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University Theatre University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Theatre and Drama presents

YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU By George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart April 15 – 30, 2011 Mitchell Theatre Director – Ron Himes Set Designer – Cynthia Dean Costume Designer – Sarah E. Woodworth Lighting Designer – Katie H. Kudrick Sound Designer- Jack Sayre Technical Director – Cole Muth Stage Manager – Nicole Wiegert Dramaturg – Megwyn Sanders-Andrews

Produced through special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York, NY. This production is made possible with grant support from The College of Letters and Science Anonymous Fund.

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CAST Alice Sycamore.........................................................................................................Abby Taubner Anthony Kirby.................................................................................................................. Jon Hause Boris Kolenkhov.......................................................................................................... William Bolz Donald...................................................................................................................... Trevon Jackson Ed Carmichael................................................................................................................Stuart Mott Essie Carmichael........................................................................................................Liz Cassarino G-Men........................................................Maurice Demus, Yeng Kong Thao, Jacob Penner Gay Wellington............................................................................................ Ariane de Francesco Martin Vanderhof......................................................................................................J. Peter Shaw Mr. Kirby...................................................................................................... Whitney Derendinger Mrs. Kirby..............................................................................................................Ginger Contreras Mr. DePinna................................................................................................................Santiago Sosa Paul Sycamore.................................................................................................................... Joe Lullo Penelope Sycamore...............................................................................................Alanna Reeves Rheba.....................................................................................................................................jaki-terry Olga................................................................................................................... Annelise Dickinson Henderson.................................................................................................... Kristin Hammargren Setting: New York City, 1936 There will be two 10-minute intermissions AC K N OW L E D G E M E N T S Electronic Theatre Controls of Middleton, Mary Waldhart, Children’s Theatre of Madison, Robert Dunn

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F R O M T H E D I R E C TO R O F T H E AT R E P R O D U C T I O N Welcome to the final production of our 2010-11 season. Hopefully the weather does not prove me a liar, but I certainly have been looking forward to spring with great anticipation. Hopefully your visit to Mitchell Theatre includes warmer temperatures and some green foliage to enjoy. There is something to be said during times of crisis about taking a few moments to escape from those things that trouble us, to give our minds a chance to refresh. I hope that this production of You Can’t Take It With You provides just enough fun to help refresh your mind and body. We are very fortunate to have Ron Himes as our guest director for this production. We also welcome two additional guest artists to the production, Charles Trieloff our prop master, and Jack Sayre, the sound designer. The presence of these guest artists is a great opportunity for our students to work with professionals active in the field. This production also features the work and talents of many of our MFA in design students, Cynthia Dean on sets, Sarah Woodward on costumes, Katie Kudrick on lights and Cole Muth, who serves as the TD for the show. I like to remind our patrons that UT is the production “arm” of the Department of Theatre and Drama and the productions literally are the “labs” for our students to practice and improve their knowledge of the various theatre studies they are involved with. At this time I would also like to express my thanks and admiration to the faculty and staff of the Department and UT. This has been a very heavy-duty year for us, with several big shows, not to mention other tensions. With all your help we have reached the conclusion of another great season. I must also acknowledge the many donors who have helped make the season possible. We are so grateful for your contributions. And now we come to you, dear audience member. Thanks for your attendance. You complete that dynamic circuit. Without you, these productions would be empty and lifeless. Live theatre needs live audiences. If you are not already a member of Friends of UT we invite you to become a member. Have a great summer. Aloha, David Furumoto Director of Theatre Production

THE ENDURING POPUL ARIT Y OF AN A MERICAN CL ASSIC When George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart collaborated on You Can’t Take It With You in 1936, the United States was steeped in the privations and uncertainty of the Great Depression. Unemployment had dropped to 17% by 1936 after reaching a high of nearly 24% in 1932, meaning that one out of four Americans were out of work. The hardships were further compounded by the possibility of war in Europe. The American public embraced the 1936 hit song “Let’s Face the Music and Dance” by Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers and the idea behind it – also evidenced by the popularity of escapist comedy. Astaire sang: There may be trouble ahead But while there’s moonlight and music and love and romance Let’s face the music and dance… Soon we’ll be without the moon Humming a different tune and then University Theatre 3


TH E E N D U R I N G P O PU L A R IT Y O F A N A M E R I C A N C L A SS IC ( c o n t .) There may be teardrops to shed So while there’s moonlight and music and love and romance Let’s face the music and dance. Faced with the hardships present in daily life, audiences chose to … laugh. This choice is exemplified by the popularity of You Can’t Take It With You. The original production is the fifth longest run in Broadway history and the amount the movie rights sold for set a record. You Can’t Take It With You won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and the movie won an Academy Award for Best Picture in 1938. The play, despite these accolades, received mixed reviews from critics, leading to controversy when it was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. Although critics universally agreed that the play was comically entertaining, many objected to a lack of a clearly stated philosophy. Beneath the hilarity, however, lies a message exemplified by the number one song in 1936, “Pennies from Heaven” by Bing Crosby: A long time ago a million years BC the best things in life were absolutely free but no one appreciated the sky that always blue and no one congratulated a moon that was always new So it was planned that they would vanish now and then And you must pay before you get them back again That’s what storms were made of And you shouldn’t be afraid ‘cause Every time it rains, it rains pennies from heaven. You Can’t Take It With You and “Pennies from Heaven” emphasize the importance of those things in life that are absolutely free and the hope that even in dark times things will get better. The hilarity of You Can’t Take It With You is underscored by an emphasis on the importance of family, love and belonging. The play also connects to American values of individuality, freedom, tolerance and the right to the pursuit of happiness. Regardless of whether the popularity of You Can’t Take It With You is based primarily on the comedy of the play or the values it espouses, this American classic still thrives more than 70 years after its original production. It has been revived on Broadway twice and is still widely produced internationally and at university, community and high school theatres across the U.S. This gem of American drama continues to please audiences with its quirky characters, quick humor and, ultimately, Grandpa’s straightforward message.“Life is pretty simple if you just let it come to you…[I] just relaxed. Thirty-five years ago, that was. And I’ve been a happy man ever since.” Theatre in the 1930s Grandpa Vanderhof and his family in You Can’t Take It With You place tremendous value on their unencumbered creativity and on their freedom from societal and economic constraints. Yet the context in which You Can’t Take It With You was first produced – the Broadway stage of the 1930s – was in many ways the most constrained and the least innovative theatre of the period. Just prior to the Great Depression, Broadway of the 1920s was booming. Lavish reviews, such as the Ziegfeld follies, rubbed elbows with international offerings from England, Germany, Hungary, France, Belgium, Spain, Czechoslovakia, and 4 University Theatre


TH E E N D U R I N G P O PU L A R IT Y O F A N A M E R I C A N C L A SS IC ( c o n t .) China. Not surprisingly, the Depression era marked a sharp decline in the number of productions on the Broadway stage. Those for-profit producers who were still able to finance productions generally didn’t want to risk financial failure. As a result, the shows that did make it to production tended to safe and escapist, the opulent optimism of the 1920s tempered in the 1930s by caution and limited resources. A lighthearted comedy like You Can’t Take It With You was tailor-made, not just for the Broadway audiences of the 1930s, but for the Broadway producers as well. But then, as now, Broadway was only a part of the story of the American theatre. If the carefree bounty of the Vanderhof family’s lifestyle was an escapist counterpoint to the general hardship of the Depression, it was a counterpoint also to other theatrical endeavors of the period. The same economic hardships that led to the downsizing of Broadway prompted innovations in theatrical form, production, and funding models. Because commercial theatres were reluctant to produce potentially controversial pieces, theatre artists who wished to make work addressing the social contexts of the Depression were forced to create other means of production. As a result, new theatre companies, many with blatant leftish political agendas, sprang up. Numerous important actor, directors, and playwrights of the middle of the twentieth century, including Elia Kazan, Clifford Odets, Lee Strasberg, and William Saroyan had ties to one of the most influential of these companies, the Group Theatre. The Group Theatre and other companies like it were revolutionary not only in the works they shepherded to the stage, but also in their financial and organizational structures. As company members produced and financed their own plays, the majority of the profits went into their own pockets, rather than those of non-theatrical businessman-financiers, as was the case in the commercial theatre. Perhaps the most unique theatrical development of the 1930s was the Federal Theatre Project. Although it lasted only four years (1935-39), the Federal Theatre Project was significant particularly in that it marked the only time in history during which the U.S. government was an active producer of theatre. As part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Works Progress Administration, the Federal Theatre Project was created with the express aim of reemploying out-of-work theatre professionals. The work of the Federal Theatre Project was vast and various. Within a year, its operations spanned thirty-one states and employed twelve thousand theatre professionals. In New York City alone, various units of the Federal Theatre Project produced 1) original plays by new authors; 2) experimental works focused on new production techniques; 3) Negro theatre; 4) risky productions on behalf of commercial managers; 5) the Living Newspaper, which dramatized current events and topical issues with massive casts and various innovative theatrical forms; and 6) University Theatre 5


TH E E N D U R I N G P O PU L A R IT Y O F A N A M E R I C A N C L A SS IC ( c o n t .) miscellaneous works such as Gilbert and Sullivan operettas, vaudeville, minstrel shows, and circuses. Thus the Federal Theatre Project did much more than provide theatre workers with employment opportunities. It allowed for experimentation; it served as a proving ground for new production techniques; it helped to launch the careers of such luminaries as Arthur Miller and Orson Welles; and, as it offered most of its productions at little or no cost to audience members, it welcomed a broad spectrum of society into its theatres. So while creativity, freedom, and eccentricity are celebrated in the Vanderhof household, You Can’t Take It With You itself was actually rather conservative for the time, in its form, in its subject matter, and in the commercial Broadway context in which it was produced. by Megwyn Sanders-Andrews and Leigh Henderson

MOONLIGHT and MAGNOLIAS Ron Hutchinson By

Apr. 28 - May 15 at Overture Center

Tickets $35/$25 students and seniors. To order, call (608) 258-4141 or visit overturecenter.com

Sponsored by:

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P R O D U C T I O N S TA F F Vocal Coach............................................................................................................Susan Sweeney Assistant Dramaturg........................................................................................ Leigh Henderson Assistant Costume Designer.................................................................................Chris Tiernan Assistant Stage Managers.........................Jennifer Current, Lisa Marten, Evan Mayhew Fight Captain............................................................................................. Whitney Derendinger Master Carpenter..............................................................................................................Jim Vogel Carpentry Crew.......................................................................... Sean Douglas, Evan Mayhew, Erik Munoz, Alejandro Ortiz, Ely Phan Scenic Artist...............................................................................................................Mike Maloney Paint Crew............................................................................................................... Ashley Lusietto Run Crew...................................................................................... Amanda Arnold, Lisa Burton, Ariane DeFrancesco, Peter Hiller, Anna Lehner, Jon Hause Properties Master........................................................................................... Charles J. Trieloff II Assistant Properties Master.....................................................................................Alex Nelson Properties Crew............................................................................ Aaron Johnson, Lisa Marten Costume Shop Crew......................................................................................Ali Neid, Chris Neir, Hadeih Tazangi, Mike Hennessy, Lynette Davis Wardrob/Hairstylist........................................................................................................Liz Conlon Master Electrician......................................................................................................Casey Martin Assistant Master Electricians.................................................................................. Paul Timmel Light Board Operator..................................................................................................Katie Gibbs Sound Board Operator.............................................................................................Zack Warner Technical Shop Crews.................................................................................. Students in TH 160 WHO’S WHO Actors William Bolz (Boris) is glad to perform in the Mitchell Theatre again. He last appeared on this stage as a guest speller in The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. A second-year graduate acting student, William has been seen as Jim Casy in The Grapes of Wrath, Dr. Arnholm in The Lady from the Sea, and the Father in Blood Wedding. Long active in Madison area theatre, he has worked with American Players Theatre, Madison Rep, CTM, Strollers, and Madison Theatre Guild. He can also be seen in Blame Society Films’ internet comedy series Chad Vader. Liz Cassarino (Essie) is a 2nd year MFA actor at UW-Madison and recently made her Madison Opera debut as Lucy Brown in The Threepenny Opera. Other Madison credits include: Valparaiso (Livia Majeski), Into the Woods (Baker’s Wife), Blood Wedding (Maid), The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Rona), Andrew Lippa’s

Wild Party (Queenie). Regional credits include: Oklahoma (American Theatre Company), Lysistrata, Chess, Baby, The Diary of Anne Frank (national tour). Film and television: Chuck Palahniuk’s Choke, Rescue Me, The 4400. She has done various voice-over work in Madison as well as Chicago and NYC and is pleased to call Madison her home for the next couple of years. Many thanks to family, friends, and Revere for endless love and support. Ginger Contreras (Mrs. Kirby) is double majoring in Biological Anthropology, and Theatre and Drama, with certificates in Archeology and Classics. She is also a recent member of Phi Beta Kappa. At the moment, Ginger is planning her Honors Thesis in Archeology, which will take her to Italy this summer. She will also be pursuing her love of acting in Europe. Ginger would like to thank everyone involved in the show along with her great acting instructors Patrick Sims, Susan Sweeney and David Furumoto. She is excited to be in University Theatre 7


W H O ’ S W H O ( c o n t .) her first UT production and hopes you enjoy the show! Ariane de Francesco (Gay Wellington) hails from Manhattan, New York. She is a theatre major in the Acting Specialist Program, and is excited to finish her final year at UW with UT’s You Can’t Take It With You. She has enjoyed working with the talented cast of the play. She loves to entertain and tries to find the joy in any given situation. Ariane wants to thank her parents for their support and a special thanks to Albert Einstein for the words of wisdom by which she tries to live– “imagination is more important than knowledge.” Maurice Demus (G-Man) is a senior at UW Madison studying Art History. His previous productions include UT’s The Grapes of Wrath, and Elephant’s Graveyard produced by the Antagonists. During his free time he auditions for UW student films and local film productions. He also enjoys making little hats for his bearded dragon, Monty, and eating french toast for breakfast. This is his last University Theatre show and he is excited to work with such a talented cast and crew. He would like to thank Ron Himes for this opportunity and all of his friends and family for their support. Whitney Derendinger (Mr. Kirby) is delighted to make his first appearance in the Mitchell Theatre in this classic American comedy. Here at UW, Whitney has been seen in the Hemsley Theatre in Blood Wedding, The Lady from the Sea, The Grapes of Wrath, and Elephant’s Graveyard, most of which involved his character having trouble hanging on to his wife. Other favorite previous roles include Macduff in Macbeth, Bottom in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Victor Prynne in Private Lives, also playing men whose wives are ruthlessly slain, mysteriously absent, or patently unfaithful. Countless thanks are due to the faculty for constantly pushing him to explore and play, his friends for 8 University Theatre

their encouragement, his parents for their unwavering support, and his wife Deb…who thankfully proves that art does not imitate his life. Annelise Dickinson (Olga) Originally from Grand Rapids, MI, Annelise earned her BA in Theatre from Purdue University. Since then, she has lived and worked in five different Midwestern states and the Czech Republic, settling happily in Chicago before moving to Madison. She has appeared in UT’s Blood Wedding (Wife/Moon), The Lady from the Sea (Ellida), and The Grapes of Wrath. Other favorite roles include Dunyasha in The Cherry Orchard, Tecumapese in Tecumseh!, and Luna in the world premiere of A Story About A Girl. Much love and many thanks go to her wonderful and supportive parents, mentors and classmates. Kristin Hammargren (Henderson) is excited to close out the UT season with this theatre classic. Originally from Minnesota, she has a degree in theatre and vocal performance from Lawrence University and is a second year MFA Acting student at UW. Recent roles include Cinderella in Into the Woods, the Bride in Blood Wedding, Catherine in Proof and ensemble/doorbell in A Christmas Carol at the Guthrie Theater. Much love to family, friends and loved ones. Thank you for supporting theatre. Jon Hause (Tony) is a senior this year at UW majoring in Theater. Past roles include Tom Joad in The Grapes of Wrath, Young George Bailey in A Wonderful Life, Ellard in The Foreigner, and Matt in Dog Sees God. Jon is incredibly grateful to be working with such an awesome group of people in his final production with UT. Thank you to his wonderful professors, Ron for this incredible opportunity, Nicole for all her patience, the amazing cast, the equally amazing crew, TIOY, Mom & Turtle Shoes, Miss Abigail Sky, and, of course, his family who always remain his biggest fans and


W H O ’ S W H O ( c o n t .) Joe Lullo (Paul) is thrilled to be a part of You Can’t Take It With You. Joe is currently pursuing his MFA in acting at UW Trevon Jackson (Donald) is a twenty Madison. Joe was most recently seen five year old second year MFA acting in The Threepenny Opera at Madison graduate student from Austin, Texas Opera, and will be heading back to studying at The University of WisconAmerican Players Theatre this summer. sin-Madison. He completed his underJoe has also acted at summer stock and graduate studies at Baylor University in dinner theater venues in Wisconsin, and Waco, Texas, and is honored to be a part he also toured the states with CLIMB of the Wisconsin theatre team. He made Theater and Missoula Children’s Thehis Wisconsin debut in the fall of 2009 ater. Joe would like to thank his mother with Frederico Garcia Lorca’s Blood and father for encouraging him to Wedding, followed by Into the Woods as follow his dream, and Ken Hill and Bob The Narrator, Sam Hemelstien in Music Amsden for all their wonderful support. Theatre of Madison’s 2010 production Joe would also like to thank Alanna of The Wild Party, and multiple characReeves for all her support and love. ters in The Grapes of Wrath adapted for the stage in the fall of 2010. He recently Stuart Mott (Ed Carmichael) is a portrayed Jackie Robinson in Children’s sophomore majoring in Theatre & Theatre of Madison’s production of Drama with a certificate in Integrated Most Valuable Player: The Jackie RobinLiberal Studies. He is thrilled to be son Story in February of 2011. making his debut with University Theatre and has most recently appeared in Elephant’s Graveyard, the 20th Annual number one source of love and support. LB for life.

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W H O ’ S W H O ( c o n t .) Marcia Legere Play Festival, and HAIR. Thanks to all his friends and family for their support and to the cast and crew for this awesome experience! Jacob Penner (G-Man) Born and raised in Chicago, Jacob is currently a junior majoring in English Literature. He previously played a supporting role in Murder at Bates Manor as part of the 20th anniversary Marcia Léggère Student Play Festival performed at the Memorial Union Play Circle in February. A published short fiction writer, Jacob won the Literary Arts Student of the Year award at Madison Area Technical College in 2009. You Can’t Take it With You is Jacob’s debut University Theater production. Alanna Reeves (Penny) Alanna is in her second year as a theatre major and is excited to be working with such a great ensemble of characters! Recent credits include: The Grapes of Wrath, Lady From the Sea and A Christmas Carol. Alanna currently works with Waunakee Parks and Recreation, teaching theatre and drama to age 5-12 yrs. Alanna thanks her family for always encouraging her to boldly pursue her dreams wherever they may take her. A special thanks to Joe, for being the cat’s meow! J. Peter Shaw (Martin Vanderhof ) is delighted to be making his debut with University Theatre. J. Peter has performed in many theatrical productions with local acting groups. Some favorite roles include: Stage Manager I in Our Town, Norman Thayer Jr. in On Golden Pond, Hucklebee in The Fantasticks, Smee in Peter Pan, Benjamin Franklin in 1776, Professor Marvel in Gate Keeper, Wizard in The Wizard of Oz, Rev. Hale in The Crucible, and Papa in I Remember Mama which toured Norway. Shaw has appeared with CTM, Madison Theatre Guild, Strollers Theatre Ltd., St. Bernard’s Players, Oregon Straw Hat Players, Stage Works (Stoughton), Janesville Little Theatre, Theatre 10 University Theatre

Unlimited, Summerset Theatre (UWBaraboo). J. Peter lives in Evansville and encourages everyone to support the Arts; attend and experience live performances as much as possible! Santiago Sosa (De Pinna) is a second year MFA acting candidate from Guayaquil, Ecuador. In 2002, Santiago earned both a BFA in directing and acting from Texas State University. Santiago has worked as an actor for companies like American Players Theatre, Muse of Fire Shakespeare Company, Pennsylvania Shakespeare Company, Magic City Actors Theatre, The Bolding Studio, Harrison Theatre, Theatre Downtown, All Things to All People, as well as co-founding both At Random Theatre and From the Branch Theatre Co. This summer, Santiago will be working at the Illinois Shakespeare Festival. Abby Taubner (Alice) is a freshman at UW pursuing Theatre. In Arrowhead High School’s Broadway Company she played Victoria in CATS and Wendy Jo in Footloose. Since arriving in Madison, she joined the student organization 1-UP, performed as Young Violet in CTM’s A Wonderful Life, and participated in Humorology with her sorority Kappa Alpha Theta. Abby is extremely excited to make her UT debut working with and learning from this amazing cast and crew. Thank you to Jon, her teachers, friends, and especially her family for showing her that “do what makes you happy” is more than just a cheesy cliché. jaki-terry (Rheba) is a second-year MFA-Acting candidate with a concentration in Theatre for Cultural & Social Awareness. Here at UW-Madison, her stage credits include Blood Wedding, The Zen Substitute, and Valparaiso. In addition, she was recently in the CTM production of MVP: The Jackie Robinson Story at the Overture Center, and directed Bullying: The Musical for TapIt New Works. jaki has also done industrial


W H O ’ S W H O ( c o n t .) training film work with the Wisconsin Division of Public Health, and voiceover work for parent training modules with Wisconsin Foster Care.

Face of the Earth (University of South Carolina in Columbia); Trojan Women, The Lion and The Jewel and Ragtime (Washington University in St. Louis).

Yeng Kong Thao (G-Man) is a senior at the University of Wisconsin-Madison majoring in Theater and Drama as an acting specialist. Born in Milwaukee, he now calls Wausau his home. This is his first University Theater production. He would like to thank his family, friends and brothers of Chi Sigma Tau for their support.

Cynthia Dean (Set Designer) is a second year MFA scenic designer. She received her BFA in Technical Theatre and Design from the University of Central Florida. Previous designs include: The Yum Yum Room, Smokey Joe’s Café, Narukam: The Thunder God, Zen Substitute, Jack and the Beanstalk, and If You Give A Mouse A Cookie.

Artistic/Production Staff

Sarah E. Woodworth (Costume Designer) is a 1st year MFA Costume Design student at UW-Madison. Sarah holds a BS in Theatre Design and Technology from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. SIUE costume design credits include Intimate Apparel, Pointe of Revue, and Polaroid Stories. Professional costume design credits include Ruthless! (SIUE 2010); God’s Ear(2010), Fugitive Songs (2009), The Secretaries (2009) and Mary’s Wedding (2008) (Echo Theatre Company); The Road to Mecca (2008, The Orange Girls Theatre Company); I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change, and Leading Ladies (2009, Tibbits Opera Foundation); and Katatonika (2009 Prague Fringe Festival, Akanda Theatre Company). She would like to thank her family for their undying love and support and Professor Strange for always being there.

Ron Himes (Director) is the Founder and Producing Director of The Black Rep and the Henry E. Hampton, Jr. Artist-in-Residence at Washington University in St. Louis. He recently directed the critically acclaimed production of Ruined at The Black Rep. Himes created and directed the highly acclaimed Crossin’ Over, Tell Me Somthin’ Good, the Midwest premiere of Caroline, Or Change, Relativity, Dreamgirls and The Dance on Widow’s Row. Himes has directed world premieres including: Home the Musical, Servant of the People, Riffs and Urban Transitions: Loose Blossoms. Directing credits from theatres across the country include Ain’t Misbehavin’ and Fences (The Clarence Brown Theatre in Knoxville); The Colored Museum, Blues for an Alabama Sky (Indiana Repertory Theatre); Flyin’ West (Delaware Theatre Company); For Colored Girls......... (People’s Light and Theatre Company in Philadelphia); Riffs (Seven Stages in Atlanta); Radio Golf, Spunk and Spell #7 (Studio Theatre in Washington, DC); One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and I’m Not Rappaport (Old Creamery Theatre in Garrison, IA); and Enemy of the People (Perseverance Theatre in Juneau, AK). University and College credits include: The Last Season and The Dance on Widow’s Row, (Dillard University in New Orleans); Three Ways Home (University of Illinois in Champaign); The Darker

Katie H. Kudrick (Lighting Designer) A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Katie is a third year UW MFA student in Lighting Design. Her other design work includes Valparaiso (University Theatre), Last Summer at Bluefish Cove (StageQ), 25th Annual Putnum County Spelling Bee (University Theatre), Blood Wedding (University Theatre), UT’s 2010 MFA Kabuki Showcase, An Evening with Fred Ho (UW Arts Institute), and Penn State URTC’s As You Like It and Six Degrees of Separation. Recently, she has served Into the Woods, Hair, War of the University Theatre 11


W H O ’ S W H O ( c o n t .) Worlds, and Unto These Hills: A Retelling (Cherokee Indian Reservation, NC) either as Assistant Lighting Designer or Master Electrician. Katie would like to thank her family, fellow grad students, professors, and advisor Ann for their continued guidance and support. She is delighted to end her career as a UW student with You Can’t Take It With You, with such a talented and wonderful group of designers, technicians, director and actors. Jack Sayre (Sound Designer) is a composer, sound designer, and educator. He has lent his talents to over 25 theater productions over the last 15 years. Recent UW theater productions include: War Of The Worlds, Hair, Into The Woods, and Grapes Of Wrath. Jack also teaches sound design at Madison Media Institute where he has been known to use theater work as a roving classroom for some of his students, permitting them to observe the theater production process, and where appropriate, take a technical role in the show. Jack is thrilled to be a part of this wonderful classic, You Can’t Take It With You. Enjoy. Cole Muth (Technical Director) is a second year MFA candidate in Technical Direction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to graduate school, Cole received his Bachelor’s degree from UW-Platteville. Cole studied at Northern Illinois University prior to continuing his studies in Design and Technology at UW-Madison. Some of his recent credits include: The Producers, You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown, Cabaret, The Lady from the Sea, 25th

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Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, Beauty and the Beast, and The Yum Yum Room (US debut production). Cole would like to thank his family and friends for their love and support. Cole would also like to thank the cast and crews for all of their hard work on You Can’t Take It With You. Nicole Wiegert (Stage Manager) is thrilled to be involved with this explosive show! Hailing from Green Bay (Go Pack!), Nicole is a senior studying theatre with an emphasis in stage management. Previous productions include Elephant’s Graveyard (SM), Being Harold Pinter (SM), The Yum Yum Room (SM), and Into the Woods (ASM). Many thanks to Ron, her amazing ASMs: Jennifer, Lisa, Evan, Dstew, the lovely stage management team, the talented cast, crew and design team who made this show possible, and the two people who always come to shows to cheer for the people wearing black: her parents. Megwyn Sanders-Andrews (Dramaturg) is a second-year PhD student in Theatre Research at the University of Wisconsin in Madison.  Megwyn obtained her M.A. in Performance Studies at Tisch School of the Arts at New York University.  Prior to her arrival at UW, she served as the Artistic Director of the Kaleidoscope Theatre Company, an arts program for/by/with adults with multiple/developmental disabilities.  Megwyn’s research interests center around “theatre in communities” and include applied theatre, theatre as therapy in volatile regions and disability studies.


U N I V E R S I T Y T H E AT R E S TA F F Director of Theatre Production..................................................................... David Furumoto General Manager............................................................................................... Michele Traband Production Manager..............................................................................................David Stewart UT Technical Director...............................................................................................Dan Lisowski Scene Studio Supervisor.....................................................................................Chuck Mitchell Costume Studio Supervisor.........................................................................................Jim Greco Electric s and Sound Studio Supervisor ...........................................................Casey Martin UT Office Manager...............................................................................................Cindy Schkirkie House Managers . .......................................................................Mary McAvoy, Carol Carlson, Erin Hood, Liz Foster-Shaner PR/Marketing Assistant . .................................................................................... Molly Richards Literary Manager..................................................................................................Sandy Peterson Scene Shop Assistants........................................ Walter Claassen, Cynthia Dean, Katy Lai, Michael Maloney, Cole Muth, Allyn Weber, Jennifer Reider Lighting Assistants..........Katie Kudrick, Erik Barry, Jonathan de Leon, Brandi Mitchell Costume Assistants.................................... Katie Gray, Sarah Woodworth, Emily N. Smith

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND DRAMA FACULTY, ACADEMIC AND CLASSIFIED STAFFS

Department Chair ............................................................................................ Ann M. Archbold Acting/Directing Faculty/Staff . ...................................Patricia Boyette, David Furumoto, Norma Saldivar, Patrick Sims, Susan Sweeney Design/Technical Faculty/Staff . ...................................... Ann M. Archbold, Gail Brassard, Jim Greco, Dan Lisowski, Casey Martin, Chuck Mitchell, David Stewart, Joe Varga Theatre Research Faculty/Staff.................................... Aparna Dharwadker, Kristin Hunt, Michael Peterson, Mary Trotter, Michael Vanden Heuvel, Manon van de Water Theatre for Youth Director..................................................................... Manon van de Water Theatre for Cultural and Social Awareness Director.......................................Patrick Sims Department Administrator.............................................................................Melinda Menard Departmental Office Staff................................ Terry Bonner, Jean Hauser, Brenda Weiss

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F R I E N D S O F T H E U N I V E R S I T Y T H E AT R E The FRIENDS of UT is a group of individuals that serves as a support organization for UW Madison’s University Theatre, providing members with opportunities to connect with and offer support for student actors, dramaturgs, directors, and designers involved in University Theatre productions. FRIENDS of UT plan and host receptions prior to productions, enjoy exceptional performances together, and work to encourage broader awareness and appreciation of the UW Department of Theatre and Drama throughout the community. Funds raised by FRIENDS of UT will provide much needed production support, including technical enhancements such as state-of-the-art equipment upgrades, as well as special guest artist residencies that will support the training of our students. In the past, Friends of UT have enjoyed invitations to a special post-performance reception with Olympia Dukakis as well as a pre-performance discussion with show directors. They sponsored a visit with Anthony Rapp (from the original Broadway cast of RENT). Funds raised were used to support a Suzuki acting workshop with Brandeis Professor Eric Hill and several guest sound designers. This fall, the group enjoyed a day trip faculty and students to Ten Chimneys in Genesee Depot, WI. We are proud to share the names of the FRIENDS of UT with you throughout this season.

FRIEND ($50-$249) Roger & Elizabeth Gray Heather & Samuel Murn Jeanne Whitish Guy Plunkett III & Joanne Harper Plunkett Louis & Julie Swedarsky Hal & Shirley Winsborough Susan Cook & Roger Pierson Dr. Jay & Sabrina Gold Shawn & George Klasek Bonnie D. Lewis Eric Mueller & Torrie Kopp Mueller David & Jodie Rohrer Gerald & Vicki Stewart

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Bob and Sharon Stephenson Katherine & Bailey Walsh John & Nancy Webster William & Sharon Koenen Maureen Skelton Prof Barbara Buenger Peter & Donna Napoleone Norlin & Cynthia Benevenga David & Shirley Susan Laura & Barry Burden Joe & Jeanne Silverberg Tim & Rhonda Current A. Erick Weber

ANGEL ($250 and up) Shana Lewis & Robert Magasano Dennis Dorn Howard & Ellen Louise Schwartz Merry Anderson Tim & Pat Size Jon Sorenson CORPORATE ($250 and up) Lathrop and Clark


CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEPARTM ENT OF THE ATR E AN D DR A M A (from January 1 to December 31, 2010) $1,000+ Evjue Foundation Inc. Jonathan B. and Susan Lipp Timothy K. and Patricia B. Size $250-999 Russell Howes Patricia Kugler Whitely Robert D. Magasano and Shana R. Lewis $100-249 Patricia J. Boyette Daniel P. Boylen Barbara C. Buenger Dennis L. and Katherine A. Dorn Melissa J. Friesen Julie M. Johnson Eric D. Loring

John E. Reilly, Jr. David M. Shaw Susan R. Sweeney Joseph Varga Milan Zivanovic $1-99 Ann M. Archbold William P. and Martha K. Barlow Steven D. Burch Katherine M. Charron Peter M. Cole Chris M. and Joan M. Collins Pamela S. Decker-Nelson Mariam A. Duckwall David H. Fennema David J. Furumoto Roger E. and Elizabeth E. Gray John M. Gulley Jessica Holmes Virginia A. Hostetter Tamara S. M. Kaplan

Marna J. King Bonnie D. Lewis Kimberley B. Marra Charles W. Mc Graw Samuel and Heather L. Murn James W. Neely, Jr. Sue A. Nilsson Joohee Park Guy D., III and Joanne H. Plunkett Sybil C. Robinson Judith R. Shuler Robert and Joann Skloot Bob and Sharon Stephenson C. John and Barbara R. Tolch Michael J. and Tracy L. Vanden Heuvel Allen and Brenda Weiss Jeanne H. Whitish Mary T. Zellmer

H OW TO C O N T R I B U T E There are many ways to contribute to the Department of Theater and Drama, including: Gifts of appreciated securities, personal property, and real estate Deferred gifts such as bequests, trusts, and life income agreements Permanently endowed scholarships, fellowships, and professorships named for a relative or friend For more information about all giving opportunities, please call Jon E. Sorenson at the UW Foundation, (800) 443-6162 or (608) 262-7211. Please make your check payable to University of Wisconsin Foundation and mail to University of Wisconsin Foundation, US Bank Lockbox, PO Box 78807, Milwaukee,  WI  53278-0807.  Indicate that your contribution should be credited to the Department of Theater and Drama.

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