__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

FORDHAM

UNIVERSI T Y PRESS Spring 2014


eInitiatives & Distribution Partnerships Fordham University Press titles are available through:

table of contents G ENERA L INTEREST _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 ACA D EMIC TRA D E _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 5 HISTORY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 21 LAW _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 21 PHILOS OPHY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 22 RELIG ION _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 29 LITERATURE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 33 B ACK LIST _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 38 IND EX _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 39 ORD ER FORM _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 4 0 SALES INFO _ _ _ _ _ _ _inside back cover

Stay Connected! www.fordhamimpressions.com

www.facebook.com/ FordhamUP

www.twitter.com/ fordhampress

www.pinterest.com/ fordhampress/

Attention Booksellers and Librarians! You can view and order books in this catalog on Edelweiss, the internet-based interactive service through Above the Treeline. http://edelweiss.abovethetreeline.com/

C OVER UL LUST R AT I O N :

Vor Frue Kirke, Copenhagen. Lithograph of drawing by Heinrich Hansen. Courtesy of The Royal Library, Denmark (Centre for Maps, Prints, and Photographs).


general interest

North Brother Island

The Last Unknown Place in New York City

photographs by Christopher pay ne text by r an dall Mas on foreword by rob e rt su llivan 144 pages • 130 color illustrations • 11 × 9½ 978-0-8232-5771-3 • Cloth • $39.95 • £25.99 (02) Simultaneous electronic edition available Empire State Editions M ay New yo rk | H iStory | art

At first encounter, North Brother Island is among the most unexpected of places: an uninhabited island of ruins in New York City that hardly anyone knows, existing today almost in secret. But in some fundamental sense it is also quite ordinary, for just as they have in other parts of the city, people have lived, worked, studied, healed, and died here for centuries. The island has been bought and sold, used and re-used many times over. For a while, though, it was famous: In 1885, it became the home of the Riverside Hospital, which had been established to isolate and treat people with infectious diseases. By 1895, the hospital had grown to such an extent that the social reformer Jacob Riis wrote that there “was nothing like it in the world.” Later, the island’s reputation grew mostly in infamy: In 1904, the passenger steamship General Slocum caught fire in the East River, leaving more than a thousand souls dead on the shores of North Brother Island, the single greatest loss of life in New York City to that time; in 1908, the hospital received as a patient Mary Mallon, better known as “Typhoid Mary,” who would die on North Brother in 1938. North Brother Island is both part of the City of New York and a world apart from it. Its twenty acres sit low in the East River, just north of Hell Gate, with twenty-five or so buildings in various states of decay. As there is no public access, it’s most easily seen as you lift off the tarmac at LaGuardia. Look to the west for a brown smudge stuck in the blue-gray East River, close up against Rikers Island and not far from the Bronx shoreline. That’s NBI. Photographer Christopher Payne, renowned for his work at abandoned state mental hospitals, received permission to visit and photograph the island over a period of years, and this book, North Brother Island, is the result of that work. His collaborator and co-author is Randall F. Mason, Chair of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at the University of Pennsylvania, who has studied the island and its history as a unique example in the annals of urban planning and policy. North Brother Island features an essay and more than 80 large-scale color images by Christopher Payne and a highly illustrated study by Professor Mason, including images from throughout the island’s history, official documents, and other supporting graphics. Christophe r pay ne , a photographer based in New York City, specializes in the documentation of America’s vanishing architecture and industrial landscape. He is author of New York’s Forgotten Substations: The Power Behind the Subway and Asylum: Inside the Closed World of State Mental Hospitals. randall F. Mason is Associate Professor in the Department of City & Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania. His books include The Once and Future New York: Historic Preservation and the Modern City and Giving Preservation a History: Histories of Historic Preservation in the United States. robe rt sullivan has written for The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, New York, and Vogue. His books include The Meadowlands: Wilderness Adventures at the Edge of a City and Rats: Observations on the History and Habitat of the City's Most Unwanted Inhabitants.

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

1


general interest

volume I

More than a Monologue Sexual Diversity and the Catholic Church

Voices of our Times edited by Christine Fire r hinz e and J. patriCk horn b e Ck ii 240 pages 978-0-8232-5658-7 • Paper • $26.00• £16.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5657-0 • Cloth • $90.00• £60.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Catholic Practice in North America Ma rCH G ay a N d LeS biaN Studie S | CatHoLiC Studie S | re L i G i o N

2

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

The Second Vatican Council’s landmark document Gaudium et spes called Catholics to cultivate robust, mutually enriching dialogue with the modern world by attentively and discerningly listening to the “voices of our times.” This distinctive new publication, the first of two volumes that explore sexual diversity and the Catholic Church, gathers an important set of these voices: the testimonies and reflections of Catholic and former Catholic LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) persons, their friends, family members, and those who teach and accompany them. Drawn from a series of conferences held in autumn 2011 and offering a spectrum of professional, generational, and personal perspectives, the essays in Voices of Our Times suggest the breadth and complexity of Catholic experiences of and engagements with sexual diversity. Each writer locates her or his reflections in careful attention to how ways of experiencing sexuality and speaking about sexual diversity are embodied in and shaped by particular practices—familial, interpersonal, professional, ecclesial, cultural, and political. Part I, “Practicing Love,” introduces the voices of singles, families, couples, parents, and children who reflect on their experiences of sexual diversity in light of their experiences of Catholicism and of Catholics. Part II, “Practicing Church,” offers the perspectives of clergy and lay ministers, casting light on what pastoral workers, Catholic and otherwise, encounter as they walk with people who are grappling with issues of faith and sexuality. In Part III, “Practicing Education,” writers discuss their experiences with sexual diversity in Catholic educational settings as teachers, as students, and as witnesses to the lives, loves, and struggles of LGBTQ young adults. Finally, Part IV, “Practicing Belonging,” spotlights contributions by authors who have struggled with their identities and place within and around the Catholic community. Striving to acknowledge, honor, and respect the truth and value embodied in both LGBTQ persons’ lives and in the Catholic tradition, this book provides a closeto-the-ground look at the state of the conversation about sexual diversity among contemporary Roman Catholics in the United States. Along with its companion volume, Inquiry, Thought, and Expression, Voices of Our Times represents a unique opportunity for readers inside and outside the Catholic community to engage in a conversation that is at once vibrant and complex, difficult and needed. Contribu tors: Kate Henley Averett, Tom Beaudoin, Mark Andrew Clark, Carol Conklin, Donald B. Cozzens, Teresa Delgado, John P. Falcone, Thomas J. Gumbleton, Bradford Hinze, Christine Firer Hinze, J. Patrick Hornbeck II, Hilary Howes, Jamie L. Manson, Bryan N. Massingale, M. Sheila Nelson, Michael A. Norko, Janet F. Peck, Dan Savage, Eve Tushnet, Winnie S. Varghese, Jeanine Viau, Deb Word Christine Fire r hinze is Professor of Theology and Director of the Francis and Ann Curran Center for American Catholic Studies at Fordham University. She is the author of Comprehending Power in Christian Social Ethics.

is Chair and Associate Professor of Theology and Medieval Studies at Fordham University. He is the author of What Is a Lollard? Dissent and Belief in Late Medieval England.

J. patriCk hornbeCk ii


general interest

volume II

More than a Monologue Sexual Diversity and the Catholic Church

inquiry, ThoughT, and expression edited by J. patri Ck horn b eC k ii and MiChae l a. norko 272 pages 978-0-8232-5763-8 • Paper • $28.00• £18.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5762-1 • Cloth • $100.00• £67.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Catholic Practice in North America Ma rCH G ay a N d LeS biaN Studie S | CatHoLiC Studie S | re Li G i o N

This volume, like its companion, Voices of Our Times, collects essays drawn from a series of public conferences held in autumn 2011 entitled “More than a Monologue.” The series was the fruit of collaboration among four institutions of higher learning: two Catholic universities and two nondenominational divinity schools. The conferences aimed to raise awareness of and advance informed, compassionate, and dialogical conversation about issues of sexual diversity within the Catholic community, as well as in the broader civic worlds that the Catholic Church and Catholic people inhabit. They generated fresh, rich sets of scholarly and reflective contributions that promise to take forward the delicate work of theological-ethical and ecclesial development. Along with Voices of Our Times, this volume captures insights from the conferences and aims to foster what the Jesuit Superior General, Fr. Adolfo Nicolás, has called the “depth of thought and imagination” needed to engage effectively with complex realities, especially in areas marked by brokenness, pain, and the need for healing. The volumes will serve as vital resources for understanding and addressing better the too often fraught relations between LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) persons, their loved ones and allies, and the Catholic community. Inquiry, Thought, and Expression explores dimensions of ministry, ethics, theology, and law related to a range of LGBTQ concerns, including Catholic teaching, its reception among the faithful, and the Roman Catholic Church’s significant role in world societies. Within the volume, a series of essays on ministry explores various perspectives not frequently heard within the church. Marriage equality and the treatment of LGBTQ individuals by and within the Roman Catholic Church are considered from the vantage points of law, ethics, and theology. Themes of language and discourse are explored in analyses of the place of sexual diversity in church history, thought, and authority. The two volumes of More than a Monologue, like the conferences from which they developed, actively move beyond the monologic voice of the institutional church on the subject of LGBTQ issues, inviting and promoting open conversations about sexual diversity and the church. Those who read Inquiry, Thought, and Expression will encounter not just an excellent resource for research and teaching in the area of moral theology but also an opportunity to actively listen to and engage in groundbreaking discussions about faith and sexuality within and outside the Catholic Church. Contributors: Lisa Sowle Cahill, Michael Sepidoza Campos, Patrick S. Cheng, Elizabeth A. Dreyer, Jeannine Gramick, Kelby Harrison, J. Patrick Hornbeck II, Gerard Jacobitz, Mark D. Jordan, Patricia Beattie Jung, Paul F. Lakeland, Jamie L. Manson, Joan M. Martin, Michael A. Norko, Michael John Perry, Frederick Roden

is Chair and Associate Professor of Theology at Fordham University. He is the author of What Is a Lollard? Dissent and Belief in Late Medieval England.

J. patriCk hornbeCk ii

MiChael a. norko is Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine in the Law and Psychiatry Division. f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

3


general interest

A Dancer in the Revolution

Stretch Johnson, Harlem Communist at the Cotton Club h owa rd e uge n e John s o n with wendy Johns on f oreword by Mark d. nais on 208 pages • 25 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5653-2 • Cloth • $29.95 • £19.99 (02) Simultaneous electronic edition available Empire State Editions a PriL H iStory | a f riCaN aMe riCaN Studie S | Ne w york

4

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

The life of Howard Johnson, nicknamed “Stretch” because of his height (6'5"), epitomizes the cultural and political odyssey of a generation of African Americans who transformed the United States from a closed society to a multiracial democracy. Johnson’s long-awaited memoir traces his path from firstborn of a “multiclass/ multiethnic” family in New Jersey to dancer in Harlem’s Cotton Club to communist youth leader and, later, professor of Black studies. A Dancer in the Revolution is a powerful statement about Black resilience and triumph amid subtle and explicit racism in the United States. Johnson’s engaging, beautifully written memoir provides a window into everyday life in Harlem—neighborhood life, arts and culture, and politics—from the 1930s to the 1970s, when the contemporary Black community was being formed. A Dancer in the Revolution explores Johnson’s twenty-plus years in the Communist Party and illuminates in compelling detail how the Harlem branch functioned and flourished in the 1930s and ’40s. Johnson thrived as a charismatic leader, using the connections he built up as an athlete and dancer to create alliances between communist organizations and a cross-section of the Black community. In his memoir, Johnson also exposes the homoerotic tourism that was a feature of Harlem’s nightlife in the 1930s. Some of America’s leading white literary, musical, and artistic figures were attracted to Harlem not only for the community’s artistic creativity but to engage in illicit sex—gay and straight—with their Black counterparts. A Dancer in the Revolution is an invaluable contribution to the literature on Black political thought and pragmatism. It reveals the unique place that Black dancers and artists hold in civil rights pursuits and anti-racism campaigns in the United States and beyond. Moreover, the life of “Stretch” Johnson illustrates how political activism engenders not only social change but also personal fulfillment, a realization of dreams not deferred but rather pursued and achieved. Johnson’s journey bears witness to critical periods and events that shaped the Black condition and American society in the process. howard “stretCh” e ug ene J ohnson (1915–2000) was a former Communist Party leader, Cotton Club dancer, World War II veteran, and academic. His final years were spent as a professor of Black studies at SUNY New Paltz and as an ongoing activist in Hawai'i, where he helped achieve state recognition of Martin Luther King’s birthday as a bank holiday, marching until the age of 80 in Paris, France, and Harlem for causes he believed just. we ndy J ohnson is the eldest of Stretch and Martha Sherman Johnson’s three daughters. She has worked as an activist, translator, and teacher of English. She lives in Paris. Mark d. naison is Professor of History and African American Studies at Fordham University, where he also directs the Bronx African American History Project. He is the author of three books, including Communists in Harlem During the Depression.


general interest

new in

paperback

Hidden

Reflections on Gay Life, AIDS, and Spiritual Desire r i Ch ard giannone

“Richard Giannone has written the latest classic in the revered genre of spirituality—a genre that has produced Thomas Merton’s Seven Storey Mountain, Dorothy Day’s Long Loneliness, and Richard Rodriguez’s Days of Obligation. This is a must-read for anyone interested in lived religion in America.” — Ma rk Massa , s. J. , Boston College

“[Giannone] emphasizes otherwise indiscernible patterns of grace, thereby sieving the essence of Catholicism from the dogma to redeem the gay community’s place in the Church.” —Publ is h er s W eek ly

198 pages • 25 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-6167-3 • Paper • $19.95 • £12.99 (03) [Cloth available: 978-0-8232-4184-2] ebook available J uNe G ay & LeS bia N Studie S | Cat H oLiC St udie S | bioGraP Hy

“This is a work that resists easy or tidy conclusion. While caring for ailing female relations, Giannone rediscovered a spirituality inspired in part by the desert fathers and mothers of the third century and in part by his scholarly work on Flannery O’Connor. . . . His work captures two important historical points: the impact of AIDS on gay life and the experience of baby boomers as caregivers. . . . His memoir will be of interest to social historians and many gay and lesbian readers.” —l ibrary Journ al

r i Chard g iannone is Professor Emeritus at Fordham University. He is the author of four books, including Flannery O’Connor: Hermit Novelist.

academic trade

After the Monkey Trial Evangelical Scientists and a New Creationism C hristo pher M. rio s In the well-known Scopes “Monkey Trial” of 1925, famously portrayed in the film and play Inherit the Wind, William Jennings Bryan’s fundamentalist fervor clashed with defense attorney Clarence Darrow’s aggressive agnosticism, illustrating what current scholars call the conflict thesis. It appeared, regardless of the actual legal question of the trial, that Christianity and science were at war with each other. Decades later, a new generation of evangelical scientists struggled to restore peace. After the Monkey Trial is the compelling history of those evangelical scientists in Britain and America who, unlike their fundamentalist cousins, supported mainstream scientific conclusions of the world and resisted the anti-science impulses of the era. This book focuses on two organizations, the American Scientific Affiliation and the Research Scientists’ Christian Fellowship (today Christians in Science), who for more than six decades have worked to reshape the evangelical engagement with science and redefine what it means to be a creationist. is Assistant Dean in the Baylor University Graduate School and a parttime lecturer in Baylor’s Department of Religion.

C hristopher M. rios 240 pages 978-0-8232-5667-9 • Cloth • $45.00 • £30.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available auG uSt reLiG io N | S Cie NCe | P oLitiCaL tHeory

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

5


academic trade

“Cybertheology, by Antonio Spadaro, is an excellent attempt to understand Christian faith and theology in the era of the Internet and digital communication. It is a pioneering work that contributes to a new understanding of the familiar concept of theology as faith seeking understanding.” — J ose Pa la k eel, Theologicon, kochi, India

“The book provides a substantial introduction to the anthropological and theological questions raised by our life ‘on line’: smartphones, Google, virtual spaces, avatars. Spadaro raises questions having to do with the need of the Church to engage the new intellectus fidei in the age of the Internet.” — MassIMo FaggIo lI, University of st. Thomas

Cybertheology

Thinking Christianity in the Era of the Internet

a nto ni o spadaro translated by Maria way 172 pages 978-0-8232-5700-3 • Paper • $24.00 • £15.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5699-0 • Cloth • $85.00 • £57.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available J uNe t H eo Lo Gy | CatHoLiC Studie S | Med ia St ud ieS & CoMMuNiCatioN

6

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

Because the Internet has changed and is changing the ways in which we think and act, it must also be changing the ways in which we think Christianity and its theology. Cybertheology is the first book to explore this process from a Catholic point of view. Drawing on the theoretical work of authors such as Marshall McLuhan, Peter Lévy, and Teilhard de Chardin, it questions how technologies redefine not only the ways in which we do things but also our being and therefore the way we perceive reality, the world, others, and God. “Does the digital revolution affect faith in any sense?” Spadaro asks. His answer is an emphatic Yes. But how, then, are we to live well in the age of the Internet? Spadaro delves deeply into various dimensions of the impact of the Net on the Church and its organization, on our understanding of revelation, grace, liturgy, the sacraments, and other classical theological themes. He rightly points out that the digital environment is not merely an external instrument that facilitates human communication or a purely virtual world, but part of the daily experience of many people, a new “anthropological space” that is reshaping the way we think, know, and express ourselves. Naturally, this calls for a new understanding of faith so that it makes sense to people who live and work in the digital media environment. In developing the notion of cybertheology, Spadaro seeks to propose an intelligence of faith (intellectus fidei) in the era of the Internet. The book’s chapters include reflections on man the decoder and the search engines of God, networked existence and the mystical body, hacker ethics and Christian vision, sacraments and “virtual presence,” and the theological challenges of collective intelligence. antonio spadaro, s.J. , is editor of the review La Civiltà Cattolica and teaches

at the Pontifical Gregorian University.

Maria way was formerly Senior Lecturer in Media Theory at the University of Westminster’s School of Media, Art & Design.


academic trade

Teach Me to Be Generous

The First Century of Regis High School in New York City A nt hony D. An Dre Assi , C.o. , foreword by timothy miCh Ae l CA r Di nAl DolAn, ArChbis h op o f new york

Teach Me to Be Generous tells the remarkable story of Regis High School, the Jesuit school on New York’s Upper East Side that was founded in 1914 by an anonymous donor as a school for Catholic boys whose families could not otherwise afford a Catholic education. Enabled by the philanthropy of the founding family for nearly a century, and now by alumni and friends carrying on that tradition of generosity, Regis has been able to provide tuition-free, all-scholarship education for its entire history. It also holds the distinction of being the first free-standing Jesuit high school in the United States, with no connection to any Jesuit colleges or universities. Regis High School’s unique story is told by an engaging storyteller and historian who has taught at the school for more than ten years. Father Andreassi offers captivating glimpses into the lives and daily experiences of Regis’s students and faculty while chronicling the development of the school’s educational philosophy and spiritual approach in its first century. Filled with entertaining anecdotes alongside wider historical context and illuminating statistical analysis, Teach Me to Be Generous tracks Regis High School through the decades of the twentieth century to the present day—from the generosity of a devout Catholic widow, through the Depression and World War II, to changes in demographics of the Catholic community and shifts in the landscape of Catholic education in New York City. During the school’s first few decades, Regis admitted thousands of Catholic boys, mostly from poor or lower-middle-class families, helping prepare them for success in college and leadership positions in the professions. Because of the closing of dozens of urban Catholic schools and the general decline of the quality of New York City’s public schools, in more recent years the school has faced the challenge of remaining true to its mission in offering an education to Catholic boys “who otherwise would not be able to afford a Catholic education.” Teach Me to Be Generous paints a vivid portrait of the first one hundred years of an exceptional institution and looks with hope and confidence to its future. Anthony D. AnDre Assi, C.o. , a priest of the Brooklyn Oratory of St. Philip

Neri, holds a doctorate in history from Georgetown University with a specialization in the history of American Catholicism. He has taught history at Regis High School since 2003.

His Eminence timothy miChAel CArDinAl Do lAn is Archbishop of New York. He has published widely on Church doctrine. One of Cardinal Dolan’s recent publications is A People of Hope: The Challenges Facing the Catholic Church and the Faith That Can Save It, coauthored with John L. Allen, Jr.

272 pages • 27 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5633-4 • Cloth • $35.00 • £23.99 (02) Simultaneous electronic edition available Empire State Editions Ma rC h h iSto ry | Urban StUdie S | re ligion

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

7


academic trade

“More than just a collection of smart essays, The Humanities and Public Life leaves ample room for discussion, dialogue, and dissent among its distinguished participants. This volume crackles with intellectual energy. Strongly recommended for anyone concerned with the ethics of reading and the public good of the humanities.” — rITa Felsk I, University of Virginia

The Humanities and Public Life edited by peter b rooks with hilary Jewett 172 pages • 3 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5705-8 • Paper • $18.00 • £11.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5704-1 • Cloth • $75.00 • £50.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Ma rC H Lit erat ure | P HiLoSoP Hy | e duCatioN

This book tests the proposition that the humanities can, and at their best do, represent a commitment to ethical reading. And that this commitment, and the training and discipline of close reading that underlie it, represent something that the humanities need to bring to other fields: to professional training and to public life. What leverage does reading, of the attentive sort practiced in the interpretive humanities, give you on life? Does such reading represent or produce an ethics? The question was posed for many in the humanities by the “Torture Memos” released by the Justice Department a few years ago, presenting arguments that justified the use of torture by the U.S. government with the most twisted, ingenious, perverse, and unethical interpretation of legal texts. No one trained in the rigorous analysis of poetry could possibly engage in such bad-faith interpretation without professional conscience intervening to say: This is not possible. Teaching the humanities appears to many to be an increasingly disempowered profession—and status—within American culture. Yet training in the ability to read critically the messages with which society, politics, and culture bombard us may be more necessary than ever in a world in which the manipulation of minds and hearts is more and more what running the world is all about. This volume brings together a group of distinguished scholars and intellectuals to debate the public role and importance of the humanities. Their exchange suggests that Shelley was not wrong to insist that poets are the unacknowledged legislators of mankind: Cultural change carries everything in its wake. The attentive interpretive reading practiced in the humanities ought to be an export commodity to other fields and to take its place in the public sphere. Contribu tors: Kwame Anthony Appiah, Derek Attridge, Peter Brooks, Judith Butler, Jonathan Culler, Didier Fassin, William Germano, Ralph Hexter, Paul W. Kahn, Charles Larmore, Jonathan Lear, Michael Roth, Elaine Scarry, Kim Lane Scheppele, Richard Sennett, Patricia Williams pe ter brooks is Sterling Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature at Yale University and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Scholar at the University Center for Human Values and the Department of Comparative Literature at Princeton University. hilary J ewe tt, Assistant Director of the “Ethics of Reading” project, is a lawyer, literary scholar, and editor.

8

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m


academic trade

War after Death On Violence and Its Limits stev en Miller

256 pages • 8 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5678-5 • Paper • $24.00 • £15.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5677-8 • Cloth • $85.00 • £57.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Modern Language Initiative Ma rCH PHiLoSoPHy | Literature | PSyCHoaNaLySiS

War after Death considers forms of violence that regularly occur in actual wars but do not often factor into the stories we tell about war, which revolve invariably around killing and death. Recent history demonstrates that body counts are more necessary than ever, but the fact remains that war and death is only part of the story—an essential but ultimately subordinate part. Beyond killing, there is no war without attacks upon the built environment, ecosystems, personal property, artworks, archives, and intangible traditions. Destructive as it may be, such violence is difficult to classify because it does not pose a grave threat to human lives. Nonetheless, the book argues that destruction of the nonhuman or nonliving is a constitutive dimension of all violence—especially forms of extreme violence against the living such as torture and rape; and it examines how the language and practice of war are transformed when this dimension is taken into account. Finally, War after Death offers a rethinking of psychoanalytic approaches to war and the theory of the death drive that underlies them. steve n Miller is Associate Professor of English at the University at Buffalo, the State University of New York. He is the translator of Catherine Malabou’s The New Wounded: From Neurosis to Brain Damage (Fordham).

academic trade

The Babylon Complex

Theopolitical Fantasies of War, Sex, and Sovereignty e r in ru nions

272 pages • 2 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5734-8 • Paper • $26.00 • £16.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5733-1 • Cloth • $85.00 • £57.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available a PriL reLiGioN

Babylon is a surprisingly multivalent symbol in U.S. culture and politics. Political citations of Babylon range widely, from torture at Abu Ghraib to depictions of Hollywood glamour and decadence. In political discourse, Babylon appears in conservative ruminations on democratic law, liberal appeals to unity, Tea Party warnings about equality, and religious advocacy for family values. A composite biblical figure, Babylon is used to celebrate diversity and also to condemn it, to sell sexuality and to regulate it, to galvanize war and to worry about imperialism. Erin Runions explores the significance of these shifts and contradictions, arguing that together they reveal a theopolitics that tries to balance the drive for U.S. dominance with the countervailing ideals and subjectivities of economic globalization. Examining the confluence of cultural formations, biblical interpretations, and (bio)political philosophies, The Babylon Complex shows how theopolitical arguments for war, sexual regulation, and political control both assuage and contribute to anxieties about waning national sovereignty. Theoretically sophisticated and engaging, this remarkable book complicates our understanding of how the Bible affects U.S. political ideals and subjectivities. er in ru nions is Associate Professor and Chair in the Department of Religious Studies at Pomona College. Her previous books are Changing Subjects: Gender, Nation, Future in Micah and How Hysterical: Identification and Resistance in the Bible and Film.

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

9


academic trade

Simultaneously restless and enchanted, the primary speaker of these poems is a tourist in the truest sense. She finds herself on trains, in the backcountry of the American wilderness, in crowded European hostels, and in Vietnam, eating a partially fertilized egg. All the while, Michigan, the landscape of childhood, serves as her reference point (“A rustic sort of place I can’t back away from”). Inspired by the Buddhist concept of anatta, or “no-self,” the speaker navigates unfamiliar terrain, sparking the question of identity and the agent of its construction. The poems ask how through perception the body metabolizes experience. From this intersection the passionate investigation of consciousness takes flight, framing the slippage between thinking and being, the feast of the subconscious and the seeds planted from waking life, the impermanence of a given moment, versus the materialism of memory, the reality of isolation despite the presence of a crowd, the influence of culture versus biology’s common baseline. Drawing from contemporary neuroscience and rare case studies, the poems illuminate the peculiar interrelated aspects of the mechanisms of the brain and personality. But there is nothing clinical about these poems, culled from dreams and memory fragments. The question of consciousness gives rise to the distinct human ability to reflect, to invent. Which is what the poems—poignant, strange, radiating musicality—enact: someone gropes for the deer mount

Gray Matter

sar a Mi Chas -Martin foreword by susan whe e le r 80 pages • 8 × 9 978-0-8232-5779-9 • Paper • $19.00 • £12.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5778-2 • Cloth • $45.99 • £31.00 (06) Poets Out Loud Ma rC H Po et ry

its goofy snarl and patchwork hide a ruse underway

laughter in the pantry

the deer lifted into someone’s sleep (from “Staff After Hours”)

not the love a mile underground on a train that slows into the station like a sore arm bending, but the kind boarded on a ship and sailed hard into the storm we’ve made of ourselves. (from “Please do Not Touch”)

more information at saramichas-martin.com.

Gray Matter: 1. the material of the brain. 2. an expression naming an idea or situation held in shadow. This book tangles with the unknown, but also celebrates the seductive curiosity its mystery provokes. It is a love letter from the imagination to the scientists and philosophers who, despite remarkable attempts, still cannot locate its source. sa ra MiChas-Martin , former Wallace Stegner Fellow and Jones Lecturer at Stanford University, has taught creative writing and interdisciplinary studies widely, most recently for Goddard College and Stanford’s Online Writers’ Studio.

10

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m


academic trade

“Peter Streckfus’s great subject is the discovery, repeated second by second, that we exist. The subject is older than Plato, but precedent, though passionately embraced, does not prepare us for the shock of being. ‘I held myself, first born,’ says Streckfus. Then: ‘I heard a voice in my ear.’ Then: ‘I felt my language torn from my mouth, writhing on the deck like an eel out of water.’ To exist in Errings is to experience one’s own language as an alien tongue while finding oneself miraculously capable of understanding it. To read the poems is to experience a similar ecstasy, for their language feels simultaneously erotic and chaste, ancient and avant-garde. Streckfus makes the act of reading feel as thrilling, syllable by syllable, as the fact of being alive—‘you my young thing, you shaped like a mouse, like an ear.’ No other poet of his generation coaxes from such a sternly disciplined instrument such ravishingly lyrical music.” — Ja Mes lo n gen B aCh

“In his two collections, Peter Streckfus has made a lyric poetry of the highest order: spacious, luminous, contemplative, filled with strange voyages and miniature epics—he is a seer, a visionary, and yet how effortless this work seems; at its center, a stillness as ardent and searching as anything within memory.” —a MerICa n aCa deMy o F a rTs a n d leT T er s CI TaTI on For The ro Me P rIze In lIT eraT U re

Errings

pet er stre CkFus 96 pages • 5½ × 8½ 978-0-8232-5776-8 • Paper • $19.99 • £12.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5775-1 • Cloth • $45.00 • £30.00 (06) Poets Out Loud Ma rC H Po et ry

Spoken on the margin between death and birth, reading and writing, separation and union, the poems of Errings address the absent—a lost leader, a remote love, a protégé not yet born—and across those distances delineate the motion of consciousness as it passes from one body to the next. “Videos of Fish,” the opening sequence, speaks to the spirit of the poet’s late father, adapting devices from Dante, Tibetan metaphysical philosophy, and the biomechanics of the most primitive of vertebrate bodies, the fish, to envision paths of the disembodied soul. “How difficult it is to remain one person,” the poet claims, echoing Czesław Miłosz; in its progress between persons, the collection’s regular shifts in mode and form include the purgatorian tercet, the Japanese poetic diary, didactic verse, the Persian ghazal, the erasure, and the miniature. THE READER

experience among the waves allows one to limit the field. each year he grew another soul, oblong, slightly pointed at the end, like an oar, its surface turned to the light. Blacken now and lift your news into the air. peter streCkFu s is Professor of English at George Mason University. He is the author of The Cuckoo, winner of the 2003 Yale Series of Younger Poets competition.

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

11


academic trade

“A few paragraphs of Marc Shell, dip in where you will, and you know you’re in the presence of one of the profession’s small handful of eccentric polymaths and geniuses.” — PaUl F ry, yale University

Talking the Walk and Walking the Talk A Rhetoric of Rhythm Ma r C she ll 240 pages, 48 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5683-9, Paper, $26.00 • £16.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5682-2, Cloth, $85.00 • £57.00 (06) Verbal Arts: Studies in Poetics J uLy Lit erat ure | P oe try

12

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

This book argues that we should regard walking and talking in a single rhythmic vision. In doing so, it contributes to the theory of prosody, our understanding of respiration and looking, and, in sum, to the particular links, across the board, between the human characteristics of bipedal walking and meaningful talk. The author first introduces the philosophical, neurological, anthropological, and aesthetic aspects of the subject in historical perspective, then focuses on rhetoric and introduces a tension between the small and large issues of rhythm. He thereupon turns his attention to the roles of breathing in poetry—as a life-and-death matter, with attention to beats and walking poems. This opens onto technical concepts from the classical traditions of rhetoric and philology. Turning to the relationship between prosody and motion, he considers both animals and human beings as both ostensibly able-bodied creatures and presumptively disabled ones. Finally, he looks at dancing and writing as aspects of walking and talking, with special attention to motion in Arabic and Chinese calligraphy. The final chapters of the book provide a series of interrelated representative case studies. MarC she ll , a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellow, is Irving Babbitt Professor of Comparative Literature and Professor of English and American Literature and Language at Harvard University. The most recent of his many books are Polio and Its Aftermath: The Paralysis of Culture and Stutter.


academic trade

“Reading Baer’s elegant prose is a rare pleasure. Baer’s brilliant book The Rilke Alphabet captures the genius of the modern poet and Rilke’s intelligence as a witness of modernity—by employing a dazzling device. Baer presents us twentysix viewpoints on Rilke’s work, twenty-six perspectives that are vital for anyone who is interested in the poet’s work and in modernism as such. It reads as a real page turner.” —A MIR ESHEL, Stanford University

The Rilke Alphabet

ULR IC H B AE R translated by ANDREW HAMI LTON 240 pages 978-0-8232-5629-7 • Paper • $26.00 • £16.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5628-0 • Cloth • $90.00 • £60.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available A PRIL LIT ERAT URE

The enduring power of Rainer Maria Rilke’s poetry rests with his claim that all we need for a better life on earth is already given to us, in the here and now. In twentysix engaging and accessible essays, Ulrich Baer’s The Rilke Alphabet examines this promise by one of the greatest poets in any tradition that even the smallest overlooked word may unlock life’s mysteries to us. Fueled by an unebbing passion and indeed love for Rilke’s poetry, Baer examines twenty-six words that are not only unexpected but also problematic, controversial, and even scandalous in Rilke’s work. In twenty-six mesmerizing essays that eschew jargon and teutonic learnedness for the pleasures and risks of unflinchingly engaging with a great artist’s genius, Baer sheds new light on Rilke’s politics, his creative process, and his deepest and enduring thoughts about life, art, politics, sexuality, love, and death. The Rilke Alphabet shows how Rilke’s work provides an uncannily apt guide to life even in our vexingly postmodern condition. Whether it is a love letter to frogs, a problematic brief infatuation with Mussolini, a sustained reflection on the Buddha, the evasion of the influence of powerful precursors, or the unambiguous assertion that freedom must be lived in order to be known, Rilke’s writings pull us deeply into life. Baer’s decades-long engagement with Rilke as a scholar, translator, and editor of Rilke’s writings allows him to reveal unique aspects of Rilke’s work. The Rilke Alphabet will surprise and delight Rilke fans, intrigue newcomers to his work, and deepen every reader’s sense of the power of poetry to penetrate the mysteries and confusions of our world. ULRICH BAE R is Vice Provost for Arts, Humanities and Diversity and Professor of German and Comparative Literature at New York University. He is editor and translator of Rainer Maria Rilke: Letters of Life, editor of 110 Stories: New York Writes after September 11, and author of several books on poetry and photography. His most recent book is Beggar’s Chicken: Stories from Shanghai. ANDREW HAMILTON

at Indiana University.

is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Germanic Studies

F O R D H A M P R E SS .CO M

13


academic trade

What does it mean to be nude? What does the nude do? In a series of constantly surprising reflections, Jean-Luc Nancy and Federico Ferrari encounter the nude as an opportunity for thinking in a way that is stripped bare of all received meanings and preconceived forms. In the course of engagements with twenty-six separate images, the authors show how the nudes produced by painters and photographers expose this bareness of thought and leave us naked on the verge of a sense that is always nascent, always fleeting, on the surface of the skin, on the surface of the image. While the nude is a symbol of truth in philosophy and art alike, what the nude definitively and uniquely reveals is unclear. In Being Nude: The Skin of Images, the authors argue that the nude is always presented as both vulnerable in its exposure and shy of conceptualization, giving a sense of the ultimate ineffability of the meaning of being. Although the nude represents the revealed nature of truth, nude figures hold a part of themselves back, keeping in reserve the reality of their history, parts of their present selves, and also their future possibilities for change, development, and demise. Skin is itself a type of clothing, and stripping away exterior layers of fabric does not necessarily lead to grasping the truth. In this way, the difference between being clothed and being nude is diminished. The images that inspire the authors to contemplate the nudity of being show many ways in which one can and cannot be nude, and many ways of being in relation to oneself and to others, clothed and unclothed. is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the Université Marc Bloch, Strasbourg. Among the most recent of his many books to be published in English are Corpus; Corpus II; Dis-Enclosure: The Deconstruction of Christianity; Noli me tangere: On the Raising of the Body; The Truth of Democracy; and Adoration: The Destruction of Christianity II (all Fordham). J e an-lu C nanCy

Being Nude

The Skin of Images

J ean- luC nanCy and F ed eriCo Fe rrari translated by anne o’byrne and Carli e angle Mire 128 pages • 26 b/w illustrations • 5½ × 8½ 978-0-8232-5621-1 • Paper • $24.00 • £15.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5620-4 • Cloth • $85.00 • £57.00 (06) auG uSt PH iLoSo PH y | art

14

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Stony Brook University. She is co-translator of Nancy’s Being Singular Plural and author of Natality and Finitude. anne o’by rne

Carlie ang leMire

is a Ph.D. student of philosophy at Stony Brook University.


academic trade

Identity

Fragments, Frankness J eAn-luC nAnCy translated by frAnçois rAffou l 60 pages • 5 × 7½ 978-0-8232-5611-2 • Paper • $16.00 • £10.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5610-5 • Cloth • $65.00 • £44.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Commonalities aUg USt Ph iloSo Phy | P olitiCal theory

Identity: Fragments, Frankness is a rich and powerful essay on the notion of identity and on how it operates in our contemporary world. In contrast to the various attempts to cling to established identities or to associate identity with dubious agendas, Nancy shows that an identity is always open to alterity and its transformations. Against cynical initiatives that seek to instrumentalize the question of identity in an attempt to manipulate sentiment against immigration, Nancy problematizes anew the notions of identity, nation, and national identity. He seeks to show that there is never a given identity but always an open process of identification that retains an exposure to difference. Thus identity can never operate as a self-identical subject, such as “the French.” Ultimately, for Nancy, one does not have an identity but has to become one. One can never return to a self-same identity but can only seek to locate oneself within difference and singularity. Nancy shows the impasse of a certain conception of identity that he calls the “identity of the identifiable,” which refers to some permanent, given, substantial identity. In opposition to such identity, Nancy offers the identity of whatever or whoever invents itself in an open process of exposure to others and internal difference. Hence, an identity is never given but “makes itself by seeking and inventing itself.” One does not have an identity, but is an identity. Identity is an act, not a state. This important book will provide much-needed philosophical clarification of a complex and strategic notion at the center of many current events and discussions. is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the Université Marc Bloch, Strasbourg. Among the most recent of his many books to be published in English are Corpus; Corpus II; Dis-Enclosure: The Deconstruction of Christianity; Noli me tangere: On the Raising of the Body; The Truth of Democracy; and Adoration: The Destruction of Christianity II (all Fordham). J eAn-lu C nAnCy

FrAnçois rAFFoul is Professor of Philosophy at Louisiana State University. He is the author of Heidegger and the Subject and The Origins of Responsibility and has co-translated (with David Pettigrew) Jean-Luc Nancy’s The Creation of the World.

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

15


academic trade

Beyond the Supersquare

Art and Architecture in Latin America after Modernism edited by Antonio se rgio be s s A, with additional research by m Ar i o torre s 150 pages • 65 b/w illustrations • 9 × 9 978-0-8232-6079-9 • Paper • $35.00 • £23.99 (01) M ay a rt | a rChiteCtUre | Urban StUdie S Co-published with the Bronx Museum of the Arts

16

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

Beyond the Supersquare: Art and Architecture in Latin America after Modernism, which developed from a symposium presented by the Bronx Museum of the Arts in 2011, showcases original essays by distinguished Latin American architects, historians, and curators whose research examines architecture and urban design practices in the region during a significant period of the twentieth century. Drawing from the exuberant architectural projects of the 1940s to the 1960s, as well as from critically engaged artistic practices of the present day, the essays in this collection reveal how the heroic visions and utopian ideals popular in architectural discourse during the modernist era bore complicated legacies for Latin America—the consequences of which are evident in the vastly uneven economic conditions and socially disparate societies found throughout the region today. The innovative contributions in this volume address how the modernist movement came into being in Latin America and compellingly explore how it continues to resonate in today’s cultural discourse. Beyond the Supersquare takes themes traditionally examined within the strict field of urbanism and architecture and explores them against a broader range of disciplines, including the global economy, political science, gender, visual arts, philosophy, and urban planning. Containing a breadth of scholarship, this book offers a compelling and distinctive view of contemporary life in Latin America. Among the topics explored are the circulation of national cultural identities through architectural media, the intersection of contemporary art and urban social politics, and the recovery of canonically overlooked figures in art and architectural histories, such as Lina Bo Bardi and João Filgueiras Lima (“Lelé”) from Brazil, Juan Legarreta of Mexico, and Henry Klumb in Puerto Rico. Contribu tors: Alessandro Balteo Yazbek, Carlos Brillembourg, Augusto de Campos, Ana Maria Duran Calisto, Hannia Gomez, Julieta Gonzalez, Terence Gower, Dan Graham, Alejandro Hernandez-Galvez, Javier de Jesus Martinez, Jose Lira, William Morrish, Ligia Nobre, Mauro Restiffe, Pedro Reyes, Eduardo Luis Rodriguez, and others.

is the director of programming at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. He is the editor of Intersections: The Grand Concourse at 100 (co-published with Fordham University Press).

Antonio serg io bessA


academic trade

Sabato Rodia’s Towers in Watts Art, Migrations, Development

edited by luisa de l giu diCe 576 pages • 100 b/w illustrations • 7 × 10 978-0-8232-5797-3 • Paper • $45.00 • £30.00 (01) 978-0-8232-5796-6 • Cloth • $165.00 • £111.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Critical Studies in Italian America J uN e ita Lia N a MeriCaN Studie S | CuLturaL Studie S | So C i o Lo Gy

The extraordinary Watts Towers were created over the course of three decades by a determined, single-minded artist, Sabato Rodia, a highly remarkable Italian immigrant laborer who wanted to do “something big.” Now a National Historic Landmark and internationally renowned destination, the Watts Towers in Los Angeles are both a personal artistic expression and a collective symbol of Nuestro Pueblo—Our Town/Our People. Featuring fresh and innovative examinations that mine deeper and broader than ever before, Sabato Rodia’s Towers in Watts is a muchanticipated revisitation of the man and his towers. In 1919, Sabato Rodia purchased a triangular plot of land in a multiethnic, working-class, semi-rural district. He set to work on an unusual building project in his own yard. By night, Rodia dreamed and excogitated, and by day he built. He experimented with form, color, texture, cement mixtures, and construction techniques. He built, tore down, and re-built. As an artist completely possessed by his work, he was often derided as an incomprehensible crazy man. Providing a multifaceted, holistic understanding of Rodia, the towers, and the cultural/social/physical environment within which the towers and their maker can be understood, Sabato Rodia’s Towers in Watts compiles essays from twenty authors, offering perspectives from the arts, the communities involved in the preservation and interpretation of the towers, and the academy. Most of the contributions originated at two interdisciplinary conferences held in Los Angeles and in Italy: “Art & Migration: Sabato Rodia’s Towers in Watts, Los Angeles” and “The Watts Towers Common Ground Initiative: Art, Migrations, Development.” The Watts Towers are wondrous objects of art and architecture as well as the expression and embodiment of the resolve of a singular artistic genius to do something great. But they also recount the heroic civic efforts (art and social action) to save them, both of which continue to this day to evoke awe and inspiration. Sabato Rodia’s Towers in Watts presents a well-rounded tribute to one man’s tenacious labor of love. Contribu tors: Augustine Aguirre, Katia Ballacchino, Monica Barra, Guglielmo Bilancioni, Gail Brown, Brad Byer, Richard Cándida Smith, Felice Ceparano, Luisa Del Giudice, Charles Dickson, George Epolito, Paul A. Harris, Thomas Harrison, Shirmel Hayden, Jo Farb Hernandez, Jeffrey Herr, Rosie Lee Hooks, Edward Landler, Jeanne Morgan, John Outterbridge, Judson Powell, Laura E. Ruberto, Betye Sarr, Kenneth Scambray, Sarah Schrank, Joseph Sciorra, Kenzi Shiokava luisa de l g iu diCe is an independent scholar, formerly a university academic (UCLA), and public sector educator (founder/director of the Italian Oral History Institute). She is the editor of Oral History, Oral Culture, and Italian Americans. a d d i t i o Na L Co Nt eNt wi L L be ava i L a bL e o NL i Ne at www.for dH a M P r e SS .CoM

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

17


academic trade

Making Italian America

Consumer Culture and the Production of Ethnic Identities edited by siMone Cinotto 352 pages • 40 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5624-2 • Paper • $35.00 • £23.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5623-5 • Cloth • $100.00 • £67.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Critical Studies in Italian America a PriL H iStory | itaLiaN aMe riCaN Studie S | CuLt ura L St udie S | SoCioLoGy

18

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

How do immigrants and their children forge their identities in a new land—and how does the ethnic culture they create thrive in the larger society? Making Italian America brings together new scholarship on the cultural history of consumption, immigration, and ethnic marketing to explore these questions by focusing on the case of an ethnic group whose material culture and lifestyles have been central to American life: Italian Americans. As embodied in fashion, film, food, popular music, sports, and many other representations and commodities, Italian American identities have profoundly fascinated, disturbed, and influenced American and global culture. Discussing in fresh ways topics as diverse as immigrant women’s fashion, critiques of consumerism in Italian immigrant radicalism, the Italian American influence in early rock ’n’ roll, ethnic tourism in Little Italy, and Guido subculture, Making Italian America recasts Italian immigrants and their children as active consumers who, since the turn of the twentieth century, have creatively managed to articulate relations of race, gender, and class and create distinctive lifestyles out of materials the marketplace offered to them. The success of these mostly working-class people in making their everyday culture meaningful to them as well as in shaping an ethnic identity that appealed to a wider public of shoppers and spectators looms large in the political history of consumption. Making Italian America appraises how immigrants and their children redesigned the market to suit their tastes and in the process made Italian American identities a lure for millions of consumers. Fourteen essays explore Italian American history in the light of consumer culture, across more than a century-long intense movement of people, goods, money, ideas, and images between Italy and the United States—a diasporic exchange that has transformed both nations. Simone Cinotto builds an imaginative analytical framework for understanding the ways in which ethnic and racial groups have shaped their collective identities and negotiated their place in the consumers’ emporium and marketplace. Grounded in the new scholarship in transnational U.S. history and the transfer of cultural patterns, Making Italian America illuminates the crucial role that consumption has had in shaping the ethnic culture and diasporic identities of Italians in America. It also illustrates vividly why and how those same identities— incorporated in commodities, commercial leisure, and popular representations— have become the object of desire for millions of American and global consumers. Contributors: Danielle Battisti, Marcella Bencivenni, Giorgio Bertellini, Vittoria Caterina Caratozzolo, Simone Cinotto, John Gennari, Ervin Kosta, Stefano Luconi, Dominique Padurano, Fabio Parasecoli, Courtney Ritter, Maddalena Tirabassi, Donald Tricarico, Elisabeth Zanoni siMone Cinotto teaches history at the University of Gastronomic Sciences, Pollenzo, Italy. He is the author of The Italian American Table: Food, Family, and Community in New York City and Soft Soil, Black Grapes: The Birth of Italian Winemaking in California.


academic trade

Italoamericana

The Literature of the Great Migration, 1880–1943 edited by FranCe s Co du ran t e general editor of the american edition: ro be rt v i s C u si translations editor: a n t h o n y J u l i a n ta M bu r r i bibliographic editor: Ja M es J. p e r r iConi 800 pages • 7 × 9 978-0-8232-6062-1 • Paper • $40.00 • £26.99 (01) 978-0-8232-6061-4 • Cloth • $125.00 • £84.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available a PriL ita Lia N a MeriCaN Studie S | Lite rature | CuLturaL St ud i eS

To appreciate the life of the Italian immigrant enclave from the great heart of the Italian migration to its settlement in America requires that one come to know how these immigrants saw their communities as colonies of the mother country. Edited with extraordinary skill, Italoamericana: The Literature of the Great Migration, 1880–1943 brings to an English-speaking audience a definitive collection of classic writings on, about, and from the formative years of the Italian-American experience. Originally published in Italian, this landmark collection of translated writings establishes a rich, diverse, and mature sense of Italian-American life by allowing readers to see American society through the eyes of Italian-speaking immigrants. Filled with the voices from the first generation of Italian-American life, the book presents a unique treasury of long-inaccessible writing that embodies a literary canon for Italian-American culture—poetry, drama, journalism, political advocacy, history, memoir, biography, and story—the greater part of which has never before been translated. Italoamericana introduces a new generation of readers to the “Black Hand” and the organized crime of the 1920s, the incredible “pulp” novels by Bernardino Ciambelli, Paolo Pallavicini, Italo Stanco, Corrado Altavilla, the exhilarating “macchiette” by Eduardo Migliaccio (Farfariello) and Tony Ferrazzano, the comedies by Giovanni De Rosalia, Riccardo Cordiferro’s dramas and poems, the poetry of Fanny Vanzi-Mussini and Eduardo Migliaccio. Edited by a leading journalist and scholar, Italoamericana introduces an important but little-known, largely inaccessible Italian-language literary heritage that defined the Italian-American experience. Organized into five sections— “Annals of the Great Exodus,” “Colonial Chronicles,” “On Stage (and Off-Stage),” “Anarchists, Socialist, Fascists, Anti-Fascists,” and “Apocalyptic Integrated / Integrated Apocalyptic Intellectuals”—the volume distinguishes a literary, cultural, and intellectual history that engages the reader in all sorts of archaeological and genealogical work. FranCe sCo du rante is a journalist as well as Professor of literature at the University of Suor Orsola Benincasa as part of the Program in Modern Languages and Culture. robe rt visCusi, ph.d. , is Professor of English and executive officer of the Wolfe Institute for the Humanities at Brooklyn College, president of the Italian American Writers Association, novelist, critic, scholar of Italian-American literature and culture, and author of the epic poem “Ellis Island.” anthony J u lian taMburri, ph.d. , is dean of the John D. Calandra Italian American Institute (Queens College, CUNY) and former president of the Italian American Studies Association and the American Association of Teachers of Italian. His latest book is Re-reading Italian Americana (2013). JaMes J. perriConi , a Manhattan attorney, exhibited his collection of more

than one hundred Italian-language American imprints of authors whose works are excerpted in Italoamericana at New York’s Grolier Club in 2012 and extensively catalogued these works in Strangers in a Strange Land. f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

19


academic trade

Home, Uprooted

Oral Histories of India’s Partition d evika Chawla 288 pages • 6 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5644-0 • Paper • $30.00 • £19.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5643-3 • Cloth • $110.00 • £74.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available J uN e a Nt H ro Po LoGy | CuLturaL Studie S | woMe N’S Stu d i eS | aS ia N St ud ie S

20

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

The Indian Independence Act of 1947 granted India freedom from British rule, signaling the formal end of the British Raj in the subcontinent. This freedom, though, came at a price: partition, the division of the country into India and Pakistan, and the communal riots that followed. These riots resulted in the deaths of an estimated 1 million Hindus and Muslims and the displacement of about 20 million persons on both sides of the border. This watershed socioeconomic–geopolitical moment cast an enduring shadow on India’s relationship with neighboring Pakistan. Presenting a perspective of the middle-class refugees who were forced from their homes, jobs, and lives with the withdrawal of British rule in India, Home, Uprooted delves into the lives of forty-five Partition refugees and their descendants to show how this epochal event continues to shape their lives. Exploring the oral histories of three generations of refugees from India’s Partition—ten Hindu and Sikh families in Delhi, Home, Uprooted melds oral histories with a fresh perspective on current literature to unravel the emergent conceptual nexus of home, travel, and identity in the stories of the participants. Author Devika Chawla argues that the ways in which her participants imagine, recollect, memorialize, or “abandon” home in their everyday narratives give us unique insights into how refugee identities are constituted. These stories reveal how migrations are enacted and what home—in its sense, absence, and presence—can mean for displaced populations. Written in an accessible and experimental style that blends biography, autobiography, essay, and performative writing, Home, Uprooted folds in field narratives with Chawla’s own family history, which was also shaped by the Partition event and her self-propelled migration to North America. In contemplating and living their stories of home, she attempts to show how her own ancestral legacies of Partition displacement bear relief. Home—how we experience it and what it says about the “selves” we come to occupy—is a crucial question of our contemporary moment. Home, Uprooted delivers a unique and poignant perspective on this timely question. This compilation of stories offers an iteration of how diasporic migrations might be enacted and what “home” means to displaced populations. devika Chawla is Associate Professor in the School of Communication Studies at Ohio University. She is the co-author of Intercultural Communication: An Ecological Approach and co-author of Liminal Traces: Storying, Performing, and Embodying Postcoloniality.


h i sto ry

|

african american studies

New Bedford’s Civil War eArl f. mu lDerink iii

“Imaginative and exhaustive research grounds New Bedford’s story in the rich details of people’s lives, whether these involve day-to-day business in New Bedford or life and death on the battlefield. . . . The book illuminates a city whose history speaks usefully to the Civil War in general and to the Civil War in the North more specifically.” — Micha el Frisch, University at Buffalo, sUNY

new in

paperback

“Explores the impact of the war on Massachusetts’s ‘Whaling City’ with particular emphasis on the sizable black community.” —Th e C h ron iC l e review

“. . . a sweeping review of a changing community and how it responded to and, over the years, remembered and memorialized the Civil War.” — C h oiC e

318 pages 978-0-8232-6166-6 • Paper • $24.00 • £15.99 (01) [Cloth available: 978-0-8232-4334-1] The North’s Civil War a Pril

e Arl F. mu lDe rink iii

l aw

|

is Professor of History at Southern Utah University.

p o l i t i ca l t h e o ry

|

philosophy

Law and Revolution in South Africa

uBuntu, Dignity, and the Struggle for Constitutional Transformation

DruCillA Co rnell The relation between law and revolution is one of the most pressing questions of our time. As one country after another has faced the challenge that comes with the revolutionary overthrow of past dictatorships, how one reconstructs a new government is a burning issue. South Africa, after a long and bloody armed struggle and a series of militant uprisings, negotiated a settlement for a new government and remains an important example of what a substantive revolution might look like. The essays collected in this book address both the broader question of law and revolution and some of the specific issues of transformation in South Africa.

224 pages 978-0-8232-5758-4 • Paper • $24.00 • £15.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5757-7 • Cloth • $85.00 • £57.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Just Ideas a Pril

DruCillA Corne ll is Professor of Political Science, Women’s and Gender Studies, and Comparative Literature at Rutgers University. She also teaches at Birkbeck College, University of London and the University of Pretoria in South Africa. Her most recent books are uBuntu and the Law: African Ideals and Postapartheid Jurisprudence and The Dignity Jurisprudence of the Constitutional Court of South Africa: Cases and Materials, Volumes I & II (both Fordham).

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

21


philosophy

|

classical studies

|

women’s studies

“Nietzsche considered that Socrates mischaracterized the Sophists and exiled them out of the Logos, making their art the other of philosophy, of what became the Platonic-Aristotelian orthodoxy in the history of Western thought. Barbara Cassin’s Sophistical Practice undertakes the Nietzschean task of reappraising the Sophists’ enterprise and the lessons that their ‘other’ conception of the Logos has for us, today: about the long-suppressed feminine buried under the orthodox history of philosophy, about language and translation, about the meaning of a transitional justice (of the kind illustrated by post-apartheid South Africa) that demands not the absolute Platonic truth-in-itself but the sophistical 'enoughtruth-for' restoring communities fractured by hate and strife and giving them the sense of a future. This is a superb work of classical erudition at the service of the reflection on contemporary issues.” — so U leMa n e B aChIr dIagn e, Columbia University

Sophistical Practice

Toward a Consistent Relativism ba r bara Cassi n 384 pages • 5 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5639-6 • Paper • $30.00 • £19.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5638-9 • Cloth • $95.00 • £64.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available a PriL

22

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

Sophistics is the paradigm of a discourse that does things with words. It is not pure rhetoric, as Plato wants us to believe, but it provides an alternative to the philosophical mainstream. A sophistic history of philosophy questions the orthodox philosophical history of philosophy: that of ontology and truth in itself. In this book, we discover unusual Presocratics, wreaking havoc with the fetish of true and false. Their logoi perform politics and perform reality. Their sophistic practice can shed crucial light on contemporary events, such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa, where, to quote Desmond Tutu, “words, language, and rhetoric do things,” creating things like the new “rainbow people.” Transitional justice requires a consistent and sustainable relativism: not Truth, but truth for, and enough of the truth for there to be a community. Philosophy itself is about words before it is about concepts. Language manifests itself in reality only as multiplicity; different languages perform different types of worlds; and difficulties of translation are but symptoms of these differences. This desacralized untranslatability undermines and deconstructs the Heideggerian statement that there is a historical language of philosophy that is Greek by essence (being the only language able to say what “is”) and today is German. Sophistical Practice constitutes a major contribution to the debate among philosophical pluralism, unitarism, and pragmatism. It will change how we discuss such words as city, truth, and politics. Philologically and philosophically rethinking the sophistical gesture, relying on performance and translation, it proposes a new paradigm for the human sciences. barbara Cassin is Director of Research at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris. She is the editor of Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon (forthcoming).


philosophy

“For Strasbourg makes a superb introduction to Derrida’s ideas and to what might be called his styles of thinking, as well as to their difference from those of Jean-Luc Nancy and Lacoue-Labarthe.” — J. hIllIs MIller, University of California, Irvine

For Strasbourg Conversations of Friendship and Philosophy

JaC q ue s de rrida edited and translated by pas Ca le -ann e b rau lt and M iC ha e l naas 144 pages 978-0-8232-5649-5 • Paper • $16.00 • £10.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5648-8 • Cloth • $65.00 • £44.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available a PriL

For Strasbourg consists of a series of essays and interviews about the city of Strasbourg and the philosophical friendships Jacques Derrida developed there over a period of some forty years. Written just months before his death, the opening essay, “The Place Name(s): Strasbourg,” recounts in detail, and in very moving terms, Derrida’s deep attachment to this French city on the border between France and Germany. More than just a personal narrative, however, the essay is a profound interrogation of the relationship between philosophy and place, philosophy and language, and philosophy and friendship. As such, it raises a series of philosophical, political, and ethical questions that might all be placed under the aegis of what Derrida once called “philosophical nationalities and nationalism.” The other three texts included in the book are long interviews/conversations between Derrida and his two principal interlocutors in Strasbourg, Jean-Luc Nancy and Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe. These interviews are significant both for the themes they focus on (language, politics, friendship, death, life after death, and so on) and for what they reveal about Derrida’s relationships to Nancy and Lacoue-Labarthe. Filled with sharp insights into one anothers’ work and peppered with personal anecdotes and humor, the interviews bear witness to the decades-long intellectual friendships of these three important contemporary thinkers. This collection thus stands as a reminder of and testimony to Derrida’s unique relationship to Strasbourg and to the two thinkers most closely associated with that city. The late JaCque s derrida was the single most influential voice in European philosophy of the last quarter of the twentieth century. His Athens, Still Remains; The Animal That Therefore I Am; Sovereignties in Question; and Deconstruction in a Nutshell have been published by Fordham University Press. pasCale-anne brault is Professor of French at DePaul University. She is the co-translator of several works of Jacques Derrida, including The Work of Mourning and Learning to Live Finally, and of Jean-Luc Nancy’s Noli Me Tangere: On the Raising of the Body (Fordham). MiChael naas is Professor of Philosophy at DePaul University. His most recent books include Taking on the Tradition: Jacques Derrida and the Legacies of Deconstruction; Derrida from Now On; and Miracle and Machine: Jacques Derrida and the Two Sources of Religion, Science, and the Media (the last two Fordham).

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

23


philosophy

|

p o l i t i ca l t h e o ry

“This book moves forward the entire debate on biopolitics. Offering a new articulation of the politics of life with the republican conception of politics, the book outlines in suggestive ways the contours of an affirmative biopolitics. Natality, normativity, and eternal life are the categories through which the author gives new strength to Foucault’s perspective.” — ro B erto esp osito

The Republic of the Living Biopolitics and the Critique of Civil Society mig ue l VAtte r 384 pages 978-0-8232-5602-0 • Paper • $32.00 • £21.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5601-3 • Cloth • $125.00 • £84.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Commonalities J Un e

24

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

This book takes up Foucault’s hypothesis that liberal “civil society,” far from being a sphere of natural freedoms, designates the social spaces where our biological lives come under new forms of control and are invested with new forms of biopower. In order to test this hypothesis, its chapters examine the critical theory of civil society— from Hegel and Marx through Lukács, Adorno, Benjamin, and Arendt—from the new horizon opened up by Foucault’s turn to biopolitics and its reception in recent Italian theory. Negri, Agamben, and Esposito have argued that biopolitics not only denotes new forms of domination over life but harbors within it an affirmative relation between biological life and politics that carries an emancipatory potential. The chapters of this book take up this suggestion by locating this emancipatory potential in the biopolitical feature of the human condition that Arendt called “natality.” The book proceeds to illustrate how natality is the basis for a republican articulation of an affirmative biopolitics. It aims to renew the critical theory of civil society by pursuing the traces of natality as a “surplus of life” that resists the oppressive government of life found in the capitalist political economy, in the liberal system of rights, and in the bourgeois family. By contrast, natality offers the normative foundation for a new “republic of the living.” Finally, natality permits us to establish a relation between biological life and contemplative life that reverses the long-held belief in a privileged relationship of thinking to the possibility of our death. The result is a materialist, atheological conception of contemplative life as eternal life. mig ue l VAtte r is Professor of Politics in the School of Social Sciences at the University of New South Wales, Australia. He is the author of Between Form and Event: Machiavelli’s Theory of Political Freedom (paperback edition Fordham) and editor of Crediting God: Sovereignty and Religion in the Age of Global Capitalism (Fordham).


philosophy

Where Are You? An Ontology of the Cell Phone

m Aurizio fe rrAri s translated by sArAh De sAnCt is

|

media studies

&

c o m m u n i c at i o n

This book sheds light on the most philosophically interesting of contemporary objects: the cell phone. “Where are you?”—a question asked over cell phones myriad times each day—is arguably the most philosophical question of our age, given the transformation of presence the cell phone has wrought in contemporary social life and public space. Throughout all public spaces, cell phones are now a ubiquitous prosthesis of what Descartes and Hegel once considered the absolute tool: the hand. Their power comes in part from their ability to move about with us—they are like a computer, but we can carry them with us at all times—in part from what they attach to us (and how), as all that computational and connective power becomes both handy and hand-sized. Quite surprisingly, despite their name, one might argue, as Ferraris does, that cell phones are not really all that good for sound and speaking. Instead, the main philosophical point of this book is that mobile phones have come into their own as writing machines—they function best for text messages, e-mail, and archives of all kinds. Their philosophical urgency lies in the manner in which they carry us from the effects of voice over into reliance upon the written traces that are, Ferraris argues, the basic stuff of human culture. Ontology is the study of what there is, and what there is in our age is a huge network of documents, papers, and texts of all kinds. Social reality is not constructed by collective intentionality; rather, it is made up of inscribed acts. As Derrida already prophesized, our world revolves around writing. Cell phones have attached writing to our fingers and dragged it into public spaces in a new way. This is why, with their power to obliterate or morph presence and replace voice with writing, the cell phone is such a philosophically interesting object. mAurizio Fe rrAris is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Turin. He is the co-author, with Jacques Derrida, of A Taste for the Secret and the author of Documentality: Why It Is Necessary to Leave Traces (Fordham). sArAh De sAnCtis is a professional translator and a Ph.D. student at the London Graduate School, where she specializes in literature and new realism.

256 pages • 16 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5616-7 • Paper • $26.00 • £16.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5615-0 • Cloth • $85.00 • £57.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Commonalities aUg USt

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

25


philosophy

|

m e d i e va l s t u d i e s

Treatise on Consequences J oh n bu ridan translated with an introduction by st ephen read

The rediscovery of Aristotle in the late twelfth century led to a fresh development of logical theory, culminating in Buridan’s crucial comprehensive treatment in the Treatise on Consequences. Buridan’s novel treatment of the categorical syllogism laid the basis for the study of logic in succeeding centuries. This new translation offers a clear and accurate rendering of Buridan’s text. It is prefaced by a substantial Introduction that outlines the work’s context and explains its argument in detail. Also included is a translation of the Introduction (in French) to the 1976 edition of the Latin text by Hubert Hubien. John bu ridan , ca. 1300 to after 1358, was a French independent cleric who studied and later

taught at the University of Paris.

240 pages • 15 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5718-8 • Cloth • $45.00 • £30.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Medieval Philosophy: Texts and Studies M ay

stephe n re ad is Professor of History and Philosophy of Logic in the Arché Research Centre for Logic, Language, Epistemology and Metaphysics at the University of St. Andrews.

philosophy

|

p o l i t i ca l t h e o ry

|

african american studies

Fugitive Rousseau

Slavery, Primitivism, and Political Freedom

J i MMy Casas klau sen “This is a complex and fascinating project. The ideas are original and provocative and should advance new thinking in political theory.” —a n n e n o rTo n , University of Pennsylvania

320 pages • 4 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5729-4 • Cloth • $65.00 • £44.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Just Ideas Ma rC H

26

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

Critics have claimed that Jean-Jacques Rousseau was a primitivist who was uncritically preoccupied with “noble savages” and that he remained oblivious to the African slave trade. Fugitive Rousseau demonstrates why these charges are wrong and argues that a fresh, “fugitive” perspective on political freedom is bound up with the themes of primitivism and slavery in Rousseau’s political theory. Rather than trace Rousseau’s arguments primarily to the social contract tradition of Hobbes and Locke, Fugitive Rousseau places Rousseau squarely in two imperial contexts: European empire in his contemporary Atlantic world and Roman imperial philosophy. Anyone who aims to understand the implications of Rousseau’s famous sentence “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains” or wants to know how Rousseauian arguments can support a radical democratic politics of diversity, discontinuity, and exodus will find Fugitive Rousseau indispensable. is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is co-editor, with James Martel, of How Not to Be Governed.

Ji MMy Casas klause n


philosophy

|

p o l i t i ca l t h e o ry

The Government of Life Foucault, Biopolitics, and Neoliberalism

edited by vanessa leMM and Migu el vat t er Foucault’s late work on biopolitics and governmentality has established him as the fundamental thinker of contemporary continental political thought and as a privileged source for our current understanding of neoliberalism and its technologies of power. In this volume, an international and interdisciplinary group of Foucault scholars examines his ideas of biopower and biopolitics and their relation to his project of a history of governmentality and to a theory of the subject found in his last courses at the Collège de France. Many of the chapters engage critically with the Italian theoretical reception of Foucault. At the same time, the originality of this collection consists in the variety of perspectives and traditions of reception brought to bear upon the problematic connections between biopolitics and governmentality established by Foucault’s last works. 272 pages 978-0-8232-5597-9 • Paper • $26.00 • £16.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5596-2 • Cloth • $85.00 • £57.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Forms of Living a PriL

Con tributors: Francesco Paolo Adorno, Melinda Cooper, Simona Forti, Frédéric Gros, Thomas Lemke, Vanessa Lemm, Maria Muhle, Roberto Nigro, Paul Patton, Judith Revel, Miguel Vatter vane ssa le MM is Professor of Philosophy at the School of Humanities and Languages of the University of New South Wales, Australia. M i gue l vatte r is Professor of Politics in the School of Social Sciences at the University of New South Wales, Australia.

philosophy

|

p o l i t i ca l t h e o ry

|

renaissance studies

Between Form and Event Machiavelli’s Theory of Political Freedom

M i gu el vatter, with a new afterword by the author Machiavelli uncovers the productive function of social conflict in establishing a new idea of popular power and its legal institutions whose function is to relativize the command of the state and check the abuses of the privileged groups in society. Henceforth, every legitimate form of government must at the same time be inscribed with its immanent critique and imminent subversion: The possibility of political form is conditioned by the possibility of changing it in an event of political revolution. The book argues that Machiavelli’s new understanding of political freedom presupposes a revolutionary change in the way that history is conceived. Machiavelli changes the paradigm of action from the classical idea that virtue means acting in correspondence to what the times demand to a modern idea of virtue wherein acting means going against the times in order to effect a radical new beginning. In so doing, Machiavelli becomes the first political philosopher of the event. 352 pages 978-0-8232-5594-8 • Paper • $32.00 • £21.99 (01) Commonalities J uNe

M i gu e l vatte r is Professor of Politics in the School of Social Sciences at the University of New South Wales, Australia.

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

27


philosophy

|

art

Art and Morality

Essays in the Spirit of George Santayana M orris grossMan, edited by Mart in a. Co leMan

272 pages • 7 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5723-2 • Paper • $26.00 • £16.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5722-5 • Cloth • $85.00 • £57.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available American Philosophy M ay

The guiding theme of these essays by aesthetician, musician, and Santayana scholar Morris Grossman is the importance of preserving the tension between what can be unified and what is disorganized, random, and miscellaneous. Grossman described this as the tension between art and morality: Art arrests a sense of change and yields moments of unguarded enjoyment and peace; but soon, shifting circumstances compel evaluation, decision, and action. According to Grossman, the best art preserves the tension between the aesthetic consummation of experience and the press of morality understood as the business of navigating conflicts, making choices, and meeting needs. This concern was intimately related to his reading of George Santayana. The best philosophy, like the best art, preserves the tension between what can be ordered and what resists assimilation, and Grossman read Santayana as exemplifying this virtue in his embrace of multiple perspectives. Other scholars have noted the multiplicity or irony in Santayana’s work, but Grossman was unique in taking such a style to be a substantive part of Santayana’s philosophizing. M orris g rossMan (1922–2012) was Professor Emeritus in the Department of Philosophy, Fairfield University (Connecticut). He was a founding member of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy and a committed supporter of the Santayana Edition. M artin a. ColeMan is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis and director and editor of the Santayana Edition.

philosophy

|

p o l i t i ca l t h e o ry

Freedom and Limits J oh n laCh s, edited by pat riCk shade

Freedom and Limits is a defense of the value of freedom in the context of human finitude. A contribution to the American tradition of philosophy, it focuses attention on moral problems as we encounter them in daily life, where the search for perfection and the incessant drive to meet obligations make it difficult to attain satisfaction. The book argues that uniformity is unproductive: Human natures are varied and changeable, making the effort to impose a unitary good on everyone futile. Moreover, we don’t need to strive for more than what is good enough: Finite achievements should be adequate to satisfy finite people. The ultimate aim of the book is to reclaim the role of philosophy as a guide to life. In doing so, it presents discussions of such important philosophers as Fichte, Hegel, Peirce, Dewey, James, and, above all, Santayana. is Centennial Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. His latest book is Stoic Pragmatism.

John laChs

patriCk shade 520 pages 978-0-8232-5675-4 • Paper • $35.00 • £23.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5674-7 • Cloth • $125.00 • £84.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available American Philosophy Ma rCH

28

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Rhodes College.


philosophy

|

religion

|

american studies

Yes, But Not Quite

Encountering Josiah Royce’s Ethico-Religious Insight dwayne a. t u nstall

“Presents a new and enriched understanding of the philosophy of Josiah Royce, a philosopher who is one of the giants in American thought and life.” — JaCq U elIn e k egley, California state University, Bakersfield

new in

paperback

“Dwayne Tunstall’s linking the philosophy of Josiah Royce to the resurgent tradition of American Personalism is both salutary and promising.” — J. J. MCderMoT T, Texas a&M University

“Tunstall offers an intensive examination of Royce’s general theological system and his radical ethics of loyalty. . . . Highly recommended.” — C h oiC e

is Assistant Professor of Philosophy and African and African American Studies at Grand Valley State University and the author of Doing Philosophy Personally (Fordham). dway ne a. tu nstall

192 pages 978-0-8232-6165-9 • Paper • $24.00 • £15.99 (01) [Cloth available: 978-0-8232-3054-9] ebook available American Philosophy Ma rCH

religion

|

theology

|

philosophy

The Rebellious No

Variations on a Secular Theology of Language noëlle vah anian This book aims to renew theological thinking by extending and radicalizing an iconoclastic and existentialist mode of thought. It proposes a theology whose point of departure assumes and accepts the critiques of religion launched by Nietzsche, Freud, Marx, and Feuerbach but nevertheless takes theological desire seriously as a rebellious force working within, but against, an anthropomorphic, phallogocentric worldview. As a theology of language, it does not claim any privileged access to some transcendent divine essence or ground of Being. On the contrary, for Noëlle Vahanian theology is a strictly secular discourse, like any other discourse, but aware of its limitations and wary of great promises—its own included. Its faith is that this secular theological desire can be a force against the constitutive indifference of thought, and it is a meditative act of rebellion. Aphoristic instead of argumentative, this book offers an original and constructive engagement with such seminal issues as indifference, belief, madness, and love.

176 pages 978-0-8232-5695-2 • Cloth • $45.00 • £30.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Perspectives in Continental Philosophy Ma rC H

noëlle vahanian is Associate Professor of Religion and Philosophy at Lebanon Valley College in Annville, Pennsylvania. She is the author of Language, Desire, and Theology: A Genealogy of the Will to Speak.

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

29


religion

|

theology

|

performance studies

Kierkegaard and the Staging of Desire Rhetoric and Performance in a Theology of Eros Carl s. h ughes

256 pages • 5 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5725-6 • Cloth • $55.00 • £37.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available J uLy

Theology in the modern era often assumes that the consummate form of theological discourse is objective prose—ignoring or condemning apophatic traditions and the spiritual eros that drives them. For too long, Kierkegaard has been read along these lines as a progenitor of twentiethcentury neo-orthodoxy and a stern critic of the erotic in all its forms. In contrast, Hughes argues that Kierkegaard envisions faith fundamentally as a form of infinite, insatiable eros. He depicts the essential purpose of Kierkegaard’s writing as to elicit ever-greater spiritual desire, not to provide the satisfactions of doctrine or knowledge. Hughes’s argument revolves around close readings of provocative, disparate, and (in many cases) little-known Kierkegaardian texts. The thread connecting all of these texts is that they each conjure up some sort of performative “stage setting,” which they invite readers to enter. By analyzing the theological function of these texts, the book sheds new light on the role of the aesthetic in Kierkegaard’s authorship, his surprising affinity for liturgy and sacrament, and his overarching effort to conjoin eros for God with this-worldly love. Carl s. hu g he s

religion

|

is Assistant Professor of Theology at Texas Lutheran University.

theology

Tastes of the Divine Hindu and Christian Theologies of Emotion M i Chelle voss ro berts The intensity and meaningfulness of aesthetic experience have often been described in theological terms. By designating basic human emotions as rasa, a word that connotes taste, flavor, or essence, Indian aesthetic theory conceptualizes emotional states as something to be savored. At their core, emotions can be tastes of the divine. In this book, the methods of the emerging discipline of comparative theology enable the author’s appreciation of Hindu texts and practices to illuminate her Christian reflections on aesthetics and emotion. Three emotions vie for prominence in the religious sphere: peace, love, and fury. Whereas Indian theorists following Abhinavagupta claim that the aesthetic emotion of peace best approximates the goal of religious experience, devotees of Krishna and medieval Christian readings of the Song of Songs argue that love communicates most powerfully with divinity. In response to the transcendence emphasized in both approaches, the book turns to fury at injustice to attend to emotion’s foundations in the material realm. The implications of this constructive theology of emotion for Christian liturgy, pastoral care, and social engagement are manifold. 256 pages 978-0-8232-5739-3 • Paper • $28.00 • £18.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5738-6 • Cloth • $85.00 • £57.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Comparative Theology: Thinking Across Traditions M ay

30

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

M i Chelle voss roberts is Assistant Professor of Theology and Culture at Wake Forest University School of Divinity. She is the award-winning author of Dualities: A Theology of Difference.


religion

|

p o l i t i ca l t h e o ry

Orthodox Christianity and Nationalism in NineteenthCentury Southeastern Europe edited by luC i a n n. leu st ean

256 pages 978-0-8232-5606-8 • Cloth • $55.00 • £37.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Orthodox Christianity and Contemporary Thought J uLy

Nation-building processes in the Orthodox commonwealth brought together political institutions and religious communities in their shared aims of achieving national sovereignty. Chronicling how the churches of Greece, Romania, Bulgaria, and Serbia acquired independence from the Patriarchate of Constantinople in the wake of the Ottoman Empire’s decline, Orthodox Christianity and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Southeastern Europe examines the role of Orthodox churches in the construction of national identities. Drawing on archival material available after the fall of communism in southeastern Europe and Russia, as well as material published in Greek, Serbian, Bulgarian, Romanian, and Russian, Orthodox Christianity and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Southeastern Europe analyzes the challenges posed by nationalism to the Ecumenical Patriarchate and the ways in which Orthodox churches engaged in the nationalist ideology. Contribu tors: Bojan Aleksov, Daniela Kalkandjieva, Paschalis M. Kitromilides, Lucian N. Leustean, Dimitris Stamatopoulos luCian n. leustean is Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

religion

|

classical studies

|

l i t e r at u r e

Ordinary Oblivion and the Self Unmoored Reading Plato’s Phaedrus and Writing the Soul J e nniFer r. rapp

208 pages 978-0-8232-5743-0 • Cloth • $55.00 • £37.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Ma rC H

Rapp begins with a question posed by the poet Theodore Roethke: “Should we say that the self, once perceived, becomes a soul?” Through her examination of Plato’s Phaedrus and her insights about the place of forgetting in a life, Rapp answers Roethke’s query with a resounding Yes. In so doing, Rapp reimagines the Phaedrus, interprets anew Plato’s relevance to contemporary life, and offers an innovative account of forgetting as a fertile fragility constitutive of humanity. Drawing upon poetry and comparisons with other ancient Greek and Daoist texts, Rapp brings to light overlooked features of the Phaedrus, disrupts longstanding interpretations of Plato as the facile champion of memory, and offers new lines of sight onto (and from) his corpus. Her attention to the Phaedrus and her meditative apprehension of the permeable character of human life leave our understanding of both Plato and forgetting inescapably altered. Unsettle everything you think you know about Plato, suspend the twentieth-century entreaty to “Never forget,” and behold here a new mode of critical reflection in which textual study and humanistic inquiry commingle to expansive effect. Jen niFer rapp

is Robert Aird Chair in the Humanities at Deep Springs College.

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

31


religion

|

theology

Questioning the Human

Toward a Theological Anthropology for the Twenty-First Century edited by liev en b o ev e, yv es de Maeseneer, and ellen va n st iCh el Theological anthropology is being put to the test: In the face of contemporary developments in the spheres of culture, politics, and science, traditional perspectives on the human person are no longer adequate. Yet can theological anthropology move beyond its previously established categories and renew itself in relation to contemporary insights? Uniting Roman Catholic theologians from across the globe, this collection tackles from a theological perspective challenges related to the classical natural law tradition (Part I), to the modern conception of the subject (Part II), and to the postmodern awareness of diversity in a globalizing context (Part III). Entering into a critical-constructive dialogue with contemporary culture, science, and philosophy, this volume will be essential reading for anyone seeking a state-of-the-art account of theological anthropology.

240 pages 978-0-8232-5753-9 • Paper • $24.00 • £15.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5752-2 • Cloth • $75.00 • £50.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available J uLy

Contributors: Lieven Boeve, Rosemary P. Carbine, Oliver Davies, Celia Deane-Drummond, Yves De Maeseneer, Johan De Tavernier, Henri-Jérôme Gagey, Anthony J. Godzieba, Michelle A. Gonzalez, Wilhelm Guggenberger, Robyn Horner, David G. Kirchhoffer, Stephen J. Pope, Ellen Van Stichel li even boeve is Professor of Fundamental Theology at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium. yve s de Maese nee r teaches Fundamental Theological Ethics at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium. elle n van stiChel is a at Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium.

religion

|

philosophy

|

l i t e r at u r e

Messianic Thought Outside Theology

edited by a n na glaz ova and paul no rt h

304 pages • 3 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5672-3 • Paper • $28.00 • £18.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5671-6 • Cloth • $95.00 • £64.00 (06) J uNe

Why did a “secularized” concept of messianicity seem so crucial in the twentieth century? Are messianic structures intelligible outside the theological systems in which they were invented? This book seeks to situate the ethical, ontological, and literary adoptions of messianism within the broader contours of messianic thought. The gesture by Benjamin, Rosenzweig, and others of detaching messianism from the person of the messiah, understanding it instead as a redemptive potential inherent in all human history, is one facet of a broad move in political theory, philosophy, linguistics, and historiography to redeem secular thinking through theological figures. Yet already within religious discourse the messiah figure is paradoxical. With the invocation of a future arrival “to come,” history is opened, yet the previous assumption of an end threatens to shut it off from whatever unexpected might come. The coming arrival, so certain, so complete, will have already come in an anteriority that seems to cancel the future and close down historical life before it starts. Co ntributors: Lisa Marie Anderson, Catharine Diehl, Peter Fenves, David Ferris, Oleg Gelikman, Anna Glazova, Werner Hamacher, Vivian Liska, Thomas Macho, Paul North, Nicole Pepperell, Joshua Wilner. a nna g lazova pau l north

32

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

is Max Kade Visiting Researcher at Rutgers University.

is Associate Professor of German at Yale University.


l i t e r at u r e

|

art

|

religion

"Once in a while, a book comes along with the force of a gale and shakes the carefully laid foundations of an academic field or discourse. This is such a book. A compelling and erudite tour-de-force that relentlessly examines the historical amnesias and political erasures at the center of contemporary popular culture and critical theory constructions of the Muslim subject, At Freedom’s Limit powerfully reminds us that radical critique is rooted in complex histories of identity and struggle, both local and global. Incisive, passionate and peppered with scintillating humor, Abbas’s book will surely change the face of postcolonial studies." — sa Ma h selIM, rutgers University

“Sadia Abbas has produced a watershed study that promises to be a landmark in the critical analysis of the nexes between empire, Islam, gender, and culture. This book provides a roadmap for a new generation of scholarship that matches the spirit and urgencies of the time.” — PaUl a Ma r, University of California, santa Barbara

At Freedom’s Limit Islam and the Postcolonial Predicament sa d ia ab b as

224 pages • 8 color illustrations 978-0-8232-5786-7 • Paper • $24.00 • £15.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5785-0 • Cloth • $65.00 • £44.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available a PriL

The subject of this book is a new “Islam.” This Islam began to take shape in 1988 around the Rushdie affair, the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989, and the first Gulf War of 1991. It was consolidated in the period following September 11, 2001. It is a name, a discursive site, a signifier at once flexible and constrained—indeed, it is a geopolitical agon, in and around which some of the most pressing aporias of modernity, enlightenment, liberalism, and reformation are worked out. At this discursive site are many metonyms for Islam: the veiled or “pious” Muslim woman, the militant, the minority Muslim injured by Western free speech. Each of these figures functions as a cipher enabling repeated encounters with the question “How do we free ourselves from freedom?” Again and again, freedom is imagined as Western, modern, imperial—a dark imposition of Enlightenment. The pious and injured Muslim who desires his or her own enslavement is imagined as freedom’s other. At Freedom’s Limit is an intervention into current debates regarding religion, secularism, and Islam and provides a deep critique of the anthropology and sociology of Islam that have consolidated this formation. It shows that, even as this Islam gains increasing traction in cultural production from television shows to movies to novels, the most intricate contestations of Islam so construed are to be found in the work of Muslim writers and painters. This book includes extended readings of jihadist proclamations; postcolonial law; responses to law from minorities in Muslim-majority societies; Islamophobic films; the novels of Leila Aboulela, Mohammed Hanif, and Nadeem Aslam; and the paintings of Komail Aijazuddin. sadia abbas

is Assistant Professor of English at Rutgers University, Newark.

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

33


m e d i e va l s t u d i e s

|

p o et ry

Eddic, Skaldic, and Beyond Poetic Variety in Medieval Iceland and Norway edited by Mart in Chase

272 pages 978-0-8232-5781-2 • Cloth • $55.00 • £37.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Fordham Series in Medieval Studies M ay

Eddic, Skaldic, and Beyond shines light on traditional divisions of Old Norse–Icelandic poetry and awakens the reader to work that blurs these boundaries. Many of the texts and topics taken up in these enlightening essays have been difficult to categorize and have consequently been overlooked or undervalued. The boundaries between genres (Eddic and Skaldic), periods (Viking Age, medieval, early modern), or cultures (Icelandic, Scandinavian, English, Continental) may not have been as sharp in the eyes and ears of contemporary authors and audiences as they are in our own. When questions of classification are allowed to fade into the background, at least temporarily, the poetry can be appreciated on its own terms. Some of the essays in this collection present new material, while others challenge long-held assumptions. They reflect the idea that poetry with “medieval” characteristics continued to be produced in Iceland well past the fifteenth century, and even beyond the Protestant Reformation in Iceland (1550). This superb volume, rich in up-to-date scholarship, makes little-known material accessible to a wide audience. Co ntributors: Christopher Abram, Paul Acker, Ingvil Brügger Budal, Hannah Burrows, Martin Chase, Shaun F. D. Hughes, Mikael Males, Rory McTurk, Russell Poole, Rolf Stavnem, Kevin J. Wanner M artin Chase

is Associate Professor of English and Medieval Studies at Fordham University.

m e d i e va l s t u d i e s

|

religion

|

women’s studies

Religious Women in Early Carolingian Francia

A Study of Manuscript Transmission and Monastic Culture F eliCe liFshitz

368 pages • 10 color and 2 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5687-7 • Cloth • $55.00 • £37.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Fordham Series in Medieval Studies M ay

34

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

Religious Women in Early Carolingian Francia, a groundbreaking study of the intellectual and monastic culture of the Main Valley during the eighth century, looks closely at a group of manuscripts associated with some of the best-known personalities of the European Middle Ages, including Boniface of Mainz and his “beloved,” abbess Leoba of Tauberbischofsheim. This is the first study of these “Anglo-Saxon missionaries to Germany” to delve into the details of their lives by studying the manuscripts that were produced in their scriptoria and used in their communities. The author explores how one group of religious women helped to shape the culture of medieval Europe through the texts they wrote and copied, as well as through their editorial interventions. Using compelling manuscript evidence, she argues that the content of the women’s books was overwhelmingly gender-egalitarian and frequently feminist (i.e., resistant to patriarchal ideas). This intriguing book provides unprecedented glimpses into the “feminist consciousness” of the women’s and mixed-sex communities that flourished in the early Middle Ages. FeliCe liFshitz is Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and of Religious Studies at the University of Alberta.


l i t e r at u r e

|

renaissance studies

|

m e d i e va l s t u d i e s

Figures of a Changing World Metaphor and the Emergence of Modern Culture h arry berger, Jr.

160 pages 978-0-8232-5748-5 • Paper • $20.00 • £12.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5747-8 • Cloth • $75.00 • £50.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available auG uSt

Figures of a Changing World offers a dramatic new account of cultural change, an account based on the distinction between two familiar rhetorical figures, metonymy and metaphor. The book treats metonymy as the basic organizing trope of traditional culture and metaphor as the basic organizing trope of modern culture. On the one hand, metonymies present themselves as analogies that articulate or reaffirm preexisting states of affairs. They are guarantors of facticity, a term that can be translated or defined as fact-like-ness. On the other hand, metaphors challenge the similarity they claim to establish, in order to feature departures from preexisting states of affairs. On the basis of this distinction, the author argues that metaphor and metonymy can be used as instruments both for the large-scale interpretation of tensions in cultural change and for the micro-interpretation of tensions within particular texts. In addressing the functioning of the two terms, the author draws upon and critiques the work of Friedrich Nietzsche, Roman Jakobson, Christian Metz, Paul Ricoeur, Umberto Eco, Edmund Leach, and Paul de Man. ha rry berg e r, J r. , is Professor Emeritus of Literature and Art History at the University of

California, Santa Cruz.

l i t e r at u r e

|

renaissance studies

Harrying

Skills of Offense in Shakespeare’s Henriad h arry berger, Jr.

Harrying considers Richard III and the four plays of Shakespeare’s Henriad—Richard II, Henry IV Part 1, Henry IV Part 2, and Henry V. Berger combines close reading with cultural analysis to show how the language characters speak always says more than the speakers mean to say. Shakespeare’s speakers try to say one thing. Their language says other things that often question the speakers’ motives or intentions. Harrying explores the effect of this linguistic mischief on the representation of all the Henriad’s major figures. It centers attention on the portrayal of Falstaff and on the bad faith that darkens the language and performance of Harry, the Prince of Wales who becomes King Henry V. harry berg e r, J r. , is Professor Emeritus of Literature and Art History at the University of

California, Santa Cruz.

256 pages 978-0-8232-5663-1 • Paper • $26.00 (01) 978-0-8232-5662-4 • Cloth • $85.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available auG uSt

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

35


l i t e r at u r e

|

renaissance studies

|

race

&

ethnic studies

|

religion

Becoming Christian

Race, Reformation, and Early Modern English Romance d ennis au st in brit ton

256 pages • 2 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5714-0 • Cloth • $55.00 • £37.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available a PriL

new in

paperback

Becoming Christian argues that romance narratives of Jews and Muslims converting to Christianity register theological formations of race in post-Reformation England. The medieval motif of infidel conversion came under scrutiny as Protestant theology radically reconfigured how individuals acquire religious identities. Whereas Catholicism had asserted that Christian identity begins with baptism, numerous theologians in the Church of England denied the necessity of baptism and instead treated Christian identity as a racial characteristic passed from parents to their children. The church thereby developed a theology that both transformed a nation into a Christian race and created skepticism about the possibility of conversion. Race became a matter of salvation and damnation. Britton intervenes in critical debates about the intersections of race and religion, as well as in discussions of the social implications of romance. Examining English translations of Calvin, treatises on the sacraments, catechisms, and sermons alongside works by Edmund Spenser, John Harrington, William Shakespeare, John Fletcher, and Phillip Massinger, Becoming Christian demonstrates how a theology of race altered a nation’s imagination and literary landscape. d e nnis au stin britton is Associate Professor of English at the University of New Hampshire. His areas of research include early modern English literature, Reformation theology, and race and ethnic studies. In 2012, he received a year-long National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship at the Folger Shakespeare Library.

l i t e r at u r e

|

gender studies

|

renaissance studies

The Pain of Reformation Spenser, Vulnerability, and the Ethics of Masculinity

J oseph CaMpana “A brilliant, bold, generous, and moving book. Campana makes powerful contributions in ethics, gender and sexuality, and the narrative imagination in Spenser’s Reformation culture.” —T heresa k rIer, Macalester College

“Each chapter is a gem.” — C h oiC e

“Campana makes a highly compelling case for his claims, and this accomplished and ambitious book will undoubtedly provoke a great deal of lively discussion for years to come.” —sTud ies in en gl is h l iTeraTure, 1 50 0 –1 9 0 0

is Assistant Professor of English at Rice University. He is a well-published poet as well as a scholar; his poems have been collected in The Book of Faces.

Joseph CaMpana 296 pages • 8 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-6168-0 • Paper • $24.00 • £15.99 (01) [Cloth available: 978-0-8232-3910-8] Ma rCH

36

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m


l i t e r at u r e

|

p o l i t i ca l t h e o ry

Political Magic

British Fictions of Savagery and Sovereignty, 1650–1750 C hristo pher F. loa r

320 pages 978-0-8232-5691-4 • Cloth • $65.00 • £44.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available J uNe

Political Magic examines early modern British fictions of exploration and colonialism, arguing that narratives of intercultural contact reimagine ideas of sovereignty and popular power. These fictions reveal aspects of political thought in this period that official discourse typically shunted aside, particularly the political status of the commoner, whose “liberty” was often proclaimed even as it was undermined both in theory and in practice. Like the Hobbesian sovereign, the colonist appears to the colonized as a giver of rules who remains unruly. At the heart of many texts are moments of savage wonder, provoked by European displays of technological prowess. In particular, the trope of the first gunshot articulates an origin of consent and political legitimacy in colonial showmanship. Yet as manifestations of force held in abeyance, these technologies also signal the ultimate reliance of sovereigns on extreme violence as the lessthan-mystical foundation of their authority. By examining works by Cavendish, Defoe, Behn, Swift, and Haywood in conjunction with contemporary political writing and travelogues, Political Magic locates a subterranean discourse of sovereignty in the century after Hobbes, finding surprising affinities between the government of “savages” and of Britons. Christopher F. loar

l i t e r at u r e

|

is Assistant Professor of English at Western Washington University.

c u lt u r a l st u d i e s

Thresholds of Illiteracy

Theory, Latin America, and the Crisis of Resistance a b r ah aM aCo sta

272 pages 978-0-8232-5710-2 • Paper • $26.00 • £17.99 (01) 978-0-8232-5709-6 • Cloth • $85.00 • £57.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available Just Ideas The American Literatures Initiative a PriL

Thresholds of Illiteracy reevaluates Latin American theories and narratives of cultural resistance by advancing the concept of “illiteracy” as a new critical approach to understanding scenes or moments of social antagonism. “Illiteracy,” Acosta claims, can offer us a way of talking about what cannot be subsumed within prevailing modes of reading, such as the opposition between writing and orality, that have frequently been deployed to distinguish between modern and archaic peoples and societies. This book is organized as a series of literary and cultural analyses of internationally recognized postcolonial narratives. It tackles a series of the most important political/aesthetic issues in Latin America that have arisen over the past thirty years or so, including indigenism, testimonio, the Zapatista movement in Chiapas, and migration to the United States via the U.S.–Mexican border. Through a critical examination of the “illiterate” effects and contradictions at work in these resistant narratives, the book goes beyond current theories of culture and politics to reveal radically unpredictable forms of antagonism that advance the possibility for an ever more democratic model of cultural analysis. ab rahaM aCosta

Arizona.

is Assistant Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

37


l i t e r at u r e

|

p o l i t i ca l t h e o ry

Imagined Sovereignties Toward a New Political Romanticism k ir ku iken

240 pages 978-0-8232-5767-6 • Cloth • $45.00 • £30.00 (06) Simultaneous electronic edition available M ay

Imagined Sovereignties argues that the Romantics reconceived not just the nature of aesthetic imagination but also the conditions in which a specific form of political sovereignty could be realized through it. Articulating the link between the poetic imagination and secularized sovereignty requires more than simply replacing God with the subjective imagination and thereby ratifying the bourgeois liberal subject. Through close readings of Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Shelley, the author elucidates how Romanticism’s reassertion of poetic power in place of the divine sovereign articulates an alternative understanding of secularization in forms of sovereignty that are no longer modeled on transcendence, divine or human. These readings ask us to reexamine not only the political significance of Romanticism but also its place within the development of modern politics. Certain aspects of Romanticism still provide an important resource for rethinking the limits of the political in our own time. This book will be a crucial source for those interested in the political legacy of Romanticism, as well as for anyone concerned with critical theoretical approaches to politics in the present. k i r ku ike n

is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Albany, SUNY. backlist

The Queer Turn in Feminism

Transforming Ourselves, Transforming the World

Lessons in Secular Criticism

The Routes Not Taken

edited by M a ry b et h Co M b s and patr i Ci a rug g i a no s C hMidt

216 pages 978-0-8232-5379-1, Paper, $24.00, £15.99 ebook available Thinking Out Loud

J o se p h b. r aski n

240 pages 978-0-8232-5386-9, Paper, $29.00, £18.99 ebook available Commonalities

352 pages 978-0-8232-5430-9, Cloth, $65.00, £44.00 ebook available

Gettysburg Religion

X—The Problem of the Negro as a Problem for Thought

Red Apple

Communism and McCarthyism in Cold War New York

st ev e lo ng e n e Ck e r

Identities, Sexualities, and the Theater of Gender

a n n e eMM a n u e l l e be r ger , translated by Cath erin e p ort e r

nahu M d iMit r i C ha n dl er 288 pages 978-0-8232-5407-1, Paper, $28.00, £18.99 ebook available American Philosophy American Literatures Initiative

Committing the Future to Memory History, Experience, Trauma s ara h Cl iFt 264 pages 978-0-8232-5421-7, Paper, $26.00, £16.99 ebook available Modern Language Initiative

38

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

Justice in Jesuit Higher Education

p hil l ip d e e ry 240 pages, 6 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5368-5, Cloth, $34.95, £22.99 ebook available

The Problem of the Color Line at the Turn of the Twentieth Century The Essential Early Essays

w. e. b. d u b o i s, edited by na hu M d i M i t r i Ch a n d le r 400 pages, 7 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5455-2, Paper, $28.00, £18.99 ebook available American Philosophy

stat h i s g o ur g o ur i s

Refinement, Diversity, and Race in the Antebellum and Civil War Border North 208 pages 978-0-8232-5519-1, Cloth, $45.00, £30.00 ebook available The North's Civil War

A Word from Our Sponsor

A Trip Through New York City's Unbuilt Subway System 336 pages, 100 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5369-2, Cloth, $34.95, £22.99 ebook available

Kant in the Land of Extraterrestrials

Cosmopolitical Philosofictions pete r sz e ndy t ranslated by will bi sho p 192 pages, 25 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5550-4, Paper, $25.00, £16.99 ebook available

Admen, Advertising, and the Golden Age of Radio

Giving Beyond the Gift

Cy n t h i a b . M ey e r s

e l li ot r . wo lFs o n

288 pages, 25 b/w illustrations 978-0-8232-5371-5, Paper, $32.00, £21.99 ebook available

Apophasis and Overcoming Theomania 576 pages 978-0-8232-5571-9, Paper, $35.00, £23.99 ebook available


index A

Abbas, Sadia 33 Acosta, Abraham 37 After the Monkey Trial 5 Andreassi, Anthony D., C.O., 7 Anglemire, Carlie 14 Art and Morality 28 At Freedom’s Limit 33

B

Babylon Complex, The 9 Baer, Ulrich 13 Becoming Christian 36 Being Nude 14 Berger, Anne Emmanuelle 38 Berger, Harry, Jr. 35 Bessa, Antonio Sergio 16 Between Form and Event 27 Beyond the Supersquare 16 Bishop, Will 38 Boeve, Lieven 32 Brault, Pascale-Anne 23 Britton, Dennis Austin 36 Brooks, Peter 8 Buridan, John 26

C

Campana, Joseph 36 Cassin, Barbara 22 Chandler, Nahum Dimitri 38 Chase, Martin 34 Chawla, Devika 20 Cinotto, Simone 18 Clift, Sarah 38 Coleman, Martin A. 28 Combs, Mary Beth 38 Committing the Future to Memory 38 Cornell, Drucilla 21 Cybertheology 6

D

Dancer in the Revolution, A 4 Deery, Phillip 38 Del Giudice, Luisa 17 De Maeseneer, Yves 32 Derrida, Jacques 23 De Sanctis, Sarah 25 Dolan, Cardinal Timothy Michael 7 Du Bois, W. E. B. 38 Durante, Francesco 19

E

Eddic, Skaldic, and Beyond 34 Errings 11

F

Ferrari, Federico 14 Ferraris, Maurizio 25 Figures of a Changing World 35 Firer Hinze, Christine 2 For Strasbourg 23 Freedom and Limits 28 Fugitive Rousseau 26

G

Gettysburg Religion 38 Giannone, Richard 5 Giving Beyond the Gift 38 Glazova, Anna 32 Gourgouris, Stathis 38 Government of Life, The 27 Gray Matter 10 Grossman, Morris 28

H

Hamilton, Andrew 13 Harrying 35 Hidden 5 Home, Uprooted 20 Hornbeck, J. Patrick, II 2, 3 Hughes, Carl S. 30 Humanities and Public Life, The 8

I

Identity 15 Imagined Sovereignties 38 Italoamericana 19

J

Jewett, Hilary 8 Johnson, Howard Eugene 4 Johnson, Wendy 4

K

Kant in the Land of Extraterrestrials 38 Kierkegaard and the Staging of Desire 30 Klausen, Jimmy Casas 26 Kuiken, Kir 38

L

Lachs, John 28 Law and Revolution in South Africa 21 Lemm, Vanessa 27 Lessons in Secular Criticism 38 Leustean, Lucian N. 31 Lifshitz, Felice 34 Loar, Christopher F. 37 Longenecker, Steve 38

M

Making Italian America 18 Mason, Randall 1 Messianic Thought Outside Theology 32 Meyers, Cynthia B. 38 Michas-Martin, Sara 10 Miller, Steven 9 More than a Monologue 2, 3 Mulderink, Earl F., III 21

Q

Raffoul, François 15 Rapp, Jennifer R. 31 Raskin, Joseph B. 38 Read, Stephen 26 Rebellious No, The 29 Red Apple 38 Religious Women in Early Carolingian Francia 34 Republic of the Living, The 24 Rilke Alphabet, The 13 Rios, Christopher M. 5 Routes Not Taken, The 38 Runions, Erin 9

O

T

P

Pain of Reformation, The 36 Payne, Christopher 1 Perriconi, James J. 19 Political Magic 37 Porter, Catherine 38 Problem of the Color Line at the Turn of the Twentieth Century, The 38

X

X—The Problem of the Negro as a Problem for Thought 38

Y

Yes, But Not Quite 29

S

Naas, Michael 23 Naison, Mark D. 4 Nancy, Jean-Luc 14, 15 New Bedford’s Civil War 21 Norko, Michael A. 3 North, Paul 32 North Brother Island 1

O’Byrne, Anne 14 Ordinary Oblivion and the Self Unmoored 31 Orthodox Christianity and Nationalism in NineteenthCentury Southeastern Europe 31

War after Death 9 Way, Maria 6 Wheeler, Susan 10 Where Are You? 25 Wolfson, Elliot R. 38 Word from Our Sponsor, A 38

R

Sabato Rodia’s Towers in Watts 17 Schmidt, Patricia Ruggiano 38 Shade, Patrick 28 Shell, Marc 12 Sophistical Practice 22 Spadaro, Antonio 6 Streckfus, Peter 11 Sullivan, Robert 1 Szendy, Peter 38

N

W

Queer Turn in Feminism, The 38 Questioning the Human 32

Talking the Walk and Walking the Talk 12 Tamburri, Anthony Julian 19 Tastes of the Divine 30 Teach Me to Be Generous 7 Thresholds of Illiteracy 37 Torres, Mario 16 Transforming Ourselves, Transforming the World 38 Treatise on Consequences 26 Tunstall, Dwayne A. 29

V

Vahanian, Noëlle 29 Van Stichel, Ellen 32 Vatter, Miguel 24, 27 Viscusi, Robert 19 Voss Roberts, Michelle 30

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

39


Fordham University Press | University Box L, Bronx, NY 10458 | Tel: 1-800-451-7556 | Fax: 919-677-1303 (ox fo r d u ni v e r s i ty p r e ss )

bill to:

s h i p to:

Name

Name

Street

Street

City

State

qt y

Zip

i s bn

City

State

titl e

All prices are subject to change without notice.

pric e

Total for book(s): shipping & handling (U.s. orders): $5.50 for first book, $1.50 each additional book: Ca, nC, Wa, and WI residents please add sales tax: tota l a mo u n t

in d ivid ua l s : Individual orders must be prepaid

❑ Check (make payable to Oxford University Press) enclosed, drawn on a U.S. bank, in U.S. dollars

Charge my order to:

❑ AmEx ❑ MasterCard ❑ Visa

Account no. Authorization code*

Expiration date

Signature * 3 to 4 digits at the end of the number appearing on the signature strip on the back of your credit card.

40

f o r d h a m p r e ss .co m

Zip


C USTO M E R S E RVICE

Customer Service agents are available 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM EST., Mon.-Fri. Inquiries may be addressed to: Customer Service Department Oxford University Press 2001 Evans Road Cary, North Carolina 27513 Phone: 800-445-9714 Fax: 919-677-1303 Email: custserv.us@oup.com O R DER S

Orders placed by mail or fax may be directed as indicated under customer service listings. Phone orders may be placed with an operator from 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM EST., Mon.-Fri. Phone: 800-451-7556 Fax: 919-677-1303 Email: orders.us@oup.com Oxford University Press is a PubEasy member. Our SAN number is 202-5892. Our PubEasy contact is: Sandy Stover Phone: 919-677-0977 ext. 5121 C O N TI N UAT IO N O R D E R S

Many Fordham titles are published in series, or as multi-volume works where the individual volumes are not all published simultaneously. With your authorization, we will ship and bill you for each volume in a series or serial publication automatically upon publication. This order will remain in effect until canceled. Please specify the volume with which your order is to begin. For further information on Continuation Orders, please contact: Continuation Orders Department. Oxford University Press 2001 Evans Road Cary, North Carolina 27513 Phone: 800-445-9714 Fax: 919-677-1303 C R E DI T D E PA RT ME N T

Phone: 800-732-3120 Fax: 919-677-8828

G E NER AL IN FORM AT ION

This catalogue describes a wide range of new and recent publications in fields of both general and special interest. For a full range of Fordham University Press titles, visit www.fordhampress.com J O U RNAL S

For information on the complete list of Fordham University Press Journals visit www.fordhampress.com or email mnoonan@fordham.edu CU STOM ER T ER M S

For information regarding terms of sale and discount schedules, contact the Customer Service Department at 800-445-9714. B O O KSTORES

Please contact your Oxford University Press sales representative at 212-743-8336. S P E CIAL M ARKETS

Specialty Retail and Corporate Premium Sales call: 212-743-8340 Online Retailers, Associations, and Cataloguers call: 212-726-6148 L IB R ARY SAL ES

Contact your local sales representative or call 1-800-624-0153 or email: library.sales@oup.com P U B L IC IT Y

For review copies media should contact Kate O’Brien Nicholson at 718-817-4782, or by email at bkaobrien@fordham.edu.

FOR EIGN SAL ES Europe, Africa and the Middle East

Combined Academic Publishers Ltd. 15a Lewin’s Yard, East Street, Chesham, Buckinghamshire, HP5 1HQ UK TELEPHONE: +44 (0)1494 581601 FAX: +44 (0)1494 581602 nickesson@combinedacademic.co.uk www.combinedacademic.co.uk Asia and the Pacific

EWEB c/o University of Hawaii Press Royden Muranaka 2840 Kolowalu Street Honolulu, HI 96822 TELEPHONE: 808-956-8830 FAX: 808-988-6052 royden@hawaii.edu Latin America and India

Cranbury International LLC Ethan Atkin 7 Clarendon Ave., Suite 2 Montpelier, VT 05602 TELEPHONE: 1-802-223-6565 FAX: 1-802-223-6824 eatkin@cranburyinternational.com


ŎÐÓľ ®óúĆþń Ŝ®þŐ® ^þçŜ®Ĭijçńţ ĆŢ 7 ĬĆþޟ >o ĐŮÓж

hçijçń ĆŐĬ ‹óĆÖ xń ŝŝŝĜÃĆĬ¢áxú+úOQUUçĆþijĜ”Ćú

>C>æOQC$+Z CQ%Ĝ ^ĜUĜ OCUZ% O+ Q+OC>Ÿ i+ OQ=+Z >CĜ ĐŮŮ

Profile for Fordham University Press

Spring 2014  

Spring 2014  

Profile for fordhamup