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WE ALL BUY GROCERIES IM PAC T RE P O RT 2 01 9 FOOD & CONSUMER PRODUCTS OF CANADA


CONTENTS 03 The issues 04 The new frontier 04 The impact of government 07 Environmental sustainability 08 Retail consolidation/Industry sustainability 11

International trade

12

Economic strategy table reports

14 A message from CEO Michael Graydon 17

Delivering value

18 Transformative growth 19 Stronger together 20 Board of Directors and Board of Governors 21

Governance Committees

CANADIANS NEED A STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FO


This year’s Impact Report looks at solutions aimed at keeping Canada’s food and household products industry strong in order to support the families, farmers, and workers who rely on us every day.

O D , B E V E R A G E A N D C O N S U M E R P R O D U C T I N D U S T R Y.


IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

FCPC members are changing the world—

we’re helping them do it. Ask Canadians and they will tell you how much they value the foods, beverages and household products that enhance their everyday lives — those are the products FCPC members are proud to make.

E M P L O Y I N G 3 0 0, 0 0 0 P E O P L E I N M O R E T H A N 6, 5 0 0 F A C I L I T I E S I N C O M M U N I T I E S

from coast to coast, Canada’s food and household product sector is a key pillar of the Canadian economy, positioning Canada to feed the world for years to come. In an evolving marketplace, Canada’s food and household product industry is driving innovation, listening and responding to the needs of consumers, rethinking age old practices and leading the way to sustainable and transparent manufacturing. But it’s not doing it alone. Along every step of the way, FCPC is impacting the issues that are shaping our industry and the foods and products Canadians are using. In the pages that follow, you’ll discover that the past year has been a busy one for both FCPC and industry as we continue to raise the bar, working with government, associations, other industries, academia and everyday Canadians to deliver products and solutions that ensure their continued confidence and support. 02


T H E I S S U E S


IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

THE NEW FRONTIER

The marketplace of food and household products has dramatically changed. Today’s consumers control all aspects of their product experience, supported through an endless array of product, shopping and delivery choices aimed at giving them innovative new tastes, greater transparency and healthier options while also addressing their concerns about sustainability and ethical production practices. Canada’s food and consumer product manufacturers have evolved with the marketplace by continually driving new ways to delight consumers and earn our place at their table. To ensure all Canadians can access high-quality, safe, nutritious, affordable food, regardless of where they live or their income, FCPC has worked with industry to: • Virtually eliminate industrial trans-fats from Canada’s food supply. • Encourage Canadians to eat less salt by gradually reducing sodium in our products without compromising safety and taste. • Collaborate with government to set new standards for reformulated products, helping Canadians achieve their dietary goals.

Launch SmartLabelTM, an innovative digital label that gives consumers easy, instant access to more detailed information than could ever be printed on a product label. • Establish Plant-Based Foods of Canada (PBFC), a division of FCPC, to act as a collective voice for the producers of plantbased products. We advocate for a modernized regulatory environment that will allow members to market their products effectively and to make them accessible to all consumers. • Address concerns related to the lack of information about cannabis edibles by holding two sold-out cannabis events that capitalized on thought leadership, collaboration and perspective on this critical emerging market. • Partner with charities, including Food Banks Canada, to help Canadians living with hunger, particularly in rural and northern Canada where affordable, shelf-stable products are particularly important. •

T H E I M PA C T O F G O V E R N M E N T

As one of Canada’s foremost industry associations, FCPC demonstrates leadership and member value through a relentless focus on improving our industry’s reputation and building an operating environment that fosters competitive-

H E A LT H I S A TO P C O N C E R N for many consumers— from millennials looking for “organic” and “natural” labels to older Canadians worried about cardiovascular health and diabetes.

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IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

ness, innovation and growth. In 2018/19, FCPC was among Canada’s most active firms advocating on behalf of the food and household products industry on a wide and diverse range of critical legislative and regulatory initiatives, including Health Canada’s Healthy Eating Strategy and the formation of a National Food Policy for Canada. FCPC was a strong and consistent voice in discussions with government related to the development of: Safe Food for Canadians regulations as well as an updated Canada Food Guide; legislation concerning marketing to children; and the proposed introduction of new rules concerning Front-of-Pack food labelling. We are proud that Canada has one of the safest, globallyrespected food regulatory systems in the world; however, a build-up in the complexity and inconsistency of regulatory processes over time has created an environment that can inhibit the sector’s competitiveness and ability to take advantage of new global opportunities. Regulations should enable innovation and job creation while prioritizing the health, safety and choice of Canadians. With 140,000 regulations at the federal level alone, red

tape unnecessarily impedes our industry’s competitiveness, increasing the cost of doing business, shrinking razor-thin profit margins, and limiting businesses’ resources to expand. Throughout the past year, FCPC worked with government and other associations to support regulations based on science and evidence. No stakeholder group has a greater role and impact on food environments and food formulation than those within the food supply chain. Yet the unprecedented level of government intervention calling for dramatic and rapid changes to virtually all aspects of how industry makes, markets, packages and labels its products remained a primary concern in 2018/19. Simply put, the government has not asked any other manufacturing sector to make these types of changes all at once. A National Food Policy For the past several years, FCPC has been actively engaged with government and key stakeholders in the development of a National Food Policy. Our efforts were supported by a June 2019 announcement by Federal Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, the Hon. Marie-Claude Bibeau, outlining plans for a national food policy titled “Everyone at the table!”.

foremost industry associations, FCPC demonstrates leadership and member value through a relentless focus on improving our industry’s reputation and voice. A S O N E O F C A N A D A’ S

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6,500 We make food and consumer products across 6,500 facilities from coast to coast.

16.7% We account for 16.7% of total manufacturing jobs across the country

300,000 We employ more Canadians than any other manufacturing sector, with nearly 300,000 employees from coast to coast


IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

The forthcoming policy aims to support Canadians with access to sufficient amounts of safe, nutritious and culturally-diverse food, as well as ensuring that Canada’s food system is resilient, innovative, and sustains the environment and supports the economy. FCPC ’s submission to the government’s “What We Heard Report” strongly influenced policy development including: evidence-based decisionmaking, the importance of aligning with the government’s agri-food economic growth and export strategy, enhancing food literacy and support for innovation. Election 2019: Amplifying the voice of industry With 300,000 employees, food and consumer product manufacturing is fundamental to Canada’s economic and community growth. Yet leveraging the collective impact of that voice during a federal election has historically been a missed opportunity for our sector. In 2019, FCPC took decisive steps to promote member political outreach and advocacy through an integrated government relations and communications approach aimed at engaging Canadians and positioning industry for post-election success. Using a three-tiered approach that included extensive government

and candidate outreach, media and social media influence, and member engagement, FCPC ’s year-long Federal Election strategy ensured industry issues were at the forefront of the election cycle. When combined with FCPC’ s highly successful annual Lobby Day, a 50% year-over-year increase in senior political interventions, the introduction of our influential MP newsletters and special Lobby 101 briefings for members, FCPC ’s capacity to impact key files, including retaliatory tariffs, sugar tax and labelling changes, was unparalleled. These efforts were further supported through an extensive mix of nationwide polling, comprehensive media campaigns, FCPC ’s Election website, candidate pledges of industry support and a letter campaign aimed directly at spurring all-party commitments and opportunities for post-election engagement. E N V I R O N M E N TA L S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

We only have one planet, and we know that our members’ products play a critical role in shaping Canada’s impact on the environment. According to national polling, 90% of Canadians want food and consumer product manufacturers

L E V E R A G I N G T H E C O L L E C T I V E I M PA C T of our voice in a clear and consistent manner during a federal election has historically been a missed opportunity for our sector.

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IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

to care deeply about our environmental impact. In 2018/19 FCPC and its member companies put concrete action

behind our commitments to reduce our industry’s environmental impact. Make packaging reusable, recyclable, or compostable In June 2019, FCPC became Canada’s first national trade association to endorse the Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s vision for a New Plastics Economy, moving Canada toward a future of zero plastic waste. FCPC encouraged all its members and industry partners to ensure all packaging is recyclable, compostable or reusable by 2025. This is not just talk; it’s action. In addition to creating sustainable packaging solutions, FCPC members fund and manage recycling programs in some provinces. FCPC supported the August 2019 commitment by the Ontario government to strengthen the existing Blue Box program by transitioning it to full producer responsibility. This is a positive and necessary step in achieving a harmonized, efficient and cost-effective residential recycling program. FCPC ,the Retail Council of Canada (RCC) and the Canadian Beverage

Association (CBA) collectively represent the majority of producers who contribute to the Blue Box. The three associations worked closely together and with government to support this significant milestone. Combat food waste Food waste is responsible globally for almost as much greenhouse gas emissions as road transportation, and almost 60% of food produced in Canada ends up wasted. In 2019 FCPC members took aggressive action to prioritize efficient production practices, give consumers information that helps prevent and reduce food waste, and partner with provinces and charities to keep food on plates and out of landfills. R E TA I L CO N S O L I D AT I O N / I N D U S T R Y S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y In April 2019 FCPC released a report drawing the attention

of media and the public to the growing competitiveness challenges of Canada’s food and household goods industry. Findings revealed that industry had been underperforming due to a number of challenges, leading to potential job losses as well as higher food and consumer good prices.

I N A P R I L 2 0 1 9 F C P C R E L E A S E D A R E P O RT drawing the attention of media and the public to the growing competitiveness challenges of Canada’s food and household goods industry.

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33.5 B

$

We fuel the economy, contributing $33.5 billion to Canada’s GDP last year alone

40% We are the largest employer in rural Canada, connecting Canadians with opportunity and purchasing 40 percent of what farmers grow

35.8B

$

Our products account for $35.8 billion in exports that helps Canada feed the world


50% FCPC enjoyed a 50% increase (over 2017/18) in senior-level political government meetings with more focus on: Economic departments & competitiveness, influential MPs, Senators and key political advisors

8o% 80% of Canadians want industry and government to work together to advance industry (keeping jobs in Canada)

100

FCPC’s Carla Ventin named one of Ottawa’s Top 100 Lobbyists (out of 5,000) by the Hill Times


IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

While a variety of barriers to innovation and growth were cited, key takeaways included: • High growth in costs has outpaced growth in sales, which negatively impacts the likelihood of investment. The cost of placing and maintaining a product on store shelves in Canada rose 22% from 2013 to 2017, while remaining flat in the US. • The high level of consolidation among retailers is having a negative impact on the cost of placing and maintaining products on store shelves. • Most product innovation does not take place in Canada. Eighty-three per cent of branded products sold on Canadian shelves were neither developed nor manufactured domestically. • Compared to other manufacturing sectors in Canada, food manufacturers rank amongst the lowest in terms of a competitive operating environment. • Not surprisingly, manufacturing capabilities have remained constant in Canada, with little to no change in the total number of plants. FCPC firmly believes that to survive in an increasingly

globalized landscape, retailers must support the ideal that strong manufacturing supports strong retail and vice versa.

A sustainable ecosystem also benefits the consumer in terms of variety, price and availability, and contributes even more to Canadian communities in the way of jobs and investment. In the months to come, FCPC will continue to focus its attention on this critical issue by amplifying awareness and speaking with both government and retail to drive the creation of a framework supporting fairness, sustainability, partnership and healthy market competition. I N T E R N AT I O N A L T R A D E

Canada’s food industry should be a powerhouse at home and overseas. To reach Canada’s goal of increasing agri-food exports to $75 billion by 2025, Canadian products need fair standards and free trade. Canada must continue to implement and expand its ambitious free trade agenda in North America, Europe and Asia to ensure value-added food exports don’t face protectionist measures such as tariffs or technical barriers to trade. The Canada-US relationship is critical to our members given the integrated supply chain. Since the beginning of NAFTA–CUSMA negotiations, FCPC has been at the table with Canada’s lead negotiators ensuring a good deal for Canadian food and consumer product manufacturers.

and expand its ambitious free trade agenda in North America, Europe and Asia to ensure value-added food exports don’t face protectionist measures such as tariffs or technical barriers to trade. C A N A D A M U S T CO N T I N U E TO I M P L E M E N T

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IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

We have worked in alignment with other business and farm groups, political parties, federal departments and our US counterparts, and are currently focused on ensuring support for CUSMA in Canada so that it will be ratified by the new government after the election. Behind the scenes, FCPC proactively engaged at the highest levels in pushing for the elimination of these tariffs. Our efforts were focused on the negative impact on consumers through increased costs and reduced choice on grocery and drug store shelves, on the competitiveness of companies operating in Canada, and on the disruption to our highly integrated North American supply chain. FCPC ’s lobbying efforts were rewarded in May 2019 with the lifting of retaliatory tariffs on our industry.

this more apparent than the late 2018 release of the government’s Economic Strategy tables, specific to AgriFood and Advanced Manufacturing, aimed at improving competitiveness in Canada. Through a whole-of-government approach, FCPC and members played a key role in supporting recommendations advancing our sector, including specific recommendations tied to digital alternative pathways to Front-of-Pack labelling, the development and diversification of markets, investment in innovation through increased automation and robotics, and development of a modern regulatory and infrastructure network and a skilled workforce.

E CO N O M I C S T R AT E G Y TA B L E R E P O RT S Throughout the past year FCPC has been successful in

placing the food and consumer product industry on the top of the agenda across multiple government departments by leveraging our strong relationships in Ottawa, carefully navigating the political landscape and telling our story in a way that aligns with government priorities. Nowhere was

C A N A D I A N S WA N T TO S E E A S T R O N G and secure food system, choice in product selection and availability of made-in-Canada products.

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90% 90% of Canadians are concerned about rising food prices

81% The largest five grocery retailers account for 81% of the goods sold to Canadian consumers

22%

Between 2013 and 2017 the cost to place and keep products on grocery shelves increased 22%


IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

A M E S S A G E F R O M C E O M I C H A E L G R AY D O N

From morning routines to bake sales to laundry days to family picnics and beyond, we make the products Canadians rely on for their everyday moments.

Those moments build to create many stories—stories in which we play a critical role today, tomorrow and into the future. Yet, telling our story is not always easy. While our products are part of the fabric of so many households, the impact of our work can be underestimated by the public and policymakers alike. Like all good stories, we must start at the beginning. 14


IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

We employ more Canadians than any other manufacturing sector, with nearly 300,000 employees across 6,500 facilities from coast to coast. We are the largest employer in rural Canada, connecting Canadians with opportunity and purchasing 40% of what farmers grow. We fuel the economy, contributing $33.5 billion to Canada’s GDP last year alone and exporting $35.8 billion that helps Canada feed the world. But we know that isn’t enough. Sustainability, health, transparency and ethics are increasingly important to consumers. Our customers are more engaged and more interested than ever before in every aspect of the products they use. This new landscape brings both risks and opportunities as we strive to deliver diverse products that meet a wide range of needs while living up to new and rapidly-evolving expectations—from customers, our retail partners, and sometimes from government. Change doesn’t come easily, and this new chapter is no exception. We must remain committed to clear priorities and principles that guide us through, for example, creating healthy products consumers want while standing by our belief that

food policy should encourage balanced diets, not denigrate individual foods or nutrients. Similarly, we will lead in reducing packaging and food waste and helping to manage and fund recycling programs while insisting that consumers, manufacturers, retailers, and government must all be responsible partners in keeping plastic and food waste out of landfills. The great news is, we have already made important strides. We know that when we lead boldly and make our voice heard, Canadians will respond. From health to sustainability to transparency, we have proven that we are committed to serious, evidence-based solutions. We have made it a particular priority to take concrete action to keep plastic in the economy but out of the environment. As the first Canadian trade association to endorse the MacArthur Foundation’s vision for a New Plastics Economy, we have taken up the mantle of moving Canada toward a future of zero plastic waste. Many of our members have committed to make all packaging recyclable, compostable or reusable by 2025, and we are encouraging more members and industry partners to take up this commitment. We are also taking on responsibility for the entire lifecycle of packaging by working to ensure

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IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

My key message as we look to 2020 and beyond is that there is room for companies of all sizes to build on momentum like this and shape our future without waiting for change to be imposed on us by government.

recycling programs are effectively managed, funded and equipped to handle the packages of the future. Even in the hotly contested nutrition area, we have seen the results of leaning in. By voluntarily reducing trans fat in our products on a timeline that allowed suitable substitutes without government forcing our hand, we seamlessly transitioned into a Canadian food supply virtually free of industrial trans fats. Building on that success, we are now engaged in a similar process for sodium, encouraging Canadians to eat less salt by gradually reducing sodium in our products without compromising safety and taste. It is no secret that the Healthy Eating Strategy presents some challenges for us. One area that industry and government can agree on, however, is transparency. Our members are proud of the products they make, and we want to arm our customers with everything they need to make healthy, informed choices. That is why FCPC launched SmartLabelTM, our innovative digital label that gives consumers easy, instant access to more detailed information than could ever be printed on a product label. If we want to prove to government that our solutions are credible, industry must be forward thinking in adopting SmartLabelTM now.

government policies that exclude industry are simply not as good as policies that draw on our technical, operational, and consumer insights (whether for dietary guidance, responsible marketing, or fair competition in retailing). A key part of embracing our voice is to make sure government understands what we do and what we need to reach our ambitious goals.In 2018/2019 I’m proud to say that FCPC saw a 50% increase in senior level meetings with government. In 2019, FCPC launched its Election Platform, clearly laying out our top asks for a federal policy agenda that will strengthen our industry, not stifle it. The platform and our online campaign hub are also tools for you and your teams. We are as strong as the nearly 300,000 people who depend on us for their livelihoods, and it is our responsibility to ensure they have the facts and figures to engage with government about our many contributions and the prospects for our future growth. This is our opportunity to control our own destiny, and we won’t easily get it back. We will step up and take the lead, shaping the direction of key issues that will impact generations of consumers.

My key message as we look to 2020 and beyond is that there is room for companies of all sizes to build on momentum like this and shape our future without waiting for change to be imposed on us by government. Michael Graydon We have a voice, and we must use it confidently—to reach our customers and to demonstrate by our actions and impact that we are without doubt a critical partner for achieving government objectives. We must make it clear that

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CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


DELIVERING VALUE


IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

Employee Engagement

GROUP

ORGANIZATIONAL ENGAGEMENT

JOB ENGAGEMENT

GRAND DRIVER*

FCPC 2018

77.5%

77.7%

77.4%

FCPC 2019

89.6%

87.0%

86.1%

Not for profit 2018

65.3%

71.9%

56.9%

Not for profit 2019

68.4%

75.9%

GTA 2018

66.3%

71.7%

GTA 2019

73.0%

73.5%

57.6%

SOURCE: LIGHTHOUSE 9 GROUP

T R A N S F O R M AT I V E G R O W T H

There’s something special happening at FCPC . While not always easy to define, there’s a renewed sense of pride that comes from representing our members and helping them achieve their business goals while also making the most of ourselves as a company and as individuals.

In 2018/2019 we saw the spirit of FCPC shine through the dramatic year-over-year growth in employee engagement and satisfaction, placing FCPC well above the benchmark for similar organizations within our field.

Some members have known us for a lifetime, others measure in months. We’re proud that both think of FCPC as a trusted friend. But friends can grow in new and exciting ways. Surely you have. And so have we.

FCPC Board of Directors and the overwhelming participation and member support at FCPC events, participation in member surveys and activity at FCPC lobby days or meetings in Ottawa with prominent MPs. We saw it in the groundbreaking work of FCPC ’s newest Division (Plant Based Foods of Canada) and the collaboration of FCPC ’s Confectionary

This engagement was echoed through the enthusiasm of the

Since 2017, we’ve been on a mission of transformative growth. It began with the hiring of CEO Michael Graydon, and a commitment to enhance the best of what made FCPC, well, FCPC . In 2018 we moved to bright new offices that addressed our member needs for greater access but also reflected a renewed spirit of optimism and collaboration. In 2019 we built on that momentum, creating a culture based on the values of Service, Transparency, Accountability and Respect—a brand we call STAR.

When we spoke, people listened. In 2019 FCPC partnerships and collaborations with other associations took on a new life and prominence, impacting proposed legislation and benefitting Canadians. Communications campaigns resonated on a national level, helping to balance our industry story with the public and the media. Imagine what 2020 will bring.

These four values together provide a foundation for our interactions and expectations as we move along our journey together. Even the tagline, “We All Shine” is a reminder that FCPC at its best, is a collective of smart, resourceful and dedicated individuals and members who come together to make great things happen.

* Grand Driver: Drivers are the areas within a workplace that are looked at when exploring employee engagement. The survey looked at 21 areas or Drivers. The Grand Driver is the average of all 21 drivers (areas).

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cluster supporting a new industry brand.


IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

98% of members choose to renew their membership year after year.

In 2019, FCPC further expanded its freight consolidation initiative to Western Canada, improving members’ carbon footprint, bottom line and customer service.

FCPC events consistently receive attendee

grades exceeding 4 out of 5.

S T R O N G E R TO G E T H E R More than 60 years ago, FCPC was formed around a simple

idea—whatever the challenge, deliver value to members. In 2019 we delivered. We did it through an innovative mix of new and old events that set the bar high and then exceeded it. We also did it through new opportunities to help members take costs out of their systems, creating an environment where they can compete and grow. FCPC is privileged and proud to have consistent member

retention of over 98% year over year. We believe our success is a reflection of industry’s understanding and commitment to the philosophy of “stronger together”. Membership provides world-leading food, beverage and consumer products manufacturers, sales and marketing agencies and associates with an opportunity to be part of something bigger, a community dedicated to advancing a stronger, more competitive sector. Since 2018 FCPC has been pleased to add 36 new members (including 13 Associate members). This spirit of collaboration can be seen through the work of FCPC’s Supply Chain Council, which in 2019 further explored ways to reduce overhead costs by leveraging member warehouse assets with a simple Airbnb-type model. Logistics challenges, whether availability or cost, are the single biggest obstacle our industry faces today. Our members are

focused on taking unnecessary costs out of their systems, and looking for FCPC to lead and support them in their efforts to get products to consumers faster and cheaper. In 2019 FCPC events reflected the broad changes impacting our industry. From the promising opportunities of the cannabis edibles movement to key trends such as digital, blockchain, artificial intelligence, consumer transparency and trust, FCPC acted as a trusted partner to industry, driving member discussion and supporting them each step of the way. We also focused on rethinking and enhancing the benchmarks and surveys we offer members to ensure our data goes well beyond the generic. We know members need to compare within their own peer groups, so restructuring information for maximum benefit and working with our Associate members to close the loop, helps them turn our insights into actions. When you consider the cost of other forms of consulting and research, FCPC offers significant value that is unique within our industry.

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IMPACT REPORT 2019 / WE ALL BUY GROCERIES

Board of Directors

Board of Governors

2018 – 2019

2018 –2019

Beena Goldenberg (Chair) Hain Celestial Canada

Bruno Keller Kraft Heinz Canada

Carla Anger Kimberly-Clark

Cory Price Johnson & Johnson Inc.

Ian Roberts (Treasurer) Conagra Brands

Frank Kollmar L’Oreal Canada Inc.

Ian Ricketts Ocean Brands

Gary Wade (Vice-Chair) Unilever Canada Ltd.

Peter Luik Dare Foods Limited

Rupa Bahri GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare

John Pigott (Vice-Chair) Club Coffee L.P.

Dan Magliocco Danone Inc.

Danielle Barran McCain Foods (Canada) Dino Bianco Kruger Products L.P. Eric Breissinger Proctor & Gamble Inc. Aurelio Calabretta Smucker Foods of Canada Corp.

Jamie Moody Tree of Life Canada ULC Darlene Nicosia Coca-Cola Ltd. Canada Mike Pilato Jamieson Wellness Inc. Mike Read Church & Dwight Ron Schindler Clover Leaf Seafoods

Tony Chow Kellogg Canada Inc.

Rudy Sequeira Ferrero Canada Ltd.

James Crosby Crosby Molasses Co. Ltd.

Carmela Serebryany Upper Crust

Jeremy Daveau Mars Wrigley Confectionery Canada

Mark Taylor Parmalat Canada Inc.

Bryana Ganong Ganong Bros., Limited Jean Gattuso A. Lassonde Inc. Stephane Glorieux Keurig Dr. Pepper Canada Richard Glover PepsiCo Beverages Canada Jeff Hamilton Nestlé Canada Inc. Margaret Hudson Burnbrae Farms Limited David Iacobelli The Clorox Company

Cécile Van Zandijcke Dr. Oetker Canada Ltd.

Scott Bjaanes Jelly Belly Candy Company (Canada) Ltd. Sylvie Cloutier Conseil de la transformation alimentaire du Québec– CTAQ Deb Cochrane Aryzta Canada Derek Conibear Energizer Holdings Inc.

Scott Singer Reinhart Foods Limited Trevor Squires McCormick Canada Dale Storey General Mills Canada Corporation Jean-David Tardif Cascades Tissue Group Doug Watt Catelli Foods Corporation

Frank DeMichino Italpasta Limited Ana Dominguez Lindt & Sprungli (Canada), Inc. David Dusangh Mars Canada Inc. Matt Harris Abbott Nutrition Canada Tony Luongo Concord Sales Inc. Helen Kargas Edgewell Personal Care Cara Keating PepsiCo Foods Canada Todd Kelly KIND Healthy Snacks Erik Igel Peter Igel Group Inc. Martin Parent Mondelez Canada Inc. Simon Petersen Colgate-Palmolive Canada David Pigott Morrison Lamothe Inc. John Porco Unico Inc.

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Vinicius Santos Sanofi Consumer Health Inc.

CONCEPT & DESIGN: HM&E DESIGN

Michael Aucoin Agropur

Jerry Mancini Dole Foods of Canada Ltd.

Liz Beemer Bayer Inc.


Governance Committees

2018 – 2019

PUBLIC AFFAIRS POLICY COMMITTEE (FOOD & BEVERAGE)

Richard Glover (Chair) PepsiCo Beverages Canada Danielle Barran McCain Aurelio Calabretta Smucker Foods of Canada Corp. Tony Chow Kellogg Canada Inc. Ana Dominguez Lindt & Sprungli (Canada), Inc. David Dusangh Mars Canada Inc. Jeff Hamilton Nestlé Canada Inc.

Cory Price Johnson & Johnson Karen Proud CHP Canada Gary Wade Unilever

Maheb Nathoo Earth’s Own Food Company Inc. David Pigott Morrison Lamothe Inc. Mike Pilato Jamieson Wellness Inc.

INDUSTRY AFFAIRS POLICY COMMITTEE

John Porco Unico Inc.

Frank Kollmar (Chair) L’Oreal Canada Inc.

Carmela Serebryany Upper Crust

Rupa Bahri GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare

Scott Singer Reinhart Foods Limited

Jeremy Daveau Mars Wrigley Confectionery Canada

Cecile Van Zandijjcke Dr. Oetker Canada Ltd. MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE

Jean Gattuso A. Lassonde Inc.

Jamie Moody (Chair) Tree of Life

Jennifer Hutchinson Post Foods Canada, Inc.

Helen Kargas Edgewell Personal Care Canada

Todd Kelly KIND Healthy Snacks

Bruno Keller Kraft Heinz Company

Cara Keating PepsiCo Foods Canada

Darlene Nicosia Coca-Cola Ltd.

Dan Magliocco Danone Canada

David Pigott Morrison Lamothe Inc.

Simon Petersen Colgate-Palmolive Canada

Carmela Serebryany Upper Crust

Rudy Sequeira Ferrero Canada Ltd

PUBLIC AFFAIRS POLICY COMMITTEE (CPG)

Dale Storey General Mills Canada Corporation

Michael Read (Chair) Church & Dwight Canada

Mark Taylor Parmalat Canada Inc.

Mario Altan Henkel Consumer Goods Canada

Cecile Van Zandijjcke Dr. Oetker Canada Ltd.

Liz Beemer Bayer Inc.

CANADIAN MANUFACTURING

Eric Breissinger Proctor & Gamble Inc.

John Pigott (Chair) Club Coffee

Shannon Coombs CCSPA

James Crosby Crosby Molassess

Dave Iacobelli The Clorox Company

Frank DeMichino Italpasta Limited

Frank Kollmar L’Oreal Canada Inc.

Bryana Ganong Ganong Bros. Limited

Darren Praznik CCTFA

Margaret Hudson Burnbrae Farms Limited

Margaret Hudson Burnbrae Farms Limited

Peter Luik Dare Foods Limited

Michael Lines Wellness Foods Jerry Mancini Dole Foods Canada Ltd. Andrew Salisbury Bellisio Foods Canada Corporation Simon Small The Jordans & Ryvita Company Trevor Squires McCormick Canada AUDIT & INVESTMENT COMMITTEE

Ian Roberts (Chair) Conagra Brands James Crosby Crosby Molasses Ron Schindler Clover Leaf Seafoods EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Beena Goldenberg (Chair) Hain Celestial Canada Gary Wade (Vice Chair) Unilever John Pigott (Vice Chair) Club Coffeer Ian Roberts (Treasurer) Conagra Brands

WORKING COMMITTEES

Industry Affairs Collaborative Logistics Deductions Foodservice Industry Affairs SmartLabel™ Supply Chain Unsaleables Public Affairs CEPA CODEX

Food Allergen Front-of-Pack Nutrition Labelling Committee Government Relations International Trade Marketing to Children Ad Hoc Committee Public Affairs Consumer Products Public Affairs Food & Beverage Safe Food for Canadians Ad Hoc Committee Scientific and Regulatory Affairs Sodium Sustainability Networking Groups Finance Human Resources Legal Private Label Sales & Marketing Agencies Sales Best Practices Small-Mid-Sized Enterprises Supply Chain Clusters Confectionery Cluster Infant Formula Cluster Divisions Plant-Based Foods of Canada


FOOD & CONSUMER PRODUCTS OF CANADA

2700 Matheson Boulevard East East Tower, Suite 602E Mississauga, ON L4W 4V9 Tel: (416) 510-8024 Fax: (416) 510-8043 info@fcpc.ca www.fcpc.ca

Profile for Food & Consumer Products of Canada

FCPC Impact Report 2019  

FCPC Impact Report 2019