Page 1

THE BUSINESS DEAN RETURNS TO NURTURE A NEW GENERATION VOLUME 1, NO. 2


UNLIMITED data, talk & text

per month (plus taxes and fees)

Get unlimited data, talk and text, including up to 5 GB of full-speed data for just $49.99/month per line, with the Small Business Unlimited Value Plan.

®

including 4G coverage in Lawrence!

23rd & Ousdahl.....842-5200 6th & Wakarusa.....749-1850 T-Mobile’s HSPA+ 4G network not available everywhere. See coverage details at T-Mobile.com. Limited-time offer; subject to change. Taxes and fees additional. Unlimited features for direct U.S. communications between two people. Domestic only. Participating locations only. Small Business Plan: Limit 49 voice lines per account. Data does not include BES. Federal tax ID required. General Terms: Credit approval and two-year agreement with up to $200/line early cancellation fee may be required. Regulatory Programs Fee (not a tax or government mandated charge) of $1.41 per line/month applies. Taxes approx. 6–28% of bill. Coverage: Not available everywhere. Abnormal Usage: Service may be limited or terminated for misuse, abnormal usage or significant roaming. See Terms and Conditions (including arbitration provision) at www.T-Mobile.com for additional information. T-Mobile and the magenta color are registered trademarks of Deutsche Telekom AG. Operated by Simply Wireless


IN THIS ISSUE: CO N T R IB U TORS :

FEATURES:

VOLUME 1 NO.2 PUBLISHER:

22

LAWRENCE NON-PROFITS SURVIVING THE HOLIDAYS

28

THE BUSINESS OF: CATERING A HOLIDAY PARTY

36

KU BUSINESS DEAN DR. NEELI BENDAPUDI RETURNS TO HER JAYHAWK ROOTS

42

BLUE COLLAR PRESS & DISTRO FROM THE BASEMENT TO THE BOARDROOM

48

BTBC DEVELOPING SUCCESS

FOUR BIRDS MEDIA

MANAGING EDITOR: DEREK HELMS CREATIVE EDITOR: ANN FRAME HERTZOG ART DIRECTOR: DARYL BUGNER CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: CATHY HAMILTON, DAISY WAKEFIELD,

JOE MONACO

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: STEVEN HERTZOG, MEGAN AXELSSON, CASEY WRIGHT, TASHA KEATHLEY, ARTEM BAGIEV

IN EVERY ISSUE:

INQUIRIES CONTACT: info@lawrencebusinessmagazine.com

Website: LawrenceBusinessMagazine.com

Lawrence Business Magazine 1617 St. Andrews Dr. Lawrence, KS 66047 785.766.5669 (P) 785.856.1995 (F) All rights reserved. No part of this publication can be reprinted or reproduced without the consent of the publisher. Lawrence Business Magazine assumes no resonsibility for unsolicited

4

DOWNTOWN IN FOCUS

8

BUSINESS ON THE HILL

12

PROFESSIONAL SPOTLIGHT

14

MARKETING

16

MANAGEMENT

56

FINANCIAL

58

TECHNOLOGY

materials. Statements and opinions printed in Lawrence Business Magazine are those of the author or advertiser and not necessarily the opinion of Lawrence Business Magazine.

ON THE COVER:

DR. NEELI BENDAPUDI, THE NEW DEAN OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS. PHOTO BY STEVEN HERTZOG FOR SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION GO TO LAWRENCEBUSINESSMAGAZINE.COM/SUBSCRIBE

facebook.com/lawrencebusinessmagazine Follow us: @LawrenceBizMag

3


DOWNTOWN by Cathy Hamilton Downtown Lawrence Association

Downtown Lawrence is a spirited place to shop, dine and work any time of year, but the holiday season reveals its unique, festive charms. With white lights on every bare-branched tree lining Massachusetts Street, green garland and red bows festooning the antique lampposts, you’d almost expect Santa Claus to fall from the sky any minute. And, he does…almost! Traditions abound in the downtown district, starting with the annual Christmas lighting ceremony and Santa’s arrival, scheduled for Friday, Nov. 25th at 5:00 p.m. at 9th & Massachusetts Street. Lighting ceremonies are not unique to Lawrence, of course, but what other city sends the fire department to rescue the jolly old elf one from the roof of its anchor department store? Weaver’s department store president, Joe Flannery, guesses the tradition started over 20 years ago. Prior to that, Santa made his entrance into town on a horse-drawn carriage. “The credit has to go to then-Fire Chief Jim McSwain,” Flannery says. “He was the first Santa Claus who stepped off of Weaver’s roof and onto the 50-foot ladder truck. ” The daredevil role of Kris Kringle continues to be played by a member of the fire department, although the identity of this year’s big guy in red remains hush-hush. Whoever he is this year, he’ll be making his grand entrance on the fire department’s new pride and joy - Truck No. 5, a platform aerial (ladder truck) with a 100-foot extension ladder that has been in service since August 2011. Santa will descend on downtown at six o’clock and spend an hour or so taking children’s requests for Christmas presents and posing for photos. Entertainment will be provided beforehand.

4


I N FOCU S

ing a sizable donation to Just Food and merchants will be collectThe season picks up the pace the following weekend for the 19th

ing cash donations for the pantry throughout the season.

Annual Downtown Old-Fashioned Christmas parade, Saturday, Dec. 3rd at 11 a.m. The nationally acclaimed event features exclu-

“We’re excited to be working with DLI this holiday season”, says

sively horse-drawn carriages, wagons, coaches and riders deco-

Just Food Executive Director Jeremy Farmer. “They’ll be partner-

rated for the season. More than 300 horses from eight states are

ing with us to feed thousands of children and families in Douglas

expected to follow the route, which begins at 7th & Mass. and trots

County, and we are grateful for their unwavering support of Just

along to South Park at 13th Street. Each year, the parade brings

Food.”

thousands of bundled-up visitors downtown from far and wide to see this old-fashioned spectacle, one of the few horse-drawn-only

As exciting as holiday happenings can be, the main events down-

parades in the country.

town are always shopping and celebrating. This season, a host of new merchants – mixed with your favorite mainstays – have every

The Wells Fargo stagecoach, a perennial favorite, will be among the

holiday need covered.

colorful rigs featured this year. But, the equines sure to make the loudest clip-clop-clip-clops are a team of rare black and white Express Clydesdales. Standing more than eight feet high and weighing over 2,000 pounds, these beautiful horses tour North America as goodwill ambassadors for Express Employment Professionals and have been seen in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade and the Tournament of Roses Parade. Parade goers and Santa enthusiasts are asked to bring canned or other non-perishable food items downtown to donate to Just Food,

Located at 717 Massachusetts in the old Bay Leaf space, Sweet! is

Downtown Lawrence, Inc.’s Holiday 2011 designated charity.

a one-stop shop for supplies for baking, decorating and packaging your holiday cakes, cupcakes and candies, with a good amount

In our first holiday partnership, Just Food, Douglas County’s own

of kitchen gadgets and cookware thrown into the mix. Co-owner,

food pantry, is providing dozens of volunteers to decorate down-

Susan Hess, says she has received good advice from the original

town lampposts on Sunday, Nov. 20. In exchange, DLI will be mak-

owners of the Bay Leaf, as to which products local cooks crave.

D OWNTOWN I N FO CUS

5


DOWN TOW N IN FOCUS Not a bake-it-yourselfer? The Cupcake Construction Company at 727 Mass., will gladly do the work to provide full-size and mini gourmet cupcakes for your holiday event. Owners Michael and Megan Kricsfeld even have a Mobile Interactive Cupcake Bar to set up at your next event. Have cupcakes, will travel! A new arrival in the gift shop category is Made on Mass., owned by Matt and Jennifer Richards. Located at 737 Massachusetts St., Made carries modern, locally made items complimented by goods created by regional and national artists. It’s a great place to find a unique gift for that impossible-to-buy-for person. For all those holiday procrastinators (and you know who you are), Downtown Lawrence gift certificates, for sale at any Douglas County Bank, make the decisionmaking process a no-brainer and allow the recipient to purchase the gift of their choice at over 100 downtown merchants. Put Downtown Lawrence on your list this holiday season. The downtown experience is a sure way to get into the spirit. See you on Mass. Street!

Your Knowledge Leader

Colliers International

Colliers International is uniquely positioned to be your knowledge leader in both the local commercial real estate market and across the globe. For vacancy rates, pricing, and other data, as well as representation services, Colliers International is your one stop shop for commercial real estate services and information. Contact us today to find out how our expanded reach and extensive market knowledge can accelerate your success. main +1 785 865 5100 fax +1 785 865 3842 www.colliers.com

Allison Vance Moore | Marilyn Bittenbender | Kelvin Heck

6

D OW N TOWN IN FOCU S


BUSINESS ON T H E H I L L

by Joe Monaco, University of Kansas

KU N A M ES NEW DIR ECTOR OF I N D U STR I AL PARTNER S HIPS

Nagel’s academic background

Building business relationships and enhancing the Kansas

from John Brown University, an M.S.

economy are high priorities for the University of Kansas (KU).

degree in zoology from Oklahoma

To help further that mission, KU has created a new position

State University and a Ph.D. degree

and hired an experienced scientist and business strategist to

in ecology and volutionary biology

lead the effort.

from theUniversity of Tennessee.

Julie Nagel joined KU on Aug. 1 as director of industrial

At Discovery Park, Nagel managed a

partnerships, reporting to Julie Goonewardene, associate vice

multi-institutional, $8 million cancer care engineering proj-

chancellor for innovation and entrepreneurship in the Office

ect that involved proposal development, project management,

of Research and Graduate Studies. Nagel was previously man-

regulatory compliance, interdisciplinary research and the in-

aging director of the Oncological Science Center at Purdue

terface with research coordinators at clinical sites.

includes a B.S.E. degree in biology

University’s Discovery Park.

technology into the marketplace through startup companies

KU’S NEW RENEWAB LE SCHOLARSHIPS M AKE COLLEG E AFFORDAB LE

and licensing agreements. In the process, Nagel will strengthen

A University of Kansas education is becoming more affordable

and broaden relationships with external partners, seek grants

thanks to a package of new, four-year renewable scholarships

in support of these efforts and assist with the development of a

for freshmen and two-year scholarships for transfer students.

strategic plan for technology commercialization and outreach.

Starting with the Fall 2012 incoming class, KU will automati-

Since joining KU, Nagel has been working closely with the KU Center for Technology Commercialization to move university

cally award students renewable scholarships according to their “KU is on the threshold of becoming a first-rate center for

academic performance. Prospective students will now know

technology commercialization,” Nagel says. “It has all the piec-

what scholarships they qualify for even before they apply, and

es in place. This is an opportunity to join a team that can look

KU will confirm the awards within two weeks of a student’s

at the assets we have and use them to make a difference in peo-

admission to the university.

ples’ lives. That means fostering innovation, creating jobs and focusing every day on how to make an impact.”

Four-year scholarships for Kansas students run as high as $40,000. Students and their families can visit the new

Prior to joining Purdue in 2005, Nagel was a program

affordability.ku.edu to see the range of scholarships, grants

director for Biotechnology Business Consultants, following

and financial aid available.

service as a technical coordinator with Rubicon Genomics in Ann Arbor, Michigan.“That introduced me to the business

The university has also created the KU Pell Advantage pro-

side of the life sciences,” Nagel says. “I learned about all sorts

gram, which will be available to new Fall 2012 Kansas fresh-

of technologies coming out of the University of Michigan and

men who receive Federal Pell Grants and meet academic

Wayne State University. I also learned why some technologies

requirements. The KU Pell Advantage assures high-need stu-

make it and others don’t.”

dents a gift aid package to fully fund 15 hours of KU tuition and fees each semester for four years, through federal, state and institutional resources.

8

B U S I N ESS O N THE HILL


“We don’t want finances to keep students who are ready to attend KU from being able to realize their educational dreams,” says Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little. “These new scholarships will open the door to a KU education, and by rewarding academic achievement, encourage students to do well in both high school and college. When combined with our Four-year Tuition Compact, these renewable scholarships add to the affordability of a KU education.” In 2010, KU provided more than $70 million in scholarships

are successful and loyal. When those words appear together it

and grants to 13,878 students, and tuition and fees at the uni-

means scholarship dollars are also there to ensure great stu-

versity rank 28th lowest among the nation’s top 34 public re-

dents have affordable access to an education that opens doors

search universities. For more information on the new scholar-

and helps them change the world for the better.”

ships, visit http://affordability.ku.edu The school and its departments provided more than $2 million in scholarship dollars and financial awards to its students in ad-

KU M E E TI N G STATE’S NEED FOR M O R E E N G I N EER S

dition to funds from the university. About one-third of students

The University of Kansas School of Engineering made signifi-

also is home to the Self Engineering Leadership Fellows (SELF)

cant gains in undergraduate enrollment this fall as part of an

Program, a four-year leadership and enrichment program that

ongoing effort to meet Kansas’ workforce needs.

provides ambitious students in the school with additional lead-

in the School of Engineering receive scholarships. The school

ership opportunities, access to top leaders in business and inFall enrollment reached a 29-year high at 1,911 undergradu-

dustry, and a generous financial package to help defray the cost

ate students. The figure represents a 6.6 percent increase (119

of college.

students) over last year. “Efforts like the SELF Program have far-reaching effects and The enrollment increase is part of the school’s long-term stra-

help set the KU School of Engineering apart from other en-

tegic effort to boost the number of students in Kansas who

gineering programs,” Bell says. “Prospective students see that

graduate with bachelor’s degrees in engineering. Engineering-

engineering and computer science are opportunities for inno-

intensive industries in Kansas and the Kansas City region have

vation and greater involvement with the world around them.”

called for the state’s engineering programs to produce addition-

Several majors saw significant enrollment gains this fall, in-

al engineering graduates to meet the state’s workforce needs

cluding electrical engineering, petroleum engineering and en-

and help fuel the economy. The point was echoed by the Kansas

gineering physics.

Legislature with the passage of the Engineering Initiative Act this spring, designed to produce more engineering graduates in

Student quality also remained exemplary. Thirteen freshmen

Kansas. Gov. Sam Brownback signed the act into law in May.

with National Merit distinction enrolled in the school. Five students in the freshman class – four of whom are National

“Our staff has worked very hard to show high school and com-

Merit Scholars – earned Perfect Achievement marks with a 36

munity college students the great career opportunities that

score on the ACT. Overall, the average ACT scores of freshmen

await them as engineers and computer scientists,” Stuart Bell,

entering the KU School of Engineering remained high with a

dean of engineering, says. “Moreover, our alumni stand as a

composite score of 28.19, an ACT Math score of 29.6 and an

testament to the opportunities they received here. Our alumni

ACT Verbal score of 27.8. Both the Composite and Math scores represent slight increases over last year’s averages.

B USI NESS ON THE H ILL

9


ME N CU R O THERAPEU TICS MOVES I N TO BT BC EXPANS IO N FAC ILITY

KU UNVEI LS SUSTAINABILITY PLAN

The Bioscience & Technology Business Center at the University

Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little and the KU Center for Sus-

of Kansas will house another biotech company with ties to the

tainability on Oct. 19 announced the completion of Building

university.

Sustainable Traditions, the KU campus sustainability plan.

Mencuro Therapeutics Inc., a drug de-

“As a public institution, the University of Kansas has a respon-

velopment company focused on pain

sibility to operate in an efficient, effective and sustainable man-

treatment, has leased space at the BTBC

ner,” Gray-Little says. “We must elevate the expectations we

Expansion Facility. The company will

have for ourselves as a community, finding ways to maximize

create one new position — a biologist

the benefits of the work we do at KU, while minimizing finan-

— and plans to add additional scientists

cial, environmental and societal costs.”

within the next year. The plan was commissioned by the chancellor in spring 2010. Mencuro utilizes technologies developed by Tom Prisinzano, a

Formal work began in October 2010 with the appointment of

medicinal chemist at KU, and Laura Bohn, a neuroscientist at

an advisory council by Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor

The Scripps Research Institute in Florida. Prisinzano and Bohn

Jeffrey Vitter. In all, more than 150 students, faculty, staff and

teamed up with colleagues Robert Karr and Randy Weiss to

community members were involved in the process of develop-

launch the company earlier this year.

ing a vision for a sustainable campus and plotting a course to get there.

“We’re excited to locate in Lawrence as part of the BTBC at KU incubator system,” says Prisinzano, an associate professor

“KU is engaged in a number of major initiatives, and under-

in the medicinal chemistry department. “We considered loca-

lying the success of each is our ability to responsibly steward

tions in Iowa City and Kansas City, but the BTBC was clearly

fiscal and physical resources,” Vitter says. “Our sustainability

the best option. The BTBC gives us great lab space and a range

plan will fold into everything we do at KU, from the efficiencies

of business and financing services. Most importantly, this loca-

pursued as part of the Changing for Excellence initiative to the

tion gives Mencuro access to KU equipment, technology and

implementation of our strategic plan, Bold Aspirations.”

researchers, including me and my Malott Hall lab. It’s ideal for an early stage biotech company like Mencuro.”

Building Sustainable Traditions focuses on creating a community that is engaged in sustainability, adaptive in its cultural, in-

Mencuro will collaborate with various KU units, including the

stitutional, educational and operational practices, and efficient

department of medicinal chemistry, as well as the department

in its use of resources. The plan calls for several initial activities,

of pharmaceutical chemistry in the KU School of Pharmacy.

including increased contact and coordination throughout cam-

Mencuro became the 11th company to locate in the BTBC at

pus, review of standards for facilities and for landscaping and

KU incubator system, which comprises three buildings — the

open spaces, expanded recycling efforts, and new standards for

BTBC Main Facility and the BTBC Expansion Facility in Law-

environmentally and socially preferred purchasing practices.

rence, and the BTBC at KUMC Facility in Kansas City. Mencuro became the second tenant in the Expansion Facility, join-

The sustainability plan will be integrated throughout Bold As-

ing KU spinout CritiTech.

pirations and the Changing for Excellence initiative. A key aspect of Bold Aspirations is the development of four strategic initiative themes, one of which is “Sustaining the Planet, Powering the World.” Visit http://www.sustainability.ku.edu/Plan for details.

10

B U S I N ESS O N THE HILL


11


P R OFES S I ONA L SPOTLIGHT M I L ES SC H N AER CR OWN TOYOTA SC IO N

LBM: How do you reward excellent work performance? MS: We celebrate revenue generators. Our pay is based on creating revenue for the dealership. If you do that, your paycheck will reflect it. We’re always happy to pay earned bonuses. LBM: How do you manage poor performance? MS: Each department head conveys our expectations to their staff daily. Really, we try to avoid the issue by hiring, training and challenging the best people we can find.

LBM: What is your company’s most impor tant commodity or ser vice? MS: Our customer service is what we sell. We work hard to exceed our customers’ expectations in every facet of our business. LBM: Other than monetar y, what is your company’s most impor tant priority? MS: We expect our customers to be as happy when they’re leaving as they were when they came. We want to greet them with a smile and we want them to leave smiling, feeling like they were treated right. LBM: What have been the most impor tant aspects of your success? MS: Being able to attract and keep good people who want to succeed is the key. Without highly ambitious people to perpetuate your philosophy you won’t succeed. LBM: How do you manage the day-to-day stress of business? MS: I work with a highly motivated physical trainer to keep me in top physical health. That helps a lot. Also, I wake up every morning expecting something good to happen. I’ve always believed the sun shines on the highest branch of the tree. If I’m pouting or something, people notice that. I have a positive attitude and that rubs off on people.

12

LBM: What is the biggest challenge your company faces? MS: Our challenge is to attract people who want to make the car business a career. We have work available for anyone who wants to talk about it. Too many people view selling cars as something they’ll do for a while until they figure out what they want their career to be. I was one of those people. One day I made the decision to make this my career. That was more than 30 years ago. LBM: How many people does your business employ? How many of those live in Lawrence? Does your company encourage people to live in Lawrence? What is the benefit? MS: We employee 90 people, both full and part-time, in Lawrence. Of those, 78 live in Lawrence. I think it’s important because living near your work allows you more time in your life. You can spend more time with your family and less driving to the job. LBM: What would you change about doing business in Lawrence? MS: We really need to get the South Lawrence Trafficway completed. Regardless of the politics involved, having a corridor that shows travelers that South Iowa Street is alive and well is important. We have a lot of good businesses on this side of town that could be greatly helped by the roadway. LBM: How does your business make a posi tive impact on the Lawrence community? MS: Having the success of working with so many great people has allowed me to be philanthropic with my resources to help others in our community. As a businesses we go out of our way to support as many charities as we can. We’ve always focused on youth and helping those who can not help themselves.


LBM: You operate in an industr y increasingly penetrated by online competition. How have you manage to remain relevant and profitable? MS: We try to advertise as much as possible without spending money. We try to be everywhere we can be financially. But, if we can offer a great consumer experience, people will tell their friends. It’s hard for a website to duplicate that. Also, we are taking advantage of the internet with a new e-commerce department that utilizes social media to reach people looking to buy a car. LBM: Over the course of your career, what has the been the single largest change in the Lawrence auto environment? MS: The internet, without question. Today when someone wants to buy a car, they can come in knowing the make, model, year and color they want. Often, they’ll know how much we paid for it and come to the table with an offer. LBM: What do you foresee as being the big gest challenge to auto dealers in Lawrence? MS: Our biggest challenge, believe it or not, is getting people that live in Lawrence to shop in Lawrence. We have as much to offer as the big city and we care about taking care of the people of Lawrence.


by Ron Covert Great Plains Media

3 STEPS TO

B ETTER MA R K E T I NG Where are we going? Heck, we don’t know, but we’re going. We’ll figure it out when we get there. This is not the dialogue before a last-minute college road trip. Unfortunately, it is an accurate representation of the amount of thought many companies put into their advertising and marketing plans.

I want businesses to make more money with their advertising, not waste their time and money. Way too many people put way too little thought into their advertising and marketing plans. That is why there are people like me. My job is to ask the difficult questions. Questions like…

What are you really trying to do with your advertising and marketing? What do you want to make different from what is happening now? “I just want to get my name out there” doesn’t cut it. You need to have a clear and defined destination in mind. If not, you are just getting in your car and driving around.

Partner with the bank that

takes care of business.

Get the personal attention your business deserves by partnering with INTRUST Bank. Our trusted experts work closely with businesses of all sizes to develop customized banking solutions that meet our customers’ needs. While our vast range of products and services ensure those needs are always fulfilled. Call or stop by our branch today to learn what we can do for you. Commercial Lending | Small Business Checking | Treasury Management | Merchant Services | Retirement Planning Member FDIC I ©2011 INTRUST Bank

Lawrence | 1555 Wakarusa 830-2650 | 544 Columbia 830-2614 | 901 Vermont 830-2600


He re i s a s i mpl e, t h ree-step process to in stant ly i mprove yo ur adver t isin g an d market ing.

1

IDENTIFY WHAT YOU WANT TO HAVE HAPPEN Be specific. Wanting to get more customers doesn’t count. More customers do not translate into more sales. I like to use a drill bit analogy to make this point. Most everyone has bought a drill bit, but has anyone ever really wanted a drill bit? No. What did they really want? A hole? Most likely the drill bit was used to make a hole to hang that new piece of art. If you don’t set specific and measurable goals for your advertising, it is impossible to judge the success or failure of your efforts. One you have defined a goal, the hard part starts.

2

PUT A STRATEGY IN PLACE TO MAKE IT SO Your advertising strategy must persuade your customers and potential customers to do whatever it is you want them to do. You need to speak to the consumer about what they care about in language that resonates with them. If Pavlov had used broccoli paste instead of meat paste to train his dogs, I am pretty sure the bell would have started to just tick off the dogs. You have to speak to the consumer in the language of the consumer. It takes a bit of practice and you must have the ability to look at your business from the end consumer’s point of view. Customers do not care how long you have been in business or that you have a cute family. What they really care about is what you can do for them – and nothing else. Then the even harder part starts.

3

EXECUTE THE STRATEGY AND GIVE IT TIME TO WORK A strong advertising plan will take more than a few weeks to show dividends. Many advertisers start with a good strategy but fail when they don’t allow the proper time to work. You can’t predict a consumer’s time of need. They don’t need what you have because you want them to. It is up to you to communicate why a customer should do business with you when they have a need for your product or service. While planning your strategy you must keep in mind the time commitment needed for your campaign to reach your goals. Now that you are ready to go, figure out where you want to end. You’re already buckled up.

Ron Covert is VP/GM of Great Plains Media in Lawrence. Great Plains Media operates radio stations Lazer 105.9, 92.9 The Bull and 1320 KLWN. Ron also operates Strategically Sound, a consulting company specializing in small business marketing and advertising.

M ARKET IN G

15


Shane M. Jones, LSCSW

“Hey, are you two able to swim across and back?” asked the mustached lifeguard.

“Rest for 20 minutes before you get back in the deep end,” he said.

It was 1971 and my friend, Todd, and I swam toward the side of the pool in “the deep end.” We knew that you had to

Todd and I looked like a couple of really small beached

show a lifeguard you could swim across the pool and back

whales on the side of the pool… but we did it! We couldn’t

without touching the bottom before you would be allowed

believe it.

to swim in the deep end. The “deep end” housed the diving boards and, of course, the coolest kids in town. It was

My son, a distance runner says, “When you feel pain, run

the summer after 4th grade and Todd had convinced me

harder.” When we are faced with a fight or flight situation

that we could, “just go into the deep end and no one would

and the amygdala in our brain sends epinephrine (adrena-

know if we had actually swam across and back.”

line) to our bodies, our flexor muscles increase by 30%.

He was wrong.

The thing we have to develop is our ability to regulate ourselves and use these things in a positive, focused way,

We had to prove that we could do something we had never been able to do. I could hear my heart pumping so loud; oh the shame that was about to be placed around our necks. What felt like an eternity had passed and the “bigger-thanlife” lifeguard pulled two exhausted skinny nine-year-olds out of the pool.

16

M A N AG E MENT

not reactively. For instance, studies have shown that when pain is introduced into a person’s body, and the objective in the study is to endure it as long as they can while a facilitator increases the pain, they will endure much more pain if they can control the “off switch” rather than having to ask for it to stop.


JUST ASK THOSE WHO HAVE SERVED UNDER GREAT LEADERS, GENERALS,

COACHES,

ETC.,

THEY

WILL

OFTEN

SIGHT

THE

STRENGTH OF THE LEADER AND HOW THAT INSPIRED THEM TO ACCOMPLISH MORE THAN THEY THOUGHT WAS CAPABLE.

In my counseling practice, I don’t just help

battling with the struggles of getting a new

tomers will sense the attitude in you, and

people overcome a problem, I also help

business established; hanging on in a diffi-

will respond in like manner. It’s about be-

them discover their strengths and give

cult job, or sticking in there to make a mar-

lieving in the strength in ourselves and

them tools that enable them to have more

riage or family stronger. Whatever it is you

looking for strength in others that makes

success over future problems. For instance,

may be facing, remember you, and those

the difference. Just ask those who have

using the previous example, I tell my cli-

around you, are stronger than you or they

served under great leaders, generals, coach-

ents they need to develop their own “off

think.

es, etc., they will often sight the strength of

switches.” An off switch in our lives can be

the leader and how that inspired them to

as simple as someone saying, “I am going

Our mind is powerful, but often we don’t

accomplish more than they thought was

to work very hard for the next hour, then

use it well. We will very easily let our

capable.

take a break.” Another is being more mind-

thoughts go down the negative path, un-

ful of what healthy boundaries they can set

less we cause our thoughts to be on what is

Henry Ford nailed it when he said “whether

for themselves and with others, in order to

good, right, positive and vision driven. We

you think you can, or think you can’t, you’re

keep too many things from taking our time

have to start with ourselves. “I am stronger

right.” We are stronger than we think.

and energy, and as a result feeling used up

than I think” causes us to test ourselves a

and angry about it.

little more, expect more from ourselves and

BO O K R ECO M M E NDATION:

believe in ourselves more.

The Sur v ivo r ’s C lub, by Be n S he r wo o d .

It doesn’t matter what you are facing. Sometimes it could be a literal life or death sur-

When you make that positive mental

vival situation. More commonly you are

change, employees, co-workers, and cus-

MANAG EME NT

17


by Megan Gilliland City of Lawrence

SAVING ST RUCT UR ES CREATING OPPORTUNITIES

In today’s world, we often forget the significance of the past. However, Lawrence city leaders have been able to work with local business owners to create opportunities within Lawrence’s historic districts and revitalize once-functioning buildings into new spaces for commerce and housing.

The Poehler Mercantile Building, 618 E. 8th Street, recently won City Commission approval to be part of a multi-building redevelopment plan that will create 49 multi-family apartment units, additional artist/office space and event facilities. The building is part of a larger East Lawrence Industrial Historic

18


District which houses several historic buildings with archi-

street lighting. Although the improvements will contribute

tectural integrity associated with the city’s industrial past.

to the Poehler project, the City Commission hopes they will

The District’s historic integrity and importance in com-

also benefit the neighborhood community by spurring fur-

merce def ines

ther redevelopment in the area. This type of development

a rare, concen-

opportunity is often cited as one of the ways that historic

trated and intact

preservation can be linked with economic development.

area of industrial

By targeting areas for improvement, the city may be able to

resources dating

create opportunities to modernize and develop the public

from the 1880s

infrastructure and set the stage for future redevelopment,

through the Great

revitalization and growth.

Depression. By revitalizing existing structures in Lawrence, the city The city will complete infrastructure and public improve-

has been able to keep its downtown a thriving center for

ments, including street improvements on Delaware Street

retail activity and entertainment. Throughout the past few

and 8th Street, parking lot pavement, sidewalks, replace-

decades, local businesses and city leaders have worked to-

ment of utility water line, fire sprinkler installation and

gether to create opportunities to reclaim buildings that may

19


have otherwise been demolished and left as vacant spaces or re-built in

Opportunities to preserve and restore sig-

a style that does not fit within the historic characteristics of downtown

nificant historic structures in the community

Lawrence. Downtown Lawrence’s main street, Massachusetts Street,

will continue to present unique challenges for

was recognized by the American Planning Association in 2010 as a

community planners. As opportunities arise,

“Top 10 Great Street” in America through the “Great Places” program.

the city will use previous principles to balance

The recognition largely focused on the city’s commitment to keeping

community impact and the desire for historic

downtown a viable retail and entertainment corridor that remains rel-

preservation.

evant today when competition presents many options for consumers. As a community, Lawrence embraces its fiery As a city, Lawrence has taken great steps to develop policies that bal-

past and continues to look for ways to retain

ance the use of public funds with overall benefit to the community. The

the structures that hold a key place in its col-

historic Union Pacific Depot filled a void in the community when it

lective history. The buildings, regardless of

was transformed from a rail depot into the Lawrence Visitor’s Center.

years of deterioration, have stood the test of

The Union Pacific Depot, with its towering steeple and lush gardens,

time and help write the history of Lawrence.

welcomes visitors to Lawrence and provides a quiet respite to residents

Through both public and private revitalization

looking for relaxation. The Carnegie Building, 9th and Vermont Streets,

efforts, Lawrence will continue to place a high

was renovated in 2010 to serve as the home of the Convention and Visi-

value on history and the substantial benefits

tor’s Bureau and as the central location for the Freedom’s Frontier Na-

that historic structures provide.

tional Heritage Area. Both the Depot and Carnegie Building celebrate Lawrence’s prominence in history and recognize the significant role the town’s founders played in shaping the nation through the struggle for freedom and the westward expansion of the country.

20


21


L AW R E N C E N ON P R O F I TS

OP E NI NG T H E I R D O O R S

WIDER THAN EVER Daisey Wakefield

Nonprofits never have it easy, but these days, it seems like they have it pretty darn hard. As the economy continues to drag, charitable organizations that provide material assistance and resources to financially struggling populations are being especially stretched. Previously only accessed by those who hover at poverty income levels, nonprofits are now being tapped by a widening berth of people. The line between middle class and poverty becomes a slippery slope when factoring in rising food costs, unexpected medical bills, and unemployment or underemployment.

For three local organizations, these trends knock at their door on a daily basis. They meet the needs as they can, always with the long-term objective of helping their clients become self sufficient.

22


Cars line up to help distribute food for the once-a-month mobile food bank.

Over 40 tons of food distributed each month.

JUST FOOD “The economy is in a weird spot,” says Jeremy Farmer, ex-

With the increasing needs and numbers, Farmer, who be-

ecutive director of Just Foods, “Our numbers of people we

came director in July, is feeling the pressure of increasing

serve are increasing, even though we are seeing some families

their funding sources. He is applying for grants and planning

achieve self-sufficiency and graduating out of the system. But

fundraisers. ($60,000 in grant funds and $13,000 raised in

more new people are are coming in to receive help. Last year

a golf fundraiser adds a boon to the 2011 books.) With the

at this time, we directly served 1200 people a month. Now it’s

support of local businesses, Just Foods was able to provide

2200 a month.”

300 Thanksgiving meals. Farmer says they are soliciting businesses to help provide 300 meals for Christmas as well.

An outreach of the East Central Kansas Economic Opportunity Corporation (ECKAN), Just Food goes beyond typical food pantry services by providing both perishable and nonperishable food as well as extended hours of operation. It is the largest emergency food provider in Douglas County, acting as a distributor for Kansas City-based Harvester’s Community Food Network to its local partner pantries. With a bare bones annual budget of $139,000, Just Food keeps its overhead costs low by partnering with local farmers and grocers to provide food at free or discounted costs. A staff of one to two and a crew of volunteers keep the operations running smooth. Even so, the organization was on the brink of closing in February 2010 from lack of funding. Local contributions of $115,000 granted an 11th hour reprieve to the pantry. Just Food Holiday Opportunities: Individual and business donors for holiday meal boxes

23


Petey Cerf Early Education Center

BALLARD CENTER Though its initiatives have broadened over the past 30 plus years, the core mission at the Ballard Community Center has remained the same: to provide quality early childhood care and preschool for low income families. The main site Ballard Center site in North Lawrence serves 58 kids in 5 classrooms, and another one at Brookcreek Learning Center serves 45 kids in 4 classrooms. A third, the Petey Cerf Early Childhood Center, is slated to open at the end of 2012 and will serve 88 infants and toddlers in a new and green sustainable building designed by Gould Evans. “Children tend to not learn as well when they are hungry or tired or worried about what’s going to happen to their families,” Dianne Ensminger, CEO Ballard Center, explains. The organization also provides wraparound services for families in need. These social services include food pantries at Ballard Center, a clothing closet at Penn House, emergency rent and utility assistance through the Douglas County Emergency Service Council, among others. Ensminger echoes the trend of seeing a new class emerge, those who are between abject poverty and solid working class. “We are seeing families who never even thought this would happen, but now are facing foreclosure or job loss. These are hardworking people — but they are right above ‘just making it.’ It’s a delicate balancing act for families to keep from falling over the edge.” To meet these increasing needs, Ballard raised their tuition in 2010, but even so, it is only half of what it costs to run the program. Funds from private donors and foundations have increased, as have funds from city and county sources. Ballard is also the largest recipient of the Douglas County United Way, receiving $250,000 in 2010. And for the past two Septembers, the Ballard B3 (Blues, Brews, and Barbeque) Fundraiser has helped to bridge the gap in meeting the overall operating budget of $1.4 million. Ballard Community Center Holiday Opportunities: Individual and business donors for Adopt-a-Family Christmas program


SALVATION ARMY It’s a familiar sight and maybe even more familiar sound — the bell ringers from Salvation Army in front of stores during the holiday season. A token of generosity goes into the kettles - but as with any global organization, one wonders how much influence a dollar actually has in the local area. “Eighty three cents,” replies Wesley Dalberg, director of the Lawrence chapter of the Salvation Army, “Some money flows up to our headquarters for administrative and overhead, but eighty three cents of every dollar stays here in our local community for our operational and outreach costs.” Those operational costs include the staff and overhead necessary to provide social services like emergency housing, utilities, and food assistance, a warming/cooling center each evening where people can come for snacks and drinks, community lunches three times a week, and special outreaches held throughout the year. A major component of Salvation Army’s mission is the case management that they provide for the homeless or transient. Three case managers work with clients to receive

Salvation Army Holiday Opportunities:

transitional or permanent housing, with an emphasis on

Individual and business donors for holiday meal boxes

life skills training. Salvation Army is also a church denomination, holding religious services through the week and on Sundays that reach out to a population that may not feel comfortable in a traditional church setting. Funded by the United Way, HUD, and private donations, the Lawrence Salvation Army has yearly operating

Individual and business donors for Adopt-a-Family and Angel Tree Christmas programs Individual and business volunteers for the Kettle Program

budget of $1 million. (The Salvation Army thrift store is a separate entity that provides funds to the Kansas City chapter of the Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center). The kettle program, which draws in funds from nineteen Lawrence locations, is hoped to bring in $95,000. Dalberg also plans to do a major gifts solicitation and a direct mail solicitation this holiday season to raise a total of $300,000 in holiday drive money.

Each of the three nonprofits highlighted are doing holiday outreaches and would welcome individual and business sponsorships. Additional information can be found at: Eckan.org/justfood Ballardcenter.org Wesley Dalberg 785-843-4188


Great People. Exceptional Lawyers.

Serving Kansans Since 1930. Business & Corporate Law,

Civil Litigation, Real Estate Law Employment Law

and Domestic

Relations Law

Call us at our new Lawrence Location.

SloanLawFirm.com


Kick Back and Relax...

We’ve got your business covered. Options for all of your business needs. Ask about our Central Business Value, Central Business Premium or Central Cash Sweep accounts. Convenient Locations at: 711 Wakarusa Dr. 603 W. 9th St. 3140 Nieder Rd. 3300 Iowa St. (Inside Walmart)

Member FDIC Equal Housing Lender


T HE B U S I N ESS O F:

CATERI NG A H OL I DAY PARTY

Photos by Casey Wright


The end-of-the-year holiday season is a time to reflect. Either quarterly budgets January’s

and

goals

great

were

met

expectations

or

have

given way to the financial reality of a bad year. For most, it’s a time to relax and enjoy the company of friends and family while feasting at office parties and family gatherings. For caterers in Lawrence, the holiday season is one of the busiest, and most profitable, times of the year. Three local companies describe how they handle the stress, expense and joys of helping others celebrate.

Evan Williams, owner of Evan Williams Catering, loves the holiday season. “It reminds me of why I got into the business,” Williams says. “I grew up in an entertaining house. My mother was always cooking for guests and hosting parties. A lot of them were for my dad and his football friends, but the holiday season was a very busy time in my mother’s kitchen. So cooking for other’s celebration is a real pleasure for me.”

29


Evan Williams, Evan Williams Catering

Williams has been fine-tuning her

and every event, fantastic is both a

priority. We have as many conversa-

cooking and business practice for more

challenge and a goal for any good ca-

tions about the event as possible to help

than 20 years. Her dedication to the

terer, Williams says. People trust you to

ensure we get it right the first time, be-

craft cannot be questioned. In fact, she

make their party or event a success, and

cause there isn’t a second time.”

finished her first paying job the day she

disappointing a client can have disas-

was due to give birth to her first child.

trous consequences. When you work as

Stephen Maceli, owner of Maceli’s in

a caterer, you’re not cooking for one or

downtown Lawrence, agrees.

“I was catering a luncheon at a bank

two people; you’re cooking for a room-

and kept having these pains,” Williams

ful of people. Since dishes are planned

“Many people don’t understand that

recalls. “I called my doctor, who wasn’t

and prepped well before the event, if

most restaurant food doesn’t always

too pleased with me. He subtly remind-

you get it wrong, it is incredibly diffi-

translate into catering,” Maceli says.

ed me I was due and let me know I was

cult to make changes.

“The reality of catering is that most

having contractions.”

30

food is prepped and cooked at one lo“Luckily, we haven’t had that happen,”

cation, then transported and served at

Williams finished serving the meal, po-

says Regan Pillar, who owns Culinaria

another. Food must be resilient to this

litely thanked the bank president and

with her husband Aaron. “We’ve been

delay in serving without sacrificing

headed to the hospital. “My son was

at it for more than 2 years, and I hope

taste, texture and temperature.”

born 45 minutes later,” she says. “May-

we never have a horror story to tell. We

be I should have bowed out sooner,

make it a priority to communicate as

Williams says working on other peo-

but that was my first gig, I had to get

clearly as possible with clients about

ple’s ideas can be difficult.

it right.”

what they want and what we can pro-

That type of resolve to make each dish,

vide. Managing expectations is a top

“I know what I like and I know how to


make it,” she says. “I think most cater-

be buffet style and hosts are often un-

ordered. People always ask if we plan

ers are like that. We didn’t get into the

certain of the headcount. Pricing for the

for extras. We let them know that if they

businesses because we wanted to cook

food is a fine line, because if you charge

think that more guests will show up, or-

other people’s recipes. One of the biggest

too much and have a bunch of leftovers,

der more, and if they don’t they get to

challenges for me is letting go of some

your client won’t be happy. Of course,

keep the food, so nothing is wasted.

of the creative control. I’m lucky enough

that’s much better than not ordering or

to be in the position now where people

preparing enough food.”

know me for my food, so I have to conform less. But reminding yourself you

Maceli says having a definite policy on

are working for your client is important.”

food orders helps in two ways, he doesn’t have to worry about leftovers and the cli-

Most holiday parties are smaller affairs

ent knows exactly what they are getting.

than, say, a wedding reception. Aaron

The policy, he says, helps maintain the

Pillar says that is both a blessing and a

bottom line.

curse.

Since the price of food changes so fre“When you order food from us, you get

quently and unpredictably, budgeting for

“At a wedding you have fairly solid head

to keep the leftovers,” Maceli says. “We

an event is difficult.

count,” Pillar says. “Often you are serving

will even pack them up for you as long

by the plate and you have budgeted your

as you request them in a timely man-

“You have to figure in some wiggle room

food and service for that certain number

ner. My philosophy is we make what is

on pricing,” Williams says. “The price of

of plates. Smaller, holiday events tend to

ordered and you get to keep what you

an ingredient may increase 5 or 10 per-

Aaron and Regan Pillar, Culinaria

31


MACELI SAYS HAVING A DEFINITE POLICY ON

cent between the time you price it and

“Labor is the greatest expense in our

FOOD ORDERS HELPS IN

the time you purchase it. If you already

type of catering,” Maceli says. “One big

TWO WAYS, HE DOESN’T

priced it too low, you have to eat that

difference between Maceli’s and other

HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT

cost.”

companies is service fees or gratuities.

LEFTOVERS AND THE CLIENT KNOWS EXACTLY WHAT THEY ARE GETTING.

THE POLICY, HE SAYS, HELPS MAINTAIN THE BOTTOM LINE.

At Maceli’s, there is no 18-20% service Aaron and Regan at Culinaria factor

fee that is added on to one’s bill. All

unstable food prices into quotes.

food and beverages include some type of service.”

“We always estimate high when calculating the cost of food,” Regan says. “Es-

The Pillars say they spend less on labor

pecially as a young company, we cannot

and more on hardware.

lose money on a job. We work very hard to make our margins on food as solid as

“There is always another pot to buy or

we can.”

warmer to get,” Regan says. “Every event we cater is different, and almost all need

Food, though the center of a caterer’s

a unique piece of equipment. The profit

business, is often not the biggest ex-

from the first job we ever catered was

pense.

spent entirely on equipment. Now we budget a percentage of every job toward equipment costs.”

Making a living working at other’s parties gives caterers a keen sense of what makes a party work. Maceli says planning ahead and making it interesting is the key to hosting a great holiday party.

“Holiday entertaining is more special Steve Maceli, Maceli’s

32

when there is great food and plenty of


it,” Maceli says. “I recommend having one or two items that people can talk about. When entertaining at home, try to choose items that can be prepped ahead of time and reheated easily. Your menu should also reflect the production capacity of your kitchen. If your kitchen is small, potlucks can be great. Since guests would likely bring something they are proud of, potlucks can make for superior buffets, unless everyone brings chips.”

Aaron Pillar tells clients to think a little differently. “Try to make it something people actually want to do, “ he says. “We’ve all been to the party in the conference room and had a tray of cold cuts with punch. Boring. Have us make a signature cocktail, host the party at someone’s home and get some great food. And be sure to have booze. It makes interesting people more interesting and boring people more tolerable.”

Interesting people help, says Williams, but food can save almost any party.

“Good food can be the savior of almost any party,” she says. “Let’s face it, well-planned, great tasting food is one of the great pleasure of life. The holidays are a great time to indulge.”

33


Taking care of business Financial solutions to grow your business. Our experienced business banking team can provide you with financial solutions to help you take care of your business. If it’s important to you, it’s important to us.

We Make It Work. MEMBER FDIC

WWW.CAPCITYBANK.COM HOBBS TAYLOR BANKING CENTER 740 NEW HAMPSHIRE INSIDE HYVEE 4000 W 6TH STREET


STONEBACK APPLIANCE Locally owned for over 50 years 925 Iowa St. Ste A, Lawrence, KS 66044 785 843 4170

StonebackAppliance.com GE • Sony • Amana • Maytag • Whirlpool • Hotpoint • KitchenAid

IMPROVE your advertising return on investment!!

WE GET RES ULTS!

(785) 843-1320 klwn.com bull929.com lazer.com

Reach Over

130,000 Listeners


NEELI BENDAPUDI

KU SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

Dr. Neeli Bendapudi, the new Dean of the University of Kansas School of Business, leans forward and emphatically taps her office table with her forefinger. She squints her eyes and slightly lowers her head. “This,” she says with the passion of a preacher and the seriousness of a judge, “is the University of My American Dream.” And with that, a broad smile graces her face; she sits back in her chair and gazes out of her office window at the passing students. “The University of Kansas has been very good to my family,” she says. “I am so thrilled to be able to return the favor.”

At a young age, her father introduced Dr. Bendapudi to

Her appreciation for KU was instilled almost as early as

the University of Kansas. Though her father’s passion for

Bendapudi had set her career goals.

KU was strong, it had little to do with the Jayhawk basketball team. When Dr. Bendapudi was 5 years old, her

“Teaching and academics are always what I’ve wanted to

father left their home in India to begin work on a doctor-

do,” she says with a laugh. “When other kids were playing

ate at KU on the American Playwright Arthur Miller.

and maybe getting a little rowdy, I was always the one to bring everybody back to focus on learning. I’m sure my

“When you’re a child, anywhere your parents go is like

sisters will confirm that.”

a mystical place,” Bendapudi says. “My father was in the

36

mystical land of Kansas. He would tell us all about this

After earning her undergraduate degree and MBA from

beautiful place called Lawrence and send us these great

Andhra University in India, Bendapudi, along with hus-

pictures of things called Jayhawks. I was five or six and

band Venkat, moved to Lawrence to begin work on her

already enamored with KU.”

doctorate (she graduated in 1994).


Family photo - taken the day her father was leaving for the USA and Lawrence. Neeli is the oldest girl in the front. Father- Ramesh Dutta Thippauajjala, Mother- Padma Thippavajjala Middle Sister - Gowri (lives in Austin, TX), Youngest Sister - Chitra (lives in Richmond VA)

Lawrence welcomed her with some very unexpected challenges. “I had always been told how flat Kansas is,” she says. “After a few hours walking around campus I thought ‘Wow, if this is flat, I don’t need to see the rest of the state.’ Of all the things my father mentioned about KU, the hills were not one of them.”

37


Bendapudi’s primary research focus is on how cus-

research and outreach regarding service manage-

tomers evaluate which service providers and organi-

ment.

zations are best able to meet their needs and when they merit long-term relationships. The second area

“Neeli is missed,” says Dr. Stephen Mangum, Senior

of interest has to do with how organizations can

Associate Dean at the Fisher College of Business. “She was one of our most respected faculty members, most popular instructors and most friendly co-workers. I can’t think of a University teaching award she didn’t win. She published often and really invested herself in her work. Not only that, but her connections with the busi-

This photo of the three sisters (Neelie, Gowri, Chitra) was sent to their father when he was in Lawrence.

ness world are invaluable. The Business School at Kansas is

effectively communicate their ability to meet cus-

lucky to have her, that’s for sure. I don’t think they

tomer needs. Her research has been published in the

could have found someone more qualified or pas-

Journal of Academic Medicine, Harvard Business

sionate for the position.”

Review and Journal of Marketing, among others.

38

Bendapudi is so respected in the field, she was asked

Of all the candidates for the position, something

to give a TED lecture on the topic.

about Bendapudi stood out.

After a time as an assistant professor of marketing

“In addition to being an outstanding researcher,

at Texas A&M University, Bendapudi started at Ohio

teacher and administrator, Neeli brings a bold vision

State University. She began as an assistant professor

for the School of Business,” James P. Guthrie, search

in 1996, before becoming an associate professor in

committee co-chair and business professor says. “Her

2002 and earning full professorship in 2008. While

understanding of what it will take to move the school

at Ohio State, Bendapudi founded and ran the Initia-

forward is based upon her unique blend of business

tive for Managing Services, a center within the Fish-

and academic experiences. And as a KU alumna, she

er College of Business representing a consortium of

brings an obvious love for the university and a famil-

companies that partner with the college on teaching,

iarity with the state’s business climate that will benefit


“As a KU alumna, she brings an obvious love for the university and a familiarity with the state’s business climate that will benefit the school, its programs and its graduates.”

Students from India in front of Strong Hall (1969)Neeli’s father (Ramesh Dutta Thippavajja) is the second from right.

the school, its programs and its graduates.”

Dr. Neeli Bendapudi today, at the University of Kansas.

Bendapudi has three very simple goals for the Business School.

The opportunity for Bendapudi to return to Lawrence was completely unexpected.

“This must be a great place to learn, a great place to work and a great place to invest,” she says. “All three are directly

“I can’t speak highly enough about my time at Ohio State,” Bendapudi says. “The faculty, the Provost, the President and the students at Ohio State are absolutely fabulous. Honestly, I hadn’t ever considered leaving. Ohio State felt like home.

tied to the others. That said, we cannot concentrate on only one or two. We, as a school, must accomplish all three goals if we are going to continue to be a great university and serve our students.”

KU was the only other university at which I could ever imagine working. When the search committee at KU contacted me, I was shocked and absolutely thrilled. Ohio made every effort to keep me. But I told them, ‘KU is home.’”

Students, without question, must be the main focus of everyone at the university, according to Bendapudi. If KU is a business, the student body is the consumer. As a dean, Bendapudi feels a great responsibility to ensure the experience of her customers is second-to-none.

39


“KU is already a fantastic place to get an education,”

coming freshman and he said something that really struck

Bendapudi says. “My job is to make it even better for our

a chord with me. He said ‘The set of letters I care most

students. I think we, as an administration, can’t forget that

about after my child’s name when she graduates aren’t

the students pay our salary. I mean let’s face it: their tu-

MBA or Ph.D. It’s JOB.’ That articulates my point exactly.

ition dollars are how we make a living. We are here to serve

Our graduates must be able to compete for the best jobs.”

them.” Bendapudi believes KU must also be a great place to work. Bendapudi has clearly put a lot of thought into how to at-

That, she says, means ensuring faculty understand both

tract and keep the best students and her business acumen

the opportunity and responsibility of working for a world-

is apparent when relating her ideas.

class university. Too many professors, Bendapudi says, take a laissez faire attitude toward teaching.

“We have to evaluate the value of an education from our Business School in respect to the burdens,” Bendapudi

“The faculty here is, really and truly, fantastic,” Bendapudi

says. “We have to let students know we offer three things:

says an excitement that can’t be faked. “They understand

security, esteem and justice. Students can be secure that

that if they aren’t excited to be here teaching, they can’t

they made the right decision to enroll at KU. They will

expect their students to be excited. I mean really, what’s in

feel respected and fairly treated by their professors. And

it for a student with an instructor who isn’t engaged? Our

finally, they will leave with a degree that serves them in the

faculty must remain engaged, energetic and excited to be

future. If those benefits outweigh the financial and time

here. It’s my responsibility to make sure that happens.”

burden of attending KU, we will succeed.” Being stuck on campus without venturing into the busiProviding security, esteem and justice to students are all

ness world may not be the best way to teach business,

nice points, but Bendapudi points to a more tangible mea-

Bendapudi argues. She values “real world” experience for

suring stick.

faculty. After all, if you haven’t done it, how can you teach it, she asks.

“Job placement,” she says definitively. “The market speaks; there’s no way around it. If our graduates find quality, challenging work in the their fields, then we have succeeded as a business school. I recently met with the parent of an in-

40


Bendapudi has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Customer Officer of Huntington National Bank and has con-

“I haven’t had a bad trip yet,” Bendapudi says. “Our alumni

sulted for dozens of the world’s largest companies, including

are so proud of their involvement with the school and very

Cessna and Proctor & Gamble. Bendapudi is a Leadership

excited about the future. Once a Jayhawk, always a Jayhawk.”

Foundation Fellow of the International Women’s Forum, one of 27 women selected worldwide.

When she refers to alumni of the school being among the most accomplished and distinguished people in the business

Bendapudi says faculty must feel satisfied and appreciated

world,” she says it with a sincere smile. She’s been on the job

in their positions, but remain challenged. “Being happy and

a short while, but it is apparent Bendapudi feels a sense of

comfortable is okay,” Bendapudi says. “But being complacent

ownership and responsibility for the Business School.

is not. We must always be ready for a challenge.” “My father, my sisters, my husband and I all have degrees Business involves the transfer of currency from one party

from KU,” Bendadupi says with pride. “I know how fortunate

to another. Having alumni of the School of Business send

I am to be in this position, and I plan to make the most of it.”

in their currency is not a concept missed by Bendapudi. She took over the reins in August and hit the ground running. Much of the past four months has been spent traveling the country glad-handing alumni and school donors. If the Business School remains a good investment, Bendapudi is convinced, donors will continue to be generous with their currency.

“ONCE A JAYHAWK,

ALWAYS A JAYHAWK.”

41


BLUE COLLAR PRESS

Jim David, Burton Parker & Sean Ingram photos by Casey Wright

Sean Ingram’s understated office at Blue Collar Press & Distro is quiet and clean. As he sits at his desk sending an email, the bottom of an arm-length tattoo shows under his shirt cuff. Clean cut with black glasses, the tattoo is the only hint of his “other” job: lead vocalist for the influential hardcore band Coalesce.

42


Through sweat equity, reinvesting profits and

seemed like the perfect atmosphere in which to produce t-

sticking to a punk rock Do-It-Yourself ethos,

shirts for bands. According to Ingram, it was, almost, per-

Ingram has grown a small start-up t-shirt shop

fect.

into an internationally recognized promotional merchandise business.

“I don’t give a damn what anybody says,” Ingram says with a defiant smile. “That damn place is haunted. I’m man

Years ago, Ingram’s band, and every other band he knew,

enough to admit I was scared more than once by the hap-

had the same problem with merchandise. Either they

penings. But, being scared is great motivation for getting

couldn’t get what the wanted when they needed it, or the

your work done. I sure as hell didn’t waste any time. I got in.

quality was so poor they felt they couldn’t sell it to their

I got my work done and I got the hell out of there.”

fans. “Unfortunately, because of the industry we are in, there isn’t always a lot of accountability,” Ingram confesses.

The first orders filled were simple. He started by printing

“Not a lot of guys in punk rock want to keep a 9 to 5 job

shirts for his band. Then friends in a band asked for some

taking care of inventory, invoices and quality control. I had

t-shirts. The orders were small, manageable and produced

already been doing that with the wallpaper job.”

very limited, if any, profits.

Ingram was helping his mom run her wallpaper stripping business in Kansas City. It wasn’t glamorous, but the pay was good and Ingram soaked in business lessons. He knew, however, stripping wallpaper wasn’t going to be his career. In the late 1990’s iMacs had just been released and Ingram was teaching himself graphic design. One night while online, Ingram found a screen press for sale on Ebay. He bought the press for $200 and, with the help of his dad, drove to Denver, picked up the press and headed back to Kansas. He made a few calls to friends and found a spot to plant his press: the basement of Black Lodge Recording Studio on Main Street in Eudora.

Ingram lived the DIY and entrepreneurial lifestyle. He continued to work the wallpaper job during the day and would

In many circles, Black Lodge Recording Studio is a legend-

crank out t-shirts orders at night. Time not working the two

ary place. The list of bands and artists that have recorded at

businesses was spent working with his band.

the facility reads as a who’s who of local music lore. The Get Up Kids (who’s founding members owned the building),

“I didn’t sleep much those first few years,” Ingram says.

the Appleseed Cast and the Ultimate Fakebook have all re-

“Days were spent with wallpaper. I’d clock out, hop in my

corded in the 150 year-old building. Kurt Cobain recorded

car and head over to Eudora. I’d print and fill orders at night

with William S. Burroughs at Black Lodge in the ‘90s. It

until the job was done. The next day I’d do it all over again.

43


It was, really, a pretty simple existence. I knew what I had to do and I got it done.” Ingram’s reputation with the press screen spread like a Kansas grass fire on a windy day. His work ethic, combined with the respect other musicians had for his band, created an easy marketing campaign. Bands from across the country started calling in orders. “I don’t think I’ve ever made a cold call in my life,” Ingram says with a hint of relief. “Since the beginning, all business has come from word-of-mouth and references. To this day we don’t have a sales staff or a single salesperson. I learned very early that if you do what you say you will do, and deliver a quality product when the client wants it, they will tell their friends.” And they did tell their friends. It didn’t take long for the business to grow. With the growth, Ingram had to quit working with his mom. “It was time,” he says with a nod. “I was more than tired peeling wallpaper, and the hours and gas were getting to be too much.” Jim David had done contract work with Ingram for a few years and was well versed with both the t-shirt and music industries. David had been touring with his band The Anniversary and, with a partner, operating a boutique t-shirt line called Breakdance America. The music was good, but David was growing tired of partnering in a business he didn’t have daily, hands-on control. “I sold my shares of Breakdance America,” he says. “Right around that time, one of Sean’s silent partners wanted out. Sean and I had been talking about me coming on board with Blue Collar for awhile, but I wasn’t really interested unless there was an option for ownership. Having one of his partners step down opened the door for me.”

44


Burton Parker moved to Lawrence with his band in 2001

The platform Parker built is the base for Blue Collar’s on-

and also started doing contract work for Blue Collar. A

line stores. Almost 150 different bands have set up ‘stores’

Wichita-area native, Burton had taught himself graphic de-

through Blue Collar that feature their merchandise. The in-

sign, Photoshop and some computer programming while

dividualized stores highlight t-shirts, posters, bags or even

working at a Kansas City Barnes and Noble. He help develop

books from the band or record label. The crew at Blue Col-

early forms and sites for Blue Collars’ online capabilities that

lar maintains inventory and processes orders, payments and

launched in December of 2002. Parker left the job in Kansas

shipping from the Lawrence shop. Bands are able to get real

City and signed on as partner in June of 2003.

time updates on what is selling and what isn’t. The staff at Blue Collar even model merchandise, when needed.

“It’s not sexy, but it makes money,” Parker jokes. “I set up the system that allows us to accept credit card payments online

As founder and president, Ingram is the face of the business.

and developed the first individual online stores for bands to

Humble and uncomfortable with adulation, he is quick to

sell their products directly to their fans. Most of what I do

spread credit to David, Parker and the staff of Blue Collar.

now is based off that platform.”

“In the aspect of worrying if things are going to get done, this is a low-stress business. Jim and Burton get the job done

Soon Blue Collar found themselves with 5 employees, mul-

and they make sure their departments get the job done.”

tiple presses and occupying a 4,000 square foot warehouse in Eudora. The business was printing merchandise for several well-known national acts and for independent record labels such as Hydra Head, Doghouse and Vagrant. In addition, they were managing their ever-expanding online capabilities. In 2005 the business moved to a warehouse in East Law-

“I F YO U DO WHAT YOU SAY YO U WI LL DO, AND DELIVER A Q UALI T Y PRO DU CT WH EN T HE C LI ENT WANTS I T, TH EY WI LL T ELL T HEI R F RIEN DS.”

rence. Recently the shop relocated to its current location on Delaware Street.

Ingram deals a lot with billing, individual accounts, record labels and Fixcraft (Blue Collar’s newest revenue stream:

As business has grown, so have services. What was once a

manufacturing bike polo equipment). Parker handles on-

guy in a basement with a screen press is now a team of inno-

line stores and e-commerce ventures while David manages

vative entrepreneurs grabbing a big piece of the independent

production and, according to both Ingram and Parker, “does

music merchandise pie. Blue Collar Press has grown to Blue

everything else.” Though roles are roughly defined, roles and

Collar Press & Distro. The company prints shirts, of course,

responsibilities are often blurred. “We do the job that needs

but makes a lot of their hay through distribution models and

to be done,” David says.

a thriving online services department.

45


BLUE CO L L AR M E R CHA NDISE

“Working with Blue Collar will increase our merchandise profit by 75 percent,” beams Portia Sabin, president of Kill Rock Stars Records. “By not having to maintain

The Rakes: 4 Pin Set

an offsite warehouse, and worry about staffing and insuring the site, we eliminate so much expense, our profits will undoubtedly increase. Throw in the fact that Blue Collar prints most of the inventory on site, and it is a no brainer for us.”

Motion City Soundtrack: Lion T-Shirt

Sabin says Kill Rock Stars had been looking for an outside agency to handle their merchandise. She was asking others in the industry, and nearly everyone she spoke to recommended Blue Collar.

The New Amsterdams: Vacation T-Shirt

The Cardigans: Swan Tote Bag

Website for Kill Rock Stars.

The Submarines: Tiger Poster

Landing the Kill Rock Stars account was a major win and undertaking for Blue Collar. Their warehouse now features rows of empty shelves in anticipation of KRS merchandise. The label is one of the most respected independent labels in the industry, and earning their business is a badge of honor for Blue Collar. “I think they are working on a monopoly,” Sabin jokes. “Everyone I talked to said

The Get Up Kids: Script Logo Tour T-Shirt

‘Talk to the guys at Blue Collar.’ So, I did. After our initial conversation, it was clear we would be able to work together. We’ve been around for 20 years, so we come with a lot of product. Blue Collar is working with us to set up great online stores for our bands and our label. They’ve already had really great ideas on the most cost-effective way to transfer our pre-existing inventory to their warehouse in Lawrence. And they are nice guys. That goes a long way in this industry. I am really so excited to be work-

Josh Ritter: Idaho Wave T-Shirt

ing with them.” The fact that almost everyone at Blue Collar is, or was, in a band lends credibility. “I think it does help them understand what the artists are doing,” Sabin says. “Because they’ve been in the position, they’ve been on tour; they know that the bands aren’t al-

46


ways planning ahead with their merchandise orders. It’s great

Though known nationally for their work with musicians and

to get that call from them saying ‘hey, so and so band is low on

artists, Ingram wants people to know they are thrilled to work

a certain t-shirt, should we ship some to their next tour stop?’

with local businesses. “Yeah, we work with hardcore death

Their insight is great.”

metal bands,” he jokes. “But we also like making shirts, coffee mugs and promotional garb for Lawrence accountants.”

Nobody in the office wears a tie, or even dress pants. T-shirts, jeans and Vans is the understood dress code. Music plays and laughter abounds in the warehouse. It’s clear the people who work at Blue Collar do it because they want to. Almost everyone who works at Blue Collar is either a musician, or loves music, and helping independent bands and artists remains an important part of what they do. In fact, bands have been known to crash on the office floors after they play shows at local clubs. The crew at Blue Collar understands that a personal connection to each artist is important. The office most often deals

No longer a DIY project in a friend’s basement, Ingram is

with a band’s manager with some being more hands-on than

happy with the business, but sometimes longs for the past.

others. “It’s a crap shoot,” Ingram says. “Some managers call 3

Gone are the days of him and the press, pumping out orders

or 4 times a week to check inventory and billing. Other bands

for his friends. Blue Collar Press and Distro has 19 full-time

we won’t hear from for weeks or months at a time.”

employees and one part-timer. Ingram never imagined running a business this large. He’s not complaining, but it took

Darius Zelkha of Tough Love Artist Management thinks of

some getting used to.

Blue Collar Press as part of his team. Zelkha manages Josh Ritter, a rising singer-songwriter and author.

“At some point, you have to become comfortable with feeding the beast,” he says with a very matter-of-fact tone. “We need

“Josh and I are both pretty particular when it comes to the

to find revenue streams and new products that help our busi-

merchandise we offer fans,” Zelkha says. “It’s important to us

ness grow. Sure, sometimes I think it would be fun to go back

to have a personal relationship with our vendors, and work-

to just making a few dozen shirts for my friends’ bands, but

ing with Blue Collar has been effortless. Their rates are good.

we have employees that depend on us to provide health insur-

They do what they say they will do. They return calls with

ance and mortgage payments. If we close up shop tomorrow,

answers. What we really like is how proactive they are. I get

what are they going to do? How am I going to feed my family?

calls from Burton with suggestions on products and orders

I do it by making t-shirts for some of my favorite bands. I have

and distribution ideas. They really take what works for other

the coolest job.”

artists and help us mold it for our model.”

47


DEVE LO PIN G S U C C E S S B I OSC IENCE A ND TECHNOLOGY BUS INESS CENTER

In new business ventures, expectations can be a tricky thing. Aim too high and flirt with the hassle and embarrassment of missed expectations. Shoot too low and risk appearing too cautious or insecure in your product. Lucky are those that aim high and end higher.

The Bioscience & Technology Business Center at the University of Kansas opened its doors in August of 2010 with a plan to reach 33% occupancy by 2012. With recent lease signings in the books, the BTBC will end 2011 with nearly 85% occupancy, years ahead of schedule

That’s meeting expectations.

48


The Bioscience & Technology Business Center at the Univer-

had suitable lab space and I wouldn’t have a good answer. We

sity of Kansas (BTBC) consists of three multi-tenant facili-

knew we needed that space.”

ties that provide modern wet and dry lab space in which to conduct business, access to world-class research, access to

The LRTC and the Lawrence Douglas County Biosciences

capital through various sources and business development

Authority (LDCBA) began work on a strategic plan that

services. The group serves life science and technology-based

would provide infrastructure and business planning support

companies.

to both local start-up companies and national companies looking to relocate.

The BTBC’s main facility is located on KU’s west campus. The modern, 21,400 square foot structure is set amongst lush landscape. Walls of windows and a second floor overhang stand out against a backdrop of green vegetation. The building looks, and feels, contemporary with clean lines, abundant glass and sleek furniture.

The building, and the companies it houses, is the product of a well-executed business plan. In 2005 the Lawrence Regional Technology Center (LRTC) decided it needed a building.

McClorey said the group focused on three critical business

The group had been recruiting businesses to locate in Law-

areas: infrastructure, capital and talent. If they could provide

rence, and convincing venture capital firms that investing

all three, they would attract great companies. “We knew if we

in Lawrence start-ups was a good idea. According to Matt

could offer those three things in Lawrence, on the University

McClorey, Director of the BTBC and President and CEO of

of Kansas campus, we would keep our technology start-ups

the LRTC, their efforts were successful, but not nearly to the

here and attract growing companies to town. In the BTBC

degree they wanted. McClorey and company had raised $180

we provide wet and dry labs facilities for infrastructure, ac-

million in venture capital for area companies but felt they

cess to potential capital investment, and the talent at KU is

kept leaving money on the table.

second to none.”

“We could help in so many ways,” McClorey says. “But far

Funding the $7.5 million BTBC construction was, in effect,

too often KU scientist would want to take their research and

a community effort. The LDCBA committed $500,000. Law-

develop it into a marketable product. They would ask if we

rence City Commission and Douglas County Commission


both committed $75,000 per year for 10 years. The university and KU Endowment each invested in the project and

Argenta, a global provider of drug development services

the Kansas Bioscience Authority provided $3.25 million for

and contract product manufacturing for the animal health

the effort.

industry, has announced it will locate a new lab facility at the BTBC. Argenta will bring 27 new jobs and $500,000 in

Finding business to locate to the BTBC has been an easy sell,

laboratory equipment to the facility.

McClorey says. “We are offering world-class facilities and a pipeline to world-class talent.”

Assurant Employee Benefits, a division of insurance leader Assurant, will lease space at the BTBC Main Facility spe-

“When we started the project, we knew there was some de-

cifically to establish a year-round internship program with

mand,” says E. LaVerne Epp, President & Chairman of the

the KU School of Engineering. The company is the seventh

Board for LDCBA. “We took a very strict business approach

to lease space in the BTBC Main Facility since it opened in

to the plan and carefully wrote our business plan. We built

summer 2010 and the 12th in the three-building BTBC sys-

the facility based on what our research said the market

tem at KU. Other Main Facility tenants include 360 Energy

wanted.”

Engineers, an engineering and energy management firm;

Growing

Local

The Merc purchas

es ove

$1 Million annuallyr lo

SMALL PR NG O TI

L

OC

Your Community

CERS DU

Ci ty, Ka ns as

SUPPO R

p ro d u c e rs li ke thcal Vesecky Family Fa e rms ne ar Ba ld w in

AL & O-OP C

S

from small scale,

Market & Deli

901 Iowa · Lawrence, KS · 785 843 8544 · www.TheMerc.coop


Garmin, a global leader in navigation and communication

innovate together and grow successful businesses.”

devices; BrightEHR, an electronic health records company;

Business development services for BTBC tenants are provid-

Sunlite Science and Technology, a producer of specialty LED

ed by the LRTC. From corporate formation to exit strategy,

products; and Propylon, a producer of software systems for

the BTBC helps developing businesses grow into sustainable

state legislatures.

companies. LRTC staff can assist with nearly every aspect of starting a business from writing a business plan to locating

“We considered other Midwestern schools,” Tim Bachta, ap-

capital investment and operational management.

plication development director for Assurant Employee Benefits, says. “However, the University of Kansas was the obvious

“I hate to use a bad sports analogy,” McClorey jokes. “But it is

choice because of the experiences we’ve had with KU interns

like the minor leagues. We help the businesses develop into

and graduates in the past. KU engineering students are so

solid companies.”

well rounded. And once we chose Lawrence, the BTBC Main Facility was easily the best location, thanks to its new space, its business support services and its location on the KU bus route. This is an ideal setup.”

The BTBC main facility serves as a temporary location for tenants. Start-ups or small, growing companies are able to use the building and all amenities on a 3-5 year lease. When the lease is up, the business is expected to have outgrown the facilities. The goal, McClorey says, is to have the businesses

The overwhelming success of the BTBC’s main facility has

stay in Lawrence.

kick-started work on phase II. Plans are made for a second 20,000-30,000 square foot building to be attached to the

“We may have under built,” Epp jokes. “The truth is Matt and

current facility. Phase II will feature wet and dry labs, office

his team have done a phenomenal job marketing the build-

space and meeting rooms.

ing and available services. They are executing a nearly flawless business plan.”

Though funding isn’t set, the success of Phase I certainly doesn’t hurt expectations. “I think everyone involved, espe-

McClorey stresses that the BTBC is much more than an emp-

cially investors, is very pleasantly surprised with just how

ty room that a business can fill with employees. “The goal of

successful the first building has been,” McClorey says with

the BTBC is to be more than a facility,” he says. “We want the

a smile. “We are all very happy with the first 18 months and

BTBC to become the hub of entrepreneurial activity for the

excited for the future.”

region. It can be a place where entrepreneurs can share ideas,

51


GY RASOL T ECHNOLOG IES

of a treatment outside the body – before subjecting patients to

H I TS T HE GRO UND RU N NI NG AT BTBC MAI N FACI LI TY

1980, cited the BTBC’s facilities, its access to KU resources,

since

only

been

Gyrasol

Burgess, who earned her PhD in pharmacology from KU in and the financial support network provided by the BTBC and its partners in the decision to move to Lawrence. She said Gyrasol considered other locations, including San Diego, but decided Kansas is “at the exciting end of the growth curve.”

by Joe Monaco

It’s

costly and potentially harmful treatments.

10

weeks

Technologies

announced it would relocate from New Mexico to the BTBC, but the company’s founders say they’re already realizing the benefits of their new location. “I honestly thought we’d have more downtime in the weeks after the move,” says Susan Burgess, Gyrasol co-founder, president and CEO. “But our office and lab space was in great shape when we arrived, and we were able to get up and run-

“The BTBC at KU – and more broadly, the state of Kansas – is on the front end of some big things in biotechnology and entrepreneurship,” says Burgess, who has founded or cofounded four bioscience companies. “We were looking for a strong intellectual environment and a strong financial support system, and we found both in Kansas.” In May, Burgess and Rininsland visited with Matthew McClorey, executive director of the BTBC, and LaVerne Epp, president of the Lawrence Douglas County Bioscience Authority (LDCBA), as well as Julie Goonewardene, associate vice chancellor for innovation and entrepreneurship at KU, and

ning very quickly.”

key academic collaborators. Burgess and Rininsland quickly

A great start, indeed. Since coming to Lawrence, the early

that would support Gyrasol’s growth plans. With funding

stage molecular diagnostics company has seen a spike in demand for its drug assay kits, which are now being shipped from the BTBC to customers nationwide. Gyrasol has hired two scientists – both of them KU grads – and plans to add as many as 12 new positions in the next two years. “We couldn’t have asked for a better first few months,” co-founder and chief science officer Frauke Rininsland says.

became convinced that Lawrence provided the environment assistance from the LDCBA and Douglas County Development Inc. and support from the Lawrence Regional Technology Center, they soon began the process of moving operations from Santa Fe to Lawrence. “We’re driven to make a difference in human health care, to benefit our investors, to do cool science and to provide jobs for talented young workers,” Burgess says. “We’re delighted

“The BTBC, the university and the town have been wonderful.”

to find all the elements in place here to achieve success,

Gyrasol has invented and patented a sensing system that

thankful to Matt McClorey and LaVerne Epp, who have done

detects how a cell’s signaling network is changed in cancer. With this information, doctors can select those drugs that interact with the faulty signaling targets and test the efficiency

and we’re grateful to be part of the BTBC. We’re especially so much to ensure alignment and convert good intentions into real actions.”


Take Control of

Your Finances with

See What Your Money is Doing. View SPENDING.

Create BUDGETS.

Get EMAIL ALE ALERTS.

Investing in our Community, One Customer at a time.

Get FinanceWorks™ FREE at DouglasCountyBank.com


by Daisy Wakefield

If you happened to be in Lawrence from 1974-1993, you might have heard Big Blue Bob Neu’s voice announcing Jayhawk basketball and football games on radio stations KLWN and KLZR. It was a great gig and he misses it to this day. But sacrifices are made when starting up a family business, so when Bob joined his wife Lydia in 1993 to run Neu Physical Therapy Center, he put his whole lot in. He took his business and marketing experience and marshaled them into the development and operations of the business that is now in its 23rd year.

Bob and Lydia Neu came to Lawrence in 1968 and 1973,

And work she does. The clinic is open each weekday from 5

respectively, to study at the University of Kansas. They fell

am to 7 pm, and 8 to noon on Saturdays. Two satellite clin-

in love with each other and with Lawrence, and stayed here.

ics, in Baldwin City and Tonganoxie, also demand her time.

Lydia, who majored in physical therapy, started a private

“We wanted to be able to accommodate people’s needs, with-

clinic out of their home. In 1996, they moved into their own

out them having to take time off from work to do rehab. So

constructed space at 1305 Wakarusa Drive. Bob took over

we’ve always opened early and closed late.”

the business aspects of the operation: accounting, insurance, HR, general administration.

Among its 25 employees, Neu Physical Therapy staffs physical and occupational therapists, a certified hand therapist,

With an exercise gym, six treatment rooms, and shower/

a craniosacral therapist, a chiropractor, and a myofacial

dressing room space, the therapy clinic uses both traditional

release therapist. Specialists in pediatrics, urinary inconti-

equipment as well as new state-of-the-art technology. But

nence, postural restoration, lymphedema, weight loss, ath-

the shining jewel in the clinic is the heated 20x40 foot pool

letic training, and massage are also available.

where individual and group therapy classes are held. “We use a holistic approach to treatment,” says Lydia, “Our “When I worked for Visiting Nurses,” remembers Lydia, “I

job is to help our clients meet their goals, whether it is to

would rent a pool at the Holidome and volunteer my time

walk again, to continue to work, to manage back pain, or

for group water therapy. It was always packed, and I knew

whatever else their goal is.”

that someday I would have my own pool to work in.”

54


To that end, sessions at Neu Physical Therapy can run for

business during meals and get togethers. We can’t shut it

one or two hours or more. Clients range from infants to the

down, even when we’re not working.”

elderly, and Lydia says that people with every diagnosis of illness or pain has walked through their doors, from lower

Neu Physical Therapy engages with the larger community

back pain to TMJ.

through sponsorships for disability support groups, fundraising events, and at the two high schools. They are also

Bob and Lydia’s son, Bob Jr., joined the operation three

veterans with an 11 year history of participation in Cotton-

years ago after finishing his chiropractor’s training — at the

wood’s employment program.

top of his class, his proud mother interjects. Bob is certified in acupuncture, which he uses in his practice. Another

As another defining mark of their commitment to health

son, Jacob, also lives in Lawrence and helps with marketing.

and community, Neu Physical Therapy only charges clients

Daughter Angie is currently in Kansas City getting an os-

what their out-of-pocket payment would be with an in-net-

teopathic degree, and may join the fun after her graduation.

work therapy provider, even if Neu Physical Therapy does not happen to be in network for their insurance.

“We are blessed to have our family close, and especially with our first grandbaby on the way!” exults Lydia.

“We never want people to have to choose where to get their

And is there a downside to being in business with family?

rehabilitation or care based on cost,” says Lydia, “After all,

“Only that it never leaves us,” answers Bob Jr., “We talk

these people are trying to get well!”

55


W H I CH

RET IRE ME NT PLAN Joe Paul, Financial Advisor Wells Fargo Advisors

I S R IG HT FO R YOU R BUS I NESS?

If you own a small business, there are many retirement plan alternatives available to help you and your eligible employees with retirement planning. For most closely-held business owners, a Simplified Employee Pension Individual Retirement Account (SEP IRA) was once the most cost-effective choice. Then the Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees (SIMPLE IRA) became a viable alternative. Today you may find that a defined-benefit or 401(k) plan best suits your needs. To make an informed decision on which plan is right for your business, review the differences carefully before you choose. SIMPLIFIED EMPLOYEE PENSION INDIVIDUAL RETIREMENT ACCOUNT (SEP IRA) This plan is flexible, easy to set up and has low administrative costs. An employer signs a plan adoption agreement and IRAs are set up for each eligible employee. When choosing this plan, keep in mind that although it does not allow employees to save through payroll deductions, contributions are immediately 100% vested.

The maximum an employer can contribute each year is 25% of an employee’s eligible compensation, up to a maximum of $245,000 for 2011. However, the contribution for any individual cannot exceed $49,000. Employer contributions are typically discretionary and may vary from year to year. With this plan, the same formula must be used to calculate the contribution amount for all eligible employees, including any owners. Eligible employees include those who are age 21 and older and those employed (both part time and full time) for three of the last five years.

56

FINANCIAL PLANNING FIN A N C IAL

SAVINGS INCENTIVE MATCH PLAN FOR EMPLOYEES (SIMPLE) If you want a plan that encourages employees to save for retirement, a SIMPLE IRA might be appropriate for you. In order to select this plan, you must have 100 or fewer eligible employees who earned $5,000 or more in compensation in the preceding year and have no other employer-sponsored retirement plans to which contributions were made or accrued during that calendar year. There are no annual IRS fillings or complex paperwork, and employer contributions are tax deductible for your business. The plan encourages employees to save for retirement through payroll deductions; contributions are immediately 100% vested. The maximum salary deferral limit to a SIMPLE IRA plan for 2011 cannot exceed $11,500. If an employee is age 50 or older before December 31, then an additional catch-up contribution of $2,500 is permitted. Each year the employer must decide to do either a matching contribution (the lesser of the employee’s salary deferral or 3% of the employee’s compensation) or non-matching contribution of 2% of an employee’s compensation (limited to $245,000 for 2011). All participants in the plan must be notified of the employer’s decision. DEFINED-BENEFIT PENSION PLAN This type of plan helps build savings quickly. It generally produces a much larger tax-deductible contribution for your business than a defined-contribution plan; however, annual employer contributions are mandatory since each participant is promised a monthly benefit at retirement age. Since this plan is more complex to administer, the services of an enrolled actuary are required. All plan assets must be held in a pool, and your employees cannot direct their investments.


Certain factors affect an employer’s contribution for a plan, such as current value of the plan assets, the ages of employees, date of hire and compensation. A participating employee with a large projected benefit and only a few years until normal retirement age generates a large contribution because there is little time to accumulate the necessary value. The maximum annual benefit at retirement is the lesser of 100% of the employee’s compensation or $195,000 per year for 2011 (indexed for inflation). 401(K) PLANS This plan may be right for your company if you want to motivate your employees to save towards retirement and give them a way to share in the firm’s profitability. 401(k) plans are best suited for companies seeking flexible contribution methods.

When choosing this plan type, keep in mind that the employee and employer have the ability to make contributions. The maximum salary deferral limit for a 401(k) plan for 2011 is $16,500. If an employee is age 50 or older before December 31st, then an additional catch-up contribution of $5,500 is permitted. The maximum amount you, as the employer, can contribute is 25% of the eligible employee’s total compensation (capped at $245,000 for 2011). Individual allocations for each employee cannot exceed the lesser of 100% of compensation or $49,000. The allocation of employer profitsharing contributions can be skewed to favor older employees, if using age-weighted and new comparability features. Generally, IRS Forms 5500 and 5500-EZ (along with applicable schedules) must be filed each year. Once you have reviewed your business’s goals and objectives, you should check with your Financial Advisor to evaluate the best retirement plan option for your financial situation.

This article was written by Wells Fargo Advisors and provided courtesy of Joe Paul, Financial Advisor in Lawrence at (785) 842-7680. Wells Fargo Advisors does not provide legal or tax advice. Be sure to consult with your tax and legal advisors before taking any action that could have tax consequences. Investments in securities and insurance products are: NOT FDIC-INSURED/NOT BANK-GUARANTEED/MAY LOSE VALUE

Lawrence Christmas Parade.org

2011

11 AM Saturday, December 3rd Downtown Lawrence, Kansas

Thank You:


COMPU TER

VI RUSE S A N D W H AT TO D O A BO U T T H E M Viruses. Spyware. Malware. Scareware. Worms. Chances are you or someone you know has been affected by one of these little buggers at some point. If not, count yourself among the lucky. Almost all users will be hit more than once in their computing lifetimes.

by Lance Keltner UNI Computers

Viruses have progressed from little annoyances that only displayed unwanted messages on your monitor to fullblown, data destroyers and credit card stealers. It has changed from a game of “I did it because I could” to “I did it to make money.” Viruses used to be only the domain for PCs. Macs and other Apple products seemed to be completely immune. This is no longer the case, and while the vast majority of viruses are still written for PCs, Macfriendly viruses are on the rise. Needless to say, computer viruses are serious business.


H OW TO STAY SAF E

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU GET HIT

1. DON’T. TRUST. ANYTHING.

1. RUN A FULL VIRUS SCAN

More than 95% of all email sent today is spam email. That’s

Run a full virus scan if you think you’ve been hit. Most an-

not a typo: 95%. This means most of the messages you re-

tivirus software supports doing periodic scheduled scans. If

ceive do NOT have your best interest in mind. Messages that say ‘Go here and check this out!’ or ‘You have 23895 viruses,

yours is not already setup, get it done.

Ebay messages that say ‘We need your account information

2. SHUT DOWN AND VISIT YOUR PREFERRED REPAIR SHOP OR EXPERT FOR REMOVAL

so that we can verify blah blah blah.’ It’s almost all fake. If you

Unfortunately, sometimes a full virus scan doesn’t clean a

click here to remove!’ New favorites of mine are Paypal and

receive a message like this and think it may be real, open up a web browser, go to the actual site (e.g. www.paypal.com) and log in. If they have something that needs verifying, they will let you know right there. This is doubly true for anything concerning your bank account or credit card.

machine all the way and more drastic measures are needed. This is when you contact your trusted computer repair shop and have them do an in-depth cleaning. Once in a while, a full clean can’t be achieved and a full format will be required. Make sure you have prior backups (i.e. Dave Greenbaum’s

2. KEEP UP-TO-DATE ANTIVIRUS SOFTWARE

article in the last issue).

You’d think by now it would be obvious, but we run into

3. CHANGE PASSWORDS TO WEBSITES/ BANK ACCOUNTS

people all of the time that have let their protection expire, or don’t have any at all! There are many options to stay protected. Subscriptions to updates usually last one year, and can be

You’re doing this on a regular basis anyway, right? Even if you are (and most aren’t), if you have any reason to suspect

easily renewed via credit card. Be careful to only use name

you’ve been hit with something, change all of your important

brand products. If you can’t find it on the shelf of your favor-

passwords. This includes banks, credit cards, mortgage ac-

ite software place, double check before you install. There are

counts, facebook, twitter, email, you name it. Also, don’t use

5 fake antivirus programs for each legitimate one.

the same, or similar, passwords for multiple accounts. Once

3. THE MAGIC OF ALT+F4 A little-known way to get rid of those annoying pop-ups is Alt+F4. Hold the Alt key while you tap the F4 key, and then

a virus obtains one, it will try various permutations of that password on major sites. If it gets lucky, you’re going to lose more.

letting go of both. This is the universal close command in any version of Windows (on Mac it’s command + Q). Pop-

Keeping your computer files safe from viruses must be ad-

ups have gotten quite a bit smarter recently. They have re-

dressed daily. Never let your guard down and you can keep

mapped that red ‘X’ button at the upper right to be an ‘OK’

your computer up and running.

button instead of the standard ‘Exit’ button. Sneaky. Lucky for you, they can’t re-map Alt + F4. Keep in mind that if you have a laptop, sometimes you have to activate the F4 (or any F-key) by holding an additional ‘Fn’ button.

TECHNOLO GY

59 59


201 1 ECOD EV YE A R IN REV IEW The economic landscape of Lawrence has changed significantly in the past year with the addition of several new companies, growth of local businesses and revitalization of an abandoned property. The Lawrence-Douglas County Economic Development partnership brings together the efforts of the city, county and Chamber of Commerce to attract new investment and help existing businesses grow in Lawrence and Douglas County. “2011 has been a good year for business development,” Beth Johnson, Vice President of Economic Development for the Chamber of Commerce says. “Working with the LawrenceDouglas County Bioscience Authority and Lawrence Regional Technology Center, we have been successful in bringing new businesses that will benefit our community now and in the future.” The Bioscience Technology and Business Center on the KU campus continues to be effective in attracting capital investment to Lawrence. Two companies have joined the rapidly growing bioscience community located in the BTBC bringing its occupancy rate to 75 percent in its first year of operation. The most recent additions to the BTBC are Argenta, a global company providing drug development services and product manufacturing for the animal health industry, and Gyrasol Technologies, a molecular diagnostics and drug testing company that is relocating from Santa Fe, New Mexico. Argenta and Gyrasol join four other companies leasing space in the BTBC main facility.

60

Existing businesses also are choosing Lawrence and Douglas County when it’s time for growth. McFarlane Aviation of Baldwin City is building a 24,000 square foot warehouse and production plant at its Vinland Airport location to support its growing business needs. Berry Plastics is investing almost $20 million in building a 600,000 square foot warehouse just off Farmer’s Turnpike in Douglas County. The expansion would create 11 new jobs. The East Hills Business Park is enjoying a surge in occupancy with the arrival last year of Plastikon in the old Serologicals facility. Plastikon has leased an additional 10,000 square feet of warehouse space in the Franklin Business Center. In October, Grandstand Sportswear and Glassware finalized a deal to move into the former Sauer-Danfoss facility in the East Hills Business Park. Grandstand is expected to invest more than $5 million with this expansion and create approximately 40 jobs in the next five years. CAL Testing, located on Clinton Parkway, has expanded its operations into an adjacent building to provide additional space for new and existing staff in support of growing demand for its services. The City of Lawrence continues its work to revitalize the former Farmland Industries property on K-10 Highway just east of the city. With the old structures demolished and environmental clean-up underway, the property will provide space, rail service and proximity to utilities and infrastructure for future industrial and business park tenants. “Attracting new business investment allows us to provide employment opportunities for our residents and an increased tax base to fund needed city services,” Johnson says. “We are constantly striving to showcase the capabilities that exist in our area.” A new partnership between Lawrence, Topeka and Manhattan will market the capabilities within that nine county region in an effort to bring new companies to the area. The Kansas Research Nexus partnership will highlight the three major universities found in the region and their groundbreaking research in animal health, drug development, food safety and research in cancer treatments.


Doesn’t it just make sense to keep your school photography local?

SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPHY

Your LOCAL source for QUALITYschool photography with OPTIONS. Creative Road Studio Lawrence Kansas www.CreativeRoadStudio.com


N E WS M A K E RS

P EOP L E O N THE MOV E.

ORTHOKANSAS, PA WELCOMES ORTHOPAEDIC SPINE SURGEON TO PRACTICE OrthoKansas, PA proudly announces the addition of Dr. Ryan M. Stuckey Fellowship-trained Orthopaedic Spine Surgeon to their staff. Dr. Stuckey specializes in both non-surgical and surgical treatment of spine disorders, including minimally invasive spine surgery, spine trauma and fractures, spinal tumors, osteoporosis, sports injuries, degenerative spine disease, lumbar and cervical disc herniations, lumbar and cervical stenosis, and myelopathy. DPI HIRES ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Brenda joins DPI as an Account Executive and is bringing over ten years with Multifunctional Copiers/ Printers and other office equipment to DPI. Brenda recently received training in Kyocera’s new line of Multifunctional Printers and is ready to help local business owners manage all of their office document needs. Brenda has lived in Lawrence since 1985 and has more than 20 years of sales and customer service. EMPRISE BANK ANNOUNCES ADDITIONS TO COMMERCIAL BANKING TEAM Emprise Bank is pleased to announce that Grant Ryan and Rhonda Scott have joined the bank’s commercial banking team as Commercial Banker and Commercial Banking Specialist, respectively.

62

“Grant and Rhonda bring an outstanding commitment to their customers and the community, and we’re thrilled to have them as part of the Emprise team. This is a good day for Emprise and, more importantly, for our customers,” says Cindy Yulich, Emprise Bank president. Ryan is a graduate of Kansas State University with a B.S. in Business Administration. He has been in the financial services industry for 15 years, most recently at The University National Bank in Lawrence where he served as Chief Lending Officer. Scott has been in the financial services industry since 1975, with the past nine years spent at The University National Bank in Lawrence. Emprise Bank is headquartered in Wichita, andstretches across the state of Kansas. The Emprise system includes 42 locations in 24 communitie. EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS CELEBRATES ONE YEAR UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP SERVING LAWRENCE The Lawrence, Kansas Express Employment Professionals office celebrated it’s one year anniversary under new ownership on September 13, 2011. The Express office opened in May 2001 and has been providing businesses and job seekers with temporary and full time staffing solutions in a variety of fields including commercial, administrative, and technical. Since purchasing the franchise last September, owners Barry Kingery and Kate Turner have worked hard in marketing their business as locally owned and operated. “Every day Barry and I are talking to other local busi-


nesses about how to maintain our local job force. It is important we keep them working in our community, in turn we hope they will be a more active and productive citizens,� said Turner. The Lawrence office, located at 1000 Iowa accepts online applications at www.expresspros.com. Businesses seeking employees are welcome to call the office or email Kate Turner at kate.turner@expresspros.com.

PATRICK

BROWN,

FOUNDER:

ABRAM

BROWN FINANCIAL CONSULTANTS LLC, LAWRENCE. The firm works to provide clients with efficient and transparent financial solutions, with a focus on comprehensive wealth management strategies. Brown, a financial consultant, founded the firm after working as a senior advice consultant for American Century Investments, financial adviser for Smith Barney and financial adviser for Merrill Lynch, having worked with high net worth clients and large institutions in designing investment portfolios.

The Lawrence Business Magazine invites you to share news of new employees or promotions in 50 words or less. Please submit an electronic color photo no less than 300 ppi, JPGs or TIFs, saved on CD or emailed to: N ews M a ke rs @ L aw re n ce Bu s i n ess M a g a z i n e.co m .

Because of space and layout considerations, photos are not guaranteed to run. Send CD to: Lawrence Business Magazine,

1617 St. Andrews Drive Lawrence, Kansas 66047

Brown is a graduate of Kansas University, where he played football (#47) and was team captain in 1998. He received a master’s in business administration from the University of Phoenix.

63


photos by Artem Bagiev

TASTE OF LAWRENCE

64


2011 LIVE IT LOCAL BUSINESS EXPO

65


HABITAT FOR HUMANITY WOMEN BUILD LUNCHEON

66


CHAMBER OF COMMERCE VALOR GOLF TOURNAMENT

67


NEW L AW R EN CE BU SI N ESSES R EGISTERED W IT H T H E SEC R E TA RY O F STAT E IN D O UG L AS CO U N T Y FO R S EPTEMBE R, O CTO B E R A N D N OV E M B E R 20 11

1300 WILLOW STUDIO LLC 1720 LOUISIANA STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044

D BUI SKY, LP 3107 COTTAGE LN LAWRENCE, KS 66049

GPW ENGINEERING, LLC 1001 NEW HAMPSHIRE STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044

JACKPOT, LLC 4209 TAMARISK COURT LAWRENCE, KS 66047

8 FLAVORS LLC 2210 IOWA ST LAWRENCE, KS 66046

EMILY PETERSON, LLC 3531 SWEETGRASS COURT LAWRENCE, KS 66049

GREENHOUSE LLC 1347 NEW HAMPSHIRE LAWRENCE, KS 66044

JAGTAT TRUCKING, LLC PO BOX 912 LAWRENCE, KS 66044

817 MASS, LLC 817 MASSACHUSETTS LAWRENCE, KS 66044

EUCO LLC 839 1/2 MASSACHUSETTS LAWRENCE, KS 66044

GYRASOL TECHNOLOGIES INC 2029 BECKER DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66047

JASON ROBINSON, INC. 1304 MORGAN ST. LAWRENCE, KS 66049

846 PENN LLC 618 WALNUT ST. LAWRENCE, KS 66044

EVERYTHING DOMESTIC SERVICES LLC 4501 WIMBLEDON DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66047

HECK LAND COMPANY, L.C. 805 NEW HAMPSHIRE STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044

KANSANS UNITED IN VOICE & SPIRIT, INC 719 MASSACHUSETTS STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044

AESTHETICARE OF LAWRENCE, LLC 116 RUNNING RIDGE RD. LAWRENCE, KS 66049 AMY TRETTEL LLC RR 618 LAWRENCE, KS 66044 ANR SAVINGS LLC 1720 LOUISIANA LAWRENCE, KS 66044 BAD COMPANY BONDS & RECOVERY, L.L.C. 1083 E. 1200 ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66047

FINANCIAL SERVICING, LLC 300 ROCK FENCE PLACE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 FINISH CARPENTRY SPECIALIST LLC 2328 MANCHESTER RD LAWRENCE, KS 66049 FLAT CREEK HOMES LLC PO BOX 128 LAWRENCE, KS 66044 FLIGHT TEST ENGINEERING SERVICES INC. 1568 N 2000 ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66044

BANDORBAR PRODUCTIONS LLC 25511 LINWOOD RD LAWRENCE, KS 66044

FOOTPRINTS, LLC 511 SAMANTHA AVENUE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

BAT CAVE, LC 935 N KANSAS AVE. LAWRENCE, KS 66608

FOURFIRE STUDIOS, LLC 3900 MONTEREY PLACE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

BAYSINGER FILMS LLC 1904 W 3RD TER LAWRENCE, KS 66044

GEEKBAUCHERY.COM LLC 3612 LAKECREST CT LAWRENCE, KS 66049

BHR CONSULTING, LLC. 4026 PARKWAY CIR LAWRENCE, KS 66047 CELESTIAL IRON ART, LLC 537 LOCUST STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044 CUSTOM FABRICATION, LLC 1017 N 1156 ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66044

68

GERMAN SCHOOL OF NORTHEAST KANSAS INC 1275 N 1108 ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66047 GHR, LLC 3520 W. 22ND ST #G1 LAWRENCE, KS 66047

HI FRIEND P.O. BOX 804 LAWRENCE, KS 66044 HOOP MAMAS LLC 2619 BELLE CREST DR LAWRENCE, KS 66046 HPH LLC 1135 BRYNWOOD CT. LAWRENCE, KS 66049 I TILE, LLC 508 SAMANTHA AVENUE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 IBA CONSULTING AND MARKETING, LLC 401 ELDRIDGE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 IRON MOUNTAIN PRODUCTS LLC 511 CANYON DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 ISLAY EXPLORATION, LLC 520 LOUISIANA ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044

KANSAS HOTEL CORPORATION 904 CONGRESSIONAL DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 LAWRENCE BLUE SANTA PROGRAM INC. 4820 15TH STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66049 LAWRENCE FAMILY THERAPY LLC 510 KASOLD DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 LAWRENCE PEDIATRICS, P.A. 5710 LONGLEAF DR. LAWRENCE, KS 66049 LH ENGINEERING, LLC 2402 LANCASTER DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 MAJESTIC CONSTRUCTION LLC 6344 CANDY LANE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

ITEMIZED RECORDS, LLC 409 N. OLIVIA AVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

MEDICAL REVENUE SPECIALISTS, LLC 2040 W. 31ST ST. LAWRENCE, KS 66046

IVPACKS LLC 1119 KANZA DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

MENDEZ, INC. 903 LAWRENCE AVENUE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

IXL MARTIAL ARTS, LLC 4505 FREEDOM CREEK LAWRENCE, KS 66049

MISSION SPEC LLC 1403 W 23RD ST LAWRENCE, KS 66047


MVP FARMS, L.L.C. 3712 QUAIL CREEK COURT LAWRENCE, KS 66047 NETSHELL, LLC 1301 W 24TH STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66046 NORRIS MEDIATION, L.L.C. 324 EDINBURGH RD LAWRENCE, KS 66049 ONLINE SALES CONSULTING LLC 1025 COLLEGE BLVD LAWRENCE, KS 66049 PAUL MEIER DIALECT SERVICES, L.C. 4316 WIMBLEDON DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66047 PERSONAL TOUCH LAWN CARE LLC 3524 YALE RD. LAWRENCE, KS 66044 PESCON LLC 2524 KENSINGTON LAWRENCE, KS 66046 PIX NINJA LLC 1720 LOUISIANA STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044 PLANET POLLARD PRODUCTIONS, LLC 730 NEW HAMPSHIRE LAWRENCE, KS 66044 R L C PROPERTY LLC 725 N 2ND STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044 R.P.M. ENTERPRISES, LLC 1009 E. 1296 RD LAWRENCE, KS 66047

RELATIONSHIP MATTERS, LLC P.O. BOX 804 LAWRENCE, KS 66044

THE SOCIETY OF CHRISTIAN SCHOLARS 2410 W 25 ST. LAWRENCE, KS 66047

SABR HOLDINGS INC 530 ELDRIDGE STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66049

THE STRIVE, LLC 409. N. OLIVIA AVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

UDL IMPLEMENTATION AND RESEARCH NETWORK, INC. 4407 GRETCHAN COURT LAWRENCE, KS 66047

SANDERS ELECTRIC, INC 814 W 28TH STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66046

TINY SHINY OBJECTS 2313 BRETT DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

VSAP CONSULTING INC 3514 CLINTON PARKWAY LAWRENCE, KS 66044

TLS INVESTMENTS, LLC 4301 NICKLAUS DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66047

SEEKEDGAR, LLC 1300 SUNNYSIDE AVENUE LAWRENCE, KS 66047 SHAFEEN RETAIL, LLC 2337 MURPHY #7 LAWRENCE, KS 66046 SIDE STAGE LLC 1206 PENNSYLVANIA ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044 SLOAN LAW FIRM, PA 5030 BOB BILLINGS PKWY LAWRENCE, KS 66045 SMS CONSTRUCTION INC 6117 PALISADES DR LAWRENCE, KS 66049 SO BIG FITNESS LLC 1709 LAKE ALVAMAR DRIVE LAWRENCE,, KS 66047 SUNFLOWERS, LLC 1065 E 1326 ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66046 TAKE THE FIELD! FOUNDATION 15264 254TH STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044

RCH, LLC 4704 CHERRY HILLS COURT LAWRENCE, KS 66047

TANGO LIMA FLYING, LLC 920 SUNSET DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66044

REDESIGN4LIVING/ SELLING, LLC 5802 SAGAMORE COURT LAWRENCE, KS 66047

TANKED & SMASHED, LLC 2601 HARPER ST LAWRENCE, KS 66046

69


photo by Tasha Keathley

W H OSE

D E S K?

Be the first to correctly guess which local business figure works behind this desk. Winner receives a $50 gift card to 23rd Street Brewery. facebook.com/lawrencebusinessmagazine

70


“Lawrence Memorial Hospital gave me options, including the right cancer research trial. They gave me hope and saved my life.” Tammie Breast Cancer Survivor Lawrence, KS Tammie was devastated when she learned she had breast cancer. Then she chose to participate in a cancer research trial at The Oncology Center at Lawrence Memorial Hospital. Empowered with knowledge and backed by a dedicated team of providers – a team she considers family – Tammie is now cancer-free. To hear Tammie’s story, visit lmh.org/qualitymatters.

Quality Matters

Excellence in cancer care is measured in many ways, including patient satisfaction. At The Oncology Center at Lawrence Memorial Hospital, 100 percent of our cancer patients say they would recommend us to others fighting cancer.* We treat everyone like family, and it shows. Our board-certified oncologists offer individualized therapies that include more than 150 cancer research trials, all approved by the National Cancer Institute. For many patients, trials offer advanced treatment options that may be more effective or easier to manage. Visit www.lmh.org/qualitymatters to learn more about our clinical outcomes and why quality matters. * HealthStream Research Q1-Q2 2011.

325 Maine

Lawrence , KS

785-505-5000

w w w. l m h . o r g


Lawrence Business Magazine Vol 1 Issue 2  

Lawrence Business Magazine spotlights the individuals and companies making a positive impact in Lawrence, Kansas.

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you