Page 1

Student I.D. and Information Student No.

Home Room No.

Name

School Information School Name Address City, State, Zip Phone

FOCUS on your future

Fax

Website School Work HELP! Names and Phone Numbers

2013-2014 Using Your Planner

2-3

Class Schedule

4-5

Study Tips

6

Medical and Emergency Information In Case of Emergency, Contact

Assignment and Planning

7-121 Relationship

Maps

Periodic Table

Math

English

Personal Directory

122-124

Phone (Home)

(Work)

Physician

Phone

125

125-126

Goal Setting GPA

Clubs

Sports

Band

127

128

Other

Middle School - Future Focus (K300) © Copyright 2013-2014 Academic Planners Plus®

W W W. AC A D E M I C P L A N N E R S P L U S . C O M

1


Focus on using your planner Development of the right study skills aids in future learning. Develop your building blocks of success. This planner will assist you in managing your time more effectively. It will be your personal guide in setting goals, whether they are effective study times or improving your overall grades. The information documented will be your tool to maximum achievement.

How to use your planner: 1.

Note in your planner all assignments right away. Don’t try to remember the details later. Ask questions if you don’t understand.

8.

Record hall pass information, where you are going, what time you left, what time you returned, and who gave you permission.

2.

Record the day each assignment is due. To reference your assignment on the due date, list the assignment with a backwards arrow and the date it was assigned.

9.

Don’t forget to note weekend activities.

10.

Record reading minutes or pages each week.

11.

Write down some ideas in the space provided for the different Character Challenge each week.

12.

Your teacher can communicate with your parent/guardian using the comment code boxes (TCC) or write extra comments in the space provided in comment boxes.

13.

Record your weekly goals at the top of the page to keep you on track.

3.

As you complete each assignment, mark the column with a check.

4.

Write the time you should allot for each assignment.

5.

Choose a symbol to identify tests or quizzes.

6.

Record elective classes and after school activities to keep track of your entire day.

7.

Remember to get a parent/guardian signature.

2

1

sson 2 Review Le 16 s 1-5 pg. Question ) due (9/16

3 3

ges Review pa Study

12-30 4:45-5:30 (9/15)

T

9/14 T 4

5

2

on 2 9/14 Less


13 Basketba ll 9am-9p m Washingto n Middle S chool

9

Practice trumpet

10

11

Drama C 4-4:30 lub:

take turn s with pe ople listen to o thers good spo rtsmansh ip

6 8

Bathroom

2:10 2:15

7 12

Mrs. Sally J ones

James h skills thisas improved his ma week. th

James is the classalso a good lead room. er in 3

30 min.


CLASS SCHEDULE

4

First Semester


CLASS SCHEDULE

5

Second Semester


FOCUS on Studying Fundamentals

Classroom Skills

Utilizing your planner is a key fundamental for successful study management. Keep your planner with you at all times. Write all short-term and long-term assignments, school activities, and after-school commitments in your planner. Write down exactly what you want to accomplish each day. Refer to your planner often throughout the day; your schedule may change and you need to stay on top of these changes. Number tasks in the order of importance and assign a time schedule for when you plan to do each task. Stick to your schedule. Complete task number one before moving on to task number two. Then, focus on task number two the same way before moving on to task number three. If you don’t finish the last couple of tasks, move them to the next day. If you continue with this same process, you will be less likely to forget assignments. Also, you would have accomplished the most important tasks for that day. Review your planner the last five minutes of each day to prepare for the following day’s tasks.

Be ready for each class by having your materials and your planner. Be prepared to listen and take good notes. Develop a system of note-taking including abbreviations, punctuation, and margins. Leave some space as you move from one point to the next so you can fill in additional notes later. Record only the major points. Spend more time listening and asking clarification questions if you don’t understand something. Keep your notes neat, legible enough for you to read. Note everything written on the board. Listen carefully to what the teacher presents as important. Listen for the main points, transitions from one point to another, relationships between points, results and summaries made by the teacher. Record all details of the assignment in your planner on the day the assignment is given. Record on the “due date” itself that the assignment is due, but do not record all of the details again. Instead, record the date the assignment was given with a backward arrow (date) so you know where to look for the details of the assignment (see page 2 of this planner for an example).

Opportunity Take the opportunity to maximize your study time. Where you study is just as important as when and how you study. Your study environment must eliminate all distractions. Before you study, review this checklist of important items that affect the physical environment of your “study room”: • Good lighting – avoids eyestrain. • Clock – helps you manage your time and assignments. • Flat, solid surface – keep your work area clean and clear of clutter. • Good chair – avoids stiff neck or muscle fatigue. • Comfortable room temperature – allows mental alertness and physical comfort. • School tools – keep in a convenient place to avoid wasting time looking for them. • Noise level – avoid all loud distractions that affect your concentration. • Background music – soft background music may be helpful. Be honest with yourself if the music is distracting you. • Glasses – if you wear glasses, use them.

CAREERPLANET

Utilize Time Proper and effective use of your time is the key to your success as a student. Before you begin your study period, plan how much time you will spend on each assignment. Using your planner, set up a schedule for each assignment and prioritize them according to length of needed time to complete the assignment, tests or quizzes, and date due. Then check to see if you have all of your school tools. In other words, get prepared before you sit down to work. Know your objective and goals for each study time. Be sure to schedule some breaks between assignments. Stand up and stretch, do some simple exercises, or refresh with a beverage before moving on to your next task.

Stick to It Review your planner the last period of the day. Make sure you have all your books and materials necessary for that night’s study session. Take the time to plan and review before you leave school for the day. If you have time, prioritize and put a time on each assignment or commitment for that night. This is your game plan, stick to it!

6


SEP 2013

JUL 2013 T W

T

F

S

S M

T W

T

F

S

1

2

4

5

6

1

2

3

5

6

7

8

9 10 11 12 13

8

9 10 11 12 13 14

S M 7

3

4

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

28 29 30 31

29 30

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

SATURDAY

2

3

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

third week of August

second week of August

6

fourth week of August

1

5

READING CHALLENGE

4

FRIDAY

fifth week of August

first week of August

SUNDAY

SUNDAY

AGOSTO

Friendship Day

Book Title

Pages

Total

__________________________________________

_________ __________

__________________________________________

_________ __________

__________________________________________

_________ __________

__________________________________________

_________ __________

__________________________________________

_________ __________

__________________________________________

_________ __________ Grand Total __________

7


2013

DID YOU KNOW?

AGOSTO

The name of the dog from "The Grinch Who Stole Christmas" is Max.

AUGUST JUL 29

3

TUESDAY martes

JUL 30

3

WEDNESDAY miércoles JUL 31

LANGUAGE ARTS / READING

SOCIAL STUDIES

SCIENCE

MATH

MONDAY lunes

COMMENTS

HALL PASS

AFTER SCHOOL:

AFTER SCHOOL:

AFTER SCHOOL:

To:

To:

To:

To:

To:

To:

Time Out:

Time Out:

Time Out:

Time Out:

Time Out:

Time Out:

Time In:

Time In:

Time In:

Time In:

Time In:

Time In:

Initial:

Initial:

Initial:

Initial:

Initial:

Initial:

PARENT/GUARDIAN SIGNATURE:

TCC

PARENT/GUARDIAN SIGNATURE:

TCC

8

PARENT/GUARDIAN SIGNATURE:

TCC

3


Weekly Goals____________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ AUG 1

3

AUG 2

FRIDAY viernes

MATH

THURSDAY jueves

S 4 11 18 25

3

AUGUST '13 M T W T F S 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

SEPTEMBER '13 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

AUG 3

sábado

AUG 4

domingo

SCIENCE

Reading Goals Minutes

Pages Read

Monday

_________ _________

Tuesday

_________ _________

SOCIAL STUDIES

Wednesday _________ _________ Thursday

_________ _________

Friday

_________ _________ _________ _________

LANGUAGE ARTS / READING

Total

Total

INTEGRITY: Be reliable — do what you say you’ll do.

CHARACTER CHALLENGE: What will you do to display INTEGRITY this week?

AFTER SCHOOL:

AFTER SCHOOL:

QUOTE OF THE WEEK:

COMMENTS

HALL PASS

I'd rather be a failure at something I love than a success at something I hate. George Burns To:

To:

To:

To:

Time Out:

Time Out:

Time Out:

Time Out:

Time In:

Time In:

Time In:

Time In:

TEACHER COMMENT CODES (TCC):

Initial:

Initial:

Initial:

Initial:

GW: Good Work

IN: Improvement Necessary

EA: Excellent Attitude

PA: Poor Attitude

GA: Good Attendance

TA: Tardy/Absent

PARENT/GUARDIAN SIGNATURE:

TCC

PARENT/GUARDIAN SIGNATURE:

9

TCC

GP: Good Participation

DC: Disrupts Class

GS: Good Social Skills

RW: Relationships Need Work

MT: Manages Time Well

LA: Late Assignments


FINANCIAL

Education

Money Management It is said that money can’t buy happiness. But saving it correctly can make you feel better about your future. Bad spending habits can cause stress, which affects your mood and can even have a negative effect on your health! If you’re currently spending your allowance or money you earn as fast as you get it, you are creating bad spending habits that will be tough for you to break later. That is why it’s important for you to start building good money management habits now.

Earning Money in Middle School or Junior High Want to find ways in which you can earn money other than getting an allowance from your parents? Get creative, and talk with your parents or guardians about some of these ideas: • Tutoring younger kids in music, math, science, or reading. • Walking dogs or animal care (pet sitting). • Weeding and watering gardens or potted plants, mowing yards, snow shoveling. • Paper routes. • Babysitting. Check out this website for additional ideas: www.careerkids.com

Consider volunteer work. You won’t earn a paycheck, but you will feel great about helping other people or animals. By volunteering your time, you make a difference and you also learn skills that you can use for other jobs in the future. Possible places to volunteer would be a nursing home, a food bank, or an organization that helps children with special needs.

Jobs that I could do... __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________

MORE TO COME... Financial Education on page 28.

CAREERPLANET

10


FINANCIAL

Education

Good Money Habits Now that you have found a way to make money, you need to get smart about what you do with that money. You worked hard to earn the money, so you should put some thought into how to manage your money. To create good habits that will last a lifetime, start by taking a look at the four choices you have: Spend, Save, Invest or Donate. 1. SPEND your money now. This would be fine for items that are considered disposable or would only be used for a short time. Could include: fast food, clothing, movie tickets, music downloads, or candy. 2. SAVE for items you want in the near future. These items would be a bit more expensive than movie tickets. Examples would be: MP3 Player, a bicycle, or a computer. 3. INVEST your money for things you will need further into the future. Some things you may be investing for would include: college or technical school, a car – or a down payment on a house. While it might seem like you have "plenty of time" to save for these items, you'll need that money sooner than you think. It is important to look at your future when dealing with your money. 4. DONATE or Give to Charities. If you feel strongly about giving back to your community or to others that are not as fortunate, you should put aside some of your money for this. You could donate to an organization that helps other kids, animals, or even the environment. Talk it over with your parents or guardians to figure out what portion of your money should go into each of the four "buckets" – Spend, Save, Invest and Donate. Once you've created that plan, stick to it. It will not be easy, but you will find that you will feel a sense of accomplishment by saving, investing, and giving. Don't forget to put at least some into your Spend bucket – and have fun! Interest – What is it? Interest is either money that you earn or get paid when you save your money with a bank or other financial institution (savings account, certificate of deposit, money market account) – or money that you have to pay if you borrow money (bank loan or charging items to a credit card). Savings: When you are saving money, the bank is paying you interest because they get to keep your money and use it for other things until you need to access it. So, the more money you can save now, the more interest (additional money) you can earn. There are some great websites that show how much money you'll have in the future by starting to save now. A couple of sites are: www.themint.org and http:///life.familyeducation.com. There is even a website that calculates how long it would take for you to become a millionaire! Go to: http://www.themint.org/kids/when-will-you-be-a-millionaire.html. Borrowing: When you have borrowed money or have charged items to a credit card, you have to pay money to that organization because they need to earn something for allowing you to purchase items before you have the money to pay for them. So, whenever you have to borrow money or put money on a credit card that you cannot pay off immediately, you will have to pay MORE for that item than if you had just paid for it right away with cash. These websites show you how much you REALLY pay for something if you charge it and don't pay off your entire balance right away: www.coolmath.com and www.themint.org.

MORE TO COME... Financial Education on page 40.

CAREERPLANET

11


FINANCIAL

Education

Credit Cards: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly The Good – If used the right way, credit cards can help you to establish a credit history. A good credit history will help you get better interest rates on loans when you need to buy a car or a house. Some credit cards offer perks, like cash back or frequent flier miles on an airline. Many also offer purchase protection, which can protect you in the event that an item you purchased on your credit card is damaged on the way home, lost or stolen shortly after you purchase it. Be careful to read all of the details of your card agreement, as the protection coverage varies and there are dollar limits to what is covered. Credit cards are great to have in case of an emergency when you don’t have enough cash available. An example would be if you got a flat tire and needed a new one, but didn’t have enough money to pay for it right away.

The Bad – If used the wrong way, credit cards can be an expensive money management lesson. It is tempting to charge impulse items that you want, but don’t need, because you can always “pay it off later.” The problem is that many people charge a lot of items and before they know it, they have a large credit card balance that they can’t pay off that month. Now, the bad part is that you have to pay interest. So, you are paying MORE for the items you bought than if you had paid cash. Interest rates, especially for younger people with little or no credit history, are often 18%, 20% or higher. On a $100 item, if you charged it and didn’t pay it off for a year, you would have paid $120 if your interest rate was 20%. That is $20 you could have used to buy something else if you would have paid in cash.

The Ugly – If you find yourself charging items, and only paying off the minimum balances, rather than paying off your account each month, the interest will add up quickly on your account, and you may end up paying double (or more) what that item was worth. Worse, if you charge so many items that you can’t even make your minimum monthly payments; you will damage your credit. It will be difficult to get loans for items in the future, and if you can get them, you’ll pay huge interest rates. Some people get into such debt with their credit cards that they have to declare bankruptcy. These people have a very tough time getting any loan approvals at even the highest interest rates. Money stress can cause problems with your personal relationships and can also cause your health to suffer.

A Better Bet – Talk with your parents to determine if and when the right time is for you to get a credit card. Set limits up front on how many dollars you can charge and pay off each month. This should relate back to the money you earn and how much you have already discussed is available for spending each month. Better yet, pay cash for everything and only use the credit card in the case of a true emergency.

MORE TO COME... Career Education on page 50.

CAREERPLANET

12


CAREER Education Introduction to Career Planning and Personal Assessment You may be saying to yourself “Why is career planning important to me? After all, I am a middle school student.” Well, it is never too early to look into what you will want to do after you graduate from high school. The pages throughout this planner that focus on Career Education will walk you through several areas of the planning process. The first area of focus is learning about yourself, and the current skills or interests you may possess. As you move through the middle school years, your perspective may change and take you down an entirely different career path. Using this model will help you organize your research and allow you to make additions and changes to it. The second area of focus is Researching Occupations. There are countless opportunities for you to explore. Navigating through the major career types and narrowing down an actual occupation will be a fun exercise. You will be able to record specific details regarding each job title. The third area of focus is the Career Interests and Occupations. This exercise will give you a general feel of your current interests and how they match up with the major categories of careers. There may be experiences that you have had and enjoyed that correspond with a long term career. The fourth area of focus is Writing the Career Plan. For each of the occupations that you found interesting, narrow down to one or two. Fill out the career plan for each. You may be surprised to find they are similar in skills needed and potentially education. Know the facts, create your own future: Your middle and high school years will go by very quickly. When you graduate from high school, you have three main choices: 1. Continue with higher education at a college or university. 2. Attend a technical/vocational school for further training. 3. Get a job or join a military branch of service. Use your resources: • School Counselors • Teachers • Parents/Guardians • World Wide Web • Books NOTES: ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

MORE TO COME... Skills and Interests – Self–Assessment on page 60.

CAREERPLANET

13


CAREER Education Skills and Interests — Self-Assessment Nothing in life can be worse than doing a job that you don’t enjoy. You may ask the question, “How do I know which job, or career, I will enjoy?” The answer to that lies in what interests you have and what skills you possess. There are many ways for you to identify those interests and skills, but you will need to put some effort into this self-discovery process. Start with making a list of activities and experiences you have enjoyed. After making this list, think about why you had fun or enjoyed them. Explore your past successes. What skills were involved that contributed to your success and enjoyment? Focus on your accomplishments and what was satisfying about them. Jot down some notes. There are no right or wrong answers here. Just write what comes to mind. There are many personality and interest surveys available to you through your guidance counselor. These tools use scientific methods to uncover aspects of yourself you may not be aware of. These surveys are interesting and fun to take, so make sure you use these valuable discovery tools.

Interests ______________________________________ Skills _____________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________

Accomplishments and Successes ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

One Thing I Would Love To Do and Why: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MORE TO COME... Research Occupations on page 72.

CAREERPLANET

14


CAREER Education Research Occupations of Interest Your next step is to do some research on occupations of interest to you. There are several Web sites for researching careers as well as publications like the Big Book of Careers and the U.S. Government’s Occupational Outlook Handbook. These nationally recognized sources of career information provide valuable assistance to people making career decisions. Your guidance counselor can also provide other valuable resources. Other sources of information are parent(s), relatives, family friends, teachers, job fairs, and the internet.

There are several Career Types which are general classifications under which jobs fall. These major Career Types are: • • • • • •

Agriculture and Natural Resources Building and Trades Education Health Manufacturing and Processing Transportation

• • • • • •

Art, Media and Communications Business and Finance Engineering, Math and Science Human and Personal Legal Sales and Marketing

Things to consider when researching a career are listed below on the Career Chart. Career Type:

#1

#2

#3

Job Title Training/Education Needed Earnings/Pay Benefits Vacations Working Conditions Related Job Titles Advancement

Web sites to research: www.bls.gov/oco www.jobprofile.com www.mapping-yourfuture.org/planning www.mycoolcareer.com www.breakthroughcollaborative.org www.careerexplorer.net www.careerlaunch.net www.careercruising.com

Other sites you have found: ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________

MORE TO COME... Career Interests and Occupations on page 82. CAREERPLANET

15


CAREER Education Career Interests and Occupations If you took a personality and interest survey, several jobs are identified within the major occupational fields. The survey results indicate that you have the same type of personality and interests as people who already work within those jobs and careers. Realize there are several different career possibilities within the major occupational fields. Spend some time researching your major occupational field.

Ask yourself these questions: Your answers to these six basic questions will give you clues as to the type of work you will enjoy. 1. Do I prefer to work with objects, machines, tools, plants or animals? ___ Yes ___ No 2. Do I prefer to solve problems by observation, investigation, evaluation? ___ Yes ___ No 3. Do I like to do things using my imagination and creativity? ___ Yes ___ No 4. Do I prefer to work with people by helping, teaching, training, and curing them? ___ Yes ___ No 5. When working with people, do I prefer to persuade, influence, lead and manage people for organizational goals and monetary gains? ___ Yes ___ No 6. Do I like to work with data or numbers, and do clerical work and detailed tasks? ___ Yes ___ No Think about your experiences and activities, then indicate which of the six questions above would apply. Do you see a connection or a pattern between the questions and your life experiences? Experience/Activity example: Volunteering at a nursing home

# Applied

Experience/Activity

#4

# Applied

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––

Financial aid for college or technical school: Even though you have a few years before you will be graduating from high school, it is never too early to start researching colleges and technical schools you may want to attend. Part of your decision on where you will go may depend on how much financial help you can get from that particular college or technical school. Check with each school's financial aid office to start. There are many ways to finance your education, and some of the main ways are listed below. • Grants: These do not have to be paid back and are usually based on financial need (how much money your family makes). • Scholarships and Fellowships: These also do not have to be paid back and normally offered to students who have specific qualifications or skills – such as athletic ability, musical ability or strong grade point and test scores (academic ability). • Loans: Unlike grants and scholarships, student or parent loans for college must be repaid. The federal government mandates maximum interest rates and fees that financial institutions can charge for these loans, so they are usually at very low interest rates. • Military/GI Bill: The United States Military has a number of programs that offer financial aid in return for serving our country in the Armed Forces. You can find more information on this at education.military.com Financial Aid Websites: www.finaid.org www.fafsa.ed.gov www.fastweb.com

MORE TO COME... Writing a Career Plan on page 92.

CAREERPLANET

16


CAREER Education Writing a “Career Plan” From the three jobs you researched, pick the ONE that most interests you. The lesson this month is to help you write a simple “Career Plan.” Now that you know your interests and skills, you can then match them with an occupation. I.

Career Goal: (Example: To become an accountant. To work for an accounting firm which audits other companies to help them with planning and growth.) ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

II.

Requirements: (Write what you need to do to achieve your chosen occupation.) Example: • Bachelor’s degree in accounting • Master’s degree to further my job choices and expertise •

Analytical mind • Presentation skills • Writing skills • Knowledge of sound business practices • Accreditation by passing board test

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ III.

Current Skills and Interests: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

IV.

How I Plan to Reach My Career Goal: Education needed; work experience which would help – summer jobs, etc.; Networking – who I already know, who I should know, organizations I could join which would help ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

CAREERPLANET

17


United States Government The chart below shows the basic structure of the government of the United States. The U.S. Constitution creates three separate branches – legislative, executive and judicial – to share governmental powers. In general, the legislative branch makes the nation’s laws, the executive branch carries out the laws, and the judicial branch interprets the laws.

Constitution Executive Legislative

Judicial

President Congress

Supreme Court Vice President

Senate House of Representatives

Office of the Vice President

Executive Office of the President* Council of Economic Advisers Council on Environmental Quality Domestic Policy Council National Economic Council National Security Council Office of Administration Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives Office of Management and Budget Office of National AIDS Policy Office of National Drug Control Policy Office of Policy Development Office of Science and Technology Policy Office of the U.S. Trade Representative President’s Critical Infrastructure Protection Board President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board USA Freedom Corps White House Military Office

Agencies Architect of the Capitol Congressional Budget Office Copyright Royalty Tribunal General Accounting Office Government Printing Office Library of Congress Office of Technology/Assessment United States Botanic Garden

Court of Appeals

District Courts

Special Courts

* Presidents frequently create, eliminate and reorganize agencies in the Executive Office of the President.

Presidents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

George Washington John Adams Thomas Jefferson James Madison James Monroe John Quincy Adams Andrew Jackson Martin Van Buren William Henry Harrison John Tyler James K. Polk Zachary Taylor*

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Millard Fillmore Franklin Pierce James Buchanan Abraham Lincoln* Andrew Johnson Ulysses S. Grant Rutherford B. Hayes James A. Garfield* Chester A. Arthur Grover Cleveland Benjamin Harrison Grover Cleveland

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

18

William McKinley* Theodore Roosevelt William H. Taft Woodrow Wilson Warren G. Harding* Calvin Coolidge Herbert Hoover Franklin D. Roosevelt* Harry S. Truman Dwight D. Eisenhower John F. Kennedy* Lyndon B. Johnson

37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44

Richard M. Nixon* Gerald R. Ford James E. Carter Ronald Reagan George H. W. Bush William J. Clinton George W. Bush Barack Obama

* Did not finish term.

Pending the November 2012 election results, there may be a new 45th President.


1 Advance and promote dietary guidance for all Americans, and

Focus on Fruits

2

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Information according to the USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. April 2005 - CNPP-15

The Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, an organization of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, was established in 1994 to improve the nutrition and well-being of Americans. Toward this goal, the Center focuses its efforts on two primary objectives—

Conduct applied research and analyses in nutrition and consumer economics. The Center's core products to support its objectives are the following:

Make at least half your grains whole Get your calcium-rich foods

• Dietary Guidelines for Americans • MyPyramid Food Guidance System

Vary your veggies

• Healthy Eating Index

Go lean with protein

• U.S. Food Plans • Nutrient Content of the U.S. Food Supply • Expenditures on Children by Families

FIND YOUR BALANCE BETWEEN FOOD AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY!

Be sure to stay within your daily calorie needs. • Be physically active for at least 30 minutes most days of the week. • About 60 minutes a day may be needed to prevent weight gain. • For sustaining weight loss, at least 60 to 90 minutes a day may be required. • Children and teenagers should be physically active for 60 minutes every day, or most days.

KNOW THE LIMITS ON FATS, SUGARS, AND SALT (SODIUM)

Make most of your fat sources from fish, nuts, and vegetable oils. • Limit solid fats like butter, stick margarine, shortening, and lard, as well as foods that contain these. • Check the Nutrition Facts label to keep saturated fats, trans fats, and sodium low. • Choose food and beverages low in added sugars. Added sugars contribute calories with few, if any, nutrients. 19


DID YOU KNOW... The earth is a globe and can be divided into lots of lines called latitude and longitude. Longitude lines run north and south; Latitude lines run east and west. The lines measure distances in degrees.

But where do you start? Where is 0 degrees? Well, that depends on whether you're looking for 0 degrees latitude or 0 degrees longitude. They are different things. The equator is 0 degree latitude. This imaginary line, which runs through parts of South America, Africa, and Asia, is officially the halfway point between the North Pole and the South Pole.

29,637,900 SQUARE MILE AREA

The prime meridian is 0 degrees longitude. This imaginary line runs through the United Kingdom, France, Spain, western Africa, and Antarctica. By using the equator and prime meridian, we can divide the world into four hemispheres, north, south, east, and west. For instance, the United States is in the Western Hemisphere (because it is west of the prime meridian) and also in the Northern Hemisphere (because it is north of the equator).

60,060,700 SQUARE MILE AREA

SOUTH AMERICA Argentina...............Buenos Aires Bolivia............................Sucre Brazil.............................Brasilia Chile ................................Santiago Colombia ...........................Bogota Ecuador ................................Quito French Guiana.................Cayenne Guyana ......................Georgetown Paraguay........................Asuncion Peru ......................................Lima Suriname....................Paramaribo Uruguay .....................Montevideo Venezuela ........................Caracas

NORTH AMERICA Antigua & Barbuda....................St. John’s Bahamas.........................................Nassau Barbados ...................................Bridgetown Belize .....................................................Belmopan Bermuda..................................................Hamilton Canada .......................................................Ottawa Costa Rica ...............................................San José Cuba...........................................................Havana Dominica ....................................................Roseau Dominican Republic ......................Santa Domingo El Salvador........................................San Salvador Grenada ..............................................St. George’s

Guatemala.....................................Guatemala City Haiti .................................................Port-au-Prince Hondurus.............................................Tegucigalpa Jamaica ....................................................Kingston Mexico .................................................Mexico City Nicaragua ...............................................Managua Panama..............................................Panama City St. Kitt’s & Nevis ................................Basseterre St. Lucia.....................................................Castries St. Vincent & the Grenadines.............Kingstown Trinidad & Tobago............................Port-of-Spain U.S.A. ............................................Washington, DC

ASIA Afghanistan ..................................Kabul Armenia .....................................Yerevan Azerbaijan .......................................Baku Bahrain.................................................Manama Bangladesh..............................................Dhaka Bhutan ..................................................Thimphu Brunei................................Bandar Seri Begawan Cambodia .......................................Phnom Penh China........................................................Beijing Cyprus.....................................................Nicosia East Timor....................................................Dili Georgia .....................................................Tbilisi India ...................................................New Delhi Indonesia ...............................................Jakarta Iran ..........................................................Tehran Iraq .......................................................Baghdad Israel ..................................................Jerusalem

Japan ........................................................Tokyo Jordan ....................................................Amman Kazakstan ..............................................Almaty Korea North.....................................Pyongyang Korea South..............................................Seoul Kuwait.....................................................Kuwait Kyrgyzstan ...........................................Bishkek Laos .....................................................Vientiane Lebanon....................................................Beirut Malaysia ......................................Kuala Lumpur Maldives ....................................................Male Mongolia ...........................................Ulan Bator Myanmar................................................Yangon Nepal................................................Kathmandu Oman.......................................................Muscat Pakistan.............................................Islamabad Philippines ..............................................Manila

Qatar .........................................................Doha Russia ....................................................Moscow Saudi Arabia...........................................Riyadh Singapore ...........................................Singapore Sri Lanka ..............................................Colombo Syria ...................................................Damascus Taiwan ......................................................Taipei Tajikistan ............................................Dushanbe Thailand ...............................................Bangkok Turkey.....................................................Ankara Turkmenistan....................................Ashkhabad United Arab Emir..............................Abu Dhabi Uzbekistan...........................................Tashkent Vietnam....................................................Hanoi Yemen.......................................................Sanaa

ANTARCTICA 20

WESTERN HEMISPHERE ¥ WESTERN HEMISPHERE ¥ WESTERN HEMISPHERE ¥ WESTERN HEMISPHERE ¥ WESTERN HEMISPHERE

5,427,000 SQUARE MILE AREA


NOTE: Maps always show a distorted view of the earth and its continents because they are not curved in three dimensions.

5,427,000 SQUARE MILE AREA

EASTERN HEMISPHERE ¥ EASTERN HEMISPHERE ¥ EASTERN HEMISPHERE ¥ EASTERN HEMISPHERE ¥ EASTERN HEMISPHERE

60,060,700 SQUARE MILE AREA

26,469,500 SQUARE MILE AREA

29,637,900 SQUARE MILE AREA

AUSTRALIA Australia.......................Canberra

OCEANIA Fiji .........................................Suva Kiribati........................................Tarawa Marshall Islands........................Majura Micronesia...................................Palikir Nauru............................................Yaren New Zealand........................Wellington Palau.............................................Koror Pap. N. Guinea.................Port Moresby Solomon Islands.......................Honiara Tonga .....................................Nukúalofa Tuvalu .......................................Funafuti Vanuatu...........................................Vila Western Samoa.............................Apia

EUROPE Albania .............................Tirana Andorra .............Andorra la Vella Austria..............................Vienna Belarus .........................................Minsk Belgium .....................................Brussels Bosnia & Herzegovina ...........Sarajevo Bulgaria .........................................Sofia Croatia........................................Zagreb Czech Republic...........................Prague Denmark .............................Copenhagen Estonia.........................................Tallinn

Finland.......................................Helsinki France.............................................Paris Germany.......................................Berlin Greece .........................................Athens Hungary...................................Budapest Iceland ....................................Reykjavik Ireland .........................................Dublin Italy...............................................Rome Latvia..............................................Riga Liechtenstein................................Vaduz Lithuania......................................Vilnius

Luxembourg.......................Luxembourg Macedonia...................................Skopje Malta..........................................Valletta Moldova ...................................Kishinev Monaco ......................................Monaco Netherlands .........................Amsterdam Norway ..........................................Oslo Poland........................................Warsaw Portugal.......................................Lisbon Romania .................................Bucharest Russia ........................................Moscow

San Marino ..........................San Marino Slovakia .................................Bratislava Slovenia...................................Ljubljana Spain ...........................................Madrid Sweden..................................Stockholm Switzerland ...................................Bern Ukraine ...........................................Kiev United Kingdom ........................London Vatican City.........................Vatican City Serbia/Montenegro ...............Belgrade

AFRICA Algeria .............................Algiers Angola ...........................Luanda Benin ..........................Porto-Novo Botswana ...............................Gaborone Burkina Faso....................Ouagadougou Burundi .................................Bujumbura Cameroon .................................Yaounde Cape Verde ...................................Praia Central African Rep. .................Bangui Chad......................................N’Djamena Comoros......................................Moroni

Congo ....................................Brazzaville Dem. Rep. of Congo...............Kinshasa Djibouti ......................................Djibouti Egypt..............................................Cairo Equatorial Guinea .....................Malabo Eritrea ........................................Asmara Ethiopia...............................Addis Ababa Gabon ......................................Libreville Gambia .......................................Banjul Ghana ............................................Accra Guinea.......................................Conakry

Guinea-Bissau.............................Bissau Ivory Coast ...............................Abidjan Kenya .........................................Nairobi Lesotho.......................................Maseru Liberia .....................................Monrovia Libya.............................................Tripoli Madagascar......................Antananarivo Malawi.....................................Lilongwe Mali ...........................................Bamako Mauritania ...........................Nouakchott Mauritius................................Port Louis

21

Morocco........................................Rabat Mozambique..............................Maputo Namibia..................................Windhoek Niger ..........................................Niamey Nigeria..........................................Abuja Rwanda ........................................Kigali Sao Tome & Principe .............Sao Tome Senegal ........................................Dakar Seychelles ..................................Victoria Sierra Leone............................Freetown Somalia .................................Mogadishu

South Africa..............................Pretoria Sudan......................................Khartoum Swaziland ...............................Mbabane Tanzania ...................................Dodoma Togo ...............................................Lome Tunisia............................................Tunis Uganda.....................................Kampala Zambia........................................Lusaka Zimbabwe ..................................Harare


60,060,700 SQUARE MILE AREA

CANADA Ottawa Province/Territory Capital AB Alberta ............................................Edmonton BC British Columbia ..................................Victoria MB Manitoba..........................................Winnipeg NB New Brunswick...............................Fredericton NF New Foundland ................................St. John’s NT Northwest Territories......................Yellowknife NU Nunavut................................................Iqaluit NS Nova Scotia .........................................Halifax ON Ontario ...............................................Toronto PEI Prince Edward Island..................Charlottetown QC Quebec .........................................Quebec City SK Saskatchewan.......................................Regina YT Yukon Territory ..............................Whitehorse

29,637,900 SQUARE MILE AREA

MEXICO Mexico City State Capital 1 Aguascalientes.....................Aguascalientes 2 Baja California Norte.....................Mexicali 3 Baja California Sur.........................La Paz 4 Campeche ................................Campeche 5 Chiapas ...........................Tuxtla Gutiérrez 6 Chihuahua...............................Chihuahua 7 Coahuila........................................Saltillo 8 Colima ..........................................Colima 9 Durango.....................................Durango 10 Guanajuato ............................Guanajuato 11 Guerrero ..............................Chilpancingo 12 Hidalgo .......................................Pachuca

UNITED STATES Washington, DC State Capital AL Alabama .............................Montgomery AK Alaska.........................................Juneau AZ Arizona ......................................Phoenix AR Arkansas ................................Little Rock CA California..............................Sacramento CO Colorado......................................Denver CT Connecticut................................Hartford

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Jalisco...................................Guadalajara Mexico ...........................................Toluca Michoacan....................................Morelia Morelos..................................Cuernavaca Nayarit ............................................Tepic Nuevo León .............................Monterrey Oaxaca ........................................Oaxaca Puebla ..........................................Puebla Querétaro ................................Querétaro Quintana Roo ............................Chetumal San Luis Potosi ..................San Luis Potosí Sinaloa .......................................Culiacán Sonora ....................................Hermosillo

DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA

26 27 28 29 30 31 32

Delaware.......................................Dover Florida ..................................Tallahassee Georgia .......................................Atlanta Hawaii......................................Honolulu Idaho .............................................Boise Illinois....................................Springfield Indiana ................................Indianapolis Iowa .....................................Des Moines Kansas.........................................Topeka Kentucky..................................Frankfort Louisiana ............................Baton Rouge

Tabasco................................Villahermosa Tamaulipas........................Ciudad Victoria Tlaxcala ......................................Tlaxcala Veracruz........................................Jalapa Yucatán ........................................Mérida Zacatecas..................................Zacatecas Federal District .......................Mexico City ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH

Maine ........................................Augusta Maryland.................................Annapolis Massachusetts...............................Boston Michigan.....................................Lansing Minnesota...................................St. Paul Mississippi ..................................Jackson Missouri.............................Jefferson City Montana......................................Helena Nebraska.....................................Lincoln Nevada .................................Carson City New Hampshire ..........................Concord

22

NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC

New Jersey .................................Trenton New Mexico...............................Santa Fe New York.....................................Albany North Carolina.............................Raleigh North Dakota............................Bismarck Ohio ........................................Columbus Oklahoma........................Oklahoma City Oregon .........................................Salem Pennsylvania..........................Harrisburg Rhode Island..........................Providence South Carolina..........................Columbia

SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY PR

South Dakota ................................Pierre Tennessee .................................Nashville Texas ............................................Austin Utah..................................Salt Lake City Vermont.................................Montpelier Virginia ...................................Richmond Washington................................Olympia West Virginia ..........................Charleston Wisconsin...................................Madison Wyoming.................................Cheyenne Puerto Rico...............................San Juan

UNITED STATES MAP ¥ UNITED STATES MAP ¥ UNITED STATES MAP ¥ UNITED STATES MAP ¥ UNITED STATES MAP

5,427,000 SQUARE MILE AREA


PERCENTAGES AND DECIMALS

PERCENTAGES 100% 50% 33.3% 25% 20% 16.6% 12.5% 11.1% 10% 8.3% 66.6% 75%

100% 95% 90% 85% 80%

75% 70% 65% 60% 55%

= = = = =

1 .95 .90 .85 .80

= = = = =

.75 .70 .65 .60 .55

50% 45% 40% 35% 30%

DECIMALS 1 = 1.0 1/2 = 0.5 1/3 = 0.3 1/4 = 0.25 1/5 = 0.2 1/6 = 0.16 1/8 = 0.125 1/9 = 0.1 1/10 = 0.1 1/12 = 0.083 2/3 = 0.6 3/4 = 0.75 = = = = =

.50 .45 .40 .35 .30

25% 20% 15% 10% 05%

= = = = =

.25 .20 .15 .10 .05

ALGEBRA BASICS EXPANDING

FACTORING

(a+b)2 = a2 + 2ab + b2 (a-b)2 = a2 - 2ab + b2 (a+b)(c+d) = ac + ad + bc + bd (a+b)3 = a3 + 3a2b + 3ab2 + b3 (a-b)3 = a3 - 3a2b + 3ab2 - b3

a2 - b2 = (a+b)(a-b) a3 + b3 = (a+b)(a2-ab + b2) a3 - b3 = (a-b)(a2 + ab + b2)

To add or subtract different fractions, To divide or multiply, multiply the first

FRACTIONS first obtain a common denominator: with the reciprocal of the second fraction: _5 numerator 8 denominator

1 2 5 6 11 + = + = 3 5 15 15 15

2 3

1 2 6 = x =4 6 3 1

MEASUREMENT CONVERSION METRIC Basic Unit x 10 x 100 x 1000 รท 10 รท 100 รท 1000

LENGTH meter (m) decameter (dam) hectometer (hm) kilometer (km) decimeter (dm) centimeter (cm) millimeter (mm)

ENGLISH LENGTH 1 foot (ft. or ')................equals 12 inches (in. or ") 1 yard (yd.)........................................equals 3 feet 1 mile (mi.)..............equals 1760 yards/5280 feet 1 nautical mile.............................equals 1.15 miles 1 league ...........................................equals 3 miles

VOLUME liter (l) decaliter (dal) hectoliter (hl) kiloliter (kl) deciliter (dl) centiliter (cl) milliliter (ml)

WEIGHT gram (g) decagram (dag) hectogram (hg) kilogram (kg)* decigram (dg) centigram (cg) milligram (mg) *metric ton is 1000 kilograms

VOLUME 1 tablespoon (tbl. or T)..... equals 3 teaspoons (tsp. or t) 1 cup (c.) .....................................equals 16 tablespoons 1 pint (pt.).................................................equals 2 cups 1 quart (qt.)..............................................equals 2 pints 1 gallon (gal.) ........................................equals 4 quarts

WEIGHT AREA 1 pound (lb.)...................equals 16 ounces (oz.) 1 acre............equals 4840 sq. yards/43,560 sq. feet 1 ton ...................................equals 2000 pounds 1 square mile ..................................equals 640 acres

23


MATH FORMULAS

Parallelogram

ANGLE TYPES Acute Obtuse

Cube Rectangular Solid Right

Triangle

Trapezoid

Straight

Circle Complementary Angles

Equilateral

Scalene

Isosceles

Right

Congruency

Pyramid

Cone

Sphere

Supplementary Angles

GEOMETRY TRIANGLES

Rectangle

Square

PRIME NUMBERS Any integer greater than 1 that is divisible only by 1 and itself. The first twelve primes are 2,3,5,7,11,13,17,19,23,29,31, and 37.

MULTIPLICATION TABLE

CONVERSION TABLE

x

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

2

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

18

20

3

3

6

9

12

15

18

21

24

27

30

4

4

8

12

16

20

24

28

32

36

40

5

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

6

6

12

18

24

30

36

42

48

54

60

7

7

14

21

28

35

42

49

56

63

70

8

8

16

24

32

40

48

56

64

72

80

9

9

18

27

36

45

54

63

72

81

90

10

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

FRACTIONS Equivalents of common fractions

1/2............0.5000 1/3............0.3333 1/4............0.2500 1/5............0.2000 1/6............0.1667 1/7............0.1429 1/8............0.1250

1/9............0.1111 1/10..........0.1000 1/11..........0.0909 1/12..........0.0833 1/16..........0.0625 1/32..........0.0313 1/64..........0.0156

2/3............0.6667 2/5............0.4000 2/7............0.2857 2/9............0.2222 2/11..........0.1818 3/4............0.7500 3/5............0.6000

24

3/7............0.4286 3/8............0.3750 3/10..........0.3000 3/11..........0.2727 4/5............0.8000 4/7............0.5714 4/9............0.4444

When you know Multiply by To find inches ...........................................2.54 .............................centimeters feet .............................................30.48 ............................centimeters yards ..........................................0.9144 ..................................meters miles ...........................................1.609..............................kilometers teaspoons ...................................4.9289...............................milliliters tablespoons.................................14.787...............................milliliters cups............................................0.2366 .....................................liters pints ...........................................0.4732 .....................................liters quarts.........................................0.9464 .....................................liters gallons........................................3.7854 .....................................liters pounds........................................0.4536..............................kilograms tons ............................................0.9072............................metric tons centimeters .................................0.3937 ...................................inches meters ........................................1.0936 ....................................yards kilometers...................................0.6214.....................................miles milliliters.....................................0.0338...........................fluid ounces liters............................................1.057 ....................................quarts liters...........................................0.2642..................................gallons grams.........................................0.0353 ..................................ounces kilograms ...................................2.2046..................................pounds metric tons..................................1.1023 ......................................tons

4/11..........0.3636 5/6............0.8333 5/7............0.7143 5/8............0.6250 5/9............0.5556 5/11..........0.4545 5/12..........0.4167

6/7............0.8571 6/11..........0.5455 7/8............0.8750 7/9............0.7778 7/10..........0.7000 7/11..........0.6364 7/12..........0.5833

8/9............0.8889 8/11..........0.7273 9/10..........0.9000 9/11..........0.8182 10/11........0.9091 11/12........0.9167


TYPES OF SENTENCES

Sentences can be either simple, compound, complex, or compound-complex. THE SIMPLE SENTENCE

A simple sentence will have only one independent clause. There will be no dependent clauses, and the sentence must be limited to one subject and one predicate. The sentence may contain modifying words or phrases: Language class is fun. "Smallville" is an American television show. THE COMPOUND SENTENCE

Compound sentences are made up of two or more independent clauses, which are joined by a coordinating conjunction or a semicolon. A comma should always be used before any coordinating conjunction that joins two independent clauses: Mike likes "Smallville," but he thinks language class is boring. Laura likes language class, so she does not like "Smallville." THE COMPLEX SENTENCE

Complex sentences use one independent clause and one or more dependent clauses: When Laura is in language class, she often dreams of the next Smallville show. ("When Laura..." is a dependent clause, "she often..." is an independent clause.) THE COMPOUND-COMPLEX SENTENCE

The compound-complex sentence connects a compound and a complex sentence together. The sentence should contain two or more independent clauses and one or more dependent clause: Smallville is based off of the story of Superman, and they often make things different than the comic book, which can be confusing at times.

RULES OF

PUNCTUATION

"Quotation Marks" Quotation marks are used around the exact words of a speaker. Example: She said, "The answer is one." Apostrophe' The apostrophe is used in place of omitted letters in a contraction. Example: He can't go to the store until later. The apostrophe is also used to show possession. Example: Here comes Mike's dog around the corner. Exclamation Point! An exclamation point is used at the end of a sentence to show emotion or excitement. Example: I can’t believe they won that game with no time left on the clock!

Comma, There are many comma rules. The most common rule is using a comma to separate items in a list. Example: She played softball, basketball, and volleyball. Colon: The colon is used to show that a list of items follows it. Example: He studied two subjects: Reading and English. Semicolon; Use a semicolon to join two closely related clauses if they are not joined by the words and, or, but, for, or nor. Example: Don't open the window; the screen isn't in. Period. Used at the end of a sentence. Example: The dog ran away. Question Mark? A question mark is used at the end of a direct question. Example: Where is your dog?

HOMONYMS Homonyms are words that have the same form or sound but different meanings. They can also be very confusing.

• all ready, already • buy, by • complement, compliment • for, four • hole, whole • it's, its • miner, minor • past, passed • principal, principle • stationary, stationery • their, there, they're • threw, through • to, too, two • weather, whether • your, you're

ANTONYMS A word opposite of another word. Example: hot or cold, long or short, big or small, light and dark.

SYNONYMS One of two or more words that have the same or nearly identical meanings. Example: student or pupil, baby or infant, smart and intelligent.

ACRONYMS Words or names formed by combining the first letters of words in a phrase.

Example: NBA is an acronym of National Basketball Association.

PARTS OF A SENTENCE

SUBJECT The subject of a sentence is the person, place, thing, or idea that is doing or being something. Example: The light bulb needs to be replaced.

PREDICATE The predicate is the completer of a sentence. Example: Benita is going biking.

PARTS OF SPEECH NOUN

(names) A person, place, thing or idea. • COMMON NOUN – Any person, place, or thing. Example: baby, school, or book

• PROPER NOUN – Particular person, place, or thing. Example: Kara, North Dakota, or Saturday

PRONOUN (replaces) Used in place of a noun or more than one noun. Example: him, her, it, they • NOMINATIVE CASE – Takes the position of the subject of a sentence. Example: She went to the mall. • POSSESSIVE CASE – Shows ownership. Example: That bike is his. • OBJECTIVE CASE – Receives action, or follows a preposition. Example: The teacher gave him his test back.

ADJECTIVE (describes) Describes a noun, or pronoun by telling “which one,” “what kind” or “how many.” Example: that car, blue eyes, five players VERB

(asserts) Shows action, tells what someone or something is doing. Example: kick, jump, laugh, talk, think, or study

ADVERB (modifies) Describes or modifies a verb, adjective or another adverb. Adverbs always answers the question: when, where, how, and why (or to what extent). Example: walked slowly, very red apple, ran very quickly CONJUNCTION (joins) Joins words, phrases, or clauses. • COORDINATING CONJUNCTION – connects words of the same element. Example: and, but, for, or, nor, yet, or so • SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTION – joins the clause to the rest of the sentence. Example: until, since, because, unless, as, if, or after

PREPOSITION (links) Shows the relationship of one noun or pronoun to another word in the sentence. Example: She went across the field. INTERJECTION

(exclaims) Communicates strong emotion or surprise. Example: Ha!, Oh no!, Hooray!, Hello!, Ouch!, Yes!, or No!

DECLARATIVE STATEMENT

A declarative sentence states an idea. Example: I am going outside. INTERROGATIVE STATEMENT

An interrogative sentence asks a direct question. Example: Are you going outside? IMPERATIVE STATEMENT

An imperative sentence gives a command. Example: Larry, open the door. EXCLAMATORY STATEMENT

An exclamatory sentence shows strong feeling. Example: The bear is attacking! 25


PERSONAL DIRECTORY Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

Name _____________________

Phone ______________________

Email __________________________

26

Middle School Full Size Planners  

128 pages, resource section,grades 6 through 8 appropriate assignment tracker,career development supplement included, and financial manageme...