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Student Number:

Name:

SCHOOL INFORMATION School Name: ................................................................. Address: ................................................................. School ID: ................................................................. City, State, Zip: ................................................................. Phone: ................................................................. Fax: ................................................................. Email: .................................................................

Class Schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Two Year Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Using Your Planner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Study Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 Week at a Glance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-125 U.S. and World Maps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126-129 Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 General Math Formulas . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131-133 Periodic Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Social Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136-137 Grammar and Speech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138-139 ACT and SAT Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . 140-141 Long-Term Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142-143 Personal Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 1

2013-2014

INDEX

The building blocks of success.

STUDENT I.D. INFORMATION


Period

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Club (s) Meeting (s) Team Practice Club (s) Meeting (s) Team Practice Club (s) Meeting (s) Team Practice

2

Thursday

Friday


Period

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Subject Teacher Time Room Club (s) Meeting (s) Team Practice Club (s) Meeting (s) Team Practice Club (s) Meeting (s) Team Practice

3

Thursday

Friday


2013 CALENDAR FEBRUARY 2013

JANUARY 2013 S M T 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

T 3 10 17 24 31

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

F 3 10 17 24 31

S 4 11 18 25

S M T W T

3 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 17 18 19 20 24 25 26 27

3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 27 28 31

MAY 2013 S M T W 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

M 2 9 16 23 30

T 3 10 17 24

W 4 11 18 25

T 5 12 19 26

F S 1 2 7 8 9 14 15 16 21 22 23 28

JUNE 2013 S M T W T

F 6 13 20 27

S 7 14 21 28

S 1 8 15 22 29

S M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

S 5 12 19 26

S M T W T

OCTOBER 2013 S M T 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

T 3 10 17 24 31

F 1 8 15 22 29

APRIL 2013 S 2 9 16 23 30

S M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

S 6 13 20 27

S M T W T 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

JULY 2013 F

2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 20 21 23 24 25 26 27 28 30

SEPTEMBER 2013 S 1 8 15 22 29

MARCH 2013

S M T W T

F 4 11 18 25

T 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24 31

T 4 11 18 25

W 3 10 17 24

T 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

AUGUST 2013

F 5 12 19 26

NOVEMBER 2013 3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 27 28

T 2 9 16 23 30

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24 31

DECEMBER 2013 S 1 8 15 22 29

M 2 9 16 23 30

T 3 10 17 24 31

W 4 11 18 25

T 5 12 19 26

F 6 13 20 27

S 7 14 21 28

2014 CALENDAR JANUARY 2014 S M T W 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

FEBRUARY 2014

F 3 10 17 24 31

S 4 11 18 25

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24 31

S M T W T 2 3 4 5 6 9 10 11 12 13 16 17 18 19 20 23 24 25 26 27

MAY 2014 S M T W T 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24

T 4 11 18 25

S 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28

JUNE 2014

SEPTEMBER 2014 S M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

MARCH 2014

F

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

S 1 8 15 22 29

M 2 9 16 23 30

T 3 10 17 24

W 4 11 18 25

T 5 12 19 26

F 6 13 20 27

T 2 9 16 23 30

F 3 10 17 24 31

2 9 16 23 30

F

3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 27 28 31

APRIL 2014 S 1 8 15 22 29

S M T 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

S 5 12 19 26

S M T W T

JULY 2014 S 7 14 21 28

S M T 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

S 4 11 18 25

S M T W T

OCTOBER 2014 S M T W 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

S M T W T

W 2 9 16 23 30

T 3 10 17 24 31

T 3 10 17 24

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

AUGUST 2014

F 4 11 18 25

NOVEMBER 2014

4

W 2 9 16 23 30

F

2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 20 21 23 24 25 26 27 28 30

S 1 8 15 22 29

F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

DECEMBER 2014 S M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24 31

T 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27


Using Your Planner This planner will assist you in managing your time more effectively. It will be your personal guide in setting goals, whether they are effective study times or improving your overall grades. The information documented will be your tool to maximum achievement.

How to use your planner: 1. Note in your planner all assignments right away. Don't try and remember the details later. Ask questions if you don't understand. 2. Record the day each assignment is due. This will assist you in prioritizing study time. 3. Write the time you should allocate for each assignment. 4. As you complete each assignment, check them with a check mark as shown below. 5. Record hall pass information: where you’re going, what time you left and who authorized your leaving class. 6. Record elective classes and after school activities. 7. Identify assignments that directly relate to tests and quizzes.

1

6 7

2

4

3

5

√ 9:00 8:000 √ 14) -10:0 5/01/ ( 0 :0 9 0 8-12 ) 0 √ - p. 8 02/14 0-1:0 y / r 5 :0 ( o 1 t 1 His 9-40 /14) 5:30 - p. 2 (5/04 3:302 Math h 55 C p. 33Art ctice ll Pra a b e test Bas istory

T

or H iew f 1. Rev e ct du proje t r A . 2

5


Study Tips Study Guide To excel in studying is directly related to how you FOCUS. Your ability to learn the fundamentals of time management; how you take the opportunity to design your study location; how you develop your classroom skills; how you best utilize your time; and how you stick to your goals. The most important element that you must remember is to never lose your FOCUS.

Fundamentals Utilizing your planner is a key fundamental for successful study management. Keep your planner with you at all times. Write all short and long-term assignments, school activities, and after-school commitments in your planner. Write down exactly what you want to accomplish each day. Refer to your planner often throughout the day; your schedule may change and you need to stay on top of these changes. Number tasks in the order of importance and assign a time schedule for when you plan to do each task. Stick to your schedule. Complete task number one before moving on to task number two. Then, focus on task number two the same way before moving on to task number three. If you don’t finish the last couple of tasks, move them to the next day. If you continue with this same process, you will be less likely to forget assignments. Also, you would have accomplished the most important tasks for that day. Review your planner the last five minutes of each day to prepare for the following day’s tasks.

Opportunity Take the opportunity to maximize your study time. Where you study is just as important as when and how you study. Your study environment must eliminate all distractions. Before you study, review this checklist of important items that affect the physical environment of your “study room”: • Good lighting – avoids eyestrain. • Clock – helps you manage your time and assignments. • Flat solid surface – keep your work area clean and clear of clutter. • Good chair – avoids stiff neck or muscle fatigue. • Comfortable room temperature – allows mental alertness and physical comfort. • School tools – keep them in a convenient place to avoid wasting time looking for them. • Noise level – avoid all loud distractions that affect your concentration. • Background music – soft background music may be helpful. Be honest with yourself if the music is distracting you. • Glasses – if you wear glasses, use them.

6


Study Tips Classroom Skills Be ready for each class by having your materials and your planner. Be prepared to listen and take good notes. Develop a system of note-taking including abbreviations, punctuation, and margins. Leave some space as you move from one point to the next so you can fill in additional notes later. Record only the major points. Spend more time listening and asking clarification questions if you don’t understand something. Keep your notes neat, legible enough for you to read. Note everything written on the board. Listen carefully to what the teacher presents as important. Listen for the main points, transitions from one point to another, relationships between points, results and summaries made by the teacher. Record all details of the assignment in your planner on the day the assignment is given. Record on the “due date” itself, that the assignment is due, but do not record all of the details again. Instead, record the date the assignment was given with a backward arrow (date) so you know where to look for the details of the assignment. Example: (4/14) Test

Utilize Time Proper and effective use of your time is the key to your success as a student. Before you begin your study period, plan how much time you will spend on each assignment. Using your planner, set up a schedule for each assignment and prioritize them according to length of needed time to complete the assignment, tests or quizzes, and date due. Then check to see if you have all of your school tools. In other words, get prepared before you sit down to work. Know your objective and goals for each study time. Be sure to schedule some breaks between assignments. Stand up and stretch, do some simple exercises, or refresh with a beverage before moving on to your next task.

Stick to It Review your planner the last period of the day. Make sure you have all your books and materials necessary for that night’s study session. Take the time to plan and review before you leave school for the day. If you have time, prioritize and put a time on each assignment or commitment for that night. This is your game plan, stick to it!

Reading Improvement Tips • Start your own library with reading materials that you collect. • Take notes in your purchased copies of magazines, novels, or newspapers. • Ask your teacher for a suggested reading list. • Read over your school breaks and summer vacation; never stop learning. • Read different types of material; newspapers, magazines, text books, instruction manuals, greeting cards, and even street signs! • Get a library card and spend time looking at the different media types. • Read original text, not secondary sources.

7


Financial Education Money Management It is said that money can’t buy happiness. But saving it correctly can make you feel better about your future. Bad spending habits can cause stress, which affects your mood and can even have a negative effect on your health! If you’re currently spending your allowance or money you earn as fast as you get it, you are creating bad spending habits that will be tough for you to break later. That is why it important for you to start building good money management habits now. Earning Money in High School Want to find ways in which you can earn money, other than getting an allowance from your parents? Check out the help wanted ads in your newspaper or online for part–time jobs. If you're interested in a particular career, check out a summer internship with businesses in your area. Get creative, and talk with your parents or guardians about some of these ideas: • Tutoring younger kids in music, math, science, or reading. • Walking dogs or animal care (pet sitting). • Weeding and watering gardens or potted plants, mowing yards, snow shoveling. • Paper routes. • Babysitting. Check out this website for additional ideas: www.careerkids.com Consider volunteer work. You won’t earn a paycheck, but you will feel great about helping other people or animals. By volunteering your time, you make a difference and you also learn skills that you can use for other jobs in the future. Possible places to volunteer would be a nursing home, a food bank, or an organization that helps children with special needs.

MORE TO COME... Financial Education on page 20.

CAREERPLANET 8


9

T 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24 31

T 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

JULY 2013

S 6 13 20 27

M 2 9 16 23 30

T 3 10 17 24

W 4 11 18 25

T 5 12 19 26

F 6 13 20 27

S 7 14 21 28

NOTES________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________

S 1 8 15 22 29

SEPTEMBER 2013

S M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

4

26

25

12

5

19

Monday

18

11

Friendship Day

Sunday

AUGUST Tuesday

27

20

13

6

7

28

21

14

Wednesday

8

1

29

22

15

Thursday Friday

30

23

16

9

2

Saturday

31

24

17

10

3

2013


AUGUST 2013 S M 4 11 18 25

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY: Aug 2, 1990: Iraq invades Kuwait.

T W T F S 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31

HALL PASS CHECK OUT

✔ To:

29 MONDAY lunes JUL

Time: Initial: To: Time: Initial: To: Time: Initial:

✔ To:

30 TUESDAY martes JUL

Time: Initial: To: Time: Initial: To: Time: Initial:

✔ To:

31 WEDNESDAY miércoles JUL

Time: Initial: To: Time: Initial: To: Time: Initial: 10


1

✔ To:

THURSDAY jueves

Time: Initial: To: Time: Initial: To: Time: Initial:

2

✔ To:

FRIDAY viernes

Time: Initial: To: Time: Initial: To: Time: Initial:

3

SATURDAY sábado

4

SUNDAY domingo

Character is like a tree and reputation like its shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing. Abraham Lincoln

NOTES:

QUOTES: Keep true to the dreams of thy youth. Friedrich von Schiller

11

SEPTEMBER 2013 S 1 8 15 22 29

M T W T F S 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 20 21 23 24 25 26 27 28 30


Financial Education Good Money Habits Now that you have found a way to make money, you need to get smart about what you do with that money. You worked hard to earn the money, so you should put some thought into how to manage your money. To create good habits that will last a lifetime, start by taking a look at the four choices you have: Spend, Save, Invest or Donate. 1. SPEND your money now. This would be fine for items that are considered disposable or would only be used for a short time. Could include: fast food, clothing, movie tickets, music downloads, or candy. 2. SAVE for items you want in the near future. These items would be a bit more expensive than movie tickets. Examples would be: MP3 Player, a bicycle, or a computer. 3. INVEST your money for things you will need further into the future. Some things you may be investing for would include: college or technical school, a car – or a down payment on a house. While it might seem like you have "plenty of time" to save for these items, you'll need that money sooner than you think. It is important to look at your future when dealing with your money. 4. DONATE or give to charities. If you feel strongly about giving back to your community or to others that are not as fortunate, you should put aside some of your money for this. You could donate to an organization that helps other kids, animals, or even the environment.

Talk it over with your parents or guardians to figure out what portion of your money should go into each of the four "buckets" – Spend, Save, Invest and Donate. Once you've created that plan, stick to it. It will not be easy, but you will find that you will feel a sense of accomplishment by saving, investing, and giving. Don't forget to put at least some into your Spend bucket – and have fun! Interest – What is it? Interest is either money that you earn or get paid when you save your money with a bank or other financial institution (savings account, certificate of deposit, money market account) – or money that you have to pay if you borrow money (bank loan or charging items to a credit card). Savings: When you are saving money, the bank is paying you interest because they get to keep your money and use it for other things until you need to access it. So, the more money you can save now, the more interest (additional money) you can earn. There are some great websites that show how much money you'll have in the future by starting to save now. A couple of sites are: www.themint.org and http:///life.familyeducation.com There is even a website that calculates how long it would take for you to become a millionaire! Go to: http://www.themint.org/kids/when-will-you-be-a-millionaire.html. Borrowing: When you have borrowed money or have charged items to a credit card, you have to pay money to that organization because they need to earn something for allowing you to purchase items before you have the money to pay for them. So, whenever you have to borrow money or put money on a credit card that you cannot pay off immediately, you will have to pay MORE for that item than if you had just paid for it right away with cash. These websites show you how much you REALLY pay for something if you charge it and don't pay off your entire balance right away: www.coolmath.com and www.themint.org.

MORE TO COME... Financial Education on page 30. CAREERPLANET 12


Financial Education Credit Cards: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly The Good – If used the right way, credit cards can help you to establish a credit history. A good credit history will help you get better interest rates on loans when you need to buy a car or a house. Some credit cards offer perks, like cash back or frequent flier miles on an airline. Many also offer purchase protection, which can protect you in the event that an item you purchased on your credit card is damaged on the way home, lost or stolen shortly after you purchase it. Be careful to read all of the details of your card agreement, as the protection coverage varies and there are dollar limits to what is covered. Credit cards are great to have in case of an emergency when you don’t have enough cash available. An example would be if you got a flat tire and needed a new one, but didn’t have enough money to pay for it right away. The Bad – If used the wrong way, credit cards can be an expensive money management lesson. It is tempting to charge impulse items that you want, but don’t need, because you can always “pay it off later.” The problem is that many people charge a lot of items and before they know it, they have a large credit card balance that they can’t pay off that month. Now, the bad part is that you have to pay interest. So, you are paying MORE for the items you bought than if you had paid cash. Interest rates, especially for younger people with little or no credit history, are often 18%, 20% or higher. On a $100 item, if you charged it and didn’t pay it off for a year, you would have paid $120 if your interest rate was 20%. That is $20 you could have used to buy something else if you would have paid in cash. The Ugly – If you find yourself charging items, and only paying off the minimum balances, rather than paying off your account each month, the interest will add up quickly on your account, and you may end up paying double (or more) what that item was worth. Worse, if you charge so many items that you can’t even make your minimum monthly payments; you will damage your credit. It will be difficult to get loans for items in the future, and if you can get them, you’ll pay huge interest rates. Some people get into such debt with their credit cards that they have to declare bankruptcy. These people have a very tough time getting any loan approvals at even the highest interest rates. Money stress can cause problems with your personal relationships and can also cause your health to suffer. A Better Bet – Talk with your parents to determine if and when the right time is for you to get a credit card. Set limits up front on how many dollars you can charge and pay off each month. This should relate back to the money you earn and how much you have already discussed is available for spending each month. Better yet, pay cash for everything and only use the credit card in the case of a true emergency.

MORE TO COME... Career Education on page 42. CAREERPLANET 13


Career Education Why Is Career Education and Planning Important? When you graduate from high school, you will be faced with two basic questions: “What am I going to do with my life? How do I find a career versus a job?” Graduation will be a crossroads for you. The choices you make will have significant implications on your life for many years. Your choices at graduation will be: • Continue with higher education at a college or university. • Attend a technical/vocational school for further training. • Get a job or join a military branch of service. College students are spending an average of 5+ years to graduate with a bachelor’s degree which results in higher educational loan debts. Many college graduates are taking entry level jobs in fields other than their major field of study. Students re-entering technical schools have an average age of 27 years. Employers are asking why students applying for jobs are not better prepared. Corporate America is very concerned with how they will find future employees with the skills needed in a very competitive business world. These questions beg to be asked: Why is it so difficult to choose a career? Why is it so difficult to find the right match of employer and employee? Successful career preparation is no accident. The Career Prep pages in your student planner will help you write a career plan. Your career plan will evolve and change with time as you learn more about yourself and the many opportunities in the world of work. Each month the Career Plan Prep pages will provide you with the “next step.” Use the weeks each month to complete the current step through research, exploration and personal reflection. Enjoy the process as it will be revealing, exciting and very rewarding for you. Develop a career plan and then work your plan. To get you started reflect on these two questions and jot down your thoughts. Why will having a Career Plan help you? What do you think a Career Plan should include? Helpful websites to get started: www.careerlaunch.net www.bls.gov www.mycoolcareer.com www.nextstepmagazine.com

MORE TO COME... Self Assessment - Skills and Interests on page 52.

CAREERPLANET 14


Career Education Self-Assessment — Skills and Interests Nothing in life can be worse than doing a job that you don’t enjoy. You may ask the question, “How do I know which job, or career, I will enjoy?” The answer to that lies in what interests you have and what skills you possess. There are many ways for you to identify those interests and skills but you will need to put some effort into this self-discovery process. Start with making a list of activities and experiences you have enjoyed. After making this list, think about why you had fun or enjoyed them. Explore your past successes. What skills were involved that contributed to your success and enjoyment? Focus on your accomplishments and what was satisfying about them. Jot down some notes. There are no right or wrong answers here. Just write what comes to mind. There are many personality and interest surveys available to you through your guidance counselor. These tools use scientific methods to uncover aspects of yourself you may not be aware of. These surveys are interesting and fun to take so make sure you use these valuable discovery tools.

Interests _____________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________

Skills ____________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________ _________________________________

Accomplishments and Successes _______________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ One Thing I Would Love To Do and Why: __________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

MORE TO COME... Research Occupations of Interest on page 62. CAREERPLANET 15


Career Education Research Occupations of Interest Your next step is to do some research on occupations of interest to you. There are several Web sites for researching careers as well as publications like the Big Book of Careers and the U.S. Govt’s Occupational Outlook Handbook. This nationally recognized source of career information provides valuable assistance to people making career decisions. Your guidance counselor can also provide other valuable resources. Other sources of information are parent(s), relatives, family friends, teachers, job fairs, and the internet. There are several career types which are general classifications under which jobs fall. These major Career Types are: • Agriculture and Natural Resources • Building and Trades • Education • Health • Manufacturing and Processing • Transportation

• Art, Media and Communications • Business and Finance • Engineering, Math and Science • Human and Personal • Legal • Sales and Marketing

Things to consider when researching a career. Career Type:

#1

#2

Job Title Training/Education Needed Earnings/Pay Benefits Vacations Working Conditions Related Job Titles Advancement Check out these Web sites: www.bls.gov www.search4careercolleges.com

www.jobprofiles.com www.careervoyages.gov

MORE TO COME... Career Interests and Occupations on page 74. CAREERPLANET 16

#3


Career Education Career Interests and Occupations If you took a personality and interest survey, several jobs are identified within the major occupational fields. The survey results indicate that you have the same type of personality and interests as people who already work within those jobs and careers. Realize there are several different career possibilities within the major occupational fields. Spend some time researching your major occupational field. Ask yourself these questions: 1. Do I prefer to work with objects, machines, tools, plants or animals? ___ Yes ___ No 2. Do I prefer to solve problems by observation, investigation, evaluation? ___ Yes ___ No 3. Do I like to do things using my imagination and creativity? ___ Yes ___ No 4. Do I prefer to work with people by helping, teaching, training, and curing them? ___ Yes ___ No 5. When working with people, do I prefer to persuade, influence, lead and manage people for organization goals and monetary gains? ___ Yes ___ No 6. Do I like to work with data or numbers, and do clerical work and detailed tasks? ___ Yes ___ No Your answers to these six basic questions will give you clues as to the type of work you will enjoy. Think about your experiences and activities‌then indicate which of the six questions above would apply. Do you see a connection or a pattern between the questions and your life experiences? Experience/Activity ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________

# Applied __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________

MORE TO COME... Writing a Career Plan on page 84. CAREERPLANET 17


Career Education Writing a “Career Plan” From the three jobs you researched, pick the ONE that most interests you. The lesson this month is to help you write a simple “Career Plan.” Now that you know your interests and skills, you can then match them with an occupation.

Career Plan I.

Career Goal: (Example: To become an accountant. To work for an accounting firm which audits other companies to help them with planning and growth.) ____________________________________________________________________________

II. Requirements: (Write what you need to do to achieve your chosen occupation.) Example: • Bachelor’s degree in accounting • Master’s degree to further my job choices • Analytical mind • Writing skills • Knowledge of sound business practices • Accreditation by passing board test ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ III. Current Skills and Interests: (your list) ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ IV. How I Plan to Reach My Career Goal: Education needed; Work experience which would help – summer jobs, etc.; Networking – Who I already know, who I should know, organizations I could join which would help ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

MORE TO COME... Selecting a School on page 94.

CAREERPLANET 18


Career Education Selecting a School You have many colleges/universities or vocational/trade schools from which to choose. The task is to narrow down the number of schools that will meet your educational needs and still be affordable. While this is not always easy, you have many resources available to you. “If it is to be, it is up to me,” is the slogan by which you will accomplish this task. Your guidance office has many brochures and materials from various educational institutions. The Internet provides a wealth of information as most schools have their own Web sites for you to do your research. Talk to former graduates of your high school who attend these schools for information. Talk to people in the occupations of interest to you about their jobs. Find out where they went to school, what were the strengths and weaknesses of the school, and if they have any suggestions for you. Ask your teachers, parent(s), guardians and other adults about their work. Attend job fairs and contact professional organizations to request information and answers to your questions. Use a chart to compare the following categories: Public or Private In-state or Out-of-state Size of the School Location (urban/suburban/small town) Religious Affiliation Gender (women’s/men’s/coed) Ethnicity Military Specialized (Liberal Arts/Communications/Business, etc.) Costs (room and board, transportation to and from school, tuition, books) Financial Aid Scholarships Some Web Sites: __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________

MORE TO COME... Resumé Writing on page 106. CAREERPLANET 19


Career Education Resumé Writing Resumé – by definition a resumé is a “summary.” It is a composite picture for a potential employer of your education and experiences. Because it is usually the first impression you make on an employer, it is a critical part of your job search. The resumé gives the employer an example of your writing, organizational, and summarization skills. Because your resumé should have a “professional” look, it should be laser printed on quality paper. The resumé is a concise one page, if possible, document that fully describes your goals, experiences, and accomplishments. In addition to your name, address, and phone number, you should include the following in your resumé:

Objective – states what kind of position you are seeking.

Education – name(s) the school(s) attended and date(s).

Activities – list extracurricular activities, volunteer work in the community, and leadership positions you have had.

Experience – begin with current job and list date of employment (From: To:), company’s name, city, state, job title, and very concise statement of your responsibilities and work.

Awards and Honors – it is important to “brag” a little and list any awards, accomplishments, honors you have received.

Web Sites with Tips on Resumé Writing – www.jobweb.com www.rockportinstitute.com/resumes.html

MORE TO COME... Planning Ahead on page 116.

CAREERPLANET 20


Planning Ahead Dates to Remember: July 2014: ________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ August 2014: ______________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ Summer Activities: _________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ 21


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Length

Time

English System

1 minute (min.) = 60 seconds (sec.) 1 hour (hr.) = 60 min. = 3,600 sec. 1 day = 24 hr. 1 week = 7 days 1 month = 30 days (for ordinary accounting) 1 year (yr.) = 12 months = 52 weeks = 365 days 1 leap year = 366 days 1 decade = 10 yr. 1 century = 10 decades = 100 yr.

1 foot (ft.) = 12 inches (in.) 1 yard (yd.) = 36 in. 1 mile (mi.) = 1,760 yd. = 5,280 ft.

Metric System 1 centimeter (cm) = 10 millimeters (mm) 1 decimeter (dm) = 10 cm 1 meter (m) = 10 dm = 100 cm = 1,000 mm 1 kilometer (km) - 1,000 m

Area English System 1 ft.2 = 144 in.2 1 yd.2 = 9 ft.2 = 1,296 in.2 1 acre = 4,840 yd.2 = 43,560 ft.2 1 mi.2 = 640 acres

Approximate equivalents English to Metric

Metric System 1 in. = 2.54 cm (exactly) 1 ft. = 30.48 cm = 0.3048 m 1 yd. = 91.44 cm = 0.9144 m 1 mi. @ 1.609 km 1 oz. @ 28.349 g 1 lb. @ 454 g @ 0.454 kg 1 ton @ 907.18 kg 1 oz. @ 29.573 ml (cc) 1 cup @ 237 ml (cc) 1 qt. @ 0.946 L 1 gal. @ 3.785 L

1 cm2 = 100 mm2 1 dm2 = 100 cm2 1 m2 = 100 dm2 1 m2 = 10,000 cm2 1 m2 = 1,000,000 mm2 1 km2 = 1,000,000 m2

Volume and Capacity English System 1 ft.3 = 1,728 in.3 1 yd.3 = 27 ft.3 = 46,656 in.3 1 cup = 8 fluid ounces (oz.) 1 pint (pt.) = 2 cups = 16 oz. 1 qt. = 2 pt. = 32 oz. 1 gallon (gal.) = 4 qt. = 8 pt. = 128 oz.

Metric to English 1 cm @ 0.3937 in. 1 m @ 39.37 in. @ 3.281 ft. @ 1.094 yd. 1 km @ 0.6214 mi. 1 g @ 0.035 oz. 1 kg @ 2.205 lb. 1,000 kg @ 1.1 tons 1 L @ 1.057 qt.

Metric System 1 cm3 (cc) = 1,000 m3 1 dm3 = 1,000 cc 1 m3 = 1,000 dm3 = 1,000,000 cc = 1,000,000,000 mm3 1 km3 = 1,000,000,000 m3 1 liter (L) = 1,000 cc = 1,000 milliliters (ml) = 100 centiliters (cl) 1 ml = 1 cc 1 kiloliter (kl) = 1,000 L

Other Approximate Equivalents 1 ft3 @ 7.48 gal. 62.4 lb. @ weight of 1 ft3 of water 00 C = 320 F freezing point of water 1000 C = 2120 F boiling point of water

Weight

Conversion Factors for Metric System Kilo unit = 1,000 units Hecto unit = 100 units Deca unit = 10 units Deci unit = 0.1 unit Centi unit = 0.01 unit Milli unit = 0.001 unit

English System 1 pound (lb.) = 16 ounces (oz.) 1 ton (T) = 2,000 lb.

Metric System 1 gram (g) = 1,000 milligrams (mg) = 100 centigrams (cg) = 10 decigrams (dg) 1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams 1 g = weight of 1 cc (1 ml) of water at 40 C

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Algebra Basic Concepts

Subtraction: a – b = a + (–b)

Division: a ÷ b = a = a · b–1 = a · 1

b

Closure Property: a + b

b

ab are real numbers.

Commutative Property: a + b = b + a and

and

ab = ba

(a + b) + c = a + (b + c) and (ab)c = a(bc) Associative Property:

a(b + c) = ab + ac and (b + c)a = ba + ca

Distributive Property:

Power of a Product: (xy)p = x p y p

Power of Exponents: (x a )b = x (ab) Power of a Quotient:

For any real numbers x and y, y ≠ 0, and positive integer p.

x p xp = p y y

Zero Exponent:

For any real numbers x (except 0), x 0 = 1

Algebra Square of 1st Order Polynomial:

Polynomial FOIL Operation:

Difference of Squares Factorization: Difference of Cubes Factorization: Sum of Cubes Factorization:

Cube of 1st Order Polynomial:

Roots of Quadratic: The solution for a quadratic equation ax 2ax + 2bx + +c c==00 The solution for a quadratic equation + bx is given by the quadratic formula: is given by the quadratic formula: 2 2

4ac - b-±b ±b b- -4ac x =x = 2a 2a 27


Geometry Formulas

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Trigonometry Formulas A = measure of – A B = measure of – B C = measure of – C = 900 a = side opposite – A b = side adjacent to – A c = hypotenuse

Basic Formulas sin A =

cos A =

side opposite a = hypotenuse c side adjacent

=

hypotenuse tan A =

csc A =

b

sec A =

c

hypotenuse side opposite hypotenuse

=

=

side adjacent

side opposite a = side adjacent b

cot A =

side adjacent side opposite

c a c b

=

b a

A = 900 – B B = 900 – A Pythagorean Theorem: c2 = a2 + b2

Radian-Degree Conversions 1 degree =

π

radians

180

1 radian = 180 degrees π

TABLE OF VALUES FOR TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS OF SPECIAL ANGLES angle (degrees)

angle (radians)

sine

cosine

tangent

cotangent

secant

cosecant

0

0

0

1

0

undefined

1

undefined

30˚

45˚

60˚

90˚

π

1

3

1

6

2

2

3

π

1

1

4

2

2

π

3

1

3

2

2

1

0

π 2

1

2 3

1

3

2

1 3

undefined

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3

0

2

2

2 2

undefined

3

1


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Definitions:

Scalars – described as magnitude. Example: 7 meters Vectors – described as both magnitude and direction. Example 10 mi., South Distance – how much ground an object has covered. Displacement – How far out of place an object is. Speed – how fast an object is moving. Average Speed =

Distance Traveled Time of Travel

Velocity – is the rate at which an object changes its position. Average Velocity =

Position Time

=

Displacement Time

Acceleration – is the rate at which an object changes its velocity. Time (s) 0 1 2 3 4 5

Velocity (m/s) 0 10 a= 20 30 40 50

Velocity Time

Newton’s Laws of Motion Law 1 – A body at rest tends to remain at rest or a body in motion tends to remain in motion at a constant speed in a straight line unless acted on by an outside force. Law 2 – The acceleration a of a mass m by an unbalanced force F is directly proportional to the force and inversely proportional to the mass, or aF/m

Law 3 – For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.

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UNITED STATES FLAG 1776 Betsy Ross sewed the first American flag at the request of three people: George Ross (her uncle), Robert Morris and George Washington.

1777 The Continental Congress officially adopted the flag. They decreed, “Resolved: that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the Union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.” The stars stood for Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Virginia, New York, North Carolina, and Rhode Island – the first 13 states.

Adding New Stars When Vermont and Kentucky joined the Union, Congress added 2 more stars and stripes to the flag. They soon realized that adding a new stripe for every state would quickly make the flag look odd. In 1818, Congress decided the flag should always have 13 stripes to represent the first 13 states. The stars would represent the number of states in the Union. Hawaii became the 50th state in 1960, and since then the flag has had 50 stars.

When to Salute the Flag You should face the flag, stand at attention, and salute (1) when the flag is passing in parade or in a review, (2) during the ceremony of hoisting or lowering, (3) when the National Anthem is played, and (4) during the Pledge of Allegiance. Anyone in uniform should give the military salute. Everyone else should place the right hand over the heart. People wearing hats should remove them and hold them, with the right hand over the heart, at their left shoulder.

The National Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner The words of “The Star-Spangled Banner” were written on September 13-14, 1814, by Francis Scott Key. He was on a ship in Baltimore harbor while the British were attacking Fort McHenry. Key watched the battle and was moved to write the first stanza on the back of an envelope. He finished the poem the next day. Congress declared it the National Anthem on March 3, 1931. Oh, say can you see by the dawn’s early light What so proudly we hailed at the twilight’s last gleaming. Whose broad stripes and bright stars thru the perilous fight, O’er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming. And the rockets’ red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there. Oh, say does that star-spangled banner yet wave O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

The Pledge of Allegiance Francis Bellamy wrote the original Pledge of Allegiance in August 1892 for a public school Columbus Day celebration. His words were changed slightly over the years to form the Pledge we know today: I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

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U.S. PRESIDENTS

*Did not finish term.

George Washington Virginia April 30, 1789-March 3, 1797 1 2 John Adams Massachusetts March 4, 1797-March 3, 1801 Thomas Jefferson Virginia March 4, 1801-March 3, 1809 3 James Madison Virginia March 4, 1809-March 3, 1817 4 5 James Monroe Virginia March 4, 1817-March 3, 1825 6 John Quincy Adams Massachusetts March 4, 1825-March 3, 1829 Andrew Jackson South Carolina March 4, 1829-March 3, 1837 7 8 Martin Van Buren New York March 4, 1837-March 3, 1841 9 William Henry Harrison Virginia March 4, 1841-April 4, 1841 10 John Tyler Virginia April 6, 1841-March 3, 1845 11 James K. Polk North Carolina March 4, 1845-March 3, 1849 12 Zachary Taylor* Virginia March 4, 1849-July 9, 1850 13 Millard Fillmore New York July 10, 1850-March 3, 1853 14 Franklin Pierce New Hampshire March 4, 1853-March 3, 1857 15 James Buchanan Pennsylvania March 4, 1857-March 3, 1861 16 Abraham Lincoln* Kentucky March 4, 1861-April 15, 1865 17 Andrew Johnson North Carolina April 15, 1865-March 3, 1869 18 Ulysses S. Grant Ohio March 4, 1869-March 3, 1877 19 Rutherford B. Hayes Ohio March 4, 1877-March 3, 1881 20 James A. Garfield* Ohio March 3, 1881-Sept. 19, 1881 21 Chester A. Arthur Vermont Sept. 20, 1881-March 3, 1885 22 Grover Cleveland New Jersey March 4, 1885-March 3, 1889 23 Benjamin Harrison Ohio March 4, 1889-March 3, 1893 24 Grover Cleveland New Jersey March 4, 1893-March 3, 1897 25 William McKinley* Ohio March 4, 1897-Sept. 14, 1901 26 Theodore Roosevelt New York Sept. 14, 1901-March 3, 1909 27 William H. Taft Ohio March 4, 1909-March 3, 1913 28 Woodrow Wilson Virginia March 4, 1913-March 3, 1921 29 Warren G. Harding* Ohio March 4, 1921-August 2, 1923 30 Calvin Coolidge Vermont August 3, 1923-March 3, 1929 31 Herbert Hoover Iowa March 4, 1929-March 3, 1933 32 Franklin D. Roosevelt* New York March 4, 1933-April 12, 1945 33 Harry S. Truman Missouri April 12, 1945-Jan. 20, 1953 34 Dwight D. Eisenhower Texas Jan. 20, 1953-Jan. 20, 1961 35 John F. Kennedy* Massachusetts Jan. 20, 1961-Nov. 22, 1963 36 Lyndon B. Johnson Texas Nov. 22, 1963-Jan. 20, 1969 37 Richard M. Nixon* California Jan. 20, 1969-Aug. 9, 1974 38 Gerald R. Ford Nebraska Aug. 9, 1974-Jan. 20, 1977 39 James E. Carter Georgia Jan. 20, 1977-Jan. 20, 1981 40 Ronald Reagan Illinois Jan. 20, 1981-Jan. 20, 1989 41 George H. W. Bush Massachusetts Jan. 20, 1989-Jan. 20, 1993 42 William J. Clinton Arkansas Jan. 20, 1993-Jan. 20, 2001 43 George W. Bush Texas Jan. 20, 2001-Jan. 20, 2009 44. Barack Obama Illinois Jan. 20, 2009-Present Pending the November 2012 election, there may be a new 45th President.

Order of Presidential Succession. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. Secretary of Commerce 11. Secretary of Labor 12. Secretary of Health and Human Services 13. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development 14. Secretary of Transportation 15. Secretary of Energy 16. Secretary of Education 17. Secretary of Veteran Affairs

Vice President Speaker of the House President pro tempore of the Senate Secretary of State Secretary of the Treasury Secretary of Defense Attorney General Secretary of the Interior Secretary of Agriculture

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Grammar Period . Used at the end of a declarative, complete sentence. Example: Laura went to a movie on Saturday.

Comma , Used to indicate a separation of ideas, or when listing items in a sentence. Example: We are ready to go camping, when everything is packed. Example: For lunch I had a sandwich, chips, juice, and an apple.

Colon : Used when you are introducing a list, quotation, explanation, or example. Example: Her favorite sports are: softball, volleyball, and track.

Semicolon ; Used to link independent clauses if not using a coordinating conjunction. Example: He would have made the Olympics; he missed the qualifying run.

Quotation Mark “ ” Used when enclosing a direct quotation, not indirect statements. Example: Mary said, “I have a great idea.” (Direct) Mary said that she had a great idea. (Indirect)

Apostrophe ’ Used to indicate omission of letters from a word, the possessive case, or the plural case. Example: They’re planning a winter vacation this year. Example: That is Michelle’s bike.

Question Mark ? Used at the end of a direct question. Example: Are you planning on going to the dance?

Exclamation Point ! Used after a word group or sentence to express exceptional feeling. Example: He shook me and kept yelling, “They won the game!”

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Parts of Speech Noun A person, place or thing. Common noun – Any person, place, or thing. Examples: baby, school, or book Proper noun – Particular person, place, or thing. Examples: Kara, North Dakota, or Saturday

Pronoun Used in place of a noun or more than one noun. Examples: him, her, it, they Nominative Case – Takes the position of the subject of a sentence. Example: She went to the mall. Possessive Case – Shows ownership. Example: That bike is his. Objective Case – Receives action, or follows a preposition. Example: The teacher gave him his test back.

Adjective Describes a noun, or pronoun by telling “which one,” “what kind” or “how many.” Examples: that car, blue eyes, five players

Verb Shows action, tells what someone or something is doing. Examples: kick, jump, laugh, talk, think, or study

Adverb Describes or modifies a verb, adjective or another adverb. Adverbs always answer the question: when, where, how, and why (or to what extent). Examples: marched slowly, very red apple, walked very quickly

Conjunction Joins words, phrases, or clauses. Coordinating conjunction – connects words of the same element. Examples: and, but, for, or, nor, yet, or so Subordinating conjunction – joins the clause to the rest of the sentence. Examples: until, since, because, unless, as, if, or after

Preposition Shows the relationship of one noun or pronoun to another word in the sentence. Example: She went across the field.

Interjection Communicates strong emotion or surprise. Examples: Ha!, Oh no!, Hooray!, Hello!, Ouch!, Yes!, or No!

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Preparation Here are some general tips for successful test taking: The English, Reading, and Science Tests ask for the best answer. Read and consider all of the answer choices before you choose the one that best responds to the question. The Mathematics Test asks for the correct answer. Read each question carefully to make sure you understand the type of answer required. The test time limits give nearly everyone enough time to answer all the questions. However, because some tests include reading passages, don’t spend too much time on a single passage or on any one question. Your supervisor will announce when five minutes remain for each test. • Carefully read the instructions on the cover of the test booklet. • Read the directions for each test carefully. • Pace yourself. Read each question carefully. • Answer the easy questions first. After you answer all of the easy questions, go back and answer the more difficult ones.

• Use logic to answer difficult questions. When you return to the more difficult questions, use logic to eliminate incorrect answers. Eliminate as many incorrect answers as you can, then make an educated guess among those remaining.

• Answer every question. Your ACT scores are based on the number of questions you answer correctly. There is no penalty for guessing, so it is to your advantage to answer every question during the time allowed for each test.

• Review your work. If you finish a test before time is up, go back and check your work in that test before time is called.

• Mark your answers neatly. Do not mark or alter any ovals on a test for which time has been called. To do so will disqualify you from the examination.

• If you erase an answer, erase completely.

The preceding information is from www.act.org. This is a great source for information concerning the ACT testing preparation and process. © 2005 by ACT, Inc. All rights reserved.

CAREERPLANET 36


SAT Preparation Approaches and reminders on how to do well on the SAT Subject Tests™ Approaches • Take the SAT Subject Tests when the content is fresh in your mind. • For subjects like biology, chemistry and world history, you should consider taking the test at the end of the course. • For languages, you may want to take the tests after you have been studying the language for several years. • Take an educated guess by ruling out one or more answer choices for a multiple-choice question as definitely wrong; your chances of guessing correctly among the remaining choices improve. • Omit questions only when you really have no idea how best to answer them. You don't gain or lose points for omitting an answer. • Use the test book for scratch work to cross off answers you know are wrong, and to mark questions you did not answer. • Be sure to mark your answers on the separate answer sheet. You won't receive credit for any answers you marked in the test book. • Avoid extra marks on the answer sheet. The answer sheet is machine-scored, and the machine can't tell an answer from a doodle. Tips • Become familiar with the organization of the tests you are interested in, the SAT Subject Test answer sheet, types of test questions on each test, and the test directions ahead of time. • Check out free SAT Subject Tests practice. • Answer the easier questions first. • The easier questions are usually at the beginning of a grouping of questions. Items you may use: • Use a calculator on the SAT Subject Tests Mathematics Level 1 and Mathematics Level 2 tests only. • Bring an acceptable CD player and extra batteries to the test center if you are registered for any of the Language with Listening tests. • Get familiar with the SAT Subject Tests. • The SAT Subject Tests are the only admissions tests that give you the opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge and skill in specific subjects. This is another chance to shine, especially if you are interested in a particular subject area. The preceding information is from www.collegeboard.com

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Dates to Remember July 2014

August 2014

September 2014

October 2014

November 2014

December 2014

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Dates to Remember January 2015

February 2015

March 2015

April 2015

May 2015

June 2015

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Name

Contact Information

The building blocks of success. www.AcademicPlannersPlus.com

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