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OCT•NOV•DEC 2004

Listings and maps restaurants to

900

the fem 5 Five leading local female chefs who have earned their place atop their profession

the art of restaurant design

PLUS over 700 restaurant

REVIEWS inside!

We talk with restaurant designers about their trade, and how it can make or break a restaurant

recipes Equus’s mushroom fume soup Plus 4 other beautiful soups!

road trip Dining in St. Louis

$ 4 . 9 9 U. S . 4 3>

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74470 58360

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www.foodanddiningmagazine.com


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Z’s steaks are selected from Prime mid-western aged beef, hand-cut to order and cooked the way you like it. Z’s seafood is purchased directly from “day boat fisherman,” prepared simply and cooked to perfection. Don’t call prior to 4:00 p.m. about seafood specials for the evening… Chef is still at the airport… we just don’t know, yet! Z’s oyster lovers can select from both East and West Coast oysters!

Lunch

Monday – Friday

11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Dinner

Monday – Thursday Friday – Saturday Sunday

5:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Louisville’s ★The Courier-Journal ★★★&◆◆◆◆ Restaurant Opened in October 2000, Z’s Oyster Bar & Steakhouse is independently owned and operated.

101 Whittington Parkway Louisville, KY 40222 Telephone (502) 429-8000 Facsimile (502) 339-0335 www.zsoysterbar.com


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3101 Bardstown Road - Louisville, Kentucky 40205 • 800.844.1354 • www.sullivan.edu www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Fall 2004

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© 2004 Darden Corporation

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fall 2004 FA2003 PUBLISHER / CEO JOHN CARLOS WHITE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF ROBIN GARR VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS DANIEL F. BOYLE COLUMNISTS ROGER A. BAYLOR ROBIN GARR JERRY SLATER CONTRIBUTING WRITERS MICHAEL L. JONES MARTY ROSEN CONTRIBUTING CHEFS THOMAS HICKEY SR DAVID MOELLER CHIEF RESTAURANT CRITIC ROBIN GARR CONTRIBUTING RESTAURANT CRITIC MARTY ROSEN CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER DAN DRY GRAPHIC DESIGN KATHY KULWICKI DONOVAN DEFERRARO STEFAN TAMBURRO COPY EDITOR DONNA GORDON ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES ANNETTE B. WHITE TOM SFURA

Food & Dining Magazine® is published quarterly by Louisville Dining Magazine, Inc. P.O. Box 665, Louisville KY. 40201. Single copies $4.99, Annual Subscriptions rate $18.00. Submit subscription requests to: Food & Dining Magazine® P.O. Box 665, Louisville KY 40201, or call (502) 493-5511 ext. 540 or subscribe online at www.foodanddiningmagazine.com The publisher and advertisers are not responsible or liable for misprints, typographical errors or misinformation. The opinions expressed herein are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the publisher. Food & Dining Magazine® and Louisville Dining Magazine Inc. are in no way affiliated with Louisville Magazine® or any of its affiliates. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. All rights reserved.

For Advertising information call (502) 493-5511 ext. 550

on the cover

104 Oxmoor Court Adjacent to Oxmoor Mall 502-423-9040 • BahamaBreeze.com 4

Fall 2004

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The Patron’s Amber McCool serves a simple dish of Salt-n-Pepper scallops. Photo by Dan Dry


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cove r sto r y

the fem five

8 fe a t u re sto r i e s

We introduce a few leading local chefs who’ve earned their place at the top of their profession … and who just happen to be female.

women & the whisk Think of a restaurant chef, and you most likely think of a man in a tall, white toque. Until now. A national network of women chefs convenes in Louisville this month.

22

the art of restaurant design A great restaurant can be grand or cozy, comforting or challenging, calming or stimulating: It all depends on design. Marty Rosen talks with restaurant designers about their art, and how it can make or break an eatery.

28 road trip! st. louis Writer Ron Johnson inaugurates a new Food & Dining feature, taking us on a foodie’s tour of the top eats and eateries in St. Louis.

RECIPES FROM YOUR FAVORITE AREA RESTAURANTS

52

Dining Guide Restaurant reviews and details for 900-plus regional restaurants.

Maps 82

Now that you know where you want to go, here’s how to get there. Our map section shows all the restaurants in our Dining Guide, on 16 colorful metroarea maps.

menu gems Equus’s Mushroom Fume

Pure essence of mushrooms borne on a silken dairy base, this memorable soup clearly demonstrates that less can be more. Beautiful Soups The Mock Turtle sang its praise, and so do we: four seasonal soup temptations from our guest chefs.

comings & goings 6 Our quarterly report records the action in recent restaurant openings, closings, moves and changes.

co l u m n s cork 101 Hot Town …Wineries in the City 40

46

recipe gems

26

A visit to a winery traditionally involves a trip to the countryside. But two new Louisville wineries have turned up in thoroughly urban facilities. Robin Garr takes us on a visit.

hip hops Autumn Harvest 42 48

Beer is an agricultural product linked to the four seasons, brew guru Roger A. Baylor says. We celebrate autumn with a historic seasonal brew: Oktoberfest.

spirits How Sexy Is Your Vodka? 44 The law defines vodka as a neutral spirit without distinctive character, aroma, taste or color. So why are there more than 70 varieties? Drinks expert Jerry Slater explains. www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Fall 2004

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[ comings ]

&

[ goings ] You can’t tell the players without a scorecard, and it’s just about as difficult to keep up with Louisville’s changing restaurant scene. To help you remain au courant, we’ve provided our usual quarterly update on new arrivals, significant alterations and the few regretful depar tures. In that last depar tment, we’re delighted to report that openings again outnumbered closings by a solid 3-to-2 edge. [ OPENINGS ] The name and location are new, but the white chili and other good things are likely to seem familiar at Diamonds, 2427 Bardstown Road, where the team from the old Timothy’s comes back to the Kentucky side, returning from its sojourn in Jeffersonville to the Highlands quarters recently vacated by Steam Fire & Ice. Diamonds glitter across the street as well, where Chef Mike Driskell, formerly of Club Grotto, is upgrading the old Diamond Station bar at 2280 Bardstown Road and moving it upscale as Diamante. Not so upscale but much missed, Harrods Creek’s beloved Chick Inn reopened in October, welcoming a joyous throng nearly two years after a fire destroyed its old home at 6325 Upper River Road. Four th Street Live continued to bustle with new venues—the former Louisville Galleria is reportedly just about fully occupied now—including the glitzy entertainment center’s first locally connected establishment, Kentucky’s own Maker’s Mark Bourbon House & Lounge, and the nosh-while-youplay Lucky Strike Lanes and Felt, featuring bowling and billiards. Two new drinks spots join the mix: Saddle Ridge Saloon and Sully’s Saloon. If marijuana humor tickles your funnybone, you’ll love Che¯ba Hut, 947 Baxter Avenue. The fare is casual and the ambience of this Arizona-based spinoff can only be described as … weedy. Also in the Baxter nightclub strip and open almost all night, Spinelli’s Pizzeria, 614 Baxter Avenue, offers authentic Philly cheese steaks and Philadelphia-style pizza by the slice. Still can’t get enough Italian? Head to Oldham County for sandwiches and hot dishes with vowels on the ends of their names at Frascelli’s New York Deli, 6247 Crestwood Station. Briefly told, other recent openings include Fusion, where former Bluegrass Brewing Co. chefs present an eclectic mix of European and Asian cuisines in the former Butchertown home of Greek Paradise, 1605 Story Avenue; Magic Corner Bakery in the Brown Hotel; and a quartet of casual eat-and-drink 6

Fall 2004

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PHOTO BY DAN DRY

establishments around town: ZaZoo’s, in Kitty O’Kirwan’s old digs at 102 Bauer Avenue in St. Matthews; Trestle Sports Café under the old railroad trestle at 3701 Hopewell Road east of Jeffersontown; Big Dave’s Outpost, evoking memories of the historic Fat Cats in the former Judge Roy Bean’s at 1801 Bardstown Road, and Jabber’s Family Sports Grill, 6121 Bardstown Road. Finally, welcome a delicious variety of ethnic goodies and world fare, including Bakelicious, a Chinese bakery, at 6915 Southside Drive; China King, 3830 Ruckriegel Parkway, and Double Dragon 9, 9501 Taylorsville Road, both in Jeffersontown; and Ichiban Samurai, new in the Plainview venue that long housed Benihana of Tokyo at 1510 Lake Shore Court. Recent Mexican additions include Puerto Vallarta, 4214 Charlestown Road in New Albany; and Tijuana Flats Burrito Co., an Orlando-based chain with a focus on hot sauce, in the former Mancino’s at 2420 Lime Kiln Lane.

[ MOVES & CHANGES ] Alameda Southwest Grill is back at 1381 Bardstown Road, ending a yearlong concept transplant that had repositioned it as Mezzaluna Tuscan Grill. In another double-reverse shift, Abyssinia closed at 3220 Frankfort Avenue but has come back to life as Queen of Sheba Ethiopian in the old home of India Palace, 3315 Bardstown Road. Thai Smile 4 is gone from Hurstbourne, but Thai Smile 5 has come to life at 5800 Preston Highway, where Won Ton Express closed.


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Following a management change, Rancho Alegre, 7502 Preston Highway, is now La Embajada.The menu and style are much the same, however, and it’s still one of our favorite authentic Mexican restaurants. Closing individual properties but remaining in business at other locations are J. Harrod’s, which has departed from 3814 Frankfort Avenue but remains in its original Harrods Creek location, and Amshoff ’s Fish Inn, gone from 8012 Bardstown Road but reportedly reopening in Mount Washington. Restaurants adding additional locations include Ermin’s French Bakery & Café, now at 211 East Main Street, New Albany, and 9550 U.S. 42; Java Brewing Company, 135 S. English Station Road, 4013 Dutchmans Lane and Fourth Street Live; Lemongrass Café, 11300 Maple Brook Way; Papa Murphy’s, 9501 Taylorsville Road, and Pepper Shaker, 4918 Poplar Level Road. [ CLOSINGS ] Bim Deitrich’s Allo Spiedo lost its lease at 2309 Frankfort Avenue and closed in September; it will be replaced by another Java Brewing outlet. We’ll miss its excellent pizza margherita. Also to be missed is the nostalgic Sir Churchill’s, 10317 Watterson Trail, a favorite for its pub grub and excellent beers and ales of the British Isles. Central Park Café, 318 W. Ormsby, is out of business, amid reports that it may return under a new name and management if litigation issues can be resolved.

PARK PLACE INTRODUCES

A N O S H A R

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MODERN

A M E R I C A N

CUISINE

"N obody, but nobody can make a plate of food both look and taste as gorgeous as C h e f A n o o s h S h a r i a t ." Ronni Lundy Award-Winning Cookbook Author and Food Writer

The memorably idiosyncratic Me Oh My Jumbalay is gone from 2339 Frankfort Avenue.The owner, the singularly named Intisar, has told customers that she hopes to find a new West End location. More recent closings: Chuck’s On Baxter, 962 Baxter Avenue; Eve’s Sweet Revenge, 947 Eastern Parkway; Garrett’s Hickory Grille, 2343 Lime Kiln Lane; Kolache Factory, 2915 S. Hurstbourne Parkway; Sue’s Touch of Country, 2605 Rockford Lane, and the 8602 Citadel Way property of the Schlotzsky’s Deli chain. F&D Do you have information on something we missed? Send it to: editor@foodanddiningmagazine.com

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The

Y YxÅ [ chef ]

kathy cary

With a couple of hundred women chefs and restaurant owners from around the nation convening in Louisville for the 10th national conference of Women Chefs & Restaurateurs, let’s take a moment to introduce a few leading local chefs who’ve earned their place at the top of their profession—and who just happen to be female. We think you’ll enjoy their stories—as much as their happy customers enjoy their cooking.

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lilly’s 1147 bardstown rd. 451.0447

By Michael Jones Photographs by Dan Dry Lilly’s Kathy Cary 8

Fall 2004

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Kathy Cary has earned almost every accolade a chef could imagine. Gourmet magazine named her a “Great American Chef,” she has appeared often on Food Network and other national cooking programs, and she has been invited to cook at New York’s James Beard House. It all grows out of the success of Lilly’s Restaurant and the gourmet-to-go Café La Peche, both of which Cary operates with her musician husband, Will Cary. Despite this success, Cary says, three years ago she felt Lilly’s was sinking into a quagmire. Tension among the staff had grown so strong that she felt it was damaging the restaurant. After reviewing the situation and having a heart-to-heart with her husband, Cary concluded that she was partly to blame. “There was too much separation from the front and back of the house,” she said. “It was mine and Will’s fault, because we didn’t have the right people in place. We thought we could run it all, and it got out of hand.We had to ask ourselves,‘Why are we still doing this?’ It was one of the hardest things.” Feeling that Lilly’s had “strayed from its roots,” Cary decided to rebuild the restaurant from the ground up. She fired the staff and closed the restaurant for a month to recharge her battery. Then, with an almost totally new staff—some old staff members were allowed to reapply for their jobs—she started over on what she considered a more solid foundation. “I’d like to think we came out on top,” she said. “We’ve gotten more organized, more civilized. It’s all more professionally done. I looked back at some of the old menus and they were more complex than what we have now. Not better, but just more complex recipes. When Lilly’s started in 1988, it was more of a formal restaurant. I hate using words like ‘formal’ and ‘casual,’ but people came in wearing coats and ties, and now we also have customers come in wearing blue jeans.” Moreover, she said, “I realized you couldn’t cook the same year after year. Our customers want change. That’s the challenge. The restaurant has to be constantly evolving.” Cary has always had a passion for cooking. As a young woman, she moved to Washington to attend culinary school and apprenticed herself to some of the best

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From Lilly’s comes seared Hudson Valley foie gras with caramelized butternut squash and Gala apples finished with a Huber cider and maple syrup reduction

cooks in the country. She eventually found her niche combining formal dishes with a down-home flavor. “A lot of the inspiration came from African-American women caterers in Washington,” Cary explained.“These were women who didn’t have to use recipes.They were just good. I learned a lot from them.” After returning to Louisville, Cary soon tired of working for other people and decided to strike out on her own.

She opened the first La Peche on Bardstown Road in 1979, in the building that would later house Lilly’s. More than the cooking, Cary said, her biggest challenge was earning the respect of her early employees. “I’m 20 or 21, hiring men that were older than I was,” Cary remembered.“It was a learning curve. I used to be a lot softer and less demonstrative. It took a lot of showing by example to earn their respect.” www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Fall 2004

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Cary doesn’t see herself as a pioneer, although others may disagree; but she acknowledges things are different for younger female chefs today. “Our whole society has changed,” Cary said. “Women are in the workplace more than when I was younger. Some of the farmers we buy produce from are women. … I think of myself as someone who had the guts to get in the restaurant business and try to get a new concept going. The restaurant business is ever changing.” In 1988, Cary opened Lilly’s, named for her daughter, offering formal dining in the front of a space that still housed La Peche with its casual fare in the back. She later opened a second La Peche in Holiday Manor on Brownsboro Road.This added up to many hours of work. For years, she would often arrive at the Bardstown Road location at 4 a.m. to cook for the day. Then, after a few hours

El Mundo’s famous fish tacos served with sides of refried black beans, red rice, and pico de gallo

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break, she’d return to Lilly’s or check on the second La Peche location. Her husband was equally busy. He designed the Lilly’s décor, and was the jack-of-alltrades for all of the restaurants. Several years ago, Lilly’s grew to fill the entire Bardstown Road space, closing the original La Peche. A separate La Peche Express location, also on Bardstown Road, has also closed. The latest evolution for Cary was adding tapas to the Lilly’s menu, a concept that she said she picked up after enjoying this light Spanish fare in Barcelona. She said the trip also yielded contacts for Spanish wines that can be found locally only at Lilly’s. “I want to test myself, get better,” Cary said.“Any artist wants to learn.That’s what keeps this place alive. Tapas are fun and affordable for a lot of people. Plus, that’s how I like to eat when I go out. I love

to have appetizers and a glass of wine.” Now that she feels things are settled at Lilly’s with a good staff in place, Cary has more time to spend on community projects. She has long been a suppor ter of the Cabbage Patch Settlement House in inner-city Louisville, and now is working with the Home of the Innocents to create urban gardens.“I want to spend more time digging in the dirt,” she said.“My happy place is in the country, working on food.” Looking back, Cary said, “Sometimes I feel I was nuts to do what I did. But I was young and maybe there was a little ego involved. I thought I could do it all. As a woman, the hardest part was juggling a husband, children, employees and a business. You end up giving up a lot of personal time. I’m at a place now where I can just sit back and enjoy my family and the things we’ve built together.”


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Y [ chef ]

bea chamberlain el mundo 2345 frankfort ave. 899.9930

Bea Chamberlain says she used to see herself going a lot of places in life— and Louisville was not one of them. But in 1995 she made a short trip to the River City as a favor to her brother, and that trip has lasted nine years so far. “My brother, Pete, had a dream of opening a burrito shack, but he didn’t know how to do it,” remembered Bea Chamberlain, who is now chef and coowner of El Mundo. “I told him that I’d help, but I wasn’t going to stay because I didn’t want to live in Kentucky. But I ended up living here anyway.” Pete Chamberlain moved to Louisville in 1992, lured here by a business deal that later fell apart. Since he was here and the city seemed nice enough, Pete decided to stay for a while. He worked at construction jobs and taught martial arts. Then he had an idea: Louisville had a great restaurant scene, but he thought it was missing something on the lower end. Recalling the cheap burrito stands that populated Southern California, he figured something like that would go over big in Louisville, especially with the late-night crowd. Pete had an idea, a little money saved up, and, before long, a location on Frankfort Avenue. What he didn’t have was a clue about how to start. Pete had never worked in a restaurant—but his sister had. Bea Chamberlain had studied culinary arts at the New York Restaurant School. Later, in Boulder, Colorado, where she lived for eight years while attending college and working at a ski resort, she fell in love with Mexican cuisine. It would become her specialty. “All cooking is the same. It’s all technique and ingredients,” she said.“It’s hard to cook a cuisine outside its mother country because the ingredients come from the ground. My food is not authentic Mexican food. It’s my take on Mexican food.” It’s easy to see the difference

El Mundo chef and co-owner, Bea Chamberlain

between the Chamberlain siblings. Pete is a tall, husky guy who is smart but prefers to work with his hands. Bea is a petite blonde with a bob haircut, a taste for culture and something of the artist about her. Bea Chamberlain was working at a Mexican restaurant in Martha’s Vineyard when her brother called for help. She agreed to come to Louisville to help get the restaurant off the ground. Deciding her next move could come later. Fortunately for Louisville diners, she took her brother’s idea for a simple burrito shack and expanded it into something else

entirely.“Pete just wanted to serve burritos,” she said. “But I’m a classically trained chef. I got bored making burritos all day.” El Mundo, which is Spanish for “The World,” opened in 1995. The first menu featured burritos, as Pete intended. It also had eight entrees that Chamberlain created. Together brother and sister had created a first-rate restaurant that was an almost immediate success. But therein lay the rub. Could Chamberlain go back to being a vagabond chef after she had enjoyed success with a menu she created? Of course not. At least, www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Fall 2004

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not after her brother helped make the decision by offering her part-ownership. Chamberlain accepted, still believing it was only a temporary stay for her. “It was Pete’s dream, but it was my creation—all my food,” she said. “I didn’t want to drop it in his lap and leave. But I didn’t plan on living in Louisville forever.” The Chamberlains have a clear division of labor. He is the day manager and handles most of the prep work. She works at night and is in charge of the menu, scheduling and handling the books. “He actually works more than I do,” she said. “But I learned the taxes and the filing, keeping good books. There is a lot more than cooking that goes into running a restaurant.” The siblings make a good team. El Mundo is so popular that it has maxed out its space on Frankfort Avenue. First, they put a small bar on the second floor. Then they expanded additional dining space upstairs. The bar stays open until 2 a.m. On occasional Fridays, a DJ will perform a set. Chamberlain has become friends with many local ar tists who patronize El Mundo … and sometimes earn extra money working there. Now Chamberlain is trying to expand the definition of Mexican cuisine with such innovative menu additions as oyster crispy tacos, fish tacos and other seafood specials. “I’ve had people comment, ‘Seafood is not Mexican,’” she said, adding, “Mexico is bordered by thousands of miles of coastline. A lot of people don’t realize how much seafood they eat. Plus, I’m from New England and we love seafood too. It’s good for you.” Several years ago, an attempt at a El Mundo II just east of downtown proved shor t-lived. Chamberlain said she and her brother just weren’t experienced enough to operate two locations; but, she said, “We’re a lot more prepared now.” But don’t go looking for another El Mundo just yet. That might suggest that Bea Chamberlain is setting down roots. “It may or may not happen,” she said, adding a bit wistfully, “I am leaving Louisville sometime. Really.”

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Chef Sara Gibbs of Lynn’s Paradise Café

Y

Gibbs credits her husband,Tommy, for nudging her to leave the stacks of books behind. Ironically, they met at a library conference and were lynn’s paradise cafe married in 1990.Tommy Gibbs is 984 barrett ave. from Texas, and Sara says she 583.3447 decided to learn Southwestern cooking to please him. When he For many years, Sara Gibbs sampled the results,Tommy knew his wife expected to spend her life shelving had what it took to be a professional cookbooks, not using them. Gibbs spent cook. “If he hadn’t pushed me, I wouldn’t 15 years working as a librarian in West have done it,” she said. “My husband Virginia and rose to the post of head totally made this happen.” librarian.Then she decided to ditch books Gibbs found her calling in an for the spatula, and now she’s culinary unorthodox way, but she may have development chef at Lynn’s Paradise Café inherited the traits from her mother, in Louisville. who was a home demonstrator for a “Most people were shocked utility company. “They were trying to get when I said I was giving up the library to people to switch from gas to electric work in a kitchen,” Gibbs recalled. “At stoves,” Gibbs said. “So, they would send the library you have a good working women like my mother to people’s environment and security. I gave that up homes to show them how to cook on to basically work at minimum wage again. the new stoves.” But deep down, I’ve always enjoyed Instead of following her mother cooking and catering more than working directly into a cooking career, though, in a library.” Gibbs gravitated to West Virginia

[ chef ]

sara gibbs


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Lynn’s Paradise Café’s Southern Comfort pepper jelly grilled salmon: a grilled boneless salmon fillet drizzled with spicy Southern Comfort red-pepper jelly glaze and garnished with scallions and toasted sesame seeds

Wesleyan College, where she got a bachelor’s degree in library science. She later earned her master’s degree from the University of Maryland. In 1993, she and Tommy packed their belongings and moved to Louisville so she could attend culinary school at Sullivan University. “As a librarian, you tend to be very structured. I wanted to think outside the box,” Gibbs said. Because she already had a master’s degree, she was able to speed through the Sullivan program, graduating in December 1994. Once she entered the job market, Gibbs learned some lessons about sexual politics in the kitchen.“People think that women chefs should only be pastry chefs,” she said. “For some reason, men think they should be the ones to handle meat. Women always get pushed towards the salad and sandwiches. Men are not interested in that. They like the flames and the heat. You have to fight to do something.” One of the things Gibbs loves about Lynn’s Paradise Café is its woman-centric attitude. Both the owner and general

manager are women.“I think sometimes for men, running a kitchen or business can be all about the ego. Women seem to be able to set that aside more often. They will do things for the good of the kitchen or of the business. I enjoy being in an environment like that.” Gibbs originally intended to go back to West Virginia after graduation, but found she had established a life in the Louisville

area. Tommy was teaching at Jefferson Community College and they had a farm in Taylorsville. Against her better judgment, she took a job at a chain restaurant, which she characterized as a complete failure, declining even to give up the establishment’s name. “I lasted a week at the chain restaurant,” she admitted. “It was too fast. I wasn’t ready for it. I didn’t want to work for a chain anyway, because so much comes

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from a can.” She moved on to the locally owned, and moderately sized, Cottage Inn, where she was working when Lynn Winter, owner of Lynn’s Paradise Café, hired her as a consultant. This evolved into her current position, in which she oversees menu changes, tastes new products and plans special events. Lynn’s is known for its unusual décor, and Gibbs runs the kitchen in an offbeat fashion, too. “We don’t have an executive chef,” she said. “We run it as a team. Everything we do, we do it democratically. That’s why an executive chef doesn’t work here. We try to get everyone to buy into it. That takes a lot of energy, but the kitchen runs like a family.” What Gibbs likes most about her jobs is that she’s allowed a creative freedom that she didn’t have at the library. “If they ran a library like a kitchen, they would assume books were perishable,” she laughed. “It would be much more efficient.” While she was being interviewed, Gibbs had her mind on fall menu planning. She particularly likes Lynn’s Harvest Moon Salad, which she makes with romaine lettuce, apple cider honey vinaigrette, Gorgonzola cheese, spicy Cajun pecans, Granny Smith apples and walnut-crusted fried chicken. “Actually, that’s something I put on the fall menu last year, intending to take it off in the spring. But it has such a following that I’ll probably never take it off the menu.” Gibbs is also looking forward to special events at Lynn’s. In November, she’ll cook for the national conference of Women Chefs & Restaurateurs in Louisville. In December, there’s a presentation of cheese from artisanal producers throughout the South. And on New Year’s Day, Lynn’s hosts its popular annual pajama party. With so much activity, you can bet Gibbs never sits around missing the Friends of the Library book sale. Even friends and family members who questioned her decision to become a chef have come around.“They all agree it was the right choice now,” Gibbs said. “It’s certainly a decision I’m glad I made.”


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Y [ chef ]

michele melillo-clem melillo’s 829 e. market st. 540.9975

Michele Melillo-Clem dreamed of being a restaurateur ever since she was a little girl, but it probably would never have happened if she hadn’t learned that her late father shared the dream. Not long after her father, Joe Melillo, died in 1999, Melillo-Clem discovered that “Papa Joe” had written a checklist for a restaurant. The list included commonsense criteria like having a standalone building for the business and placing it in a location that customers would pass on their way home from work. “I don’t know when he wrote it, if it was 10 or 20 years ago,” Melillo-Clem said, adding that she loved the Italian shops and bakeries that she saw when the family went to New Jersey to visit her father’s relatives. “I used to ask my father to open one,” she said. “My father always said it was too much trouble.Then I find this list.” Melillo-Clem has always loved to cook, but she never worked in a restaurant. A wife and mother of two daughters, she spent nearly 14 years as a secretary and teacher’s assistant at Chenoweth Elementary School in Louisville. A few catering jobs in her kitchen were the extent of her professional cooking experience. “I grew up as the only girl in a house with three brothers,” Melillo-Clem said. “I use to resent the fact that I had to help my mother in the kitchen and they didn’t. But after a while I got to like it. “I shy away from calling myself a chef, because I have no formal training. What I do have is passion. It’s like an artist who picks up a brush and immediately knows how to paint.” Not long after finding her father’s list, Melillo-Clem was driving down Brownsboro Road and noticed that a little cottage that had housed a Heitzman’s Bakery was for rent. Her imagination caught fire. Everything about it matched Papa Melillo’s criteria, she said. “The building was stand-alone, it was on the way home from work and everything on down the line.” Melillo-Clem was prepared to gamble on her dream, but it took a little Melillo’s Michele Melillo-Clem


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Melillo’s antipasto platter: Genoa salami, mortadella, ham, pepperoni, roasted red peppers, pistachios with assorted olives (including kalamata and Sicilian) and cheeses (including provolone and fontina)

longer for the building’s landlord to come around. A 47-year-old woman with zero experience in the restaurant industry wanted to open a restaurant? He didn’t see that as a winning combination. “I told the landlord that if things didn’t work out he could always rent it again,” Melillo-Clem said. “I was the one with something to lose, because I would owe him money. I was excited, but kind of scared. I quit my job, but I didn’t retire early from Chenoweth. I wanted to be able to go back if I ever needed my job back.” Melillo’s opened as a small Italian deli in 2001.“I wish I’d done this when I was in my 20s,” Melillo-Clem confessed. “I would have done things a little differently. For one thing, the kitchen was too small. I had been catering out of my home in a small kitchen for years, so I didn’t think it would be a problem. I didn’t think about 16 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

how small the kitchen would be with five people in it.” But with help from family and friends, Melillo’s became a quick success. Before long, regular customer Jeff Tatman, who was building the Piazza di Felice on East Market Street, made her a business proposition. He wanted a restaurant to pair with the winery he was building there. Melillo-Clem saw it as an opportunity to have the kind of restaurant she had dreamed about as a girl. She also had become a little more realistic about the restaurant industry. “I always want to be able to handle what I have against me,” she said. “I didn’t want to have a restaurant that was too big. … I didn’t want to do it if it wasn’t going to be fun.” The new Melillo’s, which opened earlier this year, is a family establishment in every sense of the word. Menu items like

the popular Eggplant Parmigiana are made from an old Melillo family recipe for marinara sauce. Many dishes, especially on the lunch menu, are named for family or friends. The por tabella mushroom sandwich is dubbed the Edison in honor of cousins in Edison, New Jersey. The Rene— Gorgonzola cheese spread topped with roasted red peppers—is named for MelilloClem’s best friend, Rene Schnurr. The family connections don’t stop with the menu. Melillo-Clem’s brothers Bill and Nick built the restaurant’s bar. Her daughter Ashley is the manager. MelilloClem’s mother occasionally works in the kitchen, and an 8-year-old niece serves as a hostess on the weekends. “My father always told me that the best thing he could give me was family,” Melillo-Clem said.“I’m not shy about using it.” Expanding her schedule to include both lunch and dinner has demanded a few compromises for Melillo-Clem. She said the regular customers who followed her to the new location are constantly offering advice. Against her own judgement, she laughed, she added a chicken salad sandwich to the menu at the urging of her friend Greg Kaelin.“Greg would always say,‘You need to have chicken salad,’ and I said, ‘That’s not Italian,’ ” Melillo-Clem remembered.“Finally, I put the sandwich on the lunch menu, and it is one of our best sellers. I would say we sell 100 pounds of it every week. But I did add garlic to it, so it’d seem a little more Italian.” “I’m open to anything,” Melillo-Clem said. “If a customer wants to come give me a recipe, I’ll try it.That’s what makes the family atmosphere special. Everyone feels they have something invested into the restaurant.” Melillo’s doesn’t accept reservations, because Melillo-Clem doesn’t want her customers to feel rushed by others waiting for their table. She rarely advertises because she prefers word-of-mouth business. It’s all aimed at keeping things comfortable for her customers and herself. “It’s a great way to spend the twilight of your life,” Melillo-Clem said. “I’m always going through cookbooks, searching the Internet or the library for new recipes. Everything is a learning experience—even dealing with suppliers and employees. My hardest thing is learning to say ‘no.’ Someone could call me tomorrow for a lasagna and I’d probably agree. I end up working 18hour days sometimes because of things like that. But I love what I’m doing.”


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Melilloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fettuccine Jennifer: fettuccine pasta, peas and prosciutto tossed with pecorino and Romano cheeses in a creamy alfredo sauce


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The Patronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Humboldt Fog salad: romaine lettuce, roasted beets and Cypress Grove Humboldt Fog cheese, topped with Weisenberger cornbread croutons and finished with a toasted black-peppercorn vinaigrette

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Y [ chef ]

amber mcCool the patron 3400 frankfort ave. 896.1661

Amber McCool thought she had learned everything she needed to know about the restaurant business when she studied culinar y ar ts at Sullivan Univer sity’s National Center for Hospitality Studies. But when McCool opened The Patron in 1999, she discovered that her professors had overlooked some practical points. “They should have had some classes in electricity and plumbing, because that’s something you’ve got to deal with when you own a restaurant,” she said. “I always tell my staff that a restaurant is like wor king in an emergency room: You never know what is going to happen. One day you get bad fish, and the next the toilet is overflowing. You’ve got to be ready for anything.” McCool has been on track to be a chef all her life. Growing up in Dayton, Ohio, with her parents and two brothers, she was so taken by cooking that she says she still remembers the name of the lunch lady at her elementary school. She worked restaurant jobs while still in high school, and says her love of cooking traces back to the intimate family dinners she cherished as a youth.“Dinner wasn’t a skipped thing at my house,” she said. “We all got together at night and talked about our day. That really left an impression on me.” McCool moved to Louisville to attend Sullivan and stayed here after graduation, working at Café Metro and later at Lilly’s. She went on her own in 1999, opening The Patron initially as a gourmet-to-go restaurant. “It felt like a natural thing to do,” she said. “I wanted to be a part of Louisville’s dining scene. … This is a very good restaurant town and I felt that I had something to offer to it.”

Amber McCool, chef/owner of The Patron


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Avoiding restaurant-saturated areas like Bardstown Road and Frankfort Avenue, she settled on the restaurant’s current location a mile or so east on Frankfor t from the neighborhood’s restaurant cluster. “I looked at a lot of different spaces, but this one felt right to me,” McCool said.“A lot of what you can do with your restaurant depends on your location.” McCool recruited a friend from Dayton to paint a striking mural on The Patron’s exterior, and she enjoyed designing her own kitchen from scratch. The Patron soon gained a group of regular customers and gradually evolved from its gourmet-to-go concept. McCool put in tables, expanded the menu, extended to evening hours and recently added a bar.The Patron offers a variety of martinis (including such confections as the Pomegranate Martini, a Margatini and the Breezy Martini), not to mention such drinks for the adventurous as The Patron’s own Black Cherry Fizz. McCool said her customers are always the best judges of what works. “It continues to be a learning curve. It’s a huge transition going from being a chef to being the owner. When you’re in the kitchen you don’t interact with people. I’ve had to make a concerted effort to get feedback from customers. I like hearing the hellos and goodbyes, and asking people about their dining experiences. Sometimes, it can be a little ego boost.” McCool describes her bill of fare as “modern American cuisine,” which she defines as traditional recipes tweaked with regional ingredients. So the Patron Burger comes with caramelized onions, buttermilk blue cheese and pommes frites. The Organic Chicken and Gorgonzola Ravioli adds crumbled bacon and baby spinach to the Italian ingredients. Quality ingredients are critical, McCool says. “I try to layer the flavor in my dishes. I want people trying to guess what the ingredients are. I’m inspired by people’s palettes.” McCool said being a female chef has been a particular challenge. “It’s a male-dominated career, but I don’t think

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a female chef is as rare as it once was. … Chefs like Julia Child really inspired a lot of women. And culinary schools are producing a lot of trained female chefs. It’s a different world now.” But she sounds a warning note to ambitious young cooks who see the kitchen as a stepping-stone, not a lifelong craft.“Because of the Food Network and Emeril, people think being a chef is a quick moneymaking career. They don’t realize how hard it is and how much dedication it takes.You miss out on a lot of holidays and other fun things when you choose this career.” McCool, who is single, said cooking is her life. On her rare nights off,

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she likes to go out and sample the competition. And she hangs out with a number of other young chefs. The only thing that excites her as much as cooking, she said, is paper. “Sometimes, I dream about owning a stationery store with lots of flowers. I love paper and pens,” she said, adding that when she’s having a bad day, a trip to the florist always makes her feel good. “I’ve learned that I can’t do everything in one day,” she said. “But I’m really addicted to the business. It’s a craving. … And when we have customers that come in for lunch and come back for dinner, I know that we are doing something right.” F&D

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PHOTO BY MICHAEL PERRY

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By Robin Garr

When you think of a cook working at home in the kitchen, chances are you visualize a woman. Maybe it’s your Mom, tying up her apron as she turns on the oven to bake an apple pie. But think of a chef, dominating a restaurant kitchen in a tall, white toque, and your imagination is almost certain to come up with a man. “Men cook in restaurants; women cook at home,” said journalist and restaurateur Dianne Aprile, newsletter editor for the Louisville-based Women Chefs & Restaurateurs (WCR) and co-owner, with her husband, Ken Shapero, of The Jazz Factory. “Women chefs have to earn respect in the restaurant industry. Historically, there has been a lot of discrimination, a lot of verbal abuse.” Chef Pam Price, who runs the kitchens at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, says she has seen a lot of changes in her 30 years in the culinary profession. 22 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com


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(opposite page, top): A panel of WCR founders discuss the organization’s history at last year’s conference. (opposite page, right): Louisville Chefs Nancy Russman (left) and Pam Price go over menu plans for the WCR conference in Louisville.

“Women have not been accepted very long in the culinary world. Twenty years ago, it was unheard-of for women to be in the kitchen, considered a chef or called a chef.” Sitting for job interviews in those early days, she said, “you could tell they were just going through the motions, because they believed as a woman you didn’t have the skills. Even now, when you say ‘chef,’ like ‘doctor,’ you think of a man. It’s just a tradition, and I think we’re making great gains. And associations like WCR help us realize that we’re not quite there in equality, but we can be.” Ten years ago, eight women chefs and restaurant owners—most of them in San Francisco and New York City— founded WCR with the specific intention of working to overcome that inequity. The founders read like a Hall of Fame of prominent women chefs: Lidia Bastianich, co-owner of Felidia and Becco in New York City; Elka Gilmore, chef in San Francisco; Joyce Goldstein, author, restaurant and food consultant and former owner-chef of Square One in San Francisco; Johanne Killeen, co-owner of Alforno in Providence, R.I.; Barbara Lazaroff, owner of Spago Beverly Hills and Imaginings Interior Design in California; Mary Sue Milliken, co-owner of Ciudad & Border Grill in Santa Monica, California; Anne Rosenzweig, owner of Inside, New York City, and the late Barbara Tropp, longtime chef and consultant in San Francisco. WCR’s mission is to “promote the education and advancement of women in the restaurant industry,” and it seeks to accomplish that by a variety of programs that range from scholarships and internships for young women in the restaurant business to an extensive set of “mentoring” partnerships that bring together some 400 pairs of skilled chefs who volunteer assistance that ranges from

(this page): WCR’s

member chefs prepare a gala dinner at last year’s conference in San Francisco.

PHOTOS BY RICHARD WHEELER

friendly support to detailed, hands-on tutoring. Now the professional non-profit organization lists 2,000 members on its roster, and it is based in Louisville, managed by FSA Group LLC, a restaurant-industry public-relations and management firm housed in a historic office building at Third and Liber ty streets. (See sidebar on the following page.) Women Chefs & Restaurateurs is holding this year’s national conference in Louisville. Women chefs, restaurant owners, cookbook authors, food stylists and other culinary professionals will converge on the Seelbach Hilton Hotel November 6-8. Past conferences in San Francisco and Santa Monica in California and in Washington, D.C., have attracted 350 to 400 people, and the Louisville organizers are hoping for even more, said WCR Executive Director Deborah Skaggs. They’re hoping to keep the event more affordable than past gatherings in major cities and cash in on Louisville’s convenient location between the coasts. “This is not like a normal conference group,” Skaggs said.“These people want to come in and cook, and they have to find a hotel willing to let 80 women (not all at the same time!) come in and take over the kitchen. Seelbach chef Walter Leffler has been eager to work with us.” As you might expect of a restaurant group, the three-day conference is primarily focused on one meal function after another, most of them featuring guest chefs joining the Seelbach’s staff. “All they do is eat!” laughed Ellen McKnight, sponsorship director for FSA Group.“A lot of people don’t understand about Louisville:They’re not aware of our culinary scene. This is our chance to showcase what we have.”

Indeed. Local chefs and culinary professionals involved in conference planning were just about bubbling over with excitement when Food & Dining caught up with them to talk about the event. “It’s a great sorority and … well, we party,” said Nancy Russman, a longtime Louisville culinary professional who has cooked at Casa Grisanti and Vincenzo’s, teaches culinary arts at Jefferson Community College, and devotes much of her professional time to teaching cooking skills to “at-risk” children. As one of a number of local women chefs who’ll cook at one or more of the conference meals, Russman said the excitement of working with national culinary luminaries—like Susan Spicer of Bayona and Herbsaint in New Orleans or Rick Bayless of Chicago’s Frontera Grill and Topolobampo—can be intense. “Say, your assignment is to do lunch on Friday,” she said. “You get in the kitchen, you’ve got a lead chef and a concept, and you look around at who you’re cooking with and you say, ‘Oh, my God, I’ve got her cookbook.’ ” The conference agenda will be chockablock with culinary fun, said Russman, Price and Sullivan University Chef Instructor Anne Sandhu, who, like Russman, will be one of the conference chefs. On the first day, Saturday, visiting chefs will take their pick among several food-related tours of regional landmarks. The Louisville Urban Legends Tour will begin with breakfast at Lynn’s Paradise Café, followed by a visit to Shuckman’s Fish Co. & Smokery in the West End, where visitors may get a taste of proprietor Lewis Shuckman’s pricey Kentucky spoonfish caviar. This tour will also stop by Grateful Greens, Chef Greg Craft’s 8,500-square-foot urban greenhouse, where quality greens, herbs and edible flowers are grown by hydroponics.

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The group will enjoy lunch at the Churchill Downs Turf Club, followed by an afternoon at the races, then a walking tour of West Main Street on the way The Foodie Organization back to the Seelbach. Hub of the Universe? Another group will head for the country for a visit and tasting Women Chefs & Restauraat Brown-Forman Corporation’s teurs, a national culinary organiWoodford Reserve Distillery, zation, was born in San Francisco just off I-64 in Woodford and New York City; but its home County between Frankfort and office is in Louisville now. Versailles, Kentucky. A third FSA Group Associate and Women Chefs & Restaurateurs This might seem like quite a Executive Director Deborah Skaggs. Saturday option offers a tour of feather in the city’s chef ’s bonnet, Woodland Farm, which combines but in fact, it’s only one feather in a full headdress. After all, the International a historic 1840s Federal-style home, art Association of Culinary Professionals is headquartered here, too. So is the American gallery and herd of American bison, along Institute of Wine & Food, the Council of Independent Restaurants of America, and with a sampler of buffalo recipe dishes by the American Cheese Society. resident Chef Nancy Schoenhoff. In fact, nine national nonprofit culinary and food-service organizations are based “This is always fun,” said Price. “We in Louisville. All nine groups’ executive offices neatly fit into a single office, specifically, the have a dozen or so restaurants, and we headquarters of FSA Group LLC in the historic Landmark Building, 304 W. Liberty St. put everyone’s name in a hat and draw As you might assume, this remarkable concentration of foodie organizations is out groups of 8 to 12. You don’t know no mere coincidence. Trace it back to 1978, when Chicago entrepreneurs Phillip who you’re going to dinner with or where Cook and Daniel Maye moved their food-industry public-relations company, then you’ll go, but it’s always fun to see what other cities have to offer.” Most of the called Food Service Associates, to Louisville. A few years later they organized and groups will dine at local restaurants, where hosted the first Symposium on American Cuisine, an annual gathering of chefs, foodyou can be sure the resident chef will be service operators, food journalists and others interested in the American culinary going out of his (or her) way to impress; scene. A great success, it attracted food-industry luminaries from all over the nation, one lucky group will find its way to a placing Louisville in the national culinary spotlight annually for seven years before the private dinner at the home of Kathy Cary, Symposiums ran their course in 1989. co-owner and chef at Lilly’s. Food Service Associates, recently renamed FSA Group, had developed a The rest of the weekend will be relationship with the National Industrial Cafeteria Managers Association in 1974, devoted mostly to an intense series contracting to provide the organization’s administrative support.Thanks to the exposure of meals, keynote speeches, awards that the Symposiums gained for the city and FSA Group, it landed a similar management ceremonies and seminars at the Seelbach. contract for the respected International Association of Culinary Professionals in 1989. Local chefs involved in conference “Today,” according to a glowing article about FSA in the June 1999 edition of planning say they expect the three days of Food Arts magazine,“FSA acts as a management team for some of the biggest movers eating, talking and networking to be a and shakers in the food world.” memorable experience. “Women chefs Here’s a summary of the national organizations now managed by FSA: who succeed want to share,” Baptist International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP). A professional Seminary Chef Price said. “That doesn’t organization of 4,000 members worldwide. happen a lot in business, where you don’t Foodservice Consultants Society International (FCSI). Management and design usually hear, ‘I’ve been successful, and now consultants and suppliers for commercial kitchen designers. I’m going to tell everyone how to do it.’ American Society for Healthcare Food Service Administrators (ASHFSA). But these women felt a real need and Food service executives for more than 1,000 health-care institutions. desire to share what they had found out American Cheese Society (ACS). Artisanal and farmstead cheese makers, through trial and error, share this with distributors, restaurant professionals and interested consumers. other women who are coming along.” Society for Foodservice Management (SFM). On-site food-service professionals. Russman agreed. “The ability to The American Institute of Wine & Food (AIWF). A social organization of learn and to network through WCR is sophisticated consumers who seek to learn, share and promote their knowledge of amazing,” she said. “I’ve met all these wine and food. women who teach all over the country. Women Chefs & Restaurateurs (WCR). Professional organization of women We E-mail back and forth and say,‘Hey, try in key positions in every segment of the restaurant and hospitality industry. this in your class.’ Students are benefiting from a national organization. I’ve done so American Personal Chef Association (APCA). Personal chefs who are much through them and learned so much. independent business owner-operators. The information you can get from these Council of Independent Restaurants of America (CIRA). Owners of people is amazing.” F&D independent restaurants.

Louisville’s FSA Group

PHOTO BY DAN DRY

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[ROAD

TRIP]

Louis By Ron Johnson

St. Louis is a city of neighborhoods. From working-class Scrubby Dutch to well-heeled Compton Heights, every neighborhood in the other American city named after a French king reflects not only its current citizenry but also its ethnic roots. And nothing better shows off a St. Louis neighborhood’s roots than its restaurants. A straight shot west on I-64, just four hours away by car, St. Louis is an ideal weekend destination for a Louisvillian seeking culinary adventure. Hotels are reasonably priced and plentiful, both downtown and in suburban Clayton, the St. Louis county seat.You’ll need a car, anyway, to explore as many neighborhoods as possible. St. Louis dining starts on “The Hill.” Once the city’s premier dining destination, where each block boasted a four-star, white-tablecloth restaurant with opulent décor and tuxedo-clad service teams, today The Hill has settled into a more familiar and frankly more comfortable role as provider of solid and authentic Italian food. Populated by immigrant populations from both Lombardia in northern Italy and Sicily in the south, The Hill is home to a diverse selection of Italian treats. At the high end, Giovanni’s, Gian-Tony’s and Charlie Gitto’s continue to turn out the 26 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

kind of classy and slick Northern Italian dishes that Louisvillians will recall fondly from Casa Grisanti. Just as delicious are some of the lesser-known spots where the locals eat. The Hill is still over 80 percent Italian, and it’s not unusual to overhear conversations in Italian. Adriana’s, a tidy corner restaurant, serves the most authentic Sicilian cuisine in the Midwest. It’s counter service, and the food is served in wax-paper-lined baskets, but nowhere else has real twice-baked Sicilian pizza.The assortment of sandwiches is staggering. While not a restaurant in the typical sense, John Volpi & Co. is the region’s best salumeria, turning out the finest quality cured meats, including Genova salami, sopressata, pancetta and my favorite, pepperoni. One could make a meal out of the free samples handed out by the cheerful staff. To round out a full day on The Hill, visit J.Viviano’s & Sons, a shop that attracts those of Italian heritage from all over the Midwest and South. It’s not unusual to see folks filling their trunk with cartloads of Italian staples like Sicilian deli olives, liters of extra virgin olive oil and cans of San Marzano tomatoes—at one-third of the price of fancy gourmet shops. You could easily spend an entire weekend on The Hill alone, but St. Louis offers much more. The Central West End

buffers the eastern edge of magnificent Forest Park from downtown and is home to some of the most significant architecture in the city.The neighborhood’s streets, lined with mature trees and stately homes reminiscent of Old Louisville, bustle with sidewalk cafes, wine bars, coffee shops and fine-dining restaurants. The best restaurant in the Central West End, if not all of St. Louis, is Chez Leon. Leon Bierbaum, a Francophile of the highest order, has transported the very best of Provence, Burgundy and Alsace to the Midwest. For those who miss the bistro and brasserie cuisine of Le Beaujolais and Deitrich’s in Louisville, Chez Leon will be a welcome oasis. A prix fixe three-course dinner for just over $30 and a wonderful selection of French wines under $40 per bottle make the experience all the more attractive. Reservations are recommended for weekend nights. For those without a reservation— or jacket and tie—Liluma is just a short walk down scenic Euclid Avenue. The second restaurant for the owner/chefs of the haute-cuisine Crossing in Clayton, Liluma offers equally delicious and innovative food in a less formal atmosphere. The price is right too. The homemade pastas are without equal in the city and can serve as a decadent starter or a worthy main course.

PHOTO BY ERIK M. LUNSFORD

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To get a flavor of the older and Welsh corner of the Central West End, diners should drop in to Duff’s for a simple and delicious lunch, or Llywelyn’s Pub for a cold beer and a plate of the house-made potato chips. Beer aficionados and fans of the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas can easily while away an afternoon or evening in Dressell’s Pub, where the atmosphere is not unlike that of the Irish Rover. The recently gentrified South Grand neighborhood is home to the city’s best Vietnamese cuisine. Pho Grand Restaurant has long been considered the spot for Vietnamese in town and rightly so, but relative newcomer Mekong is a strong contender as well. Those familiar with Vietnamese cuisine will find all the favorites including near-perfect goi cuon (rice-paper-wrapped salad rolls) and banh mi (Vietnamese sandwiches). Immediately south of the city are two of the oldest neighborhoods in St. Louis. Soulard, on the bank of the

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Mississippi, is riddled with cobblestone streets lined with sturdy brick dwellings and decorative Victorian homes. Since 1845 Soulard has been home to a massive market within an ancient brick structure. The market houses butchers, fresh produce, fishmongers and shops to satisfy just about any culinary whim. Vendors offer an array of street food and ethnic fare to munch as one browses the aisles. The Sidney Street Café serves food that is significantly more upscale, but the atmosphere is all Soulard and everyone feels right at home. Just west of Soulard is historic Lafayette Square, where townhouses, row houses and mansions of post-Civil War architecture encircle a 30-acre Victorian park. Unexpectedly, this neighborhood boasts one of St. Louis’s finest Mexican restaurants. Arcelia’s menu is chock-full of familiar favorites, including combination plates that are guaranteed to satisfy the most voracious appetite. It’s priced right for lunch, and is a good precursor to a

leisurely stroll through the neighborhood. For dinner, the new Eleven Eleven Mississippi is the current hit in the neighborhood and for good reason. An eccentric wine list and gutsy cuisine combine in a formula that’s quickly becoming a St. Louis favorite. Like Louisville, St. Louis is blessed with a multitude of great restaurants at every price point. Even the most adventurous eater would find it impossible to tackle them all in a year, much less a weekend. Another worth mentioning is Annie Gunn’s, in the far west county, where the overflowing crowds give a hint at the magic going on inside. The food is simple—steaks, chops and seafood—but delicious and consistently perfect. It warrants the journey west on I-40. Take a weekend, take a car and take a map. St. Louis’s neighborhoods offer a treasure trove of food and dining opportunities. If it’s not possible to see and eat it all in one weekend, it’s good to have an excuse to go back. F&D

PHOTO BY ERIK M. LUNSFORD

Charlie Gitto’s fettuccine with seafood: littleneck clams, shrimp, scallops, langostinos and fettuccini noodles tossed in a three-pepper cream sauce

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Art Restaurant The

of

Design By Marty Rosen Photographs by Dan Dry

At the most primitive level, food and shelter are nothing more than basic human needs: fuel and protection for the body. But food is more than fuel. It’s also the stuff of science and art, nutrition and cuisine.We know that some 17,000 years ago, in the caves at Lascaux, humans had already begun enhancing their shelters, adding decorative designs and taking the first steps toward architecture. In the affluent sectors of the modern world, food and shelter are no longer primitive needs; rather, they’re rich avenues of social, cultural and artistic expression. In contemporary private homes, dining rooms and kitchens—spaces that were once strictly functional—become lavish exercises in imagination. But when cuisine, design and architecture are conjoined in public spaces, the result is, almost by definition, a restaurant. And in America, restaurants are our most frequently used public spaces, far outpacing the public spaces of the past—churches, arenas, government buildings and the like. When chefs, architects and designers collaborate in developing a restaurant, the outcomes are as varied and unpredictable as any work of imagination. Great restaurants can be grand or cozy, comforting or challenging, calming or stimulating. They come in a multitude of shapes and sizes. Most of us sense quickly whether we like the “feel” of a restaurant, whether its complex mix of colors, textures, shapes, sounds and spaces makes us feel welcome or intimidated, comfortable or stressed. But more often than not, we find it difficult to articulate the factors that make us want to stay or leave. When a restaurant satisfies us, it’s always a crafty blend of artistic form and utilitarian function, reflecting the restaurateur’s attempt to meet the needs of a specific audience, whether for fast food or high dining. We spoke with a series of experts in the field—chefs, architects and designers—to get a sense of the thinking that goes into restaurant design. 28 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com


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J. Alexanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dining room is designed to convey the elegant feeling of an upscale restaurant.


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An Architect Speaks Architect Jill Smith’s work includes two of Louisville’s most controversial and celebrated dining rooms: Chef Peng Looi’s August Moon and Asiatique. Smith, who earned her master’s degree in architecture at Tulane University and served as architect for the city of Louisville for nine years, founded her firm, Jill Lewis Smith Architect Inc., five years ago. She works on a variety of commercial, government and residential buildings, but she counts restaurant design among the most challenging and joyful aspects of her work. “Restaurants are very special clients,” Smith said. “More than any other clients, restaurateurs—especially chefs— are extremely sensitive to color, texture and shape. And chefs are always very opinionated.” Those opinions, played out in collaboration between Looi and Smith, yielded a spare, almost stark, but comfortable design for August Moon that Smith laughingly describes as “Frank Lloyd Wright on a shoestring.” Glossy and urbane, Asiatique is more edgy, “a polished restaurant with a big-city feel.” Both restaurants are united by a spare, intelligent minimalism that some diners find enchanting and energizing, although others have declared them cold and forbidding. Smith first worked with Looi on a renovation of August Moon’s earlier facility; when he and co-owner Mimi Ha decided to build a new structure for the popular Lexington Road Chinese restaurant, he called on her again.“Architects love it when we’re brought in at the very conception of an idea,” Smith said. She was involved in every aspect of formulating the new restaurant, from determining the number of seats to laying out the parking and developing a business plan. She helped pick out tables and chairs and even took part in the selection of teas and coffees. “I still feel like it’s my building, even though I don’t own any part of it,” she said. Looi had very specific ambitions for August Moon. “For at least 10 years he’d been collecting pictures of things he really liked from restaurant magazines and other places. … There’s no one element that’s copied straight from those things, but the overall feel is informed by the experience of riffling through and experiencing the things that appealed to Looi.” Every aspect of August Moon’s design was based on a careful study of the 30 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

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restaurant’s setting between busy Lexington Road out front and a pretty wooded cliffside scene in the back. “So we designed ‘to the site,’ ” she said, pushing the building toward the back of the property to place its rear deck under shade trees, with high ceilings and large windows to take advantage of the scenic view, while locating the kitchen and restrooms up front, where windows weren’t needed. They even studied the changing angles of the sun, and quickly realized that there was no need for shades over the northeast-facing windows. “When you walk in, there are no blinds, so when you’re in the dining area you get an indoor-outdoor kind of feel.” August Moon was built with 10inch-thick concrete walls and an excessive amount of insulation to hold down energy costs, with an added benefit in stormy weather: “I’ll tell you right now, if I were in that area and a tornado warning came up on my radio, that’s the building I’d go to. Nothing will happen to it; it’s solid concrete. You couldn’t drive a Mack truck through that building,” Smith said with a laugh. Call them opinionated, but Looi and Ha had two firm requirements for August Moon’s interior design: “The first thing they said to me was ‘No dragons, and no red.’ They didn’t want any of the Chinese restaurant clichés.” Instead, Smith chose three shades of soft gray-green, based on a decorator’s theory that green both soothes and stimulates the appetite. Playing on the natural surroundings of the building, they used wood and copper as natural elements, with a limestone-look tile floor to create a feeling that’s in touch with nature. For contrast, color highlights stand out in Looi’s favorite color, cobalt blue, and—in spite of the owner’s original concern—a few bright spots of red cloth. “In a way, we created a kind of abstract riff on the red dragon theme,” Smith said. “We had to make the pennies squeal, but the effect is spectacular when you’re surrounded by those gray-green walls, looking out the windows, seeing a solid wall of green,” she said. “And of course, there’s a small rock garden in the entrance.” The rock-garden concept was carried over to the new Asiatique, which opened in a completely renovated building on Bardstown Road earlier this year. When Looi and co-owner Pabs Sembillo began talking to Smith about their plans for Asiatique, they were torn between renovating the restaurant’s

original location on Sears Avenue in St. Matthews or finding a new space. When they found the Bardstown Road location, “it was a vacant storage area that had originally been a dairy and was in very poor condition. But it was a multistory building, and that was one of the things they wanted, so they were very excited.” But when they analyzed the construction costs, budget and business plan, she said, initial budget estimates were “terrifying.” It would literally have been less expensive to build a new building on a vacant site. “But they wanted to be in the Bardstown Road area, and you’re very limited in that area in what you can purchase.” Asiatique’s fine-dining mission added to the expense. “They wanted a polished restaurant with a big-city feel.They wanted you, as the patron, to not really know you were in Louisville, Kentucky, when you stepped through the doors. … They wanted to create a restaurant for special occasions. So that’s what we went for: more intimate spaces, broken up so you’re not there to see and be seen, but to have your own personal, private space. They wanted it to be a date destination, and I think they’ve done that. They’ve gotten a more varied response from the people who come in than they’d ever imagined, but I believe they are getting the people they were targeting, the special-occasion people, so I think we were successful.” But, she said, renovating an old building was challenging. “Renovations are probably the most difficult things any architect can get involved with, because you have to reverse-engineer everything that was done. And this building—it looked like a bomb had gone off in it. … During the process of demolition … we would find holes in the wall we hadn’t expected and we would take advantage of those maybe by putting a cabinet there. So there are some surprising elements. A lot of times, I was running back to fight with the drawings, adjusting things to fit a new-found spot, and changing things because we couldn’t get through an area.” “In August Moon, we designed the kitchen and then fit the restaurant around it,” Smith recalled. “In Asiatique we didn’t have that opportunity, because we had a finite building. So the kitchen is on two levels because we couldn’t fit everything we needed on one level. Every time I met with them, I brought my sketch paper, and we’d sketch and trace, talk, sketch and trace


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At top left, booths and tables at Asiatique carry out a bold color scheme, while lighting creates a focal point at its curved glass bar (top right). More bold colors highlight another dining room (near right), and a striking light columnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Doric proportions highlight a corridor (far right). At bottom, sunny colors light up the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s popular downstairs lounge.

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some more until we agreed that we’d found something that worked. I find that designing in front of the client really helps the process work more quickly and helps them express themselves; with something this specialized it doesn’t work any other way.” When it came to designing that two-level kitchen, Looi was extremely analytical, Smith recalled. “We sketched what we thought would work; he threw it back to us a few times, and eventually we found what we wanted. Looi chose

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instance, we have light columns going throughout. Well, the size of those light columns, believe it or not, is based on columns through history in terms of their width and height.Their proportions exactly follow the Doric column proportions; so even though in one way they’re totally off the wall—they’re not anything anybody would imagine as a column—they create comforting reference points and help create sizes, shapes and volumes of space that are in human scale.

bartenders. It has no underneath parts or legs, so it’s perfect for a wheelchair, and it’s in the most open area of the whole bar, so it’s very comfortable.” Oddly, Smith favors traditional architecture.“I live in a ‘50s-style ranch,” she said. “And when I’m just dreaming stuff up on my own, I naturally gravitate toward traditional forms and structures. But when I’m working with a client, I think of myself as the hand that’s trying to accomplish the client’s vision.”

“Another example of our philosophy is the curved glass bar at Asiatique. We didn’t really have enough room to put that in, we knew; we designed it too big for its space. But we wanted to give a sense of busyness and activity even when there were only a few people in there. And we wanted that almost water effect that the bar gives.We wanted a visual focal point that reinforced the light coming back from the liquor bottles. And we wanted a sculptural effect, which conceals the fact that the bar also has a crowdcontrol function. “We tried to think of every possible scenario, because we want patrons to come back; once they’ve been there, we want them to say, ‘You know, I was really comfortable there.’ So when we were designing the bar to be accessible for people using wheelchairs, we created a space that could also serve as a gate for the

The Elements of Dining Room Design

The comfortable design of Ditto’s Grill allows plenty of room for guests to pass through.

everything he wanted, very specifically; then we bid the equipment among four different vendors. Since nobody in this area puts in tremendous wok stoves, he called a company in San Francisco, ordered his stove, and had it shipped in. Looi’s stoves are enormous seven-hole woks that are seven or eight feet long.” Asiatique’s color scheme is bold because the restaurant caters to a “more vibrant, almost night-clubby crowd.” Even the rock garden is different, with bright red and black rocks rather than soft gray. The restaurant’s design is a seditious mixture of progressive and traditional elements. “You have to temper the minimalism,” said Smith. “People don’t want to go into a perfectly crisp box.You want to have some feeling and life around you. I like to work with the classic rhythms and forms that come through in architecture from the Greeks and Romans. At Asiatique, for 32 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

Chef Frank Yang, co-owner of Ditto’s Grill, divides the process of diningroom design into two parts: first, form and function; second, intrinsic values like comfort, touch, feel and esthetics. Decisions about form and function, he says, are based on a calculated process. Ditto’s is a case in point.“We wanted three tables in a row because that forms one station. And we wanted a certain corridor width so that people could comfortably pass one another on their way to the tables or to the bathrooms. The analytical part includes equations, like I might need 4,000 square feet in the front for 120 seats and another 3,000 in the back of the house for the kitchen. Then you start talking what are the qualities you’re looking for: open kitchen, closed kitchen, open or closed


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bar, and the theme of the restaurant, and so forth. “The second element in design includes the intrinsic values: comfort, space, touch and feel.Those also tie in with the theme and qualities of the restaurant, what a guest looks for in a restaurant. They’re driven by what the restaurant wants to be, and how you want to respond to customer perceptions. In the corporate world, for instance, suppose that you’re designing a chain of Italian restaurants. There are basically three types of Italian restaurants: there’s the countr yside restaurant; the modern, cutting-edge restaurant, very modernistic, and there’s a third kind based on Mediterranean design. “You might do various renderings of buildings, and then use focus groups, made up of people from the demographic you want to serve, and ask them what the images conjure up for them and whether they’d go into particular buildings. Do they find the building inviting? How do they feel about the color? What would you expect to find inside? Then you might show them menus and price points, and ask them whether the building matches their expectations. Everything has to be consistent with the guest’s expectations, from the colors and size of the room to the lighting, to the look of the staff, to the menu itself.” Houston Jones, whose full-service restaurant consulting firm, The Houston Group (www.thehoustongroup.net), has worked with area restaurants, including ZaZoo’s, the old Zephyr Cove, Olive’s On Fourth and the new Chick Inn, reinforced Yang’s point.“In the final analysis,” said Jones, “it comes down to the five senses. Everything that people see, feel, hear, touch and taste should be consistent. Customers are checking a restaurant out before they even get to the front door, so everything from the curb to the plate has to be consistent. Logos, colors, fixtures, the finish on the tables, the light fixtures, the design of the menu, all these things have to match. And they have to be realistically tied to the price structure, the theme of the restaurant and the target market. There’s a difference between a diner and fine dining, and that difference comes through in everything.” Identifying and focusing on a target market can be one of the most challenging aspects of planning a new restaurant, said Jones. More than a few restaurateurs are chefs who’ve been employed in other restaurants and are making their first foray

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As seen in this photo montage, J. Alexander’s is a rarified philosophical riff on levels of comfort, with emphasis on using local materials that fit graciously into the surroundings.

into the business. They may be clearly focused on a culinary style, but not so clear on whom they’re going to attract. For Yang, identifying the target market is the most important step. And it’s not a simple matter of establishing price points. Rather, it’s a nuanced analysis of many factors, including age, income, family composition, marital status, occupation, geographic location and more.“It’s really an entire lifestyle analysis,” said Yang. “Lifestyle is the major driver in how people use restaurants. And some people have extremely varied lifestyles. Over the course of the week, or even a single day, people’s lives can be quite varied. A person in a white-collar job, for instance, may eat a very formal lunch, not only in what is discussed at the table, but formal in terms of dress and menu. Almost certainly that meal will involve knife-and-fork foods. “Later in the day, when that person goes home, the meal may be more casual. Maybe something from the grill; maybe he or she cooks, or goes out with a spouse or partner for a special-occasion dinner, or to 34 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

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the country club or to a bar for snacks. On a weeknight, busy people may just improvise their dining, and convenience may be the priority. But on weekends, people tend to plan their dining. If they’re going to Morton’s, they’re going to order a steak or lobster and drop some dollars. In that case, everybody is going to the table with the same purpose. But when a family is eating out during the week, maybe after picking up the kids at a soccer game, people are more flexible and varied in what they’re looking for.” Those lifestyle choices are reflected in the details of restaurant design and furnishings, said Yang. “Chippendale chairs suggest formal dining; ladder-back chairs are more casual. There’s a continuum of design, and you have to decide where you fit on that continuum and select things that match. Chairs, for instance, are very restrictive. You have to sit a certain way. Booths are comfortable and friendly. You can put your feet up, and it’s more relaxing. But you won’t see booths in a formal dining room, because everybody is dressed in a suit and tie; the server pulls the chair out for you. Chairs lend themselves to formal service, serving from the left, pulling from the right, and serving drinks.”

Lifestyle choices play out in thematic ways as well. Some themes are obvious: Ethnic and regional menus— Mexican, Italian, Chinese or whatever— almost demand certain design elements. But from a design standpoint, every restaurant has a theme, even if it isn’t as explicit as an Australian steakhouse or a French bistro. The theme can simply be a certain level of finish. In the case of chef-owned restaurants, the theme is often unique to a single location. But restaurant groups and chains often emphasize the brand identity of their restaurants, through layouts, colors and fixtures down to the last detail (the gold in every McDonald’s arch is the same hue). But not all chains are alike. An exception is J. Alexander’s, which operates 27 restaurants around the country, including a Louisville property. Lonnie J. Stout II, the firm’s chairman, president and CEO, said, “Most groups that operate multiple restaurants emphasize sameness. We emphasize difference. Most restaurant groups want exactly the same trade dress inside the restaurant. They choose a color scheme and essentially make every restaurant look the same. Our philosophy is quite different. We believe we’re a


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collection of restaurants; in essence we’re the most ‘unchain’ of any restaurant group that operates multiple restaurants under the same name. “We use a host of different design approaches. We don’t build one footprint, like a lot of multiple restaurant operators. We do tend to use Craftsman-style architecture, Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired. Our Louisville design is in that genre.” J. Alexander’s follows Wright’s emphasis on using local materials and fitting graciously into the surroundings. “Our designs fit the environment where we build,” said Stout. “For instance, we have a restaurant in the Somerset Collection mall in Troy, Michigan. That’s a very upscale mall area, and the design is appropriate for a big urban area. Louisville, on the other hand, is a transitional city. It’s Southern but it’s not Southern. It’s Northern but it’s not Northern. The city is a blend of characteristics, and we think the restaurant matches that.” When it comes to branding, J. Alexander’s uses none of the usual tactics. “What brands our restaurants,” said Stout, “is the guests feel that they’re eating in an upscale environment rather than in an ordinary casual restaurant. Our tabletops have a furniture finish—almost everything in the restaurants is furniture-grade material.We use real materials that you can actually feel; there’s nothing artificial or faux about what we have. We use all original artwork in each restaurant. When a guest looks at the materials, textures, the lighting systems, the colors and the individual table lighting, it starts to all come together as if someone has tried to create an environment for your pleasure. “You might find mahogany or walnut or brazil wood. … You’ll see some restaurants have terrazzo floors; others

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have stained tile; one has a porous Italian tile floor. In terms of color schemes, there is no single color.We use red, burgundy, black, blue or whatever seems appropriate in a particular environment. Even the look from the curb is varied in terms of building design and materials. And there the goal is to be consistent with the area where we’re building, so in Chicago we use a lot of brick; in Florida we use stucco. We always try to tie into local materials. “So the theme, the brand, is more about substance than surface. And that carries over to our food preparation. We don’t use a commissary; all our food is prepared right in the restaurant. If you’re eating tortilla chips, they were made in the restaurant.The only point of similarity among our restaurants is the kitchen itself, which is consistently designed for a four-person line, so our culinary teams can feel comfortable operating in any of our locations.” Where J. Alexander’s theme is a rarified philosophical riff on levels of comfort, most restaurateurs look for more explicit identifying factors. Houston Jones argues that for the independent, chefowned restaurant, it’s crucial to identify a “point of difference,” a unique identifying factor that stands out from the competition.That might be as simple, say, as deciding to serve a hamburger on an English muffin, an innovation that the Bristol Bar & Grille introduced to Louisville a quarter of a century ago. Or it might be more personal. And it will almost certainly be less expensive than finishing a room in mahogany. Havana Rumba, a Cuban restaurant that recently opened on Sears Avenue, is a case in point. Fernando Martinez, whose resume includes stints at Ernesto’s and Salsa South Beach, dreamed of opening his own place for nearly a decade. As he was saving the

dollars to bring his dream to reality, he was also collecting artifacts that would give his place the ring of authenticity. “We wanted the restaurant to look like a real Cuban restaurant,’ said Martinez. “For a long time we’ve been saving the cigar stamps they put on cigar boxes. We got those from Havana, and when we had saved enough to open the business, we went to The Dine Company (a local supplier of restaurant equipment) and they helped us find a factory in Indiana who put the stamps on tables and covered them with a clear finish. So the tables look like cigar boxes. “My dad still lives in Cuba, so he would go to art fairs and take digital pictures of paintings and send them to us. Then we would choose the ones we liked and he would send them to us. So we have artwork from Havana and drums on the walls, and paintings of different places in Cuba. For our chairs, we went to Miami and got authentic Cuban taburetes; they’re leather and hardwood and have a kind of Spanish look. My brother-in-law is a civil engineer and he did the drafting and drawing. So we were able to do everything ourselves except actually manufacture the tables.” Furnishings do more than simply create theme, of course. As Frank Yang noted, seating choices are directly linked to a restaurant’s “finish level” or feeling of luxury. But they also are related to the kind of food a restaurant serves. “Certain companies want fast turnover,” said Yang. “They don’t put any padding in their seats, because they don’t want you too comfortable. Other restaurants accomplish the Havana Rumba gains an authentic Cuban feeling from owner Fernando Martinez’s sensitive use of Cuban drums and art, cigarbox labels on the tables (center) and genuine leather taburetes chairs (right) from Miami.


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same thing in other ways without discomfort; they drive turnover with faster service, for example, by designing the menu so that delivering food to the table requires 10 minutes instead of 20 minutes.” Of course budgetary constraints and priorities can drive furniture choices as well. In the experience of designer Giampaolo Bianconcini, “Restaurants don’t like to spend on chairs. But if you buy a chair that is going to crack down after six months, it’s ridiculous, so you have to let them know you can’t really go cheap there.We usually don’t have a big budget on chairs, so you have to figure out which is the best chair for the look you want to create.” An added complexity of modern restaurant design is the legal requirement under the Americans With Disabilities Act. Under this 14-year-old federal law, restaurants and other businesses that serve the public must eliminate barriers that prevent access to customers with physical disabilities. For Yang, welcoming all kinds of patrons is one of the keys to hospitality. “If you are inviting people into your home,” he said, “you naturally want them to be as comfortable and welcome as possible. To the extent that we can eliminate barriers, we’re less discriminating, and that’s the goal.” In new construction, he said, ADA standards are simple, and stringent: There should be no barriers to wheelchair access in any part of the restaurant. If the bar is elevated, for instance, it must be accessible via a ramp or other means. “But most independents are not dealing with new construction. They’re working in existing spaces,” he added. Building in access can be difficult, with challenges ranging from multiple steps at the entrance to restrooms too small to accommodate wheelchairs. “During the design stage it’s very important to consider

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these things very carefully,” he said. “In my experience it’s best to use an architect to ensure that you’re meeting the standards, but some independents can’t afford that.” Louisville’s Metrosweep organization, which has filed numerous lawsuits against local restaurants and other businesses over lack of wheelchair access, says the cost of accessibility is often overstated, and that the ADA requires changes only if they are “readily achievable.” But simple measures—adding a ramp, using a different door as a main entrance or even simply putting up a sign directing patrons to the accessible entrance—may get the job done at relatively low cost while avoiding exposure to litigation.

Light, Color,Texture and Sound At Havana Rumba, the colors are as vibrant as a sun-dappled Caribbean beach. Of all the tools a designer can use, none is more powerful than color. And perhaps none is as mysterious. Martin Alan Hirsch, whose firm, Decorative Finishes Studio, has done decorative painting for restaurants like Chef ’s Table, the old Steam, Fire & Ice, Mezzaluna (now Alameda) and the Uptown Café, as well as corporate and professional offices, said, “Psychological studies show that the same endorphins kick in when you’re dining as when you’re having sex. And when people dine in restaurants, art and wall colors kick in the brain and enhance the experience. That’s why restaurants hang art on the wall.” Then he added with a chuckle, “Of course, most restaurants don’t hang art on the ceiling.” In themed restaurants, like Havana Rumba, the choices may be simple, but choosing color is not always a simple matter. For Frank Yang, the variables can be

straightforward or nuanced. “Yes, if you’re a Caribbean restaurant, you’re not going to use muted colors,” he said. “And if you’re a sandwich shop or a lunch-driven operation, you’re not going to use subdued colors. Color establishes who you are. Just as the choices you make when you dress are conscious—you decide to wear houndstooth or sharkskin suits for a reason, or choose your eyeglasses for a reason—the colors you choose have a reason as well. If you want fast turnover in a restaurant, you don’t use soothing colors. If you want to be perceived as traditional, or as trendy and upscale, those fashion choices will drive the colors you choose.” Giampaolo Bianconcini, a designer with the firm Ewald Design Associates, has put his artistic stamp on fine restaurants like Z’s Oyster Bar & Steakhouse, Porcini and the Bristol Bar & Grille as well as fondly remembered eateries, including Allo Spiedo, Deitrich’s, the Savoy and Myra’s. He’s now working on a redesign of Saffron’s. Bianconcini grew up in Florence, Italy, and graduated from the art institute there, where he specialized in textiles. He married a Louisvillian and came here in 1967. When it comes to choosing colors, he says, “It’s intuitive mostly. If you look at the restaurants I’ve designed, they’re all different; I never repeat a color. The Bristol has used some consistent colors since the beginning, because those colors link all the restaurants together. For instance, that dark green color—we started using that when we did the first one, so we usually use some of the green in all their restaurants because it’s characteristic of the Bristol. “On the rest, I go by instinct mostly. I will ask the owners whether they have colors they like or colors they have in


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mind, but most of the time I’m just using my imagination. People say I have a good sense of color, and I guess I do. And I think that if you have a good sense of color, you can use almost any color. People will say that you shouldn’t use certain colors in restaurants, but I don’t believe that. I think if you control the colors, you can use almost any color; it all depends on how you use it. “For example, at Z’s I used a blue color that I never thought to use before. I was thinking about water; they serve a lot of fish there. So I say,‘Water? Why not blue?’ Sometimes it hits you in different ways. I try to create a contrast in color; I’m not trying to use black and white, but there’s some contrast. And you can use colors to make a room look deeper or longer.” Bianconcini is also highly sensitive to lighting choices. “Light is very, very important in restaurants. You have to be very careful how you use light. I use a lot of dimmer. I like accent lights once in a while, on the table; I usually use a recess light or a pendant light; once in a while I put an accent light, maybe on the corner, or on a table or on the bar.The goal is to create different kinds of light and mood, and to var y the look through the restaurant. “Lighting is an area where over the last five years there has been a lot of technological evolution in what you can do. There are computerized lighting systems where you set up the lights so that as the outside light changes, the inside lighting adjusts. I haven’t used that in any restaurants yet, but I’ve done some residential houses that way. Windows are always calculated, of course, but sometimes you can’t change the windows because you’re working with an existing building.”

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In one of Bianconcini’s recent projects, lighting was used to create extraordinary design effects. “During the design of the Bristol’s new downtown location,” he said, “I happened to go into Glassworks and saw this curved element in glass, and I thought, ‘We should do something with that.’ We worked with them to create something we could use for the curved glass accents on the partitions, and we came up with a unique lighting scheme that has a uniquely local feel.” Glass is something of an emerging theme in Bianconcini’s work; at Z’s, for instance, he played on the restaurant’s seafood orientation by deploying a spectacular array of aquariums. Like Stout, of J. Alexander’s, Bianconcini creates comfort by using rich materials. “At Z’s we wanted to create a very elegant place, so we used a lot of wood and very rich colors. That was the main thing; the bar is nice, mahogany, and all over the restaurant is mahogany. The walls there are very plain, but the wood makes it very interesting. “At the downtown Bristol, we used a different wood to create a more contemporary feel; the walls are very plain, the colors add interest, and the use of ar t adds to the effect. At Porcini, we wanted to create a rustic Italian feel, so I found an old door and some old wrought iron at Architectural Salvage on Broadway. If we can find things in town, it adds to the atmosphere.” Textures, colors and thematic materials in the restaurant are becoming ever more critical to diners, says Martin Alan Hirsch, a decorative artisan who is deeply attuned to these elements.“Sept. 11 had a big impact on this,” he said. “Because the world is so screwed up, this notion of cocooning has become very important to

people.They want their homes, businesses, restaurants and everything to feel more comfortable and safe. So people felt an impulse to surround themselves with things that feel more permanent. … They want their surroundings to evoke design ideas that have been around for centuries.” So, for example, when Alameda Southwest Grill briefly undertook a theme and personality change to Mezzaluna Tuscan Grill (it recently returned to its original concept), management asked Hirsch to help create a comfortable Northern Italian feel. “In Tuscany, sandstone, limewash walls are very popular,” he said. “They build cafés around them, and those walls have been up for centuries. That creates a very permanent, stable feeling. We decided we could do that in faux right over the top of the existing walls, using the new acrylic products … So we were able to make the inside of that building look just like the outside of our building, which is real mortar. “When the Chef ’s Table decided to move to Old Louisville, they wanted to know what they could do cool in the new location. Well, they were going to put in a winery, so we decided to do some old brick—the kind of thing you’d find in an old winery basement. We wanted to create a broken plaster effect and embed some posters in so they’d look as if they’ve been covered up and then exposed again—the kind of things you’d find in an old winery in Europe, and that’s where the ideas came from.” Creative glass design at Louisville’s Glassworks inspired designer Giampaolo Bianconcini to these creative flights of fancy at the Bristol Bar & Grille Downtown. Light fixtures in the dining room (opposite page and in close-up below) are works of art. More artful glass is found over the bar (center).


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A

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R E T U R N

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38 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com


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Hirsch’s work is with faux decorative painting, but he’s an advocate of good design in general. “A lot is going on now with the brushed and sanded aluminum and stainless steel. Places like Asiatique and Sapporo are examples. A lot of sushi bars use sanded metal because it’s reflective and will color from wherever else color is in the place. It’s cool to have sanded steel or stainless steel. That’s going to pick up the reflective image of a sushi-grade ahi tuna or salmon. That kind of effect is very important. … It’s a good example of texture and the importance of texture.” Even if the colors and textures are perfect, bad acoustics can ruin a dining experience.When Bianconcini was starting out, he learned that a hushed dining experience isn’t always what the restaurateur desires. “One of the first restaurants I ever worked on was W.W. Cousins off Breckenridge Lane,” he recalled. “I was trying to make a more quiet space, and the owners said, ‘No, we want it very noisy.’ Being noisy made the restaurant seem more busy, so they actually piped noise through speakers to create the atmosphere they wanted. I’m not kidding. It works for them.” “Of course, in a higher-end restaurant, we use acoustic tiles and carpet to absorb the sound. One of the hardest restaurants I ever worked on was Deitrich’s. It had been the old Crescent Theater, so it was a very wide, long space. It was very difficult to get the acoustics right because we had a tile ceiling, but we did a good job.” From the romance of flickering candlelight to the brutish practicality of handling grease-laden vapors, the contemporary restaurant is a remarkable blend of architecture and psychology, engineering and commerce, aesthetics and practicality. In the end, a restaurant’s design is a multifaceted answer to myriad questions about the intersection between fundamental human needs and aspirations. In every case, the answers involve a mix of necessity and invention, calculation and imagination. The final test for the designer and restaurateur is whether we feel comfortable in a restaurant, whether the spaces around us work together to soothe, invigorate and uplift us, or whether they clash with our expectations and foster worry and unease. And as we dine, it is the alignment of sensory impressions, of sight, sound, smell, touch and taste, that finally lets us know that everything is just right. F&D www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Fall 2004 39


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CORK 101 By Robin Garr

Traditionally, a visit to a winery suggests a trip to the countryside, whether it’s a short ride across the Ohio to the Huber’s Orchard & Winery, or a long flight to the wine country in California or France. Think of a winery, and most of us will visualize a rural scene: an old-fashioned stucco building, maybe, surrounded by rows of vineyards. But the hottest winery action in our town these days doesn’t look much like this traditional image. Two active new artisanal Louisville wineries are operating in thoroughly urban facilities that resemble small industrial operations more than farms. Felice Vineyards set up shop last winter in an 1870s-vintage storefront at 829 E. Market St., in the hear t of Louisville’s growing arts district east of downtown. Meanwhile, In Town Winery & River Bend Winery, which started bottling fine wine in 2002 on Baxter Avenue, has moved to new quarters at 120 S. 10th St., where it will open a public tasting room in November. Both wineries are attracting positive critical reviews for their wines, which can— and do—stand competition with more familiar labels on local restaurant wine lists and liquor-store shelves. And both defy the conventional wisdom by breaking the traditional close connection between the winery and the vineyard: They acquire most of the grapes used in their wine from brokers in other states, primarily California. Jeff Tatman, who is co-owner of Felice Vineyards with his wife, Anna, said he began commercial production three years

Hot Town … Wineries in the City

ago with three tons of California grapes, then expanded last year to 15 tons, enough to fill more than 10,000 wine bottles. This year in September, 23 tons of grapes from vintage 2004—a full truckload of red grapes plus a smaller batch of whites— came rolling up to the winery’s door. “When it gets in, all hell breaks loose,” Tatman said with a laugh. To avoid premature natural fermentation, the grapes are kept refrigerated at near-freezing temperatures during the long haul from Monterey County (with a printout temperature graph to prove it). But once the grapes arrive, they must quickly be crushed and their juice piped into Felice’s four 1,500-gallon fermenting vats without delay. This hands-on process kept Tatman and a crew of helpers busy from 6 a.m. until midnight on the day the grapes arrived, followed by another session to tie up loose ends at 5 a.m. the next day. Tatman says he discovered that wine making is hard work when he learned the trade more than 20 years ago from Anna’s father, Felice Cristofoli, in whose memory the winery is named. This year’s vintage will yield both white wines (Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Semillon and Chenin Blanc) and reds (Zinfandel, Syrah, Merlot, Cabernet and a bit of Chianti-style Sangiovese), which will ferment, then “sleep” in oak barrels in the winery basement for months or even years before they go on sale. The 2004 whites may be ready by next spring, Tatman said; he’ll hold the reds longer because they benefit from greater age. Felice wines sell in the range of $15 to $20, depending on the grape variety.

They’re popular on the wine list at Melillo’s Italian restaurant, which shares space in the redeveloped “Piazza di Felice” complex, and are also available in a few other local restaurants and wine shops. Felice’s winery and tasting room is formally open Fridays from 4 to 10 p.m. and Saturdays from 1 to 6 p.m., but Tatman is often in the building and will open for customers on request on weekdays. In Town Winery, which we’ll cover in more depth in a coming edition, attracted local attention with a popular wine created in partnership with a prominent local sports figure: It’s an Italian-style, Californiagrown white labeled in red and named “Pitino Grigio.” Following up on this success, another label series is planned in partnership with golfer Fuzzy Zoeller. In Town wines are sold at The Chef ’s Table and other local restaurants and wine shops, where some of their varietal wines bear the label River Bend, and others Sud de la Rivière (“South of the River”), featuring a color photo of the Louisville skyline at night. In Town’s president and wine master is Leonard Olson, a respected figure in Eastern U.S. wine making with more than 30 years’ experience; he helped start one of Michigan’s first wineries,Tabor Hill, in 1972. Felice’s Tatman, who owned a farm in Henry County for many years, said he’s glad he decided to put his winery in the heart of the urban area.“If they’re going to buy one bottle of wine, most people aren’t going to drive 35 miles out in the country to do that. But I’ve got 50,000 people passing by here every day. All I need to do is come up with a reason for them to stop in.” F&D PHOTO BY DAN DRY

Felice Vineyards winemaker Jeff Tatman gets his nose into his work in the winery’s barrel room.


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New Fall Hours

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HIP HOPS Autumn Harvest By Roger A. Baylor

Ask Joe Six-Pack about beer, and he’ll tell you that it’s for drinking. For me, beer is for thinking—then drinking. Think about it. Beer encompasses vast territories of human endeavor, providing us with a joyful mirror of human diversity. Beer incorporates elements of cultural history and physical geography, and it celebrates the fruitful marriage of science and the creative arts. But at its most elemental, beer is an agricultural product inexorably linked to the four seasons, and as such, it provides a tasty antidote to our climate-controlled, homogenized and sterile workaday world. That is, if you think outside the Bud. Of all the seasons, autumn holds a place of special affection for the knowledgeable beer lover. It’s a time of year redolent of waning summer heat, a hint of chill in the air and most important, the totemic conclusion of the harvest. Indeed, during no other season of the year do we find so much of the preindustrial origins of brewing to be celebrated as in autumn. Before refrigeration, summer was too hot for brewing—fermentation runs

amok in summer heat—so brewers in places like Bavaria learned to plan ahead. Brewing ceased in late spring, but not before large stocks of beer were brewed for storage (“lagering”) in cool cellars and caves. The beer was tapped and served throughout summer, until active brewing resumed in October following the malt and hop harvests. Autumnal harvest festivals called for special beers, often brewed as early as March (in German,“Marz,” so the beer was called “Märzen”) and lagered for six months. A seasonal style was born. The copper color of today’s Märzen is the result of evolution. Amber malts introduced by the 19th-century Viennese brewer Anton Dreher first were used in his signature Vienna-style beers, then adopted by Bavarian brewers. In time, Märzen beers came to be closely identified with the tawny lagers tapped at Munich’s famous Oktoberfest. These autumn lagers are not strongly hoppy like the famous Pilsner style; rather, they display the firmness and balance that noble continental hops like Hallertauer yield. The characteristically clean Märzen/Oktoberfest flavor showcases rich malt flavors of toffee and caramel.The

alcoholic strength is in the range of 5.5% to 6% alcohol by volume, slightly higher than that of everyday golden lagers or pilsners. It’s no surprise that these beers make an ideal accompaniment to the foods devoured at German-theme festivals throughout the world, particularly grilled chicken and sausages. Not so traditionally, Märzen is delicious with a veggie-loaded meatless pizza. Imported commercial Oktoberfest beers are easiest to find in autumn, although some are brewed year-round. Either way, it pays to be discerning. Northern German brewers like Beck’s and Warsteiner have added lackluster Oktoberfest beers to their portfolios, but these corporate brewers specialize in generic style Euro-lagers, somewhat removed from the Bavarian brewing tradition. Turn instead to the authentic Bavarian beers. Spaten, Paulaner and Hacker-Pschorr, all of Munich, are good introductions to the style, and are usually available at the larger Louisville-area party stores. Better yet is Ayinger Ur-Märzen, brewed at a small, family-owned brewery in the Alpine foothills south of Munich; it tops the Munich brewers for textbook Oktoberfest flavor.

Copper brew kettles at Browning’s Brewery complement the autumnal glow of Oktoberfest and Märzen beers.

PHOTO BY DAN DRY


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Samuel Adams and Goose Island brew representative American Oktoberfeststyle beers, and these may be easier to find than imports at smaller liquor stores. Local microbreweries offering tasty and festive seasonal variations on the Märzen/Oktoberfest theme include Louisville’s Browning’s Brewery (401 E. Main St., in Louisville Slugger Field). Browning’s brewmaster Eileen Martin will celebrate the 2004 harvest with an Oktoberfest-style beer and a pumpkin ale, the latter serving to introduce the contributions of American microbrewers to the autumn beer-drinking calendar. Thinking and drinking seasonally need not end with the classical Bavarian lagers of autumn. Martin’s use of pumpkin as a flavoring agent originally emerged in (where else?) California with Buffalo Bill’s Pumpkin Ale, and sightings of the Dogfish Head brewery’s version (and Shipyard’s Pumpkinhead) are expected in the Louisville area this fall. West Coast microbrewers have established another, funkier tradition revolving around the bounty of the harvest—the hops harvest, that is. I first experienced this mouthwatering innovation at the Great American Beer Festival several years ago, when the hit of the evening at the opening VIP reception was Sierra Nevada’s Harvest Ale. In terms of strength and body, this seasonal Sierra Nevada is formulated somewhere above its flagship Pale Ale and below the high alcoholic content of India Pale Ale. But the selling point for the “hophead” is its generous use of harvest-fresh, unprocessed “green” Cascade hops for aroma and flavor. Numerous other micros brew similar harvest ales, but the time-sensitivity of the brewing schedule, limited quantities and a short shelf life all conspire to prevent them from reaching Louisville on any predictable basis. However, Sierra Nevada has sent kegs this way in previous years and should do so again in 2004. Hop-laden harvest ales make ideal session beers (a beer-lover’s term for a brew that you can enjoy on its own in a “session” of beer tasting) yet they also match well with a variety of foods. The citrus-like flavors and aroma of the Cascade hop stack up nicely against TexMex peppers,Thai dishes and Indian curry. Think about it.Then drink it. Happy autumn! F&D

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Party Rooms Available

www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Fall 2004 43


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SPIRITS Vodka By Jerry Slater

The U.S. Treasury Department defines vodka as a neutral spirit “without distinctive character, aroma, taste or color.” So why does my local liquor store have more than 70 varieties? I wondered about this as I cruised the spirits aisle recently, looking for new cocktail inspiration. Not only does vodka outnumber other spirits in variety on the shelf, it tops all sales of spirits in the United States. If vodka is as bland as its federal definition suggests, then why is it so popular? It would be easy to assume that its lack of flavor fits into a consumer market where light beers rule and many people prefer homogenized fast food to authentic regional cuisine. But I think that’s much too simplistic, for a couple of reasons. First, vodka defies the “neutral” or “tasteless” rule. Personally, I lean toward strong flavors in my liquor: I prefer gin to vodka, Bourbon to Cognac, and the Rolling Stones to the Beatles. But friends who regularly partake of the clear liquor say they recognize subtle characteristics that

define their favorite brands. What’s more, vodka producers have marketed their spirits aggressively, elbowing each other for consumer attention with innovative bottles, designs, even added flavors, capturing consumers’ attention more than just about any product other than blue jeans. Indeed, it’s instructive to compare blue jeans and vodka in the marketplace. Excepting a few name brands, jeans vary only slightly in appearance. Their color, cut and material are blue, two-legged and denim, in that order.Yet, like vodka drinkers, jeans wearers tend to be loyal to specific brands, expounding their favorite’s virtues and explaining how it is better than the others. Vodka producers set themselves apart by distillation processes, stylish bottles and inventive marketing campaigns. In the early ’90s, Ketel One launched as the first “triple distilled” vodka. Now competitors have pressed beyond that. Kentucky’s own Rain Vodka distills five times, using organic Indiana corn and passing the distillate through charcoal filters.The goal is smoothness of flavor:The

more times through the still, the fewer impurities remain. While producers of whiskeys talk about their nectar’s colorful shades of flavor, vodka stands as the white palette of the spirits world. It has a clean aesthetic when served alone, and it mixes well with a whole spectrum of flavors. Vodka makers have gone out of their way to appeal to drinkers’ sense of style by packaging the liquor in bottles that evoke the arts. Van Gogh Vodka stands out from the crowd with its tiny portraits by Dutch masters painted on the back of a see-through label. The trademark racing stripe of Hangar 1 evokes the style of a Formula One race car. And in an interesting display of verisimilitude, the Rain bottle is shaped like a single drop of water. One of the newest exhibitionists on the shelf is Effen (yes, say it out loud, Effen Vodka), whose black-and-white rubber coating looks like a Gautier S&M outfit and dares you to pick it up. Well-bred and dressed up nicely, all vodka needed was a public relations campaign to make it a star. Absolut was

PHOTO BY DAN DRY


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so successful with its magazine ads— featuring whimsical one-liners like “Absolutely Chicago” with the letters blowing off the bottle, and designs by such prominent artists as Keith Haring—that New York City school kids used to collect and trade them. In the age of the Internet, vodka brands have spared no expense in building multimedia Websites that serve as brand commercials. Some of the best include Absolut (www.Absolut.com), Grey Goose (www.greygoosevodka.com), and Skyy (www.skyy.com), whose website features its own soundtrack and edgy short films starring the likes of supermodel Claudia Schiffer. Locally Finlandia sponsors a Taste of Derby Bloody Mary Contest each April and simultaneously promotes the Dare to Care charity event, and Finlandia itself as the vodka to use for Derby morning’s second most popular drink. If vodka only pays a place ticket behind Bourbon in Louisville on the first Saturday in May, it remains second to none on drink lists all over the country. Its defined “neutral” character makes vodka the mixer of choice for the new cocktail culture. Although young people are now exploring rum mojitos and whiskey Manhattans, it was the vodkabased cosmopolitan that got everyone drinking out of funny cone-shaped glasses again. As vodka brands compete for more market share, diversification takes the form of new flavors: Flavors like citrus, pepper, vanilla, orange, even strawberry and black cherry have made their way into vodka from such well established brands as Stolichnaya. American producer Hangar 1 tries to appeal to gourmet types by adding exotic ingredients like Buddha’s hand (a type of citrus fruit), Kaffir lime leaf (usually used in Thai cuisine) and orange blossom (using the flowers, not just oils or peel). As a product of Oakland in Northern California, Hangar 1 adds a hint of trendy viognier wine to its product. All these flavors bring us back to a fundamental question: Do flavored vodkas still fit into the definition of a neutral spirit having no aroma, taste or character? Definitions have loosened, it seems; but not sales or loyalty to one’s favorite brand. F&D

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[ menu gems ] Equus

Mushroom Fume By Robin Garr Photographs by Dan Dry

If it’s a gift to be simple, as the Shakers sang, then true simplicity is surely attained in this signature dish that Chef Dean Corbett created when he and his father Jack Corbett bought into Louisville’s fine Equus restaurant nearly 20 years ago. Pure essence of dark, earthy mushrooms borne on a silken base of rich dairy cream, this memorable soup clearly demonstrates that less can be more. It won instant popularity at the then-new restaurant, and has remained a mainstay of the Equus bill of fare ever since. Equus was floundering when the Corbetts bought in after its first six months in business, Dean Corbett said.“Busy trying to eliminate debt left by our first owner, I had to come up with a delicious soup which would not cost an arm and a leg to produce, while utilizing ingredients already on hand.The mushroom fume was born in the never-ending quest for total utilization of all food without sacrificing flavor. It is now our single most popular item.” It’s certainly a longtime favorite in our family—in my reviews of Equus over the years, if I didn’t order it as part of the meal, my wife surely would. Currently $4.50 for a bowl, I described it in my most recent review as a “simple but seductive puree of mushrooms and heavy cream,” and that pretty much covers its style and the recipe. If you’re in a hurry, you can buy Equus mushroom fume in cans (put up at Louisville’s Bloemer’s Foods under Corbett’s direct supervision) at many city gourmet specialty stores, including Campbell’s Gourmet Cottage, Doll’s Market, Burger’s Market, Paul’s Fruit Market, Liquor Barn and Party Outlet.

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But it’s worth the effort to make your own Equus mushroom fume at home. It needs to be fashioned in restaurant-size portions. In the Equus kitchen, it’s made in 100-gallon batches, and Corbett warns that one gallon is the absolute minimum: “I would not suggest cutting the quantity of this soup to any less than one gallon, as you will not achieve the same results. I know—we have tried. The reduction time is too critical in the production of the soup. Bottom line, when

people call and say theirs doesn’t taste the same, it is always due to the lack of long, slow reduction.” Our advice: Make it for a party. Or fashion the dish up to the point where cream is added—completing that critical reduction—then freeze it in portions, and thaw and finish each portion as needed, using a proportional amount of cream and thickening “slurry” to finish each batch. F&D


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Equus Mushroom Fume ____________ 2 pounds fresh white domestic or brown crimini mushrooms 2 pounds white or yellow onions 2 ounces vegetable oil (Corbett uses soy oil) 8 ounces dry red wine 1 gallon water 3 ounces Minor’s brand beef base (available at gourmet shops) 1 quart heavy cream 3 /4 cup arrowroot or cornstarch 3 /4 cup additional dry red wine Mince the mushrooms and the onions—Corbett uses a mix of white and brown plus some portabello or shiitake stems, but notes that it’s not necessary to use expensive wild mushrooms in this dish. In a large stockpot, saute the onions and mushrooms in the vegetable oil over high heat until the onions are translucent, about 5 to 7 minutes. Deglaze with 8 ounces red wine, boiling until the liquid is reduced by half.Add the water and beef base, bring to a full boil, then reduce heat to a slow boil and cook until total volume is reduced by one-third.Add the heavy cream, bring back to a simmer, and thicken with a slurry of either arrowroot or cornstarch and the remaining red wine.The amount of thickener needed will vary, so add a little at a time until you achieve the thickness you desire. As an optional final step, if you want a silken texture like the Equus original, pour the soup through a large strainer (or a restaurant chinois if you have one), pressing all the solids through with the back of a wooden spoon. (Makes one gallon, enough to serve about 16 cups or eight larger bowls of soup.)

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1 2 3 4 5

sauté minced onions and mushrooms over high heat

deglaze with red wine, boil to reduce

add heavy cream

thicken with wine-andcornstarch slurry

press through strainer or chinois

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[ recipe gems ]

beautiful soup

By Robin Garr Photographs by Dan Dry

Soup, beautiful soup. Just as soup inspired Lewis Carroll’s Mock Turtle to burst into song in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, this lovable comfort food inspired Sullivan University instructor-chefs David Moeller and Tom Hickey to flights of culinary fancy in our quarterly recipe challenge. “This time of year, soup is what I like to eat,” Moeller said on a crisp October morning.“I think it’s more mental than anything else—it’s comfort food. It harkens back to when I was young, the kind of thing my mom would make on a winter day: stick-to-your-ribs food.” Not only does soup comfort the soul, Moeller said, but it consoles the pocketbook. You needn’t invest in fancy ingredients to make it, as excellent soup

Chef David Moeller’s hearty beef short rib pot au feu

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Chef David Moeller’s roasted red pepper bisque with tomato red pepper jam

Chef Tom Hickey’s saray corbasi (palace soup)

Chef Tom Hickey’s goulash soup

can be made from leftovers, trimmings, even kitchen scraps. In his days as a chef at Chicago’s popular Bistrot Zinc, he recalled, he rarely had to order ingredients specifically for soup. Asparagus stalks, for instance: The tough lower end of the stalk might be too woody and fibrous to eat; but simmered in soup, it imparts a delicious flavor. “I would use whatever we had on hand,” he said. In tasty testimony, consider Moeller’s Pot au Feu. An ancient French tradition, its name—literally “Pot on the fire”—sums up the recipe, which, pardon the expression, boils down to a rich broth of beef stock and wine, longsimmered with beef and a harvest bounty of vegetables. “It’s an old French technique, using bones to fortify the soup as you cook it,” he explained. “Normally they’ll serve the broth separate from the meat and vegetables.There’s always broth left over, so they use it to start the next pot au feu, and it just keeps getting richer and richer.” “You can call it a soup or a stew,” he added.“I thought of it because of the time of year. It’s getting a little cooler, and you want something hearty—a meal in a bowl—and you can change it any way you want to. But you have to be careful of the time of year. I don’t serve pot au feu in the middle of summer, when you want something lighter.” Like Moeller’s other offering, for instance. More subtle and frankly more luxurious than pot au feu, his roasted red pepper bisque is a refined dish suited for a special occasion. Despite the fancy name, though, Moeller said a bisque is really “just a cream soup, a basic formula to which I add whatever auxiliary flavorings I like.” Bisques are traditionally made with shellfish, but this one offers a stunning vegetarian alternative, rich and velvety, with sweet red bell peppers in place of seafood, enhanced by a sweet-tart tomato and red pepper “jam” that offers a tangy contrast to the richness of the bisque. Chef Tom Hickey offered Saray Corbasi, a Turkish mushroom soup that he discovered during a NATO posting to Turkey years ago. It’s also called palace soup, he said, because in old times, only royalty could afford to import mushrooms, a delicacy that’s not easy to find in Turkey’s hot and arid climate. It would make an intriguing compare-andcontrast with the Equus Mushroom Fume featured in this issue’s Menu Gems. Hickey also presents a hearty Hungarian goulash that he discovered at a student guest house in Heidelberg, Germany. It’s a restaurant-size portion meant to feed a crowd, and he doesn’t recommend cutting it down by more than half; but it freezes beautifully, he said.

‘‘

beautiful soup, so rich and green, waiting in a hot tureen! who for such dainties would not stoop? soup of the evening, beautiful Soup!

’’

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Beef short rib Pot au Feu SERVES ABOUT 8-10

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Note: any other vegetables should be added according to the cooking time neededâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; longer for potatoes, less for summer squash, for example 11. Add mustard, being careful not to tear the meat apart. 12. Add the pearl onions and mushrooms and heat through. 13. Season with salt and pepper.

1 pound bacon, diced Vegetable oil 5 pounds beef short ribs 2 medium Spanish onions, peeled and diced large 2 carrots, peeled and diced large Chef David Moeller 4 stalks celery cut into 11/2inch sections Roasted Red Pepper Bisque with 1 bottle full-bodied red wine Tomato and Red Pepper Jam (Cabernet or Shiraz, for example) S ERVES ABOUT 10-12 1 1 /2 gallons rich veal or beef stock (itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best to have a little extra on hand to For the bisque: replace any that boils away) 2 sticks (8 ounces) unsalted butter 2 sprigs fresh thyme 1 Spanish onion, peeled and diced 1 1 /2 pounds carrots diced large or small tournĂŠed (cut into large â&#x20AC;&#x153;football6-8 red bell peppers, roasted, peeled, shapedâ&#x20AC;? cubes) seeded and diced (canned roasted Any other vegetables desired (such red peppers may be substituted) as potatoes, squash, etc.) 1 cup flour 1 cup grainy Dijon mustard 1 gallon chicken stock (vegetable 1 pound peeled pearl onions, stock may be substituted for a fully caramelized (browned in a sautĂŠ pan vegetarian dish) in a little oil) 11/2 quarts heavy cream 2 pounds mushrooms, quartered and Salt and white pepper roasted Salt and pepper 1. Melt the butter in a large pot. Add the onion and â&#x20AC;&#x153;sweatâ&#x20AC;? until translucent; do 1. Cook bacon until crisp in a large not brown. shallow pot. (A French rondeau, with a 2. Add the diced roasted red peppers. broad, flat base and straight sides, is ideal, 3. Add flour and stir or whisk to form a but any wide, deep pot will do.) Remove smooth roux. bacon, leaving fat in the pot. 4. Add chicken stock in four portions, 2. Add enough vegetable oil to the bacon taking care to avoid forming lumps. fat to just cover the bottom of the pot. 5. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and 3. Season the short ribs with salt and cook until starch flavor is gone. pepper and sear them in the hot fat. 6. Add heavy cream and stir until itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4. Remove any excess fat from the pot. smoothly incorporated. 5. Add the diced onions, carrots and 7. Season with salt and pepper. celery (this combination is called a 8. Strain the soup, reserving the liquid; mirepoix) and sautĂŠ. puree the peppers and onions and 6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deglazeâ&#x20AC;? by pouring in the red wine reincorporate into the liquid. Note: for a and boiling quickly, scraping the bottom of more velvety soup, strain again through a the pot; then add the beef stock. fine mesh chinois or, if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this 7. Add fresh thyme and bring to a low cone-shaped restaurant tool, use a large simmer. kitchen strainer lined with muslin or cheese8. Continue to simmer until meat is fork cloth, pressing the soup through with the tender. back of a wooden spoon; discard any 9. Carefully remove meat from the pot. tough or fibrous bits that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go through. Strain out the mirepoix, reserving the liquid 10. Place the liquid and meat back in the For the jam: 1 shallot, minced pot and add tournĂŠed carrots.


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1 red bell pepper, diced small (remove seeds and ribs) 2 tablespoons Champagne vinegar 1 tomato, peeled, seeded and diced Granulated sugar to taste 1. Lightly sauté minced shallot; do not brown. 2. Add diced pepper and sauté. 3. Deglaze with vinegar and cook until the liquid is “reduced” to a thick syrup. 4. Add tomato and stir to incorporate. 5. Add sugar to taste and reduce to syrup consistency. 6. Chill and reserve for service. ________________________________ Saray Corbasi (Palace Soup) SERVES ABOUT 4-6 21/2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons flour 21/2 cups chicken stock 1 pound button mushrooms 5 egg yolks 1 cup heavy cream 1 cup white wine 1 /4 teaspoon white pepper 1 teaspoon celery salt

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5. Just before service add the wine and herbs and simmer for 1-2 minutes. 6. Serve with buttered croutons or Parmesan straws.

CLUB GROTTO AMERICAN BISTRO

Goulash Soup SERVES ABOUT 10-12 51/2 ounces bacon, chopped 1 pound onion, diced 5 cloves garlic, minced 21/2 pounds beef tenderloin, butt, coarsely chopped 4 tablespoons Hungarian paprika (sweet or hot will work; Hickey likes it hot because it adds “a little kick” to the flavor) 5 level tablespoons white flour 51/2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 gallon brown stock Make a sachet by tying the next five ingredients into a small piece of cheesecloth:

/2 teaspoon caraway seeds 1 bay leaf 1 /2 teaspoon marjoram, flakes Chef Tom Hickey 1 /2 teaspoon fresh thyme, leaves only 1 /2 sprig rosemary 1 pound potatoes, peeled and diced The following herbs should be available at small specialty stores or Asian markets, but may Salt and pepper be left out or substituted with more familiar herbs if you can’t find them: 1. Cook the bacon over low heat. 3 tablespoons garlic chives, finely Remove the bacon, leaving its rendered chopped fat in the pot. 1 tablespoon salad burnet leaves, 2. Raise the heat to medium. Add the chopped onion and garlic and sauté them in the 1 tablespoon lovage leaves, chopped bacon fat until they are light brown. 3. Add the beef and paprika and sauté the 1. Melt one tablespoon of the butter; add mixture briefly. flour and brown slightly. Add stock, a little 4. Add the flour and tomato paste and stir at a time, stirring constantly. them in well. 2. Slice mushrooms in half and sauté in 5. Add the stock and sachet. Bring the the rest of the butter. Add to stock and mixture to a simmer. Simmer for 45 bring to a boil slowly. minutes. 3. Cook for about 40 minutes over low 6. Add the potatoes and continue heat. simmering the soup until they are tender. 4. Mix together egg yolks and heavy 7. Adjust the seasoning to taste with salt cream. Temper with stock (adding a little and pepper on the day of service. stock at a time to the egg and cream mixture so the eggs won’t “cook”), then This soup will have an even better flavor add this mixture, called a “liaison,” to the if it is served on the second day. F&D soup. 1

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dining guide

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Alphabetical Index

ALL RESTAURANTS LISTED ALPHABETICALLY, FOLLOWED BY THE PAGE NUMBER OF ITS REVIEW, IT’S CUISINE STYLE, AND THE CORRESPONDING MAP NUMBER(S).

52

[ ] DENOTES UNMAPPED MULTIPLE LOCATIONS. RESTAURANT

Cuisine Style

56

ASIAN/CHINESE ASIAN/JAPANESE ASIAN/KOREAN ASIAN/THAI ASIAN/VIETNAMESE BAR & GRILL BARBECUE BISTROS CAFÉS CAFETERIAS CAJUN/CREOLE CASUAL DINING COFFEE HOUSE DESSERTS/BAKERY ENTERTAINMENT DINING EUROPEAN/BOSNIAN EUROPEAN/GERMAN EUROPEAN/GREEK EUROPEAN/IRISH EUROPEAN/ITALIAN FINE DINING HOME STYLE COOKING INDIAN INTERNATIONAL LATIN AMERICAN/MEXICAN MICROBREWERIES MIDDLE EASTERN PIZZA SANDWICH/DELI SEAFOOD STEAKHOUSE UPSCALE CASUAL

Area Maps

72 74 74 75 75 70 70 61 57 66 72 62 80 81 80 75 75 76 76 76 56 66 77 77 78 80 80 67 68 61 62 57

82

MAP # DIRECTION PG # Overview 82 (Index) Downtown 84 1 (Downtown Louisville) Near East 85 2 (Highlands – Crescent Hill) East 86 3 (St. Matthews) South East 87 4 (Hikes Point – Buechel) East 88 5 (Hurstbourne N. – Lyndon) South East 89 6 (Hurstbourne S. – Jeffersontown) North East 90 7 (River Rd. – Brownsboro Rd.) North East 90 8 (Westport Rd.) Far East 91 9 (Middletown) North East 91 10 (Prospect) South East 91 11 (Fern Creek) South 92 12 (Airport – Okolona) South West 93 13 (Shively – Pleasure Ridge Park) Indiana 94 14 (New Albany – Floyds Knobs) Indiana 95 15 (Clarksville) Indiana 95 16 (Jeffersonville)

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

2 Hahn’s Mongolian Grill 211 Clover Lane 610 Magnolia A Nice Restaurant Alameda Alley Cat Café Amazing Grace Deli Anchor Inn Angilo’s Pizza Angio’s Restaurant Annie Café Annie’s Pizza Ann’s by the River Another Place Anthony’s Anytimes Apple Annie’s Café Applebee’s Appleby’s Café Arirang Arni’s Pizza Aroma Café Artemisia Asian Buffet Asian Pearl Asiatique Atmosphere Atomic Saucer Atrium Café August Moon Austin’s Avalon Azalea Babby’s Steakhouse Babylon Backyard BBQ Backyard Burger Bahama Breeze Baja Fresh Mexican Grill Bakelicious Bake’s Barbeque The Bakery Bamboo House Bank Shot Billiards Barbara Lee’s Kitchen Baxter Station Bazos Mexican Grill BB’s Chicken & Ribs Bean Street Café Bearno’s Pizza Beef O’Brady’s Beg for More Café Behar Café Bendoya Sushi Bar Benny B’s Bentley’s Big Dave’s Outpost Big Hopp’s Big Subs Binky’s of Chicago Blimpie’s Subs Blue Dog Bakery Blue Mule Sports Café Blue Peppermill Café Bluegrass Brewing Co. Bluegrass Café Bombay Int’l. Market Bonefish Grill Bootleg Barbecue Co. Brandon’s Bar-B-Que Bravo! Breadworks Brick Oven Bristol Bar & Grille Browning’s Brewery Buca Di Beppo Buckhead Mountain Grill Buck’s Buffalo Crossing Buffalo Wild Wings Bull Frog Garden Bulldog Café The Butterfly Garden Café

MAP #

72 Asian/Chinese 6 56 Fine Dining 3 56 Fine Dining 1 62 Casual Dining 14, 16 78 Latin Amer/Mex 2 59 Cafés 9 68 Sandwich/Deli 2 66 Home Style 9 67 Pizza 13 67 Pizza 4 75 Asian/Vietnamese 12 67 Pizza 1, 13 66 Cafeterias 16 68 Sandwich/Deli 1 68 Sandwich/Deli 1 62 Casual Dining 7 59 Cafés 4 62 Casual Dining [9] 59 Cafés 16 74 Asian/Korean 4 67 Pizza 14 62 Casual Dining 14 57 Upscale Casual 1 72 Asian/Chinese 14 72 Asian/Chinese 6 57 Upscale Casual 2 70 Bar & Grill 2 80 Coffee House 1 61 Bistros 5 72 Asian/Chinese 2 57 Upscale Casual 7 57 Upscale Casual 2 57 Upscale Casual 7 62 Steakhouse 16 80 Middle Eastern 2 70 Barbecue 14 68 Sandwich/Deli 6 77 International 3 78 Latin Amer/Mex 2 81 Desserts/Bakery 12 70 Barbecue 13 81 Desserts/Bakery 4 72 Asian/Chinese 12 68 Sandwich/Deli 1 66 Home Style 2 61 Bistros 2 78 Latin Amer/Mex 3 70 Barbecue 3 80 Coffee House 14 67 Pizza [12] 62 Casual Dining 3, 8, 9, 12 59 Cafés 12 75 Euro/Bosnian 12 74 Asian/Japanese 1 68 Sandwich/Deli 3 62 Casual Dining 1 70 Bar & Grill 2 62 Casual Dining 1 68 Sandwich/Deli 13 68 Sandwich/Deli 1 68 Sandwich/Deli 2, 4, 6 59 Cafés 2 70 Bar & Grill 6 59 Cafés 14 80 Microbreweries 1, 3 59 Cafés 4 77 Indian 2 61 Seafood 5 70 Barbecue 11, 12 70 Barbecue 8 62 Casual Dining 3 81 Desserts/Bakery 2, 7, 9 76 European/Italian 6 57 Upscale Casual 1, 2, 5 80 Microbreweries 1 76 European/Italian 6 62 Casual Dining 4, 5, 12, 16 56 Fine Dining 1 80 Ent. Dining 6 70 Bar & Grill 2,3, 6, 8, 9, 13 63 Casual Dining 11 59 Cafés 12 59 Cafés 2


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RESTAURANT

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C.A.P.P.P.’s Deli 68 The Café at the Antique Mall 63 Café Chardeau’s 59 Café Emilie 59 Café Fraiche 59 Café J 59 Café Kilimanjaro 77 Café Lou Lou 59 Café Metro 56 Café Mimosa 75 Caffe Classico 80 California Pizza Kitchen 67 Captain’s Quarters 63 Cardinal Hall of Fame Café 63 Carolina Seafood 61 Carolyn’s 66 Carrabba’s Italian Grille 76 Caspian Grille 80 Champions Grill 63 Ch¯ eba Hut 68 Check’s Café 66 Cheddar Box Café 59 Cheddar’s Casual Café 60 The Chef’s Table 57 Chester’s Tavern 66 Chez Seneba African 77 Chick Inn 63 The Chicken House 66 Chicken King 63 Chili’s 63 China Buffet 72 China Garden 72 China Inn 72 China King 72 China King Palace 72 Chinatown 72 Chinese Chef 72 Chinese Express 72 Chinese Restaurant 72 Chong Garden 72 Chopsticks 72 Chopsticks House 72 Chung King 72 Ciano’s 68 Cici’s 67 City Café 60 City Wok 72 Clark Boy Bar-B-Que 70 Clarksville Seafood 61 Cleon’s Rib Shack 70 Cleo’s Coffee 80 Clifton’s Pizza 68 Club Grotto 57 Coach Lamp 57 Coffee Beanery 80 Coffee Pot Café 80 Colonnade Cafeteria 66 Come Back Inn 76 Corner Café 57 Cottage Café 66 Cottage Inn 66 Country Kitchen 66 Cravings a la Carte 66 Cribstone Pub 63 Crystal Chinese 72 Cumberland Brews 80 Cunningham’s 63 Cutting Board Café 63 Cyclers Café 60 Damon’s 70 Danish Express 68 Day’s Espresso 80 De La Torre’s 58 Deke’s Marketplace Grill 63 Del Frisco’s 62 Delta Restaurant 70 Derby Café 60 Derby City Café by Dalal 60 Derby Dinner Playhouse 80 Desserts by Helen 81 De-ville’s 66 Diamante 61 Diamonds 58 Diefenbach Café 60 Dillon’s Steakhouse 62 Dino’s Down to Lunch 68 Ditto’s Grill 64 Dixie Cup Café 60

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MAP #

Sandwich/Deli Casual Dining Cafés Cafés Cafés Cafés International Cafés Fine Dining Asian/Vietnamese Coffee House Pizza Casual Dining Casual Dining Seafood Home Style European/Italian Middle Eastern Casual Dining Sandwich/Deli Home Style Cafés Cafés Upscale Casual Home Style International Casual Dining Home Style Casual Dining Casual Dining Asian/Chinese Asian/Chinese Asian/Chinese Asian/Chinese Asian/Chinese Asian/Chinese Asian/Chinese Asian/Chinese Asian/Chinese Asian/Chinese Asian/Chinese Asian/Chinese Asian/Chinese Sandwich/Deli Pizza Cafés Asian/Chinese Barbecue Seafood Barbecue Coffee House Pizza Upscale Casual Upscale Casual Coffee House Coffee House Cafeterias European/Italian Upscale Casual Home Style Home Style Home Style Cafeterias Casual Dining Asian/Chinese Microbreweries Casual Dining Casual Dining Cafés Barbecue Sandwich/Deli Coffee House Upscale Casual Casual Dining Steakhouse Bar & Grill Cafés Cafés Ent. Dining Desserts/Bakery Home Style Bistros Upscale Casual Cafés Steakhouse Sandwich/Deli Casual Dining Cafés

3 1 16 3 7 3 1 2 2 2 2 5 10 12 3 13 5 12 16 2 1 3, 9 8 1 12 12 10 14 1 5 15 12 1 6, 14 11 3, 12 1 13 12 13 1 1 1 9 14 1, 2 1 13 15 1 14 2 2 1 5 1 1 1, 16 5 9 1 13 1 2 1 2 1 8 2 6 3 1, 2 2 1 3 1 12 4 16 2, 10 12 2 2 15 6 1 2 13

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RESTAURANT

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

Dizzy Whizz Drive-In Djuli Dmitri’s Deli D’Nalley’s Restaurant Domino’s Pizza Don Pablos Dooley’s Bagels Double Dragon Double Dragon 8 Double Dragon 9 Double Dragon Buffet Double Dragon II Downtown New Orleans Dragon Garden Dutch’s Tavern Dynasty Buffet Eastern House Edna’s Good Stuff Eggroll King Eggroll Machine El Caporal El Mundo El Nopal El Nopalito El Paraiso El Rey Mexican El Rodeo Mexican El Tarasco Emperor of China Empress of China Encore at Actors Theatre The English Grill Equus Erika’s German Rest. Ermin’s French Bakery Ernesto’s Euro Market Expressions of You Famous Dave’s Bar-B-Que Fast Break Pizza Fat Jimmy’s Federal Hill Feed Bag Deli Ferd Grisanti Fifth Quarter Figaro’s Pizzeria Finley’s BBQ Firehouse BBQ First Wok The Fish House The Fish Hut The Fishery The Fishery Station Flabby’s Schnitzelburg The Flagship Flanigans Ale House Fork in the Road Formosa Chinese Fountain Room Four King’s Café Frank’s Steak House Frascelli’s N.Y. Deli Frolio’s Pizza Fuji Steakhouse Furlong’s Fusion Garden Room Café Garrett’s Hickory Grille Gasthaus Gavi’s Restaurant Geli Cakes Genny’s Diner Germantown Café Gerstle’s Place Golden Buddha Golden Corral Golden Wall Goose Creek Diner Gourmet Grazing Grand Buffet Granville Inn Grape Leaf Grapevine Pantry Great American Grill Great Wall Great Wok Greek Paradise Café Hall’s Cafeteria

MAP #

68 Sandwich/Deli 1 75 Euro/Bosnian 12 68 Sandwich/Deli 1 66 Home Style 1 67 Pizza [20] 78 Latin Amer/Mex 5, 15 68 Sandwich/Deli 3, 5, 7, 9, 14 72 Asian/Chinese 2 73 Asian/Chinese 1 73 Asian/Chinese 6 73 Asian/Chinese 5 72 Asian/Chinese 5, 8, 11 72 Cajun/Creole 1 73 Asian/Chinese 2 70 Bar & Grill 3 73 Asian/Chinese 7 73 Asian/Chinese 13 77 International 6 73 Asian/Chinese 13 73 Asian/Chinese 2 78 Latin Amer/Mex 4,6,12,15 78 Latin Amer/Mex 2 78 Latin Amer/Mex 6, 8, 12 78 Latin Amer/Mex 2, 4, 11 78 Latin Amer/Mex 12 78 Latin Amer/Mex 4 78 Latin Amer/Mex 13 78 Latin Amer/Mex 3, 12 73 Asian/Chinese 7 73 Asian/Chinese 4 58 Upscale Casual 1 56 Fine Dining 1 56 Fine Dining 3 75 European/German 6 60 Cafés 1, 10, 14 78 Latin Amer/Mex 3, 5, 12, 16 60 Cafés 8 80 Coffee House 1 70 Barbecue 6 67 Pizza 8 67 Pizza 2, 5 60 Cafés 14 68 Sandwich/Deli 3 76 European/Italian 6 62 Steakhouse 12 67 Pizza 9 70 Barbecue 1 70 Barbecue 4, 11 73 Asian/Chinese 13 61 Seafood 2 61 Seafood 1 61 Seafood 3 61 Seafood 11 70 Bar & Grill 1 56 Fine Dining 1 70 Bar & Grill 2 66 Home Style 13 73 Asian/Chinese 14 58 Upscale Casual 1 64 Casual Dining 4 62 Steakhouse 16 69 Sandwich/Deli 7 67 Pizza 12 74 Asian/Japanese 8 72 Cajun/Creole 2 58 Upscale Casual 2 60 Cafés 1 64 Casual Dining 5 76 European/German 7 77 International 1 69 Sandwich/Deli 2 66 Home Style 2 60 Cafés 1 70 Bar & Grill 3 73 Asian/Chinese 12 64 Casual Dining 4, 12, 15 73 Asian/Chinese 12 66 Home Style 8 60 Cafés 10 73 Asian/Chinese 13 71 Bar & Grill 1 80 Middle Eastern 2 60 Cafés 9 71 Bar & Grill 12 73 Asian/Chinese 2 73 Asian/Chinese 1 76 European/Greek 2 66 Cafeterias 2

RESTAURANT

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

Happy Dragon Hard Rock Café Harper’s Restaurant Harvest Moon Havana Rumba Hazelwood Restaurant Heather’s On The River Heavenly Ham Heine Brothers Coffee Heitzman Bakery & Deli Highland Coffee Co. Highland Wildflower Highlands Taproom Hitching Post Inn Holly’s Legal Street Hometown Buffet Hometown Pizza Hong Kong Chinese Hong Kong Fast Food Hoops Grill and Sports Bar Hooters House of Dragon Huttster’s Burger Ichiban Samurai Imperial Palace Indi’s Restaurant India Palace Indigo Bistro & Bar The Irish Rover Iroquois Pizza J. Alexander’s J. Graham’s Café J. Harrods J.J.’s Café Jabber’s Sports Grill Jack Fry’s Jack’s Lounge Jade Palace Jalapeño’s Jane’s Cafeteria Jarfi’s Bistro Java Brewing Co. Jay’s Cafeteria Jazz Factory Jersey Mike’s Subs Jessie’s Restaurant Jicama Grill Jillian’s Jimbo’s BBQ Jimmy’s on the River Joe Huber Restaurant Joe Muggs Joe’s Crab Shack Joe’s O.K. Bayou Joe’s Older Than Dirt John E’s JoJo’s Fish Market Juanita’s Burger Boy Jucy’s Smokehouse Julie’s of Jeffersonville Jumbo Buffet Kaelin’s Restaurant Kashmir Indian Kern’s Korner Kim’s Asian Grille King Buffet King’s Buffet King Wok King’s Fried Chicken Kings Fast Food Kingfish Kobe Japanese Steak Koreana II KT’s Kunz’s KY Taco L&N Wine Bar and Bistro La Bamba La Bodega La Embajada La Herradura La Marimba La Peche II La Petit Patisserie La Tapatia Le Relais Lee’s Korean Legend’s

MAP #

73 Asian/Chinese 1 64 Casual Dining 1 64 Casual Dining 5 73 Asian/Chinese 5 78 Latin Amer/Mex 3 66 Home Style 13 64 Casual Dining 7 69 Sandwich/Deli 4, 9, 14 80 Coffee House 2, 3 81 Desserts/Bakery 5 81 Coffee House 1, 2 81 Coffee House 2 67 Pizza 2 71 Bar & Grill 11 66 Home Style 1 66 Home Style 6, 8, 13, 15 67 Pizza 7, 9, 13 73 Asian/Chinese 14 73 Asian/Chinese 12 71 Bar & Grill 8, 12 64 Casual Dining 3,12,13,15,16 73 Asian/Chinese 3 64 Casual Dining 2 74 Asian/Japanese 6 73 Asian/Chinese 11 64 Casual Dining 1, 3, 12 77 Indian 5 58 Upscale Casual 3 76 European/Irish 2, 7 67 Pizza 13 58 Upscale Casual 3 60 Cafés 1 58 Upscale Casual 3 70 Barbecue 15 71 Bar & Grill 11 58 Upscale Casual 2 71 Bar & Grill 3 73 Asian/Chinese 7 79 Latin Amer/Mex 13 66 Cafeterias 4 58 Upscale Casual 1 81 Coffee House 1, 2, 3, 9, 10 66 Cafeterias 1 61 Bistros 1 69 Sandwich/Deli 5, 6, 8 66 Home Style 13 79 Latin Amer/Mex 2 64 Casual Dining 2 70 Barbecue 12 64 Casual Dining 16 80 Ent. Dining 14 81 Coffee House 3, 8 61 Seafood 1 72 Cajun/Creole 6 64 Casual Dining 5 58 Upscale Casual 4 61 Seafood 4 69 Sandwich/Deli 1 70 Barbecue 5 69 Sandwich/Deli 16 73 Asian/Chinese 6 64 Casual Dining 2 77 Indian 2 64 Casual Dining 2 75 Asian/Korean 1 73 Asian/Chinese 6 73 Asian/Chinese 12 73 Asian/Chinese 3 66 Home Style 1 66 Home Style 13 62 Seafood 4, 6, 7, 13, 16 74 Asian/Japanese 16 75 Asian/Korean 12 56 Upscale Casual 2 56 Fine Dining 1 79 Latin Amer/Mex 11 61 Bistros 2 79 Latin Amer/Mex 2 77 International 2 79 Latin Amer/Mex 12 79 Latin Amer/Mex 15 79 Latin Amer/Mex 11 64 Casual Dining 7 60 Cafés 1 79 Latin Amer/Mex 12 56 Fine Dining 4 75 Asian/Korean 12 64 Casual Dining 14

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RESTAURANT

Melillo’s... where memories taste great! Hours: Lunch Tuesday thru Saturday 11am til 2pm Dinner Tuesday thru Saturday begins at 5pm

Featuring wines from Felice Vineyards and Brown-Forman. Imported Italian Beers.

Come experience and play on Louisville’s only Bocce Ball Court.

54 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

Lemongrass Café 75 Lentini’s 76 The Lighthouse 64 Lilly’s 56 Limestone 58 Lindy’s 66 Little Caesar’s Pizza 67 Little Chef 69 Little Saigon 75 Logan’s Roadhouse 62 Lolitas Tacos Inc. 79 Lone Star Steakhouse 62 Longhorn Steakhouse 62 Longino’s Grill 64 Lonnie’s Taste Chicago 66 Los Aztecas 79 Los Indios Mexicano 79 Lotsa Pasta 69 Louisville Pizza Co. 67 Luchessi’s Ravioli & Pasta Co. 76 Lucky Dragon 73 Lucky House Buffet 73 Lucky Strike Lanes / Felt 58 Luigi’s 76 Lunch Today 69 Lynn’s Paradise Café 64 Ma Zerellas 67 Magic Corner Bakery 81 Maharaja Indian Restaurant 77 Maido Essential Japanese 74 Mai’s Thai Restaurant 75 Main Eatery 69 Main Menu 64 Main Street Grind 60 Maker’s Mark Lounge 58 Mama Rosa 79 Mambo 79 Manchu Wok 73 Mancino’s Pizza 67 Manhattan Grill 64 Manoosh’s 77 Mark’s Feed Store 70 Martini Italian Bistro 76 Masterson’s 64 Max & Erma’s 64 Mayan Gypsy 79 Mazzoni’s Oyster Café 62 McAlister’s Deli 69 Melillo’s 76 The Melting Pot 64 Meridian Café 60 Mexico Tipico 79 Michael Murphy’s 71 Mike Linnig’s 62 Mitchell’s Fish Market 62 Moe’s Southwest Grill 79 Molly Malone’s 76 Morton’s of Chicago 62 Mr. Gattis 67 Mr. Lou’s 66 Mr. Z’s Kitchen 60 Muse Café 60 My Favorite Muffin 81 My Old KY Dinner Train 80 Naiman’s Deli 69 Nancy’s Bagel Grounds 60 Napa River Grill 58 Neil’s Place 66 Nermana’s Cuisine 75 Nero’s 58 New Direction Bar & Grill 71 New World Buffet 73 Nik’s Restaurant 76 Nord’s Brown Bag Deli 69 North End Café 60 O’Charley’s 64 O’Dolly’s 66 O’Shea’s Irish Pub 76 The Oakroom 56 Old Spaghetti Factory 76 Old Stone Inn 58 Ole Hickory Pit BBQ 70 The Olive Garden 76 Ollie’s Trolley 69 Olive’s on Fourth 66 Olmecas 79 Omar’s Gyro 80 On the Border 79

MAP #

Asian/Vietnamese 2, 8 European/Italian 2 Casual Dining 16 Fine Dining 2 Upscale Casual 5 Home Style 12 Pizza 6, 11, 12 Sandwich/Deli 14 Asian/Vietnamese 8 Steakhouse 3, 13, 15 Latin Amer/Mex 12 Steakhouse 5 Steakhouse 6 Casual Dining 12 Home Style 3 Latin Amer/Mex 1, 6, 7, 10 Latin Amer/Mex 14 Sandwich/Deli 3 Pizza 6 European/Italian 7 Asian/Chinese 7 Asian/Chinese 4 Upscale Casual 1 European/Italian 1 Sandwich/Deli 16 Casual Dining 2 Pizza 15 Desserts/Bakery 1 Indian 2 Asian/Japanese 2 Asian/Thai 16 Sandwich/Deli 1 Casual Dining 14 Cafés 14 Upscale Casual 1 Latin Amer/Mex 4 Latin Amer/Mex 12 Asian/Chinese 5 Pizza 7 Casual Dining 1 International 1 Barbecue 2, 9, 13, 15 European/Italian 8 Casual Dining 1 Casual Dining 6, 8, 10 Latin Amer/Mex 1 Seafood 4 Sandwich/Deli 5, 6, 7, 11 European/Italian 1 Casual Dining 6 Cafés 3 Latin Amer/Mex 13 Bar & Grill 1 Seafood 13 Seafood 8 Latin Amer/Mex 3, 6 European/Irish 2 Steakhouse 1 Pizza 1, 4, 5, 6, 12, 13 Home Style 13 Cafés 1 Cafés 3 Desserts/Bakery 4, 5 Ent. Dining 12 Sandwich/Deli 5 Cafés 2 Upscale Casual 3 Home Style 14 Euro/Bosnian 2 Upscale Casual 14 Bar & Grill 8 Asian/Chinese 8 European/Greek 6 Sandwich/Deli 1 Cafés 2 Casual Dining 3,6,8,12,13,15 Home Style 13 European/Irish 2 Fine Dining 1 European/Italian 1 Upscale Casual 6 Barbecue 11 European/Italian 6 Sandwich/Deli 1 Home Style 1 Latin Amer/Mex 2 Middle Eastern 2 Latin Amer/Mex 8

RESTAURANT

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

Onion Rest.Tea House Oriental Express Oriental House Oriental Star Osaka Sushi Bar Oscar Brown’s Southbeach Otto’s Café Outback Steakhouse Palermo Viejo Panda Chinese Panera Bread Co. Pa Pa Murphy’s Pizza Papa Johns Pizza Papillon Grill & Bar Park Place Restaurant Parrott Beach Pat’s Steak House The Patron Paul’s Fruit Market Peking City Penn Station Pepper Shaker Bar-B-Q Perkfection Pesto’s Italian Piccadilly Cafeteria Picnicaters BBQ Pie in the Sky Pit Stop Bar-B-Que Pizza Box Pizza By The Guy Pizza Hut Pizza King Pizza Magia Pizza Place Plehn’s Bakery Po-Boy Shoppe Ponderosa Steakhouse Porcini Portico Prospect Fish Market Puerto Vallarta Qdoba Mexican Grill Queen of Sheba Queenie’s Pizza & Such Quick Wok Quizno’s Subs Rafferty’s of Louisville Rainbow Blossom Ramsi’s Café Ranch House Ray Parrella’s Red Cheetah Lounge Red Horse Grille & Bar Red Lounge Red Star Tavern Rich O’s Public House Rincon Latino River Creek Inn River Grille Roadway Wings Rockwall Bistro Rocky’s Italian Grill Rollo Pollo Romano’s Macaroni Grill Rosticeria Luna Royal Garden Rubbie’s Bar-B-Que Ruby Tuesday The Rudyard Kipling Rufad’s Kebob Rumors Raw Oyster Bar Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse Ryan’s Steakhouse Saddle Ridge Saloon Saffron’s Saint’s Sakura Blue Sala Thai Sam’s Food & Spirits Santa Fe Grill Sapporo Japanese Grill Sarajevo Schlotzsky’s Deli Scotty’s Ribs Sesame Chinese Shalimar Indian Shanghai Restaurant Shenanigan’s Irish Grille

MAP #

74 Asian/Chinese 14 74 Asian/Chinese 9 74 Asian/Chinese 3 74 Asian/Chinese 12 74 Asian/Japanese 2 59 Upscale Casual 1 64 Casual Dining 1 62 Steakhouse 3, 8, 11, 12, 15 64 Casual Dining 2 74 Asian/Chinese 10 69 Sandwich/Deli 3, 6 67 Pizza 3, 8, 12 67 Pizza [30] 75 Euro/Bosnian 2 56 Fine Dining 1 59 Upscale Casual 1 62 Steakhouse 2 60 Cafés 3 69 Sandwich/Deli 3, 4, 7, 9 74 Asian/Chinese 8 69 Sandwich/Deli [11] 70 Barbecue 12 81 Coffee House 16 76 European/Italian 1 66 Cafeterias 5, 6 70 Barbecue 1 67 Pizza 6 70 Barbecue 1 67 Pizza 8 67 Pizza 5 67 Pizza [15] 68 Pizza 14, 16 68 Pizza [13] 68 Pizza 4 81 Desserts/Bakery 3 69 Sandwich/Deli 2 62 Steakhouse 7 76 European/Italian 2 56 Fine Dining 14 62 Seafood 10 79 Latin Amer/Mex 14 79 Latin Amer/Mex 2,3,5,8,15 77 International 4 68 Pizza 1 74 Asian/Chinese 1 69 Sandwich/Deli 1,6,8,14,15,16 64 Casual Dining 3, 8 81 Desserts/Bakery 8 64 Casual Dining 1, 2 64 Casual Dining 14 76 European/Italian 2 59 Upscale Casual 1 64 Casual Dining 12 61 Bistros 2 59 Upscale Casual 1 80 Microbreweries 14 79 Latin Amer/Mex 8 62 Seafood 7 64 Casual Dining 1 66 Home Style 13 59 Upscale Casual 14 76 European/Italian 16 64 Casual Dining 3 76 European/Italian 5 79 Latin Amer/Mex 12 74 Asian/Chinese 12 70 Barbecue 12 65 Casual Dining 3, 6 65 Casual Dining 1 75 Euro/Bosnian 2 62 Seafood 9 62 Steakhouse 3 62 Steakhouse 11, 12, 13, 15 71 Bar & Grill 1 80 Middle Eastern 1 71 Bar & Grill 3 74 Asian/Japanese 3 75 Asian/Thai 6 65 Casual Dining 14 79 Latin Amer/Mex 12 74 Asian/Japanese 2, 9 75 Euro/Bosnian 11 69 Sandwich/Deli 8, 9, 12 70 Barbecue 9 74 Asian/Chinese 5 77 Indian 6 74 Asian/Chinese 1 71 Bar & Grill 2


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Shogun 74 Shoney’s 65 Sichuan Garden 74 Skyline Chili 65 Smokey Bones BBQ 70 Somewhere In Thyme 65 Soupy’s 69 South Side Inn 67 Spaghetti Shop 77 Spinelli’s Pizzeria 68 Sportstime Pizza 68 Stan’s Fish Sandwich 62 Star of Louisville 80 Starbucks Coffee 81 Starving Artist Café 60 Steak N Shake 65 Steinert’s Grill & Pub 71 Stevens & Stevens 69 Stoney River 62 Strawberry Patch Deli 69 Stumler Rest. & Orchard 65 Sub Station II 70 Sully’s Saloon 71 Sweet ‘N’ Savory Café 69 Sweet Surrender 81 Tacqueria La Mexicana 79 Tailgaters Sports Bar 71 Taj India 77 Texas Roadhouse 62 TGI Friday’s 65 Thai Café 75 Thai Kitchen 75 Thai Siam 75 Thai Smile 5 75 Thai Taste 75 The Other Place 65 Third and Main Café 60 Third Avenue Café 60 Thyme Café 60 Tijuana Flats Burrito Co. 79 Tokyo Japanese 74 Toll Bridge Inn 66 Tologono 61 Tommy Lancaster 65 Tony Boombozz 68 Tony Impellizzeri’s Pizza 68 Tony Roma’s 70 Trellis Restaurant 66 Trestle Sports Café 72 Tucker’s 66 Tumbleweed 79 Twiams Chicken & Waffles 66 Twice-Told Café 61 Twig & Leaf Restaurant 66 Two Bucks 70 Two Guys and a Grill 70 Uno Chicago Bar & Grill 68 Uptown Café 59 Vic’s Café 72 Vietnam Kitchen 75 The Villa Buffet 66 Vince Staten’s BBQ 70 Vincenzo’s 56 Vito’s Pizzeria 68 Volare 77 W.W. Cousin’s 66 Wagner’s Pharmacy 66 Wall Street Deli 70 Wang’s Wok 74 Webb’s Market 66 Whitney’s Diner 61 Wicks Pizza 68 Wild Oats Market 70 Willie’s Italian 77 Winston’s 56 Wok Express 74 Wonton Express 74 Woodford Reserve Grille 72 Yaching’s East West Cuisine 59 Yang Kee Noodle 74 Yen Ching 74 You-Carryout-A 74 ZaZoo’s 72 Zen Garden 75 Z’s Oyster Bar 56

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MAP #

Asian/Japanese 6, 8 Casual Dining 2, 6, 12 Asian/Chinese 6 Casual Dining 1, 2, 3, 6, 13 Barbecue 6 Casual Dining 6 Sandwich/Deli 4, 6, 8, 13 Cafeterias 14 European/Italian 11, 14 Pizza 2 Pizza 14 Seafood 3 Ent. Dining 16 Coffee House [11] Cafés 5 Casual Dining 4,6,8,12,13,15 Bar & Grill 14 Sandwich/Deli 2 Steakhouse 8 Sandwich/Deli 9 Casual Dining 14 Sandwich/Deli 12 Bar & Grill 1 Cafés 2 Desserts/Bakery 2 Latin Amer/Mex 12 Bar & Grill 12 Indian 6 Steakhouse 2, 12, 13, 15 Casual Dining 1, 6, 7 Asian/Thai 7 Asian/Thai 13 Asian/Thai 4 Asian/Thai 12 Asian/Thai 2 Casual Dining 2 Cafés 1 Cafés 1 Cafés 1 Latin Amer/Mex 7 Asian/Japanese 7 Home Style 14 Bistros 3 Casual Dining 14 Pizza 2, 3 Pizza 2 Barbecue 5 Casual Dining 1 Bar & Grill 6 Casual Dining 14 Latin Amer/Mex [19] Casual Dining 13 Cafés 7 Casual Dining 2 Sandwich/Deli 8 Sandwich/Deli 7 Pizza 11 Upscale Casual 2 Bar & Grill 1 Asian/Vietnamese 12 Casual Dining 14 Barbecue 10 Fine Dining 1 Pizza 12 European/Italian 2 Casual Dining 3 Home Style 12 Sandwich/Deli 1 Asian/Chinese 9 Home Style 1 Cafés 11 Pizza 2, 8, 9, 13 Sandwich/Deli 3 European/Italian 13 Fine Dining 4 Asian/Chinese 1 Asian/Chinese 4 Bar & Grill 12 Upscale Casual 1 Asian/Chinese 5 Asian/Chinese 6 Asian/Chinese 14, 15, 16 Bar & Grill 3 Asian/Vietnamese 2 Fine Dining 5

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UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE, ALL RESTAURANTS ARE LOCATED IN LOUISVILLE. ALL KENTUCKY PHONE NUMBERS LISTED ARE IN THE 502 AREA CODE, INDIANA PHONE NUMBERS ARE IN THE 812 AREA CODE. RED DENOTES AN ADVERTISER.

$ $$ $$$ $$$$

p f

e

= = = = = = =

Average Entrée under $8 Average Entrée $9–$14 Average Entrée $15–$20 Average Entrée $21 & up Full Bar Outdoor Dining Live Music

FINE DINING 211 CLOVER LANE RESTAURANT 211 Clover Ln., 896-9570. Stylish and comfortable in its leafy suburban setting, 211 Clover’s upscale atmosphere and creative cuisine rank it consistently among the city’s top tables, earning it a sizable cadre of committed fans. $$$$ p f 610 MAGNOLIA 610 Magnolia Ave., 636-0783. A full year after taking over 610 Magnolia from longtime chef/owner Ed Garber, Chef Edward Lee has put his own individual stamp on the restaurant, and it remains one of the city’s top tables. We love it as much as ever. $$$$ p f BUCK’S 425 W. Ormsby Ave., 637-5284. Eclectic Victorian with tongue-slightly-in-cheek, pleasant and not overstated, this fine dining room on the ground floor of Old Louisville’s genteel old Mayflower Apartments combines a welcoming attitude with high-quality fare and atmosphere that’s frankly stunning. $$$ p e CAFÉ METRO 1700 Bardstown Rd., 458-4830. A local tradition that helped establish Bardstown Road as one of the city’s “restaurant rows” a generation ago, Café Metro remains an upscale landmark; current Chef Michael Crouch continues to please Metro’s loyal fans. $$$ p ENGLISH GRILL 335 W. Broadway (The Camberly Brown Hotel), 583-1234. This elegant oak-paneled dining room is the same downtown landmark that our parents and grandparents enjoyed. Chef Joe Castro continues to win raves for creative, inventive (and expensive) fare that makes the Brown a major player in the downtown-hotel dining sweepstakes. $$$$ p

Page 56

Stage. It’s not just the city’s best French restaurant but a contender for best of the region, and an outstanding wine list adds value. $$$$ p f e LILLY’S 1147 Bardstown Rd., 451-0447. Chef Kathy Cary seems to spend as much time in New York City as she does in Louisville. As a repeat invitee to Manhattan’s James Beard House, she shares her Kentucky-accented cooking skills with the rest of the nation. Lilly’s combines style and Cary’s creative cookery to keep this landmark near the top of the city’s dining list. $$$$ p e THE OAKROOM 500 S. Fourth St., (Seelbach Hotel), 585-3200. Executive Chef Walter Lefler and Chef de Cuisine Todd Richards have maintained fourstar food and service in this elegant, historic hotel dining room that ranks among the “must-visit” destinations for visitors and locals alike. $$$$ p PARK PLACE RESTAURANT 401 E. Main St. (Slugger Field), 515-0172. With Anoosh Shariat as executive chef and Jerry Slater as General Manager, the signature restaurant in Louisville Slugger Field is solidifying its place in the city’s top tier of upscale eateries, with stylish service and an updated menu. $$$$ p f e

PORTICO Caesars Indiana Casino, Elizabeth, IN, 888766-2648. High-end luxury and style bring a taste of Las Vegas to Metro Louisville in this pricey, white-tablecloth eatery located on the grounds of Caesars Indiana. You don’t have to be a high roller to enjoy its luxury fare and service. $$$$ p VINCENZO’S 150 S. Fifth St., 580-1350. Known for its suavely professional service, high-end Northern Italian fare and some trademark dishes prepared at tableside, Vincenzo’s owns a place as one of Louisville’s top tables. Some find its mood and attentive service a little overbearing; others love the luxury. $$$$ p WINSTON’S RESTAURANT 3101 Bardstown Rd., (Sullivan University Campus), 456-0980. Culinary arts students at Sullivan University staff this finedining restaurant on the campus, under supervision by experienced chefs and managers. A fair number of the city’s top chefs got their training here. Open Fri.-Sun. Only. Reservations suggested. $$$$ p Z’S OYSTER BAR & STEAKHOUSE 101 Whittington Pkwy., 429-8000. This exciting spot brings a level of fine dining to the suburbs that’s previously been

Louisville’s Best Catch. Equus Restaurant has a tradition of serving the best Parmesan-Coated Sea Bass and USDA Prime Beef Steaks in town. Equus has been preparing fine continental cuisine with Kentucky accents for 19 years.

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN?

EQUUS 122 Sears Ave., 897-9721. Tucked away in a simple white-brick building, Equus is a block off the main drag in St. Matthews, but happy diners beat a path to its door. Very fine international cuisine, a stylish setting and first-rate service combine to make it one of the city’s top dining rooms. $$$$ p THE FLAGSHIP 140 N. Fourth St., 589-5200. The best thing about the Flagship is its romantic, spectacular view of the city from its revolving quarters atop the Galt House hotel. It offers fine white-tablecloth dining with service to match. $$$$ e KUNZ’S FOURTH AND MARKET 115 S. Fourth St., 585-5555. One of the oldest restaurants in Louisville, Kunz’s has moved from one downtown location to another. Its old German accent has muted a bit with time; with a new menu in place, it now offers a choice of old-fashioned, hearty steak and seafood and stylish modern fare. $$$ p LE RELAIS 2817 Taylorsville Rd., (Bowman Field), 4519020. Another longstanding contender for the city’s top table, this stylish art deco spot beautifully uses a historic 1920s airport building to present elegant modern French cuisine from Chef Daniel

56 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

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hard to find outside the city. Armed with excellent, oversize steaks, extraordinary seafood, fine service and clubby ambience, Z’s thoroughly outguns the upscale steakhouse competition. $$$$ p

UPSCALE CASUAL ARTEMISIA 620 E. Market St., 583-4177. As the bustling arts scene in this east-of-downtown neighborhood has blossomed, Artemisia has evolved right along with it, maturing from an excellent lunch spot to a favorite dinner venue in a gallery setting, with fare to please both vegetarians and omnivores, plus an attractive alfresco dining option. $$$ p f e

Page 57

CONTINUING THE TRADITION

DESIGN / BUILD

Enjoy the open atmosphere while you watch the chef prepare your meal from any seat in the house. Or for the pinnacle in dining experience, you can sit, dine and interact with our chef at

“From concept to reality.”

The Chef’s Table

ASIATIQUE 1767 Bardstown Rd., 451-2749. Chef Peng Looi, who has won diners’ raves and many culinary awards during Asiatique’s long tenure in St. Matthews, transplanted his innovative Asianfusion restaurant to larger and even more striking quarters on the busy Bardstown Road corridor, where he has kicked things up still another notch. $$$ p f AUSTIN’S 4950 US 42, 423-1990. Big, crowded and bistro-style, with heavy emphasis on the bar, this suburban watering hole taps the same vein as the national franchise booze ‘n’ beef genre, and does so well, offering satisfying dining at a fair price. $$ p AVALON 1314 Bardstown Rd., 454-5336. Fresh American and international cuisine come together in this stylish Bardstown Road spot that has become a favorite. The adjacent patio is a particularly popular spot on summer evenings. $$$ p AZALEA 3612 Brownsboro Rd., 895-5493. Another of the city’s longtime favorites, Azalea—the Louisville outpost of a popular Atlanta eatery— delights with creative American and fusion-style fare whether you dine in or enjoy the open air of its shady, brick-walled patio. Ask about “wine-down” specials with attractive pricing. $$$ p f

The Houston Group has over 20 years of experience meeting the needs of clients in the restaurant industry. Our services take you through the entire process from concept, raising capital, design to implementation.

Old Louisville’s finest new restaurant pairing international food with fine wine – at great prices.

“I found Houston invaluable in opening our restaurant … his help was instrumental.”

Open for lunch, brunch and dinner. Banquet room and catering services available.

Len Stevens, Owner, L&N Wine Bar and Bistro

On the corner of 1st & Oak

Houston D. Jones Jr. 502.419.7799

587-CHEF

w w w. t h e h o u s t o n g r o u p . n e t

BRISTOL BAR & GRILLE 1321 Bardstown Rd., 4561702, 300 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 426-0627, 100 E. Jefferson St., 540-3214, 614 W. Main St., 582-1995, 2035 S. Third St., 634-2723. The Bristol has been a star on Louisville’s bistro scene since it helped kick off the Bardstown Road restaurant renaissance some 25 years ago. Old standards like the green-chile won tons and the Bristol Burger are always reliable, and the wine program is exceptional. $$ p f THE CHEF’S TABLE 1160 S. First St., 587-2433. If you love good things to eat, what could be better than dining at the chef’s table, sitting alongside the guy with the skillet and wooden spoon, enjoying the best he has to offer? That’s the deal at The Chef’s Table in Old Louisville, a charming eatery where every diner gets personal attention from the chef. $$ e CLUB GROTTO 2116 Bardstown Rd., 459-5275. International touches by Chef Kristopher Bates make Club Grotto’s bill of fare memorable. Its comfortable, romantically dim and stylish environs and excellent service add value points. Sometimes overlooked, but worth making a special effort to remember. $$$ p COACH LAMP RESTAURANT 751 Vine St., 583-9165. This urban neighborhood tavern serves “pub grub” for lunch, but Coach Lamp turns into a serious dining room Wednesday through Saturday evenings with well-prepared dishes that range from down-home favorites to pastas. With former Brown Hotel Chef Jerome Pope in the kitchen, this is a place to watch. $$$ CORNER CAFÉ 9307 New Lagrange Rd., 426-8119. There’s nothing fancy or overly elegant about this suburban neighborhood old favorite, but the term “eclectic” fits it well, as we can tell from the neon www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Fall 2004 57


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signs across its front windows listing its fields of specialization: “Italian, Cajun, seafood, pizza and subs and more.” $$ p DE LA TORRE’S 1606 Bardstown Rd., 456-4955. From Central Spain, authentic Castilian food ranging from tapas to a memorable paella make this Bardstown Road standby a unique experience reminiscent of dining on a square in Madrid. $$$ DIAMONDS 2427 Bardstown Rd., 454-9944. OK, pay attention. This gets a little complicated. Timothy's, which abandoned East Broadway for new digs in Indiana last year, was eager to move back to the city. Meanwhile, "Bobby J" Johnson closed Steam Fire & Ice. Quick as a wink, Timothy's moved in, changing its name to Diamonds but, we're reliably informed, retaining its upscale-casual style and comfortable gourmet fare (including the trademark white chili). $$$ pe ENCORE RESTAURANT AT ACTORS THEATRE 316 W. Main St., 561-3344. Not so much a destination restaurant as a decent place to dine before the theater, Encore offers a short but eclectic bill of fare that will satisfy your palate and get you to your seat before the curtain rises. $$ p

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FOUNTAIN ROOM AT THE GALT HOUSE 140 N. Fourth St., 589-5200. This comfortable space features both buffet and menu dining. One price covers the fresh and hot buffet and salad bar. The menu often includes regional and contemporary selections and daily chef specials. $ p FUSION 1605 Story Ave., 582-1801. This good-size Butchertown spot has been home to a series of eateries, from the original "Dirty" Min's cafeteria to Greek Paradise. Welcome the latest and fanciest tenant, Fusion, where former Bluegrass Brewing Co. chefs Chris Gibson and David Salvo present an eclectic mix of international cuisines. We hope they'll stay! $$$ p INDIGO BISTRO AND BAR 3930 Chenoweth Sq., 893-0106. The name may sound famliar, but the name “Indigo” is all that this pleasant, if informal, American-style eatery shares with the more upscale and fancy Indigo that used to occupy this suburban space. $$ p f e J. ALEXANDER’S RESTAURANT 102 Oxmoor Court, 339-2206. This comfortably upscale venue, a Nashville-based chain, features “contemporary American” fare with a broad menu that ranges from burgers and sandwiches to such upscale eats as grilled tuna or a New York strip steak. $$$ p

J. HARROD’S 7507 Upper River Rd., 228-4555. J. Harrod’s is discreetly tasteful and pleasantly comfortable. The food is competitive in both quality and value. It’s an appealing, upscale blend of bistro fare and old-fashioned country cooking. $$$ p JACK FRY’S 1007 Bardstown Rd., 452-9244. If you want to give visiting friends a one-shot sample of Louisville’s urban dining style, there’s no better destination than Jack Fry’s. This popular spot (now a non-smoking venue) is always packed. It saves just a whiff of the raffish aspect of its 1960s-era predecessor, a local saloon, but upgrades it with creative American fare in a bistro setting. $$$$ p e JARFI’S BISTRO 501 W. Main St., 589-5060. The affable Jeff Jarfi is the eponymous host of this sharp, stylish venue in the Kentucky Center for the Arts. He is making the right moves (including popular lunch and pre-theater buffets) to attract happy crowds. $$$ p JOHN E’S 3708 Bardstown Rd., 456-1111. This old Louisville tradition earns a warm recommendation. From its cozy setting in a historic Buechel home (once a log cabin) to its down-home service to its good American-style fare at reasonable prices, this comfortable place is a prime choice for a family get-together. $$$$ p e KT’S 2300 Lexington Rd., 458-8888. It’s hard to argue with success, and KT’s has earned its popularity by providing good American-style bar and bistro chow and a modern bar scene for a price that’s fair. $$ p f LIMESTONE 10001 Forest Green Blvd., 426-7477. To succeed in the restaurant business, keep doing what you do best. Chefs Jim Gerhardt and Michael Cunha have followed this simple formula with considerable success at Limestone, transporting the concept that brought them international culinary kudos at the Seelbach’s Oakroom with good effect in these modern quarters in the East End. $$$ p LUCKY STRIKE LANES / FELT Fourth Street Live, 560-1400. An upscale bowling alley? A classy poolroom? Who knew! These twin concepts from Jillian's founders Stephen and Gillian Foster -- 14 lanes of bowling at Lucky Strike, 10 tables of serious billiards at Felt - light up Fourth Street Live with a stylish blend of '50s-style retro and high-tech modern, plus a menu by Chef David Himmel that serves both establishments with much more than mere bar food. $$ p f MAKER’S MARK BOURBON HOUSE & LOUNGE Fourth Street Live, 568-9009. Under a licensing agreement with the management of Fourth Street Live, Kentucky's Maker's Mark Distillery lends its name and its signature red-wax image to this stylish restaurant and lounge in the booming downtown entertainment complex. The draw is a magisterial bar featuring more than 60 Bourbons (including the namesake brand, of course), along with an attractive menu featuring traditional Kentucky fare $$$ p f NAPA RIVER GRILL 3938 Dupont Circle, 893-0141. Spanning California and the Pacific Rim, this starkly modern St. Matthews spot has gained a reputation for consistent quality and service, featuring well-prepared California cuisine and an extensive, fairly priced wine list adds to its appeal. $$$ p f NERO’S Caesars Indiana Casino, Elizabeth, IN, 888766-2648. Joining Portico as the second high-end, fine-dining restaurant at Caesar’s Indiana, Nero’s— located on the casino boat’s Fourth Deck— complements Portico’s all-American steak-andseafood theme with a broader international menu that ranges from Tuscan fettuccini to Memphis BBQ pork ribs. $$$ p OLD STONE INN 26905 Shelbyville Rd., Simpsonville, KY, (502) 722-8200. This historic stone building east

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of Louisville in Simpsonville, housed a popular restaurant for more than a generation. After a brief resurrection by Simpsonville’s sausage-making Purnell family, it is now under the management of Paul Crump, formerly of Porcini. Crump’s skills and the comfortably nostalgic atmosphere make this a hot spot. $$$ p f OSCAR BROWN’S SOUTHBEACH STATION 252 E. Market St., 581-1222. Chef Nick Sundberg features an American bistro style at his casual-upscale restaurant in the increasingly active east downtown neighborhood. His menu showcases Caribbean influences from Cuba, Jamaica and Trinidad (plus a few regional items). $$ p e PARROTT BEACH Fourth Street Live, 589-5336. $$ pf e RED CHEETAH LOUNGE Fourth Street Live, 5890695. $$ p e RED STAR TAVERN Fourth Street Live, 568-5656. Billed as “a hip, contemporary version of the classic American tavern,” this new chain operation in the rehabilitated former Galleria features steaks, chops and seafood in an atmosphere that’s upscale and clubby, with entrees from about $12 to $24, and an extensive bar as a key part of the action. $$$ p f

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to have this superb little bistro with a Hoosier twist. The fare ranges from down-home to upscale. The atmosphere is happy and bright; the service personal and quick. It’s a bit hidden away, but worth the search. $$ p BLUEGRASS CAFÉ 3255 Bardstown Rd., (Holiday Inn) 454-0451. This is a relaxing full service, casual family dining spot at the southern end of Bardstown Rd. Traditional favorites available here range from the Hot Brown to Fried Chicken. A colorful menu of freshly made soups, salads, appetizers and desserts serves the light diner. $ p BULLDOG CAFÉ 10619 W. Manslick Rd., 380-0600. $fe THE BUTTERFLY GARDEN CAFÉ 1325 Bardstown Rd., 456-4500. Tiny but tastefully attractive, this little cafe is hidden at the back of a Victorian house filled with gift shops that share a quaint, welcoming ambience. Typical luncheon fare is skillfully prepared. $ f CAFÉ CHARDEAUS 359 Spring St., Jeffersonville, IN, 288-1050. Co-owners Becky Hutchens and Charlotte McGinnis may have built their reputation on catering, but you don’t have to plan

a party to enjoy a taste of their stylish fare. Open for lunch weekdays. $ CAFÉ EMILIE 3939 Shelbyville Rd., 719-9717. Tucked into a corner of a tasteful furniture shop, Café Emilie is worth a visit. This French-accented East End eatery is a recent and welcome addition to the neighborhood’s casual dining options. $ f CAFÉ FRAICHE 3642 Brownsboro Rd., 894-8929. This is truly cuisine that makes the world go round. Homemade soups, breads and globetrotting entrees make this a favorite café to sample new tastes. Menu changes seasonally. $ CAFÉ J 3600 Dutchmans Ln., (Jewish Community Center) 459-0660. The city’s only authentic, totally Kosher delicatessen, with a flair for presentation and flavor. Homemade soups, salads and wide-ranging hot entrees are available. $ f CAFÉ LOU LOU 1800 Frankfort Ave., 893-7776. Bright and bold and artsy, this Clifton neighborhood restaurant and pub offers Chef Clay Wallace’s affordable edibles from wraps and calzones to handmade pizzas among the best in town. $$ f CHEDDAR BOX CAFÉ 12121 Shelbyville Rd., 2452622, 3909 Chenoweth Sq., 893-2324. Ladies who

ROCKWALL BISTRO 3426 Paoli Pike, Floyds Knobs, IN., 948-1705. This stylish spot takes full advantage of an old rock-quarry location in scenic Floyds Knobs to offer an atmospheric eatery, with a creative menu that features a light Louisiana accent, and an interesting, affordable wine list. It’s well worth the 15-minute trip across the Ohio for one of the metro area’s most enjoyable dining experiences. $$ p f UPTOWN CAFÉ 1624 Bardstown Rd., 458-4212. Across the street and a step downscale from its partner, Café Metro, the Uptown Café (now a nonsmoking venue except for the bar) offers similar fare with a bit more of a bistro feel for quite a few bucks less. $$ p f YACHING’S EAST WEST CUISINE 105 S. Fourth St., 585-4005. Restaurateur Laura Tao’s stylish downtown restaurant promises “an eclectic menu of contemporary Asian fusion cuisine.” It’s an attractive mix of East and West, sufficient to give just about everyone something to enjoy, regardless of which compass point attracts your taste buds. $$$ p

CAFES ALLEY CAT CAFÉ 11804 Shelbyville Rd., 245-6544. This suburban Alley Cat is a cozy and bright little place, and the lunch-only menu is affordable and appealing. $ APPLE ANNIE’S AT HEALTH & HARVEST 3030 Bardstown Rd., 451-6772. Explore the vast grocery section before coming to rest for coffee, tea, juice, pastries and sandwiches—all prepared with organic ingredients and many vegetarian and vegan selections. $ APPLEBY’S CAFÉ AND CATERING 201 Spring St., Jeffersonville, IN, 283-3663. This café and catering business offers a variety of daily lunch specials plus gourmet coffees and a tempting array of desserts. $ f BEG FOR MORE CAFÉ 380-0085. $

8402 National Turnpike,

BLUE DOG BAKERY AND CAFÉ 2868 Frankfort Ave., 899-9800. This bakery with its $50,000 Spanish wood-fired oven makes artisanal bread as good as you’ll find in the US, and competitive with the best in Europe. Its comfortable, upscale café offers a short selection of tasty dishes made to show off the fine breads. $$ f BLUE PEPPERMILL CAFÉ 1882 Blackiston Mill Rd., Clarksville, IN., 945-5830. Any city would be lucky www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Fall 2004 59


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lunch often do so here, and more than a few gents join them, lured by an attractive selection of luncheon fare that ranges from soups and salads to tasty sandwiches ... and, it goes without saying, desserts. $ f CHEDDAR’S CASUAL CAFÉ 10403 Westport Rd., 339-5400. A distinct buzz surrounded the arrival of Cheddar’s, Louisville’s first outpost of a Dallasbased chain. It’s drawing big, happy crowds with its large bar and familiar “casual to upscale American” dishes. $ p CITY CAFÉ 1907 S. Fourth St., 635-0222, 505 W. Broadway, 589-1797, 1250 Bardstown Rd., 4595600, 500 S. Preston St., 852-5739. Chef Jim Henry, a long-time star in the city’s culinary firmament, now brings his cooking skills and insistence on fresh, quality ingredients to this growing local chain of quick, simple but excellent spots for lunch. $ f CYCLERS CAFÉ 2295 Lexington Rd., 451-5152. Is it a bicycle shop or a restaurant? Well, it’s both. Filling in the small quarters that August Moon vacated to move next door, this informal spot will sell you a first-rate sandwich, soup or salad or a tire for your bike—or the whole darn bike! $ f

GRAPEVINE PANTRY & GIFT SHOP 11418 Old Main St., Middletown, KY, 245-1569. Off the beaten path, the Middletown Historic District is booming with bucolic storefronts, restaurants and a laid back glimpse of the past. The Grapevine Pantry serves up homemade soups, sandwiches and salads, and a selection of cakes and pies. $ J. GRAHAM’S CAFÉ & BAR 335 W. Broadway (The Camberly Brown Hotel), 583-1234. The Brown’s casual cafe offers an alternative to the pricey and upscale English Grill. $ p LA PETIT PATISSERIE 1036 E. Burnette Ave., 6343004. A Butchertown landmark has changed hands as the old family-run Heitzmann’s Bakery assumes an upscale look and a fancy French name under new management. There’s a short sandwich menu and a remarkable collection of soft drinks, but the Patisserie aptly shines in the pastry department with its memorable desserts. $ MAIN ST. GRIND 155 E. Main St., New Albany, IN, 944-2326. $

DERBY CAFÉ 704 Central Ave., (Kentucky Derby Museum), 634-0858. Lunch served year-round in the dining area adjacent to the Derby Museum with such regional favorites as meaty Burgoo, and the Hot Brown. $ f

MERIDIAN CAFÉ 112 Meridian Ave., 897-9703. This little lunch spot occupies a cozy old house in St. Matthews. Service is competent and polite, the place is sparkling clean, and the luncheon-style fare ranges from good to excellent. $

DERBY CITY CAFÉ BY DALAL 3819 Bardstown Rd., 454-6160. Most of the dining crowd comes for the cream cheese and olive sandwiches, veggie pockets and Kentucky’s own Benedictine creations. $

MR. Z’S KITCHEN 869 S. Third St., 584-8504. It’s run by a friendly immigrant family from Eastern Europe, but the food is all-American at Mr. Z’s Kitchen. It offers an appetizing option for a hearty diner-style meal. $

DIEFENBACH CAFÉ 128 S. New Albany St., Sellersburg IN, 246-0686. $$ p e

MUSE CAFÉ 3110 Frankfort Ave., 895-9488. A direct descendant of the old Crescent Moon deli, this small, artsy space on the eastern end of the Frankfort Avenue strip offers coffee and exceptionally fine soups and sandwiches (plus breakfast all day) in a gallery-like setting dominated by bold works of modern art. $ f e

DIXIE CUP CAFÉ 4637 Dixie Hwy., 448-6999. Former Simpsonville, Ky. postmaster Pam Hale changed careers to open this welcoming spot on Dixie near the Watterson Expressway, and we’re glad she did. Although it’s billed as a “gourmet coffee shop,” warming chili, soups and salads and alluring desserts make it a full-scale lunch destination. $ ERMIN’S FRENCH BAKERY & CAFÉ 1201 S. First St., 635-6960, 723 S. Fourth St., 587-9390, 454 S. Fourth Ave., 585-5120, 9550 U.S. Hwy 42, 211 E. Main St., New Albany, IN, 941-8674. Founded by an immigrant baker from Bosnia who has since moved on, these popular bakeries still attract crowds looking for an enjoyable soup and sandwich lunch highlighted by French-style breads and pastries. $ EURO MARKET 12907 Factory Ln., 243-0000. It looks like a neighborhood convenience store and bottle shop, but when you get inside, it contains a delicious surprise: an appetizing service counter offers a variety of goodies to take out or eat in. Don’t miss the excellent fried-oyster box, as well as an intriguing selection of quality beers and fine wines. $ FEDERAL HILL 310 Pearl St., New Albany IN, 9486646. $ f GARDEN ROOM CAFÉ 911 S. Brook St., 625-1900. The old Male High School cafeteria never looked better than it does as the Garden Room. The old school, now a privately owned office building called The Spectrum, has turned over the cavernous cafeteria space to popular Old Louisville caterer Phyllis “Gumby” Cornwell, who turns out tasty down-home fare for lunch plus a filling Sunday brunch. $ f GERMANTOWN CAFÉ 1053 Goss Ave., 637-9412. One of the many old-fashioned, simple and welcoming bars serving pub grub in Louisville’s old Germantown neighborhood is as good a spot as any for a hot burger and a cold beer. $ p f e

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GOURMET GRAZING 9550 US 42, 228-0464. This Prospect Point eatery offers a variety of pastas, crab cakes, salmon, sandwiches and desserts for carry out from its well-stocked catering cases. $ f

NANCY’S BAGEL GROUNDS 2101 Frankfort Ave., 895-8323. A friendly and casual neighborhood gathering spot. Offerings include soups, snacks, coffee drinks and bagels made on the premises to its own rather idiosyncratic formula. $ f NORTH END CAFÉ 1722 Frankfort Ave., 896-8770. This atmospheric Clifton spot in an artfully redesigned old shotgun house has become one of the city’s most popular spots, prompting a major expansion coming soon. The eclectic menu offers a combination of diverse tapas and interesting entrees, plus a bargain-seeker’s wine list. It’s an appealing, affordable place to dine. $ f THE PATRON 3400 Frankfort Ave., 896-1661. Viewed from the perspective of an evening meal, the Patron offers some of the best cooking in town. Chef Amber McCool offers a dinner menu that changes frequently, based on what’s available and perhaps the chef’s whim. It’s not just adventurous but civilized. $ THE STARVING ARTIST CAFÉ & DELI 8034 New Lagrange Rd., 412-1599. $ SWEET ‘N’ SAVORY CAFÉ 1574 Bardstown Rd., 456-6566. Hearty brunch fare with a vegetarian accent makes Sweet ‘n’ Savory a popular destination for the Bardstown Road bunch. $ THIRD AND MAIN CAFÉ 220 W. Main St., 587-6171. $ f THIRD AVENUE CAFÉ 1164 South Third St., 585-2233. One of my favorite places for a casual meal, this exceptionally pleasant neighborhood eatery is attracting loyal crowds with excellent fare and a cozy setting that brings you back for more. $$ p f e THYME CAFÉ 711 S. Third St., 587-0400. This spicy eclectic café serves up big taste with special tuna,


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ham and chicken entrees and sandwiches. Fresh basil tomato soup with the BLT on grilled sourdough is a fast-rising favorite in the neighborhood. $ TWICE TOLD PERFORMANCE CAFĂ&#x2030; 3507 W. Hwy. 146, LaGrange, 222-4506. An eclectic urban cafĂŠ in a village setting, about twenty minutes north of downtown. Menu is casual and fresh: sandwiches, fruits and veggies; daily soups and entrees from Sesame Chicken to Vegetarian Burritos. Live music every nightâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;folk, spoken word, blues, jazz. $ e WHITNEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DINER 5616 Bardstown Rd., 239-0919. $f

BISTROS ATRIUM CAFĂ&#x2030; 9940 Corporate Campus Dr., (Embassy Suites), 426-9191. An eclectic bistro atmosphere in the spacious heart of the hotel. Specials run from their popular crab cakes and array of pasta dishes to a Rueben sandwich or fruit pie. $$ p BAXTER STATION BAR & GRILL 1201 Payne St., 584-1635. This cozy spot looks a lot like a neighborhood saloon, but the eclectic menu and unique atmosphere (a railroad theme and airy patio in season) take it a notch upscale. Take particular note of an impressive beer list to go with your meal. $$ p f DIAMANTE 2280 Bardstown Rd., 456-1705. Chef Mike Driskell, formerly of Club Grotto, is upgrading the old Diamond Station bar and moving it significantly upscale with this new concept, which features an eclectic bill of fare and trendy libations in an attractive modern setting. $$ f JAZZ FACTORY 815 W. Market St., (Glassworks), 992-3242. Louisvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restored Glassworks building makes a natural home for this edgy, stylish venue for serious, live jazz. Chef Jeff Jarfiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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eclectic and innovative fare offers an extra incentive for a jazz-filled evening. $$ p e L&N WINE BAR AND BISTRO 1765 Mellwood Ave., 897-0070. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re enthusiastic about good wine, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be excited about L&N Wine Bar and Bistro. The fruit of the vine takes center stage in a vast, fairly priced wine list and imposing Cruvinet dispenser, with over 100 wines available by the glass. Comfortable exposed-brick atmosphere and excellent bistro fare add to the draw. $$ p RED LOUNGE 2106 Frankfort Ave., 896-6116. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loud. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smoky. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slick and glitzy and fun. Red Lounge is a bar first and an eatery second, but the fare, a short list of gourmet pub grub, is very good. $ p f e TOLOGONO 3702 Lexington Rd., 899-2005. In an intriguing twist on takeout food, Tologonoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s firstrate chefs will make you a gourmet-style meal to take out and enjoy in the comfort of home. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found the dishes fully competitive with local bistro fare, and more than competitive in price. $$

SEAFOOD BONEFISH GRILL 657 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 4124666. This franchise concept from the Floridabased Outback Steakhouse chain offers impressive seafood in a comfortable setting. Add Bonefish to your short list of suburban chain eateries that do the job right. $$$ p CAROLINA SHRIMP & SEAFOOD 3922 Westport Rd., 894-8947. In an East End neighborhood rich with seafood eateries, Carolina offers a tasty option within walking distance of downtown St. Matthews. This spartan little joint features shellfish and cod, much of it healthfully steamed, not fried, in an affordable family setting $ CLARKSVILLE SEAFOOD 916 Eastern Blvd., Clarksville, IN, 283-8588. As the only surviving

descendant of Louisvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s old Cape Codder chain, Clarksville Seafood upholds a long and honorable tradition. The menu is simpleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;fried fish and fried seafood, served on paper traysâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but it is consistently excellent and affordable. $ THE FISH HOUSE 1310 Winter Ave., 568-2993. Louisville is as overflowing as a well-stocked lake with fish-sandwich houses, and The Fish House is right up there with the best. Crisp breading laced with black pepper is the signature of Green River fried fish from Western Kentucky, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re mighty glad to have it here. $ f THE FISH HUT 550 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., 585-3474. If this trailerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not fryinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go away cryinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Known for their fried catfish, the only thing missing from this little fry shanty is a pond out back. $ f THE FISHERY 3624 Lexington Rd., 895-1188. The original fried-fish eatery in a neighborhood thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now awash with them, The Fishery remains justly popular for its quick, sizzling hot and affordable fish and seafood meals. $ f THE FISHERY STATION 5627 Outer Loop, 968-8363. Family owned and family style dining with a wide net of seafood dinners and appetizers. Lunch and dinner menus also include such delicacies as frog legs, shrimp and alligator. For the landlubbers there are cheeseburgers and fries. $ p JOEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CRAB SHACK 131 River Rd., 568-1171. The fake crab shack setting is bright, noisy and fun, and the servers keep everyone entertained. But the food is the bottom line, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pleased to report that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found the seafood at Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uniformly fresh and fine. $$ p f JOJOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FISH MARKET 2902 Bardstown Rd., 4517100. This small Highlands shop, vacant since the closing of the short-lived Highland Fish Market, is frying fish again, with decor and style so little changed that they're still using the same sign out front. Fried fish sandwiches, oversize fish tacos

Modern American Cuisine

Celebrating 55 years as Louisvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hometown favorite for top quality seafood and much, much more.

Upscale Casual Dining Culinary Cocktails Sunday Brunch

FOUR CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: On the River:

Lunch 11-3 Dinner 5:30-11 Sunday 11-3 Closed Monday

3021 Upper River Road â&#x2013;  895-0544 (Just east of Zorn Ave @ I-71)

601 W. Riverside â&#x2013;  284-3474 (On the Jeffersonville riverfront across from Louisville)

Around Town: 3401 Bardstown Road â&#x2013;  459-1432 1610 Kentucky Mills Dr. â&#x2013;  240-0700 (Blankenbaker @ 1-64)

3400 Frankfort Ave. Louisville, KY 40207 502-896-1661 www.thepatron.org

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and other seafood goodies are first-rate and fairly priced. $ KINGFISH RESTAURANT 3021 Upper River Rd., 895-0544, 3401 Bardstown Rd., 459-1432, 7483 Dixie Hwy., 933-3474, 1610 Kentucky Mills Dr., 2400700, 601 W. Riverside Dr., Jeffersonville, IN, 2843474. Fried fish in a family dining setting has made this local chain a popular favorite for many years. Two of its properties—upper River Road and Riverside Drive—boast river views. $$ p f

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FIFTH QUARTER STEAKHOUSE 1241 Durrett Ln., 3612363. The Fifth Quarter has that touch of class that evokes family nostalgia and romantic interludes. An attentive staff serves the sirloin your way. Some of the city’s best ivory masters are at the piano to enhance the dining experience. $$$ p f e FRANK’S STEAK HOUSE 520 W. Seventh St., Jeffersonville IN, 283-3383. A longtime north-ofthe-river favorite, this neighborhood steak house is known for comfort and hearty meals without pomp or circumstance. $$ p

MAZZONI’S OYSTER CAFÉ 2804 Taylorsville Rd., 451-4436. A history that dates to 1884 makes Mazzoni’s one of the city’s longest-running restaurant acts. It moved from downtown to the suburbs a generation ago, but kept its historic serving bar and its urban feeling, with pub grub, cold beer and the famous rolled oyster. $

LOGAN’S ROADHOUSE 5055 Shelbyville Rd., 8933884, 5229 Dixie Hwy., 448-0577, 970 Hwy. 131, Clarksville, IN, 288-9789. With more than 100 properties in 17 states, this Nashville-based chain parlays peanut shells on the floor and steaks on the table into a popular formula. $$ p

MIKE LINNIG’S 9308 Cane Run Rd., 937-1235. Mike Linnig’s has been dishing up tasty fried fish and seafood at family prices since 1925 and remains immensely popular. There’s indoor seating and a bar, but the picnic grove with its giant shade trees makes Linnig’s a special place in season. $ f

LONE STAR STEAKHOUSE & SALOON 340 Whittington Pkwy., 339-9495. Lone Star rises above the median for franchised chain establishments on the basis of popularity and style and very friendly service, with decent grub amid Texas-style surroundings and country music. $$ p f

MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET 4031 Summit Plaza Dr., 412-1818. The decor of this upscale, Columbusbased chain evokes the feeling of a large fish market, with an open kitchen that offers views of chefs at work. Quality seafood and service has made this a popular destination, and everything we’ve tried here has been fresh and wellprepared. $$$ p f

LONGHORN STEAKHOUSE 2535 Hurstbourne Ln., 671-5350. Order your sirloin on the flat-top or pork chops on the char; also prime rib, baby back ribs and a complete line of chicken entrees. All dinners come with salad and potato choice. $$ p

PROSPECT FISH MARKET 9521A US 42, Prospect, 228-6962. A great place to get an oyster, a seafood dinner or a fine fried-fish sandwich. And if you’re on the eastern edge of the metropolitan area, Prospect Fish Market offers good, affordable fish in a pleasant shopping-center setting. $ RIVER CREEK INN 6301 Upper River Rd., 228-3625. And yet there’s still something mighty pleasant about sitting on the dockside patio on the banks of Harrods Creek. It’s a favorite place to catch a quick dinner of fried fish and ice-cold beer. $ p f RUMORS RESTAURANT & RAW BAR 12339 Shelbyville Rd., 245-0366. Visualize Hooter’s without the scantily-clad waitresses, and you’ve drawn a bead on Rumor’s, the original Louisville home of the bucket-of-oysters and impressive raw bar. $$ p f STAN’S FISH SANDWICH 3723 Lexington Rd., 8966600. The fish is the thing at Stan’s, where the owner is a perfectionist who won’t sell any but the freshest fish, perfectly prepared. I’ve never had a better fish sandwich anywhere. Watch for daily specials that take advantage of fresh product. $ Z’S OYSTER BAR & STEAKHOUSE (see listing under Fine Dining)

STEAKHOUSE

MORTON’S 626 W. Main St., 584-0421. The steaks are as good as it gets, the atmosphere is elegant without being stuffy, and the service is outstanding. This downtown outpost of a Chicago chain earns a solid three stars and ranks among the top tier of Louisville’s upscale dining choices. $$$$ p OUTBACK STEAK HOUSE 4621 Shelbyville Rd., 8954329, 6520 Signature Dr., 964-8383, 9498 Brownsboro Rd., 426-4329, 8101 Bardstown Rd., 231-2399, 1420 Park Place, Clarksville, IN, 2834329. The name suggests Australia, and so does the shtick at this popular national chain, but the food is pretty much familiar American, and the fare goes beyond just steak to take in chicken, seafood and pasta. $$$ p PAT’S STEAK HOUSE 2437 Brownsboro Rd., 8969234. A visit to Pat’s may not be exactly like a trip back to the ‘50s, but when I ate there last, I think I saw Ozzie and Harriet. A local favorite, its combination of quality beef and hospitality rank it among the best steak houses in town. Bring cash: No credit cards accepted. $$$$ p PONDEROSA STEAKHOUSE 11470 S. Preston Hwy., 964-6117, 816 S. KY 53, La Grange, KY, 222-1226. Family-style dining with the ranch theme kept alive with the open flame from the grills. An extensive buffet with hot and cold foods, salads and desserts is available in addition to an a la carte menu. $

BABBY’S STEAKHOUSE 108 S. Fourth St., Utica, IN., 288-2411. This independent-minded steakhouse is one of the metro area’s best values for expertly prepared steaks. They come in all the usual sizes and configurations, but someone in the kitchen has definite opinions about seasoning and grilling. The result is a distinctive approach that rewards a visit. $$ f

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAKHOUSE 6100 Dutchman’s Ln., (Kaden Tower), 479-0026. The Robb Report magazine has declared Rolex the world’s best watch, Armani the best men’s suit, Cohiba the best cigar and Ruth’s Chris the best restaurant. It serves an excellent steak in an atmosphere of elegance that will make you feel pampered, at a price to match. $$$$ p

DEL FRISCO’S 4107 Oechsli Ave., 897-7077. Once ranked among the city’s top steakhouses, Del Frisco’s remains strong in its core competency. For deeply marbled, fork-tender prime steaks, it’s still hard to beat on quality points. $$$$ p

RYAN’S FAMILY STEAKHOUSE 7405 Preston Hwy., 964-1748, 5338 Bardstown Rd., 491-1088, 4711 Dixie Hwy., 447-4781, 636 Eastern Blvd., Clarksville, IN, 282-8520. This popular North Carolina-based chain is family dining with a unique sense of variety and fresh presentation. The diverse buffet features over 150 items and the steaks, entrees and seafood are always made to order. $

DILLON’S STEAKHOUSE 2101 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy, 499-7106. Dillon’s has a distinctly different atmosphere from more pricey steakhouses, with its ski-lodge atmosphere in a historic Louisville home. It’s probably the most affordable quality steak dinner that the city has to offer. $$ p 62 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

STONEY RIVER LEGENDARY STEAK 3900 Summit Plaza Dr., 429-8944. Stoney River in the sprawling Springhurst shopping center is one of the chain’s

first properties outside its Georgia home. It offers respectable steaks and trimmings, friendly service and a pleasant atmosphere. $$$ p TEXAS ROADHOUSE Green Tree Mall, Clarksville, IN, 280-1103, 4406 Dixie Hwy. 448-0705, 6460 Dutchman’s Pkwy., 897-5005, 3322 Outer Loop, 962-7600. The spirit of the West makes for wildly popular steak dinners served with large portions of sides. Salads, vegetables and breads round out hearty meal options. This is family-style dining, with no tray sliding—service at your table. $$ p Z’S OYSTER BAR & STEAKHOUSE (see listing under Fine Dining)

CASUAL DINING A NICE RESTAURANT 3105 Blackiston Mill Rd., New Albany IN, 945-4321, 2784 Meijer Dr., 280-9160. A Nice Restaurant, billed as “New Albany’s Finer Diner,” is, well, nice. This sunny corner shop in the Old Mill Shopping Center specializes in breakfast and lunch. The fare is down-home and simple, at a price you can afford. $ ANYTIMES AT THE RAMADA INN 1041 Zorn Ave., 897-5101. Serving dinners only, the spacious restaurant opens at 4:00 and begins serving appetizers, salads, entrees and desserts. The chef’s special attention to the steak dinner has garnered a good word-of-mouth about town. $$ p APPLEBEE’S (9 locations) This cheery national chain features an eclectic assortment of salads, steaks, ribs, poultry and pasta as well as full bar service. It’s as consistent as a cookie cutter, but good execution makes it a good bargain for those whose tastes run to mainstream American cuisine. $$ p AROMA CAFÉ Caesars Indiana Casino, Elizabeth, IN, 888-766-2648. Grab a bite before hitting the casino. Sandwiches, salads, sides, cold beverages and coffee will fuel you for a night of entertainment. $ BEEF O’BRADY’S 239 Blankenbaker Pkwy., 2542322, 5628 Bardstown Rd., 239-2226, 106 Sears Ave., 897-3725, 10000 Brownsboro Rd., 327-8881. If you think your basic sports pub is only suitable for guys guzzling beer, take another look: Beef O’Brady’s puts the “family” in “family sports pub,” offering a wholesome environment that will suit Mom and Pop and the kids too. $ BENTLEY’S 120 W. Broadway (Holiday Inn), 5822241. Enjoy a classic Kentucky hot brown or the allyou-can-eat prime rib buffet on Saturday nights. Each day features a new pasta dish, a hearty soup and salad bar, as well as steady favorites from the cutting board and grill. A separate lounge touts a well-stocked full bar and there is a Kids Eat Free menu for the dining room. $$ p e BIG HOPP’S 800 W. Market St., 589-6600. A wide variety of family-style fare, from fettuccine alfredo to fried chicken, is dished up with friendly, welcoming service at this popular local spot, now in modern quarters in the busy Glassworks district. $pf BRAVO! 206 Bullitt Ln., (Oxmoor Center), 326-0491. Management describes the Ohio-based Bravo! chain as “a fun, white-tablecloth casual eatery ... positioned between the fine-dining and casual chains.” A Roman-ruin setting houses abundant Italian-American style fare. We particularly enjoyed appetizers and first-rate grilled meats. $$ p f BUCKHEAD MOUNTAIN GRILL 3008 Bardstown Rd., 456-6680, 4112 Outer Loop, 966-5555, 10430 Shelbyville Rd., 245-6680, 707 W. Riverside Dr., Jeffersonville IN, 284-2919. Despite a mountain lodge theme that might make you think of the Colorado Rockies, this growing chain is based in Louisville. Upscale bar food and a sizable bar to match make these popular destinations. $$ p f


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BULL FROG GARDEN 5440 Del Maria Way 4990393. Another of Louisville’s hidden secrets, this family eatery in the Fern Creek area is popular with its neighbors and is earning a broader reputation for pub grub at reasonable prices, prepared with care and served in a friendly setting. $$ p e

SANDWICHES HOMEMADE DESSER TS STEAKS FRESH SEAFOOD PASTAS SALADS 12 BEERS ON TAP DAILY SPECIALS

Deke says, “Join us downtown for great food and libations!”

THE CAFÉ AT THE LOUISVILLE ANTIQUE MALL 900 Goss Ave., 637-6869. One of the city’s most attractive spots for antique and junque-shopping, this cavernous old factory building on Goss Avenue offers a similarly attractive place to catch lunch while you shop, offering a selection of luncheon fare competently made with fresh ingredients. $ CAPTAIN’S QUARTERS 5700 Captain’s Quarters Rd., 228-1651. One of the city’s most attractive eateries for atmosphere, Captain’s Quarters matches the beautiful setting with quality bistrostyle fare that won’t disappoint. Summer or winter, it’s a delightful place to dine. $$ p f e CARDINAL HALL OF FAME CAFÉ 2745 Crittenden Dr., 635-8686. This oversize eatery at Gate 4 of the Kentucky Fair & Exposition Center celebrates U of L sports with a “walk of fame” loaded with awards, photos, game balls and lots more Cardinal memorabilia. What? You want food too? Sure! Casual American dining features everything from a “Cardinal Burger” to steaks and prime rib. $$ p CHAMPIONS GRILL 505 Marriott Dr., (Holiday Inn), Clarksville, IN., 283-4411. Known by locals for its Saturday night buffet of New York strip, ribeye and prime rib. Salads, sandwiches, soups and a kid-friendly menu round out the selection. $$ p e

Corner of Third & Market 301 West Market Street • 584-8337 Dine In, Carry Out or Delivery - Outdoor Dining 11AM - 10PM Monday thru Thursday 11AM - 11PM Friday and Saturday

CHICK INN 6325 Upper River Rd., 228-3646. Now in completely new quarters rebuilt after a fire gutted the old building in December 2002, Louisville's familiar Chick Inn reopened this autumn. We're delighted to report that the new place feels much like the old, and the excellent fried chicken is still first-rate. $$ p f

Happy Hour 4PM - 7PM Monday thru Friday

CHICKEN KING 639 E. Broadway, 589-5464. Formerly a Bojangles, Chicken King has changed little but the sign since it came under independent management a while back. Spicy, crunchy and sizzling hot fried chicken remains the primary draw on a short, affordable menu. $ CHILI’S 421 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 425-6800. More than just the hip place for baby back ribs, this national chain has the coolest in hot foods like fajitas, burgers, sandwiches and veggies. $ p CRIBSTONE PUB 1202 Bardstown Rd., 459-3339. This tiny Bardstown Road eatery turns a neighborhood bar into a lobster and steak house, where fine seafood and beef is served without pomp or circumstance in a setting so casual that you can wear your shorts and T-shirt to dine. $$$ p CUNNINGHAM’S 630 S. Fourth St., 587-0526. The historic brick building at Fifth and Breckenridge Streets that housed the original Cunninghams for 131 years was destroyed by fire in 2001. But its new downtown home captures much of the nostalgia of the old, and standing-room-only crowds are just as pleased with its fish sandwiches and pub grub. $ f CUTTING BOARD CAFÉ 2905 Goose Creek Rd., 4239950. There’s a lot of potential in this East End storefront. Management’s interest in food extends to having the cable FoodTV channel on the tube in its simple, spartan dining room. The bill of fare is mostly sandwiches, panini and wraps, but they’re creative and generally well-made. $ DEKE’S MARKETPLACE GRILL 301 W. Market St., 584-8337. It starts as a downtown bar, a favorite hangout for lawyers and the Courthouse crowd, but Deke’s goes beyond the obvious to offer

Hurstbourne 2901 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy

Prospect 6051 Timber Ridge Drive

The Summit THE HOMETOWN FAVORITE®

Brownsboro Road at Gene Snyder

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steaks, burgers, pasta dishes and more. The decoera architecture adds to the soul of each appetizer and entrée. $$$ p f

concrete columns of a former grain elevator just east of downtown. Always filled with a happy crowd, it’s the place to go for casual food and fun. $ p f e

DITTO’S GRILL 1114 Bardstown Rd., 581-9129. The bill of fare offers a large and eclectic selection that ranges from bar-food munchies to an appetizing mix of exotic items and down-home dishes like Mom used to make. $$ p

JIMMY’S ON THE RIVER 100 W. Riverside Dr., Jeffersonville IN, 282-2500. The menu at this friendly bar and eatery features affordable bar food and munchies, but the fastidious may choose from the menu’s “Lighter Side.” Hearty meals at budget prices and a striking riverside view from two great decks makes for the quintessential moonlit night on the Ohio. $ p f e

FOUR KINGS CAFÉ 4642 Jennings Ln., 968-2930. Steam-table service featuring spaghetti and meatballs, lasagna and chicken attract a hungry lunch crowd at this casual spot, and brunch specialties are just as popular. $ p GARRETT’S HICKORY GRILLE 9601 Shelbyville Rd., 327-8143. Whether your pleasure is a steak or a slab of juicy ribs or something healthy like a plate of pasta, you’ll find it easy to satisfy at this familystyle restaurant located in a historic coach house. $$ p f GOLDEN CORRAL 4032 Taylorsville Rd., 485-0004, 8013 Preston Hwy., 966-4970, 1402 Cedar St., 258-2540. Buffet style family dining—one price, all you can eat. Steaks are served beginning at 4 pm. $ HARD ROCK CAFÉ Fourth Street Live, 568-2202. Louisville’s Fourth Street Live opened with a bang this summer amid hammering guitars and happy throngs as the city gained its first branch of this popular shrine to rock with its giant neon guitar to show you the way. The music scene is the draw, but you’ll have no complaints about Hard Rock’s standard American cuisine. $$ p f e HARPER’S RESTAURANT 871 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 425-2900. Harper’s draws a happy crowd of regulars with a large bar and big menu that offers a wide range of American-style fare, with management that takes quality seriously. Gourmet pizzas and fine libations are a specialty, and the prices are right. $$ p f HEATHER’S ON THE RIVER 1900 Victory Ln., 2284359. The banks of the Ohio in Oldham County make a pretty setting for this barge-based eatery that's been through several theme changes. Once The Famous Dog, it later became a private club where suburbanites could enjoy a drink in otherwise "dry" surroundings. It's now open to the public as a fine-dining, American-style restaurant ... and tiki bar. $$ p HOOTERS 4120 Dutchmans Ln., 895-7100; 4948 Dixie Hwy., 449-4194; 7701 Preston Hwy., 9681606; 700 W. Riverside Dr., Jeffersonville, IN, 2189485; 941 East Hwy. 131, Clarksville, IN 284-9464. Hooter’s may draw crowds with its long-standing reputation as a party scene, but you’ll stay for the food, an appetizing selection of soups, salads, ribs, seafood and more. Extra points for the company’s regular involvement in community causes. $ p f e HUTTSTER’S BURGER 2900 Brownsboro Ln., 8991964. Just about as basic as an eatery gets, this little white house in Crescent Hill (originally a Heitzman's Bakery and later the home of Melillo's) now houses Huttster's, a jockey-themed hamburger shop that's reminiscent of the 1950s in its style and, best of all, the kind of oversize, old-fashioned juicy burgers and crispy fries that you'll rarely see anymore. $ f INDI’S RESTAURANT 1033 W. Broadway, 589-7985, 3820 W. Market St., 778-5154, 4901 Poplar Level Rd., 964-5749, 3353 Fern Valley Rd., 969-7993, 5009 S. Third St., 363-2535. Grown from a tiny West End takeout spot to a mini-chain, Indi’s vends a variety of affordable soul food and barbecue specialties to take out or eat in. $ JILLIAN’S 630 Barret Ave., 589-9090. Louisville’s outpost of the Boston-based billiard-themed restaurant concept, this big and noisy bar, food and billiards scene is housed under the towering

64 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

JOE’S OLDER THAN DIRT 8131 New Lagrange Rd., 426-2074. Going strong after many years in this Lyndon location, Joe’s has gradually grown from a little house to a sprawling complex of indoor and outdoor tables with live music many evenings. Excellent barbecue is a specialty, and so is ice-cold beer. $ p e KAELIN’S RESTAURANT 1801 Newburg Rd., 4511801. This Highlands tradition has been around for almost 70 years, and their cheeky claim to have invented the cheeseburger actually seems to have some basis in fact. It’s a popular standard for family fare. $ KERN’S KORNER 2600 Bardstown Rd., 456-9726. This family-owned tavern has been a prime place to watch the world go by since 1978. Whether it is happy hour, lunch or dinner time, Kern’s offers freshly made ham, chicken salad sandwiches and burgers, as well as soups, chilis and appetizers. This makes a tasty, traditional pit stop. $ p LA PECHE II Holiday Manor Shopping Center, 3397593. If you want to enjoy much-honored Chef Kathy Cary’s imaginative cooking without paying the prices at Lilly’s, this sibling spot is the place to go. Take-out or eat-in, offering a good variety of creative salads, sandwiches and cold pasta dishes. $$ f LEGENDS AT CAESARS Caesars Indiana Casino, Elizabeth, IN, 888-766-2648. The hot and cold short orders are served up with riverboat hospitality, but in a Las Vegas atmosphere. A well stocked bar and a live stage welcome the best of regional and visiting national acts from Wednesday through Saturday nights. $$ p e THE LIGHTHOUSE 202 Main St., Jeffersonville, IN, 283-0077. This lighthouse has been a beacon of casual, home cooking and tavern environment for years. Generous daily specials, appetizers, chicken and fish baskets, salads and desserts round out the menu. A full bar in back and dining area in front serviced by a friendly staff makes a return trip a must. $ LONGINO’S GRILL 4041 Preston Hwy., 363-2266. Home-style cooking at this popular South End family restaurant runs the gamut from grilled steaks and chops to chicken with buttery mashed potatoes and hot vegetables. $ p LYNN’S PARADISE CAFÉ 984 Barrett Ave., 583-3447. One of the most popular places in town for brunch (and dinner too), Lynn’s Paradise Café lures happy, hungry crowds with its hearty fare and funky decor. Lynn’s sponsors the State Fair’s tongue-in-cheek Ugliest Lamp Contest, but there’s nothing ugly about the delicious and filling food. $$ p MAIN MENU 3306 Plaza Dr., New Albany, IN., 9486501. $$ MANHATTAN GRILL 200 S. 7th St., 561-0024. $

Summit Plaza Dr., 412-5229. Max & Erma’s, a national chain that started in Columbus, Ohio’s German Village in 1972, has grown to nearly 100 properties with a steady formula of friendly service and casual-dining fare that ranges from specialty burgers, soups and salads to more weighty entrees. $$ p f MELTING POT 2045 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 491-3125. This Florida-based chain brings back pleasant memories of fondue parties of the ’70s. If you can melt it and dip things in it, the Melting Pot probably has it on the menu, from cheese fondue to beef fondue to its spectacular trademark chocolate fondue, served in a classy, upscale environment at white-tablecloth prices. $$$ p O’CHARLEY’S (6 locations) O’Charley’s, Inc. could serve well as the picture in the dictionary next to “American casual dining.” The Nashville-based chain operates 206 properties in 16 states in the Southeast and Midwest, serving a straightforward steak-and-seafood menu with the motto “Mainstream with an attitude.” $$ p OTTO’S CAFÉ 500 S. Fourth St., (Seelbach Hilton Hotel) 585-3201. Southern cooking with gourmet flair has earned Otto’s a constellation of multi-star ratings. And whether you try the Southern Breakfast Buffet, with its bourbon-bread French toast or The Executive Express Lunch Buffet, you will see why. $ PALERMO VIEJO 1359 Bardstown Rd., 456-6461. This eatery’s name may sound Italian, but is, in fact, Louisville’s only source of Argentinian cuisine. Steaks seared on authentic parrillada charcoal grills are a primary draw, but there’s excellent chicken, seafood and much more—plus an affordable selection of intriguing Argentinian wines. $$ p f PETRUS 116 E. Main St., 583-3772. “Petrus” is also the name of one of the most expensive wines in the world, but this inviting “American casual” restaurant offers sandwiches, salads and soups with lunch for less than Chateau Petrus prices. $$ p RAFFERTY’S OF LOUISVILLE 988 Breckenridge Ln., 897-3900. 3601 Springhurst Blvd., 412-9000. This full-service, casual dining establishment has a hearty menu. Specialties like Red Alfredo Pasta showcase the gourmet offerings along with some of the largest and most creative salad combinations in town. $$ p RAMSI’S CAFÉ ON THE WORLD 1293 Bardstown Rd., 451-0700, 215 S. Fifth St., 589-0800. Small, funky and fun, this favorite spot of the Highlands’ Generation X crowd attracts foodies of all ages with its friendly setting, reasonable prices and well-prepared international cuisine. The downtown branch is similar. $$ RANCH HOUSE Highlander Point Shopping Center, Floyds Knobs, IN, 923-1435, 2611 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 944-9199. The menu and the retro 1950s decor hark back to the original Bob Colgazier’s restaurants that Baby Boomers remember fondly from days gone by. $ e RED HORSE GRILLE & BAR 4004 Gardiner Pt., (Holiday Inn) 753-4413. Not your ordinary hotel restaurant. Specializing in Black Angus steak dishes but a varied, well thought out menu has enough variety to suit most any party. At lunch their signature burgers feature specials such as the Wild Western, Buffalo Bonanza and the spicy Backdraft. $$ p f e

MASTERSON’S 1830 S. Third St., 636-2511. A fine, family Louisville tradition, this familiar Tudor structure near the U of L campus is the state’s largest full-service restaurant and the city’s largest caterer. Serving lunch buffet Mon.-Fri., 10am-2pm only. Sunday Jazz Brunch. $ e

RIVER GRILLE 140 N. Fourth St., (Galt House) 5895200. Gaze upon the lazy Ohio while enjoying an early bacon and eggs or enjoy a late night burger and fries. Casual and accommodating for guests on the go, the fast and friendly service awaits you on the second floor. $$$ p

MAX & ERMA’S 6051 Timberbridge Dr., 292-2779, 2901 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 493-9662, 3921

ROLLO POLLO 4975 Shelbyville Rd., 894-0012. This local family restaurant offers healthy chicken


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dinners roasted on an open-flame rotisserie. Sides from cole slaw, lentils and mac ’n’ cheese to spiced apple desserts are also on the menu. $ RUBY TUESDAY 5001 Shelbyville Rd., 897-0200, 11701 Bluegrass Pkwy., 267-7100. If success demonstrates quality, then Ruby Tuesday’s 600 international properties and 30,000 employees can stand up with pride. They’ve been upholding the slogan “Awesome Food. Serious Salad Bar” in Louisville for a generation. $$ p THE RUDYARD KIPLING 422 W. Oak St., 636-1311. The word “eclectic” fits this Old Louisville eatery in just about every dimension, from its funky decor to its diverse bill of fare, not to mention an array of entertainment that bridges the generations from Generation X’ers to aging hippies. $ p f e

GREAT VIEW OF THE OHIO RIVER (Located six blocks from the Kennedy Bridge)

Casual Dining at its Best Daily Lunch, Dinner and Drink Specials

SAM’S FOOD & SPIRITS 3800 Payne Kohler Rd., Clarksville, IN, 945-9757, 724 Highlander Point Dr., Floyds Knobs, IN, 923-7979. Opened by a man named Sam some 16 years ago, the two locations feed an army of happy diners. You’ll find seafood, steaks, pastas, salads, appetizers and desserts. The menu is extensive and child friendly. $$ p

1 Domestic Longnecks

$

SHONEY’S 1890 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 491-6870, 811 Eastern Pkwy., 636-1043, 6511 Signature Dr., 9698904. For nearly 50 years, Shoney’s restaurants have been one of America’s top choices for fast roadside dining, and happily they’ve kept up with the times. $ SKYLINE CHILI 1266 Bardstown Rd., 473-1234, Plainview Village Center, 429-5773, 392 Dutchman’s Ln., 895-7578, 6801 Dixie Hwy., 9374020, 426 W. Market St., 561-9999. Louisville’s outposts of a famous Cincinnati chili restaurant, these casual eateries offer the regional favorite (really it’s Greek spaghetti sauce, but keep it quiet) and other fast-food dishes. $ SOMEWHERE IN THYME TEA GARDEN 10320 Watterson Trail, 240-0671. The historic Seaton House, a pre-Civil War mansion on Jeffersontown’s old Town Square, makes a quaint and genteel setting for a luncheon list of soups, salads and light sandwiches. $ f e STEAK N SHAKE 3232 Bardstown Rd., 456-2670, 4913 Dixie Hwy., 448-4400, 4545 Outer Loop, 9663109, 2717 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 491-3397, 10721 Fischer Park Dr., 326-3625, 980 E. Hwy. 131, Clarksville, IN., 285-1154. One of the oldest fastfood chains in the U.S., Steak N Shake traces its ancestry to an Illinois roadside stand in 1934. It now boasts 400 outlets in 19 states but still sticks to the basics: quality steak burgers and hand-dipped shakes served, if you dine in, on real china. $

Sunday, Monday & Thursday

Karaoke with R/T Express Tuesday, Friday & Saturday 100 W. Riverside Drive • Jeffersonville, IN • 282-2500

Sam’s Food & Spirits offers excellent food and service in a casual atmosphere at reasonable prices. That’s why we’re a Southern Indiana favorite gathering spot for friends and family. Now you can enjoy Sam’s exclusively for your next social gathering, office meeting or civic function.

PrivateDining

STUMLER RESTAURANT & ORCHARD 10924 St. John’s Rd., Starlight, IN, 923-3832. Fresh produce is available in the big shed a few steps away, and that fresh produce shows up on the tables here in mammoth portions. Combine that with honest fried chicken, big ham steaks, roast beef, and sandwiches, and you can’t go wrong. $$ f

Reserve one of our private dining rooms for:

TGI FRIDAY’S 9990 Linn Station Rd., 425-8185, 2311 Lime Kiln Ln., 327-8443, Fourth Street Live, 5853577. The original place to loosen the tie and congregate after the whistle blows. TGIF carries on its party atmosphere tradition with American bistro dining and libations. The bill of fare ranges from baskets of appetizers on up to contemporary entrees. $$ p f

For booking information, contact either Sam’s location.

THE OTHER PLACE 1600 Bardstown Rd., 458-2888. $fe TOMMY LANCASTER RESTAURANT 1629 E. Market St., New Albany, IN, 945-2389. Value and variety are the strong points of this community tradition and the fare goes from burgers to lobster tails. Friday or Saturday evenings feature a buffet. $ p

for your

SOCIAL & BUSINESS FUNCTIONS

• Company training sessions • Business meetings – Breakfast, Lunch, or Dinner • Company Holiday and Christmas parties • Civic functions Special menus are available for group functions. Highlander Point 724 Highlander Point Floyds Knobs, IN 47119 (812) 923-7979

New Albany 3800 Payne Koehler Road New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-9757

Friends. Food. Fun. www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Fall 2004 65


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TRELLIS RESTAURANT 320 W. Jefferson St., (Hyatt Regency), 587-3434. Dine on café fare in the Hyatt’s lofty atrium lobby while you take advantage of an environment made for people-watching. The extensive menu ranges from drinks to desserts, a club sandwich to a filet mignon. The Trellis also offers a popular and expansive Sunday brunch. $$ p TUCKER’S 2441 State St., New Albany, IN, 9449999. Tucker’s gives you a little bit of everything with a down-to-earth flair, offering burgers, ribs, steaks, a variety of appetizers, pastas and Mexican fare. $ p TWIAMS CHICKEN & WAFFLES 2517 Dixie Hwy., 775-0216. Former U of L basketball star Tony Williams now presides over Twiams, an attractive West End eatery that impresses the visitor with cordial service and quality fare. The name of the place pretty much describes the menu, which also features other soul-food favorites. $ TWIG & LEAF RESTAURANT 2122 Bardstown Rd., 451-8944. A popular Highlands hangout, the ”Twig” is probably at its best for breakfast—whether you’re enjoying it while venturing out on a leisurely Sunday morning or heading home very late on a Saturday night. It’s a place to grab a quick, filling bite, and doesn’t pretend to be more. $

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COTTAGE INN 570 Eastern Pkwy., 637-4325. Now, this is down-home dining. Tucked away under big shade trees on Eastern Parkway not far from the University of Louisville’s Belknap Campus, Cottage Inn has been happily doling out excellent food for more than 70 years. $ COUNTRY KITCHEN 1506 Berry Blvd., 367-5995. Cafeteria style or dining room menu service: it’s up to you. This south end establishment serves up a variety of home-style food from sweet iced tea and biscuits to the country-fried steak and a fluffy mountain of real mashed potatoes and gravy. $ p f DE-VILLE’S 4900 Poplar Level Rd., 961-9102. De-Ville’s has made a science out of soul food, with collard greens, buttermilk cornbread, pork chop sandwiches and fried ribs. $ f D’NALLEY’S 970 S. Third St., 583-8015. Dirt-cheap blue-plate specials and hearty breakfasts bring droves to the counters and booths of this classic greasy spoon. Saturday morning hours are sporadic, but for a quick plate of meat loaf, green beans, and mashed potatoes, D’Nalley’s is a hard place to beat. $ FORK IN THE ROAD RESTAURANT 4951 Cane Run Rd., 448-3903. $

red-eye gravy, country ham and grits show off Mr. Lou’s country cooking style. Roast chicken is a dinner favorite, and so are homemade pies. $ NEIL’S PLACE 7611 IN 311, Sellersburg, IN, 246-5456. Best known for the specially seasoned fried chicken. Neil’s also makes excellent pastas, steaks, seafood, and salads. Homemade soups are created daily and coffee and desserts are always fresh. $$ p O’DOLLYS 7800 Third St. Rd., 375-1690. Homestyle steam-table favorites are available from breakfast through dinner, not to mention full bar service that makes O’Dollys a Southwest Louisville destination. $ p f OLIVE’S ON FOURTH 570 S. Fourth St., 588-9003. No matter what you’re hungry for, chances are Olive’s has it—from steam-table fare to pizza and calzones. Linda Zeisloft, longtime manager of The Bakery at Sullivan University, is owner and chef. $ f ROADWAY WINGS 708 Cecil Ave., 774-5543. $ f TOLL BRIDGE INN 3300 Northwestern Pkwy,, 7765505. A rich and colorful history surrounds the century-old frame building in Portland that now houses the Toll Bridge Inn, a neighborhood favorite for simple, filling down-home fare. $ f

THE VILLA BUFFET Caesars Indiana Casino, Elizabeth, IN, 888-766-2648. The Villa Buffet offers an impressive choice of international dishes, with some 150 selections. A seafood buffet is featured on Fridays. $$

GENNY’S DINER 2223 Frankfort Ave., 893-0923. What’s the difference between Genny’s Diner and a saloon? You can take the kids to Genny’s. Better still, you can get a darn good meal at Genny’s, provided that you set your expectations for hearty, filling and well-prepared diner food. $ p e

W.W. COUSINS RESTAURANT 900 Dupont Rd., 897-9684. This locally owned and operated eatery looks a lot like the national Fuddruckers chain, but the local boys do a better job, with huge burgers on magisterial home-baked buns and a Metropolitan Museum of toppings. $

WAGNER’S PHARMACY 3133 S. Fourth St., 375-3800. A track-side institution that has as much history as the nearby Twin Spires of Churchill Downs. Soups, sandwiches, shakes, cherry Cokes and an early bird “trainer’s” breakfast can be enjoyed all year round. Racing history on the walls and servers who’ll call you “hon.” $

GOOSE CREEK DINER 2923 Goose Creek Rd., 3398070. Goose Creek Diner offers old-fashioned comfort food, as the name “diner” suggests, but transcendently adds a gourmet taste to the down-home eats. $

WEBB’S MARKET 944 E. Muhammad Ali Blvd., 5830318. Webb’s is deli sandwich market style dining. Country ham sandwiches and the half-pound cheeseburger are a specialty. $

HOME STYLE COOKING ANCHOR INN 1500 Evergreen Rd., 245-7121. Enjoying new life under the same management, the former Abruzzi has switched from ItalianAmerican fare to American home-style cuisine. But the best part—its upscale casual style in the park-like setting of suburban Anchorage—is just as good as ever. $$ p f

HAZELWOOD RESTAURANT 4106 Taylor Blvd., 3619104. Whether you like your eggs over easy, or your cheeseburgers well done, you’ll like the Hazelwood Restaurant. Standard short orders cooked with lots of character and a low price. $ HOLLY’S LEGAL STREET CAFETERIA 715 W. Jefferson St., 584-4080 A longtime favorite of the Courthouse crowd, Holly’s steam table and grill consistently please, as does its full bar. $ p

CAFETERIAS ANN’S BY THE RIVER 149 Spring St., Jeffersonville, IN., 284-2667. This bustling eatery is cafeteria style dining done well. They serve up the standard steam table meat-and-three menu items as good as any. With the Ohio River a block away, it’s aptly named. $ COLONNADE CAFETERIA 455 S. Fifth St., 5846846. Sometimes cafeteria fare hits the spot, and this much-loved local landmark in the basement of the Starks Building has won a multigenerational crowd of loyal fans. $

BARBARA LEE’S KITCHEN 2410 Brownsboro Rd., 897-3967. Barbara Lee’s has been a late-night refuge for years. It’s a reliable standby for those in search of traditional blue-plate special lunch food. Honest grub, honestly priced, in a rootsy atmosphere. $

HOMETOWN BUFFET 1700 Alliant Ave., 267-7044, 3710 Chamberlain Ln., 326-9777, 6641 Dixie Hwy., 995-3320, 757 Hwy. 131, Clarksville, IN., 285-1893. This national chain serves up nostalgic dishes, casseroles, meats and desserts that allow you to set an all-American supper table with the all-youcan eat price tag. $

CAROLYN’S 3822 Cane Run Rd., 776-9519. The steam table classic, the “meat ‘n’ two” gives you the roast chicken, green beans and mashed potatoes. Or pork chops, applesauce and limas. $

JESSIE’S FAMILY RESTAURANT 9609 Dixie Hwy., 937-6332. Country cooking is Jessie’s specialty, with hearty breakfast, lunch and dinner platters to fill the inner person. $

CHECK’S CAFÉ 1101 E. Burnett Ave., 637-9515. You can scent a whiff of Louisville history coming off the old walls of this quintessential Germantown saloon, along with years of frying grease. The bar food here is about as good as bar food gets, and that’s not bad. The chili and the bean soup are particularly recommended. $ p f e

KINGS FAST FOOD 2101 W. Broadway, 772-7138. This tiny, colorful West End eatery, open for takeout only, offers a vast selection of filling, affordable urban fare that ranges from hot-andspicy chicken wings to rib tips and more. $

HALL’S CAFETERIA 1301 Story Ave., 583-0437. Hall’s Cafeteria has been doing a brisk business on the steam tables since 1955, attracting customers from Butchertown’s truck loading docks and from offices downtown. $

KING’S FRIED CHICKEN 1302 Dixie Hwy., 776-3013. $

JANE’S CAFETERIA 4601 Jennings Ln., 454-7286. This 40-year-old family-owned restaurant knows how to cook for folks missing their home table. Count on an attentive staff and fresh southern fare. $

CHESTER’S TAVERN 5444 New Cut Rd., 368-8848. $$ THE CHICKEN HOUSE 7180 Hwy. 111, Sellersburg, IN., 246-9485. The parking lot of this white frame building in rural Indiana is packed on weekend nights as families from throughout the area wait on delectable fried chicken. This is the very heart of American comfort food, including green beans, dumplings, and mashed potatoes. $$ COTTAGE CAFÉ 11609 Main St., Middletown, 2449497. This nostalgic old house in the countryside offers a taste of Kentucky-style cookery in an array of lunch specials that range from homemade soups and sandwiches to the traditional Louisville Hot Brown. $ 66 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

LINDY’S 5110 Preston Hwy., 964-6428. Open 7 days a week, this establishment is a local favorite for family dining. Variety is the key to Lindy’s reputation with buffet or full service menus available. Enjoy daily specials and down home selections from franks and kraut to steak dinners. $ LONNIE’S BEST TASTE OF CHICAGO 121 St. Matthews Ave., 895-2380. This appetizing operation offers genuine Chicago hot dogs and a taste of Chicago atmosphere for a price that won’t hurt your wallet. Make Lonnie’s the place to go when you’ve got a hankering for Windy City fare. $$ MR. LOU’S COUNTRY COTTAGE RESTAURANT 5408 Valley Station Rd., 933-0806. Biscuits and

CRAVINGS A LA CARTE 101 S. Fifth St., (National City Tower), 589-4230. Sequestered beneath the National City Tower, this thrifty deli offers a variety of build-your-own sandwiches, a soupand-salad bar, and specialty bars featuring baked potatoes, Mexican pizzas, and a monthly ethnic creation. $

JAY’S CAFETERIA 1812 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., 583-2534. Jay’s big, well-scrubbed new building wouldn’t be out of place on Hurstbourne Lane. Cafeteria fare is consistently fine, and hungry diners from all over town find a warm welcome at this popular West End location. $ PICCADILLY CAFETERIA 2131 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 493-9900, 133 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 423-1733. An east end favorite for variety, Piccadilly offers roast beef, fried chicken, cod, steak and shrimp dinners,


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a gardener’s list of vegetables and a few ethnic dishes for global measure. $ SOUTH SIDE INN CAFETERIA 114 E. Main St., New Albany, IN., 945-9645. This venerable familyowned cafeteria is the very essence of cafeteria dining. Roast beef, fried Alaskan whitefish, spaghetti and meat sauce, pies chock full of fruit and old-fashioned vegetables come in huge portions for low prices. You’ll be hard pressed to spend five bucks here, and you’ll get a lunch or dinner that will leave you napping. $

PIZZA ANGILO’S PIZZA 1725 Berry Blvd., 368-1032. The local favorite is the steak hoagie, dripping with pizza sauce, pickles and onions. Angilo’s also offers a wide selection of hot pizza pies and cold beer. $ ANGIO’S RESTAURANT 3731 Old Bardstown Rd., 451-5454. This small Buechel eatery attracts a friendly neighborhood crowd with hefty subs and quality pizzas, along with cold beer. $ ANNIE’S PIZZA 2520 Portland Ave., 776-6400, 4007 Cane Run Rd., 449-4444. Annie’s has made-toorder pizza and a variety of stacked sandwiches such as the Big Daddy Strom with beef, Italian sausage, onions and banana peppers. $ ARNI’S PIZZA 1208 State St., New Albany, IN, 9451149, 3700 Paoli Pike, Floyds Knobs, IN, 923-9805. A favorite Hoosier pizza and sandwich stop. Insist on getting the Deluxe. $ BEARNO’S PIZZA 131 W. Main St., 584-7720, 2900 Taylorsville Rd., 458-8605, 6101 Bardstown Rd., 231-2222, 135-F Marketplace Dr., 957-5100, 10117 Taylorsville Rd., 267-2549, 1318 Bardstown Rd., 456-4556, 8019 Preston Hwy., 968-6060, 4105 Dixie Hwy., 449-4141, 9222 Westport Rd.,423-1224, 7895 Dixie Hwy., 937-1234, 1923 S. Fourth St., 6345155, 3002 Charlestown Crossing, 949-7914. Bearno’s is known for its Italian entrees, generous salads, and Chicago-style pizza. If you prefer something more substantial, Bearno’s also offers spaghetti, marinara and meatballs. $ p

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FROLIO’S PIZZA 3799 Poplar Level Rd., 456-1000. Just around the corner from the Louisville Zoo, Frolio’s is a neighborhood pizzeria with a cozy, dim Italian-American mood and an all-you-caneat pizza-and-salad lunch special. $$ f HIGHLANDS TAPROOM 1279 Bardstown Rd., 4592337. This cozy nook for Bardstown Road music and microbrew fans features tavern fare and munchies, a full bar and thirteen beers on tap. Eclectic rock, folk and blues round out a popular and late night live music scene. $ p f e HOMETOWN PIZZA 11804 Shelbyville Rd., 245-4555, 8442 Dixie Hwy., 935-3555, La Grange Square Shopping Center, 222-4444. Pasta dishes, hoagies, stromboli and cold beer are available, and so is the one-of-a-kind Bacon Cheeseburger pizza. $$ IROQUOIS PIZZA 6614 Manslick Rd., 363-3211. $$ LITTLE CAESAR’S PIZZA 816 Kenwood Dr., 3665599, 9017 Galene Dr., 267-8600, 5622 Preston Hwy. 966-5800, 6714 Outer Loop, 966-3111. This Detroit-based pizzeria chain lost market share in the ‘90s, but business analysts say the company known for its two-for-one “pizza pizza” deal has turned things around with a renewed commitment to quality and service. $$ LOUISVILLE PIZZA CO. 3910 Ruckriegel Pkwy., 2671188. Also known as Chubby Ray’s, this local pizzeria makes good, fresh pizzas and ItalianAmerican sandwiches. $ p f MA ZERELLAS 949 S. Indiana Ave., Sellersburg, IN, 246-9517. A pleasant family-run-for-family-fun establishment. Pizza, pasta, salads and subs served for lunch and dinner seven days a week. $ MANCINO’S PIZZA & GRINDERS 12488 Lagrange Rd., 241-9902. Oven-baked and stuffed with all your favorites, a “grinder” is a one-step hungerslaying sandwich. The local favorite is the Mancino’s Pride, which is topped with every veggie in the kitchen plus ham, pepperoni and sausage. $

MR. GATTI’S 5600 S. Third St., 363-2211, 8594 Dixie Hwy., 935-0100, 3319 Bardstown Rd., 451-0540, 9010 Taylorsville Rd., 499-9804, 1108 Lyndon Ln., 339-8338, 2247 S. Preston St., 635 –6708, 4200 Outer Loop, 964-0920. This Austin-based chain was one of the first national pizzerias to reach Louisville in the 1970s, and quality ingredients—plus Gattiland playgrounds for the kids—have made its crisp, thincrust pizzas a popular draw for nearly 30 years. $$ PA PA MURPHY’S PIZZA 291 N. Hubbards Ln., 8956363, 5016 Mud Ln., 962-7272, 9501 Taylorsville Rd., 266-7000. $$ PAPA JOHN’S PIZZA (30 locations) “Papa” John Schnatter got into the pizza game as a Southern Indiana high-school student in 1984 and has built his business into a 3,000-restaurant international chain on the basis of a simple formula: traditional pizza, made from quality ingredients in a straightforward style. $$ PIE IN THE SKY 10301 Taylorsville Rd., 240-9988. This pizzeria offers up pies with fresh ingredients and hand-tossed dough. The selection of beer is wide and so is the TV screen for those weekend gatherings. Pasta, salads and sandwiches— including the popular Hot Sicilian—round out the casual dining menu. $$ PIZZA BOX 4111 Murphy Ln., 423-0530. Workers at the nearby Ford Kentucky Truck Plant make this bar and pizzeria a popular gathering place, but it’s more than just a blue-collar pub: the pizzas here are excellent, and an extensive brew list makes it a destination for serious beer lovers from all over. $ PIZZA BY THE GUY 8109 Lagrange Rd., 426-4044. This locally owned franchise is famous for its extra spicy, hand-tossed dough. Come and get it, literally, because there’s only a cozy table for three at the store and most folks pick up their pie or have it delivered. $ PIZZA HUT (15 locations) $$

CALIFORNIA PIZZA KITCHEN 7900 Shelbyville Rd., (Oxmoor Center), 425-5125. California pizza became a trend when famous chefs gave this simple Italian fare a multi-ethnic spin with nontraditional Pacific Rim toppings. CPK successfully translates this trend for the mass market. $$ p f CICI’S PIZZA 470 New Albany Plaza, New Albany, IN., 944-4942. Serious bargain-hunters will find Cici’s culinary offer hard to beat. This Dallasbased chain’s New Albany pizzeria, the first of 10 planned metro locations, serves up all the pizza you can eat for only $3.99. $ CLIFTON’S PIZZA 2230 Frankfort Ave., 893-3730. Clifton’s pizza appeals to me with its adult style, full of the bold flavors of herbs and spices and available with grown-up toppings like anchovies and artichoke hearts. All this and funky, fun decor makes it one of my favorite local pizzerias. $ f e DOMINO’S PIZZA (20 locations) $$ FAST BREAK PIZZA 6825 Central Ave., 243-1101. $ FAT JIMMY’S 9901C LaGrange Rd., 339-8111, 2712 Frankfort Ave., 891-4555; 2208 Bardstown Rd., 479-1040. This friendly neighborhood nook offers a cold mug of beer and a hot slice of pizza, along with sub sandwiches, pasta dishes and salads. The Lyndon spot lures a friendly biker crowd; the Crescent Hill eatery reflects its urban setting. $ FIGARO’S PIZZERIA 16201 Eastwood Cut-Off Rd., 254-7220. So far out in the East End that it’s almost at the county line, this quaint little country storefront houses something just a bit more urban: an excellent pizzeria featuring both thincrust and delicious thick Chicago-style pies. $ www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Fall 2004 67


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PIZZA KING 3825 Charlestown Rd., New Albany IN, 945-4405, 1066 Kehoe Ln., Jeffersonville, IN., 2828286. The pizza at Pizza King is baked in a sturdy, clay stone oven and hand-tossed with thinner crust where the ingredients go all the way to the edge. $$

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PIZZA MAGIA (13 Locations) This newcomer Louisville-based chain is making waves in the lowcost/high quality pizza biz. In addition to a variety of pizzas, it offers Stromboli, Sweetie Pie (an Italian dessert pastry crisscrossed with icing) wings and both cheese and traditional breadsticks. $$ PIZZA PLACE 2931 Richland Ave., 458-9700. $ QUEENIE’S PIZZA & SUCH 2622 S. Fourth St., 6363708. Queenie’s stuffed Chicago-style and crispy thin-crust pizzas offer whichever option a pizza lover desires. An active participant in its neighborhood, Queenie’s often donates a percentage of its proceeds to church and civic programs. $ SPINELLI’S PIZZERIA 614 Baxter Ave., 568-5665. This tiny storefront in the city's nightclub zone offers a tasty option for the wide-eyed-late-atnight crowd seeking good cheap eats; it's open until 5 a.m nightly from Wednesdays through Saturdays. Better yet, it gives Louisville an authentic taste of Philadelphia specialties: Phillystyle pizza and real Philly cheese steaks. $ f SPORTSTIME PIZZA 3312 Plaza Dr., New Albany, IN, 944-2577. Touting “the best pizza in southern Indiana” is quite a boast, but when the pizza biz is part of the New Albanian Brewing Company, the boast carries weight. The N.A.B.C. is the newest offshoot of Rich O’s, nationally noted for its huge selection of microbrews and hard-to-find imports. Try the “Herbavore” with spinach, sliced tomatoes and roasted garlic for a sizzling start. $ TONY BOOMBOZZ 3334 Frankfort Ave., 896-9090, 1448 Bardstown Rd., 458-8889. Boombozz wins praise for exceptionally high quality pizza and other quick Italian-style fare. Tony’s pizzas include both traditional pies and gourmet-style specialties that have won awards in national competition. $$

DONNA M. GORDON

TONY IMPELLIZZERI’S PIZZA 2306 Bardstown Rd., 451-7177. The pizza at Impellizzeri’s is something like a special effect from a Hollywood f/x lab: massive disks, broad and thick, almost unrealistically oversized. They’re good, too. $$$

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68 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

VITO’S PIZZERIA 3213 Preston Hwy., 634-5400. Reasonable people can differ on the subject, but Vito’s fans say the sizzling, oven-charred pies at this downscale little place on Preston are among the best pizzas in town. $$ WICKS PIZZA PARLOR 975 Baxter Ave., 458-1828, 2927 Goose Creek Rd., 327-9425, 12717 Shelbyville Rd., 213-9425, 10966 Dixie Hwy., 995-4333. Wick's wins popularity with a welcoming mix of good pizza, a quality beer list and a friendly neighborhood feel at all three of its eateries. The pies are straightforward, made with ample toppings. "The Big Wick" is a favorite. $ p e

SANDWICH/DELI AMAZING GRACE WHOLE FOODS DELI 1133 Bardstown Rd., 485-1122. If you think “vegan” means only raw carrots, bean sprouts, seeds and roots, think again. No animals were harmed in the making of the tasty alternative sandwiches and other dishes at this neat little deli attached to a spiffy local organic-foods grocery. $

ANOTHER PLACE SANDWICH SHOP 119 S. Seventh St., 589-4115. If you want to buy a car, go to a car dealer. To buy a carpet, patronize a carpet shop. And if you’ve got a sandwich on your to-do list, it makes sense to go to a sandwich shop. Another Place, now in this west-downtown location, has been making good ones for years. $ ANTHONY’S 22 Theater Square, 584-0364. $ f BACKYARD BURGER 1800 Priority Way, 240-9945. The open flame at this counter-service diner provides the next best thing to a family cookout. Sandwiches, fresh salads, fruit cobblers and oldfashioned hand-dipped milkshakes enhance the nostalgic theme. $ f BANK SHOT BILLIARDS 403 E. Market St., 587-8260. $ BENNY B’S 3801 Willis Ave., 896-8383. The British Earl of Sandwich may have invented the culinary confection that bears his name, but let’s all hail Benny B’s for perfecting it. You’ll find truly excellent sandwiches here, a tasty and healthful alternative to fast food. $ f BIG SUBS 9811B Old Third Street Rd., 933-2010. $ BINKY’S CHICAGO STYLE DELI 528 S. Fifth St., 568-2606. If you’re in the mood for a real Chicago-style hot dog or a delicious brothdripping Italian beef sandwich in the traditional style of the Windy City, you’ll find Binky’s a great place to grab a good, cheap lunch. $ f BLIMPIE’S SUBS & SALADS 1971 Hurstbourne Pkwy., 495-6565, 2020 Brownsboro Rd., 899-7960, 3360 Hikes Ln., 451-5480. Sublime subs—fast and fresh. Blimpie’s is all that … and a bag of chips. $ C.A.P.P.P.’S DELI 4010 Dupont Cir., 895-7064. $ ¯ BA HUT 947 Baxter Ave., 454-5507. Apparently CHE spawned by a small but growing Southwesternthemed chain based in the Phoenix area, Ch¯ eba Hut's slogan observes that "the only thing fried is an occasional customer." The marijuana theme is so insistent and pervasive that it's safe to assume this is the least likely place in town for actually scoring weed. $ f CIANO’S 11904 Shelbyville Rd., 245-6997. $ DANISH EXPRESS PASTRIES 3713 Lexington Rd., 895-2863. Just a few tables turn this takeout nook into a sit-in breakfast and lunch spot for a handful of diners at a time. Full breakfasts and light lunches are available, but as the name implies, Danish pastries are the specialty, and they’re fine. $ DINO’S DOWN TO LUNCH CAFÉ 239 S Fifth St. (Kentucky Home Life Building) 585-2874. $ DIZZY WHIZZ DRIVE-IN 217 W. St. Catherine St., 5833828. This neighborhood eatery is an institution. It goes back more than 50 years and hasn’t changed much. It opens early and stays open late and offers good value for what you’d expect. $ f DMITRI’S DELI 521 S. Third St., 584-8060. A downtown deli favorite. Great appetite-smashing daily specials are surrounded by an impressive variety of sandwiches, soups and salads. $ f DOOLEY’S BAGELCATESSEN 12903 Shelbyville Rd., 245-3354, 216 N. Hurstbourne Ln., 394-0021, 980 Breckenridge Ln., 893-3354, 2241 State St., New Albany, IN, 981-0124, 2226 Holiday Manor Center, 426-3354. A convenient and fresh deli that’s caught on big in the area. Breakfast means fresh bagels with a cool array of cream cheese, sausage, eggs and coffee. At lunchtime lines form for sandwiches—subs, panini, wraps, hot melts and cold cuts. $ THE FEED BAG DELI 133 Breckenridge Ln., 896-1899. The grilled salmon burger is worth the visit, as well as the Triple Crown wrap with three meats or a fresh veggie wrap. Soups, desserts top off the lunch-only schedule. $


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FRASCELLI’S NEW YORK DELI 6247 Crestwood Station, 243-9005. Small and spartan, this tworoom storefront in the newish Crestwood Station shopping center just out from Pewee Valley offers a broad selection of Italian-style deli sandwiches, plus a shorter list of home-style Italian hot dishes from lasagna to baked ziti. $

NORD’S BROWN BAG PUB & DELI 2100 S. Preston St., 634-0931. This simple little neighborhood spot near the University of Louisville may not be much for atmosphere, but well-fashioned if simple diner fare vaults it into the realm of serious destinations for hard-core "foodies," with extra credit for friendly, welcoming cafeteria-style service. $

GELI CAKES 1589 Bardstown Rd., 456-2466. It’s a delight to have this casual eatery on Bardstown Road. The specialty is Italian gelato, and it comes pretty close to the real thing. But don’t start with dessert; the panini (Italian grilled sandwiches) are first-rate, and it’s also open for weekend brunch. $ f

OLLIE’S TROLLEY 978 S. Third St., 583-5214. A little piece of fast-food history remains on an urban street corner in Old Louisville. It’s one of the nation’s few surviving trolleys of the Louisvillebased chain that spread across the nation in the ‘70s. Oversize burgers with a spicy, homemade flavor are just as good as ever. $

HEAVENLY HAM 11606 Shelbyville Rd., 245-1527, 3000 Bardstown Rd., 451-6110, Northgate Center, New Albany IN, 941-9426. $

PANERA BREAD CO. 5000 Shelbyville Rd., 8999992, 6221 Dutchmans Ln., 895-9991, 601 S. Hurstbourne Ln., 423-7343. Warm breads baked on the premises make a tasty base for a variety of sandwiches. Soups, salads, coffee drinks and a free WiFi hotspot make Panera’s outlets popular gathering places. $ f

JERSEY MIKE’S SUBS AND SALADS 10266 Shelbyville Rd., 244-1991, 10519 Fischer Park Dr., 425-1025, 9156 Taylorsville Rd., 499-9830. East Coast-style sub shop with local faves that includes cheese, ham, proscuittini, cappacola, salami, pepperoni and fixings. $ JUANITA’S BURGER BOY 1450 S. Brook, 635-7410. For a real slice of Louisville life, this weathered greasy spoon at the corner of Brook and Burnett is the real thing. Neighborhood denizens drink coffee and chow down on burgers and breakfast until the wee hours (the joint is open 24 hours). If Louisville is home to a budding Charles Bukowski, there’s a good chance he’s sitting at Juanita’s counter right now, recovering from last night’s excesses. $ JULIE’S OF JEFFERSONVILLE 326 Spring St., Jeffersonville, IN, 218-0318. Located in historic downtown Jeffersonville, this eatery is known for its Reuben plate, tomato basil soup or any of the desserts that Julie creates each day. $ f

PAUL’S FRUIT MARKET 3905 Chenoweth Sq., 8968918, 4946 Brownsboro Rd., 426-5059, 12119 Shelbyville Rd., 253-0072, 3704 Taylorsville Rd., 456-4750. One of Louisville’s best sources for produce, cheeses, deli items, and the like. Deli sandwiches and salads are available (takeout only). $ PENN STATION (11 Locations). Billed as the East Coast Sub Headquarters, this sandwich kitchen does a brisk business here in the Louisville area. $ PO-BOY SHOPPE 2286 Bardstown Rd., 454-0424. If you think "Po-boy" describes yourself on the weekend before payday, you might want to consider an educational trip to this casual new storefront, where they specialize in this hearty Louisiana-style sandwich treat plus more Cajun and Creole favorites. $

QUIZNO’S SUBS 223 S. Fifth St., 589-5520, 332 W. Broadway, 589-4500, 2500 W. Broadway, 7755545, 4045 Summit Place Dr., 327-8469, 2112 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 493-8292, 4212 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 981-7849, 3826 D Hamburg Pike, Jeffersonville, IN, 283-7849, 402 S. Indiana Ave., Sellersburg, IN, 246-1419. Toasted breads, a sandwich selection of meats, veggies and fish are built to fight hunger. Fresh soups are available daily, from chili to chowder; so are salads and desserts. $ SCHLOTZSKY’S DELI 4259 Outer Loop, 969-0506, 10531 Fischer Park Dr., 425-844, 12915 Shelbyville Rd., 244-9069. The original Schlotzsky’s offered just one kind of sandwich—“The Original”—when it opened its first eatery in Austin, Texas, in 1971. Now this national chain vends a full selection of deli-style fare, with one significant improvement on the traditional deli: the servers are invariably polite. $ f SOUPY’S 3019 Breckenridge Ln., 451-5325, 4632 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 499-4404, 4590 Dixie Hwy, 449-2000, 9493 Westport Rd, 425-2549, 2930 Dr. William Weathers Dr., 774-2500. In the soup kettles you will find such classics as cheesy potato, bean and ham, broccoli and cheese, chicken and dumplings and more. At the cutting board they’ll make you meat, cheese and veggie sandwiches according to your custom design, scoop up tuna and chicken salads and barbecue, or grill you a burger. $ STEVENS & STEVENS 1114 Bardstown Rd., 584-3354. Sharing space with the popular Ditto’s, Stevens & Stevens is primarily known for catering and takeout fare. They cook just as well if you choose to stay in, though, offering appealing sandwiches and deli fare with a healthy twist. $ STRAWBERRY PATCH DELI 11616 Shelbyville Rd., 254-1440. This Middletown deli offers healthy food with a dash of gourmet and a sprinkle of southern. $

LITTLE CHEF 147 E. Market St., New Albany, IN, 949-7567. Every city needs a postage-stampsized spot that knows how to fry potatoes and grill up a burger. In New Albany, the place is Little Chef. Biscuits and gravy, fried eggs, and burgers, in a joint that seems like a throwback to the heartland of America, circa 1940. $ f LOTSA PASTA 3717 Lexington Rd., 896-6361. As the name suggests, Lotsa Pasta originated as an Italian specialty-food store, and it has been a local favorite since it opened over 20 years ago. It now offers deli meats and cheeses and an eclectic international selection of sausages and cheese. You can’t dine in, but an excellent deli counter fashions New Orleans-style muffulettas and other sandwiches to go. $ LUNCH TODAY 590 Missouri Ave., Jeffersonville, IN, 282-1005. This outfit prepares all the soups, salads and sandwiches the downtown workforce needs to re-energize. $ f MAIN EATERY 643 W. Main St., 589-3354. Smack dab in the middle of the Main Street historic district, this fashionable deli lures the savvy business midday crowd. $ f MCALISTER’S DELI 10041 Forest Green Blvd., 4258900, 2721 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 671-2424, 2400 Lime Kiln Ln., 339-8544, 6508 Bardstown Rd., 239-9997. Emphasizing quality customer service, this East End delicatessen ladles up unique soups like gumbo and chicken tortilla along with their cutting board favorites. They have a special way with a tumbler of sweet iced tea and lemon. $ f NAIMAN’S DELI 237 Whittington Pkwy., 423-1414. Les Naiman returns to the deli business nearly 20 years after he closed his old Nosh Box in this very shopping center off Hurstbourne Pkwy. Naiman’s offers a good selection of deli meats and homemade lunch-counter goodies to tempt the taste buds, plus a gigantic Sunday buffet. $ f

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SUB STATION II 3101 Fern Valley Rd., 964-1075. The hardy No. 19, a six-meat-and-cheese super sub, keeps the store buzzing. An array of sandwiches, salad sides and desserts fill out an appetizing lunch menu. $ TWO BUCKS 4113 Murphy Ln., 429-9902. $ TWO GUYS AND A GRILL Center, 893-5118. $

pe

4806 Brownsboro

WALL ST. DELI 225 Abraham Flexner Way at Jewish Hospital, 585-4202. Offering New York style with Kentucky flair, this busy downtown deli will serve in-house diners or take orders for deliveries. Authentic Nathan’s Hot Dogs are a specialty. $ WILD OATS NATURAL MARKETPLACE 4600 Shelbyville Rd., 721-7373. This national natural-food grocery includes a sit-down café where you can order pizzas, sandwiches, or even sushi. $ f

BARBECUE BB’S CHICKEN & RIBS 318 Wallace Ave., 259-9936. This might seem an unexpected venue to find authentic urban barbecue, but don’t dismiss it just because it’s in the ’burbs. The ribs here are fine, and the barbecued chicken good enough to make you want to slap the Colonel. $ BACKYARD BBQ & GRILL 223 W. Fifth St., New Albany IN., 945-8310. A wide variety of barbecue, in generous portions, with exceptional side dishes make this large dining hall in New Albany well worth a trip. $ f BAKE’S BARBEQUE 5503 Valley Station Rd., 9350999. Bake’s ribs are smoked to such tender perfection that the meat slides off the bone. This is four-star barbecue, fully competitive with the region’s best. $$ BOOTLEG BARBECUE COMPANY 9704 Bardstown Rd., 239-2722, 7508 Preston Hwy., 968-5657. Bootleg Barbecue offers a touch of rusticity and a good helping of country hospitality, as it dishes out hearty portions of well prepared and affordable smoked meats and fixin’s. It’s one of the few places in Louisville where you can get Western Kentucky-style mutton barbecue. $ f BRANDON’S BAR-B-QUE 9246 Westport Rd., 4266666. Service is cafeteria-style in this shoppingcenter establishment featuring Tennessee-style barbecue, where hickory-smoked barbecue sandwiches and filling, affordable dinners are the specialty. $ CLARK BOY BAR-B-Q 6728 Johnsontown Rd., 9335577. If it’s a little off the beaten path, there’s nothing the matter with that. Clark Boy’s reasonably priced Western Kentucky-style barbecue is well worth a special trip. Like many mom ’n’ pop eateries, it accepts cash only, no plastic. $ CLEON’S RIB SHACK 701 Algonquin Pkwy., 6350750. It’s a shack, for sure, and Cleon keeps some weird hours, but that’s part of the mystique, and if you can catch him when the smoke is rising, you’re in for some manly spare ribs and soulful sides. $ f DAMON’S 1876 Hurstbourne Pkwy., 495-6111. If you’ve got a hankering for oversize ribs and a sports-bar environment for noisy fun, Damon’s might be just the place for you. But then, if you’re in the mood for a quiet steak dinner in a quieter environment, Damon’s can deliver that too. Award-winning ribs and big-screen entertainment are the primary draw at the local outpost of this 140-unit chain. $$ p FAMOUS DAVE’S BAR-B-QUE 8605 Citadel Way, 493-2812. This franchise chain operation may be based in the twin cities, but it looks like a Georgia gas station with its exuberant, if tongue-in-cheek faux country decor. The important thing, though, is the food, and Dave’s excels with genuine, hickory-smoked barbecue. $$ p f 70 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

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FINLEY’S HICKORY SMOKED BAR-B-Q 1500 W. Broadway, 581-0298. Rib tips are the specialty but you’ll find turkey legs, ham, half-chickens, pork chops and shredded beef and pork—all for dinners or sandwiches, and barbecued pig’s feet for the BBQ purists. $ f

TONY ROMA’S 150 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 327-8500. From the tomato tang to a smoky Blue Ridge savor, Roma’s advertises its ribs as the best dressed in town. Burgers, chicken and steaks are available as well, but we recommend the racks and baby backs of pork and beef. $$$ p

FIREHOUSE BAR B Q 6435 Bardstown Rd., 2397800, 3065 Breckinridge Ln., 459-5201. Fire fighters, it is said, eat heartily and well. It’s no coincidence, then, that Firehouse Bar B Q pays homage to fire departments in general and the Fern Creek Fire Department in particular. The barbecue and country fixin’s stand comparison to the best firehouse cuisine. $ f

VINCE STATEN’S OLD TIME BARBEQUE 9219 US 42, 228-7427. Author Vince Staten, who literally wrote the book on barbecue (Real Barbecue), makes his own in this Prospect storefront, and the smoked goodies here rate as good as any I ever ate. $

J.J.’S CAFÉ 1515 Lynch Ln., Clarksville, IN, 282-5280. $pf

@MOSPHERE 917 Baxter Ave., 458-5301. One of the hottest spots on the local club scene, this oversize spot on Baxter flows through 4,000 square feet on several levels, including the tasteful, clubby rooms that once housed Jupiter Grill and briefly a branch of Bazo’s. On the eatery side, it features well-crafted upscale pub grub, sandwiches and salads at affordable prices, topping out at $7.25 for the chargrilled rib eye. $ p f e

JIMBO’S BBQ 801 Kenwood Dr., 375-1888. This South End barbecue shack, an outpost of a popular spot in Corydon, IN, offers a fine range of barbecue meats skillfully smoked on the premises, with sauce served on the side as it should be. $ JUCY’S SMOKEHOUSE BAR-B-QUE 7626 Lagrange Rd., 241-5829. Jucy’s offers exceptionally good Texas-style barbecue from a little wooden shack that looks just like a country BBQ joint should. Highly recommended. $$ f MARK’S FEED STORE 11422 Shelbyville Rd., 2440140, 1514 Bardstown Rd., 458-1570, 10316 Dixie Hwy., 933-7707, 513 E. IN Hwy. 131, Clarksville, IN, 285-1998. Named for its first restaurant’s location in a former feed store with that down-home country feel, Mark’s impresses with high-quality hickory-smoked pork and chicken, and rich, silken South Carolina barbecue sauce, the yellow mustard-based variety. $$ f OLE HICKORY PIT BAR-B-QUE 6106 Shepherdsville Rd., 968-0585. Located in an attractive house not far from General Electric’s Appliance Park, this Louisville relative of a famous Western Kentucky barbecue pit is well worth the trip from anywhere in town. $ PEPPER SHAKER CHILI & BAR-B-Q 4912 Preston Hwy., 964-3011, 4918 Poplar Level Rd., 962-7077. Looking for the real thing in barbecue? Whoop! Here it is! This tiny spot near Standiford Field offers few amenities—it’s primarily for take-out— but a squadron of heavy black-iron smokers burn through cords of hickory to turn out some of the town’s best barbecue at a price that’s right. $ p PICNICATERS BBQ & CATERING 514 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., 584-7427. Located across from Louisville Gardens, this place puts the hot sauce, wings and chops right in the middle of a hungry business district. $ f PIT STOP BAR-B-QUE 612 S. Fifth St., 584-4054. Genuine Texas barbecue, dry and tender meat, red-rimmed and savory from hours in the smoker, is the style served here. March up to the window, place your order, bus your own plate. No muss, no fuss, and it is very good. $ f RUBBIE’S BAR-B-QUE & BREW 6905 Southside Dr., 367-0007. This South End family knows how to do BBQ. It may be off the beaten path for some folks but here you’ll find the bounty of secret BBQ recipes. $ p f e SCOTTY’S RIBS AND MORE 14049 Shelbyville Rd., 244-6868. Ribs, pork, chicken a la carte and dinners. The small East End venue moves a lot of pizzas and salads as well. $$ p SMOKEY BONES BBQ 2525 Hurstbourne Gem Ln., 491-7570. A newish “concept” of the Orlandobased Darden chain that runs Olive Garden, Red Lobster and Bahama Breeze, this hot Hurstbourne spot offers good ribs in a noisy sports-bar environment that emulates a Colorado ski lodge. $$ p

BAR & GRILL

BIG DAVE’S OUTPOST 1801 Bardstown Rd., 4593290. Now open in the old house at Bardstown Road and Speed Avenue recently vacated by Judge Roy Bean, Big Dave's evokes a hint of the happy memory of the old Fat Cats that once held court here: In similar fashion, it's a casual, laidback neighborhood saloon, where libations and simple pub grub are the order of business. $ p f e BLUE MULE SPORTS CAFÉ 10301 Taylorsville Rd., 240-0051. Longtime buddies John O’Connor and Jim “Mule” Riley talked for years about opening a restaurant and sports bar. Riley died before their dream came true. But now O’Connor proudly presides over this 90-seat casual Jeffersontown eatery and watering hole, and he has named it in affectionate memory of his friend “Mule.” $ p e BUFFALO WILD WINGS (BW-3’S) 6801 Dixie Hwy., 935-1997, 3900 Shelbyville Rd., 899-7732, 9134 Taylorsville Rd., 499-2356, 3584 Springhurst Blvd., 394-9596, 12901 Shelbyville Rd., 254-9464, 1055 Bardstown Rd., 454-3635. As much a sports bar as a restaurant, this national franchise chain offers tasty snack-type fare, including the chain’s trademark Buffalo chicken wings. $$ p f DELTA RESTAURANT 434 W. Market St., 584-0860. It’s not quite as historic as Gideon Shryock’s Jefferson County Courthouse around the corner, but this popular bar and short-order spot seems as if it has been a hangout for lawyers and the courthouse crowd for just about as long as there’s been a Courthouse. $ p DUTCH’S TAVERN 3922 Shelbyville Rd., 895-9004. Do you like guitars with your grub? A popular half-way-home hangout for decades in the heart of St. Matthews, this no-frills but all charm pub serves up a hardy plate lunch by day and amps up the action with music by night. $ p e FLABBY’S SCHNITZELBURG 1101 Lydia St., 637-9136. Family-owned since 1952, Flabby’s is a quintessential Germantown saloon. It’s also one of the city’s top destinations for inexpensive downhome eats, from authentic German dishes to fantastic fried chicken on weekends. $ FLANAGAN’S ALE HOUSE 934 Baxter Ave., 5853700. Gourmet pizzas, hoagies, and an enormous beer selection draw Highlands folks to this cozy neighborhood pub. For a late night pizza (the kitchen’s open until 2 a.m.), it’s one of the best options in the city. $$ p GERSTLE’S PLACE 3801 Frankfort Ave., 899-3609. A popular St. Matthews neighborhood tavern since 1924. Although dining is secondary to booze and sports here, the food goes well beyond mere pub grub. $ p e


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GRANVILLE INN 1601 S. Third St., 635-6475. A longtime gathering place for U of L students, faculty and fans, this sturdy redbrick tavern just north of the university campus offers a good variety of bar munchies, sandwiches and simple grilled fare plus pizza. It’s perhaps best known, though, for the signature Granville Burger, widely reputed as one of the best burgers in town. $ GREAT AMERICAN GRILL 2735 Crittenden Dr., (Hilton), 637-2424. Located in the Louisville International Airport Hilton. Salads, burgers, pastas and sandwiches are available for the casual diner; main entrees include New York strip, filet of salmon and more. $ p f HITCHING POST INN 7314 Fegenbush Ln., 2394724. In addition to its full bar and beer garden, and lively conversation, the Hitching Post Inn offers an array of pub grub, including burgers, chicken tenders, and sandwiches. $ p HOOPS GRILL AND SPORTS BAR 12205 Westport Rd., 327-8002, 6733 Strawberry Ln., 375-4667. The name says it all: sports, casual dining and good things to drink all find their natural meeting place in these friendly neighborhood spots where hot wings and hoops reign supreme. $ p f HOOTERS 4120 Dutchmans Ln., 895-7100; 4948 Dixie Hwy., 449-4194; 7701 Preston Hwy., 9681606; 700 W. Riverside Dr., Jeffersonville, IN, 2189485; 941 East Hwy. 131, Clarksville, IN 284-9464. JABBER’S FAMILY SPORTS GRILL 6121 Bardstown Rd., 231-3687 $$ p JACK’S LOUNGE 122 Sears Ave., 897-9026. A sophisticated, elegant bar associated with the Equus restaurant next door, Jack’s offers a short but excellent menu featuring appetizers and light bites, along with a drinks list beyond reproach. $ p MICHAEL MURPHY’S RESTAURANT 701 S. First St., 587-7916. This full service restaurant and bar has accommodated hardy thirsts and appetites for a couple of generations. Despite the Irish appeal, the food is American and lots of it. One particular claim to fame is their hamburger menu. $ p NEW DIRECTION BAR & GRILL 2630 Chamberlain Ln., 243-8429. $ p e SAINT’S 131 Breckinridge Ln., 891-8883. Almost like two restaurants in one, Saints—occupying the St. Matthews space formerly known as Jake & Elwood’s—features both a small, intimate, candlelighted room and a larger, happily boisterous main room with the look and feel of a sports bar. Saints is mostly about the bars and the music, but don’t overlook its casual fare, from salads to pasta and excellent pizzas. $$ p e SADDLE RIDGE SALOON Fourth Street Live, 5693507. $ p f e SHENANIGAN’S IRISH GRILL 1611 Norris Pl., 4543919. Not just a neighborhood tavern (although it’s a fine neighborhood tavern), Irish-accented Shenanigan’s goes an extra step with an estimable selection of memorable burgers. $ p f e STEINERT’S GRILL & PUB 2239 Charlestown Rd., New Albany IN, 945-8827. This is a cross between an old fashioned neighborhood tavern (with an aged and cozy ambience) and a trendy sports bar (with leanings in the direction of IU). Hearty burgers, rich soups, salads, and a full bar make this a hidden gem. $ p e SULLY’S SALOON Fourth Street Live, 585-4100. $$ pf TAILGATERS SPORTS BAR & GRILL 2787 S. Floyd St., 637-5241. Tailgating? No need to open your lawn chair on the Papa John’s Stadium parking lot before the U of L game now that Tailgaters is here. Billed as a premier destination for good food and lots of fun, this casual spot features classic

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American favorites and seafood specialties, plus a full bar, TVs and an expansive game room. $ p fe THE TRESTLE SPORTS CAFÉ 263-7130 $ p VIC’S CAFÉ 4338. $ p

3701 Hopewell Rd.,

E. Market St., New Albany, IN, 944-

WOODFORD RESERVE BAR & GRILLE Louisville International Airport, 363-2526. Named after local distiller Brown-Forman’s artisanal brand of Bourbon, this is the airport’s fine-dining facility, serving Kentucky-style dishes in a sit-down environment. $ ZAZOO’S 102 Bauer Ave., 894-8030. Although we still lament the loss of the lovable Irish brogue that prevailed when Kitty O'Kirwan's was here, ZaZoo's offers a mighty appealing alternative with its laidback, casual and welcoming neighborhood-bar feeling. The fare is simple but well-prepared, and goes a bit beyond pub grub to cover quick bites like chicken tenders and a "pizza burger." $ p f e

CAJUN/CREOLE DOWNTOWN NEW ORLEANS 1157 S. Second St., 797-5644. The smallish Old Louisville storefront

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offers a Cajun-style setting that’s worth a visit if you like the spicy goodness of Louisiana-style eats. $ f e FURLONG’S 2350 Frankfort Ave., 896-2610. This Louisiana-style restaurant in Crescent Hill boasts a horse-racing theme that unites the spirits of Kentucky’s and Louisiana’s racing industries. A comfortably cozy spot, it offers a memorable selection of Cajun fare. $$$ f p JOE’S OK BAYOU 9874 Linn Station Rd., 426-1320. Perhaps the best Louisiana-style fare you’ll find in Louisville is served at this East End shoppingcenter eatery. A lengthy menu and fishing-shack decor showcases authentic Cajun and Creole chow cooked by a New Orleans-born chef. $$ p

ASIAN/CHINESE 2 HAHN’S MONGOLIAN GRILL Stonybrook Shopping Center, 493-0234. Thirteenth Century Mongol warriors used to turn their steel shields to use as frying pans over the campfire, using their swords as spoons. 2 Hahn’s carries their spirit forward. This all-you-can-eat buffet is fun, and the food is fine. $$ p

ASIAN BUFFET 3813 Charlestown Rd., New Albany IN, 945-1888. Competent cookery and careful management that ensures buffet offerings stay fresh and hot makes this Southern Indiana buffet a good choice among the growing crowd of allyou-can-eat Asian spots. $ ASIAN PEARL 2060 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 4956800. Asian Pearl advertises its Chinese Grand Buffet as “The Largest Buffet Selection in Kentuckiana,” prompting a trip to check it out. It stands out from the crowd by offering a selection of Thai dishes in addition to the usual Chinese. $ AUGUST MOON 2269 Lexington Rd., 456-6569. August Moon’s secret ingredient is the culinary oversight of Chef Peng Looi, better known as the force behind Asiatique. Housed in a soaring, open space with a Zen master’s style. Consistent commitment in the kitchen and from the staff makes it a top spot for Asian fare. A lovely patio at the rear affords an alfresco dining experience overlooking shady Beargrass Creek. $$$ p f BAMBOO HOUSE 4036 Poplar Level Rd., 451-3113. An old-timer among local Chinese restaurants, this Southeastern Louisville spot may not offer the trendiest Asian fare, but it’s a reliable source for the familiar Cantonese-American standards. $ CHINA BUFFET 706 E. Hwy 131, Clarksville, IN, 2888989. Chinese buffets are ubiquitous, but this one is squarely in the upper range. Regularly refreshed steam tables, attentively fried rice, and properly spicy General Tso’s Chicken raise it above the runof-the-mill places typical of the genre. $ CHINA GARDEN 7309 Preston Hwy., 968-4672. A busy restaurant with the double pleasure of Chinese and American menu items. $ CHINA INN 1925 S. Fourth St., 636-2020. It’s not the posh, private Faculty Club, but this little Asian spot may be one of the most popular eateries around the University of Louisville’s Belknap Campus. It’s generally packed with students, professors, and a squadron of campus police so large that one wonders who’s watching the campus. $ CHINA KING 3830 Ruckriegel Prkwy., 240-0500. $ CHINA KING Highlander Point Dr., Floyds Knobs, IN., 923-1288. $ CHINA KING PALACE 6203 Old Shepherdsville Rd., 969-9696. On the edge of the county line, there’s a bustling kitchen that prepares sweet, sour and spicy Asian and Chinese entrees and a la carte items to go. Carry out service only. $ CHINATOWN 4000 Dutchmans Ln., 896-9888, 4214 Outer Loop, 968-2688. If you’re hungry, you can get more to eat here for less than just about anyplace else in town, and the weekend seafood buffet in particular is a deal that’s hard to beat. $ CHINESE CHEF 2619 S. Fourth St., 634-0979. $ CHINESE EXPRESS 3228 Crums Ln., 448-1360. $ CHINESE RESTAURANT 8605 Preston Hwy., 9687450. $ CHONG GARDEN 10341 Dixie Hwy., 935-1628. $ CHOPSTICKS 416 E. Broadway, 589-9145. $ CHOPSTICKS HOUSE 2112 W. Broadway, 772-3231. $ CHUNG KING CHINESE AMERICAN RESTAURANT 110 E. Market St., 584-8880. $ CITY WOK 526 W. Main St., 583-7238. $ CRYSTAL CHINESE 3901 W. Market St., 776-9702. $ DOUBLE DRAGON 1255 Goss Ave., 635-5656. A standout among fast-food shopping-center Chinese eateries, Double Dragon hits on all cylinders, turning out consistently well-prepared and flavorful fare. $ DOUBLE DRAGON II 12480 LaGrange Rd., 241-7766, 9901 LaGrange Rd., 326-0099, 6832 Bardstown Rd., 231-3973. $

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DOUBLE DRAGON BUFFET 233 Whittington Pkwy., 339-8897. A sizable buffet in a chic East End shopping strip, offers a good range of Chinese treats on its all-you-can-eat buffet. The fare seems prepared with attention and care. $ DOUBLE DRAGON 8 231 S. Fifth St., 587-8686. $ DOUBLE DRAGON 9 9501 Taylorsville Rd., 267-5353. $ DRAGON GARDEN 2120 Bardstown Rd., 459-3311. $ DYNASTY BUFFET 2400 Lime Kiln Ln., 339-8868. The continuing proliferation of all-you-can-eat Chinese buffets never fails to amaze me. Most of them look pretty much alike, and the food tends to be similar too. But I’m happy to report that Dynasty Buffet ranks well above the median. $$ EASTERN HOUSE 5372 Dixie Hwy., 568-2688. Serving Chinese and American food from the menu or the buffet. $ EGGROLL KING 4819 Dixie Hwy, 449-3614. $ EGGROLL MACHINE 1216 Bardstown Rd., 459-1259. A Highlands staple for good reason. This portion of the Mimosa Café does a brisk business. The Sesame Chicken is one of our publishers’ favorites. $$ p EMPEROR OF CHINA 2210 Holiday Manor Shopping Center, 426-1717. One of Louisville’s fanciest and most noteworthy Chinese restaurants, the Emperor’s quarters are stylishly strewn across multiple levels of a former suburban movie theater. Outstanding. $$ p EMPRESS OF CHINA 2249 Hikes Ln., 451-2500. Older sister to The Emperor of China, the Empress was one of Louisville’s first serious, authentic upscale Cantonese restaurants, and its fare still stands up to fancy spots in New York’s Chinatown. $$ p

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Chinese regional dishes in an attractive sit-down setting. $$

Chinese eateries, King Wok offers all the familiar standards plus a small lunch buffet. $

IMPERIAL PALACE 5316 Bardstown Rd., 491-8228. $

KING’S BUFFET 5538 New Cut Rd., 375-2236. $

JADE PALACE 1109 Herr Ln., 425-9878. When I’ve got a hankering for brunch, I choose Chinese. Jade Palace is a decent place for Chinese food at any time, but don’t miss it at mid-day Friday through Monday, when it offers the metro area’s only dim sum (Chinese brunch) menu. $$ p

LUCKY DRAGON 809 S. KY Hwy 53, Lagrange, KY, 222-1568. The pastoral setting of Oldham County surrounding the Day’s Inn Motel might not be the first place you would look for upscale Mandarin style dining, but prepare to be surprised. Guests are treated to Far East hospitality and a varied menu. $

JUMBO BUFFET 2731 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 4950028, 701 E. Hwy 131,Clarksville, IN, 283-6868. Housed in a good-looking dining room, high on Chinatown-style glitz and glitter, Jumbo offers a standard all-you-can-eat Chinese buffet, with a larger-than-average selection of American dishes for those who want something less exotic. $$ KING BUFFET 1801 Priority Way, 266-8886. Another in the growing niche of glitzy Chinese chromeand-plastic buffets, King Buffet offers a standard selection of all-you-can-eat dishes, with a few sushi items. $ KING WOK 291 N. Hubbards Ln., 899-7188. Another of the city’s many tiny shopping-center fast-food

LUCKY HOUSE BUFFET 4030 Taylorsville Rd., 4591188. A fresh idea on Asian dining, this generous Hikes Point buffet serves the menu classics from China as well as some Japanese and American entrees. $$ MANCHU WOK 7900 Shelbyville Rd., (Oxmoor Shopping Center), 429-8207. $ NEW WORLD BUFFET 9228 Westport Rd., 4231788. I rate this one of the city’s best (if not quite the biggest) all-you-can-eat Chinese buffet, not only because it offers a good selection of Chinese dishes but, more important, because it shows a consistent commitment to quality. $

tastefully exciting. casually chic.

FIRST WOK 3967 Seventh St. Rd., 448-0588. $ FORMOSA CHINESE RESTAURANT 2116 State St., New Albany, IN, 948-2540. One of the leading Southern Indiana entries in the Chinese-restaurant sweepstakes, Formosa offers a hearty buffet and, Chinese friends report, “a Taiwanese taste.” $ GOLDEN BUDDHA 8000 Preston Hwy., 968-7700. $ GOLDEN WALL 3111 Fern Valley Rd., 968-9717. $ GRAND BUFFET 5362 Dixie Hwy., 447-8833. $ GREAT WALL 2206 Brownsboro Rd., 891-8881. This Clifton restaurant ranks high up in the fast-food Chinese pack. Offering steaming-hot, competently prepared and flavorful dishes. $ GREAT WOK 2502 Preston Hwy., 634-1918. Just about every shopping center in town has a fastfood Chinese spot, but this one stands out, generating a buzz of word-of-mouth publicity about its well-crafted Chinese dishes at a bargainbasement price. $ HAPPY DRAGON 2600 W. Broadway, 778-2573. Catering to office and residential customers, this Chinese restaurant has served the West Broadway community for many years. $ f HARVEST MOON 10476 Shelbyville Rd., 245-2100. Modern and efficient in its East End shopping center location, Harvest Moon is a cut above fastfood Chinese; better yet, it adds a few Vietnamese dishes to the bill of fare. $ HONG KONG CHINESE RESTAURANT 345 New Albany Plaza, New Albany, IN., 945-1818. $ HONG KONG FAST FOOD 5312 S. Third St., 3678828. One of the many international eateries in Iroquois Manor, this fast-food Chinese spot offers Cantonese standards hot and fast and inexpensively. Check the daily specials for an occasional intriguing item. $ HOUSE OF DRAGON 126 Breckenridge Ln., 8937994. Not just fast food, this longtime St. Matthews favorite offers an extensive menu of

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ONION RESTAURANT TEA HOUSE 4211 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 981-0188. Masterful Chinese and Japanese cuisine (including magnificent hotpots, donburi dishes, and wooden-bucket steamed rice) set this airy restaurant apart from the dozens of other Asian spots in the Louisville area. Beer and wine are available. $$

SHANGHAI RESTAURANT 526 S. Fifth St. 568-8833. $

ORIENTAL EXPRESS 12567 Shelbyville Rd., 2449838. This spot in Middletown stands a cut above its shopping-center status in its atmosphere, and maybe two cuts above the median in its food, a smorgasbord of both Chinese and Japanese fare that is good enough to justify a special trip. $

WANG’S WOK 11517 Shelbyville Rd., 244-9898. This bright and attractive spot in Middletown is a step above your usual Chinese fast food. Dishes are served on attractive gold-rimmed white china, and there’s table service with a friendly, fluent hostess. Worth a special trip. $

ORIENTAL HOUSE 4302 Shelbyville Rd., 897-1017. One of the oldest continuously operated Chinese restaurants in Louisville, this St. Matthews landmark still does a fine job with the old Cantonese-American standards that we, our parents and our grandparents enjoyed. $ p

WOK EXPRESS 234 W. Broadway, 583-8988. This corner spot has housed a variety of restaurants over the years. The latest tenant isn’t the fanciest, but it might be one of the most affordable. $

ORIENTAL STAR 4212 Bishop Ln., 452-9898. A longtime area favorite in this heavy traffic lunch area. This establishment is quite good with Lo Mein Noodles, and Sweet and Sour Chicken. $ PANDA CHINESE RESTAURANT 9543 US 42., 2286400. $ PEKING CITY 3571 Springhurst Blvd., 425-0188. The regular menu features Chinese-restaurant standards and does them very well. But if you’re a foodie with a yen for the exotic, ask about the authentic Taiwanese menu—an intriguing regional cuisine new to Louisville. $ QUICK WOK 801 W. Broadway, 584-6519. $ ROYAL GARDEN 5717 Preston Hwy., 969-3788. $$ SESAME CHINESE RESTAURANT 9409 Shelbyville Rd., 339-7000. Not just another shopping-center Chinese restaurant, this East End eatery has provided some of the best fine-dining Chinese meals I’ve enjoyed in Louisville. $$ p

SICHUAN GARDEN 9850 Linn Station Rd., 4266767. One of my favorite Chinese restaurants in Louisville and another that has stood the test of time, Sichuan Garden offers high-end Chinatown style and well-made dishes, plus a few Thai specialties to spice up the bill of fare. $

WONTON EXPRESS 3000 Hikes Ln., 452-2646. Traditional Chinese fare. Family-owned-andoperated, this popular neighborhood establishment has enjoyed a steady patronage for seventeen years. $ YANG KEE NOODLE 7900 Shelbyville Rd., (Oxmoor Center), 426-0800. This locally owned and operated Oxmoor spot is colorful and stylish. It offers an intriguing array of appealing noodle and rice dishes from all over Asia with fast-food efficiency and prices happily matched by sitdown restaurant quality and style. $ f YEN CHING 1818 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 491-3581. $ YOU-CARRYOUT-A 1551 E. Tenth St., Jeffersonville, IN, 288-8313, 827 Eastern Blvd., Clarksville, IN, 282-8881, 3308 Plaza Dr., 944-9866. $

ASIAN/JAPANESE BENDOYA SUSHI BAR 217 S. Fifth St., 581-0700. Adding international flair to its downtown

neighborhood, Bendoya Sushi Bar is a genuine, serious sushi bar in a storefront just across the street from the courthouse. $ FUJI JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE 3576 Springhurst Blvd., 339-1978, 12905 Shelbyville Rd., 253-0036. Part of the fun of sitting at the sushi bar is that you get to watch the chef at work. Put in your order, then sit back, sip your tea while the artist creates edible delights. This suburban sushi bar does the job well. $$ p ICHIBAN SAMURAI 1510 Lake Shore Ct., 412-3339. This large Plainview Japanese-farmhouse building housed Benihana for many years before moving out a year ago. New management, however, offers similar delights, with the traditional slice-and-dice food show and good sushi. Best deal, while the introductory offer lasts: All-you-can-eat sushi nightly until the karaoke starts at 9 p.m. $$$ p KOBE STEAK HOUSE 301 S. Indiana Ave., Jeffersonville IN, 280-8500. Southern Indiana’s first serious Japanese restaurant is drawing crowds with its exceptional sushi bar, with skilled and friendly chefs who can be relied on to fashion fresh and tasty bites that are just about certain to please. $$$ p MAIDO ESSENTIAL JAPANESE 1758 Frankfort Ave., 894-8775. Not just another sushi bar, cool and stylish Maido is Louisville’s first and only “izakaya”style restaurant in the style of Kansai, the region surrounding Japan’s second city, Osaka. It’s also a sake bar, pouring a good variety of artisanal rice wine. $$ f OSAKA SUSHI BAR 2039 Frankfort Ave., 894-9501. This bright and cheery Japanese restaurant and sushi bar is named after Japan’s second largest city and the home of one of its most historic samurai castles. Sushi Chef James Lae presides, and that’s a good thing: a first-rate sushi chef, his welcoming presence and excellent English makes diners feel at home. $$ SAKURA BLUE 4600 Shelbyville Rd., 897-3600. Located in elegant, upscale quarters in a St. Matthews shopping center, Sakura Blue — direct descendant of the old, popular Bonsai — ranks among the city’s top sushi bars. $$ SAMURAI JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE 1510 Lake Shore Ct., 412-3339. Benihana has moved on after some 20 years in this Plainview lakeside landmark with its blue tile roof. But its successor, Samurai, appears to provide a very similar dining experience, featuring slice-and-dice chefs at grill tables, JapaneseAmerican standards and sushi. $$$ p SAPPORO JAPANESE GRILL & SUSHI 1706 Bardstown Rd., 479-5550. Trendy, even glitzy, with hard-edged industrial decor—and most important, excellent food—Sapporo ranks in my ratings as the city’s No. 1 spot for sushi and Japanese fare. $$$ p SHOGUN JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE 9026 Taylorsville Rd., 499-5700, 4110 Hampton Lake Way, 394-0123. Shogun’s decor is attractive, and quality food and service make it a pleasant dining destination. It’s unthreatening enough to appeal to those who find exotic cuisine “challenging,” but good enough to satisfy just about anyone who craves a Japanese dinner or a bite of sushi. $$$ p TOKYO JAPANESE RESTAURANT 2415C Lime Kiln Ln., 339-7171. It’s appealing, pleasant in atmosphere and friendly in service, and most important, this East End sushi bar serves excellent Japanese treats, prepared with care and flair from high-quality, impeccably fresh ingredients. $$

ASIAN/KOREAN ARIRANG 4160 Bardstown Rd., 495-1004. The sign out front indicates (in English) that it’s both a

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Japanese sushi bar and a Korean BBQ, and a couple of lines of Korean lettering presumably say the same. More elegant than the industrial-style exterior suggests, this is a worthy stop for a fine Asian meal. $$ KIM’S ASIAN GRILLE 813 E. Market St., 595-7025. This lovable little Korean and Pan-Asian eatery occupies unimposing quarters on a gritty urban block east of downtown. Despite its downscale look, you won’t want to miss its extensive selection of Korean and Japanese favorites. Hot and sour soup may be the city’s best. $$ f KOREANA II 5009 Preston Hwy., 968-9686. One of the city’s few restaurants devoted entirely to authentic Korean fare, Koreana is worth a special trip for this ethnic cuisine that offers a hearty, spicy alternative to the more familiar Chinese. $$ LEE’S KOREAN RESTAURANT 1941 Bishop Ln., 4569714. This little spot has been a secret since the ‘70s, and it just keeps on going. Walk into what looks like a diner in an office building, but push past the counter to the back room, where you’ll find generous heaps of really authentic Korean food for next to nothing. $$

ASIAN/THAI MAI’S THAI RESTAURANT 1411 E. Tenth St., Jeffersonville, IN, 282-0198. With a broad range of well-prepared and authentic Thai dishes, Mai's is the eatery to beat among the metro area’s Thai restaurants. For both authenticity and quality, it's right up there with the top Thai places I've enjoyed in New York, San Francisco and Seattle. $ SALA THAI 9114 Taylorsville Rd., (Stony Brook Shopping Center), 493-3944. Fine and fancy, Sala Thai offers Louisville an upscale Thai alternative, presenting ethnic fare in a stylish setting that places it among the best, and certainly the most upscale, of the city’s growing cadre of Thai eateries. $$ p

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any variety, particularly when value and price are taken into account. Authentic Vietnamese food is made with care and served with pride. $

growing community of immigrants from Bosnia, for whom it’s a comfortable place to get a drink, a sausage, and feel at home. $

CAFÉ MIMOSA 1216 Bardstown Rd., 458-2233. Dating back to the ‘80s as the city’s first serious restaurant in the French-Vietnamese tradition, its current management still offers a short selection of good Vietnamese food plus Chinese-American fare, as well as one of the city’s more interesting sushi bars. $ p

DJULI 5312 S. Third St., 368-5199. Bosnian fare is the specialty in this tiny spot in the increasingly international culinary smorgasbord at Iroquois Manor shopping center. Bosnian immigrants appear to be the primary clientele, but everyone’s welcome to discover this hearty Yugoslavian cuisine. $

LEMONGRASS CAFÉ 1019 Bardstown Rd., 238-3981, 11300 Maple Brook Way, 412-8606. Lemongrass Café offers an appealing blend of Vietnamese, Thai and Chinese fare in a simple setting on Bardstown Road’s Restaurant Row that transcends an obviously low budget with style and grace. $ LITTLE SAIGON 3598 Springhurst Blvd., 425-4351. Louisville’s Vietnamese restaurant community, no longer limited to the ethnic South End, now boasts a modern, stylish outpost in the Eastern suburbs. Quality, authentic Vietnamese dishes at moderate prices burnish its allure. $ VIETNAM KITCHEN 5339 Mitscher Ave., 363-5154. This little South End storefront is well worth seeking out. The chef goes beyond the ordinary, preparing authentic Vietnamese dishes of unusual subtlety and flavor. I have yet to be disappointed with the quality of the food or service. $ ZEN GARDEN 2240 Frankfort Ave., 895-9114. A vegetarian restaurant must pass one simple test: at the end of the meal, I must not miss meat. Zen Garden passes this test with flying wok and chopsticks. $ f

EUROPEAN/BOSNIAN

NERMANA’S CUISINE 2250 Frankfort Ave., 721-8998. One of the city’s more recent Bosnian arrivals has gained wide popularity for its fine fare and excellent service. This family operation in a small, cozy and inviting old frame house in Crescent Hill offers a good sampling of hearty and warming Bosnian cuisine. $$ f e PAPILLON GRILL & BAR 1616 Grinstead Dr., 562-0058. This friendly little Eastern European spot is run by Bosnian immigrants who offer tasty fare and casual elegance in a serious effort to become the city’s first white-tablecloth example of fine Balkan cuisine. $$ p RUFAD’S KEBOB 1613 Bardstown Rd., 479-9796. Arslan Redsepovic—a refugee and restaurateur from the former Yugoslavian countries BosniaHerzegovina and Montenegro—introduces us to the delights of Bosnia’s cuisine at a fair price. $ f SARAJEVO CAFÉ & RESTAURANT 325 Old Bardstown Rd., 456-1919. In the running for tiniest restaurant in town, this four-table spot is more beer bar than eatery, but the meat-based ethnicBosnian goodies like bureks (turnovers) and cevapi (beef sausages) are excellent. If you can get in when they’re grilling a whole baby lamb over coals, it’s an experience not to miss. $

EUROPEAN/GERMAN

BEHAR CAFÉ 5600 National Turnpike, 368-5658. This shopping-center storefront has become a popular after-work gathering spot for the city’s

ERIKA’S GERMAN RESTUARANT 9301 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy. 499-8822. For a city with a strong German

THAI CAFÉ 2226 Holiday Manor, 425-4815. You’ll find this small café tucked into a corner of the “Holiday Manor Walk.” Owner Chavantee Snow and her family offer a small but well-prepared selection of authentic Thai dishes at very reasonable prices. $ THAI KITCHEN 5203 Dixie Highway, 448-4710. The historic House of Chen, one of the city’s first and longest-lived Chinese restaurants, is no more, but you can still get its famous egg rolls and other Chinese specialties—and Thai goodies too—under new management that has brought the Dixie corridor its first local taste of Thai. $ THAI-SIAM 3002 Bardstown Rd., 458-6871. Thai food—a fiery-aromatic cuisine that perches somewhere between China and India on the world culinary spectrum—is worth getting to know. This Highlands spot is Louisville’s first and oldest Thai eatery. $$

Hibachi

THAI SMILE 5 5800 Preston Hwy., 961-9018. The small but popular Thai Smile restaurant group, with properties in Kentucky, Tennessee and Indiana, lost Thai Smile 4 to a lease issue this summer. Now Thai Smile 5 comes up to bat on the South Side, keeping this small but popular familyowned mini-chain alive in Louisville. $

MIDDLETOWN 12905 Shelbyville Rd. 253-0036

SPRINGHURST 3576 Springhurst Blvd. 339-1978

Lunch Mon-Fri 11:30-2

STYLES FROM EAST AND WEST COASTS

Dinner Mon-Thur 5-10 Fri-Sat 4:30-11 Sun 4:30-9:30

Over 100 Different Special Rolls

THAI TASTE 1977 Brownsboro Rd., 897-7682. The owner-host of this friendly, casual spot in Crescent Hill had a restaurant in Bangkok before moving to Louisville, and his experience shows. The warmth of his welcome—and the quality of the food—make Thai Taste special. $

ASIAN/VIETNAMESE ANNIE CAFÉ 308 W. Woodlawn, 363-4847. Annie Café ranks not just as one of my favorite Vietnamese restaurants, but one the city’s best of

Sushi Bar

All Fish Flown in Fresh Daily

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heritage, Louisville is woefully short on authentic German restaurants, but this genuinely Germanic eatery attracts hungry crowds to Hurstbourne. Take care not to miss its former fast-food quarters just off I-64 local access ramp. $$ GASTHAUS 4812 Brownsboro Center, 899-7177. The Greipel family comes straight from Bavaria to Eastern Louisville with Gasthaus, a destination for local lovers of Germanic fare. The setting has as authentic a feeling as the hearty and delicious German dishes here. $$$

EUROPEAN/GREEK GREEK PARADISE CAFĂ&#x2030; 2113 Frankfort Ave., 8910003. Maria Bell, who brought her Greek restaurant from the Fort Knox area to Butchertown last year, has moved again. The latest edition of Greek Paradise Cafe, Grocery and Deli features imported cheeses, Greek coffee and a wide variety of fresh-made mealsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;some grilled on charcoalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to eat in or take out. $ p e NIKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RESTAURANT 1915 Blankenbaker Pkwy., 2611450. Nikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu combined â&#x20AC;&#x153;Continental dining with a Mediterranean flairâ&#x20AC;? and offers both standard American fare and Mediterranean specialties with a distinct Greek-American accent that reflects the ownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; heritage. $$ e

EUROPEAN/IRISH

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cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eating and drinking scene, as authentically Irish as the Wearinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the Green. $$ p f e Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;SHEAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TRADITIONAL IRISH PUB 956 Baxter Ave., 589-7373. A steady schedule of music, and an assortment of beers may be traditionally Irish, but the food here is mainstream American pub grub, from the cheesy fries to the Rueben sandwich. $$ p f e

EUROPEAN/ITALIAN BRICK OVEN ITALIAN EATERY 9910 Linn Station Rd., 425-4310. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing that tastes and smells as good as Northern Italian cuisine as it comes out of a brick oven. The cutting board is a blur with sandwiches, salads and appetizers and the wine is red and dry. $ BUCA DI BEPPO 2051 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 4932426. Buca di Beppoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recipe has all the necessary ingredients: huge portions of excellent food served with flair and the Buca scene is fun, a conscious parody of the exuberant decor of family ItalianAmerican restaurants of the 1950s. $$ p CARRABBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ITALIAN GRILL 617 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 412-2218. Carrabbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t your ordinary suburban shopping-center franchise eatery. This place dramatically exceeds expectations. From warmed bread dishes with quality olive oil to first-rate ItalianAmerican fare at reasonable prices. $$ p f

IRISH ROVER 2319 Frankfort Ave., 899-3544, 117 E. Main St, LaGrange, 222-2286. A warm and welcoming pub with an authentic Irish accent, this is a delightful place for a tall glass of Guinness, a snack and a bit of Irish music. I recommend the fish and chips. $ p f

COME BACK INN 909 Swan St., 627-1777, 415 Spring St., Jeffersonville IN, 285-1777. With both its branches located in urban neighborhoods, Come Back Inn looks pretty much like any other neighborhood saloon. But unlike most Louisville neighborhood saloons, this one houses a family Italian spot that wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be out of place in Chicago or Brooklyn. $ p

MOLLY MALONEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 933 Baxter Ave., 473-1222. A carefully constructed replica of a modern urban Irish pub, Molly Maloneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is worthy addition to the

FERD GRISANTI 10212 Taylorsville Rd., 267-0050. An East End landmark for 30 years, Ferd Grisantiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is as comfortable as a close friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Friendly

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and unpretentious hospitality, the quiet but not staid atmosphere, and the fine Italian food prompts the comment, â&#x20AC;&#x153;They do everything so well, and they make it look so easy.â&#x20AC;? $$$ p LENTINIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 1543 Bardstown Rd., 459-3020. The more things change, the more they stay the same, and happily for hungry Louisvillians, this old saying holds true at Lentiniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, where itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all-Italian, all of the time, with old family recipes, authentically prepared and served with style in a classic Italianeatery setting, plus a first-rate Italian wine list with many selections available by the glass. $$ p LUCHESSIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RAVIOLI & PASTA CO. 2225 Holiday Manor, 719-0060. This Holiday Manor storefront, an Italian deli with a small dining room in the back, is the first expansion here of a popular Memphis specialty-grocery chain, featuring ready-tomicrowave Italian-style fare. $ LUIGIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 702 W. Main St., 589-0005. If you think one pizza is pretty much like another, you may not have sampled New York City-style pizza, a treat that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find on just about every street corner there, but only Luigiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offers in its authentic form in the Derby City. $ MARTINI ITALIAN BISTRO 4021 Summit Plaza Dr., 3949797. The American-accented Italian fare at this Ohio-based chain might be a little closer to Bayonne, New Jersey than Florence, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good, featuring a short but diverse selection of hearty pastas, pizzas and Italian-style entrees. Martiniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quality has quickly built a loyal crowd of regulars. $$ p f MELILLOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 829 E. Market St., 540-9975. Adjacent to the locally owned and operated Felice Vineyards on East Market, Melilloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offers hearty and delicious home-style Italian-American fareâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and you can enjoy it with a glass of vino. $ p f OLD SPAGHETTI FACTORY 235 W. Market St., 5811070. One of the original ventures of a national firm that places its properties in renovated urban buildings, this favorite lights up the historic Levy Brothersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; department store. Bright and noisy, it offers well-made if basic Italian family fare and dishes it out for surprisingly low prices. $$ p THE OLIVE GARDEN 1320 Hurstbourne Pkwy., 3397190. The top property of the Orlando-based Darden chain, Olive Garden now operates more than 500 properties and bills itself as the leading Italian restaurant in the casual dining industry. Hearty pastas of all shapes and sauces, appetizers and combo platters all carry the Italian theme. $$ p PESTOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 566 S. Fifth St., 584-0567. Offices for blocks around empty into this bustling Italian eatery for weekday lunches featuring hearty platters of lasagna, zesty salads, red wine and iced tea. On Saturdays, the kitchen switches over to a special Persian menu. $ PORCINI 2730 Frankfort Ave., 894-8686. An expanded dining room and a stylish alfresco patio facing busy Frankfort Ave. make Porciniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an even more popular destination, a place to see and be seenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and, while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at it, enjoy a drink and a decent Italian-American dinner. $$$ p RAY PARRELLAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ITALIAN CUISINE 2311 Frankfort Ave., 899-5575. Old-fashioned Italian-American family fare is served up with a warm and casual welcome at Ray Parellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, the latest venture of a family thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been pleasing locals for a generation. $ f

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2 3 ( 1  ' $ , / < Â&#x2021;      ) 5 $ 1 . ) 2 5 7  $9 ( 1 8 ( Â&#x2021; 5 ( 6 ( 5 9$ 7 , 2 1 6          76 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

ROCKYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ITALIAN GRILL 715 W. Riverside Dr., Jeffersonville IN, 282-3844. This longtime Southern Indiana favorite earns its popularity with fine pizzas, a good selection of bottled beers and a select choice of Italian-American entrees, with a great view of the city from its riverside location. $ p f ROMANOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MACARONI GRILL 401 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 423-9220. The Italian-style menu at this casual, Dallas-based family chain includes


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appetizers, salads, pastas, veal and desserts. Chefs entertain while creating wood-fired pizzas. $$ p SPAGHETTI SHOP 4657 Outer Loop, 969-5545, 2669 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 9445400. Baked pasta dishes, subs, salads and appetizers are prepared while you wait. $ VOLARE 2300 Frankfort Ave., 894-4446. Benvenuto "Benny" Siddu brings to Louisville the upscale Italian concepts he built in Chicago with the Sinatra-evoking Volare and Cantare. It makes its mark on the local dining scene with a broad range of Italian dishes, suave service and a luxurious but comfortable setting. $$$ p f WILLIE’S ITALIAN 8533 Terry Rd., 933-1080. $

INDIAN BOMBAY INTERNATIONAL MARKET 1591 Bardstown Rd., 473-2077. The familiar landmark building that used to house the Bonnycastle Pharmacy has turned into an ethnic convenience store. Its all-youcan-eat Indian buffet may be the cheapest lunch you’ll find in the neighborhood. $ f e INDIA PALACE 9424 Shelbyville Rd., 394-0490. This longtime local Indian restaurant, originally on Bardstown Road and now housed in this exoticlooking East End building that has housed a string of well-known eateries, is a contender for the city’s top Indian spot. The expansive lunch buffet is well handled and a particularly good value. $$ f

Page 77

Moghuls, India’s royalty, led a short life in this rather exotic looking building. It recently returned to its original roots, with stylish Indian fare prepared in an open kitchen by the same management as suburban Shalimar. $$ p SHALIMAR INDIAN RESTAURANT 1820 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 493-8899. Modern and sleek in appearance, modest in price, this Indian restaurant has become the patriarch of local Indian restaurants. With a substantial lunch buffet and a full range of Indian dinner items, it has built a loyal clientele. $ p TAJ INDIA 9904 Linn Station Rd., 412-5579. Formerly Annapurna’s, this popular Plainview Indian eatery is now for omnivores, with many of the familiar vegetarian dishes still on the menu but offering a broader range that includes standard Indian meat, poultry and seafood dishes, too. $

INTERNATIONAL BAHAMA BREEZE 104 Oxmoor Court, 423-9040. It’s a long way from Oxmoor Center to the Florida Keys, but this chain-operated eatery does a good job of bridging the gap, offering a happy beachjoint experience without the ocean view. Bahama Breeze is stylish and upscale, with a good selection of island fare and a great bar. $$ p f e

KASHMIR INDIAN RESTAURANT 1285 Bardstown Rd., 473-8765. One of the city’s most popular Indian restaurants, Kashmir is casual, neither posh nor expensive, and it produces an extensive menu of seemingly authentic Indian fare. $$ f

CAFÉ KILIMANJARO 649 S. Fourth St., 583-4332. Café Kilimanjaro showcases Black-heritage cuisine, offering well-prepared treats from Africa, the Caribbean and Black America ranging from fiery Ethiopian wots (meat barbecue) to spicy Jamaican jerk cuisine to the comforting soul food of the American South. $ p f

MAHARAJA INDIAN RESTAURANT 2901 Brownsboro Rd., 721-7200. Back in the late 1980s, an upscale Indian restaurant featuring the cuisine of the

CHEZ SENEBA AFRICAN RESTAURANT 1215 Gilmore Ln., 968-8659. Add yet another interesting ethnic cuisine to Louisville’s increasingly international

dining scene. Friendly folks serve generous portions of filling, spicy Senegalese cuisine from West Africa in this tiny (three-table) free-standing building at Gilmore and Preston Highway. $ EDNA’S GOOD STUFF 9810 Taylorsville Rd., 2677500. Add another Asian cuisine to the increasingly diverse selection available in Louisville. Edna’s is good Filipino stuff, filling rice-and-noodle fare that blends influences of Spain, China and the Americas in a cuisine that’s very easy to like. Popular dishes include lumpia (Filipino egg roll) and pancit (a delicious noodle stir-fry). The all-you-can-eat Sunday buffet offers exceptional value. $$ GAVI’S RESTAURANT 222 S. Seventh St., 583-8183. This family-owned eatery has been around for more than 20 years. Standard casual American cuisine adds a few Russian-style specialties such as homemade borsht and potato soups and beef Stroganoff. Daily lunch specials include lots of fresh vegetable dishes. $ LA BODEGA 1604 Bardstown Rd., 456-4955. Nextdoor to the excellent De La Torre’s Spanish restaurant, La Bodega offers diners the city’s most authentic Spanish-style tapas bar, featuring the small bites originally invented in the outdoor cafés of Jerez to provide an edible lid for your glass of Sherry. $$ p f MANOOSH’S 558 S. Fifth St., 584-0004. At lunch time, Manoosh’s is an above average downtown eatery, featuring sandwiches and casual American-style deli fare. Come back for dinner, though, and you’ll find owner-chef Manoosh Khosrowshahi turning out an exotic mix of Italian, Greek, Mexican and American dishes, plus Iranian goodies from his native Azerbaijan. $ f QUEEN OF SHEBA ETHIOPIAN 3315 Bardstown Rd., 459-6301. Fans of Abyssinia, the Ethiopian restaurant on Frankfort Avenue, will be pleased to learn that Queen of Sheba is their old favorite, with

Indian Restaurant

M E D I T E R R A N E A N R E S TA U R A N T

Come In and See What’s

NEW! NEW MENU! NEW PATIO!

Enjoy the fine taste and delicate flavor of cuisine from Azerbaijan, and from around the world.

Interior Renovated & Upgraded!

Wines from Australia, Greece, Turkey, Italy, and many more. Specials of the House include: Kabob Ghafgazi & Kabob Soltani (Azeri Cuisine)

Manoosh’s Favorite (Vegetarian)

Chicken Cordon Bleu Wrap (Mexican Cuisine)

Gyro (Greek Cuisine)

Grilled Salmon (International Cuisine)

Manoosh Khosrowshahi, Owner Lunch Served: Monday – Friday, 10:30am – 3pm Dinner Served: Friday & Saturday 4pm – 11pm 558 W. Fifth Street • Louisville, KY (502) 584-0004

LUNCH HOURS: Monday - Friday ✦ 11:30a - 3:00p

Lunch Buffet: Saturday & Sunday ✦ 11:30a - 3:00p DINNER HOURS: Sunday - Thursday ✦ 5:00p - 10:00p Friday & Saturday ✦ 5:00p - 10:30p Take Out & Catering Available 1285 Bardstown Road (Across from Mid-City Mall)

(502) 473-8765

473-2078

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the same owners and essentially the same menu, now moved to the small motel on Bardstown Road that formerly housed India Palace. New is an all-youcan-eat Ethiopian lunch buffet on weekdays. $

LATIN AMERICAN/MEXICAN A LA FIESTA BAR & GRILL 914 Eastern Blvd. Clarksville, IN. 284-2300. If you enjoy exploring the world’s cuisines and discovering new food experiences as much as I do, you’ll want to head for A la Fiesta, where you can enjoy dishes from just about every Latin culture from Acapulco to Tierra del Fuego. $ p f e ALAMEDA 1381 Bardstown Rd., 459-6300. After a brief sojourn into Northern Italy, reinvented as Mezzaluna Tuscan Grill, Alameda has returned in the face of what management calls "popular demand." The familiar Southwestern favorites are back, and so is the casual feel, complete with attractive renovations. $ p f BAJA FRESH MEXICAN GRILL 1255 Bardstown Rd., 657-6000. I give this glittery new fast-food stop high-fives for its variety of fresh, tasty Southwestern-style dishes prepared while you wait. Pick from Baja-style tacos, "lifestyle" choices including low-fat items and several "high protein" selections for Atkins dieters. $ f BAZO’S FRESH MEXICAN GRILL 323 Wallace Ave., 899-9600. Bazo’s Fresh Mexican Grill (formerly Baja Grill) is an inexpensive, casual spot where you’ll find the best fish tacos this side of San Diego as the highlight of its simple fast-food Mexican fare. $ f DON PABLOS MEXICAN KITCHEN 615 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 425-8780, 940 E. IN 131, Clarksville, IN, 284-1071. Born in North Texas and now based in Atlanta, this 100-property MexicanAmerican chain, offers full bar service and a

Page 78

variety of dishes that range from sizzling fajitas with portabello mushroom, beef or chicken to crisp salads tossed in a fajita shell. $$ p EL CAPORAL 7319 Preston Hwy., 969-9693, 2209 Meadow Dr., 473-7840, 1901 Blankenbaker Pkwy., 515 E. Highway 131, Clarksville, IN, 282-7174. Louisville’s growing Mexican-American community has fostered a happy trend: excellent, authentic Mexican food. El Caporal bridges the gap between the Latino and Anglo communities. $ p

EL REY MEXICAN RESTAURANT 2918 Hikes Ln., 454-6520. Although it’s more Mexican-American than hard-core ethnic Mexican, El Rey earns my recommendation for tasty fare, cordial service in a pleasant fast-Mexican-food environment, and affordable prices. $ f EL RODEO MEXICAN RESTAURANT 9070 Dixie Hwy., 995-8722. At El Rodeo, you’ll find a blend of Tex-Mex and other Latin American classics from salty margaritas to sweet sopapillas. $$

EL MUNDO 2345 Frankfort Ave., 899-9930. This crowded, noisy little Crescent Hill storefront offers creative renditions of Mexican regional specialties that make most diners want to yell “Olé!” The setting may lack the trendy flair of Rick Bayless’s Frontera Grill in Chicago, but the fare mines a similar vein and does so nearly as well. $ p f

EL TARASCO 5425 New Cut Rd., 368-5628, 110 Fairfax Ave., 895-8010. Add El Tarasco to the happy new genre of restaurants run by Latinos and offering authentic Mexican food and atmosphere, but that reach out to Anglos and make it easy to enjoy a South-of-the-Border culinary adventure without compromise. $ p e

EL NOPAL 9473 Westport Rd., 327-6551, 11336 Preston Hwy., 961-9851, 10500 Watterson Tr., 2665956. Associated with the same family that runs the smaller El Nopalito, (or “the little cactus”), El Nopal (“the cactus”) offers similar delicious, authentic and inexpensive Mexican fare in somewhat larger and more comfortable surroundings. $ p f

ERNESTO’S 10602 Shelbyville Rd., 244-8889, 6201 Dutchmans Ln., 893-9297, 7707 Preston Hwy., 962-5380, 700 Riverside Dr., Clarksville, IN, 2800032. One of the first of the more authentic locally-owned Mexican restaurant groups, Ernesto’s remains consistently reliable. From the crispy home-fried chips to filling Mexican main courses and tasty desserts, it’s a worthy destination for good Mexican food and excellent value in an enjoyable atmosphere. $ p f e

EL NOPALITO 4028 Taylorsville Rd., 458-7278, 6300 Bardstown Rd., 231-4249, 2319 Brownsboro Rd., 893-9880. This modest little eatery used to be a Taco Bell, but you’ll never find comidas like this at the Bell! Run by a family from Mexico, it’s truly authentic and delicious. $ p f EL PARAISO 6201 Preston Hwy., 968-4873. On weekend nights, it’s one of the hottest Latino spots in town, attracting Louisville’s Hispanic community (and Anglos, too) for music and dancing. It’s less frenzied by day, but if you like excellent Mexican food and don’t mind a bargain, it’s well worth making the trip. $ p

HAVANA RUMBA 4115 Oechsli Ave., 897-1959 Cuban fare with a Latin beat has arrived in St. Matthews, as restaurateurs Fernando and Christina Martinez welcome you to Havana Rumba. Fernando, a Cuban refugee, received his training from the Havana International School of Tourism. Since his arrival in Louisville, he has gained a loyal following for his offerings at privately catered affairs. Truly authentic with a great range from country to fine dining Cuban, Havana Rumba is becoming a hit. $ p

Others Claim to be “Authentic” – not us, We Claim to be “The Best!” EVERY THURSDAY IS

MARGARITA DAY

78 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

Sunday –Thursday 11am - 10pm Friday & Saturday 11am - 10:30pm 4430 Dixie Highway

448-5678


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JALAPEÑO’S 4430 Dixie Hwy., 448-5678. Jalapeño’s (Louisville’s first outpost of a Lexington-based mini-chain) is owned and operated by folks of Mexican heritage, but its fare and its flair make it comfortable for wary “gringos” in search of a mellow Margarita and mild, familiar Mexican food. $$ p e JICAMA GRILL 1538 Bardstown Rd., 454-4383. Popular, youngish chef Anthony Lamas shares the culinary fruits of his Puerto Rican and Mexican heritage with delighted diners in this perennially trendy Nuevo Latino spot, specializing in South American goodies but ranging northward to a taste of Cuba and a hint of Mexico. $$$ p f KY TACO 6911 Shepherdsville Rd., 962-8526. Traditional Mexican fare from the Ramirez family. $ LA BAMBA 1237 Bardstown Rd., 451-1418. La Bamba boasts of its “burritos as big as your head.” It may be Louisville’s most startling case of an eatery that is more than it appears to be, and that goes for both quality and quantity. Franchised and fastfoodish, it pleasantly suprises with genuine Mexican fare and Latino flair. $ LA EMBAJADA 7502 Preston Hwy., 964-8775. $ LA HERRADURA 615 Eastern Blvd., Clarksville, IN., 280-8650. Is it possible to enjoy truly authentic tacqueria cuisine when the management speaks mostly Spanish and you speak only English? These friendly folks make it simple: a handy bi-lingual menu and a smiling staff make you feel at home.$ LA MARIMBA 5412 Del Maria Way, 493-0201. $ LA TAPATIA RESTAURANT 8106 Preston Hwy., 9619153. One of the most authentic ethnic Mexican restaurants in Louisville, this little storefront offers memorable tacos and burritos and more. You might run into a slight language barrier, but don’t be shy—Anglos are welcome here, and the staff is used to working through language differences. $ p LOLITA’S TACOS 4222 Poplar Level Rd., 459-4356. This tiny place may look like a fast-food joint, but the food is about as authentic Mexican as you’ll find. Crisp or soft tacos and burritos the size of paper-towel rolls turn a meal here into a real bargain. $ f LOS AZTECAS 530 W. Main St., 561-8535, 1107 Herr Ln., 426-3994, 9606 Taylorsville Rd., 297-8003, 9207 U.S. Hwy 42, 228-2450. Authentic Mexican cuisine has become a viable option in Louisville, thanks to a growing immigrant community. With fresh bar and blender offerings, creative appetizers and comfortable seating, Los Aztecas is one of the best, with tasty Mexican dishes good enough to lure us back again and again. $ p LOS INDIOS RESTAURANTE MEXICANO 2743 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 941-9770, 730 Highlander Point Dr., Floyds Knobs, IN, 923-2929. “Why have Tex-Mex when you can have MexMex?” is asked in fun on the servers’ T-shirts. This eatery is well worth the trip to Southern Indiana for high-quality Mexican dishes. $ p MAMA ROSA 4157 Bardstown Rd., 671-7025, 3061 Breckenridge Ln., 485-1811. Located in a shoppingcenter building that formerly housed another fast-food restaurant, Mama Rosa offers Mexican standards and a few more exotic Peruvian dishes. $pf

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subtle and complex, sometimes spicy but never fiery, it is fully competitive in quality with the city’s best restaurants. $$$ f MEXICO TIPICO RESTAURANT 6517 Dixie Hwy., 933-9523. It’s a bit of a trip out to Pleasure Ridge Park for those who don’t live nearby, but this little neighborhood restaurant, one of the city’s longerestablished Mexican spots, offers good and authentic dishes. $ p e MOE’S SOUTHWEST GRILL 2001 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 491-1800, 1001 Breckinridge Ln., 893-6637. “Welcome to Moe’s!” rings the merry shout of staff whenever anyone walks in the door. The food may be more fast-food Mexican-American than authentic South-of-the-Border fare, but it is freshly made from quality ingredients and comes in oversize portions, and that’s not a bad thing. $ OLMECAS 1582 Bardstown Rd., 454-0180. MexicanAmerican entrepreneur Saul Garcia, having built a loyal following for his family’s excellent mini-chain of Los Aztecas restaurants, now moves upscale. Olmecas offers an attractive blend of style and fine Mexican Gulf Coast gourmet fare that includes, but goes well beyond, the usual tacos and burritos. $$ p f ON THE BORDER 10601 Fischer Park Dr., 412-2461. From Dallas-based Brinker International, the food-service chain that also operates Chili’s and the Macaroni Grill, this contemporary spin on traditional favorites offers a range of delights from the Ultimate Fajita to margaritas in a setting that emulates Old Mexico décor. $$ p f PUERTO VALLARTA 4214 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 945-3588. $$ p QDOBA MEXICAN GRILL 1500 Bardstown Rd., 4543380, 970 Breckinridge Ln., 721-8100, 4059 Summit Plaza Drive, 429-5151, 100 Daventry Ln., 412-6202, 4302 Charlestown Rd., New Albany IN,

941-9654. This chain operation boasts five local outlets plus more in Lexington and Frankfort. Fastfoodish in style, Qdoba edges out its competitors on the basis of variety and interesting salsas, plus sizable portions at a price you can afford. $ f RINCON LATINO 2840 Goose Creek Rd., 425-4548. Truly authentic and ridiculously inexpensive fare attracts a largely Spanish-speaking clientele. This little spot offers one of the East End’s most appetizing Mexican options. $ ROSTICERIA LUNA 5213B Preston Hwy., 962-8898. Tiny and cluttered and very friendly, this little spot on Preston looks like another tacqueria (and the tacos, in fact, are very fine), but the specialty, Mexican-style roasted chicken, takes it to another level, juicy and succulent and roasted golden brown. Chicken simply doesn’t get any better than this. $ SANTA FE GRILL 3000 S. Third St., 634-3722. This tiny eatery in a century-old red-brick South End storefront near Churchill Downs never fails to satisfy with genuine Mexican tacos and other simple fare at prices that will leave you plenty of change for an exacta bet at the races. $ TACQUERIA LA MEXICANA 6201 Preston Hwy., 969-4449. The tacos are fine at this tiny storefront, next door to a Latino grocery store. This is seriously ethnic stuff, but Anglos are thoroughly welcome, the staff is bilingual, and they will happily provide a menu with all the English translations written in. $ TIJUANA FLATS BURRITO CO. 2420 Lime Kiln Ln. Another entry in the growing niche of "fast casual Tex-Mex" eateries, specializing in burritos made from fresh ingredients while you wait. $$ TUMBLEWEED SOUTHWEST GRILL (19 locations). Tumbleweed, which started as a humble Mexican restaurant in New Albany, eventually came to

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MAMBO CUBAN CUISINE 5309 Mitscher Ave., 3631160. Authentic island fare and very friendly service (plus live music many evenings) make this goodsize, stylish South End room the city’s place to go when you’re in the mood for Cuban cuisine. $$ p e MAYAN GYPSY 624 E. Market St., 583-3300. It may have evolved from a mobile taco van, but Bruce Ucán’s high-style Yucatan and tropical Mexican cooking shows his creative genius in the kitchen:

Louisville! FREE APPETIZER AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE

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dominate Louisville’s Tex-Mex niche with colossal margaritas, gigantic burritos and spicy chili con queso. But what started as a sideline, mesquite grilled steaks, chops, and chicken, has become the main draw. These days, diners are more likely to dig into a perfectly grilled steak and baked potato as into a burrito. With its new Southwest focus, large and varied menu and added wine list, “The Weed” still has diners returning in droves. $$ p

MIDDLE EASTERN BABYLON 1971 Brownsboro Rd., 899-9100. With excellent if simple authentic Iraqi fare at rockbottom prices and an attitude that says “Welcome, we’re glad you’re here!” — plus belly dancing on weekends — Babylon offers a powerful reason to head straight for the East End and a meal at this charming little place. $ f CASPIAN GRILLE 4218 Bishop Ln., 479-6222. Louisville boasts three Persian (Iranian) restaurants, a surprising number for a city our size. Caspian Grille is a worthy entry, with a good variety of affordable dishes that comprise a tasty sampling of Persian delicacies, including a variety of skewered kabob dishes and the rich Persian stew called Khoresht. $ f GRAPE LEAF 2217 Frankfort Ave., 897-1774. Yet another Middle Eastern eatery, yet another good inexpensive source of food on Frankfort Avenue. $ f OMAR’S GYRO 969 Baxter Ave., 454-4888. No matter whether you pronounce it “Ghee-ro” or “Gyro,” you won’t be disappointed with the classic Greek sandwich served at Omar’s Gyro, a tiny Highlands shop with a simple, short and inexpensive bill of fare that seldom fails to please. $ f SAFFRON’S 131 W. Market St., 584-7800. Majid Ghavami, a veteran of Casa Grisanti and Vincenzo’s, has elevated this Persian (Iranian) restaurant far beyond a mere ethnic eatery. It transcends its location, a small urban-renewal building, with stylish decor, an intriguingly exotic menu, and a level of careful, professional service worthy of a white-tablecloth dining room. $$$ p

ENTERTAINMENT DINING BUFFALO CROSSING 1140 Bagdad Rd., Shelbyville, KY, (502) 647-0377. If you’d like to combine a day trip with a culinary adventure, consider a drive to Buffalo Crossing in Shelby County. This agricultural amusement park features a 500-head buffalo herd and an oversize dining room where you can give this healthy red meat a try. The food here is country-style and so are the friendly servers. $$ f DERBY DINNER PLAYHOUSE 525 Marriott Dr., Clarksville, IN, 288-8281. The play’s the thing at Derby Dinner Playhouse, Louisville’s long-running entry in the dinner-theater sweepstakes ... but the expansive buffet dinner adds value to the mix. $$$$ e JOE HUBER FAMILY FARM & RESTAURANT 2421 Scottsville Rd., Starlight IN, 923-5255. A pleasant 20-minute drive from downtown Louisville, Huber’s has built a solid reputation for simple farm fare that’s well-made, fresh and good. Some of the produce is grown on the premises in season. $$ p f e MY OLD KENTUCKY DINNER TRAIN 602 N. Third St., Bardstown, KY, (502) 348-7300. Talk about a nostalgia trip: My Old Kentucky Dinner Train offers a four-course meal during a two-hour voyage along scenic Kentucky railroad tracks near Bardstown in vintage 1940s-era dining cars. Reservations are strongly recommended. All aboard! $$$$ p

80 Fall 2004 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

STAR OF LOUISVILLE 151 W. Riverside Rd., Jeffersonville, IN, 589-7827. The Ohio River cruise is the best thing about this Love Boat-style yacht that makes nightly all-you-can-eat cruises up the river. $$$$ p f e

MICROBREWERIES BLUEGRASS BREWING COMPANY 3929 Shelbyville Rd., 899-7070, 636 E. Main St., 584-2739. A muststop destination for beer lovers on the national artisanal-brew trail, but it’s more than just a brewpub. BBC’s management gives equally serious attention to both liquid and solid fare, making this a great place to stop in for both dinner and a beer. $ p f e BROWNING’S BREWERY 401 E. Main St., (Slugger Field), 515-0174. Making beautiful use of the historic red-brick building that houses Slugger Field, Browning’s offers first-rate brewpub beers and tasty, informal fare that ranges from pub grub to pastas, to pizza. $$ p f e CUMBERLAND BREWS 1576 Bardstown Rd., 4588727. Giving new meaning to the term “microbrewery,” Cumberland Brews may be one of the smallest eateries in town. It’s usually packed, earning its crowds the old-fashioned way by providing very good food, friendly service, and high-quality hand-crafted artisan beers. $ f e RICH O’S PUBLIC HOUSE 3312 Plaza Dr., New Albany IN, 949-2804. Decent barbecue and pub grub make Rich O’s a popular hangout, and his remarkable beer list of more than 100 selections from around the world—and now locally brewed craft beers—attracts beer lovers from all over. $ e

COFFEE HOUSE ATOMIC SAUCER 1000 E. Oak St., 637-5399. $ BEAN STREET CAFÉ 2736 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 944-6262. New Albany’s first gourmet coffee shop, Bean Street, introduced the Sunny Side to the joys of serious espresso. Like all good coffee shops, it’s not just an eatery, but a cultural hangout with an IUS flavor. $ f CAFFE CLASSICO 2144 Frankfort Ave., 894-9689. Not just another funky neighborhood coffee shop, Caffe Classico is sleek, modern and very European in style. Outstanding espresso drinks, teas and pastries are bolstered with a short lunch menu including fine panini, and it differs dramatically in mood and personality from many of its competitors. $ f CLEO’S COFFEE AND MORE Caesars Indiana Casino, Elizabeth, IN, 888-766-2648. Open 24 hours a day, the coffeeshop at Caesars serves hot and fresh java, breakfast orders, cutting board sandwiches, pastries and a hamburger as big and smile-provoking as a slot-machine payoff. $ COFFEE BEANERY 7900 Shelbyville Rd., (Oxmoor Center), 339-0738. $ COFFEE POT CAFÉ 234 E. Gray St. (Medical Tower South), 584-5282 $ f DAY’S ESPRESSO AND COFFEE BAR 1420 Bardstown Rd., 456-1170, 720 W. Main St., 5844932. Dark and cozy, with an old-fashioned feeling, Day’s Bardstown branch has everything you would expect in a college-neighborhood coffee shop except a college near by. $ f EXPRESSIONS OF YOU 1800A W. Muhammad Ali, 584-6886. $ f e HEINE BROTHERS COFFEE 2714 Frankfort Ave., 899-5551, 1295 Longest Ave., 456-5108, 2200 Bardstown Rd., 515-0380, 118 Chenoweth Ln., 893-5103. Spartan, friendly and affordable, with


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DESSERTS/BAKERY BAKELICIOUS 6915 Southside Dr., 363-9040. The region's first Asian bakery, offering goodies that Chinese-American families have heretofore had to travel to Chicago to find, Bakelicious offers a bewildering range of baked buns filled with curry meats, hot dogs, omelets, barbecue and custard. $ THE BAKERY 3100 Bardstown Rd., 452-1210. Not just a fine bakery but a place where bakers learn their business, this excellent establishment—like the nearby Winston’s—is part of the culinary program at Sullivan University. A recent renovation adds a touch of European style. The deli option is no more, but you can’t beat the quality breads and pastries offered here to eat in or carry out. $ BREADWORKS 3628 Brownsboro Rd., 893-3200, 2420 Lime Kiln Ln., 326-0300, 2204 Dundee Rd., 452-1510, 11800 Shelbyville Rd., 254-2885. $ DESSERTS BY HELEN 2210 Bardstown Rd., 451-7151, 9209 US Hwy. 42, 228-8959. Helen has enjoyed a local clientele in Prospect for years. Now a second location brings her sweet addition to the Highlands community, with elegant cakes, tempting pies and tortes and designer cookies. $ HEITZMAN TRADITIONAL BAKERY & DELI 9426 Shelbyville Rd., 426-7736, 428 W. Market St., 5842437. The Heitzman family has been baking in the Louisville area since your great-aunt was a girl ordering dinner rolls. Made fresh daily, the pies, cakes, cookies and specialty pastries provide tasty nostalgia for all who visit. $

good coffee roasted on the premises and a short list of pastries, desserts and panini sandwiches, Heine Bros. has earned its outstanding local reputation. $ f e HIGHLAND COFFEE CO. 1140 Bardstown Rd., 4514545, 627 S. Fourth St., 540-9909. Offering two ways to get wired, this cozy neighborhood coffee shop also functions as one of Louisville’s top Internet cafes, where you can enjoy a hot cappuccino while you surf the ‘net in a WiFi hot spot. Funky Seattle-style ambience is a plus. $ f HIGHLAND WILDFLOWER & JAVA 1559 Bardstown Rd., 451-0553. In the heart of the Highlands, this storefront cafe enjoys a good buzz in the community, and we don’t just mean a caffeine buzz. It boasts a high-tech Segafreddo coffeeroasting machine. $ JAVA BREWING COMPANY 2910 Frankfort Ave., 893-6996, 9561B US Hwy 42, 292-2710, 516 W. Main St., 568-6339, 135 S. English Station Rd., 489-5677, Fourth Street Live, 561-2041, 4013 Dutchmans Ln. Another of Louisville’s many atmospheric coffee houses, this casual neighborhood spot boasts the comfortable ambience of a friendly old-fashioned book shop, with comfortable seating, a good selection of pastries, and quality coffee from Seattle. $

MAGIC CORNER BAKERY 335 W. Broadway (Camberley Brown Hotel), 583-1234. Pastry Chef Brian Logsdon has opened this gourmet bakery on the hotel's main floor, offering a variety of artisan breads, pastries and cakes during a fourhour window around midday. $ MY FAVORITE MUFFIN 3934 Taylorsville Rd., 4850518, 9800 Shelbyville Rd., 426-9645. All the muffins are made right in the store, including such popular choices as the Cinnamon Crumb and the Turtle Muffin, a double chocolate with caramel and pecans. $ PLEHN’S BAKERY 3940 Shelbyville Rd., 896-4438. A neighborhood institution, this bakery is as busy as it is nostalgic. Enjoy the hometown soda fountain with ice cream while you wait for your hand-decorated birthday cake, breakfast rolls or colorful cookies to be boxed. $ RAINBOW BLOSSOM BAKERY 311 Wallace Ave., 897-3648. Organic and vegan pastries, rolls, breads and cookies, all in the tradition of freshness, and healthiness. $ SWEET SURRENDER 1416 Bardstown Rd., 458-6363. Some of the city’s best desserts and pastries are available at this first-rate pastry shop. Debbie Richter-Keller, featured in Southern Living magazine among other local and regional publications, has a way with Belgian chocolate that every sweet tooth should experience. $

JOE MUGGS 994 Breckenridge Ln., (Books-a-Million), 894-8606, 4300 Towne Center Dr., 426-2252. $ f PERKFECTION 359 Spring St., Jeffersonville, IN, 2180611. $ e STARBUCKS COFFEE (11 locations) $ f

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Come out to any of our three convenient locations and experience one of Louisvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest dining traditions with our relaxing atmosphere, delectable foods and incredible list of fine wines.

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MAP INDEX

71

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DOWNTOWN > DOWNTOWN

MAP â&#x20AC;˘ 1

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MAP • 2

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NEAR EAST > HIGHLANDS/CRESCENT HILL

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SOUTH EAST > HIKES POINT/BUECHEL

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EAST > HURSTBOURNE N./LYNDON

MAP â&#x20AC;˘ 5

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MAP • 6

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SOUTH EAST > HURSTBOURNE S./JEFFERSONTOWN

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7 > NORTH EAST > RIVER RD./BROWNSBORO RD.

MAP

8 > NORTH EAST > WESTPORT ROAD

MAPS • 7 • 8

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MAP

11 > SOUTH EAST > FERN CREEK

MAPS • 9 • 10 • 11

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19 > FAR EAST > MIDDLETOWN 10 > NORTH EAST > PROSPECT

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MAP • 13

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SOUTH WEST > SHIVELY/PLEASURE RIDGE PARK

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I N

T H E

H I G H L A N D S

MAPS • 15 • 16

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the New Dinner Club in town UPSCALE DINING & DANCING

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Nightly Entertainment–8:30pm 2727 Bardstown Road (formerly Steam)

454-9944

15 > INDIANA > CLARKSVILLE

Se afood, St e aks & Pasta

MAP

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16 > INDIANA > JEFFERSONVILLE

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at our Dutchmans Lane location only Call 261-8232 for information.

MONDAY Speedy Gonzalez. . . . . . . . . . 3.99 Beef enchilada, beef taco, with mexican rice or refried beans. Chicken Taquitos . . . . . . . . . 4.75 Laredo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.85 Bean burrito covered with cheese dip sauce, served with mexican rice and beans. Nachos Supremos. . . . . . . . . 5.25

TUESDAY Numero Dos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.99 Beef burrito, mexican rice and refried beans. Order of Tacos . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.15 Chicken or Beef (Three) Matamoros. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.15 Giant flour tortilla taco shell stuffed with seasoned chicken, lettuce, anejo cheese and sour cream, served with mexican rice and refried beans. Juarez. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.85 Crispy corn tortilla, refried beans, chicken, lettuce, anejo cheese and mexican cream. Served with rice.

WEDNESDAY Numero Tres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.99 Cheese enchilada, bean burrito, and mexican rice. Tijuana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.99 Two beef enchiladas served with rice or beans.

El Paso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.65 Two giant chicken flautas topped with lettuce, cheese and mexican cream. Served with rice. Piedras Negras. . . . . . . . . . . . 4.85 Mashed potato burrito covered with cheese and delicious onion/tomato sauce, served with rice and beans.

THURSDAY Numero Uno . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.99 Taco, chile relleno, guacamole salad and beans. Eagle Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.29 One beef burrito and One beef taco. Calexico. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.05 Chicken mini chimichanga topped with cheese dip sauce, served with lettuce, sour cream and mexican rice. Myquesadilla. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.75 Large flour tortilla quesadilla-style stuffed with cheese and chicken served with lettuce, sour cream, cheese and pico de gall.

FRIDAY Crazy Taco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.25 Burrito Supremo. . . . . . . . . . 4.50 Beef burrito enchilada style with sour cream, lettuce, cheese and tomato. Rio Grande . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.10 Chile poblano relleno with chihuahua cheese served with mexican rice and refried beans. Reynosa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.99 Two chicken enchiladas served with lettuce, sour cream, cheese, and mexican rice.

mexican buffet Preston Hwy. – MON.- SUN. 11am-2pm Jeffersonville – MON.- FRI. 11am-2pm Look for our discount coupons in Valpak®.

FOUR LOUISVILLE AREA LOCATIONS:

7707 Preston Hwy. MONDAY - SUNDAY

11:00am - 10:30pm

962-5380 10602 Shelbyville Rd. MONDAY - SUNDAY

11:00am - 10:30pm

244-8889 6201 Dutchmans Ln. MONDAY - SUNDAY

11:00am - 10:30pm

893-9297 700 W. Riverside Dr. Ste. B (Jeffersonville, IN) MONDAY - SUNDAY

11:00am - 10:30pm

280-0032 LATINO DANCE NIGHTS (21 and over only please) FRI. & SAT. 11pm-4am Prices subject to change.


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HARDROCK.COM

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Anti-established in 1971 in London, Hard Rock Cafe has been serving up great tunes and even better tasting food for millions of rockers around the world. And we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t intend to stop anytime soon.

LOUISVILLE

LOCATED AT 4TH STREET LIVE

PHONE: 502-568-2202

l

424 SOUTH 4TH ST.


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Fall 2004 (Vol. 06)