 7 provided much more tuning capability and increased driveablilty,” Jim says. While the engine was out this time, the engine compartment was cleaned up and readied for the new powerplant. “The new assembly was installed, and this is how the car stands today. It was literally finished this month,” he says. He has owned the car for 18 years, but much of that has been down time between installs. As a result, the car has only 78,000 miles. So we don’t have blistering quarter-mile times to report or tales of slaying Ferraris — it’s still a fresh build. But as Jim finally gets to take his place behind the wheel, those things will come. The hard work and big spending are over. “My goal was to have a car with above-average performance with the look of a stock LX Mustang, and I think I’ve achieved it thanks to the meticulous work and knowledge of the crew at Brad’s Custom Auto,” Jim says. “Now it’s time to drive it and enjoy the final product.” That is, unless he gets itchy to install something else.

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MATMY #8 Fox p.indd 1

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 79 2/22/2013 1:55:57 PM


PERFORMANCE

ETHANOL IN YOUR FUEL-INJECTED ENGINE How does it affect performance and reliability? 80 FOXMustangMagazine.com


by Jim Kreuz | photography by Tom Shaw illustration by Christine Wilson

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ike it or not, your favorite filling station probably sells gas containing up to 10 percent ethanol (E-10). What does ethanol do inside your engine? Does it hinder the performance of your fuel-injected engine? Is it harmful to your injectors? What do you need to pay particular attention to, whether you’re driving a new Mustang GT or a vintage high-performance car, when running on ethanol laden gasoline? FUEL-INJECTED ENGINE PERFORMANCE

Let’s spoil the ending of this article and give you the answers up front. Basically, your fuel-injected engine can’t tell the difference between 100 percent gasoline and E-10. And, it’s not harmful to your injectors. Read on and you’ll find out why. E-85 (70-85 percent ethanol), an alternate or flex fuel, is another matter. If you want to run this type of fuel on your non–flex fuel engine, you’ll need a fuel sensor (conductivity probe that measures the ethanol content of the fuel), larger injectors, and a new chip that will accept the fuel sensor signal. Oh, and you might want to swap out your fuel filter after you’ve run through two tanks of E-85. The 85-percent ethanol mixture does a good job of removing any gunk left in your fuel tank from years of storing gasoline, and that gunk will get deposited on your fuel filter. The fuel sensor that comes with a flex fuel engine works in conjunction with the oxygen sensor mounted on your exhaust. Together they provide input to the chip that controls the fuel-to-air mixture being fed to the engine. If you want to convert to E-85 on the cheap, you can skip the fuel sensor addition ($300-$600) and have the engine chip rely solely on the oxygen sensor for adjustment. You would then “tune” the chip settings for a given fuel (E-85, for example).

DECREASED BTU VALUE

The heating value of a gallon of gasoline containing no ethanol averages 114,000 BTU (a BTU, or British thermal unit, is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water 1 degree F). As you might suspect, the heating value of ethanol is less, only 76,000 BTU per gallon. That’s 33 percent less than gasoline, implying that more E-10

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fuel is required to travel one mile than non-alcohol gasoline. But before you start screaming, keep in mind that the 33-percent reduction in BTUs is for only 10 percent of the total fuel content, so the penalty is only 3.3 percent. For E-15, the penalty is 5 percent, and with E-85 it’s up to 30 percent. The overall BTU value of E-10 is 110,400 BTU per gallon. On a side note that has nothing to do with ethanol, your engine is not 100 percent efficient in converting all the fuel into power at the drivetrain. So how close to 100 percent are we? Well, your 13-mpg 289 Hi-Po is actually only approximately 13 percent efficient in converting energy (gasoline) into force (moving your Mustang down the road). A 100-percent efficient engine in your Mustang would allow you to travel approximately 100 miles on a gallon of fuel. Sounds good, but I’d rather burn a bit more gas in my Hi-Po and have fun doing it.

INCREASED OCTANE RATING

Most assume the octane rating (87-93) is a correlation of the fuel value of gasoline, or how much energy (BTUs) is contained in a gallon. Not true. The octane rating or number is a measurement term used to identify the ability of a fuel to resist spontaneous combustion. The lower the octane rating, the greater the tendency is to prematurely ignite due to heat and compression in the cylinder housing, and cause engine knock. This knock is most noticeable when the engine is under load while climbing a steep hill or accelerating while passing another car. The octane rating of pure ethanol is 97, or 11 percent higher than the 87 octane you’re filling your tank with. So, the more ethanol you have in your fuel, the less likely you are to experience engine knock.

DECREASED BURN RATE

Burn rate is a measure of the time required to fully combust the fuel in the combustion chamber. At higher rpm, there’s less time available for the fuel to burn. If the combustion is complete by the time the crankshaft reaches 20 degrees after top dead center, optimum horsepower and fuel efficiency are achieved. Pure gasoline has a burn rate — measured in milliseconds — that is only 2 percent faster than E-10, and 3 percent more rapid than E-15. That’s not enough to make a difference, even at 3,000 rpm. Not even your wired 347 could sense the variation in burn rate.

QUARTER-MILE PERFORMANCE: LABORATORY

While the BTU value of E-10 is less than pure gasoline, laboratory tests* on a four-stroke engine indicate no true difference in torque

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generated between the two fuels. Therefore, your time in the quartermile should be the same, no matter which fuel you choose. That applies to peak horsepower (hp) as well — no change. Why is that? One theory suggests that the improved octane rating offsets the lower fuel (BTU) value. The same goes for older engines — no change. * Source: the International Journal of Engineering Science and Technology, Volume 2, 2010

QUARTER-MILE PERFORMANCE: ON THE TRACK

I quizzed a number of long-time participants at the recent Mid America Ford Team Shelby drag racing event in Tulsa, and they all claimed there is no difference in engine performance between the non-ethanol fuel and E-10 fuel, at least not that they could detect. Again, worst case is you’ll see a 3-percent drop in horsepower with E-10. If that’s true, your 5.0 that was generating 225 hp on Esso fuel back in the ’80s will today only do 218 hp on E-10. In the quarter-mile, your 14.80 seconds elapsed time on 100 percent gasoline will increase to a 15.24 with E-10. For E-15, the numbers will drop to 214 hp and 15.54 seconds. This all assumes that you have not increased the amount of fuel you can burn in your engine during that 14.80-second sprint.

HARMFUL TO YOUR ENGINE

Bill Woerner of Arthur Gould Rebuilders has spent the past nine years repairing fuel pumps that had previously been reworked with new old stock (N.O.S.) diaphragms and gaskets. It seems that the 20-yearold N.O.S. rubber products don’t last long in E-10 service — about three months, according to Bill. He and the small engine repair shop next to his business both have seen significant corrosion on aluminum parts in contact with the ethanol. It’s easy to spot: a white layer of corrosion on the surface of the aluminum. And they didn’t see any corrosion prior to ethanol being included with the gas. You can find corrosion test results on the Internet that either back up Bill’s claim or deny it. Is it dependent on the quality of the ethanol being added? Who knows? But, everyone agrees that E-85 (85 percent ethanol, 15 percent gasoline), also referred to as flex fuel, is known to be corrosive to aluminum. There are many web pages touting E-10 to be harmful to rubber materials produced today, but I couldn’t find any technical report that backs up that statement. In fact, one O-ring supplier stated in his catalog that nitrile (most commonly used rubber in fuel lines), buna-n, butyl, and natural rubber all hold up extremely well to ethanol. Other negative side effects that are being blamed on E-10 include


gummed-up injectors and carburetors, damage to fuel pumps and carburetors, and piston ring sticking. And yet the DOE (Department of Energy) part of our federal government conducted 6 million miles of testing on E-15 fuel (15 percent ethanol, 85 percent gasoline) recently and found no ill effects. The oil and automobile industry conducted their own tests on E-15 and concluded otherwise.

ABSORBING WATER

Ethanol has the ability to absorb water that may inadvertently enter your gas tank, but only so much water. At 70 degrees F, E-10 gasoline (10 percent ethanol) can absorb 0.3 percent water, or 2 teaspoons of water for every gallon of E-10. Any more than that and the water+alcohol will phase separate from the gasoline, forming two distinct layers, with the gas floating on top (lighter). As this mixture cools, the phase separation will occur more rapidly and with less water content. One lesson learned is to think twice before purchasing that container of ethanol at the parts store to absorb that large slug of water in your gas tank. It won’t. Speaking of water, the reason you don’t hear about “water in gas” today is because ethanol is produced with no water content. That, combined with fuel blenders mixing in other alcohols (iso-propanol or 1-butanol) or surfactants, virtually eliminates any phase separation should small amounts of water enter your fuel tank. And there is no “shelf life” on this mixture. As long as your gas tank or container is sealed tightly, the water+alcohol will not phase separate from the gasoline.

ETHANOL PRODUCTION

A majority of the ethanol produced in the USA for fuel — almost 14 billion gallons in 2011 — is via corn. Other feed stocks besides corn that are being considered include sugar cane, algae, and biomass (living or

recently living organisms). Synthetic ethanol is produced by reacting ethylene and water in the presence of a catalyst. Why all the effort in producing ethanol from corn? The answer lies in the 2005 EPA regulation requiring 7.5 billion gallons of renewable fuel (ethanol, for example) to be blended into gasoline by 2012, and in 2007 expanded this program to 36 billion gallons by 2022. What’s the cost of this regulation? The U.S. government provides a $0.45/gallon “blender’s tax credit” for petroleum refiners to blend corn ethanol into their gasoline, which amounted to over a $6 billion subsidy in 2011. The benefits of this regulation include lower greenhouse gas emissions from the blend and less reliance on foreign crude oil. How much does it cost to produce ethanol from corn? A bushel of corn selling at $6 equates to a cost of $2.50 to make a gallon of ethanol. This is comparable to a gallon of gas selling at $3.75 when correcting for the lower BTU value of the ethanol. And for every $1 decrease in the cost of a bushel of corn, the cost of a gallon of ethanol drops by $0.25. Does the diversion of corn to ethanol production drive up the cost of food? I can’t answer that.

ETHANOL — YOU MAKE THE CALL

Hopefully you’ve learned a bit about ethanol as a component in your gasoline and are better informed to decide if it’s a good thing or not. Consider passing this knowledge on to your friends. I wouldn’t bother with your wife or girlfriend. Mine would rather shuck corn than hear what’s keeping my engine from knocking. Jim Kreuz is a chemical engineer with BASF Corp, who’s spent the past 20 years writing magazine and newspaper articles on sports and cars. His subjects have to be “old,” like his prized Candyapple Red ’66 Hertz Shelby GT350 clone used to make milk and bread runs for his wife, Kelle.

Lake Mirror Classic

Honoring Mr. Wayne Cherry Head of GM Global Design (ret.)

A FREE Community Event Benefiting The Friends of Lake Mirror Fund Event Info: LakeMirrorClassic.com

Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 83


RESTORATION

EASTWOOD COMPANY’S SMALL JOB SODA BLASTER LESS IS MORE IN THIS AFFORDABLE, EASY-TO-USE SYSTEM story and photography by Tom Shaw

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ou’re under the hood for a little weekend fix-up, and you’ve got the new parts ready to go in. But you can’t bear the thought of putting it all back together with dirty, greasy bolts and brackets. What to do? You open the box the UPS man just brought containing the out-of-production parts you got on eBay. They’re good, but someone gave them a rinky-dink paint job and they need to be redone. What to do? You have an assortment of old, aluminum parts — brackets, fittings, manifolds, and air conditioning parts — that are dull, oxidized, and look like heck. What are you going to do? Eastwood Company has a handy solution: the Small Job Blasting Kit (part number 13943). For less than $50, you get a big 10-pound jug of blasting media — soda or abrasive, gun with replacement nozzles, lines, pickup tube, and an Allen wrench for servicing the gun. It’s everything you’ll need except for the air compressor and safety equipment. Speaking of the compressor, this is a smaller system that doesn’t demand a big, heavy, expensive compressor. It needs as little as 7 cfm at 80 psi. Moderate-to-small compressors should have plenty of capacity. Soda blasting is a relatively gentle process that will remove paint, but not rust. That makes it easy on areas near glass or trim. With some practice and discretion, it might even be used on urethane and hard plastics. This same system will also operate with more aggressive media, like crushed glass, for removing rust. This is a small rig, but if you need a bigger one, Eastwood has plenty from which to choose. From a value standpoint, this setup is hard to beat. It also takes next to no storage space. We took it for a spin around the FOX Mustang garage.

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1 The Eastwood kit comes with the blasting gun, pickup tube, feed hose, a replacement air jet, and a selection of replacement nozzles all in a large blistercard, plus a 10-pound jug of soda or abrasive ground glass — your choice.

2 This is a modest blaster, designed to work with smaller, consumer compressors, like this light, compact, inexpensive model.

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3 The gun uses the standard fittings (not included). Some Teflon tape on the threads is a good idea. Don’t bear down too hard on the wrench. We’re working with soft metals here. Going he-man risks stripping threads or cracking the gun.

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The rubber feed line slides onto the gun. It’s a siphon feed, so there’s no pressurized pot to clog.

A standard quick-connect coupling completes the air supply.

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The end of the hose that had the tightest wind in the packaging was kinked, so we cut off about a foot to make sure the feed line had an unobstructed flow from source to gun.

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IS YOUR AIR COMPRESSOR BIG ENOUGH? Eastwood’s Nick Capinski says you’ll need at least 7 cfm @ 80 psi for continuous blasting of soda or heavier, more abrasive media which is right in the range of many home DIY compressors. Compressors should have a label showing their capacity. This compressor is rated at 2.6 scfm (standard cubic feet per minute, a measurement correcting for altitude and temperature) @ 90 psi. That’s less than what Nick recommends, but it’s the only air compressor we’ve got. It’ll still do the job, provided you don’t mind the blast-a-little, wait-a-little routine. If you’re shopping for a compressor, the cheapest may not be the best deal. It might be worth spending a little more to get one that’ll keep up with the job. Time spent waiting on the compressor to catch up is time wasted.

7 Slide the other end of the hose onto the pickup tube, and push the tube down into the media, staggered end first.

8 Set the regulator (the gauge on the left) to 80 psi. This controls the force of the airstream. The gauge on the right shows how much pressure is stored up in the tank. You’re ready to go now.

9 We’re going to blast a selection of different items. On the left is a screw from the headlight assembly that received an unfortunate repaint. The middle screw is from the door mirror that has heavy corrosion from exposure to the elements. On the right is a standard fender bolt that shared the unfortunate paint job. We’re also going to blast this core Ford 2V carb.

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A cardboard box makes a good holder. More aggressive media would quickly eat away the box, but the gentler soda goes easy on it. At 80 psi it removes even the cured enamel. We had to bare down a bit to get the paint out of the tiny cracks and corners, but it removed it all.

The carb — very nasty and dirty — had a lot of hard-to-reach surfaces and was made of soft metal. The soda blaster quickly removed the buildup and didn’t scar the metal.

12 Results. The hardened enamel paint was completely removed except for one tiny spec in the Philips screw slot on the left screw. We didn’t see it at the time. A few more seconds of concentrated blasting would have removed it.

13 We wouldn’t want to blast the carb with harsh media, as the soda cleaned the soft castings down to the metal, without injuring the surface or using harsh chemicals. The dichromate plating used on steel rods and other parts was also preserved. Even the tag came clean, and without the pitting that more abrasive media would cause.

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BEFORE AND AFTER The removal of paint was thorough, while leaving the metal unharmed. The logo is still in the bolt. These pictures are intended to demonstrate the system’s blasting abilities. If this would have been used on an actual restoration, we would have used a more aggressive media on the heavily corroded screw or replaced the hardware with new. But for blasting parts that will be reused, the Small Job Soda Blasting System should prove very useful for lots of jobs.

ADJUSTING AND SERVICING THE GUN The kit includes different nozzles for a narrower or wider blast pattern. It also includes an Allen wrench, which you’ll need to change nozzles. Loosen the front Allen screw and the nozzle comes out. Loosen the rear Allen screw and the front of the gun comes off, allowing access to the air jet.

SOURCE Eastwood Company | (800) 343-9353 | www.eastwood.com 88 FOXMustangMagazine.com


Issue 8 FOX Mustang Magazine 89


FIX MY FOX by Matt Highley

Q

WHO YOU GONNA CALL?

I think I have a ghost in my ’89 GT. When I’m driving, the A/C system will just blow in the defrost vent by the windshield. If I’m sitting at a light or driving steady down the highway, it works normally. It’s still cold, but it just drives me nuts. Andre Thomas Austin, TX

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No need to call an exorcist on this one. There’s a one-way check valve in the vacuum supply system under the hood that supplies the duct system under your dash. It’s a little black plastic valve located on the passenger side of the upper firewall that allows vacuum into the duct system and closes off the system when vacuum is temporarily lost. This can be found at any Mustang parts retailer for around $12.

Q

NO TACH

No matter what I try, I can’t get the tachometer to work with my MSD box. I even bought the MSD tach adaptor (MSD-8920), and it does not work. I am almost ready to mount an aftermarket tachometer, but I don’t want that huge thing bolted to my dashpad. Do you have any suggestions? Daniel Parsons Norman, OK

A

I’ve run into this issue in the past with the Ford Duraspark ignition system. The instructions tell you to hook the white wire to the tach output on the MSD box. This does not work on the Duraspark systems. You need to wire the white wire from the tach adaptor to the signal wire from the distributor. If you’re using the stock Duraspark system, it will be the wire with the orange strip. Just splice the white tach adaptor wire into this circuit.

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Q

SENSELESS MASS AIR PROBLEMS

My mechanic has had to warranty my mass air sensor three times. The problem is it will start to run rough and the idle will surge. It takes about three months for the sensor to go bad. What could be causing this? Ted Leof Wilson, NC

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There are a couple of possibilities. First would be if you ran through a deep water puddle and was actually able to get any water past the air filter into the sensing wire on the sensor. But since your problem is recurring, that’s probably not the problem. Next, make sure there are no shorts in the wiring harness going to the sensor. The likely culprit for this complaint is a K&N air filter. K&N recommends maintaining your filter by spraying an oil that they supply onto the filter. The problem is, over time this oil will coat the sensing wire on the sensor. So the sensor is not bad; it’s just dirty. Auto parts stores do sell a mass air sensor cleaner in an aerosol can. This sensor can be cleaned as many times as you need to, but it’s also very fragile, so be careful.


Q

HAVEN’T THE FOGGIEST

I have a low-mileage ’82 GT in perfect shape except for the fog lights, which won’t come on. I’ve checked for power at the lights with a test light. No power. I went ahead and tried installing new bulbs anyway hoping it would fix the lights. I don’t know much about electrical systems short of just checking for power at the lights. What should I do next? Joe Sawin Via email

A

You started out correctly by checking for power at the lights. Most of the time it’s a relay that’s stuck open, but let’s go through the motions. For these tests, make sure the key is in the ON position and the headlights are turned on. First, check for power at the switch. Using a 12-volt tester, test the red wire with a black stripe. If there’s no power, check the No. 10 fuse. If it has power, then go to the relay and check the orange wire with a black strip. No power there means there’s an issue with the main power feed wire and/or the 20-gauge fusible link. If you do have power at that wire, then check the tan wire with an orange stripe. This is where I suspect you will have an issue. If there’s no power here, then you have a stuck or bad relay. In 1979-1985, Ford used a relay with a metal housing. These are next to impossible to find new. The Ford part number is D9BZ-14512-A. I recommend going to any auto parts store and getting a new pigtail for a Bosch-style relay and a new Bosch relay. Use these to replace the old metal-style relay and your lights should be working.

Q

VACUUM LEAK

I need help finding a vacuum leak on my engine. I can hear it under the intake but can’t find it. It’s a ’93 LX convertible with a 5.0 and five-speed. Frank Bickel Viroqua, WI

A

With the right equipment you can pinpoint a vacuum leak in seconds. We use a smoke machine. (It’s the same principle as the smoke machines used at concerts.) Any good auto shop should have one of these. You simply hook it up to a vacuum line feeding into the intake and plug off the throttle body. Smoke will soon come out of the hole where the vacuum leak is. If you do not have access to one of these machines, there are a few common places to check for intake leaks. Check the PCV valve grommet. As these get old and hard, they shrink and lose their seal. Next is the canister purge vacuum hose. This is on the front of the intake just under the plenum. And, of course, there are always those small, hard plastic lines that love to crack if you look at them wrong.

MEET MATT HIGHLEY Matt, owner of Fox Mustang Restoration, brings years of experience, a passion for Fox-bodies, and a deep knowledge of these cars to Fix My Fox. In 2004, Matt opened Fox Mustang Restoration to help keep these cars on the road. To have Matt address your Fox Mustang issues just send your question, and a pic if possible, to brandon@pattersonpublishing.com. Put “Fix My Fox” in the subject line.

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FROM THE ARCHIVES

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rom the Archives is a continuing feature, exclusive to FOX Mustang Magazine, reprinting original Ford literature without modification. This is insider literature issued to dealers only and not available to the public. Build your own reference and collection. This is the second in a series featuring the Mustang section of the 1985 Ford Car Facts, showing all the facts, features, and specifications

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Fox Mustang Magazine | Issue 8