The FosterClub Transition Toolkit

Page 1

FosterClub toolkit

a tool for developing a youth-driven transition plan

the national network for young people in foster care www.fosterclub.org FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 1


The FosterClub Transition Toolkit Copyright Š 2015 by FosterClub, Inc. 753 First Avenue Seaside, OR 97138 Limit of liability and disclaimer: While the author(s) and publisher have made their best efforts in preparing this Toolkit, they make no representation or warranties with accuracy or completeness of the contents of this publication. The information rendered in this publication is not intended to provide legal, medical, or policy advice. The advice and strategies contained in this publication may not be suitable for your situation. Neither the publisher not the author(s) shall be liable for any loss or damage. From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright Š 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact.

For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org.

2 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit


Table of contents Transition planning: an Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Message to supportive adults. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 What’s my role?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Your transition team. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 What will the journey be like?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 What should I plan for?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Creating your plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 How to track your progress. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Travel tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Let’s Get Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Roadblocks & challenges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Thinking about leaving foster care early. . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Four things to Know before you go! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Planning worksheets Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Finances + money management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Housing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Self care + health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Life skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Identity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Permanence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Community, culture + social life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Job + career. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Youth Stories transitioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Healthcare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Permanence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Career Opportunities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 3


REAL story:

Transitioning out I aged out of care at the age of 19. One of the biggest struggles I faced after exiting foster care was figuring out what to do with my spare time. I know it sounds odd, but I just spent the last 3 years of my life with very little, if any, ability to dictate my own schedule. The different check ups, appointments, visits, and court hearings were all scheduled for me - I learned to just “go with the flow.” At first I loved not having anybody check up on me. I felt so free. Not long after, though, that freedom turned to loneliness, and sometimes, even fear. I didn’t know what I wanted for myself and trying to figure it out on your own can be hard, especially when you don’t have a support system to lean on. Being involved in the planning and decision making process well before you transition out will help give you a say in what you want to do with your independence. Another problem I faced after being on my own was no longer being qualified for resources because I was now “too old” to receive them. I remember learning about all of the educational and housing benefits and thinking just how far into the future college seemed. Things such as healthcare, insurance, and taxes are things you don’t think about until you need them, or they are all of the sudden brought to your attention. By the time I started asking questions about what I could receive help on; it was usually too late. Don’t put off your future; take advantage of the support and resources before you leave care. The last thing I would share is the lack of preparation on dealing with 4 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit

family; that being foster family, adopted family, or biological family. I struggled, and continue to struggle, with how to balance the relationships I have with my bio-family and my foster parents. There is always a sense of guilt that I don’t spend enough time with, or make enough of an effort towards, my bio-family and then there is a feeling of not being appreciative and grateful for all that my foster parents did for me. NOBODY ever talked to me about that, let alone helped me prepare for it. I owe a lot of my success in life to my Transition Support Team I had while I was exiting foster care. They placed emphasis on education, making sure that I was on track to graduate I hope my personal high school and completing all the necessary steps for me experience can help to continue my education after you on your transition high school, if I so chose. Journey. There were also classes and workshops that I attended which focused on teaching “basic” life skills such as: cooking, budgeting, finding housing, car maintenance, etc. I have benefited a lot from having participated in those classes, but I still feel there are a few things that I could have been better prepared for. Ricky Ballesteros, FosterClub 2015 All-Star Intern At 16, Ricky was placed in state’s custody due to his parents’ involvement with drugs. With the help of supportive foster parents and a transition team, he navigated through Utah’s foster care system. Since his release from care, Ricky has strived to be an advocate for youth in foster care serving as the chair of Utah’s Northern Youth Council and is a member of the State Youth Council. Currently, Ricky is a student at Weber State University pursuing a degree in Social Work, while working as a Transition to Adult Living (TAL) specialist for the Division of Child and Family Services (DCFS). Ricky is an advocate, a husband, a soldier, a runner, a student, a Mormon, and a foster youth.


in transit from

foster care to adulthood For most youth in foster care, these are uncertain times. Today more than ever, if you want to travel successfully (and safely) to life on your own, you need a plan for your trip. FosterClub created the Transition Toolkit to help you develop a team of adult supporters, take inventory of your current assets, identify your resources and map out a plan for the challenges after foster care. It’s your life - take control and let your journey begin! Welcome to the FosterClub Transition Toolkit.

Without a map, your transition plan could be in trouble Suddenly you age out of foster care, you’re too old to receive foster care services, and you’re hit with millions of adult decisions to make. Where will you live? What can you afford? Do I still have health insurance? Who will take you to school? How much money to you need to make to support yourself? Most young adults in America are able to lean on their parents to help with some of this support in to their late 20’s. As a young person in foster care, it’s possible that you can’t count on support from your parents. Therefore, you need to make a plan. FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 5


This FosterClub Transition Toolkit is a map to guide you out of foster care and on to a safe, independent adulthood. This is your transition plan.

Our view at FosterClub is that this is your life. What happens should primarily be your say, and not dictated by a judge’s or a caseworker’s opinion.

WHAT IS A TRANSITION PLAN?

You owe it to yourself to get the facts and start working on your transition plan as early as you can. The law states a 90 day period to develop a plan for your life. Is that enough time? The sooner you start, the more control you’ll have. Two or three years before leaving the foster care system is not too soon to start working on your transition plan.

Federal law requires that all states must develop a transition plan for foster youth during the 90 day period before the youth leaves foster care at age 18, 19, 20 or 21. The plan must be individualized to the young person and must be developed with the young person. Among the issues to be addressed are specific topics of housing, health insurance, education, local opportunities for mentors, and workforce supports and employment services.

Take control of your future The good part about the law is that the Federal Government clearly states that a foster youth needs a transition plan and that the youth has to be involved in developing it.

You’ve dreamed about those days of independence after foster care. With the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, you can take charge and begin to make those dreams come true. Visit us online at www.fosterclub.org for bonus Transition Toolkit materials and for stories about your peers’ experiences aging out of the foster care system.

a message to supportive adults Thank you for being a supportive adult for a young person transitioning from foster care. Your role is more important than you think, or the youth may know. Having committed and reliable adult supporters is the number one factor in success for a young person transitioning from foster care. You can strengthen your role by: • Read the information in this toolkit and visit www.fosterclub.org for more tools to help youth prepare for life after foster care. • Help the youth identify their strengths AND needs. • Make it clear how you are willing to support the youth. • Help keep the youth on track. • Celebrate success. • Be a mentor. Remember that it’s the youth’s life — and it’s their transition plan. Keep in mind that ultimately, the youth will be the one living out the plan. 6 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit


what’s my role?

It’s your life, and participating in your transition plan will get you valuable connections and resources BEFORE you leave the foster care system. It is to your benefit to take full advantage and jump on board. Don’t sit and watch your transition take place without your voice.

Have a say, get control

If — at any time — you feel that you are not being heard or getting the support you need to create and carry out your transition plan, make sure you let someone know. Don’t miss any chance to speak in court or talk with a judge before you transition out of foster care. The

judge holds the real power to get you the resources and services you need. Your transition plan will probably be reviewed by the court – so make sure you show up to answer any questions the judge might have and to speak up for what you care about and want for your life.

transition team Every successful adult has a team of supportive people, like an entourage. Just ask someone you know who’s successful. Planning for your transition to adulthood can be a little daunting to tackle all by yourself. Don’t worry; you can get others to help you. By recruiting a Transition Support Team, you’ll have access to others who have already made the journey to adulthood. They can give you tips, information, advice, and access to resources along the way that will make your journey smoother. Who should be on your team? Well, that is up to you, but try to identify adults who have been supportive of you in a positive way. A member of your Transition Support Team could be an adult who has given you good advice like: • • • • • • •

a coach or teacher a pastor or church member a neighbor or employer a CASA, attorney, or guardian ad litem a relative, foster parent or guardian the parent of a friend or classmate someone with a career you are interested in

Try for at least two or three adult supporters if not more. Speak to your caseworker or social worker about other possible members for your Transition Support Team. FosterClub member Alex from Colorado

Identify your team and ask for assistance along your journey. They will help you succeed!

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 7


what will the

Journey be like? The FosterClub Transition Toolkit is a step-by-step transition plan designed as a subway map built around ten different categories or routes. For a successful transition to adulthood, we recommend taking or visiting each route. Your routes are shown as lines on a subway map (illustrated on the next page.) Each stop on the subway route is an item for you to examine on your journey to leaving foster care. If you have questions or are unclear about items, remember your Transition Support Team can help you. All you have to do is ask. At the stops, you’ll clarify your goals, gather up resources, honestly evaluate your assets, and sharpen your skills for life on your own. With the FosterClub Transition Toolkit as your guide, you are the navigator to a successful future.

Transition Routes: finances + money management job + career

*

life skills identity permanence education self care + health housing transportation community, culture + social life these items to comply with * Complete requirements of the Fostering Connections to

* * *

Success and Increased Adoptions Law.

Bonus Material: Two additional transition routes are located at www.fosterclub.org. Select Transition Toolkit under Books to access the subways routes for Parenting and Pregnancy. The material is free!

pregnant parenting 8 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit


F S e L T I P C H J

What should I plan for?

That’s up to you. This subway map provides a quick overview of the ten routes for transitioning. Just as a subway line contains many stops where you can get out and look around, each route contains several stops to explore. You’ll notice assets and skills you’ll want to pick up at each stop. They are your personal souvenirs on your journey to adulthood.

F

J

finance + money management

current employment listing of past employment resumé and/or sample application employment skills knowledge of resources vocational accessment

bank account savings source of income monthly budget money management skills credit checked check eligibility for SSI, TANF or other programs knowledge of resources

p

job + career

L

homelife skills legal issues recreation +leisure cooking personal hygiene participate in court other life skills

per

permanence

permanent family-like relationship supportive adults biological family healthy relationships

S

I

life skills

e

T

birth certificate state-issued ID social security card citizen docs (if applicable) safe personal filing system

education

high school diploma or GED higher education / training plan ETV and scholarships reading skills math skills writing skills knowledge of resources

self care + health

H

health insurance health provider/primary doctor mental health insurance mental health provider/therapist prescription plan dental insurance dental provider vision health education medical records medical proxy knowledge of resources

PR Pregnant PA Parenting

Identity

transportation

mode of tranportation driver’s license insurance knowledge of public transportation

housing

housing after care transitional housing reference and/or co-signer sample rental application back-up plan knowledge of resources

C

community, culture + social life

community connections spiritual support/church peer circle ethnicity registered to vote after-care services

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 9


creating your plan

There are ten different topic routes, like HOUSING or EDUCATION; you can include in your transition plan. It doesn’t matter where you start, but you can expect similar components for each topic.

Each transition route includes the following:

Planning Worksheet

Map Page

When you’ve worked the challenges on the subway map pages, the transition planning worksheets will help you create a plan. Each of the worksheets has four parts:

Your transition routes are visually identified as a map of a subway line. They will contain many stops along the way with challenges for you to consider. Visit each stop and work the challenges.

WHAT I HAVE.

in collab oratio

Bank accou nts: Checking

Savings Savings for leaving foste r care: Goal: $ Amount curre

Other:

n with Foste ringC onne

2

Regular sourc es of incom e (descriptio n):

Monthly budg et created Monthly Amou nt $ $

Demonstrated

money mana gement skills (list): Taxes Banking Budgeting Saving/Investin Lending / Finan g cing Emergency money matt ers

oney t your m stly. g lub.or e: y abou osterc very co be savvBank nam can be rtant to instru ly impo er:ces. Mistakes al king for d ci Loo ate pe . E Othan et cre is es HAV ly budg yon ur fin AT I Month ad: ays, it Savin ount .WH ionounttoope owtus ntAcc ly Am N tegs Month nt sta n y at accou . Pa Bank atoutentrsope ing macc $ e: Check ed: $ ter car Downlo ctions?

$ Credit checked (for identity theft) Other: Other: Other:

RESOUR CES AVA ILABLE TO ME.

Assistance type

www.f ad at

1

Eligibility (wha t I need to qualify)

3

Who I conta ct (and how to apply)

ces e two pie $ THIS IS en requir leave MY PLAN Banks oft ore you . t think. ount bef account. $ Short term you migh en an acc (1 year) goals e in the nt to op hav u rta yo po ec re nt is im n Ch be mo ft) the amou ount. It Steps & servi ty the and one can acc nti e g ide ces (and who ttin new Ge en a d (for bank nam will help me) checke ut ID to op list the l t, dit cia Cre hee Progress of offi works raw witho withd e. On the Other: ount. you can foster car acc (money the er: ds in t): e fun Oth (lis hav to lls you access t nagement ski e direct er: unma amount eting Oth co the ing dg Ac hav Bu anc u gs money e and matters D / Fin Savin dinkgnam where yo CHECKE nmonst rated ney ban Len IT nts mo the ED ou y org t ur CR ns. acc yoly) Lis Emergenc De ctio n app to at Include nature). oww wh gconne u kn one d ho n osterin Taxes son’s sig (an Do tyo www.f Has any ther per contac d ‘em g anong MOat ks like? Banki Who I nvestin E . Fin Plan immediate credit loo O M ty and Saving/I ly after I leave THqualify) W dNto LE T n ur identi foster care: il LY ILAB hatinI neel y stolen yo ? It is A VSA ity (w ou BUD ou ur credit to CES yo Eligibil d R U h age r G O p ou e had Lis ce a dam .RES n to hav tlin ay th ve e ET t mo o use in com f yo Yo n e ers not un Long term goals nce typ u k es all e bil oug u c com inco ily memb fam Assista l (five m h ls ho n e years from an . o m o ? A mo ak y biologica now, my finan u ’s credit e to w ex f yo cial goal is): ne ge sing list: ou re e m ter youth t. S Services co actl u exp onth y co credit fos Family ss ex Add supp ocia ceiv ve .or e ild and Progre tr lubm r y y wh ense ostlyerc o ing ovation The Ch of a pa con rt, e l sec , but ou n at at www.fs a budg g and Inn ) tac u the pla pe r tc y e help meImprovement READIN r yo t n . In rity not mhow to make a livin ou’ dndwh L.) 112 heo wilt l (P. E S w S ll ur busin for am clu ideasorabout o S La (an CALE g es ne lps blic vic Needs Work th te ho dis ne de Act (Pu e ps & ser exp your sta 1 urly ess, P LisA. I N e.s aGet 2 en d to 3 nd how abil y froSte requires 4 f Visit www.foster M Y len 5 ses 6 34) now ingconnections.o 7 ofte ity in m a dit report S I S rate gth you pho 8 . 9 rg for more federa 10 Prepared .THI . goa your cre n job a ls o ur l and state inform From the FosterC f ti re e e nu n an com to check year) ensure yo ation regarding yo lub Transiti on e, m d me mp Toolkit, copyrig term (1 3.0 United States the Fostering Conne r to help u ht © 2010 FosterC Short License . Permiss ctions to Succe each yea lub, Inc.and Fosterin yo loye bers how Cha do. ion granted notice remain ss and Increased to copy, adapt, s intact. For more gConne ctions.o fe u’v – m d distribu te and is safe. rg. License d informa tion, Adoptions Act transm it this under a Creativ contact FosterC e b , inc you uch e identity work e Commo ns lub at 503-717 so long as not Attribu tion-No -1552 or visit used for comme lu ee ncomm ercial www.fo sterclub rcial purpos es, n e de may you .org and www.fo work is attribut stering connec ed, and this ney mp the n tions.or g. ild Mo s loy n eed n Bu nt Skill ed ame ing nageme liv ,a Ma ent nd independ ney List any mo ating to e: n courses rel ter car u re fos yo ve er Ca ent that er I lea ing Fost tely aft managem list skills media for Leav by your Plan im en. Also Savings l is): nt of money have tak ou me or at d to ial goa cific am y be use financ in the ho pared e w, my save a spe vings ma acquired 10 Pre d ght includ from no al to 9 t date. Sa slush fun a years Set a go 8 ool. Skills mi -ou e as age (fiv or 7 , ls ancing sch ation 6 to tion, or m goa 5 ance eting, bal bal s transport dg Long ter emancipa bu 4 ing for , , 3t sav , credit al. 2curren apartment accounts ings go 1your ks/ t sav rent an oo Lis ur . rk yo ies wo checkb enc eds Neerg ss toward em lls, etc. gre ski for E er pro L A gauge consum S SC

sav rently ving fos nt cur for lea Amou Savings ): $ scription Goal: ome (de s of inc t than source g Accoun kin Regular difficult

4

5

ES DIN REA

finances

+ money

it n Toolk

nsitio Club Tra Foster

ment

manage

10 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit

| 15

ction s.org

Bank name :

ntly saved: $

What I Have. These are the assets that you already possess that will help you with the transition to adulthood. Only list items in this section that you ALREADY have. Resources Available to Me. Use this section to document resources that are available from your foster care agency or other community resources. This is My Plan. What do you want to accomplish? Use this section to document your goals and the steps you will take to get there.

Readiness Scale. Work with your Transition Support Team to score your readiness.


Assistance type

Eligibility (what I need to qualify)

Who I contact (and how to apply)

HOW TO

WH AT I H AV E. acco un

Track your progress Bank

Chec

Savi

king

ts:

ngs Savi for le ngs avin : $ g fost er ca re: Othe Regu r: Amou lar so nt cu urce rren s of tly sa inco ved: me (d $ escr iptio n): Goal

in co lla

bo ra

Bank

. T H I S I S M Y P L A N . Get ideas about how to make a plan at www.fosterclub.org

Mon

thly

tio n

nam

budg

Dem

Short term (1 year) goals

onst rate d mon Taxe ey m s anag Bank emen ing t skill Savi ng/I s (list nves ): ting Budg RES et Lend ing OU in RC Emer g / Fina ES Assi nc genc AV stan y mon ing AIL ce ty ey m AB pe LE atte

Steps & services (and who will help me)

TO ME .

In order to create a good plan, it’s important to know where currently stand. It’s also important to track your progress, so that you can celebrate achievements and find opporunity areas for improvement.

Eligib

ar) go al

term

Plan immediately after I leave foster care:

READINESS SCALE

Needs work

1

2

3

edia

goal

tely

I leav e

s (fiv e ye ar

s fro m

REA DIN ESS Visit ww SC ALE w.foste rin ctions .org fo Fro m the r

foster

now

Need

gcon ne

on ne

ct io ns

.o rg

ted

Mon

thly

Amou

nt

$

Cred

it ch ecke

Othe r: Othe r: Othe r:

rs

t I ne ed to qual

$

ify)

Who

I cont

d (for

iden

act (a nd ho w

tity

thef

t)

to ap ply)

s & se rv

ices

(and

who

will

help

me) Prog

after

er in gC

s

Step

imm

et cr ea

$

TH IS IS MY PLA t term N. (1 ye

Long

planning worksheet is a “Readiness Scale.” You and your Transition Support Team can rate how ready you are on a scale from 1 Needs Work (not ready yet) to 10 Prepared Long term goals (five years from now, my financial goal is): (completely ready) for each topic route.

(wha

Fo st

Progress

Shor

Plan

Readiness Scale: At the bottom of each transition

ility

wi th

e:

care

, my finan ci

s Wor

m

k

ress

:

al go al

is):

1

Fos ter ore fe 3.0 Un 2 Clu deral ite d 3 Sta tes b Tra nsi tio no tic and sta e rem Lic en n Too 4 te info ain s se. Per mi lkit , cop yri int act 5 rmatio ssi on . For gh t © 6 mo re gra nte n rega 20 10 inf orm Fos ter d to 7 rding cop y, ati on Clu b, 8 the Fo ad ap , con Inc .an tac t t, dis sterin d Fos 9 Fos ter trib ute ter ing g Conn Clu b 10 an d Co nn at 50 Prep ectio ect ion 3-7 17 tra nsm it ared ns to s.o rg. thi s -15 52 wo rk Succes or vis so lon Lic en sed it ww un de s and g as w.f ost r a Cre Incre erc lub no t use d ased for com ati ve Co .or g an d mm on Adop me rci ww w.f s Att al pu tions ost eri rib uti rpo ses Act ng con on -No nco , wo rk ne cti is att mm erc on s.o rib ute rg. ial d, an d thi s

4

5

6

X7

Once you’ve completed a route, log it on the TRANSITION PLAN OVERVIEW WORKSHEET. First Name and Middle Initial My Information

8

9

10 Prepared

Last Name

Case Number

Independent Living Provider or Case Manager

Transition Routes: Check the box next of the routes you’ve completed.

an sition pl rksheet tran 
 w wo nd
Initial
 over 
 vie First
Name
a

Last
Name

Youth
 
 Information

Case
Numb

Six
month

Date
Plan
C Birth
date

nt
Living
Pr

er

Independe

Additional

Date
of
1st

score

Date

re
 of
2nd
sco

n
date

Female

Date
of
3rd

Tea

m
Attach
add

itional
shee

ts
as
neces

sary

Phone
Num

Transgender

Transition Routes

ber

Phone
Num

e‐Mail

ber

Role

Name

Phon

Check off the routes you finished in this transition plan, along with your Readiness Score (optional)

e‐Mail

Name

Role

score

Housing
 
 
 
&
Health
 
 
 

Self
Care 
 
 ase
list): 

 

No
 
Other
(ple e:
 uth?


 
Yes

 ning
and
 iness
Scor lf
of
the
yo uce
redundant
plan Total
Read n
on
beha o
red s
crafted
a
pla tion
plan
in
order
t ity
partner ransi mun r
com rt
of
this
t :
 Have
othe ding
as
pa 
the
youth sider
inclu 
in
serving If
Yes,
con laboration ifeskills.org)
 gency
col ww.caseyl improve
a ills
Plan
(w sey
Life
Sk )
 

Ansell‐Ca n
Plan
(IEP lth,
etc.)
 l
Educatio ental
Hea 

Individua n
 idential,
M ntered
Pla (D&A,
Res Plan
 

Person
Ce Discharge
 loyment)
 t
Plan
and
 n
for
Emp 

Treatmen D
ISP)
 ividual
Pla ort
Plan
(D b/IPE
(Ind idual
Supp 

Voc
Reha NF/JOBS)
 isabilities
Indiv s
(TA ent
D dy
Familie 

Developm ce
to
Nee ry
Assistan IA)
 

Tempora ent
Act
(W ce
Investm 

Workfor 
 lease
list): 

Other
(p

Plans

Transition

mancipatio

Male

d
domains
 ent
 Complete 
Managem 
&
Money 

Finances n
 

Educatio Indicate
the this
 reer
 included
in
 
 

Job
&
Ca plan,
along ce
 re
 transition
 

Permanen adiness
Sco he
Re with
t 
 l
Life
 

Life
Skills (optional) e,
&
Socia ity,
Cultur 

Commun ation
 

Transport 

Identity

r

Projected
e

e

Transition 
 Domains
dom ains

ase
Manage

ue

Gender

Current
ag

)
 (mm/dd/yy

ovider
or
C

follow‐up
d

ompleted

Date from Plan Completed Six month follow-­‐up ate that you Projected emancipatio Log the Readiness Score the worksheet in column. You may dsee are stronger in some categories than in others. Tracking shows where you can improve Birth date (mm/dd/yy) What was your sex at birth? What is your gender? in a category or compensate by building up other categories. overall goal is to Male The Female Male/Boy Intersex to year. Female/Girl track your progress overtime; say, from month to month or year

e‐Mail

e
Number

Role

Name

tion
Plan.

Yout

ure:
 h’s
Signat

Success and

Increased

Act Adoptions

mercia l tion-N oncom this ons Attribu ted, and e Comm ting
a the Fostering . Licens ed under a Creativ purpos es, work is attribu ted
in
crea ercial regarding for comm I
participa nectio ns.org ection s.org. information not used Foster ingCon so long as osterin gconn al and state Club, Inc.and this work and www.f transm it for more feder copyri ght © 2010 Foster osterc lub.org ute and ctions.org visit www.f adapt, distrib Toolkit , 7-1552 or ringconne to copy, Transit ion at 503-71 grante d www.foste Foster Club Foster Club Permis sion From the contac t Licens e. ation, States inform 3.0 United For more s intact. notice remain

e
of
t nd
approv

his
Transi

ns to Connectio

Visit

Date of 1st score

1/2016

Completed Routes

X Finances & Money Management X Education X Job & Career Permanence

X Life Skills X Community, Culture, & Social Life X Transportation X Identity X Housing

6 5 8 5 7

Self Care & Health Other (please list):

Date of 2nd score

Total Readiness Score:

7 7 7 8 6 6 9 8

31

Have other plans been created that should be noted?

58

Additional Plans

Date of

5/2016

Yes

No

If Yit. es, Just consider including as pno art pass of this or transition in order reduce redundant plann You might hate keeping score or you might love know there’s fail, noplan perfect orto horrible improve score. The point system here is designed to only showagency wherecollaboration: you are at on your transition plan. You should Casey Life Skills Plan (lifeskills.casey.org) expect your “Readiness Scale” points to get higher as you get older. You at 14 years old would not fill in the Individual Education Plan (IEP) worksheet as completely as you would at 18 years old. Person Centered Plan

Treatment Plan and Discharge Plan (D&A, Residential, Mental Health, etc.)

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 11

Voc Rehab/IPE (Individual Plan for Employment)

Development Disabilities Individual Support Plan (DD ISP)


travel tIps

As you travel from foster care to adulthood, keep these tips in mind:

1

Keep your transition plan in a safe place

2

Ask for information and advice

Some of the information you document may be personal. Protect yourself from identity theft by keeping your information secure.

The adults in your life have already made the transition to adulthood. Make use of what they know. Ask your Transition Support Team for guidance.

3

revisit & revise

4

Jump in and learn more

Creating a transition plan shouldn’t be a one-time event. Every 6 months, check your progress, see how your readiness improves, and update your goals.

Go to www.fosterclub.org to find resources for foster youth and gather more information. Learn from your peers who are also making the transition from foster care to adulthood.

ready to get started? 12 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit


let’s get started Instructions for using the Transition Plan Overview Worksheet It is time to embark on your transition plan journey. What is the first thing you should do? Well, a good place to start is the TRANSITION PLAN OVERVIEW WORKSHEET on the very next page. This worksheet is your catchall for information. Continue to update this page as you build your transition plan.

Youth information

Fill out the “My Information” section, which includes basic identity information and case information.

transition plan 
 overview worksheet

First
Name
and
Initial

Youth
 Information

Last
Name

Case
Number

1

Independent
Living
Provider
or
Case
Manager

Date
Plan
Completed

Six
month
follow‐up
due

Projected
emancipation
date

Birth
date
(mm/dd/yy)

Current
age

Gender

Male

Female

Transition
 Domains

Completed
domains

Indicate
the
domains
 included
in
this
 transition
plan,
along
 with
the
Readiness
Score
 (optional)

Additional Plans

The “Additional Plans” section is for your caseworker, social worker or judge to fill out. A box might get checked off if you have another type of plan in place. If you are unsure about why a box is checked, you can always ask your caseworker or judge!

Date
of
1st
score

Finances
&
Money
Management
 

Education
 

Job
&
Career
 

Permanence
 

Life
Skills
 

Community,
Culture,
&
Social
Life
 

Transportation
 

Identity
 

Housing
 

Self
Care
&
Health
 
Other
(please
list):

Total
Readiness
Score:

Date
of
2nd
score

Date
of
3rd
score

2

Additional
Plans

3

Have
other
community
partners
crafted
a
plan
on
behalf
of
the
youth?


 
Yes



 

No
 If
Yes,
consider
including
as
part
of
this
transition
plan
in
order
to
reduce
redundant
planning
and
 improve
agency
collaboration
in
serving
the
youth:
 

Individual
Education
Plan
(IEP)
 

Person
Centered
Plan

Transition Team

Treatment
Plan
and
Discharge
Plan
(D&A,
Residential,
Mental
Health,
etc.)
 

Voc
Rehab/IPE
(Individual
Plan
for
Employment)
 

Temporary
Assistance
to
Needy
Families
(TANF/JOBS)
 

Workforce
Investment
Act
(WIA)
 

Other
(please
list):

Transition
Team
Attach
additional
sheets
as
necessary
 
 Name

Role

Name

Phone
Number

Role

Name

Role

4

e‐Mail

Phone
Number

e‐Mail

Phone
Number

e‐Mail

I
participated
in
creating
and
approve
of
this
Transition
Plan.
Youth’s
Signature:

Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal and state information regarding the Fostering Connections to Success and Increased Adoptions Act From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.

It is time to start your journey and begin your transition plan! Transition plan Overview Worksheet

Once you complete a topic domain (or route) such as education or housing, mark it off on the Overview Worksheet to update the “Transition Routes” section.

Ansell‐Casey
Life
Skills
Plan
(www.caseylifeskills.org)

Development
Disabilities
Individual
Support
Plan
(DD
ISP)

Transition Domains

If you have already identified supportive adults in your life, you can place their contact information under “Transition Team.” Please make sure you have had a conversation with your supportive adult and they have agreed to be on your team (or ask your caseworker to talk with the supportive adult). You can always add more team members later!

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 13


Transition Plan Overview Worksheet

My Information

First Name and Middle Initial

Last Name

Case Number

Independent Living Provider or Case Manager

Date Plan Completed

Six month follow-­‐up date

Projected emancipation date

Birth date (mm/dd/yy)

What was your sex at birth?

What is your gender?

Male Female Intersex

Male/Boy Female/Girl Transgender

Other

Transition Routes

Date of 1st score

Completed Routes

Check off the routes you finished in this transition plan, along with your Readiness Score (optional)

Finances & Money Management Education Job & Career Permanence Life Skills Community, Culture, & Social Life Transportation Identity Housing Self Care & Health Other (please list):

Total Readiness Score:

Date of 2nd score

Date of 3rd score

Additional Plans

Have other plans been created that should be noted? Yes No If Yes, consider including as part of this transition plan in order to reduce redundant planning and improve agency collaboration: Casey Life Skills Plan (lifeskills.casey.org) Individual Education Plan (IEP) Person Centered Plan Treatment Plan and Discharge Plan (D&A, Residential, Mental Health, etc.) Voc Rehab/IPE (Individual Plan for Employment) Development Disabilities Individual Support Plan (DD ISP) Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF/JOBS) Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Other (please list):

My Transition Support Team Attach additional sheets as necessary

Name

Name

Role

Role

Name

Phone Number

E-­‐Mail

Phone Number

Role

E-­‐Mail

Phone Number

E-­‐Mail

I, the foster youth, participated in creating and approve of this Transition Plan. Your Signature:

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org.

14 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit

Transition plan Overview Worksheet


F

finances + money management

Nowadays, it is especially important to be savvy about your money matters. Pay attention to your finances. Mistakes can be very costly. n Checking Account

Getting one can be more difficult than you might think. Banks often require two pieces of official ID to open a new account. It is important to open an account before you leave foster care. On the worksheet, list the bank name and the amount you have in the account.

n Savings Account

Include accounts where you have direct access to funds (money you can withdraw without another person’s signature). List the bank name and the amount you have in the account.

n

n

ex

g in t m co dge s ey bu help o t on y m thl nd ed ET gh on es a ne es. m ns DG ou ’ll ns BU en ? A pe ou pe LY ave ills ex at y ex TH u h e b ou wh ing . h t fy y do ON o liv M ill y ay ll o actl ur ou e y W to p es a ex r yo fe ou y ob ha d in tlin now ove a j , C ch nee u y e k oc m e ou u t fro com w m ma nam d yo ke y o n n a u i e h e m d yo e th d, a on ty e m ili an – ab en ers clud loy ot p b t n dis oft n bu or w num d, i n em o e e y e, e t h e y n m eiv uri de lo be ho p c e u co ec in u r l se Incl nd p e em u’v yo ar of e yo ocia tc. s a S , e me ou me ce m ur co st: ort na If y f ti i So st in an l upp act is. th o t Li u c g s on r th eng c n Yo usi dd er fo ss, l ho t. A pap ine ate. us y r ge ra t e b url ho

n CREDIT CHECKED

of

th

ur

yo

Do you know what your credit looks like? Has anyone stolen your identity and damaged your credit? It is not uncommon to have had biological family members use credit foster youth’s credit. The Child and Family Services Improvement and Innovation Act (Public Law (P.L.) 11234) now requires your state to check your credit report each year to help ensure your identity is safe.

n Build Money

Savings for Leaving Foster Care n Set a goal to save a specific amount of money by your emancipation, or age-out date. Savings may be used to rent an apartment, for transportation, or as a slush fund for emergencies. List your current savings balance to gauge progress toward your savings goal.

finances + money management

Management Skills List any independent living courses relating to money management that you have taken. Also list skills acquired in the home or at school. Skills might include credit, budgeting, balancing checkbooks/accounts, consumer skills, etc.

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 15


F

finances + money management in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

WHAT I HAVE. Bank accounts: Checking

Bank name: Savings

Other:

Savings for leaving foster care: Goal: $

Monthly budget created

Amount currently saved: $

Regular sources of income (description):

Monthly Amount $ $ $

Demonstrated money management skills (list): Taxes Banking Saving/Investing

Credit checked (for identity theft)

Budgeting Lending / Financing Emergency money matters

Other: Other: Other:

RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO ME. Assistance type

Eligibility (what I need to qualify)

Who I contact (and how to apply)

THIS IS MY PLAN. Short term (1 year) goals

Steps & services (and who will help me)

Progress

Plan immediately after I leave foster care:

Long term goals (five years from now, my financial goal is):

READINESS SCALE

Needs Work

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 Prepared

Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal and state information regarding the Fostering Connections to Success and Increased Adoptions Act From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright Š 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright Š 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial notice more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visitand www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org. 3.0 remains Unitedintact. StatesFor License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes,

work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org.

16 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit

finances + money management


H

housing

Calculate the cost n Do a scan of the cost for rent in your area. Research the up-front or move-in costs, including security deposit/first-last month’s rent, and application fees. Be sure to factor in the cost of utilities. n know your resources n Make a list of money that might be available to you, like Chafee, ILP subsidies, financial aid, employment n income, section 8, Social Security Income, relative and/or foster parent support. Make sure you know whether or not you’re eligible, what the application process is, and how long you’ll have to wait to start n receiving assistance.

housing

Research post-emancipation options Check into subsidized housing (such as section 8 or public housing), adult service housing, apartments, shared housing, dormitory, relative or foster home. Consider neighborhoods & potential housing locations Identify social and supportive needs: proximity to family, friends, support groups, therapy, school, ideal roommate situation, and transportation availability. Build your skills Learn skills and legal rights around housing. Familiarize yourself with Landlord/Tenant Law and housing rights, get contacts for renter’s rights organization, discuss dealing effectively with landlords.

Sample application n Complete a sample rental application to make sure you have all the information you’ll n Got stuff? need to apply, like references. Identify furniture and household item needs, make a budget and plan for securing items. Find out if there is a “moving out” or transition items available from your agency. secure a co-signer n n n Some places will require a comake your move Have a back-up Plan signer for first-time renters. It Figure out how Make a list of fallback resources can be difficult to find someone you will handle the (family, friends, caseworker, renter’s because they must be willing to moving process organizations, shelters). Locate a place take responsibility if you don’t (secure furniture, where you can seek emergency shelter or can’t pay rent. in the event that permanent housing is truck, moving help). lost. Make sure you know how to get to this location. Write your emergency housing plan down. n Decide where to live!

s on ti op e g in n hil us r a w ng. Ho offe wn livi al an ur o nt u. on s c yo nde o yo u ti si am on pe le t yo an gr g de ab on Tr pro ivin r in ail ati in l t g fo av situ ing ou sin tice ls re v ab hou rac too s a sing s. li t p th m u v l ou ona y to wi gra l ho ing i it d u ro a us t i Fin ans tun g yo at p ition ho ? r Tr po din wh ns red nt) n op ovi out a tra sha tme pr nd re ke ar Fi the r (li n ap Is efe ow pr ur yo

Explore these stops as you look for a place to live.

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 17


H

housing

in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

.WHAT I HAVE. Where I live now:

Planned end date:

Housing after foster care (leave blank until arranged):

Sample rental application completed

reference or Name:

Phone and/or email:

co-signer

Back up plan (in case of emergency, this is where I’ll go):

.RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO ME. Assistance type

Eligibility (what I need to qualify)

Who I contact (and how to apply)

.THIS IS MY PLAN. Short term (1 year) goals

Steps & services (and who will help me)

Progress

Plan immediately after I leave foster care:

Long term goals (five years from now, my housing goal is):

READINESS SCALE

Needs Work

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 Prepared

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this noticeand remains For moreregarding information, FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal stateintact. information thecontact Fostering Connections to Success andwww.fosterclub.org. Increased Adoptions Act From the FosterClub Toolkit Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 18 | FosterClub Transition housing

3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.


S

self care + health

By law, former foster are eligible for free health insurance until the age of 26. Find out about how to access when you transition. health insurance Know what type of health insurance you have access to after you leave care. Find out what you need to do to maintain eligibility for health coverage. Research what it will cost if you have to pay for your own health care. List your medical insurance provider and your identification or client number.

health care provider List your most current doctor, even if you no longer have health insurance. Compile medical records if multiple doctors/providers have been used. Confirm that your immunizations are up-to-date. Get a comprehensive health exam before leaving foster care, if possible. mental health insurance Find out if your health insurance covers mental health issues if you are in need of such services. Find out what you need to do to maintain eligibility and what your “out of pocket” costs will be.

mental health care provider List your most current mental health provider, even if you no longer have health insurance. Compile medical records if multiple doctors/providers have been used.

on isi e v lan s siv a p ed en e ne s.) eh in n se pr rm isio len e om et e v act t a c ; d ur on ge tion fut con si vi an na g or Arr mi etin ses d a e n s an ex r m gla up fo ke ck re (li he fo l c be a ta es fy en su nti e d is de to et al . I e pl nt le nu e m de ib nti ag co ny oss co ver st al e a f a f p ill co co nt ul e o e, i u w if he y. de hed car car yo ine at t pa n Sc ke g at rm h to ta avin st th dete or w ave le nti nd ble u h de e a aila f yo us av e i is ill b w self care + health

n Figure out what you’ll need Identify ongoing needs for physical health, mental health and substance abuse services (arrange comprehensive screenings, get physical, dental and vision examinations, along with developmental and mental health screenings.) n n prescriptions Make a list of current prescriptions. Find out if health insurance will continue to cover the cost and for how long. Determine what the prescriptions will cost if you have to pay for them on your own. Learn about the side effects of stopping prescriptions n without doctors’ orders. Figure out how to keep prescriptions in a safe place. n health support Identify supportive individuals who can help you stay healthy, including someone who would be willing to attend medical appointments with you and advise you in accessing resources. n n identify a health care proxy Complete a form called a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care that informs doctors and the court who you would like to make medical decisions in case you aren’t able to decide for yourself. n n substance abuse treatment Demonstrate you know the signs of addiction, the consequences of substance abuse, and know where to go for help. n health education

Prepare yourself with health education, including healthy sexual decision making, awareness of birth family’s physical and mental health history, prevention and transmission of sexually transmitted diseases, effects of trauma, substance abuse issues, constructive methods for coping with stress, addressing social and relational problems, anxiety, depression and other mental health issues.

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 19


S

self care + health in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

.WHAT I HAVE. Current HEALTH insurance coverage (name of company/plan): Does current plan continue after leaving foster care? Yes No Unsure Current Primary Doctor:

Policy #: Anticipated end date of coverage:

Clinic or Hospital:

Health issues:

Phone #

Prescriptions:

Current MENTAL HEALTH insurance coverage (name of company/plan): Does current plan continue after leaving foster care? Yes No Unsure Current Therapist:

Policy #: Anticipated end date of coverage:

Clinic or Hospital:

Mental health issues:

Phone #

Prescriptions:

Current DENTAL insurance coverage (name of company/plan): Does current plan continue after leaving foster care? Yes No Unsure Current Dentist:

Policy #: Anticipated end date of coverage:

Clinic or Hospital:

Dental issues:

Prescriptions:

VISION needs:

Prescriptions:

Phone #

Health education: Substance abuse

Healthy relationships

Fitness

Coping with stress

Pregnancy prevention

First Aid

Nutrition

Prevention of STDs

Health self-advocacy

Other: Other: Other:

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright Š 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org.

Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal and state information regarding the Fostering Connections to Success and Increased Adoptions Act

20 | FosterClub ToolkitToolkit, copyright Š 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons selfAttribution-Noncommercial care + health FromTransition the FosterClub Transition 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.


S

self care + health in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

.RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO ME. Assistance type

Eligibility (what I need to qualify)

Who I contact (and how to apply)

. T H I S I S M Y P L A N . Get ideas about how to make a plan at www.fosterclub.org Short term (1 year) goals

Steps & services (and who will help me)

Progress

Plan immediately after I leave foster care:

Long term goals (five years from now, my health, mental health, vision and dental goal is):

READINESS SCALE

Needs Work

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 Prepared

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright Š 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this noticeand remains For moreregarding information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal stateintact. information the Fostering Connections to Success andwww.fosterclub.org. Increased Adoptions Act From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright Š 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial self care + health FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 21

3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.


REAL story:

Navigating Healthcare At 18, most young adults are gearing up for their first year in college, or still getting on their feet and living with family. Aging out of the foster care system at 18 meant that I was taking complete responsibility for everything, from finances to health care. With no family to turn to, I was completely on my own trying to navigate through the ‘real’ world. The reality was: I had to figure out how to stabilize and sustain myself--and quickly.

While in care my agency mandated annual physical, dental and vision check-ups. I even received mental health services to cope with my traumatic childhood. This made me extremely aware of the importance of my health physically and mentally. After turning 21, I was no longer eligible for my health services. Anything I needed from that point on would have to be paid out of pocket including, but not limited to, medical, dental, Youth who were vision, mental health services and in foster care at medication. For a age 18 or older full-time college qualify for health student with a insurance coverage part-time job, ‘outof-pocket’ meant I until age 26, would have to just regardless of do without. So I income. did. I honestly didn’t know when I would be able to afford simple things like a teeth cleaning, an eye-examination or a basic check-up at the doctor. These weren’t a priority when food needed to be put on the table, and bills and rent were due. Well now thanks to the Affordable Care Act (aka “ObamaCare”), youth who were in foster care in any state at age 18 or older qualify for health insurance coverage until age 26, regardless of income. The ACA covers more than just medical, it covers dental and vision, mental health services and substance abuse counseling. The best part is, it’s completely free!

Paulette Castro, FosterClub 2011 All-Star Intern and 2015 Level II intern Paulette was removed from her mother’s care and remained in California’s foster care system for the next 14 years. She moved through numerous placements in both traditional and therapeutic care. During her time in care she experienced challenges with education, permanency, grieving and sibling separation. After aging out of care she went on to become a Newborn Audiology/Hearing Technician. After a switch of career, Paulette is now finishing up her last quarter at Cal State East Bay with a B.A. in Sociology. She hopes to utilize her degree to continue advocating for current and former foster youth.

22 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit

self care + health


e

education Jump on the education line!

n school records

Collect a copy of your school records, including a copy of official transcripts. Make sure you have records from ALL the middle and high schools you’ve attended.

n school credits

Evaluate current school credits and determine if you are on track to graduate. If you are behind, create a plan to make up missed credits or advocate for credit recovery for classes missed due to foster care moves.

n i.e.p. = individualized education plan

If you have had an IEP, make sure you have a copy of your plan, understand the resources that are available to you, and find out how the plan might carry over to higher education.

n finish high school

n Calculate senior fees

Some agencies have funds available to help with any senior costs, and may be able to help with extras like senior photos, prom, etc. Make a list and provide it to your caseworker well in advance of due date.

n

n

n

te st i ne enti ng f e A de y, p s de k y d fo rep t fe erm our r co are fo e w ine hig lleg for, r f aiv w h sc e e an os n e hi d n r h te r y s - w ch t ool try: sch ap ed P ou c h e Su ply th ich sts y oun SAT ule b . fo m ar ou sel , S re ea AT qui sh or hi r hi it ap l g f g r o m , o p h ap h s l os uld r a or ed t pl ch er e icat A s t ic al tak sis C ests at ool duc ion w io ay e. A tanc T. a s n cou tio to s a sk e w n va a to ai nse . A sch ve lo ila bou sk oo r rs bl ab yo ls . e t ou ur t

Complete high school, GED or training program. If you won’t finish high school by the time you are scheduled to leave foster care, talk to your caseworker about remaining in care so that you have the support you need to finish school.

A

(E

education

n

n io at ic pl ap . r es ol he ly ho lin ot sc ad or app de or g in l to , r f ip s in o da rsh ra cho oal ar len la lt g nd ca ho na ch s eer rs. c s i le e a r tou tio ca eat and ca wh ca s vo ne ls, and Cr tes, on es, rmi skil irs ti da g a e op olle Det ired ge f rs . s n c . s he s io h lle de uc hip co at arc ion d n Vo ars a pt uc se nd o e ng ol ed d r on ved tte ni sch ai er an ati hie c. A Tr able gh tify duc n ac s, et d hi e n e o e an lic er d liti n app Id e h i s g tio hi r ba s, ab ca for fo nt du ly le e E app ta fe ha and , C ify t id l a den ia I d ai nc A. a al fin SF ci r A an fo d F n fin ly pp V) a T

Id

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 23


e

education in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

.EDUCATIONAL HISTORY. Current educational status: Attending full time Attending part time

Last grade level completed:

Not attending

Most recent school attended:

G.P.A.:

On track to earn: Diploma GED or modified diploma Math Skills:

Anticipated completion date: Other:

Reading Skills:

Writing Skills:

Previous school:

Previous school:

IEP? Yes

No

Not sure

Last grade level completed:

Copy of records?

Last grade level completed:

Copy of records?

Yes

Yes

No

No

.RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO ME. Assistance type

Eligibility (what I need to qualify)

Who I contact (and how to apply)

.THIS IS MY PLAN. Short term (1 year) goals

Steps & services (and who will help me)

Progress

Plan immediately after I leave foster care:

Long term goals (five years from now, my educational goal is):

READINESS SCALE

Needs Work

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 Prepared

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright Š 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal and stateintact. information thecontact Fostering Connections to Success andwww.fosterclub.org. Increased Adoptions Act work is attributed, and this notice remains For moreregarding information, FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright Š 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 24 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit education 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.


L

life skills Got skills? There are a lot of life skills that you can (and should) practice BEFORE you leave foster care.

n Life skills support

n

Be sure one or more members of your Transition Support Team can help you learn some of the life skills listed here.

dr un la

n

(p

l ga le

ty fe sa

n io it

al +

s ue

iss

e)

m

ho

te et

qu

i et

n so er

n

y

tr nu

n n n

take the casey life skills assessment Check up on your life skills knowledge by visiting lifeskills.casey.org. It’s a way for you to build your own personal checklist of skills and strengths. It shows you what you know already and what is possible to learn to help you in the future.

n grocery shopping n recreation + leisure activities n cooking n cleaning n personal hygiene n communication

There are lots of life skills you can learn and practice. We’ve listed some here, but we’ve left space for you to add more, like changing a car tire or traveling.

n n n n n

life skills

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 25


L

life skills in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

.WHAT I HAVE. Casey Life Skills Assessment:

Completed

In progress

Not completed

Date Completed:

Demonstrated knowledge of life skills: Laundry

Recreation/leisure

Personal Hygiene

Safety

Grocery shopping

Communication

Legal issues

Cooking

Nutrition

Etiquette

Cleaning

Other:

Other: Other: Other:

.RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO ME. Assistance type

Eligibility (what I need to qualify)

Who I contact (and how to apply)

.THIS IS MY PLAN. Short term (1 year) goals

Steps & services (and who will help me)

Progress

Plan after I leave foster care:

Long term goals (five years from now, my life skills goals include):

READINESS SCALE

Needs Work

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 Prepared

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright Š 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal stateintact. information thecontact Fostering Connections to Success andwww.fosterclub.org. Increased Adoptions Act work is attributed, and this noticeand remains For moreregarding information, FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright Š 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 26 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit life skills 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.


de D te r e of ter mi m yo tran in ne em u w spo e w nee he plo ill h rta hat ds t to alth ym ave ion type e m n a co ai pp nt, for eed m n m o s (in m ta ch s in e ch clu uni in f tme dica oo l, a t ur di ch ng y co mil nts, l an y d ,r a n ec fam ne and nd re ily cti at io vis ons n, i et ts, c.)

transportation

How will you get around to accomplish all you’ve got planned?

n

T

n driver’s ed

Ask if there is assistance from the foster care agency or Chafee Independent Living Program for driver’s education classes and/or other transportation expenses.

n driver’s permit Study and apply. n public transportation

Research and practice using the metro, bus, train or other public transportation, if available in your area.

n insurance

Research auto insurance rates. Find out how insurance rates are impacted by where you live, what you drive, your age, and your driving record. Learn if there is a discount for new drivers who complete driver’s education classes or for students with strong grades. Determine what the up-front insurance costs are.

n compare options

Complete a cost-comparison of your transportation options. Compare the costs of owning a vehicle inlcuding insurance verses using public transportation.

n emergency transportation

Identify emergency transportation options in case of medical emergency or if your first plan for transportation fails.

n map navigation

transportation

Practice map reading skills or learn to use online resources to retrieve directions.

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 27


T

transportation

in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

.WHAT I HAVE. My current mode(s) of transportation: my vehicle

friend/family provides

public transportation

bicycle

walk

other:

Transportation needed for (school, employment, recreation, etc.):

Driver’s license status:

have license

have permit

do not have

Date obtained:

Auto insurance (company name):

Policy number:

.RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO ME. Assistance type

Eligibility (what I need to qualify)

Who I contact (and how to apply)

.THIS IS MY PLAN. Short term (1 year) goals

Steps & services (and who will help me)

Progress

Plan after I leave foster care:

Long term goals (five years from now, my transportation goal is):

READINESS SCALE

Needs Work

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 Prepared

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal and stateintact. information thecontact Fostering Connections to Success andwww.fosterclub.org. Increased Adoptions Act work is attributed, and this notice remains For moreregarding information, FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 28 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit transportation 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.


I

Identity

Be sure to get all of your personal documents BEFORE you leave care. It’s a lot harder to get some of these items after you exit the system.

Get state-issued official photo ID Photo identification is required on many occasions. Obtain a state-issued photo ID before you leave foster care (it’s something your caseworker can help you do). It’s smart to get a passport too, as extra identification (or if you want to travel outside of the United States).

n Obtain an original copy of your social

security card Information about obtaining a replacement card can be obtained from www.ssa.gov. Understand the importance of guarding your social security number to protect against identity theft.

n Obtain a copy of your birth certificate

n

It should be a certified, or official, copy. Learn how to replace it if it gets lost.

n Citizenship documents

If you were born in a country other than the United States, make sure you have a copy of all of your citizenship papers and understand completely what your citizenship rights and responsibilities are. If you think there may be an issue with citizenship, ask to be connected to an immigration attorney.

n Check your credit

documentation that you were in foster care This may become important in qualifying for benefits, including financial aid for higher education. Get a letter from the court (ask your caseworker for help) that proves you were a ward of the state.

n

n

ed at e of ign siz ck es e- ng fil epi tra a d em ng de for r a ke st pi lu rg t o of sy ee inc b.o ine ce b n g fk in o uld rclu ca rta fil hod s co ste ing po al et od .fo fil im on a m th w , a the rs sh Me ww ok d . pe li s. it bo an re a stab ent (vis ote erst secu n nd d h is o e um er g n bl d t oc ind rin . U a ta ee t d B 3- pe afe Es u n tan YI , a elo s s Yo por n F ion) env ent n . a t e a t le um im x, o c b v ice bo form da do te o rv for t in pan al vo r n se ter o ste ex so i r t ive gis r reg pe e ct re , st 8 le 26, gi e 1 se o Re ag r 8 t e. At fo e 1 vic n er ag ser st at e gi le tiv Re ma elec A es th

Ask to have a credit report run based on your social security number prior to leaving foster care. It is not unusual for young people from foster care to discover their credit has been damaged when relatives have “borrowed” their identity to get emergency funds or to get credit cards. The Child and Family Services Improvement and Innovation Act (Public Law (P.L.) 11234) now requires your state to check your credit report each year to help ensure your identity is safe.

identity

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 29


I

Identity in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

.WHAT I HAVE. Personal documents:

Status:

Possession: (who has them)

Birth certificate

Have

Applied for

Do not have

State-issued picture identification

Have

Applied for

Do not have

Social Security Card

Have

Applied for

Do not have

Citizen / immigration documents (if applicable)

Have

Applied for

Do not have

Other:

Have

Applied for

Do not have

Safe personal filing system in place

I know I may request a copy of my foster care case file

.RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO ME. Assistance type

Eligibility (what I need to qualify)

Who I contact (and how to apply)

.THIS IS MY PLAN. Short term (1 year) goals

Steps & services (and who will help me)

Progress

Plan after I leave foster care:

Long term goals (five years from now, my housing goal is):

READINESS SCALE

Needs Work

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 Prepared

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright Š 2015regarding FosterClub,the Inc.Fostering Licensed under a CreativetoCommons Attribution-Noncommercial Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal and state information Connections Success and Increased Adoptions Act 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes,

Fromwork the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright Š 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org. 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.

30 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit

identity


Relationships with biological family members can run the range from wonderful to stressful, supportive to destructive. In nearly all cases, relationships with family members are emotionally charged for young people from foster care. Be prepared – before you leave the foster care system, you may want to seek help from a therapist to navigate these relationships.

n

permanence

Learn about the various types of permanence (including adoption, reunification, guardianship and kinship care) and the differences between each. Understand how these types of permanence are different than permanent foster care, emancipation, or aging out.

sibling relationships Establishing a relationship with a brother or sister is often cited n know your permanency plan as the single most important Every young person in foster care shoul dhave a permanency plan. relationship by young people in Ask your caseworker or Judge to tell you what your permanency foster care. If you were separated plan is. from siblings while in foster care, ask for assistance in reconnecting before you leave the system. n identify supportive adults Many of the adults in your life may not be as available to you after you leave foster care, such as foster parents, case workers, judges and attorneys. Make connections to supportive adults who will continue to support you into adulthood. bio-family relationships

n understand permanence

n

Young people who have a permanent family connection fare better in their transitioning years. Talk to your caseworker, mentor, or Transition Support Team member about your desires for permanence.

This tool may also be used to define, substantiate and verbalize a lifelong commitment an adult has made toward supporting you and your goals.

n create permanency pact

What kinds of support from adults will be helpful as you move into adulthood and for the rest of your life? Find a list of 45 different supports in The FosterClub Permanency Pact (www.fosterclub.org).

n establish permanence

n identify the kinds of supports needed

P permanence

Permanence is number one. It’s the top reason young people successfully transition to adulthood.

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 31


P

permanence

in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

.WHAT I HAVE. My current permanency plan: Reunification Adoption

Kinship (live with relative)

If permanence has been achieved, who with? Name(s):

Guardianship

APPLA

Not sure

Phone:

Address: City, State, Zip:

E-mail:

OTHER SUPPORTIVE ADULTS Name(s):

Phone:

Address: City, State, Zip:

E-mail:

Relationship & supports provided:

Permanency Pact completed

Name(s):

Phone:

Address: City, State, Zip:

E-mail:

Relationship & supports provided:

Permanency Pact completed

Name(s):

Phone:

Address: City, State, Zip:

E-mail:

Relationship & supports provided:

Permanency Pact completed

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal and stateintact. information thecontact Fostering Connections to Success andwww.fosterclub.org. Increased Adoptions Act work is attributed, and this notice remains For moreregarding information, FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 32 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit permanence 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.


P

permanence in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

RELATIONSHIP WITH BIOLOGICAL RELATIVES Biological relatives (including siblings):

Relationship (parent, aunt, etc.)

Status

.RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO ME. Assistance type

Eligibility (what I need to qualify)

Who I contact (and how to apply)

.THIS IS MY PLAN. Short term (1 year) goals

Steps & services (and who will help me)

Progress

Plan after I leave foster care:

Long term goals (five years from now, my housing goal is):

READINESS SCALE

Needs Work

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 Prepared

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains For moreregarding information, FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal and stateintact. information thecontact Fostering Connections to Success andwww.fosterclub.org. Increased Adoptions Act

permanence

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 33


Rosalina H. Burton, 2015 FosterClub All-Star Intern “Sometimes it feels like you are climbing up a mountain that is too steep and you don’t have the right shoes, every step you take forward you slide back two more.” This is how Rosalina (Rosie) Burton, a former foster youth of San Diego, California, describes her transition out of foster care at the age of 19. This tough transition, 23 different placements and the numerous school changes during her 12 years in foster care are why Rosie began advocating for foster youth. Rosie enjoys working as a Mental Health worker at San Pasqual Academy, a residential facility for foster youth in San Diego County, and attending Palomar Community College. Rosie will obtain her Bachelors of Art and Masters in Social Work and/or Policy with a minor in communications. Rosie is hard­working, determined, ambitious, and a foster youth.

REAL STORY:

Permanence

I emancipated foster care feeling as though I was all-alone. I needed more support, but I didn’t know how to ask for it. When I learned about the FosterClub Permanency Pact, it changed my life. I now had roles that I could fill with people in my life that I knew cared about me. I was also able to face the fact that I feared rejection. Because of the Permanecy Pact I was able to talk openly with friends about our relationship so that we could build stronger connections. For the first time in my life, I am not worried about the holiday season. I know I have supportive people to spend my holidays with if I need to, even if I don’t want to.

Download the FosterClub Permanency Pact at www.fosterclub.org

34 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit

permanence


community, culture + social life

Become a mentor Becoming a mentor can instill confidence, creates bonds among foster youth and provides you with opportunity to teach what you have learned — reinforcing your knowledge.

Pe

Connect with culturally specific events and services in your community.

community resources Get connected with useful resources in the community n Register for selective service where you’ll be living after foster care. Include contact Males between 18 and 25. information and description of resources.

n Register to vote at 18

Participate in local elections.

Connect to a church or spiritual group.

n Church n

Community Organizations Become a resource within community organizations. Take on leadership roles in school and other community groups.

n

D

n

n cultural events

n

Youth Boards Use your foster care expertise by becoming involved in a Youth Advisory Board or other youth-led opportunity (find them on FosterClub.org).

n

community Find opportunities to play an active role in community life, often taking place in school settings. Locate groups and organizations for volunteering, leadership and community service.

get a mentor Get connected with one or more adult mentors to develop long-term relationships to serve as role models in areas such as employment, transitional life skills, social support and friendship. Identify through organizations (Boys and Girls Club, local mentor organizations) or through group decision-making process.

n

er yo eve su ne ur lop pp o c v d n iff ess alu a gr rt er ary es. ou fo en . p s t t Un Bui of G t h l e e an de d y po ex t c r pe on ca re rsta ou siti la n r ve rie ne re tio d re nc cte P ns how lat frie e ed d e i n hi t fo o a r s ps pe ons ds ste g u h e w r ip wh r c ro ppo ith su s o u ar p rt ad ppo kill sha e. of ul rt s, re pe t s is if er up sw po rte ho rs ha . ve n culture al so Identify and research your own culture or ethnicity. Develop your own cultural customs.

C community, culture, + social life

As a member of your community, you’ll want to participate fully to receive benefits.

n

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 35


C

community, culture, + social life in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

.WHAT I HAVE. Community Connections (social groups, activities, volunteerism)

Contact person:

Spiritual support / church:

Contact person:

Peer Circle (Names):

My ethnic heritage: List:

Phone:

Length of time known

Not sure

Phone

Registered to vote Registered for draft (if male)

.RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO ME. Assistance type

Eligibility (what I need to qualify)

Who I contact (and how to apply)

.THIS IS MY PLAN. Short term (1 year) goals

Steps & services (and who will help me)

Progress

Plan immediately after I leave foster care:

Long term goals (five years from now, my community, culture, and social life goal is):

READINESS SCALE

Needs Work

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 Prepared

Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for moreTransition federal and state information Connections Success Attribution-Noncommercial and Increased Adoptions Act From the FosterClub Toolkit, copyright © 2015regarding FosterClub,the Inc.Fostering Licensed under a CreativetoCommons States License. Permission copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this Licensed work sounder long as not used for commercial purposes, From 3.0 the United FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyrightgranted © 2010 to FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org. 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.

36 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit

community, culture + social life


J

Job + career

This important part of your life deserves special attention.

n Identify natural skills and abilities

Identify employment goals What are your career interests? What are your desired occupations? What do you want to be doing three years from now? How do you see yourself when you are 30?

Think about what you enjoy doing, where you excel and how your talents, skills and abilities n can translate into employment opportunities. Consider taking a career assessment test (ask your high school counselor about options). n Identify educational and training

Identify long-term & short-term employment options Which jobs and/or programs are attainable at present and what employment opportunities should be available after taking strategic steps?

n

Develop skills for maintaining and advancing in job Employer/employee relationships, continued education, assertiveness training, etc.

n

consider internships and volunteer opportunities While they may not pay well or may not pay at all, volunteer and internship opportunities are a great way to build skills, add depth to your resume, and create strong references. Sometimes these volunteer positions turn into paid positions.

n n Develop job search skills

? ob aj a ng g tti tin ve ge rea orti . s ce elp h c pp ce ur r h it su tan so fo e w nd sis re go anc s a r as ur u st ce fo o i r yo n y ass sou to a t n e ow e c ge t r tur kn er ou is n Wh y ? L u ca e n n Ca sum s yo t ul

Discuss where to look for employment: newspapers, Internet, signs, boards, wordof-mouth and your network. Practice doing mock job interviews. Research appropriate attire for a job interview. Identify followup actions that should be done after a job interview.

ĂŠ m s, su tie e re tivi tak t ur c d ha a t yo lar , an ills t to e d u ild ric ism sk ass an . Bu cur teer ild an eck ling - n bu s h el a C p tra lu o ex vo es t een ers. ck s s s dd as e oy he A cl ill b pl e-c w e em ubl ur do

t fu

re

ad

n

n

get a job There’s no better way to learn about being employed than to... well... be employed.

jobs + careers

needs to attain career goals What steps do you need to take to achieve long-term employment goals? Do you need training or schooling? Do you need experience in the field? Research and compare training options through Job Corps, college, apprenticeship, job shadows, etc. Ask your school if there is a career fair scheduled in your area.

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 37


J

Job + career

in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

.EMPLOYMENT EXPERIENCE. Current employment status: Full time Part time (Hours per week:

Pay rate:

Position:

)

Employer:

Phone:

Address:

City, State, Zip:

Supervisor:

Supervisor’s Position:

Supervisor’s Email:

Special Certifications: Employment Skills:

Résumé completed

Sample employment application completed

PAST EMPLOYMENT Employer

Phone:

Address:

City, State, Zip:

Position:

Dates of employment: to

Employer

Reason for leaving:

Phone:

Address:

City, State, Zip:

Position:

Dates of employment: to

Employer

Reason for leaving:

Phone:

Address:

City, State, Zip:

Position:

Dates of employment: to

Reason for leaving:

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial

3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distributethe andFostering transmit this work so longtoasSuccess not usedand for commercial Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal and state information regarding Connections Increased purposes, Adoptions Act work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org.

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.

38 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit

jobs + careers


J

Job + career

in collaboration with FosteringConnections.org

.RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO ME. Assistance type

Eligibility (what I need to qualify)

Who I contact (and how to apply)

.THIS IS MY PLAN. Short term (1 year) goals

Steps & services (and who will help me)

Progress

Plan immediately after I leave foster care:

Long term goals (five years from now, my job and career goal is):

READINESS SCALE

Needs Work

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 Prepared

From the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2015 FosterClub, Inc. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this noticeand remains For moreregarding information,the contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org. Visit www.fosteringconnections.org for more federal stateintact. information Fostering Connections to Success and Increased Adoptions Act the FosterClub Transition Toolkit, copyright © 2010 FosterClub, Inc.and FosteringConnections.org. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial jobs + careersFrom FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 39 3.0 United States License. Permission granted to copy, adapt, distribute and transmit this work so long as not used for commercial purposes, work is attributed, and this notice remains intact. For more information, contact FosterClub at 503-717-1552 or visit www.fosterclub.org and www.fosteringconnections.org.


Angelica Cox, 2015 FosterClub All-Star Intern Angelica entered the Michigan foster care system when she was eleven years old and was placed into kinship care. To help escape the trauma in her life, Angelica focused heavily on her academics and became involved in several extra curricular activities at school. In 2013, she graduated from high school in the top ten of her class with high honors before heading to James Madison College at Michigan State University. Her dream is to become a Child Advocate Lawyer so she can be a legal voice for children in the foster care system. Angelica’s motto in life is “when life knocks you down, get back up and fight harder.” Angelica is a scholar, an optimist, a leader, and a foster youth.

REAl Story:

Career opportunities I spent most of my childhood on the fast track to a life destined for failure. Although my childhood created an environment of heartbreak and limited expectations, I never gave up because those painful experiences could become my future. Instead, I made the decision to overcome those tragedies from my past and to embark on a journey to college with nothing but my desire to succeed. I did not have a forever family to aid me, but even though I could not control my past, I could control my future because my destiny was up to me. As a freshman, I had one goal in mind: get an internship at the Michigan House of Representatives. I sent in my application to numerous offices and the following week I received an interview with State Representative Henry Yanez. The night before I researched his political standpoints, but it wasn’t my well-researched answers that landed me an internship in his office. The Representative hired me because he admired my passion and desire to learn. Seeking more responsibility, I landed my second internship with State Representative Andy Schor. This internship advanced into a paid position, which means I have the financial means to support myself while in school.

40 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit

Working at the House of Representatives has opened many doors for me. Due to my political connections, I was able to be an active stakeholder in the Michigan Foster Children’s Bill of Rights. This bill is still making its way through committee right now, but I will have the opportunity to testify on behalf of this bill as it moves closer to a vote. When I think about the next step that I want to take in life, nothing excites me more than the prospect to lobby on behalf on my foster youth in the most powerful place on the planet. That is why I have applied for an internship with Voice for Adoption in Washington D.C. It would give me the chance to help foster youth on a federal level. Also, it would help me network with people for future career opportunities and give me experience in the field of my dreams. Foster care is a social justice issue that has been ignored for too long and I am determined to change that.

Get regular updates about internships, scholarships and more: sign up at FosterClub.org

jobs + careers


Roadblocks and challenges The exit from foster care can become more difficult based on paths you choose to take and circumstances put in front of you. The green section lists a selection of challenges and roadblocks that can make your journey to adulthood more difficult. If you have one or more of these challenges, it does not mean that you won’t be successful as you transition out of foster care, but it does mean that you will need to do additional planning to overcome the challenges and ensure your success. Some of these challenges you may have control over - like becoming a smoker or young parent - and others you may have no control over - like a physical disability. Think about how you might be able to improve your odds, or your Readiness Score, by increasing your preparedness other areas such as increasing your EDUCATION or LIFE SKILLS training.

Age. It is almost always a disadvantage to

leave foster care too young. You receive additional points on your Readiness Score as you are able to develop, mature and stay in the system until you “age out” with the support of additional caring adults.

Substance abuse and addiction. A high percentage of youth in care have parents with drug or alcohol dependency problems. Youth transitioning out of care should take conscious steps to avoid the dangerous pitfalls of alcohol and drug abuse.

Smoking. Smoking is a high-risk activity

that can cause significant health problems.

Incarceration or criminal record. Youth who

avoid illegal behavior are more likely to stay safe and succeed as adults. Felony crimes make it very difficult to rent an apartment or obtain employment, which may need to be taken into consideration when rating your readiness.

Young parent. Teens and young

adults who have become parents face additional challenges than their peers. Establishing yourself with education, housing, career, and finances before becoming a parent is highly recommended. If you are a teen parent, you can still have a successful transition with your family. Work on increaseing your Readiness Score in areas such as PERMANENCE, FINANCE and HOUSING.

Disability. Young people who have

physical, developmental, learning, or mental health disabilities may have additional difficulties transitioning into adulthood. Look for additional resources that might be available to assist you if you have disabilities. FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 41


thinking about

LeavIng care earIly? Most young people know that it’s important to have a plan before leaving foster care. But each year, FosterClub hears from youth who have left foster care early and lost out BIG. They regret that they didn’t have the information they needed to make an informed decision. Don’t let it happen to you. At the very least, make sure you’ve checked into the following four items and know what you’re getting into by leaving foster care before you “age out.”

4 things before you go

1 2

Find out if you’ll lose benefits, like money, if you leave foster care before turning 18. This can happen if you don’t complete certain applications.

Check if you can come back to foster care if you want or need help. Ask your caseworker or judge.

3

Have at least one “go-to” person. It should be someone that is willing to mentor you through tough situations and will provide you with a way to contact them 24/7 in case of an emergency.

4

Read the FosterClub 21 THINGS checklist filled with things you should have before you leave foster care (at the very least, you’ll know what you’re missing!) Go to fosterclub.org and search 21 Things.

If you are REALLY serious about making a successful transition to adulthood, you’ll need a complete transition plan to prepare you for the journey... this Transition Toolkit can help you map a plan for your future. 42 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit


The pinwheel is an enduring symbol of the happy, carefree childhood all kids deserve. For kids who experience the U.S. foster care system, childhood has been interrupted by abuse, neglect or abandonment. The FosterClub network gives young people in foster care a new spin on life. Every 2 minutes, a child enters the foster care system. There are more than 400,000 young people living in foster care across the United States. FosterClub is their club - a place to turn for advice, information and hope. A place where they can connect to other foster youth who are going through what they are going through. Our nonprofit mission is to lead the efforts of young people in and from foster care to become connected, educated, inspired and represented so they can realize their personal potential and contribute to a better life for their peers. We believe that young people in and from foster care deserve to be: CONNECTED to a peer support network and to people in the community who care; EDUCATED about their rights, how the foster care system works, self-advocacy strategies, and how to locate resources to help them succeed; INSPIRED and empowered through the stories of people who have succeeded after foster care; REPRESENTED by having their voices heard by policy makers, the public, and others who influence the system that profoundly impacts their lives. We want to make sure every young person who experiences foster care has what they need to thrive. The FosterClub family is filled with resilient people determined to build a better future for themselves and for other kids coming up through the system behind them. Their success depends on the generosity of concerned individuals and collaborations with partner organizations. To learn more about FosterClub and how you can support young people in and from foster care, visit www.fosterclub.org or call 503-717-1552. FosterClub is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, EIN 93-1287234.

FosterClub Transition Toolkit | 43


built for youth

powered by youth changing life in foster care

44 | FosterClub Transition Toolkit

FosterClub a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization 753 First Avenue Seaside, OR 97138 t: 503-717-1552 f: 503-717-1702 www.fosterclub.org EIN: 93-1287234

fosterclub.org