Page 1

00_OBC OFC IFC IBC_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:18 AM

Page 2

FALL 2 009 | AUG-SEP-OCT

NULU neighborhood growing, thriving and appetizing

900

restaurant listings with reviews & maps

party planner

+

inspired recipes

easy tailgating from start to finish $ 4 . 9 9 U. S .

www.foodanddine.com

Wiltshire on Market’s Eggplant Napoleon with a sundried tomato, chevre cheese and caperberry relish and a quinoa fritter.


00_OBC OFC IFC IBC_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:18 AM

Page 3


01-03_VolHorsWat_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:20 AM

Page 1


01-03_VolHorsWat_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:20 AM

Page 2


01-03_VolHorsWat_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:20 AM

Page 3


04-05_Contents_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:21 AM

Page 4

FALL 2009 PUBLISHER JOHN CARLOS WHITE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF SARAH FRITSCHNER VICE PRESIDENT PAUL M. SMITH COLUMNISTS ROGER A. BAYLOR JAY FORMAN SCOTT HARPER DAVID LANGE ENTERTAINMENT EDITORS-AT-LARGE TIM & LORI LAIRD CONTRIBUTING WRITERS ESTHER ANG GREG GAPSIS STEVE KAUFMAN BARBARA MACDONALD CONTRIBUTING CHEFS MIKE CUNHA TOM SMITH CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER DAN DRY MAGAZINE DESIGN & LAYOUT JOHN CARLOS WHITE GRAPHIC DESIGN KATHY KULWICKI STEFAN TAMBURRO COPY EDITOR PAUL NAJJAR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES ANNETTE B. WHITE GINA WOLFE DISTRIBUTION / FACT CHECKING PAUL M. SMITH IN FOND MEMORY OF OUR DEAR FRIEND DANIEL F. BOYLE

Food & Dining Magazine ® is published quarterly by Louisville Dining Magazine, Inc. P.O. Box 665, Louisville KY 40201 The publisher and advertisers are not responsible or liable f or misprints, typographical errors or misinformation. The opinions expressed herein are those of the writ ers and do not nec essarily reflect the opinion of the publisher. +Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. All rights reserved.

___________________________________

Annual Subscription rate $18. Submit subscription requests to: Food & Dining Magazine ® P.O. Box 665, Louisville KY 40201, or call (502) 493-5511 ext. 540 or subscribe online at

www.foodanddine.com For Advertising information call (502) 493-5511 ext. 550 ON THE COVER: Wiltshire on Market’s Eggplant Napoleon with a sundried tomato, chevre cheese and caperberry relish and a quinoa fritter. (see story page 38) Photo by Dan Dry 4

Fall 2009

www.foodanddine.com


04-05_Contents_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:22 AM

contents

Page 5

FALL 2009

FEATURE

38

NULU ART DISTRICT:

East Main and Market Streets, historically the Louisville’s market district, fell on hard times. A resurgence in creative energy has brought a critical mass of good restaurants to create a new restaurant row among the art galleries.

38

COLUMNS STARTERS

8

COMINGS & GOINGS A summary of changes on the local restaurant scene, with openings, closings, moves and more.

SIDE DISHES Who’s doing what in the local culinary landscape and a calendar of gastronomic events.

36

SHORT ORDERS Holding onto summer. Hot new products for outdoor entertaining and grilling.

GOOD TO GO Excellent take-outs from local restaurants replace the common fast-food foil-wrapped fodder.

50

FROM THE EDITOR: Eating seasonably and regionally Eating in or out, local ingredients offer affordable and fresh meal solutions.

HUMOR: International men of mystery meat A humorous look at the bizarre eats of the English.

LIQUIDS CORK 101: Six red wines under $10

18

Six red wines with character that we find to have great taste and value.

HIP HOPS: Real English beer Our resident expert examines an age-old beer tradition from across the pond.

TEA: Traveling Louisville’s silk road A tour of the growing population of local tea houses.

RECIPES EASY ENTERTAINING: Tailgating party

24

Here is your playbook on how to throw a winning get-together from kickoff to the final whistle.

COOKING CLASS: Cooking with fresh corn Sullivan University chefs share recipes using this summer staple.

12 14 16 18 22 32 34 36 24 50

RESTAURANT GUIDE DINING GUIDE Our comprehensive listing of over 900 area restaurants complete with reviews. Now with more user-friendly features.

MAPS Find all of the restaurants in our Dining Guide on 16 area maps.

54 82

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009

5


06-07_SullRemax_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:23 AM

Page 6

Because

I have already a lot

on my plate.


06-07_SullRemax_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:23 AM

Page 7


08-11_Come&Go_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:23 AM

Page 8

starters comings & goings

comings

& goings

For the nation at large, blue skies and bright tomorrows might still be dismayingly distant, but restaurateurs in the Louisville Metro and Southern Indiana areas are doing their part to set the stage for a revival. Both the courage of those in the restaurant business, and the ongoing loyalty of the dining public in straitened times have to be noted in the overall positive outlook of this quarter’s movement in the dining scene. Yes, 11 restaurants have closed for good, and four others with multiple outlets have trimmed back. But a full 27 new restaurants have opened — just shy of two openings for every closing.

OPENINGS Artemisia, in the heart of the NuLu art district, (see related story, p. 38) closed just before Derby, but almost immediately former Artemisia chef Allen Heintzman took over the property and opened The White Oak, 620 E. Market St., focusing his menu on seasonal dishes with a southern provenance, priced for value, thus keeping open one of the linchpins of the East Market resurgence. A prime corner at the start of the Bardstown Road restaurant row, 1126 Bardstown Rd., has seen several restaurant concepts come and go, most recently Karma Cafe. The Dragon King’s Daughter is the newest effort to make this location viable. Toki Masubuchi, owner of Maido Essential Japanese Cuisine & Sake Bar, 1758 Frankfort Ave., plans a menu that will feature international standards built on traditional Japanese ingredients. Look for intriguing choices such as pizza topped with sashimi or teriyaki chicken, or tacos, but filled with avocado tempura. The menu will also include sushi rolls, smoked salmon and prosciutto. Another location that has seen ups and downs over the years has undergone a major facelift, but you will have to venture deep inside the old Kentucky Theater, 651 S. Fourth St., in Theater Square, to see the renovations that have transformed the movie auditorium into Theater Square Marketplace. The 8,000 square foot space will be one-third gourmet grocery, two-thirds upscale take-out deli, with a circular bar in the back, and a patio sequestered between the theater and the Crescent Center townhouses. Two wineries are now serving food as well as locallycrafted wines. Riverbend Winery, 120 S. 10th St., and River City Winery, 321 Pearl St., New Albany, IN., offer a variety of bistrocontemporary and upscale-casual cuisine. Riverbend uses all Kentucky-grown grapes for its wines; River City imports grapes from Michigan and elsewhere and makes wines at its Southern Indiana location. 8

Fall 2009

www.foodanddine.com

The winery is one of six new eating establishments revitalizing downtown New Albany. Long-time tradition Steinert’s is not letting a little thing like a fire stop them. The new location of the much-loved bar and grill will be 401 E. Main St. At 400 W. Main, Joe Jackson, veteran of Clarksville Seafood, has opened Jackson’s Seafood, serving up fried fish (and broiled or blackened too). At 506 W. Main, Downtown Diner and Coffee

Toki Masubuchi


08-11_Come&Go_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:23 AM

Page 9


08-11_Come&Go_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:23 AM

Page 10

House will provide that morning jolt of java and home-style lunches. In September, two successful Louisville restaurants will open outlets in New Albany as well. Toast on Market will bring its style of arty, upscale breakfasts and lunches to 143 E. Market St., and Wick’s Pizza will open a Southern Indiana location at 225 State St., in the space vacated by the former Speakeasy jazz club. Three other Indiana restaurants have opened around the area. Scuddle’s Seafood is serving at 702 Highlander Point Dr., in Floyds Knobs, and Wishbone Grill is smoking barbecue at 408 E. Lewis and Clark Pkwy. Also in Floyds Knobs is a new Mexican restaurant, the Yellow Cactus, at 3620 Paoli Pike. Ethnic restaurants have just nosed out hot dog stands, with three of the former versus two of the latter. The Blue Lagoon at 2280 Bardstown Rd. will offer Middle-Eastern style seafood, from the owner of Sharom’s, on the Outer Loop. Arandas Mexican Restaurant will provide more south-of-the-border choices at 7200 Preston Hwy., and the Nile Restaurant and Lounge will serve Caribbean/Cuban food at 5312 S.Third St. Louisville used to have a dearth of hog dog stands, and while we are still short of the choices in, say, Chicago, the growth in this segment of the food world has been notable. Opening recently downtown is Reds, 514 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., in the former Picnicaters hut across from Louisville Gardens, serving up a variety of interesting sausages (chicken and turkey hot dogs, Kielbasa and Italian sausage) with piled-high toppings, as well as chicken barbecue and vegetarian side dishes. And Conez & Coneyz, 2716 1/2 Frankfort Ave., sells ice cream as well has hot dogs — hence the punny name.

10 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

The return of Zanzabar at its original location at 2100 S. Preston St. on the edge of Germantown is generating as much buzz as the reopening of Steinert’s is in New Albany. It serves hot table lunches, cold beer and hearty sandwiches at night when the bands play — loudly. Mulligan’s Pub and Grill (1801 Newburg Rd.) opened at the corner of Newburg and Speed, in the old Kaelin’s location. Renbarger’s Brew Haus adds another watering hole choice along Baxter Ave, at 942, and D&C Diamond Café is a new bar and grill at 2017 Brownsboro Rd. Jazzyblu (815 W. Market St.) is taking over the space in the basement of Glassworks, the former Jazz Factory location, offering jazz Thursday through Saturday, and lunches Tuesday through Friday. A few other restaurants have opened hither and yon around town. Perfetto Pizza, 9910 Linn Station Rd., will continue the New York-style pie-by-the-slice tradition in the same place as its predecessor, Slice of New York. Ahoy Fish Hut, 2902 Bardstown Rd., has been pleasing its Upper Highlands clientele with hand-cut cod, fried or broiled to order, and fish tacos. Blue Horse Cafe, 830 Phillips Lane, is a casual dining eatery in the Crown Plaza Hotel near the Fairgrounds, and Red Hot Roasters, a drive-through coffee bar at 1402 Payne St., has carved out a niche with this season’s hottest trend, cold-brewed iced coffee. They dispense espressos and lattes, too, but the word is out that Red Hot Roasters’ hottest order is the affagato, a cup of Miss Charlotte’s vanilla ice cream topped with a shot of dark, hot espresso. Several established restaurants have opened new locations. Molly Malone’s will bring Irish pub food to 3900 Shelbyville Rd. in late September. Jimmy John’s hit the ground running in the Louisville market, and has just opened the chain’s seventh


08-11_Come&Go_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:23 AM

sandwich shop at 301 E. Market St. A third Jason’s Deli can be found at 1975 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., and a third Five Guys Burger & Fries has opened at 4116 Summit Plaza Dr. China King has opened a new hot table buffet at 9106 Taylorsville Rd., and in Indiana, A.J.’s Gyro Cafe will be slicing and stuffing pita at 768 Highlander Point Dr. in Floyds Knobs.

CLOSINGS The list of restaurants that have closed is happily short, but sadly contains some notable names. Artemisia gave up the ghost, but was hardly shuttered before the space at 620 E. Market came to life as The White Oak. Jarfi’s Bistro, 1543 Bardstown Rd., has closed, but Jeff Jarfi is well along in planning his next venture in the new Zirmed Building across from Glassworks on W. Market. Sadly, the newest incarnation of the historic Colonnade had to close when its landlord, the Louisville Antique Mall, succumbed to the weak economy. Owner Chuck Krill still operates Cravings in the National City Tower, and hopes to find a new location for the Colonnade. Amerigo, like its predecessor Harper’s, found it

Page 11

rough going at 1871 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., and closed its doors, as did Fifth Quarter Steak House, 1241 Durrett Lane. Several smaller eateries also called it quits recently. The most notable of these is The Pink Door, which had its run of funky popularity at 2222 Dundee Rd. in the Douglass Loop. Long-time New Albany fixture The Little Chef, 147 E. Market St., has closed, as has Cafe Glace at 27161/2 Frankfort Ave., and Cards Cafe, 1451 S. Floyd St. Picnicaters BBQ ended a long run in the funky shack at 514 W. Muhammad Ail Blvd., which, refurbished, is now Red’s hot dog stand. And Police Doughnuts ended a brief run at 12416 Shelbyville Rd. Finally, a quartet of small local chains closed one outlet, but still serve at others. Closed are Snappy Tomato at 4005 Shelbyville Rd., J. Gumbo’s at 947 Baxter Ave., El Caporal at 7319 Preston Hwy., and Skyline Chili, 426 W. Market St.

MOVES AND CHANGES A handful of restaurants have moved their operations. Dinner is Done is now crafting its popular fried chicken at 12001 Shelbyville Rd. Moe’s Southwest Grill has moved to 4652 Chamberlain Lane, and

Bruce’s Smokehouse to 10317 Watterson Trail. Juanita’s Burger Boy lost its eponymous owner upon Juanita’s retirement.The oasis for late-night munchies at 1450 S. Brook St. is now under new ownership simply as Burger Boy. We regret any omissions, but invite the restaurant community to keep us informed. Send information by Email to publisher@foodanddine.com or give us a call at (502) 493-5511, ext. 501.

S U B S C R I B E TO FOOD & DINING Sign up for one year for $18, and we’ll give you four quarterly editions and pay you back in full with $18 in local-restaurant gift certificates. Better still, take two years for $26, we’ll send you eight issues and send you $36 worth of gift certificates. Subscribe online at:

www.foodanddine.com

2009 DOWNTOWN LOUISVILLE RESTAURANT WEEK IS A PROUD SPONSOR OF

Enjoy exceptional dishes prepared by Louisville’s finest chefs in downtown’s hottest eateries. Fleur De Licious, Louisville’s fourth annual downtown restaurant week is taking place October 19- 24, 2009. No passes to buy or coupons to carry; simply attend one of the participating restaurants and select from a special 3-course menu for $25 or $35 (beverage, tax and gratuity not included). It’s the perfect time to try new restaurants or visit your old favorites. Make your reservations today! For more information, visit www.fleurdelicious.info Fleur De Licious is brought to you by Louisville Downtown Management District. www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009

11


12-13_Side Dish_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:24 AM

Page 12

starters side dishes

side

dishes

AWARDS AND HONORS The Few, the Proud, the Master Sommeliers Louisvillians Scott Harper and Brett Davis have taken their place among 101 other North Americans (now 103) who have earned the coveted Master Sommelier diploma from the Court of Master Sommeliers American Chapter. Harper, who manages the Bristol Bar and Grille in Jeffersonville (and is this magazine’s wine columnist) and Davis, who works for Vintner Select wine importer and distributor, have worked for years — often together — to achieve the diploma.The three-day exam was given to 38 people at the Midwest Culinary School in Cincinnati. Only Harper and Davis were successful. While Davis works behind the scenes, Harper’s position as manager of the approachable casual dining spot means Louisville and Southern Indiana consumers have unusual access to affordable but unusual wines. Even if you don’t know anything about wine, the wine features at the Bristol are safe bets for a quality choice.

Scott Harper

The Court of Master Sommeliers was established in England in 1977 to encourage improved standards of beverage knowledge and service in hotels and restaurants. The first Master Sommelier Diploma Exam to be held in the United States was in 1987. The title Master Sommelier marks the highest recognition of wine and spirits knowledge, beverage service abilities, and professionalism in the hospitality trade.

Louisville Represented Well at Great American Seafood Cook-Off Louisville chef John Varanese, chef-owner of Varanese Restaurant, 2106 Frankfort Ave., took Kentucky “seafood” to New Orleans in July as one of 15 finalists in the national Great American Seafood Cook-Off. Varanese competed with a dish of Kentucky prawn-stuffed paddlefish. He filleted the paddlefish and stuffed it with chopped prawns, celery, onion and a mild white cheese, rolled it up, seared it and served it sliced with risotto. Varanese didn’t win the top prize (that went to Tory McPhail of Commanders Palace in New Orleans), but he won the hearts and mouths of many of New Orleans least fortunate residents. While in town for the competition he helped prepare lunch for the children and staff of Covenant House New Orleans, which provides shelter for homeless, runaway and at-risk youth. They breaded fish in crushed potato chips for frying and they created jerk seasoning for the shrimp and a jerk-style sauce to complement it. “This was not a typical Friday for those children and you could tell as they tried to sneak back in line for third helpings,” said Ashley Roth, of the Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing board, which helped produce the contest.

Golden Toque Award Accorded to Chef Corbett The Honorable Order of the Golden Toque recently inducted Chef Dean Corbett, owner and chef of Equus Restaurant, Jack’s Lounge and Corbett’s, An American Place as a member at their 47th annual meeting in July. Corbett was one of six chefs to be inducted last month in Frankenmuth, Mich., home to the country’s largest family-owned restaurant, Zehnder’s. Originally founded in France by Chef Pierre Berard, the Golden Toque was brought to the United States in 1961, recognizing chefs who have at least 20 years executive chef experience, have achieved professional accomplishments, and have an interest in professional progress.The award gets its name from the chef ’s tall, white, pleated hat. 12 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com


12-13_Side Dish_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:24 AM

Page 13

MARK YOUR CALENDAR Fleur De Licious Event Take your appetite downtown to enjoy some of Louisville’s best restaurants for a bargain during the fourth annual Fleur de Licious October 19 through 24. Participating restaurants will feature a special 3-course menu for $25 or $35 (beverage, tax and gratuity not included). It’s a great excuse to try something new, or visit an old favorite. Visit www.fleurdelicious.info for a list of participating restaurants and more info.

of luminaries featured at special Bourbon dinners scheduled in September and October at Bourbons Bistro, 2255 Frankfort Ave. Julian Van Winkle III and Preston Van Winkle will be the featured speakers at Bourbon’s on September 14. They will be talking about their family’s product, Pappy Van Winkle. Master Distiller Chet Zoeller will be speaking about Jefferson Reserve on Oct. 19 and signing his book, “Bourbon in Kentucky” (Butler Books; $39.95). Dinners start at 6 p.m. and cost $55 plus tax and tips.You can get more information at www.bourbonsbistro.com or call (502) 894-8838.

All the Buzz — Dumante Liqueur Tastings Locally-owned Dumante pistachio liqueur is making fans the old-fashioned way — one at a time.You can find out what all the fuss is about at any one of a number of Dumante-featured events. (If you attend any, be sure to try a Sicilian Manhattan). Aug 10: Sullivan University culinary students will compete for a $500 scholarship at Winston’s restaurant, 3101 Bardstown Rd., showing off the liqueur in dishes and in cocktails in the Dumante Culinary & Cocktail Challenge. Open to the public and costs $25. August through December: every second Tuesday is “Italian Night” at Boombozz Taproom, 1448 Bardstown Rd., from 5 p.m. until closing. Enjoy live music and drink specials including Dumante. Wednesdays from Aug. 12 through Sept. 16: “That’s Amore” dinner series from 7 to 9 p.m. at Volare, 2300 Frankfort Ave. Live music and drink specials. The first Thursday of every month, Z’s Oyster Bar, 101 Whittington Pkwy., features “Happening Hour” from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Drink and appetizer specials are featured.

N’awlins Style Seafood Boils

Under the glare of Food Network’s cameras, Louisville Chef John Varanese plates his entry for the Great American Seafood Cook-off.

Kentucky Bourbon Festival Grab your shot glass and head south to Bardstown, Ky., Bourbon capital of the world, for the 18th annual Kentucky Bourbon Festival Sept. 15 through 20. Nearly 70 percent of the world’s Bourbon is made in and around this Nelson County town, which explains why thousands of people from nearly every state and 14 countries visited the festival last year. Or maybe it’s because there’s a lot to see and do, even if you’re not a Bourbon drinker, including live music, arts and crafts, hot air balloons, the Kentucky Bourbon Festival Cornhole Classic competition, historical tours, a cooking school, a golf tournament, a gala and many, many Bourbon-oriented events as well. Find out more at www.kybourbonfestival.com or call 800-6384877 or 502-348-3623.

Bourbon Dinners at Bourbons Bistro Can’t get enough Bourbon at the Bourbon Festival? Join a couple

Selena’s Willow Lake Tavern, 10609 Lagrange Rd., specializes in Creole and Sicilian food and features “seafood boils” every Saturday. Through October they are featuring blue crab boils. Crabs are flown in live, Creole seasoned and cooked, and sold for $35 a dozen, $19 a half-dozen. Sides include boiled new potatoes and sweet corn.There are drink specials all day — the restaurant is open from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. and there are games on the deck (weather permitting). For more information, call (502) 245-9004 or go to www.selenasrestaurant.com.

World Cuisine Wednesdays at KY BBQ Co. Dinner and a movie takes on a fun twist at “World Cuisine Wednesdays” scheduled weekly on — what else — Wednesday at the Kentucky BBQ Company, 1800 Frankfort Ave. Owners Dave and Greg Kastan break the barbecue habit to present theme dinners. Latin America will be featured Aug. 12. The featured movie is “Once Upon a Time in Mexico.” August 19 will feature African fare with “Blood Diamond” as the featured movie. A New England clambake will be featured Aug. 26 (reservations are recommended, this is a popular dinner). The movie? “Jaws,” of course. Meal service begins at 4 p.m. and continues until closing. Food items are priced separately, and the regular barbecue menu is also available. For more information and reservations, call the restaurant at (502) 895-3419. F&D www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 13


14-15_Short Order_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:25 AM

Page 14

starters short orders

With the grilling season in full s wing, we offer up a few hot products to make entertaining outdoors a bit cooler. TALK TO ME AND SET ME FREE If you still recall the perfectly marbled, fresh from the butcher ribeye steaks that turned to charcoal when you wandered away from the grill for too long, the Weber folks have your back. For about $40 you can pick up the new Weber Style Audible Meat Thermometer. Note the audible part. Not only does this handy device alert you when the meat is done , it can do it in five languages, even if you’re in another room. The easy-to-use and easy-to-assemble device has a portable main unit that can be attached t o the included stand, or clipped to your belt so you can join the party, put the finishing t ouches on your side dishes, or kick back and w atch the game. (http://store.weber.com/Items/weberstyle)

CO O L PA D What’s under your grill? Tired of the mes s? You can cover up or prevent those ugly grease stains and damaging spark burns with the original and aptly named Grill P ad from Diversitech. The Grill Pad is a flexible, durable, and lightweight fiber cement pad that is easy-to-clean and weather resistant. It’s been tested with most new composite deck materials and exotic woods for compatibility. Works under fryers, chimineas, and smokers too. Available in 2 sizes ($40-$50), 3 shapes, and 5 c olors, and can be customized with your favorite college team logo ($60). Go Cards! Or Cats! (www.grillpad.com)

SCIENCE-BASTE DEVICE Sometimes, gadgets are exactly as easy and straightforward as advertised. Case in point: The Bottletop Baster from Jokari. It couldn’t be simpler. Unscrew the cap from the bottle of your favorite sauce, dressing, or condiment and screw on the baster. It has multiple threads to fit nearly every bottleneck size. Then turn the bottle upside do wn and the soft n ylon brush fills with the sauce and evenly caresses that steak, cutlet or slab. It’s easy to clean, dishwasher safe and reusable. My only gripe — I didn’t think of it. T he Bottletop Baster retails for around $5. (www.jokari.com) 14 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com


14-15_Short Order_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:25 AM

Page 15

LET THERE BE LIGHT The clamp-on barbecue light from The Designer’s Edge is for the poor grill sergeant who always seems to end up having to work in the dark. It mounts pretty easily onto nearly anything — the side of your grill, a shelf on y our grill, a nearby deck rail or fence. Its flexible goose-neck arm allows you to direct the light as you need it. And the 20-watt halogen bulb gives you all the light you need to see the chicken through to the end. The neck also flexes down easily so you can put your grill cover over it. The cord is only 12-feet long so make sure there’s an outlet nearby. (And trust us, corded over batteries is the way to go.) If your outdoor ’cue season is coming to an end, move the light to the workroom, garage or office. Retails for about $40. (www.amazon.com)

PACKING HEAT If squeezing ketchup from a bottle onto a burger bores you, you might get a bang out of shooting that k etchup — or mustard or barbecue sauce — from a gun: the Condiment Gun from The Novelty Gift Co. The snub-nosed pistol is red plastic. It has two color-coded cartridges, one for ketchup and the other f or mustard. Simply snap open the gun, insert the cartridge , aim and fire. The squeeze is pretty easy to control and avoids a lot of the mes s, clogging, sticking and over-pouring that comes with the average ketchup bottle or mustard jar. The kids (of all ages) will love it. Available online for about $25. (www.condimentgun.com)

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 15


16-17_Good to Go_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:26 AM

Page 16

starters short orders

goodto go As Americans, we like to be direct, efficient and, generally, accommodating. But these positives are sometimes extended to dining with doleful effect. Because of the demands of work and family, too often, foil-wrapped fodder from drive-through windows is seen as a necessary compromise in our mobile,‘getit-now’ culture. This really isn’t necessary. There are plenty of local purveyors of excellent eats that can accommodate your take-out needs. For example, if you need a hearty, two-handed sandwich that hits all the receptors in your comfort zone, look no farther than “The Spielberg” at Stevens & Stevens Deli. Starting with classic pastrami — deep pink and black-edged from the smoking process used to elevate a normal corned beef brisket to distinction — Stevens & Stevens layers on roast turkey, melted Swiss cheese, and coleslaw in a mild orange Russian dressing between two slices of fresh, seeded rye bread — a real bargain at $7.25.This is not a finger sandwich to accompany tea, but a hearty meal, easily

16 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

The Spielberg from Stevens & Stevens

shared and guaranteed to satisfy any two but the most famished diners. For an additional side of pleasure, try the Tomatoes Alfresco pasta salad. It is a tantalizing blend of chewy, al dente, bow-tie pasta blended with creamy goat cheese, sweet sun-dried tomatoes, fresh basil, and generous portions of slivered, crunchy roast almonds, all tossed in a tangy balsamic dressing that has a peppery kick.We only wish they were a little more generous with their side portions. Stevens & Stevens Deli, 1114 Bardstown Rd., (502) 584-3354.


16-17_Good to Go_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:26 AM

The small dining room of Kayrouz Café in St. Matthews is cozy and friendly, but unprepossessing. It gives little warning as to the magic going on just inside the kitchen door. The innovative Kayrouz sandwiches — especially novel takes on ordinary burgers and chicken breast — are marvels of invention. Its French fries are startlingly good, flavorful, moist, not too crisp, not too soggy. And for me, discovering Kayrouz’s tuna melt is like finding out there really is a Santa Claus. Perhaps best of all is getting the same quality of a tuna melt and fries when you take it home. Pop open the Styrofoam, and the sandwich is still warm and fresh. (It comes on a variety of breads — I like the rye — and I strongly recommend picking the smoked mozzarella as your melted cheese of choice.) You know how most fries get after a half-hour or so — chewy and musty — but not these! They’re every bit as good as the ones that arrive at your table right out of the kitchen. And they stay that way for as long as a couple of hours. But here’s where Kayrouz elevates itself

Page 17

Tuna melt and fries from Kayrouz Café from the ordinary take-out: a simple piece of wax paper slipped in between the sandwich and the fries. And another piece of wax paper separating the crunchy, garlicky, New York-style pickle spear. It keeps all the flavors, aromas and textures from intermixing until you’re ready to mix them up in your mouth. Owner Chris Kayrouz even slips a

piece of wax paper between the bun and burger on take-out orders. That snagged him once when a customer mistakenly ate the entire thing, wax and all. She then called to tell him about what she thought was a mistake, though she quickly added, “Overall, it was still delicious!” Kayrouz Café, 127 Wiltshire Ave., (502) 896-2630. F&D

THE PRINTING SERVICES YOU NEED Whatever your commercial printing needs may be, Publishers Printing Company provides quality products and impeccable service at a great price.

Publishers Printing Company for more information contact Bill Bisig: bill@pubprint.com or 1.800.214.1067

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 17


18-21_Editor_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:27 AM

Page 18

starters from the editor

BY SARAH FRITSCHNER | PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAN DRY

EATING &

Seasonably, Regionally Affordably

Local ingredients offer fresh meal options, whether dining in or out

T

There’s not much good about a bad economy. Many of us are paying now for pleasures we enjoyed months or even years ago, when we had no idea the brakes were on and we went ahead and bought that house, boat or flat-screen TV. At least that’s the way I’ve been thinking, paying for that afore-mentioned house and two luxurious college educations, parsing my away-from-home food dollars like batteries during an ice storm. But a glance at the incredibly reasonable menu at White Oak — one of our newer East Market Street inhabitants (see NuLu story on page 38) — makes me feel less anxious. A modest plate of chicken livers ($7), a ragout of beans and greens with grits ($11) has me not only salivating, but thinking that the dining-out crowd might actually include me. For many of us, eating out has never been about the 30ounce steak and Joseph Phelps cabernet. And it sure isn’t about having a bagged-up hamburger shoved out a window. I can make a hamburger, even on my worst days. Eating out is about a dog hair-free environment; about being able to request food and have it brought to me. It’s about not having the stress of pleasing all the people all the time. It’s about great china and stemmed crystal. It’s about not doing the dishes. If somebody can do that and make it affordable, I’m in. Louisville, by nearly everyone’s account, has an inordinate amount of interesting independents eager and able to make you drool. But many of them are outside the bounds of a cavalier decision about whether I feel like cooking tonight. Still, they have tempted me into a Scarlet O’Hara imitation: I’ll worry about money tomorrow. Not these days. For me and for lots of other people. There are exceptions. I love the Tea Station Chinese Bistro (9422 Norton Commons Boulevard), where the glassware is delicate, the small wine list is interesting, the food is good and the service is solicitous. If I lived in Norton Commons, I would eat there three times a week. El Mundo, Baxter Station, Mayan Café, Palermo Viejo.… In truth, we are a city of lucky diners who have access to lots of interesting, affordable food that isn’t stuck through a window.

18 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

And now they are joined by the folks at White Oak, who not only give me great stemware, a dog hair-free environment, and affordable food, they prepare that food from local, seasonal ingredients. Since Lilly’s restaurant chef-owner Kathy Cary adopted the local-food ethos in the mid-90s, much has been learned about eating seasonally and regionally. And the more we learn, the more important it becomes. From soil-depleting methods of farming used by monoculture techniques, to the loss of nutrients in food picked too early and shipped too far, the number of reasons to eat local continues to grow. I have made good progress eating locally at home. A few encounters with PBS Frontline specials on food production and I have found my way to predictable sources of beef, lamb, pork and chicken. And this time of year no one should have trouble cooking seasonal vegetables at home. Nearly everything you could want is available. And there are always shelf-stable foods produced in Kentucky and Indiana. Flank steak from grass-finished or corn-finished beef (you can find both in the farmers markets in Louisville) is a sure bet for company dinner at my house. And cheese grits made with Weisenberger grits (www.Weisenberger.com) and Kenny’s Country Cheese (www.kennyscountrycheese.com) are the standard side dish. I love to serve the steak with chimichurri sauce — a sort of Argentinean pesto that’s too delicious to be believed. By this time of year, anyone who has an herb garden will be glad to part with the parsley and oregano required for this dish. Ditto anyone who has even one hot pepper plant — and garlic for that matter, which grows well in Kentucky and is now in season. Like pesto, chimichurri freezes admirably. Steak and grits are the core of the meal, and the choice of vegetables requires one rotation of your garden or farmers market, to see what’s in season, what looks great and what you like most — especially tomatoes — but charred and marinated bell peppers would be good, too. Or grilled eggplant. Or okra. Eating out or in, now is certainly the season we most happily support our local farmers.


18-21_Editor_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:27 AM

Page 19

Chimichurri How much is a bunch of parsley? It’s a whole lot. I’ve never measured the parsley, whether I’ve cut it from the clump in the backyard or bought it from someone. But don’t skimp — it’s two cups at the very least.

Use an inexpensive vinegar in this recipe, not the family’s ancient balsamic. And if you grow your own hot peppers, you probably have a freezer full of them. One of those will work as well as the fresh. 1 /2 1 6 1 1

bunch parsley cup (or so) fresh oregano bunch cilantro to 8 peeled garlic cloves shallot, cut into a few pieces fresh hot green chili pepper, such as jalapeño, or to taste 1 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons vinegar 1 /2 cup olive oil 1

Cut thick stems off the parsley, but don’t worry about skinny ones. Place in a blender container as you prepare it. Add cilantro. Remove oregano leaves from woody stems but tender stems can be added to the mixture. Add remaining ingredients to the blender and begin blending. The goal: to blend the mixture into a fairly smooth www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 19


18-21_Editor_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:27 AM

sauce, which requires turning the machine off, stirring and pressing, turning it on, etc. If you’re brave, you can use a wooden spoon to press the mixture of herbs down as the blender runs — for a while you’ll be in little danger of the blades catching the spoon, but you’ll still need to stop the machine and stir occasionally. If you insist on using your food processor for this job, wait to add the olive oil until the leaves have been chopped up a little bit, then add the oil as the machine runs. Makes about two cups. Use about 1/2 cup to marinate meat or chicken overnight. The rest can be passed as a sauce to use liberally to season the grilled meat.

Baked Cheese Grits 6 2 1 1 /4 12 1

/2 4 1 /2 1

cups chicken broth or water cups Weisenberger grits teaspoon salt teaspoon pepper ounces extra sharp Cheddar cheese, grated (about 3 cups) cup milk large eggs, beaten cup (1 stick) butter teaspoon Tabasco sauce (or hot pepper sauce of choice)

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 4-quart casserole dish. Combine broth, grits and salt in a medium saucepan set over high heat. Stirring often, bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer until grits have thickened and grits are nearly cooked through, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat. Add pepper, 2 cups cheese and the milk and stir. Add eggs, stirring constantly, then add butter and Tabasco and stir until all are combined. Pour the mixture into the prepared casserole dish. Sprinkle with the remaining cheese and bake for about 60 minutes, until grits are firm. Let it stand 10 minutes for easier serving. Serves 8.

Garlic Cheese Grits Mince a clove or two of garlic. In a microwave-safe dish, combine with the butter from the above recipe, cover loosely and microwave on high to melt butter. Add to grits when called for in the recipe. F&D

20 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Page 20


18-21_Editor_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:27 AM

Page 21


22-23_Humor_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

starters humor

11:28 AM

Page 22

BY JAY FOREMAN

International Men of Mystery Meat Bizarre dishes, peculiar ingredients — the Brits sure do know how to up the weird factor “Great eaters of meat are in general more cruel and ferocious than other men. The cruelty of the English is well-known.” — Jean-Jacques Rousseau The popular perception of English cuisine is that, much like English weather, it is dreary and about as palatable as wet wool.This is not entirely accurate: It is also very scary. How did I learn this? While digging through a pile of old books I found a slim volume entitled “Quentin Crewe’s International Pocket Food Book.” Published in 1980, this book functions as a time capsule, preserving queasy regional delicacies and archaic names in a sor t of museum-quality editorial amber. In case you’ve ever wondered why English food gets a bad rap, this book explains it all. I’m no stranger to odd food. Though no Andrew Zimmerman, I’ve nevertheless gulped down huitlacoche (aka “Mexican corn smut”) on an office dare, almost hurled up “Thousand Year Old Egg” while hungover in Tokyo, and crunched through deepfried mealworms in the hope of impressing my seven-year-old niece (she wasn’t impressed). Many of the more unusual things I’ve eaten stem from Japanese cuisine, which somehow always manages to contextualize its unusual dishes with some cultural component. Sadly, this is not the case with English food. Or, at least, it suggests a culture which I don’t want to know anything more about. A quick perusal yielded the following gems (keep in mind this is verbatim — emphasis mine): Stargazey Pie: Pilchards (e.g., small fish) stuffed with onions and breadcrumbs and arranged in a pie dish with bacon, hard-boiled eggs and onion so that their heads stick up. Before the dish is covered with pastry, cider is poured in. 22 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

The fish heads protrude above the pastry, so that when the pie is baked the oil from the inedible heads trickles down. Ormer: Also known as “sea ears.” Ormers are a species of mollusk found only in the Channel Islands. Their flesh is a mottled yellow and brown. They are inedible unless severely beaten and interminably cooked. On Guernesy they put them in a casserole with, one cannot help noticing, a lot of other strong-tasting ingredients. Hungry yet? The Scottish dishes are even more terrifying: Kiossed Heids: Fish heads hidden for a while in a stone wall until they are rich, then roasted and eaten with potatoes. I’m not sure which is more frightening — the ominous vagueness of the terms “a while” and “rich” — or that the Scots feel the need to hide their fish heads. What I glean from this is that however bad the food was in England, it was far worse in Scotland. It would appear that the poor Scots had to conceal their leftovers from their tyrannical oppressors, who would periodically ransack huts and stone walls in search of rancid seafood to bake in their inedible pies. I realize there are far worse things going on in our good old American hot dogs, especially the cheap brands. But at least we have the decency to grind everything into a smooth paste and dye it a harmless pink color. There are no scales, fluids or hollow eye sockets staring back at us as we raise the red hot up to our mouth at a baseball game. The English do many things well: Bespoke suits, Aston Mar tins, and Manchester United all come to mind. But they do need to work on their marketing skills, as these


22-23_Humor_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:28 AM

Page 23

selections from the “Fish” section will show: Bloaters: Herrings, very lightly cured and smoked. Cabbie Claw: Salt cod in egg sauce. Arbroath smokies: (my favorite) A fancy name for smoked haddock, baked with butter. (This actually sounds tasty.) They should take a page from whomever it was that rebranded the prehistoric-looking Patagonian Toothfish as “Chilean Sea-bass.” A similar makeover occurred with Orange Roughy, a breed of deep-sea monstrosity formerly referred to by fishermen as “Slimeheads.” Actually, upon further thought, I think given their druthers, the English would like those names just fine: (“No no — Slimeheads it is, old boy. Boiled up with ivy and rolled in oatmeal — Tip top!”) And I kind of admire their dogged resistance to change; there is an unapologetic bluntness to some of the dishes (Pig’s Head: Pigs head boiled then grilled, served with boiled cabbage) along with a certain wry humor (Love in Disguise: Calf ’s hear t coated with vermicelli and breadcrumbs, then roasted). But integrity and humor aside, I’m still not going to eat it. Over the course of the last few years there has been a push for recognition of English cuisine as “underappreciated.” The attitude du jour is that English food has gotten a bad rap and is far tastier and more sophisticated than mere Taters and Neeps, Bubbles and Squeaks. The raging trend of “snout-to-tail” eating and charcuterie does buttress this assertion. This could be, but I’m not convinced. The most fun I’ve had with English food stems from the arcane names and offal-centric dishes. But certainly, like threepiece Savile Row suits, every generation or so it is guaranteed to come back into style. And perhaps the comfort of this food is in the fact that it does not change, unlike American tastes, which are always seeking the next new thing. But for now I’m going to stick with my Hot Dogs and Rocky Mountain Oysters, thank you very much, and leave the Arbroath smokies for the Brits. F&D www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 23


24-31_EE Tailgate_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:29 AM

Page 24

easy entertaining tailgating

BY TIM AND LORI LAIRD | PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAN DRY

TAILGATING

Party


24-31_EE Tailgate_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:29 AM

Page 25


24-31_EE Tailgate_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:29 AM

Page 26

easy entertaining tailgating

C

BY TIM AND LORI LAIRD | PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAN DRY

Throw a Winning Tailgating Party Confession time.We don’t really do the tailgating thing on a regular basis.Tim’s an Iowa State fan and I’m a Michigan native, so we have to admit impartiality with the red/blue thing. But we have friends who are very definite Kentucky and Louisville fans and we’ve experienced firsthand the nuttiness that is tailgating. Some of our friends have tailgated for 20 years.They get to the parking lot five or more hours ahead of time to get their regular spot.They get there so early they cook breakfast and lunch. Our “tailgating” is done at home. We invite 15 or 20 people over to watch a game on televisions in the den, the kitchen and/or on a big screen downstairs in the finished basement. But whether we’re participating in a real tailgate, or having a game party at home, the same rules apply: keep it easy both for cooking and for serving.We make recipes that can sit out a long time (sour cream dips, for instance), that don’t require a lot of ingredients, that are easy to pick up, carry, and reheat. At home we divide the meal into three: pre-game, half-time and game over.When people arrive, there’s a drink station and a nosh station, where people can fix themselves a drink and grab some appetizers. At halftime, we heat up the meat for the fajitas and set out all the extras so people can build their own. At the end of the game sweets are put out. When you’re in a parking lot, there’s only before the game and after, and depending on the time of day you may want to time your courses for waiting to get in, and relaxing afterward until the parking lot clears. At home, once the food comes out it stays out, so people can refill their plates.That way our host duties are minimized and we can be guests at our own party.


24-31_EE Tailgate_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:29 AM

Beef and Chick en Fajitas

Page 27

(SERVES 12-16)

Grill these at home or at the game site. Or, if you want to assemble everything ahead, you can roll up the fajitas as you would a wrap, wrap them in aluminum f oil, then rehea t them on the grill a t the tailgating site. Be sure t o label them “beef ” and “chicken.” 2 4 2 4

pounds flank steak, fat trimmed boneless chicken breasts (about 2 pounds) cups Italian salad dressing, divided tablespoons cilantro leaves, roughly chopped, divided Store-bought prepared fajita seasoning mix 1 lime, cut into wedges 2 large zipper-style plastic bags 32 large flour tortillas Accompaniments: Salsa Cheddar or pepper Jack cheese , shredded Sour cream Guacamole Jalapeño peppers Lettuce, shredded In one of the plas tic bags add the s teak, 1 cup Italian salad dr essing and 2 tablespoons cilantro. Seal the bag, place in a shallow dish and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or up to 24 hours, turning occasionally. In the other plas tic bag, c ombine chick en, remaining Italian salad dr essing and cilantr o. Seal the bag, plac e in a shallo w dish and r efrigerate for at least 4 hours or up to 24 hours, turning occasionally. Remove the meat and chick en fr om their bags and pat dry . Season the beef and chick en on both sides with a f ew shak es of the f ajita seasoning. Preheat the grill t o medium-high and the oven to 325 degrees. Wrap the t ortillas in f oil and plac e in the oven for 15 minutes to warm and soften. Remove from the oven and keep warm in the foil. Grill the s teak t o y our pr eferred t emperature, 3 t o 4 minut es per side f or medium r are. Remove fr om heat and let r est f or 10 minut es before slicing thinly agains t the gr ain. Grill the chicken f or 5 minut es per side or until c ooked through. Remove from the heat and let r est for 10 minut es bef ore slicing int o thin s trips. Toss the steak strips with a c ouple squeezes of lime and do the same f or the chicken strips. Serve with the w arm t ortillas and ac companiments so your guests can build their own to their liking. www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 27


24-31_EE Tailgate_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:29 AM

Fresh Veggie Platter

Page 28

Asparagus Mini carrots Sugar snap peas Red peppers Yellow peppers Orange peppers We like to quickly blanch our aspar agus, carrots and sugar snap peas bef ore serving. Drop each into a pot of boiling w ater for 1 to 3 minut es ( shorter f or aspar agus and peas ) then plunge them into a bowl of ice water to stop the c ooking and bring out their bright colors. Onc e the y ar e no longer w arm, dry them and refrigerate until serving. The peppers can simply be cut into strips and serv ed r aw. Be sur e t o scr ape out the seeds and white membrane on the inside. We find a gr apefruit spoon, melon baller or t easpoon works best for this job.

Southwest Chip Dip (MAKES 1 1/2 CUPS)

As a healthier alt ernative, subs titute plain yogurt (w e pref er the Greek -style) f or the sour cream in both dip recipes. 1

/2 1 1 /4 1 /4 1 /4 2

cup salsa cup sour cream teaspoon chili powder teaspoon garlic powder teaspoon ground cumin tablespoons fresh cilantro leaves, finely chopped

Mix salsa, sour cr eam, chili powder, garlic powder and gr ound cumin in a bo wl. Refrigerate. Jus t bef ore serving mix in the fresh cilantr o. Serv e with t ortilla chips, c orn chips or fresh vegetables.

Dill Dip

(MAKES 1 1/2 CUPS)

1 /2 1 1 1 1

1

cup sour cream cup ricotta cheese, part skim milk tablespoon fresh dill weed, chopped tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped tablespoon lemon juice tablespoon sweet onion, minced

Mix sour cream, ricotta cheese, dill weed, parsley, lemon juice and sweet onion in a bowl. Refrigerate for several hours. Serve with potato chips or fresh veggies Note: These types of dips can be purchased in the refrigerated section of your grocery store. 28 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Serving Tip: Whole peppers can be used as serving bowls for dips and t o stand up y our other v eggies f or a f estive presenta tion. To do this, cut the top off the pepper and a small slice off the bott om t o mak e it s tand le vel. Scrape out the seeds and whit e membr ane using a grapefruit spoon, melon baller or teaspoon. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Spoon your dips or s tand your veggies inside y our pepper bo wls and arr ange on your platter with the other veggies.


7/31/09

11:29 AM

Page 29

24-31_EE Tailgate_fall09.qxp

Hummus in Cucumber Cups

(SERVES 8-10)

To make roasted red pepper hummus, just add 1/2 cup of jarred roas ted red peppers (drained) when you process the garbanzo beans. 1 English cucumber 1 15-ounce can garbanzo beans/chick peas, drained 1 /4 cup olive oil 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon cumin 1 garlic clove, crushed Pinch of salt Paprika, for garnish To make the cucumber cups: Wash and dry the cucumber. With a vegetable peeler “stripe” the cucumber b y peeling a 1/2 -inch strip from top to bottom. Rotate the cucumber leaving 1/2 -inch of the original peel then peel another 1/ 2 - inch strip until you ha ve “ striped” the whole cucumber. Cut it int o 1 / 2 - inch r ounds. W ith a melon baller or small spoon, scoop out a little of the center of the r ound trying not to hit the bott om, making a small cup. To mak e the hummus: In a food pr ocessor, add the garbanzo beans or chick peas, oliv e oil, lemon juic e, cumin, garlic and salt. Process until smooth. T aste and adjust salt if nec essary. Refrigerate until r eady t o serve. Fill the cucumber cups with a spoonful of the hummus, sprinkle with paprika. Note: Many v arieties of hummus can be pur chased in the r efrigerated section of y our gr ocery s tore and served with the cucumber cups.

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 29


24-31_EE Tailgate_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:29 AM

Page 30

Buffalo Chicken Dip ▲ (SERVES 8-10)

If you’re traveling on game day, make this in a disposable aluminum c ontainer, bak e it before you leave (or the night bef ore), cover the c ontainer tightly with aluminum f oil and then reheat it on the grill. 2 1 1 2 2

8-ounce packages cream cheese 8-ounce container blue cheese dressing 12-ounce bottle Frank’s Redhot sauce cups shredded cooked chicken breast cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese Frito Scoops Triscuits Celery sticks

Preheat oven t o 350 degr ees. In a bo wl, mix cr eam cheese , blue cheese , hot sauc e and chicken breast. Spread the mixture into a 9 by 13 pan and top with the cheddar cheese. Bake for about 30 minutes. Serve warm with Frito Scoops, Triscuits and celery sticks. 30 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com


24-31_EE Tailgate_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:30 AM

Page 31

Timeline

Shopping List

1 week ahead

Fresh dill weed (1 bunch) Fresh parsley (1 bunch) Sweet onion (1) Fresh cilantro (2 bunches) Asparagus (1 bunch) Mini carrots (1 bag) Sugar snap peas (1 bag) Red bell pepper (2) Yellow bell pepper (2) Orange bell pepper (2) Celery (1 bunch) English cucumber (1) Guacamole Jalapeño peppers Lettuce, shredded Cream cheese (2 8-ounce packages) Ricotta cheese, part skim milk Sharp cheddar cheese, shredded (4 cups) Blue cheese dressing (8-ounce bottle) Frank’s Redhot sauce (12-ounce bottle) Chicken breasts, cooked (2 cups) Boneless chicken breasts (about 2 pounds) Flank steak, fat trimmed (2 pounds) Garbanzo beans (15-ounce can) Salsa (Large container) Frito Scoops Triscuits Italian salad dressing Fajita seasoning Large flour tortillas (32) White cranberry juice Lemonade Cranberry juice Finlandia Vodka Finlandia Tangerine Vodka Blue Curacao

Shop for non-perishable groceries

2 days ahead Shop for last minute groceries

1 day ahead Make pitchers of the Blue Blas t Make pitchers of the Red Rocket Make Hummus Make Buffalo Chicken Dip Blanch vegetables Marinate flank steak and chicken

Morning of the party Make Dill Dip Make Southwest Chip Dip Put the accompaniments for the Fajitas in serving bowls

1 hour ahead Arrange the Fritos and Triscuits on platters Put the Hummus in the Cucumber Cups and arr ange on serving platter Plate any cookies or desserts you may have purchased Preheat the oven to 350 degrees

30 minutes ahead Put the Buffalo Chicken Dip in the oven Grill the beef and chicken Arrange the Fresh Veggies on a platter with the Southwest Chip Dip and Dill Dip

Just before the party

Take the Buffalo Chicken Dip out of the o ven Put the tortillas in the oven to warm Set out the fajita accompaniments Check bar, put ice in bucket, set out pitcher drinks, sodas and water Turn your TVs or radios on to the broadcast of your game

Blue Blast (SERVES 8)

8 ounces Finlandia Vodka 16 ounces Blue Curacao 24 ounces white cranberry juice

Mix all ingredients in a pitcher and serve over ice.

Red Rocket (SERVES 8)

12 ounces Finlandia Tangerine Vodka 24 ounces lemonade 12 ounces cranberry juice Mix all ingredients in a pitcher and serve over ice. Note: The colors of each of these drinks can be enhanced with food coloring to match your teams’ colors.

Also pick up if not alr eady in your pantry Sour cream or Greek-style plain yogurt Lemons (2) Olive oil Chili powder Garlic powder Ground cumin Garlic (1 bulb) Black Pepper Paprika Lime Zipper-style plastic bags (Large) Sugar Cornstarch Ice www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 31


32-33_Wine_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:30 AM

liquids cork 101

Page 32

0 $ 1 6 BY SCOTT HARPER

U

nder

Pinot Noir Angeline 2008 (California)

While it has changed hands and names since 1881, Angeline is a label owned by the oldest Sonoma winery in continuous operation, Martin Ray. With Pinot Noir prices being exceptionally high, it is good to find a Pinot Noir that is affordable and still flavorful. Bottled with a screw cap to prevent cork issues, this wine is light red in color with red fruits of strawberry and cherry. It has a touch of smoke and cinnamon, light tannins and a nice velvety texture. Light bodied and dry.

32 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Nero D’Avola Feudo Arancio 2007 (Sicily, Italy)

Live-A-Little Stellar Winery “Really Ravishing Red” NV (Western Cape, South Africa)

The grape Nero D’Avola is obviously not a household name, yet it is one of the most important indigenous red grapes of Sicily. I adore wineries that stick with their traditional varietals when international varietals may be more popular. Nero, meaning black, once described the wines’ opaque color, but now this grape, combined with modern techniques, produces a fresher, less inky wine. This wine has a medium-light red color with rich, ripe, sundrenched blackberries, a round and velvety texture. Dry, full-body with light earth and low acidity.

I am not much into cute names but this wine has a list of admirable qualities that make it interesting — organic, fair trade and sulfite free. The winery is one of the largest organic wineries in South Africa, a boon to those who like to drink “green,” and is certified “fair trade.” The wine is medium-dark red with sweet blackberry fruit. It is dry, crisp, medium-bodied with moderate tannins and no oak. The grape types are not listed on the bottle, but it is a Shiraz blend. Because the wine comes from more than one vintage, you won’t see a vintage year printed on the label.


32-33_Wine_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:30 AM

Page 33

When I look f or inexpensive red wines I look f or character. Even at $10 .00 or less a bottle you still deserve some measure of character. While the wine most certainly mus t tas te good, char acter can be f ound in a v ariety of ways. Character pr eferably c omes fr om wher e the wine w as made — that unique sense of plac e — but if these ine xpensive but tas ty wines ar e fr om br oad general areas, then let them ha ve a s tory behind the winery , the gr ape or the wine itself. I believe these six wines have this second character. Shiraz Garcia Carrion “Opera Prima” 2007 (La Mancha, Spain)

Malbec Colores Del Sol “Reserva” 2008 (Mendoza, Argentina)

From the land of Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote comes this Spanish wine that takes the Australian’s name for Syrah, Shiraz. Shiraz is not a traditional Spanish varietal, but the warm climate of La Mancha seems well-suited. This wine’s medium-red color is lighter than most Shiraz. It possesses ripe red fruits of strawberry, raspberry, red cherry and light black pepper, all in a dry, fruit forward medium-plus body. Spanish wines are offering great value and quality at every price level. Great fortification before fighting windmills on Rocinante with your squire Sancho Panza!

This may be slightly sensational, but Argentinean Malbec could be the top value red grape in the world. Argentina continues to prove over and over again that Malbec, primarily from Mendoza, offers delicious drinking wine. Colores Del Sol translates to “colors of the sun,” which refers to the bright, high-altitude vineyards in which the grapes grow. Almost opaque, this purple wine is loaded with blackberry, black cherry, licorice, vanilla, oak and smoke. Dry, with well-integrated tannins and a full body.

Petite Sirah Guenoc 2005 (California) The grape Petite Sirah has a confusing past. You would immediately think that it was a smaller version of the Syrah grape. It has been confused regularly as the Durif grape and is used as a synonym. So, is it Durif or Petit Sirah? It is actually a crossing of the little known Peloursin grape and Syrah. Guenoc makes a few different Petite Sirahs and its California level Petite Sirah is a deep purple with flavors of blueberry, black raspberry, light earth and black licorice. Its four-year age makes it rounder and softer than most Petite Sirahs. Dry and full bodied.

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 33


34-35_Beer_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:31 AM

liquids hip hops

Page 34

BY ROGER A. BAYLOR

Real English Beer a millennia-old tradition lives on

At the Dolphin Inn, a delightfully unrefurbished Plymouth harbor pub located a few yards from the very spot where the Mayflower left England for America, thirsty visitors queue to drink draft Bass Pale Ale ser ved in a rigorously traditional and characteristically English manner. The firkin, a keg of unique and purpose-built design, lies slightly tilted on its side in a cradle at room temperature. A wooden peg (spile) faces skyward, filling a hole that had been punched at tapping. A faucet, tapped into place with a rubber mallet, protrudes horizontally from the firkin.The onrushing ale is borne on a gravity trail, pouring from the opened faucet into a waiting pint glass, cool but not cold, with minimal yet sufficient natural carbonation. Perhaps the only nod to modernity is the use of stainless steel, rather than wood, to fabricate the firkin. Otherwise, it is likely that Plymouth’s publicans were filling tankards in like fashion almost 400 years ago as the Pilgrims prepared for their voyage to the New World by loading their own ale barrels onto the Mayflower. The Dolphin decants its Bass in this simple, old-fashioned way, unpasteurized, and without the forced-pressure C02 system to which the world has grown accustomed, because the ale itself is naturally carbonated, or cask-conditioned, in the firkin by means of a secondary fermentation. Although comparatively few English pubs follow the venerable example of the Dolphin’s gravity-pour method, many of them continue to vend one or more cask-conditioned ales with the help of a beer engine, colloquially referred to as a hand pump, or a hand-pull. Their firkins are stored in the coolness of the cellar, where they are tended and prepped for serving. When ready, the ale is pumped by the barman into pint glasses. “Cask-conditioned” ale is also referred to as “real” ale, and those ales conceived, brewed, packaged and served in this natural manner are the indigenous, tasty, beery glories of the British Isles. Disturbingly, real ale almost became extinct during the 1970’s, primarily because both then and now, conditioning ale in a firkin and serving properly at a pub is thoroughly old-school — time consuming, labor intensive and absent the sexiness of mass-market commoditization, the dictates of which demand industrially produced, cost-effective “dead” ales and lagers in conventional kegs, bottles and cans. Thanks in large measure to the advocacy of the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA), one the modern era’s most principled and effective consumer lobby groups, real ale’s decline has been 34 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

reversed, even though many older brands and breweries have disappeared. A vibrant new generation of smaller brewers committed to cask-conditioning has stepped forward to keep tradition intact, enabling us to consider “living” ale as a symbol of pre- and post-industrial life. It’s the way beer was done for thousands of years, and now, in the new millennium, real ale once again tells the story of slow food, green living and an appreciation of natural virtues in food and drink. Historically, the stylistic range of England’s brewing output is relatively narrow: Mild, Bitter, IPA, Stout, Porter, Old Ale and Barley Wine still suffice to summarize most of what you’d expect to see at the pub, although these days there are Golden Ales and the occasional seasonal Wheat appearing in summertime. Apart from the rarer Old Ales and Barley Wines, the alcoholic strength of English ale tends to be lower than one might expect, perhaps averaging around 4% alcohol. In practice, probably 75% of the cask-conditioned ale in England is Bitter, which is subdivided into designations that again pertain primarily to alcoholic strength: Ordinary, Best, Extra Special and the like. Alcoholic strength and rates of taxation are intertwined; consequently, expect to pay steadily more for a pint of ale as it escalates in alcoholic content. At their finest, balance is the watchword for all English real ales, especially those quaffable Bitters, and cask-conditioning is more than a way of drinking. It’s a way of thinking. Flavors are subtle and even simplistic, yet unmistakably rendered. The malt character is rich and sweetish, with a touch of fruitiness.The classic English hop varieties are elegant, packing less of a bitter punch than their American cousins. The overall package is thirst quenching or contemplative, depending on one’s mood. From start to finish, real ale requires effort and thought, especially for the publican charged with its care.Whether dispensed by


34-35_Beer_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:31 AM

gravity feed or hand pump, the clock begins ticking when the firkin’s seals are breached. Oxygen, the prime enemy of freshness, enters the firkin to occupy the head space as its volume is depleted. The carbonation recedes with time, and the ale becomes entirely flat. Oxidization produces unpleasantness, and the ale goes “off.” There are two ways to avoid this outcome. One is to drain the vessel promptly, with it being widely held that once tapped, a firkin has three days before deterioration makes the contents undrinkable. For a pub doing a good trade, this cer tainly is achievable. But if the firkins turn over too slowly, or if the publican desires a degree of certainty to assist in what can be a coin toss, there is another way: A gadget called a cask breather, which is a nipple inserted into the spile hole and attached to a tank of CO2. As the ale is pumped out, small bursts of CO2 are drawn inside the firkin — not enough to push the liquid as in conventional kegs, but merely to occupy the head space and keep the liquid fresh. CAMRA opposes cask breathers on traditionalist grounds. However, if the firkins can’t be turned over with predictable speed, it makes more sense to use a breather. Cask-conditioned ales and the English pub are synonymous, and most readers of this publication are American, prompting the obvious question: How can one experience the joys of real ale in the States? Some genuine English-brewed, caskconditioned ales make their way to the United States in firkins, primarily through the good offices of the B. United International impor ting house’s cask ale program. I’ve sold firkins from B. United for many years at Rich-O’s (now known as New Albanian Brewing Company) and have had few problems, although there are two potential drawbacks. First, by tradition, most English caskconditioned ale is low gravity and low alcohol, which renders it fragile for shipping long distances. Consequently, B. United’s cask ale program is seasonal, with firkins sent stateside only during cold weather months. Second, transport costs translate into steep prices, and while this may be the norm for all imports, it simply doesn’t always make sense to sell a pint of 3.7%

Page 35

ale, however wonderful, at twice the price of other drafts. Remember also that the more slowly a firkin moves, the greater chance of spoilage, and the greater need for a cask breather. To experience the characteristics of English-brewed, cask-conditioned ale, it follows that the most dependable introductory option is to shop for Englishbrewed, bottle-conditioned ale, often from the same breweries. It’s the same concept in single-serving size. As with the firkins, a bit of finishing sugar goes into the bottles, and a mild secondar y fermentation provides the necessary carbonation. When scanning store shelves or beer menus, know that familiar brewery names include Fuller’s (specifically, its 1845 brand), O’Hanlon’s, Cropton, Coniston, and Young’s. Generally, these ales are exported in 16.9 ounce bottles, and will bear “bottleconditioned” in plain sight on the label. Nowadays in America, the freshest and best real ale emulates the English tradition, in that it is local or regional in origin, and hasn’t traveled very far before tapping. Look to the ranks of America’s burgeoning craft brewers, and find out whether the nearest brewery offers caskconditioned ale. An increasing number of brewpubs have a beer engine and are eager to promote real ale and to educate the drinking public about its virtues, and more microbreweries than ever before are supplying real ale to pubs and restaurants that have hand-pull capability. In the metro Louisville area, caskconditioned ale can be found at these brewpubs: Bluegrass Brewing Company (St. Matthews only), Cumberland Brews, and New Albanian Brewing Company (both locations). Beer bars that serve cask-conditioned ale include the O’Shea’s family of pubs (O’Shea’s, Flanagan’s and Brendan’s) and Pub Louisville at Fourth Street Live. Not all of these establishments are able to keep real ale flowing at all times, so before dropping in, don’t forget to phone to see what’s on the hand-pull. My final bit of advice to those who find themselves smitten with real ale: Save your nickels, dimes and frequent flier miles. The best cask-conditioned ale is local, and in England. Buy CAMRA’s annual “Good Beer Guide,” pack light, and head into the countryside from Heathrow or Gatwick. Order a pint of Bitter and a Ploughman’s Plate … and slow down. F&D

Fh[i[dj_d] j^[mehbZ -ZWoiWm[[a \hecekh Zh_l[j^hk$  6G<:CI>C6  

8g^dh!HngV]"7dcVgYV HjhVcV7VaWd!BVaWZX

6JHIG6A>6  <gZ\CdgbVc!H]^gVo  7gVchdc8dVX]=djhZ!H]^gVo ;G6C8:  K^ZjmI‚a‚\gVe]Z!  9dbV^cZYZhEVaa^ƒgZh >I6AN  BVjgdKZ\a^d!7Vgdad  <V_VEgdb^h HE6>C  AVh7g^hVh  IgZhE^Xdh JH6  9dbV^cZHZgZcZ!E^cdiCd^g  7ZVjm;gƒgZh!E^cdiCd^g

&*'.7VgYhidlcGdVY lll#DaYIdlcL^cZ#Xdb *%'#)*&#-*.&

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 35


36-37_Tea_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

liquids tea

11:32 AM

Page 36

BY DAVID LANGE | PHOTOGRAPH BY DAN DRY

Traveling Louisville’s Silk Road Growing in numbers, small t eahouses infuse flair to the tea-drinking experience Taking tea is about socializing and relaxing. It’s about delicate china in a vintage European setting or around a Zen water fountain. It’s about scones and pastries or dumplings and steamed tofu. Taking tea means getting together or getting away. It has health, history and social benefits. But while taking tea can be about many things, a great tearoom has to be about one thing: great tea. To an outsider, the tea industry can seem overwhelming. It’s growing exponentially in America and carries as much mystery and nuance as wines and coffees.Tea’s health benefits have contributed to its popularity. Black tea has flavanoids related to anti-plaque buildup in arteries. Green and white teas are high in antioxidants known to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. Pu-Erh, an earthy tea grown in China is the only tea that is aged (like wine) and is purportedly rich in antioxidants, though few studies have been conducted at this point.

O

One of the factors driving growth in the tea industry is an ongoing public concern with healthier consumption. Tea is widely perceived as a better-for-you alternative to coffee, having less caffeine (55 milligrams per cup as opposed to coffee’s 125 to 185 milligrams) and being easier on the digestive system. Tea also carries an entirely different image than coffee.There’s something elegant about it, whether it’s the art-deco still life of a deep golden Ceylon in a transparent teacup or the lace-and-linen spread of Victorian-style tea. I thought that I would take a road trip to see what Louisville has to offer regarding teahouses. I deliberately avoided coffeehouses that served tea, to search out a true teahouse atmosphere. My first stop was Jewel’s House of Tea (632 Eastern Boulevard, Clarksville, IN). Although located in a Clarksville strip mall, this charming location boasted the most laid-back décor of my destinations. I was warmly greeted by a quite knowledgeable tea master who recommended an Earl Grey white tea. I was first asked if I would like to have the tea hot or cold, then I watched as he brewed the delicate tea in a French press.Then, the brewed tea was transferred into a ceramic pot. The finished product was brought to my table and the pot was placed on a stand, over a votive candle to keep it warm.This was certainly a most impressive presentation. All the appropriate condiments were available on the table, including honey. All types of teaware and retail tea were displayed throughout the shop. It was a most unique and relaxing setting. Along with over 80 types of teas, Jewel’s offers soups, sandwiches, salads, and desserts. My next visit took me to Crescent Hill to visit the Zen Teahouse (2246 Frankfort Avenue). The Oriental waterfall and fountain outside beckoned me to enter this Eastern abode. As I

36 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

passed through the door, I was greeted by calming sage walls and shelves lined with large metal tea tins accompanied by New Age melodies. With a wide variety of over 75 teas, the well-informed tea sommelier began preparing my selection of rooibos with orange blossom tea.The loose tea was tied in a roomy sachet and brought to my table in a pre-heated mug. I was instructed to wait 5 minutes to allow the steep to be completed. As I waited for my tea, I discovered that Zen offered a great deal of vegan fare, including desserts. Tea is served hot or cold, by the cup or pot, along with the mysterious bubble tea in many flavors.Teas and teawares are sold retail.There are several rooms with block tables, couches, and small gas stoves to promise warmth and cheeriness on frosty mornings as you begin your day. An interesting feature of Zen is its tea journal. This small pamphlet lists all of the teas, tisanes and herbal infusions offered, as well as their country of origin. Customers can then keep track of their selections, take notes and then return it to the counter, where it is filed under your name for further reference. It is an excellent tool to enhance your knowledge of tea. Bubble teas and tea lattes, the new hip tea creations, are gaining popularity. And where bottled or canned tea used to mean just 12 ounces of over-sweetened Luzianne’s, today it might mean Arizona’s plum green tea with ginseng or Tazo’s Brambleberry juiced tea. The tea market includes the hip suburbanite, the cool college student, and anyone else who goes where the buzz is. Louisville is fortunate to have a new shop that specializes in making bubble tea creations. VT’s Bubble Cup (1043 Bardstown Road) is a great stop to indulge in the funkiness and weirdness of bubble tea. To further read up on this unique drink, be sure to check out my article in the Fall 2008 issue of Food & Dining. It is really an offbeat drink.


36-37_Tea_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:32 AM

Page 37

Although our area does not boast the wide profusion of teahouses that can be found in other metropolitan regions, we still have established a great start for tea enthusiasts and connoisseurs. And there are many cafés that offer a great tea presentation for customers that are looking to widen their tea awareness. During my research, I came across many area restaurants that offer unique tea menus. Included in these were August Moon, Corbett’s, and Winston’s. Given that their names feature “tea,” I had thought that the Tea Station Chinese

Bistro in Nor ton Commons and the Onion Teahouse and Restaurant might be teahouses, but they are primarily restaurants that offer a good tea presentation to their guests. So when you are looking for an alternative to your morning ritual of visiting your favorite coffeehouse, why not explore the road less traveled and indulge in a tea selection from one of our local teahouses. Travel Louisville’s “Silk Road.” Then you can experience the ancient Chinese saying, “I drink tea and forget the world’s noises.” F&D

Zen Teahouse www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 37


38-49_NuLu_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:34 AM

Page 38

people and places profiles

BY GREG GAPSIS | PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAN DRY

NULU East Market District


38-49_NuLu_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:34 AM

Page 39

“NuLu” is the ne w name adopt ed b y one of L ouisville’s oldes t neighborhoods. It e xpresses an optimis tic spirit about urban living, w alkable neighborhoods, creativity and an environmental ethos in the city’ s core. Most locals kno w the ar ea as the Eas t Mark et Dis trict, which runs along Market and Main Streets from Preston Street out to Baxter Avenue. It was vital in Louisville’s development as a major river town and industrial center, but more recently bett er kno wn as an arts dis trict with mor e than a do zen galleries, antique shops, specialty stores and a distinctive restaurant scene. Despite the ar ea’s gr adual tr ansformation, the 2 008 c ollapse of the r eal estate mark et and banking indus try did not tr eat it w ell. Se veral e xcellent restaurants closed — among them Primo, Park Place and Browning’s and more recently Melillo’ s, Art emisa and Jennica’ s Café & W ine Bar . L ocal pr ess w as unflattering, to say the least, frequently portraying the area as the local pos ter child for the broader national recession. As last winter’s panic diminished, a flurry of r ecent restaurant openings had us take a closer look around NuLu. What we found was a special vitality and an irrepressible attitude exploring some of the mos t modern trends in dining. Many L ouisvillians sho wed only t entative affection for downtown during the pas t four decades, preferring the thrall of the suburban idea that homeowner covenants and identical mailboxes w ere the k ey t o both peac e of mind and safety. But a small c ontingent never gave up on the idea that L ouisville’s history, architecture, and accessibility to the arts and work centers would sur ely build momentum f or a vibr ant urban core. In 1991, W aterfront P ark began the tr ansformation of a rus t belt riv erfront int o a welcoming gr een c ommons wher e people come f or special e vents, c oncerts and recreation. (Its success, and continued spread up-river, led to its designation in 2006 as one of the top-10 urban parks in the nation.) The y ear 2 000 added L ouisville Slugger Field, an adaptation of a 19th c entury f arm

equipment depot. And the ne w riv erfront arena scheduled t o open in 2 010 will add another destination. But perhaps more than anything else, the 2001 start of the Gallery Trolley Hop — when free tr olleys on the firs t Frida y of each month cir cle up and do wn Mark et Str eet, stopping at galleries, r estaurants and shops — showcased the pos sibilities of do wntown not only as a des tination but also as a plac e to live. Now, aft er a r ash of painful r estaurant closings, the neighborhood along the Eas t Main and Mark et Str eet c orridors, dubbed the “NuLu,” is showing signs of positive ferment. And with se veral r estaurants c ommanding notic e both locally and be yond, one is r eminded of Mark T wain’s f amous retort: “The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated.”

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 39


38-49_NuLu_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:34 AM

Page 40

STROLLING THE NEIGHBORHOOD

clothing before opening The Bodega in the Piazza de Felice at 829 Joe Ley wears a wry smile and twinkle in his eye talking about East Market in 2007. The development includes loft apartments, how he built a hugely successful business on the east side of Felice Winery, a space (formerly Melillo’s restaurant) waiting for a new restaurant and an off-street parking area bordered by grape downtown while so many others took up commuting. “This is a corridor out of town after work,” he says pointing arbors that hosts customers, residents and the Phoenix Hill Farmers Market on Tuesday afternoons. out the door. “Cars just pour through here.” “It’s been a process of responding to customers and their Ley presides over an antique and architectural-details empire housed in the old Normal/Hiram Robert School in the 600 block needs,” Joles said. “We have been evolving ever since we opened.” Joles draws both business district commuters and locals with of East Market Street. For 40 years he has outfitted franchise eateries across the country along with the homes of country delicious paninis and Cuban sandwiches in his comfortable coffee bar/deli/market. music singers and celebrities. The market carries a selection of both fairly-priced basic “It’s always had an ideal potential as a neighborhood,” Ley said. “It’s full of historic structures and was once a vital and pros- pantry goods and specialty items like craft beers, Kenny’s Farmhouse cheeses and Luna Mercato spreads. perous part of the city.” It’s a place where new arrivals like Jennifer and Ed Charles, When asked why she chose her location, Cake Flour’s who live in one of the Felice Claudia Delatorre looks out loft apartments, can hang out on East Market Street and on an arbor-covered patio to says, “It’s like a mini-mini-mini enjoy a coffee. SoHo,” referring to the New The Charles exemplify the York City neighborhood south spirit of the neighborhood. of Houston Street that was After deciding to leave Los revitalized in the 1970s when Angeles last year, they spent people started renovating old four months traveling to industrial and historic buildings explore new “up and coming into urban lofts, galleries and and under-the-radar cities,” said creative businesses. Jennifer Charles. The name “NuLu” was Louisville made their short coined by Gill Holland, a lawyer list (along with Albuquerque, turned film producer with Milwaukee, Pittsburgh and the more than 60 film credits, after Raleigh-Durham area) and he and his wife, Augusta Brown became their destination. Holland, moved to Louisville to “We discovered a sophisbe closer to her family. Augusta tication here we didn’t expect is a trained urban planner — Waterfront Park, Frederick and it was she who inspired Law Olmsted’s park system, a Holland to see the potential of commitment to the arts, the East Market Street area special events like the Humana as a mixed-use neighborhood Festival, Kentucky Author where people could live, work, For um and IdeaFestival,” eat and relax without dependJennifer Charles said. “And, as ing on cars. people coming from a large “Coming from New York, metropolitan area, we were we were impressed you could impressed by the openness to buy a whole building for the diversity.” price of a studio apartment (in Their search ultimately New York),” Gill Holland said. Mayan Café’s mayapán chilaquiles had them choose East Market “And we agreed the possibility Street, the NuLu neighborwe saw here would be a good hood. investment.” “People directed us to the Highlands and Crescent Hill, but East Market already had old churches and long-time businesses, a few professionals who renovated buildings into we were excited by the strengthening of downtown,” Jennifer offices and a smattering of antique, gift and furniture shops that continued. “We had a very good vibe here as an up and coming followed art galleries into the area during the mid-90s. But what neighborhood.” “It’s also very comfortable, and very friendly,” Ed Charles the Hollands saw, and what they are helping transform at The Green Building and Wayside Mission properties, is a new ethos of added. “We can walk down the street and wave to Bruce at the sustainability in a walkable neighborhood of residences, shops, Mayan Café or Jerod and Larry, the bartenders in Social, and stop at four or five places to have a great meal. Everyone knows galleries and restaurants. It is a vision that stimulates creativity. Bob Joles is a creative type who had a long career in retail everyone else.” 40 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com


38-49_NuLu_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:34 AM

Page 41

BEEN AROUND THE BLOCK Bruce Ucan is a Mayan Indian from the Yucatan peninsula who first opened the Mayan Gypsy, on East Market in 1997. Not only was he a culinary pioneer in the neighborhood, he is an absolute original. Now he owns the Mayan Café, at 813 E. Market St. “The Yucatan and Guatemala area, the Mayan lowlands, offers the best of the Caribbean — the best seafood, the best vegetables. All in all it is a ver y special place,” Ucan said. He developed culinary skills working in major Mexican resort hotels before coming to Louisville in 1987. In Louisville he honed his skills at Captain’s Quarters, Masterson’s and Timothy’s before setting out on his own, first in a bright blue van from which he fed construction workers. The blue continues to be his signature color and graces the walls of the modest but elegant restaurant. Traditional fare like salbutes, small corn patties covered with a variety of vegetables, meats, and legumes, or cochinita pibil, a pork roast served in mild, pepperlike achiote sauce, expand to seafood, beef and creative variations like the mole of the day, complex mixtures of spices and fresh herbs that represent seven Mexican regions. “All of Bruce’s cooking features complex flavors and light sauces which let the food shine through,” said Anne Shadle, general manager. “There are flavors that people experience for the first time, like their mouths have woken up. It’s fun to watch their faces.” One such dish is the tok-sel lima beans, roasted and then sauteed in sesame oil with lime juice, green onions and ground pumpkin seeds. It often redefines most peoples’ idea of what lima beans are all about. While Ucan still imports certain exotic chile pastes and liquors from Mexico, and a special fungus from Florida, he is proud of his relationship with local suppliers. This summer he introduced Mayan Market Mondays when he teams with one of five local farm producers to present a special menu. At a recent Monday which highlighted his farm’s produce, Jim Fiedler declared the night as one of “chaotic deliciousness.” www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 41


38-49_NuLu_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:34 AM

Page 42

Toast on Market, in the historic Empire Vaudeville Theatre building at 736 E. Market St., has struck a culinary chord that reverberates throughout the city. Opened in August 2006 by George Morris, and sisters Amy and Lisa Wepf, the wide-open interior with front patio has had people driving back into town. “The response surprised us,” Morris said.“We had no idea people would be driving in from other counties to have breakfast on Saturday mornings.” The food is excellent, coming from recipes that go back to Morris’ childhood in Bullitt County, and presented in a personal style. “When starting Toast we talked about what we were looking for when we went out,” Morris said. What they wanted, and what has proven so popular, are good portions of standout sweet, creamy and savory food coupled with a decent bar. If seeking healthy choices or only mildly hungry for breakfast, you can find succinct egg dishes, homemade Toast on Market’s gingerbread pancakes

granola or oatmeal with fruit and nuts. If you need something more substantial, there are omelets, steak and eggs, four styles of pancakes, three types of French toast and beefcakes, a delicious recipe from Morris’ youth of sweet buttermilk pancakes covered with savory pot roast and gravy that will hold you for the rest of the day. Lunch is equally homey and diverse.There’s a selection of soups, small and entrée salads, four different grilled cheese sandwiches and a dozen other sandwiches. Just as the food reflects the personality of the owners, so does the atmosphere. It’s a place to relax and enjoy (or check your email on the free WiFi). “The great thing about our place is how all people feel comfortable, whether after church and all dressed up or in shorts after a bike ride,” Morris said. “If you want to come down in your pj’s and socks for hot cocoa, you can do it.” 42 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Bourbon cupcakes from Cake Flour

Cake Flour, a tiny store-front at 910 East Market full of baked treasures, is another example of the creativity and execution that is getting commuters to pull over. Claudia Delatorre opened the store last August after moving here from the northeast. A petite brunette of Colombian descent, she often wears a gracious smile which can belie a candid manner and passion for doing things healthfully, natural and right. “Almost all of my customers say they have driven by three or four times and just decided to stop in and see what it’s all about,” Delatorre said. Once a graduate in international affairs working for a United Nations organization, Delatorre told how two things motivated her to change her life and attend the French Culinary Institute in New York City. “I didn’t want my daughter to see me doing something I didn’t love. And when she was an infant, I looked at what was in the teething cookies out there and saw that they were full of crap,” she said. As a professional pastry chef, she eschews artificial dyes, flavorings or sweeteners, as well as hydrogenated oils, over-processed flour and refined sugars. She bakes using organic, often local ingredients. “It’s really distressing how some corporate chains now present themselves as serving ‘natural’ food when in the kitchen it’s Sweetex (a buttermargarine blend) and lemon glaze that comes out of a bucket,” Delatorre said. Whether preparing quiches or cakes, tarts or cookies, she is committed to small batch production and believes customers will notice the difference and appreciate it. She has won rave reviews for her scones, cupcakes, and her version of a 300-year old recipe for Opera Cake, a flourless chocolate cake layered with hazelnut buttercream and chocolate ganache. “Maybe you could make it with cheaper ingredients,” she said, “but the whole point is the intensity of the flavor you experience in each fork full, right?”


38-49_NuLu_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:34 AM

Page 43

A classic Reuben Sandwich is served up with a side of sweet potato fries and a pint of house-brewed ale at Browning’s.

BACK ON THE BLOCK The re-opening in May of Browning’s at Slugger Field (401 E. Main St.), after nearly a year of darkness, signaled a beloved place would just not go away despite the recession and deflated real estate market that hammered everyone over the past 18 months. Under a new investor group, Browning’s restaurant and microbrewer y (and the companion Park Place restaurant, now available only for special events), are directed by wellknown chef Anoosh Shariat who had lifted them to prominence in 2005-07. In the renovated 19th century Brinly-Hardy farm implement depot at the Slugger Field complex, Browning’s houses a striking, three story glassed-in brewery producing highly regarded craft beers. “Louisville missed Browning’s. A lot of people asked about it and are coming in and thanking us for being here again,” Shariat said. “To have this in our city — crafted beers and being able to make foods to go with them — is just great.” Shariat cited brew master Brian Reymiller as a strong factor in his return. “Brian’s experience in producing a great craft beer product was one of the main reasons I thought I should come back and do this again.” Reymiller, who worked in Louisville, Pennsylvania and Tennessee before coming to Browning’s in 2005, never stopped brewing operations during the closure because of continuing regional demand for Browning’s She-Devil Imperial Pale Ale and Louis XVI Guillotine ESB.Today, while producing a pilsner-style Munich Helles lager, along with stronger stouts and porters, he brainstorms with Shariat on new creations like a refreshing Belgian Wit flavored with orange peels and coriander. “We were the first to do a bourbon barrel stout here and now others have followed Browning’s Anoosh Shariat suit,” Shariat said. “We’re keeping the favorites but also going back to the drawing board and working on more bold and newer styles.” Shariat’s kitchen matches the effort with a variety of solid appetizers, soups, salads, wraps, distinctive sandwiches (like a Helles Battered Grouper or Louisville Hot Brown) and grilled salmon, chicken or garden-style pasta entrées. Parking is plentiful and free in an adjacent lot except when a home game is being played. Best call ahead. www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 43


38-49_NuLu_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:35 AM

Page 44

THE NEXT WAVE In less than a nine-month span, four new restaurants opened their doors in the NuLu area. Beginning with Cake Flour last August and continuing with the rapid fire openings of 732 Social, Wiltshire on Market and The White Oak in April. Each restaurateur admits a passionate commitment to local suppliers, the finest ingredients, and preparation of excellent food. The combination frequently catalyzes high creativity and a positive buzz — about these eateries and the neighborhood — has been heard throughout the city and beyond. 732 Social is a spirited, small bistro that opened in April in The Green Building at 732 East Market. It is a collaboration between Jayson Lewellyn and Stephen and Michael Ton of Crescent Hill’s trend-setting Basa. Lewellyn came from Cincinnati to open the local Jeff Ruby’s, fell in love with the city and ended up striking out on his own with the Ton brothers when he met Gill and Augusta Holland. “It was almost like fate. Gill’s vision was so like my own of the potential this city has,” Lewellyn said. “Nobody sees just the building, we see the neighborhood and a dynamic of growth here.” “We heard ‘you guys have got to be crazy’ more than ‘we think this will work out,’ ” Lewellyn said.“The economy was down, restaurants were closing around us, and we wanted to create a new dining experience in an untalked about part of town. It was a little daunting.” Social’s concept evolved around the space — close and intimate bordering an open kitchen — and jelled on a trip Lewellyn and Stephen Ton made to Chicago where one night they experienced a creative emphasis on classic cocktails and preprohibition bar tending “They were using handmade bitters and mixes and specially

prepared ice cubes that wouldn’t melt quickly and dilute the drink,” Lewellyn said.“The same passion I have in the kitchen I saw taking place in the bar. My favorite food experience is simplicity on the plate and making the perfect Manhattan is part of it. It was like walking through a portal.” Jerod Schubert and Larry Rice are like wizards and run the bar at Social using original recipes, quality ingredients, small batch liquors, and special techniques like making ice cubes that won’t melt quickly and dilute your drink. “They are recreating what a beverage experience used to be 100 years ago and starting a trend in the city comparable to classic cuisine,” Lewellyn said. The three-man kitchen is equally creative with small dish offerings like herb roasted ratatouille or preserved apple with Brussels sprouts and candied black walnuts, and larger dishes like roasted mussels, barbecue pork rib or wild ocean trout. “Everything’s built to share, served in the dish it was cooked in and people are talking with each other, making new acquaintances,” Lewellyn said. “We want to be a place that stimulates you and lets you develop a relationship with it. And we don’t want to close the door on innovation.” Lewellyn points to the bistro’s menu and says, “We listen to people, what they like and what they want to try. We’ve been open two months and we’re already on our ninth menu.” Social is also turning into somewhat of a hangout for food industry professionals, who take advantage of the late hours to come by, rub shoulders and relax over a novel drink. Pleased at that distinction, Lewellyn sums up the spirit of the place and where it’s happening,“The community never let this part of town go. People always sensed something special was going to happen here.”

732 Social’s Chef-Owner Jayson Lewellyn

Rare hamachi with pickled beet, apple and red onion 44 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com


38-49_NuLu_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:35 AM

Page 45

732 SOCIAL Cast iron roasted clams in a garlic, fennel and white wine broth. (left) Dry-aged Angus steak with Castello blue cheese and pommes frites.


38-49_NuLu_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:36 AM

Page 46

Wiltshire on Market, at 635 East Market, was opened in April by Susan Hershberg who for 20 years has run the highly-regarded Wiltshire Pantry catering business. When the economy stalled and a restaurant tenant didn’t renew a lease, she saw an opportunity. “With the recession, I wanted to keep my chefs busy. So we worked on recipes and menu ideas until we felt ready to go,” Hershberg said.“Plus, it seemed the perfect time to come down and be part of something special happening in the community.” Hershberg grew up around special things happening. She is the daughter of David Hershberg, past-chair of the University of Louisville’s Romance Languages Depar tment and founder of the Louisville International Cultural Center. “I was in a family that loved to cook,” Hershberg said. “My mother thought nothing of having dinner par ties for 60 to honor visiting dignitaries.” Now, Hershberg brings decades of experience in specialty foods and entertaining to bear in exploring trends in modern dining. “Chef Coby Ming and I wanted to move away from large meat and starch, American-style meal and focus on more easily shared, healthier dishes,” Hershberg said. The restaurant offers a small plate format of seasonal, fresh ingredients “because it is popular, affordable and healthy,” Hershberg said. “Our focus is to provide a first course, salad and entrée, a three-course meal, at a price point of $18.” A great deal of creativity is displayed with entrées like coffee-rubbed duck breast with red mole and plantain puree or crisped soft-shell crab with potato scallion galette. Appetizers usually include Mediterranean-style offerings of olives and nuts, cheeses, specially-prepared meats and bruschetta, while desserts can range from cookies and tarts to chocolate truffles. Long respected as a high-end caterer, Hershberg has perhaps a perfect space in which to showcase the creations of her team led by chef Ming.There is an inviting, small garden space, seating in a side patio, and an upstairs available for special events, but it is the main dining room that strikes the dominant chord of charming intimacy. Rough stucco and a dark green wall with a ceiling-high walnutfinished wine rack face each other and frame a long, hammered, coppertopped bar. There are only eight tables in the room (which, with the bar, seats 50), but they are specimens of craft and beauty.Two are nearly five-foot diameter slices of white oak tree trunks, others walnut and maple and a unique table made of laminated bamboo strips, each glowing as a piece of art in the intimate setting. While the ambiance may nurture the diner seeking respite, Hershberg makes no bones that it is the dining experience that will be remembered. “What makes us unique is our menu, which changes every week based on what we’re getting in from local growers,” Hershberg said. “For example, last week, we had a fresh spring pea soup. Interested diners can sign up at our website to get the new menus by email as soon as they are posted.” Hershberg also has planned a series of special events for the restaurant, like a recent wine dinner pairing food with small-batch, artisanal Austrian wines. “These are served family style and limited to 30 people,” Hershberg said. “But they are wonderful. At our Austrian event we tasted a biodynamic Gruner Veltliner and a brut out in the garden before coupling dinner courses with a Riesling, a Zweigelt rose and a single-vineyard cabernet franc.” 46 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Bruschetta of oven dried tomatoes and honey ricotta with micro basil and a balsamic glaze

The charcuterie meat and cheese plate for two


38-49_NuLu_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:36 AM

Page 47

ON

WILTSHIRE M A R K E T

(above) Wiltshire on Marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s owner Susan Hershberg and Executive Chef Coby Ming. (pictured) Eggplant Napoleon with a sundried tomato, chevre cheese and caperberry relish and a quinoa fritter.


38-49_NuLu_fall09.qxp

THE

7/31/09

11:36 AM

Page 48

WHITE OAK

Chef-owners Allen Heintzman (front) and Charlie Melton preside over the kitchen at The White Oak. At left is a ragout of country beans and greens with herbed grit cakes, and at right is seared duck breast topped with shredded duck confit leg, sour cherries and finished with a sorghum glaze.

The White Oak, under the direction of chefs Allen Heintzman and Charlie Melton, opened in late April in the space previously occupied by Artemesia at 620 East Market, near Joe Ley’s. There are still Artemesia signs on the building, which makes the location easy to identify. And like Artemesia before it, The White Oak shows items from the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft. While the emphasis on art hasn’t changed, what’s going on in the kitchen from these two creative chefs is a distinctly new direction from the fusion themes and big-ticket entrées explored by the previous occupant. Instead of world-ranging themes, one finds a strong commitment to the excellent preparation of local specialties from local suppliers. “We are all about slow-cooked Southern fare using local ingredients, 85 percent of which come from the state of Kentucky,” Heintzman said.“We believe it makes a difference not having your meat shipped across country and not having your vegetables come all the way from California.” Heintzman is a local whose career took him to a landmark 48 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

restaurant in New Orleans before 2005’s Hurricane Katrina blew him home again. He said The White Oak distinguishes itself from its predecessor in several significant ways. “Artemesia was always eclectic. The White Oak is more focused, using classical cooking techniques to present Southern cuisine, comfort food if you wish, at a price 50 percent less expensive than our predecessor,” Heintzman said. “Not only do we think the era of the $25 to $32 entrée is ended, we want to be accessible as more than a ‘special occasion’ destination.” The price of lunch items ranges from $5 to $12 for soups, fried banana peppers or a fresh spinach salad with local bacon and free range egg to a catfish po’ boy or the signature ‘Louisville Chicken.’ The most expensive dinner item is a $17 country-fried steak with a peppery white sage gravy. Also available are a stuffed pork loin, the Louisville Fried Chicken, cornmeal dusted catfish, a vegetable pasta bake and similar vegetarian-friendly selection of side dishes. At dinner, appetizers also expand to include — beyond the normal soup, cheese plate, salad, and cornmeal-dusted fried chicken livers — to include chicken and dumplings and a


38-49_NuLu_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:36 AM

wonderful grits and grillades dish showcasing Kentucky pork cutlets in a sauce Diablo. There is a full bar, wine and domestic and imported beers, including a selection of Kentucky craft brews. “People are great neighbors here and helpful,” Heintzman said. “There’s a shared sense of community and we are trying to bring some culture and cuisine that fits in with the variety expressed here.” The creative ferment in the city’s core is a boon to locals and out-of-town visitors alike. As Jim George, partner in the neighborhood Scout retail stores asserted, “People have to realize we’re about a whole lot more than the Trolley Hop down here.” Indeed, a whole new spirit of urban living, coupled with a love of creative cuisine, is rising again right where it counts, downtown. F&D

Page 49

One of the best parts of Bourbon Country isn’t in the country at all.

Come to where the Bourbon flows. THE U RBAN B OURBON TRAIL . Get your Urban Bourbon Trail Passport today at one of Louisville’s seven world-famous Bourbon bars.

www.justaddbourbon.com

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 49


50-53_Sullivan_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:37 AM

Page 50

recipes cooking class

PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAN DRY

Cooking with Fr esh Corn recipes for the season’s harvest — with a flavorful twist

A

Ask Tom Smith to come up with recipes for fresh corn and you take him right back to his youth, literally surrounded by corn. “I grew up in farm country in Southern Illinois,” he says, a town named Highland not far from St. Louis, and like St. Louis, it had a heavy Germanic influence. Smith’s family raised cattle, pigs, chickens, garden vegetables and, of course, corn, on their 150-acre farm. Smith, a chef instructor at Sullivan University for about two years, naturally thought of the classic Midwestern corn chowder, “lightened up for summer,” as inspiration for one of his recipes. Out comes the cream, in go the fresh vegetables, the light broth flavored with mushrooms, corn cobs and chicken with a rich punch from smoky bacon. Smith’s polenta with chorizo and corn salsa reveals a variety of influences. “I have worked with so many Hispanics in my career,” he says, that using corn in a Mexican way seemed natural to him. Making homemade chorizo doesn’t faze him. “Growing up we made sausages all the time,” he says. But most of all, he had the backyard griller in mind when he came up with the recipes. “The entire meal can be made up in advance and finished on the grill,” he says. Sullivan chef instructor Mike Cunha’s corn dishes look imposing — there’s nothing like graphic shapes of lobster and soft shell crabs to make an impression at the table. Still, he says, you can substitute other seafood or even chicken in these dishes. The cornmeal-coated crab “is like a pork schnitzel or a breaded chicken breast. It’s more about the chow-chow.” Cunha learned about this Southern pickle during his years working at the Oak Room in the Seelbach Hilton Hotel, when he frequently traveled around Kentucky seeking inspiration for his Kentucky Fine Dining cuisine.This relish, like many, uses whatever is handy (you’ll often see it made with green tomatoes), but cabbage and mustard seed are generally de rigueur. Even the visually commanding lobster dish can be made with shrimp, or crab, or even chicken, but don’t skimp on fresh pasta. It’s a must for the edible baskets. Buy them pre-made at Lotsa Pasta, 3717 Lexington Road in St. Matthews, or substitute the egg roll wrappers you often find at the supermarket.

Corn and lobster in crispy pasta

50 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com


50-53_Sullivan_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:37 AM

Page 51

Chicken broth with corn and wild mushrooms

Cornmeal-dusted soft shell crab on Eastern Kentucky corn chow-chow

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 51


50-53_Sullivan_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:38 AM

Guest Chef

Mike Cunha Cornmeal-Dusted Soft Shell Crab on Eas tern Kentucky Corn Chow-Chow

Page 52

quart of vinegar for 3 minutes. Drain the vegetables from the vinegar and set aside. Discard the vinegar. In the second quart of vinegar, add the sugar, salt and remaining spices. Simmer the spices in the vinegar for 5 minutes then remove the vinegar from the heat. Add vegetables to seasoned vinegar and cool 24 hours. Because this mixture is pickled, it keeps well refrigerated for 3 months or more.

Corn and L obster in Crispy Pasta

(SERVES 4)

1 1 1 4 1 /4 1 4

cup flour tablespoon kosher salt tablespoon black pepper eggs cup water cup yellow cornmeal soft shell crabs, cleaned Vegetable oil

Combine together the flour, kosher salt and black pepper. In a separate bowl whisk together eggs and water. Place the cornmeal in a third bowl. Place the soft shell crabs in the seasoned flour and coat them all over. Tap off the excess flour. Dip the crab into the egg mixture then into the cornmeal to coat the crab lightly. Heat the oil in a sauté pan to 350 degrees and sauté the crab, back side down, for 2 minutes. Flip the crab over and sauté another 2 minutes. Remove the crab and place on a paper towel and reserve.

Corn Chow-Chow 2 cucumbers, peeled, seeded and diced 1 head cabbage, cut in 2-inch thin ribbons 4 med. green tomatoes, diced 1 med. yellow onion, diced 6 ears of corn, kernels removed 1 head cauliflower, cut into small florets 2 med. red bell peppers, diced 3 jalapeño peppers, seeds removed, minced 1 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons kosher salt 1 teaspoon turmeric 1 teaspoon yellow mustard seed 1 teaspoon celery seed 2 quarts white vinegar, divided Simmer all of the vegetables in one 52 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

(SERVES 4)

You can substitute shrimp, crab or even chicken for lobster, if desired. 1

/4 1 1 /2 1 /2 2 1 /4 1 1 1 1 1

cup unsalted butter stalk celery, diced medium yellow onion, diced red bell pepper, diced ears corn, kernels removed cup all-purpose flour cup whole milk cup heavy cream tablespoon fresh thyme tablespoon parsley, chopped tablespoon tarragon, chopped Salt and black pepper to taste 2 cups cooked lobster meat 2 cups vegetable oil 4 fresh pasta sheets or egg roll sheets

Melt the butter in a pan over medium heat. Add celery, onion, bell pepper, and corn and cook, stirring once or twice, for 5 to 6 minutes. Add the flour and stir for 1 minute. Slowly whisk in the milk and cook for 1 minute, bringing it briefly to a boil. Stir in the heavy cream and reduce the heat to low. Add all of the fresh herbs and the 2 cups lobster meat. Season with salt and pepper and keep mixture warm. Heat vegetable oil to about 350 degrees. Place a pasta sheet in the hot fat and press with a ladle or basket dipper to create a depression in the middle (forming a bowl of sorts). When the pasta is golden brown and crisp, transfer to an absorbent surface. Repeat with remaining pasta.

Lobster Sauce Chef Cunha makes seafood stock by combining shells and other discards from the lobster with vegetables and letting it simmer a long, long time. You can purchase stock reductions in specialty stores.

1

/4 /4 4 1 2

1

cup unsalted butter cup all-purpose flour cups lobster stock cup heavy cream ounces Bourbon Salt and black pepper to taste

Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Slowly add the flour and stir until incorporated. Add the lobster stock 1 cup at a time whisking continuously. Allow the sauce to cook over low heat for 8 to10 minutes to thicken. Whisk in the heavy cream then add Bourbon and season with salt and pepper to taste. Garnish 4 lobster claws, meat only, cooked 2 lobster tails, meat only, cooked Assembly Spoon 1/4 of the sauce onto a serving dish.Top with pasta sheet. Fill the crispy pasta with the lobster filling and garnish each with one lobster claw and 1/2 lobster tail.

Guest Chef

Tom Smith Chicken Broth with C orn and Wild Mushrooms (SERVES 4)

1 1 1 4 2 1 2 2 1 2

4

cup hot water ounce dried shiitake mushrooms quart chicken broth strips thick-sliced bacon, diced 6-ounce chicken breast halves, boneless with the skin on medium yellow onion, diced stalks celery, diced medium-sized carrots, peeled and diced clove garlic, minced medium-sized Yukon gold potatoes, peeled, diced, placed in water ears sweet corn, cut off the cob, reserve cob Sea salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper and fresh thyme, to taste


50-53_Sullivan_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:38 AM

Combine hot water and mushrooms and let stand for 1 hour; strain the liquid through a fine strainer into the chicken broth. Remove the stems from the mushrooms and discard stems; dice the mushroom caps and reserve. Brown diced bacon in a large heavybottomed pot on a medium high heat and reserve. Sauté the chicken breast in the bacon fat, until cooked thoroughly. Remove and discard the skin from chicken, dice the breasts and reserve. Add onions, celery, carrots, and garlic to the pan and cook over medium heat until the onions are translucent and the vegetables have softened. Add the chicken broth to the pot, add the reserved corn cobs and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain the potatoes and add to the pot, add the reserved bacon and chicken as well as the corn, simmer until the potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes, remove corn cobs and discard. Adjust seasonings with salt, pepper, cayenne and fresh thyme.

Fresh Corn “Tamale” Polenta with Choriz o and Roasted Corn Salsa (SERVES 4)

Fresh queso fresco cheese is made with cow’s milk and is probably the most widely used cheese in Mexico. True queso fresco will soften and become creamy when heated, but it will not melt.You can find it in Latino grocer y stores and some specialty

Page 53

shops. Substitute feta if you wish, but it will be crumblier and saltier. 6 strips thick-sliced bacon, diced 1 clove garlic, mashed 3 green onions, diced (use both the green and white parts) 1 /2 red bell pepper, diced 2 ears corn, kernels removed 1 tablespoon chili powder 4 cups chicken broth, divided 1 cup yellow corn meal 1 cup queso fresco cheese 1 pound ground chorizo sausage In a heavy-bottomed 2-quart pot, cook the bacon until it is brown. Add the garlic, green onion, red bell pepper and corn to the pot and cook over medium heat until the green onion is translucent. Add chili powder and cook until it becomes aromatic. Add 3 cups of chicken broth and bring it to a boil. Combine the reserved cup of chicken stock with the corn meal. Stirring constantly, pour the cornmeal mixture into the boiling stock. Reduce to a simmer and cook for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently. When the mixture begins pulling away from the sides of the pot when stirred, incorporate the cheese. Pour the polenta mixture into a rimmed baking pan lined with plastic wrap, smoothing until an even 3/4-inch thickness is achieved. Let chill until it is firm. Cut the polenta into four large triangles and reserve. Form the chorizo into 4 equal patties

using a 3-inch circle cutter (or just press it into a patty). Grill or pan-fry to cook through and set aside.

Corn Salsa 2 1 1 3 1 2 2 1

ears sweet corn, shucked tablespoon balsamic vinegar large tomato green onions, diced (use both the green and white parts) tablespoon Serrano pepper, chopped with seeds tablespoons cilantro, chopped tablespoons corn oil pinch cumin Sea salt and black pepper

Roast the corn on a medium-high grill until it is tender. Allow to cool and cut kernels off the cob. In a medium mixing bowl combine balsamic vinegar, corn oil, Serrano pepper, cumin, sea salt and pepper to make a light vinaigrette. Toss corn, tomatoes, onions and cilantro in vinaigrette, adjust seasonings to taste. Divide the salsa mixture in half; purée one half with an immersion blender (a food processor or blender will do the trick as well). Assembly Grill the polenta triangles until they are warmed through. Place them in the center of the plates, place the cooked chorizo patties on top of the polenta, garnish with the chunky corn salsa and dress the plate with the puréed salsa. F&D

Fresh corn “tamale” polenta with chorizo and roasted corn salsa

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 53


54-57_Index_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:38 AM

Alphabetical Index

Page 54

ALL RESTAURANTS ARE LISTED ALPHABETICALLY, FOLLOWED BY THE PAGE NUMBER OF ITS REVIEW, THE CUISINE STYLE, AND THE CORRESPONDING MAP NUMBER(S). UNMAPPED [ ] DENOTES MULTIPLE LOCATIONS.

Cuisine Style

RESTAURANT

dining guide

AFRICAN 74 ASIAN/CHINESE 74 ASIAN/FILIPINO 75 ASIAN/JAPANESE 75 ASIAN/KOREAN 76 ASIAN/MONGOLIAN 76 ASIAN/THAI 76 ASIAN/VIETNAMESE 76 BAR & GRILL 72 BARBECUE 72 BISTRO/CONTEMPORARY 62 CAFÉS 63 CAFETERIAS 68 CAJUN/CREOLE 78 CARIBBEAN/CUBAN 79 CASUAL DINING 65 COFFEE/TEA HOUSE 80 DESSERTS/BAKERY 81 ENTERTAINMENT DINING 68 EUROPEAN/BOSNIAN 77 EUROPEAN/GERMAN 77 EUROPEAN/IRISH 77 EUROPEAN/ITALIAN 77 EUROPEAN/SPANISH 78 FINE DINING 58 HOME STYLE/SOUTHERN 67 INDIAN 78 MEXICAN 79 MICROBREWERIES 74 MIDDLE EASTERN 78 PIZZA 69 SANDWICH/DELI 70 SEAFOOD 64 SOUTHWEST/TEX MEX 80 STEAKHOUSE 65 UPSCALE CASUAL 59

Area Maps MAP # DIRECTION

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

82 PG #

Overview (Index)

82

Downtown

84

Near East

85

East

86

South East

87

East

88

(Downtown Louisville) (Highlands – Crescent Hill) (St. Matthews) (Hikes Point – Buechel) (Hurstbourne N. – Lyndon)

South East

89 (Hurstbourne S. – Jeffersontown) North East 90 (River Rd. – Brownsboro Rd.) North East 90 (Westport Rd.) Far East 91 (Middletown) North East 91 (Prospect) South East 91 (Fern Creek) South 92 (Airport – Okolona) South West 93 (Shively – Pleasure Ridge Park) Indiana 94 (New Albany – Floyds Knobs) Indiana 95 (Clarksville) Indiana 95 (Jeffersonville)

54 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

#1 Asian Buffet 74 211 Clover Lane 58 60 West Bistro 59 610 Magnolia 58 732 Social 59 8 China Buffet 74 A Nice Restaurant 65 A Taste of China 74 A.J.’s Gyro Café 78 Adriann’s Around the Table 63 Adrienne & Co. Bakery Café 81 Adrienne’s Italian 77 Ahoy Fish Hut 64 Al Watan 78 Alexander’s Pizzeria 69 Alley Cat Café 63 Amazing Grace Deli 70 Amici´ 77 Angelina’s Café 77 Angilo’s Pizza 69 Angio’s Restaurant 69 Ann’s by the River 68 Annie Café 76 Annie’s Pizza 69 Another Place 70 Applebee’s 65 Arandas Mexican Restaurant 79 Arni’s Pizza 69 Aroma Café 63 Asahi Japanese 75 Asian Buffet 74 Asiatique 59 Aspen Creek Restaurant 65 Atrium Café 62 August Moon 74 Austin’s 59 Avalon 59 bd’s Mongolian Grill 76 B.J.’s Restaurant & Brewhouse 65 Babby’s Steakhouse 65 Backyard Burger 70 The Bakery 81 Bamboo House 74 Bank Shot Billiards 70 Bank Street Brewhouse 74 Barbara Lee’s Kitchen 67 Basa Modern Vietnamese 59 Baxter Station 62 Bazos Mexican Grill 79 Bean Street Café 8o Bearno’s Pizza 69 Beef O’Brady’s 72 Behar Café 77 Beijing Grill & Sushi Bar 75 Bendoya Sushi Bar 75 Big Al’s Beeritaville 72 Big Momma’s Soul Kitchen 67 Bistro 301 62 Bistro Le Relais 62 Blackstone Grille 59 Blimpie’s Subs 70 BLU Mediterranean Grille 59 Blue Dog Bakery 63 Blue Horse Café 66 Blue Lagoon 64 Blue Mountain Wine Bar 63 Blue Mule Sports Café 72 Bluegrass Brewing Co. 74 Bluegrass Grill & Bar 66 Bombay Grill 78 Bonefish Grill 64 Boombozz Pizza & Taphouse 69 Bootleg Barbecue Co. 72 Bosna-Mak 77 Bourbons Bistro 62 Brandon’s Bar-B-Que 72 Bravo! 59 Breadworks 81 Brendan’s Restaurant & Pub 77 Bristol Bar & Grille 59 Brix Wine Bar 62 Brownie’s Grille & Bar 72 Browning’s Brewery 62 Bruce’s Smokehouse 72 Bruno’s Pizza 69 Bruno’s Pizzeria & Pub 69 Buca Di Beppo 77 Buck’s 58 Buckhead Mountain Grill 66 Buenos Dias Café 79 Buffalo Wild Wings 73

MAP #

Asian/Chinese 2 Fine Dining 3 Upscale Casual 3 Fine Dining 12 Upscale Casual 1 Asian/Chinese 6 Casual Dining 14, 16 Asian/Chinese 1 Middle Eastern 14 Cafés 9 Desserts/Bakery 16 European/Italian 16 Seafood 4 Middle Eastern 4 Pizza 16 Cafés 9 Sandwich/Deli 2 European/Italian 12 European/Italian 5 Pizza 12 Pizza 4 Cafeterias 16 Asian/Vietnamese 12 Pizza 1, 13 Sandwich/Deli 1 Casual Dining [8] Mexican 12 Pizza 14 Cafés 14 Asian/Japanese 3 Asian/Chinese 4, 14, 15 Upscale Casual 2 Casual Dining 11 Bistro/Contemporary 5 Asian/Chinese 2 Upscale Casual 7 Upscale Casual 2 Asian/Mongolian 6 Casual Dining 5 Steakhouse 16 Sandwich/Deli 6, 7 Desserts/Bakery 4 Asian/Chinese 12 Sandwich/Deli 1 Microbreweries 14 Home Style/Southern 2 Upscale Casual 2 Bistro/Contemporary 2 Mexican 3 Coffee/Tea House 14 Pizza [13] Bar & Grill 8, 9, 12, 14, 15 European/Bosnian 12 Asian/Japanese 14 Asian/Japanese 1 Bar & Grill 2 Home Style/Southern 1 Bistro/Contemporary 1 Bistro/Contemporary 4 Upscale Casual 10 Sandwich/Deli 2 Upscale Casual 1 Cafés 2 Casual Dining 12 Seafood 2 Cafés 1 Bar & Grill 6 Microbreweries 1, 3 Casual Dining 7 Indian 5 Seafood 5 Pizza 2 Barbecue 11, 12 European/Bosnian 4 Bistro/Contemporary 2 Barbecue 5 Upscale Casual 3 Desserts/Bakery 2, 7, 9 European/Irish 3 Upscale Casual 1, 2, 5, 10, 12, 16 Bistro/Contemporary 8 Bar & Grill 5 Bistro/Contemporary 1 Barbecue 6 Pizza 14 Pizza 12 European/Italian 6 Fine Dining 12 Casual Dining 4,8, 12, 16 Mexican 15 Bar & Grill2,3, 6, 8, 9, 13, 15

RESTAURANT

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

Buffalo Wings & Rings 73 Bulldog Café 63 Bunz Restaurant 66 Burger Boy 70 Butcher’s Best Deli 70 Butterfly Garden Café 63 Cachito Mio Cuban Café 79 Café 360 78 Café Fraiche 63 Café Lou Lou 62 Café Magnolia 66 Café Metro 58 Café Palacio 70 Café Thuy Van 76 Caffe Classico 80 Cake Flour 81 California Pizza Kitchen 69 Calistoga Bakery Café 70 Cancun Mexican Grill 79 The Cape Codder 64 Captain Pepper Jack’s 78 Captain’s Quarters 66 Cardinal Hall of Fame Café 66 Carly Rae’s 66 Carolina Shrimp & Seafood 64 Carolyn’s 67 Carrabba’s Italian Grille 77 Caspian Grill Persian Bistro 78 Cat Box Deli 70 Catfish Haven Restaurant 64 Caviar Japanese Rest. 60 Champions Grill 66 Champion’s Sports Rest. 73 Charlestown Pizza Co. 69 Chatter’s Bar & Grill 73 Check’s Café 68 Cheddar Box Café 63 Cheddar’s Casual Café 66 The Cheesecake Factory 60 Chez Seneba African 74 The Chicago Gyro 70 Chick Inn 66 The Chicken House 68 Chicken King 68 Chili’s 66 China 1 74 China Buffet 74 China Castle 74 China Garden 74 China Inn 74 China King 74 China Taste 74 Chinese Chef 74 Chinese Express 74 Choi’s Asian Food Market 75 Chong Garden 74 Chopshop Salads 66 Chopsticks 74 Chopsticks House 74 Chrisanta’s Café 63 Chung King 74 Cici’s 69 City Café 63 Clark Boy Bar-B-Que 72 Clarksville Seafood 64 Clifton’s Pizza 69 Club Grotto 60 Coach Lamp 60 Coco’s Bakery 81 CoCo’s Chocolate Café 81 Coffee Crossing 80 Coffee Pot Café 80 Come Back Inn 77 Conez & Coneyz 70 Connor’s Place 73 Corbett’s ‘an American place’ 58 Corner Café 60 Cottage Café 68 Cottage Inn 68 Crave Café & Catering 63 Cravings a la Carte 68 Creekside Outpost & Café 63 Cricket’s Café 63 Crystal Chinese 74 Culver’s 66 Cumberland Brews 74 Cunningham’s 66 The Cupcake Shoppe 81 Cutter’s Wharf 66 Cyclers Café 63 D&C Diamond Café 73 Dakshin Indian Restaurant 78 Danish Express Pastries 70 Danny Boy’s 73 Danny Mac’s Pasta & Pizza 69 Day’s Espresso 80 De La Torre’s 78 Del Frisco’s 65 Delta Restaurant 73 Dem Bones BBQ 72 Derby Café 63 Derby City Dogs 70 Derby City Espresso 80 Derby Dinner Playhouse 68

MAP #

Bar & Grill 8, 11 Cafés 12 Casual Dining 2 Sandwich/Deli 12 Sandwich/Deli 10 Cafés 2, 3 Caribbean/Cuban 8 Middle Eastern 2 Cafés 7 Bistro/Contemporary 2,3 Casual Dining 1 Fine Dining 2 Sandwich/Deli 3 Asian/Vietnamese 12 Coffee/Tea House 2 Desserts/Bakery 1 Pizza 5 Sandwich/Deli 1,3 Mexican 6 Seafood 14 Middle Eastern 4 Casual Dining 10 Casual Dining 12 Casual Dining 1 Seafood 3 Home Style/Southern 13 European/Italian 5 Middle Eastern 2 Sandwich/Deli 1 Seafood 13 Upscale Casual 1 Casual Dining 16 Bar & Grill 1 Pizza 16 Bar & Grill 6 Home Style/Southern 1 Cafés 9 Casual Dining 8, 15 Upscale Casual 3 African 12 Sandwich/Deli 2 Casual Dining 10 Home Style/Southern 14 Home Style/Southern 1 Casual Dining 4, 5, 8, 12 Asian/Chinese 3 Asian/Chinese 15 Asian/Chinese 13 Asian/Chinese 12 Asian/Chinese 12 Asian/Chinese 6 Asian/Chinese 16 Asian/Chinese 12 Asian/Chinese 13 Asian/Japanese 5 Asian/Chinese 13 Casual Dining 1 Asian/Chinese 1 Asian/Chinese 1 Cafés 2 Asian/Chinese 1 Pizza 4, 14 Cafés 1, 2 Barbecue 13 Seafood 15 Pizza 2 Upscale Casual 2 Upscale Casual 1 Desserts/Bakery 12 Desserts/Bakery 2 Coffee/Tea House 14 Coffee/Tea House 1 European/Italian 1, 16 Sandwich/Deli 2 Bar & Grill 14 Fine Dining 8 Upscale Casual 5 Home Style/Southern 9 Home Style/Southern 12 Cafés 2 Cafeterias 1 Cafés 14 Cafés 15 Asian/Chinese 1 Casual Dining 6 Microbreweries 2 Casual Dining 1, 10 Desserts/Bakery 3 Casual Dining 10 Cafés 2 Bar & Grill 2 Indian 11 Sandwich/Deli 3 Bar & Grill 16 Pizza 2 Coffee/Tea House 2 European/Spanish 2 Steakhouse 3 Bar & Grill 1 Barbecue 16 Cafés 12 Sandwich/Deli 2 Coffee/Tea House 1 Entertainment Dining 16


54-57_Index_fall09.qxp

RESTAURANT

7/31/09

11:38 AM

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

Page 55

MAP #

The Dessert Gallery 81 Desserts/Bakery 5 Desserts By Helen 81 Desserts/Bakery 2, 1 Devino’s 70 Sandwich/Deli 1 Diamond Pub & Billiards 73 Bar & Grill 3 Dinner Is Done 68 Home Style/Southern 9 Dino’s Down to Lunch 70 Sandwich/Deli 1 Ditto’s Grill 62 Bistro/Contemporary 2 Dizzy Whizz Drive-In 70 Sandwich/Deli 1 D’Nalley’s Restaurant 68 Home Style/Southern 1 Domino’s Pizza 69 Pizza [20] Don Pablos 79 Mexican 15 Dooley’s Bagels 70 Sandwich/Deli 3, 7 Double Dragon 74 Asian/Chinese 2 Double Dragon II 74 Asian/Chinese 5, 8, 11, 12 Double Dragon 8 74 Asian/Chinese 1 Double Dragon 9 74 Asian/Chinese 6 Double Dragon Buffet 74 Asian/Chinese 5 Downtown Diner & Coffee House 63 Cafés 14 Dragon King’s Daughter 75 Asian/Japanese 2 Dynasty Buffet 74 Asian/Chinese 7 Eastern House 74 Asian/Chinese 13 Einstein Brothers Bagels 70 Sandwich/Deli 1 El Burrito de Oro 79 Mexican 15 El Caporal 79 Mexican 4,6,15 El Mundo 79 Mexican 2 El Nopal 79 Mexican 6, 8, 9, 12, 14 El Nopalito 79 Mexican 2, 4, 11 El Rey Mexican 79 Mexican 4 El Rodeo Mexican 79 Mexican 13 El Tarasco 79 Mexican 3, 5, 6, 12 El Toro Resaurante Mexicano 79 Mexican 6 Emperor of China 74 Asian/Chinese 7 Empress of China 74 Asian/Chinese 4 The English Grill 58 Fine Dining 1 Equus 60 Upscale Casual 3 Erika’s German Rest. 77 European/German 6 Ermin’s Bakery & Café 63 Cafés 1, 10, 14 Ernesto’s 79 Mexican 3, 5, 6 Eva Mae’s Creekside 66 Casual Dining 10 Expression Of You 80 Coffee/Tea House 2 The Falafel House 78 Middle Eastern 2 Famous Dave’s Bar-B-Que 72 Barbecue 6, 15 Fat Daddy’s Pizza 69 Pizza 12 Fat Jimmy’s 69 Pizza 1, 2, 9 Feed Bag Deli 70 Sandwich/Deli 3 Fiesta Time Mexican Grill 79 Mexican 8 Finley’s BBQ 72 Barbecue 1 Fire Fresh Bar B Q 72 Barbecue 1, 11, 13 Fireside Bar & Grill 66 Casual Dining 14 First Wok 74 Asian/Chinese 13 The Fish House 64 Seafood 2 The Fishery 64 Seafood 3 Five Guys Burgers & Fries 66 Casual Dining 8, 14 Flabby’s Schnitzelburg 73 Bar & Grill 12 Flanagans Ale House 73 Bar & Grill 2 Fork in the Road 68 Home Style/Southern 13 Forty Acres And A Mule 68 Home Style/Southern 12 Four King’s Café 73 Bar & Grill 4 Fox & Hound 73 Bar & Grill 3 Frankfort Ave. Beer Depot 72 Bar & Grill 3 Frascelli’s N.Y. Deli & Pizza 70 Sandwich/Deli 7 Frolio’s Pizza 69 Pizza 12 Frontier Diner 68 Home Style/Southern 13 Fuji Asian Bistro 76 Asian/Japanese 13 Fuji Japanese Steakhouse 76 Asian/Japanese 8, 9 Fun Food Café 63 Cafés 2 Furlongs 78 Cajun/Creole 5 Gasthaus 77 European/German 7 Gavi’s Restaurant 66 Casual Dining 1 Genny’s Diner 68 Home Style/Southern 2 Gerstle’s Place 73 Bar & Grill 3 Golden Buddha 74 Asian/Chinese 12 Golden Corral 68 Home Style/Southern 4,12,15 Golden Palace 74 Asian/Chinese 12 Golden Star Chinese 74 Asian/Chinese 12 Golden Wall 74 Asian/Chinese 12 Goose Creek Diner 66 Casual Dining 8 Granny’s Apron 68 Home Style/Southern 12 Granville Inn 73 Bar & Grill 12 Grape Leaf 78 Middle Eastern 2 Great American Grill 73 Bar & Grill 12 Great Life Café 70 Cafés 6,8,15 Great Wall 74 Asian/Chinese 2 Great Wok 74 Asian/Chinese 12 Hall’s Cafeteria 68 Cafeterias 2 Hanabi Japanese Restaurant 76 Asian/Japanese 10 Happy Dragon 74 Asian/Chinese 1 Hard Rock Café 62 Bistro/Contemporary 1 Harley’s House Of Brews 73 Bar & Grill 1 Harlow’s Bar & Grill 73 Bar & Grill 12 Havana Rumba 79 Caribbean/Cuban 3 Hazelwood Restaurant 68 Home Style/Southern 13 Heavenly Ham 70 Sandwich/Deli 14 Heine Brothers Coffee 80 Coffee/Tea House 2, 3 Heitzman Bakery & Deli 81 Desserts/Bakery 5 Highland Coffee Co. 80 Coffee/Tea House 2 Hiko A Mon Sushi Bar 76 Asian/Japanese 7 Hill Street Fish Fry 64 Seafood 12 Hitching Post Inn 73 Bar & Grill 11 Hobknobb Roasting Co. 80 Coffee/Tea House 14 Homerun Burgers & Fries 66 Casual Dining 6 Hometown Buffet 68 Home Style/Southern 6, 3 Hometown Pizza 69 Pizza 7, 9 Honeybaked Café 71 Sandwich/Deli 3, 11 www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 55


54-57_Index_fall09.qxp

RESTAURANT

7/31/09

11:38 AM

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

Hong Kong Chinese Hong Kong Fast Food Hoops Grill and Sports Bar Hooters Howl at the Moon Hunan Wok Ichiban Samurai IHOP Incredible Dave’s Indi’s Restaurant India Palace Indigo Joe’s Sports Pub Intermezzo Café & Cabaret The International Mall The Irish Rover Iroquois Pizza Islamorada Fish Co. J. Alexander’s J. Graham’s Café J. Gumbo’s J. Harrods J Train Pizza & Pub Jack Binion’s Steakhouse Jack Fry’s Jack’s Lounge Jackson’s Seafood Jade Garden Buffet Jade Palace Jake’s & Mr. G’s Jane’s Cafeteria Jarfi’s at Glenmary Jarfi’s Café Jasmine Jason’s Deli Java Brewing Co. Jazzyblu Jeff Ruby’s Steakhouse Jerry’s On The River Jersey Mike’s Subs Jersey’s Café Jessie’s Restaurant Jewel’s House Of Teas Jimbo’s BBQ Jimmy John’s Sub Shop Jockamo’s Pizza Pub Joe Davola’s Joe Huber Restaurant Joe Muggs Joe’s Crab Shack Joe’s O.K. Bayou Joe’s Older Than Dirt John E’s John O’Bryan’s Tavern Johnny V’s Jucy’s Smokehouse Jumbo Buffet Just Fresh Bakery & Café Kansai Japanese Rest. Karem’s Kashmir Indian Kayrouz Café KC’s Chicago Hotdog Stand Kentucky BBQ Co. Kern’s Korner King Wok Kingfish Kings Fast Food King’s Fried Chicken Kobe Japanese Steak Koreana II KT’s L&N Wine Bar and Bistro La Bamba La Bodega La Gallo Rosso Bistro La Herradura La Monarca La Perla del Pacifico La Que La Rosita Mexican Grill La Rosita Taqqueria La Tapatia La Vida Java Coffee Co. Lancaster’s Cafeteria Las Gorditas Lee’s Korean Legend’s Lemongrass Café Liang’s Café The Lighthouse Lil’ Loafers Bakery Lilly’s Limestone Ling Ling Little Caesar’s Pizza Liu’s Garden Logan’s Roadhouse Lolitas Tacos Inc. Longhorn Steakhouse Lonnie’s Taste Chicago Los Aztecas Lotsa Pasta Louisville Pizza Co. Luigi’s

MAP #

74 Asian/Chinese 14 75 Asian/Chinese 12 73 Bar & Grill 12 66 Casual Dining 3,12,13,15,16 68 Entertainment Dining 1 75 Asian/Chinese 11 76 Asian/Japanese 6 66 Casual Dining 15 68 Entertainment Dining 8 68 Home Style/Southern 1,3,12 78 Indian 5 73 Bar & Grill 7 60 Upscale Casual 1 77 European/Italian 1 77 European/Irish 2, 7 69 Pizza 12 64 Seafood 15 60 Upscale Casual 3 63 Cafés 1 79 Cajun/Creole 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 12 60 Upscale Casual 10 69 Pizza 16 58 Fine Dining 14 60 Upscale Casual 2 62 Bistro/Contemporary 3 64 Seafood 14 75 Asian/Chinese 2 75 Asian/Chinese 7 73 Bar & Grill 5 68 Cafeterias 4 60 Upscale Casual 11 63 Cafés 1 75 Asian/Chinese 9 71 Sandwich/Deli 3, 5 80 Coffee/Tea House 1, 2, 9, 10 62 Bistro/Contemporary 1 65 Steakhouse 1 73 Bar & Grill 16 71 Sandwich/Deli 5, 6, 8 73 Bar & Grill 15 68 Home Style/Southern 13 80 Coffee/Tea House 15 72 Barbecue 12 71 Sandwich/Deli 1, 2, 3, 6, 14 69 Pizza 12 71 Sandwich/Deli 2 68 Entertainment Dining 14 80 Coffee/Tea House 3, 8 64 Seafood 1 79 Cajun/Creole 6, 14 66 Casual Dining 5 60 Upscale Casual 4 73 Bar & Grill 13 69 Pizza 6 72 Barbecue 3 75 Asian/Chinese 6 71 Sandwich/Deli 2 76 Asian/Japanese 15 66 Casual Dining 8 78 Indian 2 63 Cafés 3 71 Sandwich/Deli 2 72 Barbecue 2 66 Casual Dining 2 75 Asian/Chinese 3 64 Seafood 6, 7, 16 68 Home Style/Southern 1 68 Home Style/Southern 12 76 Asian/Japanese 16 76 Asian/Korean 12 60 Upscale Casual 2 62 Bistro/Contemporary 2 79 Mexican 2 78 European/Spanish 2 77 European/Italian 2 79 Mexican 15 79 Mexican 11 79 Mexican 8 76 Asian/Vietnamese 2 79 Mexican 14, 15 80 Mexican 15 80 Mexican 2 80 Coffee/Tea House 7 68 Cafeterias 14 80 Mexican 11 76 Asian/Korean 12 66 Casual Dining 14 76 Asian/Vietnamese 3, 9 75 Asian/Chinese 8 73 Bar & Grill 16 71 Sandwich/Deli 12 58 Fine Dining 2 58 Fine Dining 5 75 Asian/Chinese 5 69 Pizza 6, 8, 11, 12 75 Asian/Chinese 9 65 Steakhouse 3, 13, 15 80 Mexican 12 65 Steakhouse 6, 8, 15 71 Sandwich/Deli 2, 3 80 Mexican 1, 7, 10 71 Sandwich/Deli 3 69 Pizza 6 69 Pizza 1

56 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Page 56

RESTAURANT

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

Lunch Today 71 Lylia’s Encore 61 Lynn’s Paradise Café 66 Ma Zerellas 69 Macca’s Florida Seafood 64 Maggie’s Grille 66 Mai’s Thai Restaurant 76 Maido Essential Japanese 76 Main Eatery 71 Maker’s Mark Lounge 61 Manhattan Grill 66 Mark’s Feed Store 72 Market Street Fish House 64 Martini Italian Bistro 77 Masterson’s 66 Max & Erma’s 66 Mayan Café 80 McAlister’s Deli 71 The Melting Pot 61 Meridian Café 63 Mexican Fiesta 80 Mexicano 80 Mexico Tipico 80 Michael Murphy’s 73 Mikato Japanese Steakhouse 76 Mike Linnig’s 64 Mimi’s Café 66 Mitchell’s Fish Market 64 Moe’s Southwest Grill 80 Mojito Tapas Restaurant 78 Molly Malone’s 77 The Monkey Wrench 66 Morris Deli & Catering 71 Morton’s of Chicago 65 Mr. Gattis 69 Mr. Lou’s 68 Mr. Z’s Kitchen 63 Mrs. Potter’s Coffee 80 Muley’s Corner 66 Mulligan’s Pub and Grill 66 My Bar 73 My Favorite Muffin 81 My Old KY Dinner Train 68 My Patria 80 Nancy’s Bagel Box 71 Nancy’s Bagel Grounds 71 Napa River Grill 61 New Albanian Brewing Co. 69 New China 75 New Direction Bar & Grill 73 Nile Restaurant & Lounge 79 Nord’s Bakery 81 North End Café 61 NV Tavern 73 O’Charley’s 66 O’Dolly’s 68 O’Shea’s Irish Pub 77 The Oakroom 58 Oasis Japanese Restaurant 76 Oceanside Restaurant 78 Oishii Sushi 76 Old Chicago Pasta & Pizza 69 Old Louisville Coffee House 80 Old Spaghetti Factory 77 Old Stone Inn 61 Ole Hickory Pit BBQ 72 The Olive Garden 77 Olivia’s Restaurant 61 Ollie’s Trolley 71 Omar’s Fast Food 78 On the Border 80 Onion Rest.Tea House 75 Orders Up Café & Deli 71 Oriental Express 75 Oriental House 75 Oriental Star 75 Original Impellizzeri’s 69 Osaka Sushi Bar 76 Otto’s Café 66 Our Best Restaurant 68 Outback Steakhouse 65 P. F. Chang’s China Bistro 61 Pa Pa Murphy’s Pizza 70 Palermo Viejo 78 Panda Chinese 75 Panera Bread Co. 71 Papa Johns Pizza 70 Passtime Fish House 64 Pat’s Steak House 65 The Patron 61 PattiCakes Café 63 Paul’s Fruit Market 71 Penn Station 71 Peppers Bar and Grill 67 Perfetto Pizza 70 Perkfection 80 Pesto’s Italian 77 Pho Binh Minh 76 Piccadilly Cafeteria 68 The Pie Pantry 81 Pig City BBQ 72 Pit Stop Bar-B-Que 72 Pita Delights 78 Pita Hut 78

MAP #

Sandwich/Deli 16 Upscale Casual 1 Casual Dining 2 Pizza 15 Seafood 7 Casual Dining 6 Asian/Thai 16 Asian/Japanese 2 Sandwich/Deli 1 Upscale Casual 1 Casual Dining 1 Barbecue 2, 9, 13, 14 Seafood 14 European/Italian 8 Casual Dining 12 Casual Dining 6, 8 Mexican 1 Sandwich/Deli 5, 6, 7, 9, 11,15 Upscale Casual 6 Cafés 3 Mexican 4, 11 Mexican 11 Mexican 9, 13 Bar & Grill 1 Asian/Japanese 3 Seafood 13 Casual Dining 5 Seafood 8 Southwest/Tex Mex 3,6,8,11,15 European/Spanish 7 European/Irish 2, 3 Casual Dining 2 Sandwich/Deli 1, 2 Steakhouse 1 Pizza 4, 5, 12, 13 Home Style/Southern 13 Cafés 1 Coffee/Tea House 1 Casual Dining 6 Casual Dining 2 Bar & Grill 14 Desserts/Bakery 5 Entertainment Dining 12 Mexican 5 Sandwich/Deli 1 Sandwich/Deli 2 Upscale Casual 7 Pizza 14 Asian/Chinese 9 Bar & Grill 8 Caribbean/Cuban 12 Desserts/Bakery 12 Cafés 2 Bar & Grill 2 Casual Dining 3,6,8,12,13,15 Home Style/Southern 12 European/Irish 2 Fine Dining 1 Asian/Japanese 12 Middle Eastern 4 Asian/Japanese 2 Pizza 6 Coffee/Tea House 12 European/Italian 1 Upscale Casual 9 Barbecue 11 European/Italian 6, 8, 15 Upscale Casual 12 Sandwich/Deli 1 Middle Eastern 12 Southwest/Tex Mex 8 Asian/Chinese 14 Sandwich/Deli 9 Asian/Chinese 9 Asian/Chinese 3 Asian/Chinese 12 Pizza 2, 10 Asian/Japanese 2 Casual Dining 1 Home Style/Southern 11,12,16 Steakhouse 3, 8, 11, 12, 15 Upscale Casual 5 Pizza 3, 8, 9, 11, 13, 15 European/Spanish 2 Asian/Chinese 10 Sandwich/Deli 1, 3, 6, 8, 12, 15 Pizza [30] Seafood 6 Steakhouse 2 Upscale Casual 3 Cafés 2 Sandwich/Deli 3, 4, 7, 9 Sandwich/Deli [16] Casual Dining 1 Pizza 6 Coffee/Tea House 16 European/Italian 1 Asian/Vietnamese 12 Cafeterias 5, 6 Desserts/Bakery 13 Barbecue 9 Barbecue 1 Middle Eastern 1 Middle Eastern 2

RESTAURANT

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

Pizza By The Guy 70 Pizza Hut 70 Pizza King 70 Pizza Place 70 Plehn’s Bakery 81 Ponderosa Steakhouse 65 Porcini 77 Proof On Main 58 Pub Louisville 67 Puccini’s Smiling Teeth 70 Puckers Bar & Grill 73 Puerto Vallarta 80 Qdoba Mexican Grill 80 Quarter Rest Café 80 Queen of Sheba 74 Queue Café 63 Quick Wok 75 Quill’s Coffee Shop 80 Quizno’s Subs 71 Rafferty’s of Louisville 67 Ramsi’s Café 62 Raw Sushi Lounge 76 Ray Parrella’s 78 Ray’s Monkey House 80 Red Hot Roasters 80 Red Pepper Chinese Cuisine 75 Red Robin Gourmet Burgers 67 Red Star Tavern 61 Red Sun Chinese 75 Red’s 71 Renbarger’s Brew Haus 73 Ri Ra Irish Pub 77 Rite Way Bar-B-Cue House 72 Riverbend Winery 61 River City Coffee House 81 River City Winery 62 Rivue 58 Road to Morroco 78 Rocky’s Sub Pub 78 Romano’s Macaroni Grill 78 Roosters 67 Rosticeria Luna 80 Royal Garden 75 Rubbie’s Bar-B-Que 72 Ruben’s Mexican Restaurant 80 Ruby Tuesday 67 The Rudyard Kipling 67 Rumors Raw Oyster Bar 64 Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse 65 Ryan’s Steakhouse 65 Saffron’s 78 Safier Mediterranean Deli 78 Sage Indian Restaurant 78 Saint’s 74 Sake Blue Japanese Bistro 76 Sakura Blue 76 Sala Thai 76 Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina 80 Sam’s Food & Spirits 67 Santa Fe Grill 80 Sapporo Japanese Grill 76 Sari Sari Exotic Filipino Cuisine 75 Savino’s Italian Food 78 Schlotzsky’s Deli 71 Scotty’s Ribs 72 Scuddle’s Seafood 65 Selena’s at Willow Lake Tavern 79 Senor Iguana’s 80 Sesame Chinese 75 Seviche A Latin Restaurant 58 Shack In The Back BBQ 72 Shady Lane Café 71 Shah’s Mongolian Grill 76 Shalimar Indian 78 Shane’s Rib Shack 72 Shanghai Restaurant 75 Sharom’s 65 Shenanigan’s Irish Grille 77 Shiraz Mediterranean Grill 78 Shogun 76 Shoney’s 67 Sichuan Garden 75 Sicilian Pizza & Pasta 70 Simply Thai 76 Sir Dano’s Pizza Parlor 70 Sister Bean’s 81 Sitar Indian Restaurant 78 Skip Jack’s 65 Skyline Chili 67 Slammer’s Sports Bar & Grill 74 Smoketown USA 72 Smokey Bones BBQ 72 Snappy Tomato 70 Sol Aztecas 80 Son Of A Sailor Seaf ood 65 Sonoma Coffee Café 81 Soupy’s 72 Spaghetti Shop 78 Spinelli’s Pizzeria 70 The Sports & Social Club 74 Sportsville Grill & Bar 67 Stan’s Fish Sandwich 65 Star Cruises 68 Starbucks Coffee 81

MAP #

Pizza 5 Pizza [15] Pizza 14, 16 Pizza 4 Desserts/Bakery 3 Steakhouse 7 European/Italian 2 Fine Dining 1 Casual Dining 1 Pizza 3 Bar & Grill 12 Mexican 11, 14, 16 Mexican 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, 15 Coffee/Tea House 6 African 4 Cafés 1 Asian/Chinese 1 Coffee/Tea House 2 Sandwich/Deli [16] Casual Dining 3, 8 Bistro/Contemporary 2 Asian/Japanese 1 European/Italian 2 Coffee/Tea House 2 Coffee/Tea House 2 Asian/Chinese 2 Casual Dining 3, 8 Upscale Casual 1 Asian/Chinese 4 Sandwich/Deli 1 Bar & Grill 2 European/Irish 1 Barbecue 1 Upscale Casual 1 Coffee/Tea House 2 Bistro/Contemporary 14 Fine Dining 1 Middle Eastern 1 European/Italian 16 European/Italian 5 Casual Dining 12 Mexican 12 Asian/Chinese 11, 12, 13 Barbecue 12 Mexican 15 Casual Dining 6, 15 Casual Dining 1 Seafood 9 Steakhouse 3 Steakhouse 11 Middle Eastern 1 Middle Eastern 1 Indian 3 Bar & Grill 3 Asian/Japanese 11 Asian/Japanese 3 Asian/Thai 1 Southwest/Tex Mex 3 Casual Dining 14 Mexican 12 Asian/Japanese 2 Asian/Filipino 2 European/Italian 13 Sandwich/Deli 8, 9 Barbecue 9 Seafood 14 Cajun/Creole 5 Mexican 12, 15 Asian/Chinese 5 Fine Dining 2 Barbecue 12 Sandwich/Deli 7 Asian/Chinese 6, 12 Indian 6 Barbecue 7 Asian/Chinese 1 Seafood 11 European/Irish 2, 7 Middle Eastern 2, 5, 7, 9 Asian/Japanese 6, 8 Casual Dining 2, 12 Asian/Chinese 6 Pizza 1 Asian/Thai 3 Pizza 15 Coffee/Tea House 12 Indian 2 Seafood 15 Casual Dining 2, 3, 6, 13 Bar & Grill 13 Barbecue 1 Barbecue 6 Pizza 8, 10 Mexican 2 Seafood 7 Coffee/Tea House 2 Sandwich/Deli 4 European/Italian 11, 14 Pizza 2 Bar & Grill 1 Casual Dining 12 Seafood 3 Entertainment Dining 16 Coffee/Tea House [35]


54-57_Index_fall09.qxp

RESTAURANT

7/31/09

11:38 AM

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

Page 57

MAP #

Starving Artist Café 72 Sandwich/Deli 5 Steak N Shake 67 Casual Dining 4,6,8,12,13,15 Steinert’s 74 Bar & Grill 14 Stevens & Stevens 72 Sandwich/Deli 2 Steve-O’s Italian Kitchen 78 European/Italian 7 Stoney River 65 Steakhouse 8 Stop Lite Café 63 Cafés 1 Studio’s Grille & Pub 74 Bar & Grill 14 Stumler Rest. & Orchard 68 Entertainment Dining 14 Sub Station II 72 Sandwich/Deli 12 Sully’s Saloon 74 Bar & Grill 1 Sunergos Coffee & Roastery 81 Coffee/Tea House 12 Sweet ‘N’ Savory Café 63 Cafés 2 Sweet Surrender 63 Cafés 2 The Sweet Tooth 81 Desserts/Bakery 3 Taco Bueno 80 Mexican 6, 16 Taco Tico 80 Mexican 13 Tacqueria La Mexicana 80 Mexican 12 TanThai Restaurant 76 Asian/Thai 14 Tea Station Chinese Bistro 75 Asian/Chinese 8 Tengo sed Cantina 74 Bar & Grill 1 Texas Roadhouse 65 Steakhouse 2, 12, 13, 15 TGI Friday’s 67 Casual Dining 1, 6 Thai Café 76 Asian/Thai 7 Thai Orchids 76 Asian/Thai 6 Thai Siam 76 Asian/Thai 4 Thai Smile 5 76 Asian/Thai 12 Thai Taste 76 Asian/Thai 2 The Back Door 74 Bar & Grill 2 The Bodega 72 Sandwich/Deli 1 The Café 63 Cafés 1 The Cheddar Box 64 Cafés 3 The Lunch Pail 64 Cafés 12 Theater Square Marketplace 72 Sandwich/Deli 1 Third Avenue Café 64 Cafés 1 Thornberry’s Deli & Pies 72 Sandwich/Deli 12 Tiffany Cellar Café 64 Cafés 9 Toast On Market 67 Casual Dining 1, 14 Tokyo Japanese 76 Asian/Japanese 7 Tommy Lancaster’s Rest. 67 Casual Dining 14 Toni’s More Than Pizza 70 Pizza 12 Tony Boombozz 70 Pizza 3, 8 Tony Impellizzeri’s Italian 70 Pizza 5 Tony Roma’s 72 Barbecue 5 Trailside Café 81 Coffee/Tea House 7 Trellis Restaurant 67 Casual Dining 1 Tubby’s Pizza 70 Pizza 7 Tucker’s 67 Casual Dining 14 Tumbleweed 80 Southwest/Tex Mex 1,2,4, 6,8,12,13,14,15,16 Turkey Joe’s 74 Bar & Grill 8 Tuscany Italian Restaurant 78 European/Italian 12 Twig & Leaf Restaurant 67 Casual Dining 2 Uptown Café 61 Upscale Casual 7 Varanese 62 Upscale Casual 2 Varsity Pizza & Pints 70 Pizza 8 Vic’s Café 74 Bar & Grill 14 Vietnam Kitchen 76 Asian/Vietnamese 12 The Villa Buffet 67 Casual Dining 14 Vince Staten’s BBQ 72 Barbecue 10 Vincenzo’s 59 Fine Dining 1 Volare 78 European/Italian 2 VT’s Bubble Cup 81 Coffee/Tea House 2 W.W. Cousin’s 72 Sandwich/Deli 3 Wagner’s Pharmacy 68 Home Style/Southern 12 Wall Street Deli 72 Sandwich/Deli 1 Wathen’s Kentucky Bistro 62 Bistro/Contemporary 3 Webb’s Market 68 Home Style/Southern 1 Westport General Store 67 Casual Dining 7 Wet Willie’s 65 Seafood 1 The White Oak 62 Upscale Casual 1 Whitney’s Diner 64 Cafés 4 Wick’s Pizza 70 Pizza 2, 8, 9, 13, 14 Wild Eggs 64 Cafés 3, 7 Wiltshire On Market 62 Upscale Casual 1 Windsor Restaurant & Garden 62 Upscale Casual 14 Windy City Pizzeria 70 Pizza 12 The Wing Zone 67 Casual Dining 12 Wings To Go 70 Pizza 14 Winston’s 59 Fine Dining 4 Wishbone Grill 72 Barbecue 15 Wok Express 75 Asian/Chinese 1 Wolfgang Puck Express 64 Cafés 1 Wonton Express 75 Asian/Chinese 4 Xavier’s 67 Casual Dining 1 Yaching’s East West Cuisine 62 Upscale Casual 1 Yafa Café 64 Cafés 1 Yang Kee Noodle 75 Asian/Chinese 5 Yellow Cactus 80 Mexican 14 Yen Ching 75 Asian/Chinese 6 You-Carryout-A 75 Asian/Chinese 15, 16 Yummy Chinese 75 Asian/Chinese 12 Za’s Pizza 70 Pizza 2 Zanzabar 74 Bar & Grill 1 Zaytun Mediterranean Grill 78 Middle Eastern 2 ZaZoo’s 74 Bar & Grill 3 Zen Garden 77 Asian/Vietnamese 2 Zen Tea House 81 Coffee/Tea House 2 Zeppelin Café 64 Cafés 12 Z’s Fusion 59 Fine Dining 1 Z’s Oyster Bar 59 Fine Dining 5

Rewards Card

Reward Your Good Taste Sign up for your FREE Louisville Originals Rewards Card. Every time you dine at any Louisville Originals restaurant, show your card and receive one point for every dollar spent. When you reach 150 points, your card will be credited for $10. Your $10 reward can be used on your next Louisville Original visit or can be stored on the card while you accumulate more points.

Globally Flavored, Locally Savored Visit

www.louisvilleoriginals.com for details. www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 57


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:41 AM

GUIDE KEY Average Entrée Price:

$$ = under $8 $$$$ = $15–$20 $$ = $9–$14 $$$$ = $21 & up

RED = ADVERTISER

p = FULL BAR

h = LATE NIGHT

OPEN PAST 10 P.M.

✿ = VEGETARIAN f = OUTDOOR MENU ITEMS DINING AVAILABLE LIVE e = MUSIC  = MENU ON-LINE ONLY ALL RESTAURANTS ARE LOCATED IN LOUISVILLE (unless noted otherwise). All phone numbers are local calls. When out of the area, use area code 502 for all listings except Indiana, use 812.

211 CLOVER LANE RESTAURANT 211 Clover Ln., 896-9570. Owner and manager Andr ew Smith has added a 1300 bottle wine cellar and private dining room to burnish the upscale atmospher e and creative cuisine from long time Chef Troy Schuster. This stylish spot in St. Matthews continues to rank among the city’s top tables. $$$$ p f ✿ 610 MAGNOLIA 610 Magnolia Ave., 636-0783. Chef Edward Lee’s creative international prix fixe menu has kept this elegantly comfortable Old Louisville restaurant a top table for more than 25 years. His monthly family style pasta and bistro dinners across the street in the Wine Studio give diners a way to appr eciate his skills at a lower price point. $$$$ p f ✿

58 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Page 58

BUCK’S 425 W. Ormsby A ve., 637-5284. Elegant but not overstated, this fine dining r oom in the Mayflower Apar tments has been quietly ser ving high-style lunches and dinners for over two decades. Former namesake and house manager Buck Heath recently retired, but the high quality of food and ser vice remains. $$$ p f e ✿ CAFÉ METRO 1700 Bardstown Rd., 458-4830. Chef Gary Byler has gradually put his mark on this anchor of Bar dstown Road’ s “r estaurant r ow,” preserving favorite dishes and adapting to a new generation of upscale diners. $$$$ p e ✿ CORBETT’S ‘AN AMERICAN PLACE’ 5050 Nor ton Healthcare Blvd., 327-5058. Dean Corbett, longtime fixture on the Louisville dining scene, went all-out with his East End destination. Housed in the stunning former Von Allmen mansion, Corbett’s kitchen is state of the art, the dining room amenities include a chef ’s table with closed cir cuit TV connection to the kitchen, and his menu has been earning raves. Worth the trip and the price. $$$$ p f ENGLISH GRILL 335 W . Br oadway (The Br own Hotel), 583-1234. This landmark, formal dining room is firing on all cylinders under Chef Laur ent Geroli, who brings an international sophistication to the menu, and a wider exploration of cuisines with occasional special wine dinners. W e recommend booking the chef ’s table for an especially memorable evening. $$$ p ✿ JACK BINION’S STEAKHOUSE Horseshoe Casino Hotel, Elizabeth, IN, 888-766-2648. Housed in the Horseshoe Casino, Jack Binion’ s, a stylish, upscale place, is no gamble for hear ty dining. A traditional steakhouse, but one that aims high: top quality meat, impeccable service, a high-roller’s ambience. $$$$ p h LILLY’S 1147 Bar dstown Rd., 451-0447. A Louisville institution appr oaching its quar ter-century mark, Lilly’s, under much heralded owner-chef Kathy Cary, continues to be as fresh as the locally-sourced foods

RED = ADVERTISER

she features on her Kentucky-accented menus. Her frequent special wine dinners ar e among the mor e affordable and creative in the area. $$$$ p e ✿ LIMESTONE 10001 For est Gr een Blvd., 426-7477. Chef Jim Ger hardt and former par tner Michael Cunha have established a stylish and elegant dining experience in the East End. Cunha’s friendly departure to train the next generation of chefs at Sullivan leaves the kitchen in Ger hardt’s capable hands. $$$$ p ✿ THE OAKROOM 500 S. Fourth St. (Seelbach Hotel), 585-3200. After six years operating his own East End r estaurant, Jim Ger hardt has r eturned as executive chef to the Oakr oom which, during his prior eight-year run, he helped attain a AAA four diamond designation. He intends to keep his rating by melding local pr oduce and specialty items like spoonfish caviar with classic continental cuisine. $$$$ p ✿ PROOF ON MAIN 702 W. Main St., 217-6360. Diners are as stimulated by the often star tling contemporary ar t on the walls of this stylish spot in the posh, nationally noticed 21C Museum Hotel as they are by Chef Michael Paley’s edgy menu, which includes house-cur ed pastrami, bison shor t ribs and sea-salt caramel gelato. A hot tip: the restrooms won a national award for excellence. $$$ p ✿ RIVUE 140 N. Four th St., (Galt House Hotel) 5684239. You can still get a r evolving view of the city in this upscale dining room. But a major makeover in 2007 has completely transformed the dark old Flagship Room into a sleek black and white modern fantasy right out of an old Fr ed Astair e movie. $$$ p h ✿ SEVICHE A LATIN RESTAURANT 1538 Bardstown Rd., 473-8560. Featur ed on the menu is s eviche, the Latino seafood dish “cooked” in tar t citrus juices, but Chef Anthony Lamas’ menu of fers a broad, eclectic range of Latin American dishes.

p = FULL BAR

f = OUTDOOR DINING

e = LIVE MUSIC


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:41 AM

Nationally noted in many food magazines, Lamas has exposed diners to the cooking traditions of the Americas with his always inter esting Gusto Latino wine dinners, another fine value in the dining scene. $$$$ p f h ✿ VINCENZO’S 150 S. Fifth St., 580-1350. Known for its suave pr ofessional ser vice, high-end Nor thern Italian fare and many trademark dishes finished at tableside, Vincenzo’s continues to hold its own against growing downtown competition. $$$$ p e h ✿ WINSTON’S REST AURANT 3101 Bar dstown Rd., (Sullivan University Campus), 456-0980. Higher education meets higher cuisine at this elegant oncampus r estaurant staf fed by Sullivan culinary ar ts students. But this is no college lab; it’s an attractive and stylish r estaurant. Chef John Castr o runs the staf f through its paces guaranteeing that while students are learning their craft, your dinner will ace the test. Open Fri. - Sun. only. Reservations suggested. $$$$ p ✿ Z’S FUSION 115 S. Fourth St., 855-8000. Consummate restaurateur Mehr zad Sharbaiani (Z’ s Oyster Bar and Steakhouse) spent $2 million to r emake this 10,500 square foot space into a cool, sophisticated oasis. Chef Dallas McGarity’ s ingenious and delicious take on fusion cooking and the excellent service make this an exceptional dining experience at surprisingly reasonable prices. $$$$ p ✿

Page 59

dining room with a lar ge, friendly bar with an imposing list of mar tinis and mar tini-style cocktails. Chef Mark Heil offers an appealing, fairly priced eclectic international menu. $$ p f e ✿

732 SOCIAL 732 E. Market St., 583-6882. Since chef-owner Jayson Lewellyn opened the doors of his sleek, intimate spot in the midst of the NuLu art district, cr owds have flowed in, both for the innovative small plates, always-changing menu, and the creative bartenders who practice the ar t of pre-Prohibition cocktail crafting. Dishes ar e designed to be shar ed, so be sur e to bring a convivial and hungry group. $$$ p f ✿ ASIATIQUE 1767 Bar dstown Rd., 451-2749. Fifteen years ago Chef Peng Looi intr oduced Louisville diners to pan-Asian Pacific Rim fusion cuisine. In his sophisticated, multi-level, Bardstown Road restaurant he continues to offer clean, simple, elegant dishes that pr esent often startling flavor combinations. His wok-seared salmon has long been a local favorite. $$$ p f h ✿ AUSTIN’S 4950 U.S. 42, 423-1990. Big, crowded and bistro-style, with heavy emphasis on the bar , this suburban watering hole taps the same vein as the national franchise booze ’n’ beef genre, and does so well, offering satisfying dining at a fair price. $$ p ✿

Z’S OYSTER BAR & STEAKHOUSE101 Whittington Pkwy., 429-8000. This exciting spot brings a level of fine dining to the suburbs that makes it stand out in the chain-rich envir ons outside the Watterson. Splendid steaks, extraordinary seafood, fine service and clubby ambience give Z’s the tools to dominate in the steakhouse competition. $$$$ p

AVALON 1314 Bardstown Rd., 454-5336. W ith renovation complete, and new chef Laur ence Agnew redirecting the kitchen, this stylish spot on Bardstown Road is in the pr ocess of r einventing itself, moving towar d a lounge dining concept, with new fixtures, sofas replacing some tables, and a lower price point. $$$ p f ✿

60 WEST BISTRO & MARTINI BAR 3939 Shelbyville Rd., 719-9717. 60 W est combines a comfortable

BASA MODERN VIETNAMESE 2244 Frankfort Ave., 896-1016. Chef Michael Ton brought a new style of Asian fusion cuisine to Louisville, playing entertaining rif fs of f V ietnamese cooking, with daring choices like caramelized catfish claypot and

tamarind-sriracha gelato. Housed in an unpr etentious Clifton shotgun house, the interior is crisp and sophisticated. $$$ p BLACKSTONE GRILLE 9521 U.S. 42, Pr ospect, KY, 228-6962. Rick Dissell, formerly of the eponymous Rick’s Ferrari Grille in Chenoweth Squar e, moved east last year to this new restaurant in the Prospect Center. The menu of fers no surprises to Rick’ s fans: sandwiches and the expected array of bistr o entrées — pasta, seafood, beef and chicken, including Rick’ s fried chicken livers and “light” fried chicken. $$$ p f ✿ BLU ITALIAN MEDITERRANEAN GRILLE 280 W. Jefferson St. (Louisville Marriott), 627-5045. BLU offers upscale Italian Mediterranean cuisine in striking surr oundings highlighted by Mexican limestone and Italian marble. For those seeking a relaxing libation and a quicker snack, the Bar at BLU offers a more casual alternative. $$$ p ✿ BRAVO! 206 Bullitt Ln. (Oxmoor Center), 326-0491. Management describes the Ohio-based Bravo! chain as “a fun, white-tablecloth casual eatery … positioned between the fine-dining and casual chains.” A Roman-ruin setting houses abundant Italian-American style fare. We particularly enjoyed appetizers and first-rate grilled meats. $$ p f ✿ BRISTOL BAR & GRILLE 1321 Bardstown Rd., 4561702, 300 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 426-0627, 614 W. Main St., 582-1995, 6051 T imber Ridge Dr ., 292-2585, 2035 S. Thir d St., 634-2723, 700 W . Riverside Dr., Jeffersonville, IN, 218-1995. A cornerstone of Louisville’s r estaurant Renaissance, T he Bristol started three decades ago on Bardstown Road. Now with six venues ar ound town, diners can always find dependable pub grub, eclectic entrées, and ever green standards like the gr een-chile won tons and the Bristol Bur ger. F&D columnist Scott Harper has crafted an exceptional wine selection. $$ p f ✿

WE ARE 732 SOCIAL!

A NEW RESTAURANT FEATURING FARM-TO-TABLE FOODS, ORGANIC WINES & PRE-PROHIBITION COCKTAILS WITH AN EVOLVING MENU OF FRENCHINSPIRED COMFORT FOOD AND A STAFF DEDICATED TO THE DETAILS. WE ARE LOCATED AT THE BASE OF THE GREEN BUILDING IN THE EAST MARKET DISTRICT. IT IS NICE TO MEET YOU.

732 EAST MARKET STREET LOUISVILLE, KY 40202 502.583.6882 732SOCIAL.COM

h = LATE NIGHT

✿ = VEGETARIAN MENU ITEMS

 = MENU AVAILABLE ON-LINE ONLY

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 59


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:41 AM

Page 60

CAVIAR JAPANESE RESTAURANT 416 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., 625-3090. Sammy Sa, the genial host of the Fuji r estaurants in the East End, adds a downtown pr esence with this stylish Japanese eatery next door to the Seelbach Hotel. Eat at the sushi bar, choose a comfortable table or reserve the traditional Japanese-style T atami Room for your group. $$$ p h ✿ THE CHEESECAKE FACTORY 5000 Shelbyville Rd., 897-3933. “Cheesecake” is its name, and this glitzy shopping-mall eatery of fers a wide variety of rich, calorific choices to eat in or take out. It’s more than just cheesecake, though, with a wide-ranging menu of California, Southwestern and Pacific Rim far e plus full bar service. $$ p h ✿ CLUB GROTTO 2116 Bardstown Rd., 459-5275. This homey, comfortable and stylish Highlands mainstay has been ser ving up gr eat seafood and other far e since 1993. The r estaurant has won 10 straight Wine Spectator awards of excellence. $$$ p ✿ COACH LAMP REST AURANT 751 V ine St., 5839165. Hurricane Katrina blew chef Richar d Lowe into town, bringing fr om New Orleans his Cajun/ Creole/Caribbean magic to Coach Lamp’ s kitchen. The restored 137-year-old building has a classic bar on one side and an upscale white-tablecloth dining room on the other side. $$$ f ✿ CORNER CAFÉ 9307 New Lagrange Rd., 426-8119. There’s nothing fancy or overly elegant about this suburban neighborhood old favorite, but the term “eclectic” fits it well. $$ p ✿ EQUUS 122 Sears A ve., 897-9721. W ith the newish Corbett’s in the East End hitting on all cylinders, veteran Chef Dean Corbett has r eturned to his flagship St. Matthews r estaurant, r edesigning the room for a more casual atmosphere, and refocusing the menu on comfor t foods, with no entrée over $19. Though the prices ar e lower, we don’t expect the quality of fare to follow suit. $$$ p ✿ INTERMEZZO CAFÉ & CABARET 316 W. Main St., 584-1265. The elegant r estaurant space in Actor’ s Theatre of Louisville’s historic building features casual American bistro fare in an attractive dining room, plus nightly entertainment in a cabaret style. $$$ p e ✿ J. ALEXANDER’S RESTAURANT 102 Oxmoor Court, 339-2206. This comfor tably upscale venue, a Nashville-based chain, featur es “contemporar y American” fare with a broad menu that ranges from burgers and sandwiches to such upscale eats as grilled tuna or a New York strip steak. $$$ p f ✿ J. HARROD’S 7507 Upper River Rd., 228-4555. J. Harrod’s is discr eetly tasteful and pleasantly comfortable. The food is competitive in both quality and value. It’s an appealing, upscale blend of bistro fare and old-fashioned country cooking. $$$ p ✿ JACK FR Y’S 1007 Bar dstown Rd., 452-9244. Good times or bad, weeknights or weekends, this Louisville institution — the r emnant of a 1930s saloon — is always cr owded and buzzing. Stephanie Meeks has taken over from long-time owner Susan Seiler, but the upscale bistr o far e, like shrimp and grits and spicy fried oysters, is as good as ever. $$$$ p e h ✿ JARFI’S AT GLENMARY 10200 Glenmary Farm Dr., 239-3500. Longtime r estaurateur Jef f Jar fi is skillfully directing the dining room at Fern Creek’s Glenmary Countr y Club, ser ving lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch to members and public alike. $$$ p f ✿ JOHN E’S 3708 Bardstown Rd., 456-1111. Owner John Shanchuck caters to the horseracing cr owd. Thir ty years of framed Derby pr ograms and winning tickets line the walls. But you don’ t have to place a bet to enjoy this rambling Buechel r estaurant. The Porterhouse steak tastes good in the Bob Baffert Room whether or not your horse came in. $$$$ p e ✿ KT’S 2300 Lexington Rd., 458-8888. It’s hard to argue with success, and KT’s has earned its popularity by 60 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

RED = ADVERTISER

p = FULL BAR

f = OUTDOOR DINING

e = LIVE MUSIC


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:41 AM

Page 61

providing good American-style bar and bistro chow for a price that’s fair. $$ p f h ✿ LYLIA’S ENCORE 501 W. Main St., 245-7734. After two fine-dining shows (Kentucky Cove and Jar fi’s Bistro) went dark, management has decided to provide food ser vice at a lower pr ofile: L ylia’s Encore, operated by popular local Ladyfinger’ s Catering, is a buf fet-style eatery, open only befor e shows in the Center. $$$ p MAKER’S MARK BOURBON HOUSE & LOUNGE 446 S. Four th St., (Four th Street Live) 568-9009. Kentucky’s Maker’s Mark Distiller y lends its name and its signatur e r ed-wax image to this stylish restaurant and lounge in the booming downtown entertainment complex. A magisterial bar featur es more than 60 Bourbons, and the menu of fers traditional Kentucky fare. $$$ p f h ✿ MELTING POT 2045 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 491-3125. This Florida-based chain brings back pleasant memories of fondue par ties of the ’70s. If you can melt it and dip things in it, the Melting Pot probably has it on the menu. $$$ p ✿ NAPA RIVER GRILL 1211 Herr Ln., 893-0141. Innovative wine-country cuisine, excellent ser vice and fine California-focused wine collection can be found in the stylish new quar ters of this popular , decade-old East End r estaurant. With an expanded menu ser ving both lunch and dinner , it’ s now anchoring W estport V illage center , a tr endy new hangout. $$$ p f h ✿ NORTH END CAFÉ 1722 Frankfort Ave., 896-8770. Known for their hear ty and inter esting br eakfast choices, The Nor th End also satisfies diners at lunch and dinner. With an eclectic menu of diverse tapas and inter esting entrées, it’ s an appealing, affordable place to dine $$$ f h ✿ OLD STONE INN 6905 Shelbyville Rd., Simpsonville, KY, (502) 722-8200. For many years diners have happily driven out to Simpsonville to enjoy both the historic building and the traditional Kentucky menu of this dining institution. Those in the know or der the fried chicken and country ham. $$$ p f e ✿ OLIVIA’S ON GOSS 946 Goss A ve., 409-6160. This huge, redbrick 19th century factory location houses the Goss A venue Antique Mall and this stylish luncheon spot. Open 7 days a week, Chef T ravis Hall (formerly of Eva Mae’s) offers soups, salads and daily specials. $ f ✿ P.F. CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO 9120 Shelbyville Rd., 327-7707. This Arizona-based, Chinese themed restaurant offers a loud, happy scene with Chinesestyle dishes. T o its cr edit, ever ything is pr epared well and service is consistently fine. $$ p h ✿ THE PATRON 3400 Frankfort Ave., 896-1661. Chefowner Amber McCool can be found haunting the farmers markets for supplies ever y week. With her bounty she produces an inventive menu using the produce (often or ganic) of local pur veyors in this small but inviting former gas station. $$$$ p ✿ RED ST AR T AVERN 450 S. Four th St., 568-5656. Billed as “a hip, contemporary version of the classic American tavern,” this chain operation in Four th Street Live features steaks, chops and seafood in an atmosphere that’s upscale and clubby, with an extensive bar as a key part of the action. $$$ p f h RIVERBEND WINERY 120 S. T enth St., 540-5650. Watch the winemakers in action, crafting 20 varieties of wine fr om Kentucky-grown grapes, as you enjoy lunch or dinner in this upscale casual eatery just west of downtown. Weekly chefs dinners with wine pairings at reasonable prices. $$ p e ✿ UPTOWN CAFÉ 1624 Bar dstown Rd., 458-4212. Across the str eet and a step downscale fr om its partner, Café Metr o, the Uptown Café of fers excellent far e with a bistr o feel for quite a few bucks less. $$ p f ✿

h = LATE NIGHT

✿ = VEGETARIAN MENU ITEMS

 = MENU AVAILABLE ON-LINE ONLY

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 61


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:41 AM

Page 62

VARANESE 2106 Frankfor t A ve., 899-9904. Chef John Varanese has made even old-timers forget that this stylish venue was once a gas station. W ith a slate interior water fall and a fr ont wall that folds open in good weather , the dining r oom is as interesting as the lively , international seasonal menu. Live jazz, contemporary ar t and urban style complete the mood. $$$ p f e ✿ VOLARE 2300 Frankfort Ave., 894-4446. (See review under European/Italian) THE WHITE OAK 620 E. Market St., 583-4177. Talented chefs Allen Heintzman and Charlie Melton offer a fresh take on Southern comfort food using classical techniques and local suppliers. Eighty-five percent of the meats and produce come from the state of Kentucky . Look for dishes such as Southern-style fried chicken, cornmeal-dusted fried catfish and chicken-fried bison steak on the ever changing menu. $$ p f e h ✿ WILTSHIRE ON MARKET 636 E. Market St., 5895224. Understated elegance and cr eative dishes characterize this new r estaurant fr om Susan Hershberg, who set the benchmark for fine catering in Louisville with W iltshire Pantr y. Chef Cor y Ming’s finely crafted small plates change weekly to showcase the best seasonal ingr edients available and no dish is over $15. Open Thur . - Sat. only . Reservations suggested. $$ f ✿

Many spaces never hit the headlines, we can help find that hidden gem. Cafe Kilimanjaro 649 S S.OForth L D St. Louisville, KY 40202 $950,000 Upscale Restaurant 2116 Bardstown Rd. Louisville, KY 40205 REDUCED! $221,500

Successful Cafe (Retiring after 20 years) 1574 Bardstown Rd. Louisville, KY 40205 $60,000 Appleby’s Cafe Building 201-207 Spring St. Jeffersonville, IN 47130 $550,000

WINDSOR RESTAURANT & GARDEN 148 E. Market St., New Albany, IN, 944-9688. With New Albany on the rise, new chef Cor y Cuff is making his mark on this upscale casual restaurant, housed in an historic hotel building. When weather permits, diners can enjoy the charming courtyard. $$$ p f e ✿ YACHING’S EAST WEST CUISINE 105 S. Fourth St., 585-4005. Yaching’s promises “an eclectic menu of contemporary Asian fusion cuisine.” It’s an attractive mix of East and W est, sufficient to give just about everyone something to enjoy , r egardless of which compass point attracts your taste buds. $$$ p ✿

ATRIUM CAFÉ 9940 Corporate Campus Dr. (Embassy Suites), 426-9191. An eclectic bistro atmosphere in the hear t of the hotel. Specials run fr om their popular crab cakes and array of pasta dishes to a Reuben sandwich or fruit pie. $$ p ✿

O RDER FROM HOUSTON’S

BAXTER STATION BAR & GRILL1201 Payne St., 5841635. The corner bar with the railr oad theme is also an ambitious r estaurant, known for surprises like Cajun linguini with andouille sausage, homemade desserts (from pastry chef Amy Berry) and lunchtime “steam table” plates. T ake par ticular note of an impressive beer list to go with your meal. $$ p f ✿ BISTRO 301 301 W. Market St., 584-8337. Quality contemporary American cuisine in a stylish environment makes Bistro 301 a reasonable alternative when you’r e looking for upscale-casual dining downtown. $$$ p f ✿ BISTRO LE RELAIS 2817 Taylorsville Rd. (Bowman Field), 451-9020. This ar t deco spot makes stylish use of an historic 1920’ s airport building to pr esent elegant modern French cuisine. After a long run as a fine dining establishment, owner Anthony Dike has recently reinvented his restaurant as a bistro, sparked by the arrival of new chef Bill Lynch. $$$$ p f e ✿ BOURBONS BISTRO 2255 Frankfort Ave., 894-8838. It’s a comfortably upscale-casual r estaurant, featuring the works of Fr ench-trained chef Michael Cr ouch. No, it’ s a gr eat bar, with what must be the world’ s most compr ehensive Bourbon list. Actually, this Cr escent Hill favorite is both, and the bill of far e is well-matched with the excellence of its libations. Don’ t miss the duck confit strudel appetizer. $$$ p f ✿ BRIX WINE BAR 12418 La Grange Rd., 243-1120. The use of an exceptionally obscure wine term (it’s

62 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

RED = ADVERTISER

pronounced “bricks” and refers to the sugar content of ripe grapes at harvest) hints that the proprietors of this wine bar know their vino. Interesting wines and a shor t bistr o-style menu make it a welcome suburban alternative. $$ h e BROWNING’S BREWER Y 401 E. Main St., 5150174. After a brief closing, Br owning’s reopened in April under the dir ection of original chef Anoosh Shariat. Although billed as “tavern far e,” what comes out of the kitchen is unlike any mere “tavern fare” that we’ve had. Also r eturning is br ewmaster Brian Reymiller , back crafting a lovely range of beers and ales. $$ p f ✿ CAFÉ LOU LOU 106 Sears A ve, 893-7776, 2216 Dundee Rd., 459-9566. This popular spot wins critical raves and packs in cr owds. Owner -Chef Clay Wallace is comfor table with his international bill of fare and laissez les bon temps r ouler mood. A second location in the Douglass Loop, is drawing equally-pleased crowds. $$ p ✿ DITTO’S GRILL 1114 Bar dstown Rd., 581-9129. This informally whimsical Highlands space masks the work of classically trained owner -chefs Dominic Serratore and Frank Yang. Sure, take note of the fanciful artwork adorning the exposed brick walls and the gar goyles in the ceiling. But don’ t overlook Serrator e’s “gourmet casual” menu of New England crab cakes, fanciful salads and Sunday brunch egg dishes. $$ p h ✿ HARD ROCK CAFÉ Fourth Str eet Live, 568-2202. Louisville’s Fourth Street Live echoes with a bang amid hammering guitars and happy thr ongs at the local branch of this popular shrine to r ock. The music scene is the draw , but you’ll have no complaints about Har d Rock’ s standar d American cuisine. $$ p f e h ✿ JACK’S LOUNGE 122 Sears A ve., 897-9026. A sophisticated, elegant bar associated with the Equus restaurant next door, Jack’s offers a short but excellent menu featuring appetizers and light bites, along with a drinks list beyond reproach. $ p h ✿ JAZZYBLU 815 W. Market St., 992-3243. The basement space at Glassworks that formerly housed The Jazz Factor y is bopping again with r egularly scheduled live jazz per formances Thurs. - Sun. nights, and southern comfor t food style lunch buffets Tues. - Fri. $ p e h ✿ L&N WINE BAR AND BISTRO 1765 Mellwood Ave., 897-0070. If you’r e enthusiastic about good wine, you’re going to be excited about L&N. The fruit of the vine takes center stage in a vast, fairly priced wine list and imposing Cruvinet dispenser , with over 80 wines available by the glass. Comfor table exposed-brick atmosphere and excellent bistro fare with a creative twist from Chef Rick Adams add to the draw. $$ p f h ✿ RAMSI’S CAFÉ ON THE WORLD 1293 Bardstown Rd., 451-0700. The beating bohemian hear t of the Highlands. Ramsi Kamar brings a wonderfully eclectic spirit to the envir onment and to his menu. Cuban. Jamaican. Greek. Middle Eastern. Moderate prices and late night hours add to the draw. $$ f e h ✿ RIVER CITY WINERY 321 Pearl St., New Albany, IN, 945-9463. The newest ar ea winery, open since late spring. Several of owner Melissa Humphrey’s wines medaled in the June 2009 Indy International W ine Competition, and since summer has been of fering a well-crafted appetizer style menu to pair with the wines. Don’t miss the crab cakes with black-eyed pea salsa. $$ e ✿ WATHEN’S KENTUCKY BISTRO 3930 Chenoweth Sq., 893-0106. The owners of the former Limestone Bay Y acht Club on River Road have moved into the Chenoweth Squar e space once occupied by Rick’s Ferrari Grill, ser ving Kentucky and southern cuisine, ribeye steak and filet, and pastas. The house bourbon is namesake W athens, but imbibers can choose fr om many small batch bottlings. $$ p f h

p = FULL BAR

f = OUTDOOR DINING

e = LIVE MUSIC


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:41 AM

ADRIANN’S AROUND THE T ABLE CUISINE 14041 Shelbyville Rd, 244-9695. Located out beyond the Snyder in the far East End, Adriann’ s offers family style diner far e ranging fr om sandwiches and wraps to fried chicken $ ✿ ALLEY CAT CAFÉ 11804 Shelbyville Rd., 245-6544. $ ✿ AROMA CAFÉ Horseshoe Casino Hotel, Elizabeth, IN, 888-766-2648. Grab a bite before hitting the casino. Sandwiches, salads, sides, cold beverages and cof fee will fuel you for a night of enter tainment. $ h ✿ BLUE DOG BAKER Y AND CAFÉ 2868 Frankfort Ave., 899-9800. This bakery with its $50,000 Spanish wood-fired oven makes ar tisanal bread as good as you’ll find in the U.S., and competitive withthe best in Eur ope. Its comfor table, upscale café of fers a short selection of tasty dishes made to show off the fine breads. $$ p f ✿ BLUE MOUNTAIN COFFEEHOUSE & WINE BAR 400 E. Main St., 582-3220. Host Nicholas Arno adds a Jamaican accent, and Jamaican Blue Mountain cof fee is the specialty , at this sleek and sophisticated spot across Main from Slugger Field. A coffee house by day, it adds a wine-bar vibe in the evenings. $ f h ✿ BULLDOG CAFÉ 10619 W. Manslick Rd., 380-0600. $fh✿ BUTTERFLY GARDEN CAFÉ 1327 Bar dstown Rd., 456-4500, 4600 Shelbyville Rd., 895-1474. This tasteful little spot that offers teas and lighter lunch fare in an attractive old-house setting on Bardstown Road has opened a second ladies’ lunch spot inside Dolfinger’s in St Matthews. $ f ✿ CAFÉ FRAICHE 3642 Br ownsboro Rd., 894-8929. Cuisine from around the world is featur ed at this East End neighbor hood café, featuring homemade soups, br eads and a variety of entrées on a seasonally changing menu. $ ✿

Page 63

Hoosiers and travelers who take exit 7 off I-65. Full breakfasts, omelets, and br eakfast sandwiches. A full range of standar d lunch sandwiches, with Reubens, Philly steak and cheese, and daily specials. Homemade soups and salads, too. $ f ✿ CYCLERS CAFÉ 2295 Lexington Rd., 451-5152. Is it a bicycle shop or a r estaurant? Well, it’s both. This informal spot will sell you a first-rate sandwich, soup or salad or a tire for your bike — or the whole darn bike! $ f ✿ DERBY CAFÉ 704 Central A ve. (Kentucky Derby Museum), 634-0858. Lunch ser ved year-round in the dining area adjacent to the Derby Museum with such r egional favorites as meaty Bur goo, and the Hot Brown. $ f ✿ DOWNTOWN DINER & COFFEEHOUSE 506 W. Main St., New Albany, IN, 725-8680. $ ERMIN’S BAKER Y & CAFÉ 1201 S. First St., 6356960, 723 S. Four th St., 587-9390, 455 S. Four th Ave., 585-5120, 9550 U.S. Hwy . 42, 228-7210, 2736 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 941-8674. These popular bakeries attract cr owds looking for an enjoyable soup and sandwich lunch highlighted by French-style breads and pastries. $ ✿ FUN FOOD CAFÉ 1860 Mellwood Ave., 895-1003. $ ✿ J. GRAHAM’S CAFÉ & BAR 335 W. Broadway (The Brown Hotel), 583-1234. The home of the legendary “Hot Br own” sandwich, J. Graham’ s offers a mor e casual bistr o-style alternative to the upscale English Grill, with choice of menu ser vice or buffet dining. $ f p JARFI’S CAFÉ 144 N. Sixth St. (Muhammad Ali Center) 992-5329. $$ ✿ KAYROUZ CAFÉ 127 W iltshire A ve., 896-2630. Tucked in among St. Matthews sidestreets is one of the best sandwich places in Louisville. The tuna salad, Portobello mushroom Reuben, fish, chicken

and hamburger — all ar e innovative and all come with some of the best fries in town. $ f ✿ MERIDIAN CAFÉ 112 Meridian Ave., 897-9703. This little lunch spot occupies a cozy old house in St. Matthews. Ser vice is competent and polite, the place is sparkling clean, and the luncheon-style fare is consistently fine. A selection of appetizing breakfast items rounds out a tasty mix. $ f ✿ MR. Z’S KITCHEN 869 S. Thir d St., 584-8504. It’ s run by a friendly immigrant family fr om Eastern Europe, but the food is all-American at Mr . Z’ s Kitchen. It offers an appetizing option for a hear ty diner-style meal. $ ✿ PATTICAKES CAFÉ 1860 Mellwood Ave., 238-7387. Located in the Mellwood Ar ts Center , Patticakes serves homemade soups and sandwiches — and cake, of course. Owner Patti Fadel offers more than 50 varieties of pound cake! $ f ✿ QUEUE CAFÉ 220 W. Main St. (LG&E Building), 583-0273. $ f ✿ STOP LITE CAFÉ 1348 River Rd., 584-3746. $ SWEET ‘N’ SA VORY CAFÉ 1574 Bar dstown Rd., 456-6566. Hear ty brunch far e with a vegetarian accent makes Sweet ‘n’ Savor y a popular destination for the Bardstown Road bunch. $ ✿ SWEET SURRENDER 1804 Frankfor t A ve., 8992008. Sweet Surr ender, with Jessica Haskell at the helm, has r eturned to its original Clifton neighborhood to pr ovide elegant desser ts as well as signature vegetarian lunches. $$ f THE CAFÉ 712 Brent St., 637-6869. Now well-settled in its new location just of f East Br oadway near Louisville Stonewar e, The Café ser ves an eclectic breakfast and lunch menu, including old favorites like tomato dill soup and chicken salad. And the new space r etains the old place’ s yard-sale look of mismatched furnitur e and chandeliers and doorways to nowhere. $ f

CHEDDAR BOX CAFÉ 12121 Shelbyville Rd., 2452622. An attractive — and busy — Middletown lunch spot, owner Michelle Bar tholmew ser ves popular salads, sandwiches and soups, as well as hot entrées such as potato-chip-crusted whitefish, specialty pizzas, and lemon-tarragon chicken with orzo. Pick up some frozen appetizers for your next cocktail party. $$ f ✿ CHRISANTA’S CAFÉ 1812 Br ownsboro Rd., 6182250. Don’t blink when you pass this small Clifton storefront down at the lower end of Brownsboro in Clifton, or you might miss your chance for a charming lunch. Mediterranean bistr o far e includes a variety of panini, kabobs and comfortable Persian home cooking. $ CITY CAFÉ 505 W . B roadway, 589-1797, 1250 Bardstown Rd., 459-5600, 500 S. Pr eston St., 8525739. Chef Jim Henr y, a long-time star in the city’s culinary firmament, brings his cooking skills and insistence on fr esh, quality ingr edients to these simple, but excellent, spots for lunch. $ f ✿ CRAVE CAFÉ & CA TERING 2250 Frankfor t A ve., 896-1488. Experienced cater ers and chefs of fer casual but quality café far e in this comfor table old frame house in Clifton. $ ✿ CREEKSIDE OUTPOST & CAFÉ 614 Hausfeldt Ln., New Albany IN, 948-9118. This atmosphere is something you won’t see every day — or week, month or year, for that matter. The Creekside Outpost warps customers back into the days of general stor es and maintains ever y bit of old fashioned charm. The Ladyhawk Café ser ves up lean buf falo, elk and surprisingly good bur gers. Exotic foods including Shinnecock ice fish, black bear , ostrich and kangaroo (when available) round out an excellent, traveled menu. $$ f ✿ CRICKET’S CAFÉ 7613 Old Hwy. 60, Sellersburg, IN, 246-9339. Of fering br eakfasts and lunch to local

h = LATE NIGHT

✿ = VEGETARIAN MENU ITEMS

 = MENU AVAILABLE ON-LINE ONLY

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 63


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:41 AM

Page 64

tradition. The menu is simple — fried fish and fried seafood, ser ved on paper trays — but it is consistently excellent and affordable. $

THE CHEDDAR BOX 3909 Chenoweth Sq., 893-2324. $f✿ THE LUNCH P AIL 502 E. W arnock St., 634-7116. Offering yet another quick and comfor ting lunch option near U of L, this family-owned spot features warming soups and filling sandwiches. Lunch is offered year -round, with a dinner menu added from April through September. $ f ✿ THIRD AVENUE CAFÉ 1164 South Thir d St., 5852233. With a menu featuring many vegetarian and vegan options, this pleasant neighbor hood eatery attracts loyal crowds with excellent fare and a cozy setting that brings you back for mor e. $$ p f e ✿ TIFFANY CELLAR CAFÉ 4411. $ f ✿

11601 Main St., 245-

WHITNEY’S DINER 3061 Br eckenridge Ln., 4545955. For many years a Fern Cr eek landmark before a shor t move west, Whitney’ s r emains a comfortable spot for a casual, diner-style breakfast, lunch or dinner . W e r ecommend the “Grandpa style roast beef.” $ ✿ WILD EGGS 3985 Dutchmans Ln., 893-8005, 1311 Herr Ln., 618-2866. The owners of Napa River Grill have hit a home run with these popular , highquality spots, the first two in a growing mini-chain. Wild Eggs, ser ving br eakfast, brunch and lunch, features traditional favorites and specialty omelets, with upscale touches at moderate prices. $ p ✿ WOLFGANG PUCK EXPRESS 221 S. Four th St., 562-0983. Bearing the name of the celebrity Austrian chef, this downtown lunch spot in the corner of the convention center of fers tasty wraps, sandwiches and soups. $$ f YAFA CAFÉ 22 Theater Sq., 561-0220. $ f h ✿ ZEPPELIN CAFÉ 1036 E. Burnett St., 365-3551. $$ h ✿

AHOY FISH HUT 2902 Bardstown Rd., 451-5508. An upper Highlands outlet that for almost a year has been delighting the neighbor hood with fish tacos, fried and br oiled cod, and homemade buttermilk pie. All dishes cooked to or der — nothing hangs around under heat lamps. $ f ✿

Celebrating 58 years as Louisville’s hometown favorite for top quality seafood and much, much more.

BLUE LAGOON 2280 Bardstown Rd., 632-2583. The Sharom family, who operate Zaytun Mediterranean Grill and Shar om’s on the Outer Loop, has a new seafood place, on the site of the old Diamante’ s. Hopes are high for an aquatic take on their falafel and hummus staples. $$ f h ✿ BONEFISH GRILL 657 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 4124666. This franchise concept fr om the Floridabased Outback Steakhouse chain of fers impressive seafood in a comfor table setting. Add Bonefish to your shor t list of suburban chain eateries that do the job right. $$$ p ✿ THE CAPE CODDER 2604 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 948-1692. $ CAROLINA SHRIMP & SEAFOOD 3922 Westport Rd., 894-8947. In an East End neighbor hood rich with seafood eateries, Carolina offers a tasty option within walking distance of downtown St. Matthews. This spartan little joint featur es shellfish and cod, much of it healthfully steamed, not fried, in an affordable family setting. $ f

THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: On the River: 3021 Upper River Road ■ 895-0544 (Just east of Zorn Ave @ I-71)

601 W. Riverside ■ 284-3474 (On the Jeffersonville riverfront across from Louisville)

Around Town: 1610 Kentucky Mills Dr. ■ 240-0700 (Blankenbaker @ 1-64)

64 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

CATFISH HA VEN LAKE & RESTAURANT 7208 Whipple Rd., 937-7658. If you like to fish, or if you like to eat fish, you’ll likely enjoy Catfish Haven, a simple, down-home eatery in Southwestern Jefferson County. Seafood is the specialty. Fishermen will enjoy their stocked pay-to-fish lake. Note though, it’s not possible to have your catch fried for dinner . $$ f CLARKSVILLE SEAFOOD 916 Eastern Blvd., Clarksville, IN, 283-8588. As the only sur viving descendant of Louisville’s old Cape Codder chain, Clarksville Seafood upholds a long and honorable RED = ADVERTISER

THE FISH HOUSE 1310 W inter Ave., 568-2993. Louisville is as over flowing as a well-stocked lake with fish-sandwich houses, and The Fish House is right up ther e with the best. Crisp br eading laced with black pepper is the signatur e of Gr een River fried fish from Western Kentucky. $ f THE FISHER Y 3624 Lexington Rd., 895-1188. The original fried-fish eater y in a neighbor hood that’s now awash with them, The Fishery r emains justly popular for its quick, sizzling hot and af fordable fish and seafood meals. $ f ✿ HILL STREET FISH FR Y 111 E. Hill St., 636-3474. This Old Louisville tradition is small and easy to miss, but it’s worth the effort to get by. It’s oversized fried whitefish sandwich is the flagship dish, but a varied menu is also available. $ f ISLAMORADA FISH COMPANY 951 E. Lewis & Clark Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 218-5300. Spawned by a beachside eatery in the Florida Keys, Islamorada Fish Company has locations in many of the nation’s 30 Bass Pr o Shops, including Clarksville’ s gigantic entry in the former River Falls Mall. Beach-shack decor adds fun, and its expansive menu of fers a broad selection of seafood and fish. $$ p JACKSON’S SEAFOOD 400 W . Main St., New Albany, IN, 945-3474. Joe Jackson, 13-year veteran of locally-famed Clarksville Seafood, ser ves up fried, broiled or blackened fish, and r olled oysters. Fans of Jackson’s former employer will find many similarities in the food, but of fered with customerfriendly service and rational, predictable hours. $ JOE’S CRAB SHACK 131 River Rd., 568-1171. The setting on the edge of River front Park is bright, noisy and fun, with a wraparound deck providing a panoramic river view. $$ p f KINGFISH REST AURANT 3021 Upper River Rd., 895-0544, 1610 Kentucky Mills Dr., 240-0700, 601 W. Riverside Dr ., Jef fersonville, IN, 284-3474. Fried fish in a family dining setting has made this local chain a popular favorite for many years. T wo of its properties — upper River Road and Riverside Drive — boast river views. $$ p f e MACCA’S FLORIDA SEAFOOD GRILL & BAR 1315 Herr Ln., 618-2770. Upscale casual seafood and fish, this popular spot in W estport Village is upscale in menu and design but af fordable for families. $$ p f e h MARKET STREET FISH HOUSE 133 E. Market St., New Albany, IN, 590-3377. Owner Dave Himmel had a vision — creating a place where you can get a typical Kentucky Catholic church fish fry every day. The out-going Himmel achieves this with fr esh fish cut on-site, fried up with car e and passion. Located in the r ecently booming downtown New Albany dining corridor . Y ou may for get how to spell his name but you won’t soon forget his great fish. $ MIKE LINNIG’S 9308 Cane Run Rd., 937-9888. Mike Linnig’s has been dishing up tasty fried fish and seafood at family prices since 1925 and r emains immensely popular . Ther e’s indoor seating and a bar, but the picnic gr ove with its giant shade tr ees makes Linnig’s a special place in season. $ f MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET 4031 Summit Plaza Dr., 412-1818. The decor of this upscale eater y evokes the feeling of a lar ge fish market, with an open kitchen that of fers views of chefs at work. Quality seafood and service have made Mitchell’s a popular destination. $$$ p f ✿ PASSTIME FISH HOUSE 4633. $$ f e

10801 Locust Rd., 267-

RUMORS REST AURANT & RA W BAR 12339 Shelbyville Rd., 245-0366. Visualize Hooter’s without the scantily-clad waitresses, and you’ve drawn a bead

p = FULL BAR

f = OUTDOOR DINING

e = LIVE MUSIC


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:41 AM

Page 65

on Rumor’ s, the original Louisville home of the bucket-of-oysters and impressive raw bar. $$ p f SCUDDLE’S SEAFOOD 702 Highlander Point Dr ., Floyds Knobs, IN, 903-0100. Bright Caribbean colors signal a fresh approach to seafood at this new Southern Indiana restaurant where one can get any entrée grilled, blackened or fried. Salads and soups are joined by a nice selection of sandwiches, including an excellent offering of fish tacos. $$ p f SHAROM’S 5637 Outer Loop, 968-8363. Family owned and family style dining with a wide net of seafood dinners and appetizers. Lunch and dinner menus also include such delicacies as fr og legs, shrimp and alligator. $$ p SKIP JACK’S 1418 Blackiston Mill Rd., Clarksville IN, 282-7557. $ SON OF A SAILOR SEAFOOD REST AURANT 617 W. Jefferson St., LaGrange, KY, 265-2202. Son Of A Sailor of fers seafood Calabash-style (“bound” breading with seasoned flour and cornmeal, popular in the Carolinas). Munch the free, slightly sweet hush puppies while you wait. $$ f STAN’S FISH SANDWICH 3723 Lexington Rd., 8966600. The fish is the thing at Stan’ s, wher e the owner is a perfectionist who won’t sell any but the freshest fish, per fectly pr epared. Known for their fish sandwich, daily specials take advantage of fresh product. $ ✿ WET WILLIE’S 441 S. Four th St., 581-1332. Stand Up Live, melding the Florida-based seafood chain Capt. Brien’ s Seafood with W et W illie’s, adds a comedy club … with seafood … to the action at Fourth Street Live. $$$ p f e h ✿ ] BABBY’S STEAKHOUSE 1207 E. Market St., Jeffersonville, IN., 288-2411. This independentminded steakhouse is one of the metr o area’s best values for exper tly prepared steaks. They come in all the usual sizes and configurations, but someone in the kitchen has definite opinions about seasoning and grilling. The r esult is a distinctive approach that rewards a visit. $$ f

leather booths. Louisville r everes its home-gr own restaurants but has welcomed this Chicago-based chain with open mouths. $$$$ p

crowds with its memorable steaks and trimmings, with extra points for friendly ser vice and a comfortable atmosphere. $$$$ p h

OUTBACK STEAK HOUSE 4621 Shelbyville Rd., 8954329, 6520 Signatur e Dr ., 964-8383, 9498 Brownsboro Rd., 426-4329, 8101 Bardstown Rd., 2312399, 1420 Park Place, Clarksville, IN, 283-4329. The name suggests Australia, and so does the shtick at this popular national chain, but the food is pr etty much familiar American, and the fare goes beyond just steak to take in chicken, seafood and pasta. $$$ p

TEXAS ROADHOUSE Green Tree Mall, Clarksville, IN, 280-1103, 4406 Dixie Hwy . 448-0705, 6460 Dutchman’s Pkwy., 897-5005, 3322 Outer Loop, 962-7600. The spirit of the West sets the theme for this popular steak house. Salads, vegetables and breads with hearty side dishes round out your meal options. This is family-style dining, with no tray sliding — service at your table. $$ p

PAT’S STEAK HOUSE 2437 Br ownsboro Rd., 8969234. A local favorite for fifty years and as traditional as a steakhouse gets, Pat Francis, like his father before him, cuts the meats himself. Its combination of quality beef and hospitality rank it among the best steak houses in town. Be sur e to bring cash: No credit cards accepted. $$$$ p f

TUMBLEWEED SOUTHWEST GRILL (15 locations) (see listing under Southwest/Tex Mex)

PONDEROSA STEAKHOUSE 11470 S. Pr eston Hwy., 964-6117, 816 S. KY 53, La Grange, KY, 2221226. Family-style dining with the ranch theme kept alive with the open flame fr om the grills. An extensive buf fet with hot and cold foods, salads and desserts is also available. $ ✿ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAKHOUSE 6100 Dutchman’ s Ln., 479-0026. The Robb Report magazine has declared Rolex the world’s best watch, Armani the best men’s suit, Cohiba the best cigar and Ruth’ s Chris the best r estaurant. It ser ves an excellent steak in an atmospher e of elegance that will make you feel pampered, at a price to match. $$$$ p RYAN’S FAMILY STEAKHOUSE 5338 Bardstown Rd., 491-1088. This North Carolina-based chain of fers family dining with good variety: Its diverse and extensive buffet features over 150 items. $$ STONEY RIVER LEGENDARY STEAK 3900 Summit Plaza Dr ., 429-8944. Stoney River in the Springhurst shopping center is one of the chain’ s first properties outside its Geor gia home. It draws big

DEL FRISCO’S 4107 Oechsli A ve., 897-7077. Loyal Louisville beefeaters continue to fill up this 28year-old St. Matthews steakhouse, with its brick walls and beamed ceilings. Any red meat enthusiast would know to or der the filet or Por terhouse, but only regulars know the glories of something called green phunque. $$$$ p

A NICE REST AURANT 3105 Blackiston Mill Rd., New Albany IN, 945-4321, 2784 Meijer Dr ., 2809160, Jef fersonville, IN, 404 Lafollette Station, Floyds Knobs, IN, 923-7770. A Nice Restaurant, billed as “New Albany’s Finer Diner,” is, well, nice enough to have launched two mor e branches. All specialize in simple, down-home br eakfast and lunch at affordable prices. $ APPLEBEE’S (8 locations) This cheery national chain features an eclectic assor tment of salads, steaks, ribs, poultr y and pasta as well as full bar ser vice. It’s as consistent as a cookie cutter , but competent execution makes it a good bargain for those whose tastes run to mainstream American cuisine. $$ p h ASPEN CREEK REST AURANT 8000 Bar dstown Rd., 239-2200. The entr epreneur who cr eated T exas Roadhouse and Buckhead’ s is back with a concept that’s both old and new — a lodge-style r estaurant that invokes the rustic feel of the Rockies, and of fers a menu of pastas, bur gers, and poultry at prices that aren’t mountain high. $$ p h ✿ B.J.’S RESTAURANT & BREWHOUSE 7900 Shelbyville Rd., 326-3850. This Southern California chain

‘‘Wild Eggs ... I Think I Love You.’’

JACK BINION’S STEAKHOUSE Horseshoe Casino Hotel, Elizabeth, IN, 888-766-2648. (see listing under Fine Dining) JEFF RUBY’S STEAKHOUSE 325 W. Main St., 5840102. This Cincinnati r estaurateur has made an impact in Louisville with his outstanding steaks, glittery bar, urban vibe and top-notch ser vice. The downtown setting doesn’ t hur t either , on W aterfront Plaza at Main and Four th, next to the Galt House. The r ooms have Chur chill Downs themes. The steaks take the rail with seafood and sushi coming up fast on the outside. $$$$ p e LOGAN’S ROADHOUSE 5055 Shelbyville Rd., 8933884, 5229 Dixie Hwy ., 448-0577, 970 Hwy . 131, Clarksville, IN, 288-9789. W ith mor e than 100 properties in 17 states, this Nashville-based chain parlays peanut shells on the floor and steaks on the table into a popular formula. $$ p LONGHORN STEAKHOUSE 2535 Hurstbourne Ln., 671-5350, 9700 V on Allmen Ct., 326-7500, 1210 Veterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN. 284-5800. Oversize steaks and a “big sky” western theme ar e the draw at this chain eatery , although most of its properties are east of the Mississippi. $$ p

3 9 85 Dut chmans L ane ( 502) 893- 8005 We s t p o r t Vi l l age • 1311 Herr L ane ( 502) 618- 2866

MORTON’S 626 W. Main St., 584-0421. This belowground temple to the r ed meat gods is elegant and masculine, full of wood paneling, brass rails and

h = LATE NIGHT

✿ = VEGETARIAN MENU ITEMS

c racki nw i l deggs. com

 = MENU AVAILABLE ON-LINE ONLY

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 65


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:41 AM

arrived east of the Mississippi, including a lar ge and imposing brewhouse at Oxmoor Center. A full range of made-in-Nevada craft beers is dispensed, along with upscale-casual pub grub. $$ p h BLUE HORSE CAFÉ 830 Phillips Ln., (Cr own Plaza Hotel) 367-2251. $$$ p h ✿ BLUEGRASS GRILL & BAR 1041 Zorn A ve., 8975101. Formerly Anytimes, this Ramada Inn dining room now features Kentucky products from catfish to pork barbecue with traditional Henr y Bain sauce. $$ p f e h BUCKHEAD MOUNT AIN GRILL 3020 Bar dstown Rd., 456-6680, 4112 Outer Loop, 966-5555, 707 W. Riverside Dr., Jeffersonville IN, 284-2919, 10206 Westport Rd., 339-0808. Buckhead’s combination of mountain lodge atmosphere and American-style fare make these popular destinations. The large menu features down-home staples like meat loaf, pot pies, steak, ribs, and lighter far e for warm weather dining. The view of Louisville’ s skyline fr om the riverfront location is not to be missed. $$ p f h ✿ BUNZ RESTAURANT 969 1/2 Baxter Ave., 632-1132. You’ll find only bur gers here, and fries, soft drinks and beer . But Anoosh Shariat, of Shariat’ s and Brownings, is the owner , so you will find topquality gr ound beef, fr esh cut fries, and a big choice of cheeses for those cheeseburgers. $ h CAFÉ MAGNOLIA 140 N. Four th St. (Galt House), 589-5200. The Galt House’s quick and casual secondfloor dining alternative, this spacious venue of fers a range of far e for guests on the go, fr om bacon and eggs to a late-night burger and fries. $$$ p ✿ CAPTAIN’S QUAR TERS 5700 Captain’ s Quar ters Rd., 228-1651. One of the city’ s most attractive eateries for atmosphere, Captain’s Quarters matches the beautiful setting with quality bistr o-style far e that won’t disappoint. Summer or winter , it’s a delightful place to dine. $$ p f e ✿ CARDINAL HALL OF FAME CAFÉ 2745 Crittenden Dr., 635-8686. This oversize eatery at Gate 4 of the Kentucky Fair & Exposition Center celebrates U of L spor ts with a “walk of fame” loaded with awards, photos, game balls and lots more Cardinal memorabilia. What? Y ou want food too? Sur e! Casual American dining features everything from a “Cardinal Burger” to steaks and prime rib. $$ p h CARLY RAE’S 103 W . Oak St., 365-1003. The rumors of Carly Rae’ s demise have been gr eatly exaggerated. This attractive Old Louisville spot with its beautiful patio has endur ed a spate of miscommunication and bad luck, leading some to think it had closed. Au contraire, Carly Rae’ s continues to offer a diverse and appealing menu with a Cajun emphasis, the better to be enjoyed on their vast patio, r eminiscent of those found in the French Quarter. $$ p f h ✿ CHAMPIONS GRILL 505 Marriott Dr. (Holiday Inn), Clarksville, IN., 283-4411. Known by locals for its Saturday night buffet of New York strip, ribeye and prime rib. Salads, sandwiches, soups and a kidfriendly menu round out the selection. $$ p e ✿ CHEDDAR’S CASUAL CAFÉ 10403 W estport Rd., 339-5400, 1385 Veterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 2809660. This popular Dallas-based chain draws big, hungry cr owds with its lar ge bar and familiar “casual to upscale American” fare. $ p h ✿ CHICK INN 6325 Upper River Rd., 228-3646. Louisville’s familiar Chick Inn moved into upgraded quarters after a fire several years ago, but regulars still call it the “new place.” The fried chicken remains estimable, and a local cr owd calls it home base. $$ p f CHILI’S 421 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 425-6800, 3623 Bardstown Rd., 301-8888, 11600 Antonia W ay, 301-8181, 9720 V on Allmen Ct., 301-8880. Mor e than just a place to chow down on baby back ribs, this national chain has a wide selection including fajitas, burgers, sandwiches and veggies. $$ p ✿ 66 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Page 66

CHOP SHOP SALADS 436 W. Market St., 589-2467. The two-handed mezzalunas rock steady as the line cooks chop up lettuce, vegetables and meats into hear ty salads or wraps. Mostly a to-go place with limited seating, the steady lunchtime cr owds attest that of fice workers see a need for fresh light lunch fare. $ ✿

KAREM’S 9424 Nor ton Commons Blvd., 327-5646. Karem’s Grill & Pub, one of the first r estaurants to open in the village-like Nor ton Commons, carries the look and feel of a neighbor hood watering hole inside and out. The test of a r estaurant, though, is the food, and Karem’s is excellent. $ p f

CULVER’S 4630 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 671-2001. When the trademark item is called a “ButterBurger” and fr ozen custar d tops the desser t menu, you know you’re not in for diet far e. Quality fast food and friendly service make this chain a popular new East End arrival. $ f

KERN’S KORNER 2600 Bar dstown Rd., 456-9726. This family-owned tavern has been a popular neighborhood pit stop since 1978. Kern’ s of fers freshly made ham, chicken salad sandwiches and burgers, as well as a menu of soups, chilis and appetizers. $ p

CUNNINGHAM’S 630 S. Four th St., 587-0526, 6301 Upper River Rd., 228-3625. Carrying on into its third century in modern quarters that capture much of the nostalgia of its history, Cunningham’s vends fine fish sandwiches and pub grub in this downtown location and in a second eatery on Harr ods Creek. $ f

LEGENDS Horseshoe Casino Hotel, Elizabeth, IN, 888-766-2648. The hot and cold shor t or ders ar e served up with riverboat hospitality , but in a Las Vegas atmospher e. A well stocked bar and a live stage welcome the best of r egional and visiting national acts fr om W ednesday thr ough Satur day nights. $$ p e h

CUTTER’S WHARF 1902 Victory Ct., Prospect, 2283100. This floating r estaurant near Harmony Landing in Oldham County r eplaces Har vey’s On The River . In its curr ent incarnation, diners will find fish, steaks, pastas and home-made pizzas, along with the requisite river-rat bar foods.(Closes for winter — reopens in March.) $$ p f h EVA MAE’S CREEKSIDE 6313 River Rd., 614-6338. $$ p f FIRESIDE BAR & GRILL 7611 IN 311, Sellersburg, IN, 246-5456. Best known for the specially seasoned fried chicken. They also make excellent pastas, steaks, seafood, and salads. Homemade soups ar e cr eated daily and coffee and desserts are always fresh. $$ p ✿ FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES 2221 State Str eet, New Albany, IN, 944-9958, 4320 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 944-7370, 4116 Summit Plaza Dr., 426-1702. Based in V irginia, this bur ger chain invokes the early days of fast food with fr eshlygrilled bur gers, big, smoky Kosher dogs, enough condiments to satisfy any craving, fr esh-cut fries that are out of this world and a cheer y rock’n’ roll sensibility. $ h GAVI’S RESTAURANT 222 S. Seventh St., 583-8183. This family-owned eater y has been ar ound for decades. Standard casual American cuisine adds a few Russian-style specialties such as homemade borsht soup and beef Str oganoff. Daily lunch specials include lots of fresh vegetable dishes. $ ✿ GOOSE CREEK DINER 2923 Goose Creek Rd., 3398070. Goose Cr eek Diner of fers old-fashioned comfort food, as the name “diner” suggests, but transcendently adds a gourmet taste to the downhome eats. $ HOME RUN BURGERS & FRIES 2060 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 409-7004. Burgers, dogs and fries and drinks with a baseball theme highlight this suburban spot, and mor e than 20 toppings of fer you a fielder’ s choice of options to dress your burger. $ f ✿ HOOTERS 4120 Dutchmans Ln., 895-7100, 4948 Dixie Hwy., 449-4194, 7701 Pr eston Hwy., 9681606, 700 W. Riverside Dr., Jeffersonville, IN, 2189485, 941 East Hwy. 131, Clarksville, IN 284-9464. Hooter’s may draw cr owds with its long-standing reputation as a par ty scene, but you’ll stay for the food, an appetizing selection of soups, salads, seafood and, of course, wings. $ p f e h INTERNATIONAL HOUSE OF P ANCAKES 1220 Veterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN. 285-1772. This is currently the familiar IHOP franchise’ s sole property in the Louisville area. $ h ✿ JOE’S OLDER THAN DIRT 8131 New Lagrange Rd., 426-2074. Going str ong after many years in this Lyndon location, Joe’s has gradually gr own from a little house to a sprawling complex of indoor and outdoor tables with live music many evenings. Excellent barbecue is a specialty, and so is ice-cold beer. $ p e h RED = ADVERTISER

LYNN’S PARADISE CAFÉ 984 Barret Ave., 583-3447. A serious restaurant hides behind the funky décor and madcap events (like the annual New Year’s Eve pajama par ty and the Ugly Lamp contest). The Bourbon Ball Fr ench toast beat Bobby Flay on a Throwdown. And everyone loves the fried gr een tomato BLT. The World of Swirl store in the front has been described as “Cracker Barrel on acid.” $$ p ✿ MAGGIE’S GRILLE 9909 Taylorsville Rd., 267-9604. Just off Jeffersontown’s old Town Square, this neighborhood gathering place of fers well crafted casual fare in a comfortable setting with a fine fireplace to add atmosphere. $$ p f h ✿ MANHATTAN GRILL 429 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., 561-0024. $ ✿ MASTERSON’S 1830 S. Thir d St., 636-2511. A fine, family Louisville tradition, this familiar T udor structure near the U of L campus is the state’ s largest full-ser vice restaurant and the city’ s largest caterer. Scaling back in r esponse to economic conditions, Masterson’ s now is open only for Sunday Jazz Brunch. $ e MAX & ERMA ’S 2901 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 4939662, 3921 Summit Plaza Dr ., 412-5229. Max & Erma’s, a national chain that star ted in Columbus, Ohio’s German Village in 1972, has grown to nearly 100 pr operties with a steady formula of friendly service and casual-dining far e that ranges fr om specialty bur gers, soups and salads to mor e weighty entrées. $$ p f ✿ MIMI’S CAFÉ 615 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 426-6588. This California chain, a subsidiar y of Bob Evans, goes urban and upscale where farmer Bob is folksy and country. This new East End location is drawing crowds, building its r eputation on those familiar with the chain from other places. $$ ✿ THE MONKEY WRENCH 1025 Barret Ave., 582-2433. A popular spot in the urban neighborhood where the Highlands meet Germantown, The Monkey W rench offers comfort food with a stylish spin, top flight music, a relaxed ambience and welcoming ser vice. The long-awaited rooftop patio is open and packing them in on warm evenings. $ p f e h ✿ MULEY’S CORNER 10301 Taylorsville Rd., 240-0051. $p✿ MULLIGAN’S PUB AND GRILL 1801 Newburg Rd., 632-2818. O’CHARLEY’S (6 locations) O’Charley’ s, Inc. could serve well as the pictur e in the dictionar y next to “American casual dining.” The Nashville-based chain operates 206 pr operties in 16 states in the Southeast and Midwest, ser ving a straightfor ward steakand-seafood menu with the motto “Mainstream with an attitude.” $$ p h OTTO’S CAFÉ 500 S. Four th St. (Seelbach Hilton Hotel), 585-3201. Southern cooking with gourmet flair makes Otto’ s an intriguing alternative to the Seelbach’s more upscale Oakroom. Check out the

p = FULL BAR

f = OUTDOOR DINING

e = LIVE MUSIC


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:41 AM

Southern Br eakfast Buf fet and the Executive Express Lunch Buffet. $ PEPPERS BAR & GRILL 320 W. Jefferson St., (Hyatt Regency) 587-3434. The casual-dining facility in the Hyatt Regency of fers a full dinner menu for hotel guests and outside visitors as well. $$$p h ✿ PUB LOUISVILLE Fourth Str eet Live 569-7782. Owned by Cincinnati’ s The T avern Restaurant Group, The Pub featur es “nouveau pub cuisine” ranging from shepherd’s pie and fish and chips to more Continental dishes like fried calamari and a seared ahi tuna entrée. $$ p f h RAFFERTY’S OF LOUISVILLE 988 Br eckenridge Ln., 897-3900. 3601 Springhurst Blvd., 412-9000. This full-service, casual dining establishment has a hearty menu. Specialties like Red Alfr edo Pasta showcase the gourmet offerings along with some of the largest and most creative salad combinations in town. $$ p ✿ RED ROBIN GOURMET BURGERS 9870 Von Allmen Ct., 339-8616, 5000 Shelbyville Rd., 899-9001. The Robin, a Seattle-based chain well r egarded for “gourmet burgers” and trimmings, has now landed in two East End locations. Despite a full bar, it reportedly attracts hordes of happy youngsters. $$ p f h ROOSTER’S 7405 Pr eston Hwy ., 964-9464. This Columbus-based wings-and-br ews chain conquered Ohio and is now spr eading its franchise wings acr oss the Eastern U.S. Its first Louisville property is gaining popularity for a lively sports bar setting and oversize wings. $ p f h RUBY TUESDAY 11701 Bluegrass Pkwy ., 267-7100, 1354 Veterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN. 288-5010. If success demonstrates quality, then Ruby T uesday’s 600 international properties and 30,000 employees can stand up with pride. They’ve been upholding the slogan “A wesome Food. Serious Salad Bar” in Louisville for a generation. $$ p h ✿ THE RUDYARD KIPLING 422 W. Oak St., 636-1311. The word “eclectic” fits this Old Louisville eater y in just about every dimension, from its funky decor to its diverse bill of fare, not to mention an array of entertainment that bridges the generations fr om Generation X’ers to aging hippies. $ p f e h ✿ SAM’S FOOD & SPIRITS 3800 Payne Kohler Rd., Clarksville, IN, 945-9757. Opened by a man named Sam some 17 years ago, this popular Southern Indiana institution feeds an army of happy diners. You’ll find seafood, steaks, pastas, salads and desserts. The menu is extensive and child friendly. $$ p h ✿ SHONEY’S 811 Eastern Pkwy ., 636-1043, 6511 Signature Dr ., 969-8904. For nearly 50 years, Shoney’s r estaurants have been one of America’ s top choices for fast r oadside dining, and happily they’ve kept up with the times. $ SKYLINE CHILI 1266 Bar dstown Rd., 473-1234, Plainview V illage Center, 429-5773, 4024 Dutchman’s Ln., 721-0093, 6801 Dixie Hwy ., 937-4020, 426 W . Market St., 561-9999 721-0093, 4024 Dutchman’s Ln. Louisville’ s outposts of a famous Cincinnati chili r estaurant, these casual eateries offer the r egional favorite (r eally it’ s Gr eek spaghetti sauce, but keep it quiet) and other fastfood dishes. $ h ✿ SPORTSVILLE GRILL & BAR 4004 Gardiner Point Dr., 753-4413. Y ou’ll find a varied menu and a sports-bar theme at Spor tsville Grill, dining r oom of the Holiday Inn Airport East. $$ p ✿ STEAK N SHAKE 3232 Bar dstown Rd., 456-2670, 4913 Dixie Hwy ., 448-4400, 4545 Outer Loop, 966-3109, 2717 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 491-3397, 10721 Fischer Park Dr ., 326-3625, 980 E. Hwy . 131, Clarksville, IN., 285-1154. One of the oldest fast-food chains in the U.S., Steak N Shake traces its ancestry to an Illinois roadside stand in 1934. It now boasts 400 outlets in 19 states but still sticks to the basics: quality steak burgers and hand-dipped shakes served, if you dine in, on real china. $ h ✿

h = LATE NIGHT

Page 67

TGI FRIDA Y’S 9990 Linn Station Rd., 425-8185, Fourth Street Live, 585-3577. The original place to loosen the tie and congr egate after the whistle blows. TGIF carries on its par ty atmosphere tradition with American bistro dining and libations. The bill of fare ranges from baskets of appetizers on up to contemporary entrées. $$ p f h ✿ TOAST ON MARKET 736 E. Market St., 569-4099. An historic theater building lends a funky atmosphere to Toast, a local br eakfast and lunch favorite. Chef George Morris’ simple yet exciting menu adds a tongue-in-cheek bistro spin to traditional diner fare. A second location at 143 E. Market St., New Albany, IN, 941-8582, is set to open in September. $ p f ✿ TOMMY LANCASTER’S REST AURANT 1629 E. Market St., New Albany, IN, 945-2389. V alue and variety ar e the str ong points of this community tradition and the far e goes fr om burgers to steak. Friday or Saturday evenings feature a buffet. $$ p TRELLIS RESTAURANT 320 W. Jefferson St. (Hyatt Regency), 587-3434. Dine on café far e in the Hyatt’s lofty atrium lobby while you take advantage of an environment made for people-watching. $$ p TUCKER’S 2441 State St., New Albany, IN, 944-9999. Tucker’s gives you a little bit of ever ything with a down-to-earth flair, offering burgers, ribs, steaks, a variety of appetizers and pastas. $ p TWIG & LEAF RESTAURANT 2122 Bardstown Rd., 451-8944. A popular Highlands hangout, the “Twig” is probably at its best for breakfast — whether you’re enjoying it while venturing out on a leisur ely Sunday morning or heading home ver y late on a Saturday night. It’ s a place to grab a quick, filling bite, and doesn’t pretend to be more. $ h ✿ THE VILLA BUFFET Horseshoe Casino Hotel, Elizabeth, IN, 888-766-2648. The V illa Buf fet offers an impressive choice of international dishes, with some 150 selections. A seafood buf fet is featured on Fridays. $$ ✿ WESTPORT GENERAL STORE 7008 Hwy . 524, Westport, KY., 222-4626. It may be in the countr y, and you may feel far fr om the big city , until the food comes. Along with the requisite meat loaf and pork chops, you’ll find such ambitious far e as chicken buccatini and blackened scallops. $$ e ✿ THE WING ZONE 905 Hess Ln., 636-2445. Another new wings emporium situated to catch the fancy of U of L fans, Wing Zone excels with jumbo wings in 25 flavors, including traditional Buffalo-style wings that range from Mild to Nuclear. $ f h XAVIER’S 120 W. Broadway (Holiday Inn), 582-2241. The dining r oom in the Holiday Inn Downtown sports a moniker that evokes memories of the historic St. Xavier High School building that stood on this site for mor e than a century until the Holiday Inn was built in 1963. $$ p ✿

BARBARA LEE’S KITCHEN 2410 Br ownsboro Rd., 897-3967. Barbara Lee’ s has been a late-night refuge for years. It’s a r eliable standby for those in search of traditional blue-plate special lunch food. Honest grub, honestly priced, in a r ootsy atmosphere. $ h BIG MOMMA’S SOUL KITCHEN 4532 W. Broadway, 772-9580. Big Momma’ s may be the most hospitable place in the W est End to get genuine soul food. A different main course is featured daily, all home-cooked food, including such goodies as baked chicken, smother ed pork chops, meat loaf, catfish … and fried chicken every day. $ ✿ CAROLYN’S 3822 Cane Run Rd., 776-9519. The steam table classic, the “meat ‘n’ two” gives you the roast chicken, gr een beans and mashed potatoes. Or pork chops, applesauce and limas. $

✿ = VEGETARIAN MENU ITEMS

 = MENU AVAILABLE ON-LINE ONLY

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 67


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:42 AM

CHECK’S CAFÉ 1101 E. Burnett Ave., 637-9515. You can whif f a scent of Louisville history coming of f the old walls of this quintessential Germantown saloon, along with years of fr ying grease. The bar food her e is about as good as bar food gets, and that’s not bad. The chili and the bean soup ar e particularly recommended. $ p f e THE CHICKEN HOUSE 7180 Hwy. 111, Sellersburg, IN., 246-9485. The parking lot of this white frame building in rural Indiana is packed on weekend nights as families from throughout the area wait on delectable fried chicken. This is the ver y hear t of American comfor t food, including gr een beans, dumplings, and mashed potatoes. $$ CHICKEN KING 639 E. Br oadway, 589-5464. Spicy, crunchy and sizzling hot fried chicken is the primary draw on a short, affordable menu. $ h COTTAGE CAFÉ 11609 Main St., Middletown, 2449497. This nostalgic old house in the countr yside offers a taste of Kentucky-style cookery in an array of lunch specials that range from homemade soups and sandwiches to the traditional Hot Br own. $ ✿

Page 68

houses a delicious secr et: At the back you’ll find a steam table loaded with exceptional comfor t food. Fried chicken is excellent, and don’t miss the chili. $

a variety of af fordable soul food and barbecue specialties to take out or eat in. $ h ✿ JESSIE’S FAMILY RESTAURANT 9609 Dixie Hwy ., 937-6332. Countr y cooking is Jessie’ s specialty , with hearty breakfast, lunch and dinner platters to fill the inner person. $ KINGS FAST FOOD 2101 W. Br oadway, 772-7138. This tiny, colorful West End eater y, open for takeout only, offers a vast selection of filling, affordable urban fare that ranges fr om hot-and-spicy chicken wings to rib tips and mor e. $ h KING’S FRIED CHICKEN 1302 Dixie Hwy., 776-3013. $ MR. LOU’S COUNTR Y COTT AGE REST AURANT 5408 V alley Station Rd., 933-0806. Biscuits and red-eye gravy, country ham and grits show of f Mr. Lou’s countr y cooking style. Roast chicken is a dinner favorite, and so are homemade pies. $ ✿

ANN’S BY THE RIVER 149 Spring St., Jef fersonville, IN., 284-2667. This bustling eatery is cafeteria style dining done well. They ser ve up the standar d steam table meat-and-three menu items as good as any. With the Ohio River a block away, it’s aptly named. $ ✿ CRAVINGS A LA CAR TE 101 S. Fifth St. (National City Tower), 589-4230. This thrifty deli of fers a variety of build-your-own sandwiches, a soup-andsalad bar , and specialty bars featuring baked potatoes, and a monthly ethnic cr eation. $ ✿ HALL’S CAFETERIA 1301 Stor y A ve., 583-0437. Hall’s Cafeteria has been doing a brisk business on the steam tables since 1955, attracting customers from Butchertown’s truck loading docks and fr om offices downtown. $ ✿ JANE’S CAFETERIA 4601 Jennings Ln., 454-7286. This 40-year-old family-owned restaurant knows how to cook for folks missing their home table. Count on an attentive staff and fresh southern fare. $ ✿

COTTAGE INN 570 Eastern Pkwy ., 637-4325. Now under new management by the Kreso family, Cottage Inn spor ts a bright new look, and it continues happily doling out the kind of excellent downhome food it has ser ved for more than 70 years. $

LANCASTER’S CAFETERIA 223 W. Fifth St., New Albany, IN, 949-2400. Troy Lancaster, the grandson of Southern Indiana catering king T ommy Lancaster, recalls the family’s culinary heritage with this family-friendly buffet-style cafeteria. $ f

DINNER IS DONE 12001 Shelbyville Rd., 267-8686. $ D’NALLEY’S 970 S. Thir d St., 588-2003. Dir t-cheap blue-plate specials and hear ty br eakfasts bring droves to the counters and booths of this classic greasy spoon. Saturday morning hours are sporadic, but for a quick plate of meat loaf, gr een beans, and mashed potatoes, D’Nalley’s is a hard place to beat. $

PICCADILLY CAFETERIA 2131 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 493-9900, 133 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 4231733. An east end favorite for variety , Piccadilly offers r oast beef, fried chicken, cod, steak and shrimp dinners, a gardener’s list of vegetables and a few ethnic dishes for global measur e. $ ✿

FORK IN THE ROAD F AMILY RESTAURANT 4951 Cane Run Rd., 448-3903. $ FORTY ACRES AND A MULE REST AURANT 1800 Dixie Hwy., 776-5600. $

DERBY DINNER PLA YHOUSE 525 Marriott Dr ., Clarksville, IN, 288-8281. The play’ s the thing at Derby Dinner Playhouse, Louisville’ s long-running entry in the dinner -theater sweepstakes … but the expansive buffet dinner adds value to the mix. $$$$ e

FRONTIER DINER 7299 Dixie Hwy., 271-3663. The name “diner” says it all, and this friendly neighborhood spot on Dixie Highway delivers just what you’d expect in down-home comfor t far e. The word on the str eet, though, is simple: Go for the pancakes. They’re worth a special trip. $ ✿

HOWL A T THE MOON Fourth Str eet Live, 5629400. What’ll they think of next? How about a nightclub that featur es a “dueling” piano bar with two pianos and a sing-along concept? Y ou’ll find this 4,000-square-foot club at Fourth Street Live on the ground level. $ p e h

GENNY’S DINER 2223 Frankfor t A ve., 893-0923. What’s the difference between Genny’s Diner and a saloon? You can take the kids to Genny’ s. Better still, you can get a darn good meal at Genny’ s, provided that you set your expectations for hear ty, filling and well-prepared diner food. $ p e

INCREDIBLE DAVE’S 9236 Westport Rd., 426-4790. “Awesome dining, extr eme fun, wher e family fun hits maximum over drive” is the pr omise at this giant dining and enter tainment venue. It’s not just for kids: an upscale menu in a signatur e dining room is at the center of it all. $$ p h ✿

GOLDEN CORRAL 4032 Taylorsville Rd., 485-0004, 8013 Pr eston Hwy ., 966-4970, 1402 Cedar St., Clarksville, IN. 258-2540. Buffet style family dining — one price, all you can eat. Steaks are served beginning at 4 p.m. $ GRANNY’S APRON 2605 Rockfor d Ln., 449-9026. Everything at Granny’ s Apr on is homemade by owner Jan Bradley , and it tastes that way: Dinner here will r emind you of a trip back in time to Grandmother’s house, assuming that Grandmother was a really good cook. $ HAZELWOOD REST AURANT 4106 T aylor Blvd., 361-9104. Whether you like your eggs over easy, or your cheesebur gers well done, you’ll like the Hazelwood Restaurant. Standar d shor t or ders cooked with lots of character and a low price. $ HOMETOWN BUFFET 1700 Alliant Ave., 267-7044, 6641 Dixie Hwy., 995-3320. This chain ser ves up nostalgic dishes, casseroles, meats and desserts that allow you to set an all-American supper table with the all-you-can eat price tag. $ ✿ INDI’S RESTAURANT 1033 W. Broadway, 589-7985, 3820 W. Market St., 778-5154, 4901 Poplar Level Rd., 964-5749, 2901 Fern V alley Rd., 969-7993, 5009 S. Thir d St., 363-2535. Gr own fr om a tiny West End takeout spot to a mini-chain, Indi’s vends 68 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

O’DOLLYS 7800 Third St. Rd., 375-1690. Homestyle steam-table favorites ar e available fr om br eakfast through dinner, not to mention full bar service that makes O’Dollys a Southwest Louisville destination. $pfh✿ OUR BEST RESTAURANT 5404 Antle Dr., 969-6410, 2835 Holman Ln., Jef fersonville, IN, 288-8133, 5612 Bar dstown Rd., 239-2656. The original Our Best, a fine family r estaurant in Henry County , is rapidly growing into a chain, with thr ee properties in the big city now. $$ WAGNER’S PHARMACY 3113 S. Fourth St., 375-3800. A track-side institution that has as much history as the nearby Twin Spires of Churchill Downs. Soups, sandwiches, shakes, cherry Cokes and an early bird “trainer’s” breakfast can be enjoyed all year r ound. Racing history on the walls and ser vers who’ll call you “hon.” $ WEBB’S MARKET 944 E. Muhammad Ali Blvd., 5830318. An old-line neighborhood corner grocery store RED = ADVERTISER

JOE HUBER FAMILY FARM & RESTAURANT 2421 Scottsville Rd., Starlight IN, 923-5255. A pleasant 20-minute drive from downtown Louisville, Huber’s has built a solid reputation for simple farm fare that’s well-made, fresh and good. Some of the pr oduce is grown on the premises in season. $$ p f e MY OLD KENTUCKY DINNER TRAIN 602 N. Third St., Bardstown, KY, (502) 348-7300. T alk about a nostalgia trip: My Old Kentucky Dinner T rain offers a four-course meal during a two-hour voyage along scenic Kentucky railr oad tracks near Bardstown in vintage 1940s-era dining cars. Reservations are strongly recommended. $$$$ p ✿ STAR CRUISES 151 W. Riverside Rd., Jeffersonville, IN, 218-1565. The Ohio River cruise is the best thing about this Love Boat-style yacht that makes nightly all-you-can-eat cruises up the river. $$$$ p f ✿ STUMLER RESTAURANT & ORCHARD 10924 St. John’s Rd., Starlight, IN, 923-3832. Fr esh produce is available in the big shed a few steps away , and that fresh produce shows up on the tables her e in

p = FULL BAR

f = OUTDOOR DINING

e = LIVE MUSIC


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:42 AM

Page 69

hot slice of pizza, along with sub sandwiches, pasta dishes and salads. The Lyndon spot lures a friendly biker cr owd; the Cr escent Hill eater y r eflects its urban setting. $ ✿

mammoth por tions. Combine that with honest fried chicken, big ham steaks, r oast beef, and sandwiches, and you can’t go wrong. $$ f ✿

ALEXANDER’S PIZZERIA 1611 Charlestown-New Albany Rd., Jeffersonville, IN, 284-9000. $$ ANGILO’S PIZZA 1725 Berry Blvd., 368-1032. The local favorite is the steak hoagie, dripping with pizza sauce, pickles and onions. Angilo’s also offers a wide selection of hot pizza pies and cold beer. $ ✿ ANGIO’S REST AURANT 3731 Old Bar dstown Rd., 451-5454. This small Buechel eater y attracts a friendly neighborhood crowd with hefty subs and quality pizzas, along with cold beer. $ ✿ ANNIE’S PIZZA 2520 Portland Ave., 776-6400, 4007 Cane Run Rd., 449-4444. Annie’ s has made-toorder pizza and a variety of stacked sandwiches such as the Big Daddy Str om with beef, Italian sausage, onions and banana peppers. $ h ✿ ARNI’S PIZZA 1208 State St., New Albany , IN, 9451149, 3700 Paoli Pike, Floyds Knobs, IN, 9239805. A favorite Hoosier pizza and sandwich stop. Insist on getting the Deluxe. $ ✿ BEARNO’S PIZZA (13 locations) What began as a simple, family-run pizzeria near Bowman Field has morphed into a local chain with, at last count, 13 locations. $ p ✿ BOOMBOZZ PIZZA & TAP HOUSE 1448 Bardstown Rd., 458-8889. The T ony Boombozz Pizza empir e has expanded into a sit-down pizza and taphouse experience. The menu now extends into appetizers, sandwiches and pasta, and 21 craft beers can be quaffed at the fr osted metal bar top (think your mother’s old ice trays). Dine inside, or watch the Bardstown Road people parade fr om the extensive patio seating. $$ f e h ✿ BRUNO’S PIZZA 5170 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 944-5050. $$

FROLIO’S PIZZA 3799 Poplar Level Rd., 456-1000. Just ar ound the corner fr om the Louisville Zoo, Frolio’s is a neighborhood pizzeria with a cozy, dim Italian-American mood and an all-you-can-eat pizza-and-salad lunch special. $$ f ✿ HOMETOWN PIZZA 11804 Shelbyville Rd., 2454555, La Grange Squar e Shopping Center , 2224444. Pasta dishes, hoagies, str omboli and cold beer ar e available, and so is the one-of-a-kind Bacon Cheeseburger pizza. $$ h ✿ IROQUOIS PIZZA 6614 Manslick Rd., 363-3211. $$ ✿ J TRAIN PIZZA & PUB201 Spring St., Jeffersonville, IN, 283-3663. Owner Joel Stinnett of fers New York style pizza in this eatery named for the NYC subway line he rode when he lived in the Big Apple. $$ f e h ✿ JOCKAMO’S PIZZA PUB 983 Goss A ve., 637-5406. Old-timers ar e delighted to see Jockamo’ s Pizza Pub back in business in Germantown, more than a decade after it depar ted Bardstown Road. Some of the original owners (except the late Dave W ilder) have r ecreated the style, the mood and the live music, of the original. $$ e ✿ JOHNNY V’S 10509 Watterson Trail, 267-0900. $$ p f LITTLE CAESAR’S PIZZA 816 Kenwood Dr ., 3665599, 9017 Galene Dr ., 267-8600, 5622 Pr eston Hwy. 966-5800, 6714 Outer Loop, 966-3111, 12418 LaGrange Rd., 241-5445. This Detroit-based pizzeria chain lost market shar e in the ’90s, but business analysts say the company known for its two-for-one “pizza pizza” deal has turned things around with a renewed commitment to quality and service. $$ h ✿ LOUISVILLE PIZZA CO. 3910 Ruckriegel Pkwy ., 267-1188. Also known as Chubby Ray’ s, this local

pizzeria makes good, fr esh pizzas and ItalianAmerican sandwiches. $ p f h ✿ LUIGI’S 712 W. Main St., 589-0005. If you think one pizza is pretty much like another, you may not have sampled New Y ork City-style pizza, a tr eat that you’ll find on just about ever y str eet corner ther e, but only Luigi’s offers in its authentic form here. $ ✿ MA ZERELLAS 949 S. Indiana A ve., Sellersburg, IN, 246-9517. Pleasant family-run-for -family-fun establishments. Pizza, pasta, salads and subs served for lunch and dinner seven days a week. $ ✿ MR. GATTI’S 5600 S. Third St., 363-2211, 8594 Dixie Hwy., 935-0100, 3319 Bar dstown Rd., 451-0540, 1108 Lyndon Ln., 339-8338, 2247 S. Pr eston St., 635-6708, 4200 Outer Loop, 964-0920. This Austin-based chain was one of the first national pizzerias to r each Louisville in the 1970s, and quality ingredients — plus Gattiland playgr ounds for the kids — have made its crisp, thin-crust pizzas a popular draw for nearly 30 years. $$ ✿ NEW ALBANIAN BREWING CO. 3312 Plaza Dr ., New Albany, IN, 944-2577. Touting “the best pizza in Southern Indiana” is quite a boast, but pizza only tells half of this tasty stor y. NABC combines the fine pies of Spor tstime Pizza with the pub formerly known as Rich O’ s. Publican Roger Baylor’s remarkable beer list, with mor e than 100 selections fr om ar ound the world — plus locally brewed craft beers — has won international awards. A pizza like the famous “Herbivore” (spinach, sliced tomatoes and roasted garlic) makes a sizzling treat, with a world-class beer to wash it down. $ OLD CHICAGO P ASTA & PIZZA 9010 Taylorsville Rd., 301-7700. This gr owing chain specializes in both thick Chicago-style and thin traditional pizza, plus an imposing list of 110 beers from around the world. $$ p f h ✿ ORIGINAL IMPELLIZZERI’S 1381 Bar dstown Rd., 454-2711, 4933 Brownsboro Rd. Impellizzeri’s pizza,

BRUNO’S PIZZERIA & PUB 1919 S. Pr eston, 6341003. $$ p f h ✿ CALIFORNIA PIZZA KITCHEN 7900 Shelbyville Rd. (Oxmoor Center), 425-5125. California pizza became a trend when famous chefs gave this simple Italian fare a multi-ethnic spin with non-traditional Pacific Rim toppings. CPK successfully translates this trend for the mass market. $$ p f ✿ CHARLESTOWN PIZZA COMP ANY 850 Main St., Charlestown IN, 256-2699. This welcoming venue on Charlestown’s town squar e, a shor t trip upriver fr om Jeffersonville, is run by folks who learned their pizza and beer at New Albanian Brewing Company. That’s a fine pedigree, and it shows in impressive quality. $$ ✿ CICI’S PIZZA 470 New Albany Plaza, New Albany , IN., 944-4942, 3093 Br eckinridge Ln., 452-6700. Serious bar gain-hunters will find Cici’ s culinar y offer har d to beat. This Dallas-based chain ser ves up all the pizza you can eat for only $3.99. $ ✿ CLIFTON’S PIZZA 2230 Frankfor t A ve., 893-3730. One of the originators of “Louisville style” of pizza, with additional toppings placed over the cheese. The venerable Clifton’s Pizza appeals with its adult style, full of the bold flavors of herbs and spices and available with gr own-up toppings like anchovies and artichoke hearts. $ f e h ✿ DANNY MAC’S P ASTA & PIZZA 1014 Clarks Ln., 635-7994. $ DOMINO’S PIZZA (20 locations) $$ ✿ FAT DADDY’S PIZZA 10611 W. Manslick Rd., 3637551. $ h ✿ FAT JIMMY’S 2712 Frankfor t Ave., 891-4555, 2208 Bardstown Rd., 479-1040, 13829 English Villa Dr., 244-0840, 528 S. Fifth St., 589-8559. This friendly neighborhood nook offers a cold mug of beer and a

h = LATE NIGHT

✿ = VEGETARIAN MENU ITEMS

 = MENU AVAILABLE ON-LINE ONLY

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 69


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:42 AM

a Louisville icon known and loved for its massive pies for a generation, has r eturned to the Highlands! Benny Impellizzeri’s latest venture is already attracting happy crowds to the quarters vacated by Alameda. $$$ p f h ✿ PA PA MURPHY’S PIZZA 291 N. Hubbards Ln., 8956363, 5016 Mudd Ln., 962-7272, 9501 Taylorsville Rd., 266-7000, 161 Outer Loop, 361-3444, 4607 Outer Loop, 964-7272, 12535 Shelbyville Rd., 2539191, 6756 Bar dstown Rd., 239-8282, 1305 Veterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 280-7272. $$ ✿ PAPA JOHN’S PIZZA (30 locations) “Papa” John Schnatter got into the pizza game as a Southern Indiana high-school student in 1984 and has built his business into a 3,000-restaurant international chain on the basis of a simple formula: traditional pizza, made fr om quality ingredients in a straightforward style. $$ ✿ PERFETTO PIZZA 9910 Linn Station Rd., 426-4644. This new place in the old Slice of NY space of f S. Hurstbourne Parkway carries on the New Y ork style tradition: pies by the slice, just like on Flatbush Avenue. Hand-tossed crust, all kinds of toppings, plus Italian sausage and meatball sandwiches. $$ ✿ PIZZA BY THE GUY 814 Lyndon Ln., 426-4044. This locally owned franchise, now in lar ger quar ters, wins its fans’ praise for extra spicy sauce and handtossed dough. $ h ✿ PIZZA HUT (15 locations) $$ ✿ PIZZA KING 3825 Charlestown Rd., New Albany IN, 945-4405, 1066 Kehoe Ln., Jeffersonville, IN., 2828286. The pizza at Pizza King is baked in a stur dy, clay stone oven and hand-tossed with thinner crust where the ingredients go all the way to the edge. $$ PIZZA PLACE 2931 Richland Ave., 458-9700. $ h ✿ PUCCINI’S SMILING TEETH 4600 Shelbyville Rd., 721-0170. A small but gr owing pizza chain based in Indianapolis opens its first Louisville pr operty on Shelbyville Road. Thin pizza by the slice and other Italian-American dishes ar e ser ved in an attractive setting that’s a cut above fast food. $$ ✿ SICILIAN PIZZA & P ASTA 631 S. Four th St., 5898686. Ready for takeout or eat-in, this downtown storefront offers good, standard (not Sicilian) pizza and other familiar Italian-American dishes. $ h SIR DANO’S PIZZA P ARLOR 469 N. Indiana A ve., Sellersburg IN, 246-3346. $ f ✿ SNAPPY TOMA TO 10000 Br ownsboro Rd., 4126205, 13206 W. Hwy. 42, 228-9990. $$ h ✿ SPINELLI’S PIZZERIA 614 Baxter A ve., 568-5665. This tiny stor efront in the city’ s nightclub zone offers a tasty option for the wide-eyed-late-at-night crowd seeking good cheap eats; it’s open until 5 am nightly fr om Wednesday thr ough Satur day. Better yet, it gives Louisville an authentic taste of Philadelphia specialties: Philly-style pizza and r eal Philly cheese steaks. $ f h ✿ TONI’S MORE THAN PIZZA 3213 Pr eston Hwy ., 634-5400. Friendly service and sizzling pies make this neighborhood pizzeria a favorite under any name. $$ ✿ TONY BOOMBOZZ 3334 Frankfort Ave., 896-9090, 12613 Taylorsville Rd., 261-0222. Boombozz wins praise for exceptionally high quality pizza and other quick Italian-style far e. Tony’s pizzas include both traditional pies and gourmet-style specialties that have won awards in national competition. $$ h ✿ TONY BOOMBOZZ PIZZA & VINO 2813 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 394-0000. Flagship of the Boombozz flotilla, this East End establishment takes the local mini-chain’s winning pizza concept to a higher level. Featuring the awar d-winning Boombozz pizzas and paninis available at its other mostly takeout shops, but presents it for dining in a striking “urban loft” setting with Italian-made furniture to add an upscale accent. $$ p h ✿ 70 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Page 70

TONY IMPELLIZZERI’S 108 Vieux Carre Dr., 429-0606. The original Impellizzeri’ s Pizza is gone fr om the Highlands, but this decade-old strip-center stor efront near Hurstbourne houses br other Tony’s ventur e. If you like the massive, heavily loaded Impellizzeri pizza style, it’s a treat not to be missed. $$$$ ✿ TUBBY’S PIZZA 103 Quar termaster Cr t., Jef fersonville IN, 288-8870. Jef fersonville’s venerable quadrangle — it dates back to the Civil W ar — is the perfect setting for settling back over a pitcher of beer, a Hoosier -style pizza (sliced in squar es) and catching a game on one of the wall-mounted flatscreen TVs. $$ h VARSITY PIZZA & PINTS 6825 Central A ve., Crestwood, KY, 243-1101. $$ p f h ✿ WICK’S PIZZA PARLOR 975 Baxter Ave., 458-1828, 2927 Goose Cr eek Rd., 327-9425, 12717 Shelbyville Rd., 213-9425, 10966 Dixie Hwy ., 995-4333, 225 State St., New Albany, IN, 945-9425. W ick’s wins popularity with a welcoming mix of good pizza, a quality beer list and a friendly neighborhood feel at all five of its eateries. The pies ar e straightforward, made with ample toppings. “The Big Wick” is a favorite. $ p h ✿ WINDY CITY PIZZERIA 2622 S. Fourth St., 636-3708. Stuffed Chicago-style and crispy thin-crust pizzas offer whichever option a pizza lover desir es. $$ WINGS TO GO 4324 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 941-9464. $ h ✿ ZA’S PIZZA 1573 Bardstown Rd., 454-4544. $$

p✿

AMAZING GRACE WHOLE FOODS DELI 1133 Bardstown Rd., 485-1122. If you think “vegan” means only raw carr ots, bean spr outs, seeds and roots, think again. No animals wer e harmed in the making of the tasty alternative sandwiches and other dishes at this neat little deli attached to a spiffy local organic-foods grocery. $ ✿ ANOTHER PLACE SANDWICH SHOP 119 S. Seventh St., 589-4115. If you want to buy a car , go to a car dealer . To buy a carpet, patr onize a carpet shop. And if you’ve got a sandwich on your to-do list, it makes sense to go to a sandwich shop. $ ✿ BACKYARD BURGER 1800 Priority Way, 240-9945, 11201 Oscar Rd., 339-2908. The open flame at these counter-service diners pr ovide the next best thing to a family cookout. Sandwiches, fr esh salads, fruit cobblers and old-fashioned hand-dipped milkshakes enhance the nostalgic theme. $ ✿ BANK SHOT BILLIARDS 403 E. Market St., 5878260. $ h BLIMPIE’S SUBS & SALADS 2020 Brownsboro Rd., 899-7960. Sublime subs — fast and fresh. Blimpie’s is all that … and a bag of chips. $ ✿ BURGER BOY 1450 S. Br ook, 635-7410. For a r eal slice of Louisville life, this weather ed greasy spoon at the corner of Brook and Burnett is the real thing. Neighborhood denizens drink cof fee and chow down on burgers and breakfast until the wee hours (the joint is open 24 hours). If Louisville is home to a budding Charles Bukowski, there’s a good chance he’s sitting at their counter right now , r ecovering from last night’s excesses. $ h BUTCHER’S BEST MEATS & DELI 9521 US Hwy. 42., 365-4650. This fully staf fed meat stor e in Pr ospect offers custom-cut beef, lamb, pork, bison, chicken and veal, plus a well-stocked deli and specialty foods, with skilled butcher Jimmy Mike at the helm. $ f CAFÉ P ALACIO 4010 Dupont Cir cle, 708-1818. Serving lunch to workers in the Dupont ar ea five days a week. $ ✿ CALISTOGA AR TISAN SANDWICHES 4000 Dutchmans Ln., 895-3779, 401 E. Chestnut St., 561-9092. “Papa” John Schnatter , founder of the worldwide pizza chain that bears his name, is RED = ADVERTISER

taking another shot at the fast-food world with the more upscale Calistoga Ar tisan Sandwiches that some have likened to Panera Br ead. $ f ✿ CAT BOX DELI 500 W. Jefferson St., 561-6259. The name of this cozy downtown deli in the PNC Bank building might warrant a double-take, but its feline theme and kitty car toons earn a smile. Open for breakfast and lunch, it of fers a good selection of sandwiches, panini and wraps at budget prices. $ ✿ THE CHICAGO GYROS 2317 Brownsboro Rd., 8953270. $ f e ✿ CONEZ & CONEYZ 2716 1/2 Frankfor t A ve., 8977222. As the name suggests, this new place in the former Café Glacé space is about ice cr eam (“conez”) and hot dogs (“coneyz,” a bit mor e of a stretch). The selection includes hot dogs and sausages, soft-serve cones and other desserts. A few small tables, but mostly takeaway ser vice. $ f h DANISH EXPRESS PASTRIES 102 1/2 Cannons Ln., 895-2863. Just a few tables turn this takeout nook into a sit-in breakfast and lunch spot for a handful of diners at a time. Full breakfasts and light lunches are available, but as the name implies, Danish pastries are the specialty, and they’re fine. $ ✿ DERBY CITY DOGS 960 Baxter Ave., 561-2880. This walk-up hot-dog stor efront ser ves Nathan’s brand all beef hot dogs with gourmet style toppings, bratwurst, corn dogs, veggie dogs, side dishes, ice cream and smoothies — they’ll even give your r eal doggie a tr eat if she’ s along with you. Catering to the nightclub cr owd, it’s open until 5 a.m. on the weekends. $ f h ✿ DEVINO’S 104 W. Main St., 569-3939. This stylish deli of fers another lunch and dinner option downtown. Sandwiches ar e made fr om quality Boar’s Head meats and cheeses cut on the premises, with dining inside and on the patio; package beer and wine is also available. $ f DINO’S DOWN TO LUNCH CAFÉ 239 S Fifth St. (Kentucky Home Life Building) 585-2874. $ ✿ DIZZY WHIZZ DRIVE-IN 217 W. St. Catherine St., 5833828. This neighborhood eatery is an institution. It goes back mor e than 50 years and hasn’ t changed much. It opens early and stays open late and of fers good value for what you’d expect. $ f DOOLEY’S BAGELCA TESSEN 980 Br eckenridge Ln., 893-3354, 2415 Lime Kiln Ln., 426-3354. This convenient deli specializes in bagels, as the name implies. Br eakfast means fr esh bagels with an array of cream cheese, sausage, eggs and coffee. At lunchtime lines form for sandwiches — subs, panini, wraps, hot melts and cold cuts. $ ✿ EINSTEIN BROTHERS BAGELS 320 W. Jef ferson St., (Hyatt Regency) 217-6046. Nothing beats a bagel and a schmear of cr eam cheese — unless it’s a bagel, a schmear , and a gener ous slab of lox. For those who don’ t live on bagels, a good selection of soups, salads and sandwiches offer quick sustenance at this branch of the national chain. $ f ✿ THE FEED BAG DELI 133 Br eckenridge Ln., 8961899. The grilled salmon bur ger is worth the visit, as well as the Triple Crown wrap with thr ee meats or a fr esh veggie wrap. Soups, desser ts top of f the lunch-only schedule. $ ✿ FRASCELLI’S NEW YORK DELI & PIZZERIA 6010 Crestwood Station, 243-9005. This Oldham County shop offers Italian-style deli sandwiches and pizza, plus home-style Italian hot dishes fr om lasagna to baked ziti. $ p h ✿ GREAT LIFE CAFÉ 9565 Taylorsville Rd., 297-8807, 9463 Westport Rd., 420-0707, 951 E. Lewis &Clark Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 284-5624. This small but growing local chain, founded Steve and Jill Mazzoni and their friend Jason McCune, specializes in health and nutrition supplements and vitamins. $ ✿ HEAVENLY HAM 3602 Nor thgate Cr t, New Albany , IN, 941-9426. This franchise location of the

p = FULL BAR

f = OUTDOOR DINING

e = LIVE MUSIC


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:42 AM

“spiral-sliced, honey-spice glazed” ham-to-go chain offers sandwiches of the trademark product. There’s also smoked turkey , as well as box lunches, ham and smoked turkey by the pound or in bulk. $ HONEYBAKED CAFÉ 4600 Shelbyville Rd., 8956001, 6423 Bardstown Rd., 239-9292. $ JASON’S DELI 410 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 412-4101, 4600 Shelbyville Plaza, 896-0150, 1975 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 493-4130. Don’t look for a New York kosher-style deli at this T exas-based chain, but suburbanites are lining up at its multiple locations for oversize sandwiches, salads, wraps and more. $ f ✿ JERSEY MIKE’S SUBS AND SALADS 10266 Shelbyville Rd., 244-1991, 10519 Fischer Park Dr., 425-1025, 9156 T aylorsville Rd., 499-9830. East Coast-style sub shop with local faves that includes cheese, ham, pr osciuttini, capicola, salami, pepperoni and fixings. $ ✿ JIMMY JOHN’S SUB SHOP 967 Baxter Ave., 587-0550, 4000 Shelbyville Rd., 894-3331, 3901 Dutchmans Ln., 894-9393,415 W. Jefferson St., 625-7101, 301 E. Market St., 587-7888, 1321 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 425-4515, 3001 Charlestown Cr ossing W ay, New Albany, In. 725-8580. This national sandwich-shop chain offers a wide selection of over stuffed subs that benefit from fresh quality ingr edients. But what sets them apart from the r est is their value — and they deliver. $ f h ✿ JOE DAVOLA’S 901 Barret Ave., 690-5377. Near the government center in the lower Highlands, this sandwich shop will featur e healthful choices for lunch. $ ✿ JUST FRESH BAKER Y CAFÉ & MARKET 1255 Bardstown Rd., 451-2324. A national chain of fers fast-food fare billed as healthy and natural. $$f ✿ KC’S CHICAGO HOT DOG STAND 1770 Bardstown Rd., 454-9727. Walk up to this small stand and load up a V ienna All Beef hotdog “Chicago style” with mustard, ketchup, onions, cucumbers, tomatoes, salt, pepper and neon-green relish. There’s also corn dogs, and Hawaiian shave ice. No indoor dining, but some seats out front. $ f ✿ LIL’ LOAFERS BAKER Y 8522 Pr eston Hwy ., 9693990. For years, hair dresser Sheryl Lukenbill used to bake banana br eads and other tr eats as gifts for her customers. Her goodies wer e so popular that now Sheryl and her husband Paul have gone fulltime with Lil’ Loafers Bakery. $ ✿ LONNIE’S BEST T ASTE OF CHICAGO 121 St. Matthews Ave., 895-2380, 1034 Bardstown Rd., 4512965. This appetizing operation offers genuine Chicago hot dogs and a taste of Chicago atmosphere for a price that won’t hurt your wallet. Make Lonnie’s the place to go when you’ve got a hankering for Windy City fare. $ LOTSA P ASTA 3717 Lexington Rd., 896-6361. A Louisville pioneer in gourmet cheeses, oils, dips, hummus and, of course, pasta. They ar e mainly an eclectic specialty-food stor e but fans stand thr eedeep at the sandwich counter every afternoon. And next door is a comfortable place to have coffee and pastry or to eat your sandwich. $ ✿ LUNCH TODAY 590 Missouri Ave., Jeffersonville, IN, 282-1005. This outfit pr epares its shar e of the soups, salads and sandwiches that the downtown workforce needs to re-energize. $ f MAIN EA TERY 643 W. Main St., 589-3354. Smack dab in the middle of the Main Str eet historic district, this fashionable deli lur es the savvy business midday crowd. $ f ✿ MCALISTER’S DELI 10041 Forest Green Blvd., 4258900, 2721 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 671-2424, 2400 Lime Kiln Ln., 339-8544, 6510 Bar dstown Rd., 239-9997, 12911 Shelbyville Rd., 244-5133, 1305 Veterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 282-3354. Emphasizing quality customer ser vice, this delicatessen ladles up such soups as gumbo and chicken tortilla

h = LATE NIGHT

Page 71

along with cutting boar d favorites. They have a special way with a tumbler of sweet iced tea. $ ✿ MORRIS DELI & CATERING 2228 Taylorsville Rd., 458-1668, 555 S. Second St. (YMCA building), 587-2353. Many locals still know this small, popular Highlands deli as Kar em Deeb’s after its longtime previous owner. Mostly for takeout — it packs in a few cr owded tables — it’ s known for high-quality, hand-made deli far e. A second location is now open in the YMCA downtown. $ ✿ NANCY’S BAGEL BOX 651 S. Fourth St., 589-4004. An outpost of Nancy’ s Bagel Gr ounds in Clifton, this new outlet, inside Theater Square Marketplace, offers a similar mix of light fare and Nancy’s unique take on the bagel. $ ✿ NANCY’S BAGEL GROUNDS 2101 Frankfor t Ave., 895-8323. A friendly and casual neighbor hood gathering spot. Of ferings include soups, snacks, coffee drinks and bagels made on the pr emises to its own rather idiosyncratic formula. $ f ✿ OLLIE’S TROLLEY 978 S. Thir d St., 583-5214. A little piece of fast-food history remains on an urban street corner in Old Louisville. It’ s one of the nation’s few sur viving tr olleys of the Louisvillebased chain that spr ead acr oss the nation in the ’70s. Oversize bur gers with a spicy , homemade flavor are just as good as ever. $ ORDERS UP CAFÉ & DELI 1981 Nelson Miller Pkwy., 245-5991. Quick and casual, Or ders Up of fers the inviting atmospher e of dr opping in to someone’ s home for lunch. Soups salads and fr eshly made sandwiches ar e uniformly appetizing, and sandwiches are affordably priced at $5 or less. $ ✿ PANERA BREAD CO. 5000 Shelbyville Rd., 8999992, 6221 Dutchmans Ln., 895-9991, 601 S. Hurstbourne Ln., 423-7343, 10451 Champion Farms Dr., 426-2134, 3131 Poplar Level Rd., 6359164, 1040 V eterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 2889400, 400 W. Market St., 540-5250. W arm breads finish-baked on the premises make a tasty base for a variety of sandwiches. Soups, salads, cof fee drinks and a fr ee W iFi hotspot make Panera’ s outlets popular gathering places. $ f ✿ PAUL’S FRUIT MARKET 3922 Chenoweth Sq., 8968918, 4946 Br ownsboro Rd., 426-5059, 12119 Shelbyville Rd., 253-0072, 3704 T aylorsville Rd., 456-4750. One of Louisville’ s popular sour ces for produce, cheeses, deli items, and the like. Deli sandwiches and salads are available (takeout only). $ ✿ PENN ST ATION (16 Locations). Billed as the East Coast Sub Headquarters, this sandwich kitchen does a brisk business here in the Louisville area. $ ✿ QUIZNO’S SUBS (16 locations) Toasted breads, a sandwich selection of meats, veggies and fish are built to fight hunger. Fresh soups ar e available daily, from chili to chowder; so are salads and desserts. $ ✿ RED’S 514 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., 587-7337. Acr oss from Louisville Gar dens, “Red” has thor oughly refurbished the former Picnicaters into a spotless “hot-daug stand” of fering gourmet wieners and sausages, chicken barbecue topped with coleslaw and vegetarian side dishes, many made with locally sourced products. Take away, or sit at one of the nine stools lining the little building and watch the passing parade. $ f ✿ SCHLOTZSKY’S DELI 10531 Fischer Park Dr ., 4258447, 12915 Shelbyville Rd., 244-9069. The original Schlotzsky’s of fered just one kind of sandwich — “The Original” — when it opened its first eatery in Austin, Texas, in 1971. Now this national chain vends a full selection of deli-style far e, with one significant improvement on the traditional deli: the servers are invariably polite. $ f ✿ SHADY LANE CAFÉ 4806 Brownsboro Center, 8935118. Another attractive East End stor efront, Shady Lane Café, has been earning good r eviews

✿ = VEGETARIAN MENU ITEMS

 = MENU AVAILABLE ON-LINE ONLY

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 71


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

for simple br eakfast and lunch far friendly surroundings. $ ✿

11:42 AM

e ser ved in

SOUPY’S 3019 Br eckenridge Ln., 451-5325. In the soup kettles you will find such classics as cheesy potato, bean and ham, br occoli and cheese, chicken and dumplings and mor e. At the cutting board they’ll make your meat, cheese and veggie sandwiches according to your custom design. $ ✿ THE STARVING ARTIST CAFÉ & DELI 8034 New Lagrange Rd., 412-1599. $ ✿ STEVENS & STEVENS 1114 Bar dstown Rd., 5843354. This authentic New Y ork-style deli occupies the rear third of the Ditto’s space in the hear t of the Highlands. T ake out or eat in one of the booths, you’ll get piled-high pastrami, brisket and corned beef and you’ll love lox and a schmear on your bagel — even if you don’t know what a schmear is. $ ✿ SUB ST ATION II 3101 Fern V alley Rd., 964-1075. The har dy No. 19, a six-meat-and-cheese super sub, keeps the stor e buzzing. An array of sandwiches, salad sides and desser ts fill out an appetizing lunch menu. $ ✿ THE BODEGA 829 E. Market St., 569-4100. At the back of the Felice Plaza east of downtown, the Bodega combines a small specialty-food market, wine-and-beer shop and deli under one compact roof. They’ll build your lunch to dine in or enjoy on their sunny patio. $ f ✿ THEATER SQUARE MARKET PLACE 651 S. Fourth St., 625-300. The expansive space that was once The Kentucky movie theater has been r enovated into a gourmet gr ocery, an upscale take-out deli, and a classy in-the-r ound bar , opening onto a shady patio. Look for special wine tastings, wine (and beer!) and cheese pairings, and other events. $$ p f h ✿ THORNBERRY’S DELI & PIES 367-8394. $

5103 S. Thir d St.,

W.W. COUSINS REST AURANT 900 Dupont Rd., 897-9684. This locally owned and operated eater y looks a lot like the national Fuddruckers chain, but the local boys do a better job, with huge burgers on magisterial home-baked buns and a Metr opolitan Museum of toppings. $ ✿ WALL ST. DELI 225 Abraham Flexner W ay (Jewish Hospital) 585-4202. Of fering New York style with Kentucky flair, this busy downtown deli will ser ve in-house diners or take or ders for deliveries. Authentic Nathan’s Hot Dogs are a specialty. $ ✿

BOOTLEG BARBECUE COMPANY 9704 Bardstown Rd., 239-2722, 7508 Pr eston Hwy ., 968-5657. Bootleg Barbecue of fers a touch of rusticity and a good helping of country hospitality, as it dishes out hearty por tions of well-pr epared and af fordable smoked meats and fixin’s. It’s one of the few places in Louisville where you can get Western Kentuckystyle mutton barbecue. $ f BRANDON’S BAR-B-QUE 9901 LaGrange Rd., 4266666. Featuring hickor y-smoked T ennessee-style barbecue sandwiches and filling, affordable dinners. $ BRUCE’S SMOKEHOUSE & BALLP ARK GRILL 10317 Watterson Trail, 400-4440. $$ CLARK BOY BAR-B-Q 6728 Johnsontown Rd., 9335577. If it’ s a little of f the beaten path, ther e’s nothing the matter with that. Clark Boy’ s r easonably priced W estern Kentucky-style barbecue is well worth a special trip. Like many mom ’n’ pop eateries, it accepts cash only, no plastic. $ DEM BONES BBQ 1703 Charlestown-New Albany Rd., Jeffersonville, IN, 282-2277. Ribs, brisket and pulled pork dominate the menu at this diminutive family-operated smokehouse. The sauce has a sweet tang, the baked beans a rich, long-simmer ed flavor, and though tables ar e few , ever ything is available to go — in any quantity desir ed. $ 72 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Page 72

FAMOUS DA VE’S BAR-B-QUE 8605 Citadel W ay, 493-2812, 1360 V eterans Pkwy ., Clarksville, IN, 282-3283. This franchise chain operation may be based in the twin cities, but it looks like a Geor gia gas station with its exuberant, if tongue-in-cheek faux country decor. The impor tant thing, though, is the food, and Dave’ s excels with genuine, hickory-smoked barbecue. $$ p f FINLEY’S HICKOR Y SMOKED BAR-B-Q 1500 W. Broadway, 581-0298. Rib tips ar e the specialty but you’ll find turkey legs, ham, half-chickens, pork chops and shr edded beef and pork — all for dinners or sandwiches, and barbecued pig’s feet for the BBQ purists. $ f FIRE FRESH BBQ 6435 Bar dstown Rd., 239-7800, 211 S. Fifth St., 540-1171, 8610 Dixie Hwy ., 9957585. Fir e fighters, it is said, eat hear tily and well. It’ s no coincidence, then, that Fir eFresh Bar B Q pays homage to local fire departments in its restaurant’s decor. The barbecue and country fixin’s stand comparison to the best fir ehouse cuisine. $ f FRANKFORT AVENUE BEER DEPOT 3204 Frankfort Ave., 895-3223. A neighborhood bar that welcomes all comers. Ser vice can be erratic, but the ’cue is worth waiting for. (Play putt-putt golf or cornhole out back while you’re waiting) The burgoo and the baked beans rank as some of the best in the city and the pulled pork by the pound is value wor th taking home. $ p f h JIMBO’S BBQ 801 Kenwood Dr ., 375-1888. This South End barbecue shack, an outpost of a popular spot in Corydon, IN, offers a fine range of barbecue meats skillfully smoked on the pr emises, with sauce served on the side as it should be. $ JUCY’S SMOKEHOUSE BAR-B-QUE 7626 New Lagrange Rd., 241-5829. Jucy’s offers exceptionally good T exas-style barbecue fr om a little wooden shack that looks just like a countr y BBQ joint should. Highly recommended. $$ f KENTUCKY BBQ CO. 1800 Frankfort Ave., 895-3419. Brothers Dave and Gr eg Kastan offer first-rate ribs and smoked meats in this older Clifton venue. Theme dinners once a month explor e the wider world of the barbecue tradition. $$ p f MARK’S FEED STORE 11422 Shelbyville Rd., 2440140, 1514 Bar dstown Rd., 458-1570, 10316 Dixie Hwy., 933-7707, 3827 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 285-1998. Mark Er win star ted this chain in an old Hancock’ s Feed Stor e. T oday, Mark’ s r outinely takes local honors for its sauces, sandwiches and its meaty baby-back ribs. And don’ t miss the smoked take-home turkeys at Thanksgiving. $$ f OLE HICKORY PIT BAR-B-QUE 6106 Shepherdsville Rd., 968-0585. Located in an attractive house not far fr om General Electric’ s Appliance Park, this Louisville r elative of a famous W estern Kentucky barbecue pit is well worth the trip. $ f PIG CITY BBQ 12003 Shelbyville Rd., 244-3535. Down-home and honest, the name of this popular Middletown barbecue eater y pr etty much says it all. Smoke ’em if you’ve got ’em — and they do — with all cherry wood. $$ f PIT STOP BAR-B-QUE 13303 Magisterial Dr ., 2536740. This familiar old local brand, long a downtown fixtur e, now of fers its smoky T exas barbecue in an East End industrial park just off the Gene Snyder Freeway and Old Henry Road. $ RITE WAY BAR-B-CUE HOUSE 1548 W. St. Catherine St., 584-9385. Open since 1943, this W est End landmark in a one-time neighbor hood gr ocery, offers exceptional urban barbecue, including ribs that rank with the city’s best. $ f h RITE WAY BAR-B-CUE HOUSE 300 W. Chestnut St., 922-3156. Barbecue meister Kalvin Br own, who presided over the smokers at the W est End RiteWay for many years, now brings his skills to a RED = ADVERTISER

downtown establishment with similar far e but no business connection to the original. $ p e h RUBBIE’S BAR-B-QUE & BREW 6905 Southside Dr., 367-0007. This South End family knows how to do BBQ. It may be of f the beaten path for some folks but here you’ll find the bounty of secr et BBQ recipes. $ p f e h SCOTTY’S RIBS AND MORE 14049 Shelbyville Rd., 244-6868. Ribs, pork, chicken a la car te and dinners. The small East End venue moves a lot of pizzas and salads as well. $$ p SHACK IN THE BACK BBQ 406 Mt. Holly Rd., 3633227. $ f e SHANE’S RIB SHACK 12420 Lime Kiln Ln., 4293907. “Rib” may be its middle name, but you can also fill up on wings, chicken tenders, sandwiches and more at this growing Atlanta-based chain, now open in this former Tijuana Flats facility. $$ f h SMOKETOWN USA 1153 Logan St., 409-9180. The name “Smoketown” does double-duty at this T exMex storefront just east of Old Louisville in the the Smoketown neighbor hood. Ribs ar e juicy and smoky; the pinto beans and the Blue Bunny ice cream from Texas are not to be missed. $ f ✿ SMOKEY BONES BBQ 2525 Hurstbourne Gem Ln., 491-7570. A pr operty of Orlando’ s Dar den fastfood chain, which also runs Olive Gar den and Red Lobster, this noisy Stony Brook-area eatery conveys more of a spor ts-bar than barbecue concept, but the ribs are fine. $$ p TONY ROMA ’S 150 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 3278500. From the tomato tang to a smoky Blue Ridge savor, Roma’s advertises its ribs as the best dr essed in town. Bur gers, chicken and steaks ar e available as well, but we r ecommend the racks and baby backs of pork and beef. $$$ p VINCE STATEN’S OLD TIME BARBEQUE 13306 W. U.S. 42, 228-7427. Author Vince Staten, who literally wrote the book on barbecue (Real Barbecue), has moved on, but his name remains on this neighborhood joint out the road in Oldham County. $ WISHBONE GRILL 408 E. Lewis & Clark Pkwy ., Clarksville, IN, 725-1188. New entr y to the barbecue, steaks and seafood community nor th of the river . All the usual suspects ar e her e: wings, chili, quesadillas, brisket in a couple of versions and any number of hamburger combinations. $$

BEEF O’BRADY’S 239 Blankenbaker Pkwy., 2542322, 5628 Bar dstown Rd., 239-2226, 10000 Brownsboro Rd., 327-5496, 3101 S. Second St., 637-3737, 105 LaFollette, 923-1316, 1450 Veterans Pkwy., Jeffersonville, IN, 285-9464. If you think your basic sports pub is only suitable for guys guzzling beer, take another look: Beef O’Brady’ s puts the “family” in “family spor ts pub,” of fering a wholesome environment. $ h BIG AL’S BEERITAVILLE 1715 Mellwood Ave., 8934487. Good people, good food, cold beer: The sign out fr ont says it all, and we might add “cool atmosphere” in praise of this small but friendly Butchertown oasis. $ p f e BLUE MULE SPORTS CAFÉ 10301 Taylorsville Rd., 240-0051. Longtime buddies John O’Connor and Jim “Mule” Riley talked for years about opening a restaurant and spor ts bar . Riley died befor e their dream came true. But now O’Connor pr oudly presides over this 90-seat casual Jef fersontown eatery and watering hole, and he has named it in affectionate memory of his friend “Mule.” $ p e BROWNIE’S “THE SHED” GRILLE & BAR 237 Whittington Pkwy., 326-9830. Namesake owner Keith Brown used to host neighborhood gatherings in a shed at his home. Now he brings the same sociable concept to his pub and eatery. Brownie’s

p = FULL BAR

f = OUTDOOR DINING

e = LIVE MUSIC


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:43 AM

may be the closest thing Hurstbourne has to a Germantown neighborhood saloon. $ p h BUFFALO WILD WINGS (BW -3’S) 6801 Dixie Hwy., 935-1997, 4600 Shelbyville Plaza, 899-7732, 9134 Taylorsville Rd., 499-2356, 3584 Springhurst Blvd., 394-9596, 12901 Shelbyville Rd., 254-9464, 1055 Bar dstown Rd., 454-3635, 1112 V eteran’s Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 283-9464. As much a sports bar as a r estaurant, this national franchise chain offers tasty snack-type far e, including the chain’ s trademark Buffalo chicken wings. $$ p f h BUFFALO WINGS & RINGS 2610 Chamberlain Ln., 243-4464, 6501 Bardstown Rd., 239-0029. $ p f h CHAMPIONS SPOR TS REST AURANT 280 W . Jefferson St. (Louisville Marriott), 671-4246. Another popular option at the striking new downtown Marriott, Champions pr ovides a fun, casual dining alternative with a Kentucky sports theme — and a galler y of big-scr een televisions to keep the sports action flowing as fr eely as the libations and upscale pub grub. $$ p f h CHATTER’S BAR & GRILL 2745 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 961-9700. $$ p f ✿ CONNOR’S PLACE 132 E. Market St., New Albany , IN, 725-7055. Hoosier Restaurateur Dave Himmel has moved Connor’ s Place to a new location, retaining the casually upscale mood and food that he made a trademark in the original venue. $ p f e h D&C DIAMOND CAFÉ 2017 Br ownsoro Rd., 8950070. $$ p h DANNY BOY’S 1101 S. Clark Blvd., Clarksville IN, 283-3566. $ p e h DELTA RESTAURANT 434 W. Market St., 584-0860. It’s not quite as historic as Gideon Shr yock’s Jefferson County Cour thouse ar ound the corner , but this popular bar and shor t-order spot seems as if it has been a hangout for lawyers and the courthouse crowd for just about as long as ther e’s been a Courthouse. $ p ✿ DIAMOND PUB & BILLIARDS 3814 Frankfort Ave., 895-7513. $ p f h ✿ FLABBY’S SCHNITZELBURG 1101 L ydia St., 6379136. Family-owned since 1952, Flabby’ s is a quintessential Germantown saloon. It’s also one of the city’s top destinations for inexpensive downhome eats, fr om authentic German dishes to fantastic fried chicken on weekends. $ ✿ FLANAGAN’S ALE HOUSE 934 Baxter A ve., 5853700. Gourmet pizzas, hoagies, and an enormous beer selection draw Highlands folks to this cozy neighborhood pub. For a late night pizza (the kitchen’s open until 2 a.m.), it’ s one of the best options in the city. $$ p f h FOUR KINGS CAFÉ 4642 Jennings Ln., 968-2930. Steam-table ser vice featuring spaghetti and meatballs, lasagna and chicken attract a hungry lunch cr owd at this casual spot, and brunch specialties are just as popular. $ p FOX & HOUND 302 Bullitt Ln., 394-7620. A “British pub” concept operated by a W ichita, Kansas-based chain, Fox & Hound features a “mid-casual” menu with burgers, pizza, chicken and pot roast, in a large venue with plenty of billiar d tables and an ample supply of large-screen televisions. $$ p f h ✿

Page 73

GREAT AMERICAN GRILL 2735 Crittenden Dr . (Hilton), 637-2424. Located in the Louisville International Airpor t Hilton. Salads, bur gers, pastas and sandwiches ar e available for the casual diner; main entrées include New York strip, filet of salmon and more. $ p f HARLEY’S HOUSE OF BREWS 122 W. Main St., 384-0151. Long-standing blues bar Zena’ s closed, but fans wer e relieved when the funky downtown space was reopened by the owners of Amici in Old Louisville, who continue to of fer great music and even better bar food. $ p e h HARLOW’S BAR AND GRILL 2787 S. Floyd St., 6371788. If you can’ t get into Papa John’ s Stadium nearby, hunker down with satisfying bar food and drinks, either at the sprawling bar or on the patio in good weather and keep on eye on the games on the tube. $ p f e h HITCHING POST INN 7314 Fegenbush Ln., 2394724. In addition to its full bar and beer gar den, and lively conversation, the Hitching Post Inn offers an array of pub grub, including bur gers, chicken tenders, and sandwiches. $ p h HOOPS GRILL AND SPORTS BAR 6733 Strawberry Ln., 375-4667. The name says it all: spor ts, casual dining and good things to drink all find their natural meeting place at this friendly neighborhood spot wher e hot wings and hoops r eign supreme. $ p f h ✿ INDIGO JOE’S SPOR TS PUB & REST AURANT 1321 Herr Ln., 423-1633. Louisville’ s first outpost of a growing Los Angeles-based chain, Indigo Joe’ s is a family-friendly American-style spor ts bar . It features large portions and 44 flat-screen televisions, with speakers on the tables so diners can tune in the sporting event of their choice. $$ p f JAKE’S & MR. G’S 10432 Shelbyville Rd., 244-0165 $ p JERRY’S ON THE RIVER 100 W . Riverside Dr ., Jeffersonville, IN, 282-2500. The river view outshines the menu at this r estaurant that looks acr oss the Ohio with a sweeping view of Louisville. The fare is fair — sandwiches, seafood, and a few Mexican specialties, but the long bar , the outdoor deck, and the big picture windows make this a great spot for watching the towboats stream up and down the river. $ p f JERSEY’S CAFÉ 1515 L ynch Ln., Clarksville, IN, 288-2100. Quality, af fordable far e that goes well beyond pub grub to include an awesome smokehouse bur ger and barbecued ribs so tender , they say, that you can just tap the end of the bone on your plate, and the meat falls of f. $ p e h ✿ JOHN O’BRYAN’S TAVERN 4123 Flintlock Dr., 4494940. $ THE LIGHTHOUSE 202 Main St., Jef fersonville, IN, 283-0077. This lighthouse has been a beacon of casual, home cooking and tavern envir onment for years. Daily specials, appetizers, chicken and fish baskets, salads and desserts round out the menu. $ ✿ MICHAEL MURPHY’S RESTAURANT 701 S. First St., 587-0013. This full ser vice restaurant and bar has accommodated hardy thirsts and appetites for a couple of generations. Despite the Irish appeal, the food is American and lots of it. $ p

GERSTLE’S PLACE 3801 Frankfort Ave., 742-8616. A popular St. Matthews neighborhood tavern since 1924. Although dining is secondar y to booze and sports her e, the food goes well beyond mer e pub grub. $ p e h ✿

MY BAR 3306 Plaza Dr., New Albany IN, 948-6501. $

GRANVILLE INN 1601 S. Thir d St., 635-6475. A longtime gathering place for U of L students, faculty and fans, this stur dy r edbrick tavern just north of the university campus of fers a good variety of bar munchies, sandwiches and simple grilled far e plus pizza. It’ s per haps best known, though, for the signatur e Granville Bur ger, widely reputed as one of the best bur gers in town. $

NV TAVERN 1202 Bardstown Rd., 452-6101. $ p f e h

h = LATE NIGHT

pfeh NEW DIRECTION BAR & GRILL 2630 Chamberlain Ln., 243-8429. $ p e h PUCKER’S BAR & GRILL 4041 Pr eston Hwy., 3647250. This South-end spot of fers a good-size dining room and a particularly attractive alfresco patio. The bill of far e is longer and mor e varied than your typical bar menu.. $ p f e h RENBARGER’S BREW HAUS 942 Baxter Ave., $ p f h

✿ = VEGETARIAN MENU ITEMS

 = MENU AVAILABLE ON-LINE ONLY

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 73


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:43 AM

SAINT’S 131 Breckinridge Ln., 891-8883. Almost like two r estaurants in one, Saints featur es both a small, intimate, candle-lighted r oom and a lar ger, happily boister ous main r oom with the look and feel of a sports bar. $$ p e h ✿ SLAMMER’S SPOR TS BAR & GRILL 2800 Crums Ln., 618-3588. A kid-friendly spor ts bar , with 20 large flat scr eens and one huge (110-inch) one. Expect a reasonably-priced pub menu (ribs, burgers, sandwiches) and plenty of opportunity to drink beer while catching any game you want. $ p f e h THE SPORTS & SOCIAL CLUB 427 S. Four th St., 568-1400. Replacing Lucky Strike in 4th Street Live, this Cordish-owned spot has four bars — including one that opens out onto the street — plenty of TVs to catch every game, and even a “stadium style sports media r oom.” Chow down with the usual burgers, sandwiches and wings. $$ p h ✿ STEINERT’S 401 E. Main St., New Albany , IN, 9458827. The name has been on the Southern Indiana restaurant/bar scene since 1880. The newest incarnation, amid the booming New Albany Main Street ar ea, featur es family-style dining until 9 p.m., in a r oom adjoining the bar, with live music, open-mic nights and other late-evening enter tainment. $ p e h STUDIO’S GRILLE & PUB 207 E. Main St., New Albany, IN, 590-3171. Add Studio’ s to the downtown New Albany Renaissance. T rish Meyer’s fine dining r oom and bar of fers an historic envir onment, a stylish outdoor cour tyard and a galler y of local art. $$ p f h SULLY’S SALOON 434 S. Four th St., (Four th Street Live) 585-4100. $$ p f h TENGO SED CANTINA 432B Fourth St., 540-1461. “Tengo Sed” is Spanish for “I’m thirsty,” and if that’s your pr oblem, you can easily solve it in this popular Latino-accented watering hole in Four th Street Live. A selection of Cancun-style star ters, tacos and sandwiches is available. $$ p f h THE BACK DOOR 1250 Bar dstown Rd., 451-0659. Longtime owners John Dant and Mike Ewing ar e known for running one of the city’s friendliest pubs at this Mid-City Mall saloon. Limited bar far e, but don’t miss the chicken wings. $ p f h TURKEY JOE’S 2809 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 3279464. Turkey Joe’s advertises “Wings, Burgers and More,” but hot wings are the specialty, and you can take your pick of chicken, turkey or boneless chicken pr epared by a Sullivan-trained chef in a comfortable sports-bar setting. $ p h VIC’S CAFÉ 1839 E. Market St., New Albany, IN, 9444338. $ ZANZABAR 2100 S. Preston St., 635-9227. An icon of the ’70’s bar scene, the Zbar has resurrected itself at its original location in Germantown. The stylish tile front has been r ecreated anew, the steam table will dish up comfor t food by day and live music and pub grub will satisfy oldtimers and the newly hip late into the night. $ p f h ✿ ZAZOO’S 102 Bauer Ave., 894-8030. If you’re looking for casual dining, ZaZoo’s offers a mighty appealing option with its laid-back and welcoming neighborhood bar feeling. $ p f e h ✿

Page 74

BLUEGRASS BREWING COMP ANY 3929 Shelbyville Rd., 899-7070, 636 E. Main St., 584-2739, 2 Theater Square, 568-2224. A must-stop destination for beer lovers on the national ar tisanal-brew trail, but it’ s mor e than just a br ewpub. BBC’ s management gives equally serious attention to both liquid and solid far e, making this a gr eat place to stop in for both dinner and a beer . $ p f e ✿

CHINA INN 1925 S. Fourth St., 636-2020. It’s not the posh, private Faculty Club, but this little Asian spot may be one of the most popular eateries around the University of Louisville’s Belknap Campus. $ ✿

BROWNING’S BREWER Y 401 E. Main St., (see listing under Bistros)

CHINESE CHEF 2619 S. Fourth St., 634-0979. $ ✿

CUMBERLAND BREWS 1576 Bar dstown Rd., 4588727. Giving new meaning to the term “micr obrewery,” Cumberland Br ews may be one of the smallest eateries in town. It’s usually packed, earning its crowds the old-fashioned way by providing very good food, friendly service, and high-quality handcrafted artisan beers. $ f e h ✿

CHONG GARDEN 10341 Dixie Hwy., 935-1628. $ ✿

NEW ALBANIAN BREWING CO. 3312 Plaza Dr., New Albany, IN, 944-2577. (see review under Pizza)

CHEZ SENEBA AFRICAN REST AURANT 4218 Bishop Ln., 473-8959. Offering another interesting ethnic cuisine to Louisville’ s international dining scene, with gener ous por tions of spicy Senegalese cuisine from West Africa. $ QUEEN OF SHEBA ETHIOPIAN 2804 Taylorsville Rd., 459-6301. This authentic Ethiopian restaurant offers a wide selection of intriguing Ethiopian dishes, including a variety of vegetarian selections as well as the traditional beef and chicken specialties. Ethiopian far e is made for sharing and eating with the fingers, but they’ll gladly make forks available for the finicky. $ ✿

#1 ASIAN BUFFET 1250 Bardstown Rd., 451-6033. Not just another in the her d of all-you-can-eat Chinese buf fets, this 350 seat eater y is the first between-the-coasts outpost of the original #1 buffet in NYC. $$ ✿ 8 CHINA BUFFET 1850 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 4933884. $ ✿ A TASTE OF CHINA 1167 S. Fourth St., 585-5582. $ ✿ ASIAN BUFFET 3813 Charlestown Rd., New Albany IN, 945-1888, 1305 Veterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 285-8888, 3646 Mall Rd., 479-9989. Competent cookery and car eful management that ensur es buffet of ferings stay fr esh and hot makes these buffets a good choice among the gr owing crowd of all-you-can-eat Asian spots. $ p ✿ AUGUST MOON 2269 Lexington Rd., 456-6569. August Moon’ s secr et ingr edient is the culinar y oversight of Chef Peng Looi, better known as the force behind Asiatique. Housed in a soaring, open space with a Zen master’ s style. Consistent commitment in the kitchen and from the staff makes it a top spot for Asian fare. A lovely patio at the r ear affords a pleasant alfresco dining experience. $$$ p f ✿ BAMBOO HOUSE 4036 Poplar Level Rd., 451-3113. An old-timer among local Chinese restaurants, this Southeastern Louisville spot may not of fer the trendiest Asian fare, but it’s a reliable source for the familiar Cantonese-American standards. $ ✿ CHINA 1 123 Breckinridge Ln., 897-6511. $ ✿

BANK STREET BREWHOUSE 415 Bank St., New Albany, IN, 725-9585. W ith long-time Le Relais sous-chef Joshua Lehman at the helm, the food focus of this of fshoot of F&D columnist Roger Baylor’s New Albanian br ewing empir e has sharpened into Belgian-style bistro cuisine. Mussels and frites will always be available, and croques monsieurs et madames to go with the exceptional beer brewed on the premises. $$ p f ✿ 74 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

CHINA BUFFET 706 E. Hwy. 131, Clarksville, IN, 2888989. Chinese buffets are ubiquitous, but this one is squarely in the upper range. Regularly r efreshed steam tables, attentively fried rice, and pr operly spicy General Tso’s Chicken raise it above the runof-the-mill places typical of the genr e. $ ✿ CHINA CASTLE 7420 Third Street Rd., 367-4272. $ ✿ CHINA GARDEN 7309 Pr eston Hwy., 968-4672. A busy restaurant with the double pleasure of Chinese and American menu items. $ ✿ RED = ADVERTISER

CHINA KING 3830 Ruckriegel Pkwy., 240-0500. $ ✿ CHINA TASTE 135 Quar termaster Ct., Jef fersonville, IN, 284-5580. $ ✿ CHINESE EXPRESS 3228 Crums Ln., 448-1360. $ ✿ CHOPSTICKS 416 E. Broadway, 589-9145. $ ✿ CHOPSTICKS HOUSE 2112 W. Broadway, 772-3231. $ ✿ CHUNG KING CHINESE AMERICAN REST AURANT 110 E. Market St., 584-8880. $ ✿ CRYSTAL CHINESE 3901 W. Market St., 776-9702. $ ✿ DOUBLE DRAGON 1255 Goss A ve., 635-5656. A standout among fast-food shopping-center Chinese eateries, Double Dragon hits on all cylinders, turning out consistently well-pr epared and flavorful fare. $ ✿ DOUBLE DRAGON II 12480 LaGrange Rd., 241-7766, 9901 LaGrange Rd., 326-0099, 6832 Bar dstown Rd., 231-3973, 3179 S. Second St., 367-6668. $ ✿ DOUBLE DRAGON 8 231 S. Fifth St., 587-8686. $ ✿ DOUBLE DRAGON 9 9501 Taylorsville Rd., 267-5353. $ ✿ DOUBLE DRAGON BUFFET 233 Whittington Pkwy., 339-8897. A sizable buf fet in a chic East End shopping strip, of fers a good range of Chinese treats on its all-you-can-eat buf fet. The far e seems prepared with attention and care. $ ✿ DYNASTY BUFFET 2400 Lime Kiln Ln., 339-8868. The continuing pr oliferation of look alike, taste alike, all-you-can-eat Chinese buf fets never fails to amaze me. But I’m happy to r eport that Dynasty Buffet ranks well above the median. $$ ✿ EASTERN HOUSE 5372 Dixie Hwy., 568-2688. $ ✿ EMPEROR OF CHINA 2210 Holiday Manor Shopping Center, 426-1717. One of Louisville’ s fanciest and most notewor thy Chinese restaurants, the Emper or’s quar ters ar e stylishly str ewn acr oss multiple levels of a former suburban movie theater. Outstanding. $$ p ✿ EMPRESS OF CHINA 2249 Hikes Ln., 451-2500. Older sister to The Emperor of China, the Empress was one of Louisville’s first serious, authentic upscale Cantonese restaurants, and its fare still stands up to fancy spots in New York’s Chinatown. $$ p ✿ FIRST WOK 3967 Seventh St. Rd., 448-0588. $ ✿ GOLDEN BUDDHA 8000 Preston Hwy., 968-7700. $ ✿ GOLDEN P ALACE BUFFET 161 Outer Loop, 3682868. $ ✿ GOLDEN STAR CHINESE RESTAURANT 368-1833, 3458 Taylor Blvd. $ ✿ GOLDEN WALL 3201 Fern Valley Rd., 968-9717. $ ✿ GREAT WALL 2206 Brownsboro Rd., 891-8881. This Clifton r estaurant ranks high up in the fast-food Chinese pack. Of fering steaming-hot, competently prepared and flavorful dishes. $ ✿ GREAT WOK 2502 Pr eston Hwy ., 634-1918. Just about ever y shopping center in town has a fastfood Chinese spot, but this one stands out, generating a buzz of wor d-of-mouth publicity about its well-crafted Chinese dishes at a bar gainbasement price. $ ✿ HAPPY DRAGON 2600 W . Br oadway, 778-2573. Catering to of fice and r esidential customers, this Chinese restaurant has ser ved the W est Broadway community for many years. $ f ✿ HONG KONG CHINESE REST AURANT 345 New Albany Plaza, New Albany, IN., 945-1818. $ ✿

p = FULL BAR

f = OUTDOOR DINING

e = LIVE MUSIC


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:43 AM

HONG KONG F AST FOOD 5312 S. Thir d St., 3678828. One of the many international eateries in Iroquois Manor, this fast-food Chinese spot of fers Cantonese standar ds hot and fast and inexpensively. Check the daily specials for an occasional intriguing item. $ ✿ HUNAN WOK 231-0393, 6445 Bardstown Rd. $ ✿ JADE GARDEN BUFFET 1971 Brownsboro Rd., 8930822. Y et another lar ge, shiny , all-you-can-eat Chinese buffet featuring mostly Chinese dishes with a few American-style items and sushi r olls. $ ✿ JADE PALACE 1201 Herr Ln., 425-9878. Jade Palace is a decent place for Chinese food at any time, but don’t miss it at mid-day Friday thr ough Monday, when it of fers the metr o ar ea’s only dim sum (Chinese brunch) menu. $$ p ✿ JASMINE 13823 English V illa Dr ., 244-8896. A charming Asian eater y, wher e you can enjoy familiar Chinese-American plates or indulge your more adventur ous side with a selection of mor e unusual authentic dishes fr om the “Chinese Menu,” available on request. $ f ✿ JUMBO BUFFET 2731 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 4950028. Housed in a good-looking dining room, high on Chinatown-style glitz and glitter, Jumbo offers a standard all-you-can-eat Chinese buf fet, with a larger-than-average selection of American dishes for those who want something less exotic. $$ ✿ KING WOK 291 N. Hubbar ds Ln., 899-7188. Another of the city’ s many tiny shopping-center fast-food Chinese eateries, King W ok offers all the familiar standards plus a small lunch buf fet. $ ✿ LIANG’S CAFÉ 3571 Springhurst Blvd., 425-0188. Genial host Roland W ong keeps Liang’s in the top tier of local Chinese dining rooms with both authentic Chinese cuisine and fine Chinese-American dishes in this airy, stylish dining room. $ ✿ LING LING 10476 Shelbyville Rd., 245-2100. Modern and efficient in its East End shopping center location, Ling Ling is a cut above fast-food Chinese; better yet, it adds a few Vietnamese dishes to the bill of far e. $$

Page 75

are well done, but we r ecommend the authentic Chinese menu, which is available in English $ ✿ RED SUN CHINESE RESTAURANT 499-7788, 3437 Breckinridge Ln. $ ✿ ROYAL GARDEN 5717 Pr eston Hwy ., 969-3788, 6801 Dixie Hwy., 937-0428, 5316 Bar dstown Rd., 491-8228. $ ✿ SESAME CHINESE RESTAURANT 9409 Shelbyville Rd., 339-7000. Not just another shopping-center Chinese r estaurant, this East End eatery has provided some of the best fine-dining Chinese meals I’ve enjoyed in Louisville. $$ p ✿ SHANGHAI RESTAURANT 526 S. Fifth St. 568-8833. $✿ SICHUAN GARDEN 9850 Linn Station Rd., 4266767. Another Asian r estaurant that has stood the test of time, Sichuan Gar den of fers high-end Chinatown style and well-made dishes, plus a few Thai specialties to spice up the bill of far e. $ ✿ TEA ST ATION CHINESE BISTRO 9422 Nor ton Commons Blvd., 423-1202. This comfor table, sitdown Chinese r estaurant owned and operated by Paul and Amy Y ang joins the small but gr owing cluster of businesses in the Nor ton Commons village center. $$ f ✿ WOK EXPRESS 234 W. Broadway, 583-8988. $ ✿ WONTON EXPRESS 3000 Hikes Ln., 452-2646. Traditional Chinese fare. Family-owned-and-operated, this popular neighborhood establishment has enjoyed a steady patronage for seventeen years. $ ✿ YANG KEE NOODLE 7900 Shelbyville Rd. (Oxmoor Center), 426-0800. This locally owned and operated Oxmoor spot is color ful and stylish. It of fers an intriguing array of appealing noodle and rice dishes from all over Asia with fast-food ef ficiency and prices happily matched by sit-down r estaurant quality and style. $ f ✿ YEN CHING 1818 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 491-3581. $ ✿

YOU-CARRYOUT-A 1551 E. Tenth St., Jeffersonville, IN, 288-8313, 827 Eastern Blvd., Clarksville, IN, 282-8881, 3308 Plaza Dr., 944-9866. $ ✿ YUMMY CHINESE REST AURANT 968-7450, 8625 Preston Hwy. $ ✿

SARI SARI FILIPINO CUISINE 2339 Frankfort Ave., 894-0585. The city’ s sole Filipino eatery of fers a tasty introduction to the Malayo-Polynesian far e of this Southeast Asian island nation. Filipino dishes are af fordable during the dinner hour and downright cheap on the lunch buf fet. $

ASAHI JAP ANESE 3701 Lexington Rd., 895-1130. This small r oom in a new St. Matthews building houses this neighborhood sushi spot where awardwinning Chef Y ong Bong T ak, formerly of Osaka, works his magic at the sushi bar. $ ✿ BEIJING GRILL AND SUSHI BAR Sellersburg IN, 248-0900. $ ✿

8007 Hwy . 311,

BENDOYA SUSHI BAR 217 S. Fifth St., 581-0700. Adding international flair to its downtown neighborhood, Bendoya Sushi Bar is a genuine, serious sushi bar in a stor efront just across the street from the courthouse. $ ✿ CAVIAR JAPANESE RESTAURANT 416 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., 625-3090. (See listing under Upscale Casual) CHOI’S ASIAN FOOD MARKET 607 L yndon Ln., 426-4441. This suburban Asian grocery now serves hot table fare to enjoy between shopping. $ ✿ DRAGON KING’S DAUGHTER 1126 Bar dstown Rd., 632-2444. T oki Masubuchi, co-owner of Maido Essential Japanese in Clifton, has opened a

LIU’S GARDEN 11517 Shelbyville Rd., 244-9898. Small but charming, with white tablecloths and soft Chinese music, family-run Liu’s gains our approval with fr esh, competent cooker y and cour teous, friendly ser vice that makes you feel like you’r e visiting a Chinese family at their home. $$ ✿ NEW CHINA 231 Blankenbaker Pkwy., 254-9299. $ ✿ ONION REST AURANT TEA HOUSE 4211 Charlestown Rd., New Albany , IN, 981-0188. Masterful Chinese and Japanese cuisine (including magnificent hotpots, donburi dishes, and woodenbucket steamed rice) set this airy r estaurant apart from the horde of other Asian spots. $$ ✿ ORIENTAL EXPRESS 12567 Shelbyville Rd., 2449838. $ ✿ ORIENTAL HOUSE 4302 Shelbyville Rd., 897-1017. New owners continue the tradition at this longstanding St. Matthews r estaurant, featuring both traditional Chinese-American and now , authentic Cantonese, menus. $ p ✿ ORIENTAL ST AR 4212 Bishop Ln., 452-9898. A long-time ar ea favorite in this heavy traf fic lunch area. This establishment is quite good with Lo Mein Noodles, and Sweet and Sour Chicken. $ ✿ PANDA CHINESE REST AURANT 9543 U.S. 42., 228-6400. $ ✿ QUICK WOK 801 W. Broadway, 584-6519. $ ✿ RED PEPPER CHINESE CUISINE 2901 Brownsboro Rd., 891-8868. W ith a skilled Sichuanese chef who’s owned a r estaurant in Chicago’s Chinatown and cooked at Chinese embassies ar ound the world, Red Pepper starts out in the top tier of local Chinese r estaurants. Chinese-American standar ds

h = LATE NIGHT

✿ = VEGETARIAN MENU ITEMS

 = MENU AVAILABLE ON-LINE ONLY

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 75


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:43 AM

new venue at the corner of Bar dstown Road and Elmwood. The style of the menu will be international standar ds built on traditional Japanese ingredients, so look for unusual dishes such as pizza topped with sashimi, or tacos filled with avocado tempura. $ p f ✿ FUJI ASIAN BISTRO 6801 Dixie Hwy., 937-0488. $$ p ✿ FUJI JAP ANESE STEAKHOUSE 3576 Springhurst Blvd., 339-1978, 12905 Shelbyville Rd., 253-0036. Part of the fun of sitting at the sushi bar is that you get to watch the chef at work. Put in your or der, then sit back and sip your tea while the ar tist creates edible delights. This suburban sushi bar does the job well. $$ p ✿ HANABI JAP ANESE REST AURANT 6027 T imber Ridge Dr., 228-8244. A hospitable welcome, casual setting, and well-fashioned sushi and Japanese specialties have made this family run Prospect spot a worthy alternative in the East End dining scene. $$ p ✿ HIKO A MON SUSHI BAR 1115 Herr Ln., 365-1651. Japanese-trained sushi chef Norihiko Nakanashi has earned quite a local following at Shogun. Now he brings his sushi knives to this sushi bar and Japanese grill in W estport V illage. In addition to fine dining at the bar or in traditional Japanese dining rooms, Hiko A Mon of fers sushi-grade fish from a small fish market. $$$ p ✿ ICHIBAN SAMURAI 1510 Lake Shor e Ct., 412-3339. This large Japanese-farmhouse building, originally a Benihana, offers similar delights, with the traditional slice-and-dice food show and good sushi. Best deal, while the of fer lasts: All-you-can-eat sushi nightly until the karaoke starts at 9 p.m. $$$ p ✿ KANSAI JAP ANESE STEAKHOUSE 1370 V eterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 218-9238. T raditional Japanese dishes and sushi ar e available her e, but like most Japanese Steakhouses, choose the grill tables with their slice-and-dice Japanese chef show for maximum entertainment. $$$ p ✿ KOBE STEAK HOUSE 301 S. Indiana Ave., Jeffersonville IN, 280-8500. Southern Indiana’s first serious Japanese r estaurant is drawing cr owds with its exceptional sushi bar, with skilled and friendly chefs who can be r elied on to fashion fr esh and tasty bites that are just about certain to please. $$$ p ✿ MAIDO ESSENTIAL JAP ANESE 1758 Frankfor t Ave., 894-8775. Not just another sushi bar , cool and stylish Maido is Louisville’ s first and only “izakaya”-style restaurant in the style of Kansai, the region surrounding Japan’s second city, Osaka. It’s also a sake bar, pouring a good variety of ar tisanal rice wine. $$ f ✿ MIKATO JAP ANESE STEAKHOUSE 3938 Dupont Circle, 891-0081. $$ p f h ✿ OASIS JAP ANESE REST AURANT 3311 Pr eston Hwy., 375-8766. Owners of downtown’ s Bendoya sushi r estaurant have opened this Japanese restaurant on Preston Highway. $$ h ✿ OISHII SUSHI 2245 Bardstown Rd., 618-2829. This small, attractive Highlands spot, operated by sushi chefs who’ve put in time at the popular Sappor o, has been attracting raves from neighborhood sushi lovers. $$ ✿ OSAKA SUSHI BAR 2039 Frankfort Ave., 894-9501. This long-standing Clifton favorite ser ves up sushi and other Japanese dishes in a bright and cheery environment to a loyal clientele. $$ ✿ RAW SUSHI LOUNGE 520 S. Four th St., 585-5880. Raw makes good use of hip quar ters in a glitzy renovation of the old Marmaduke Building (next to the Seelbach). Diners may choose fr om a br oad selection of competent sushi and Japanese fair, plus fine international seafood dishes at dinner , in a sophisticated lounge atmosphere. $$$ p f e h ✿

76 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Page 76

SAKE BLUE JAPANESE BISTRO 9326 Cedar Center Way, 708-1500. This welcome addition to the Fern Creek dining scene of fers the “full-ser vice” Japanese r estaurant experience of hibachi grill tables and sushi bar, along with a traditional dining room and cocktail bar. $$ p h ✿ SAKURA BLUE 4600 Shelbyville Rd., 897-3600. Located in elegant, upscale quar ters in a St. Matthews shopping center , Sakura Blue — dir ect descendant of the old, popular Bonsai — ranks among the city’s top sushi bars. $$ ✿ SAPPORO JAPANESE GRILL & SUSHI 1706 Bardstown Rd., 479-5550. Ensconced in the middle of Bardstown Road’ s “r estaurant r ow,” tr endy, glitzy Sapporo steadily ranks as one of the city’s top spots for sushi and Japanese far e. If fr esh, well-made sushi is what you ar e hungr y for , you can’ t go wrong with a stop at Sappor o’s bar. $$$ p h ✿ SHOGUN JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE 9026 Taylorsville Rd., 499-5700, 4110 Hampton Lake W ay, 3940123. Shogun’s decor is attractive, and quality food and ser vice make it a pleasant dining destination. It’s unthreatening enough to appeal to those who find exotic cuisine “challenging,” but good enough to satisfy just about anyone who craves a Japanese dinner or a bite of sushi. $$$ p ✿ TOKYO JAPANESE RESTAURANT 2415C Lime Kiln Ln., 339-7171. It’ s appealing, pleasant in atmosphere and friendly in ser vice, and most impor tant, this East End sushi bar ser ves excellent Japanese treats, pr epared with car e and flair fr om highquality, impeccably fresh ingredients. $$ ✿

KOREANA II 5009 Preston Hwy., 968-9686. One of the city’ s few r estaurants devoted entir ely to authentic Korean fare, Koreana is wor th a special trip for this ethnic cuisine that offers a hearty, spicy alternative to the more familiar Chinese. $$ ✿ LEE’S KOREAN REST AURANT 1941 Bishop Ln., 456-9714. This little spot has been a secr et since the ’70s, and it just keeps on going. Walk into what looks like a diner in an of fice building, but push past the counter to the back r oom, wher e you’ll find gener ous heaps of r eally authentic Kor ean food for next to nothing. $$ ✿

BD’S MONGOLIAN GRILL 1890 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 499-4406. The proprietors of this Michiganbased East End chain invite you to “go Mongo,” building your own choice of ingredients and sauces for the chefs to stir-fry. $$ p ✿ SHAH’S MONGOLIAN GRILL Stony Brook Shopping Center, 493-0234, 423 E. W arnock St., 409-5029. Thirteenth Century Mongol warriors used to turn their steel shields to use as frying pans over the campfire, using their swor ds as spoons. Shah’ s carries their spirit for ward. This all-you-can-eat buffet is fun, and the food is fine. $$ p ✿

chef, is Thai. They’ve beautifully made over this little St. Matthews spot, of fering a small menu of traditional Thai dishes, well-made sushi and a few upscale Thai-style “fusion” dinner items. $ f ✿ TAN THAI RESTAURANT 4510 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 948-2012. It’s in a strip mall, but the folks who run TanThai create a distinctive atmospher e by hanging sheer white scrims that divvy the r oom up into ser ene little chambers. The menu of Thai specialties is small — just a dozen or so entrées — but nicely executed and beautifully presented. $ ✿ THAI CAFÉ 2226 Holiday Manor, 425-4815. You’ll find this small café tucked into a corner of the “Holiday Manor W alk.” Owner Chavantee Snow and her family of fer a small but well-pr epared selection of authentic Thai dishes at very reasonable prices. $ ✿ THAI ORCHIDS 9114 Taylorsville Rd. (Stony Br ook Shopping Center), 493-4073. This location has been known for good Thai r estaurants, and the short history of Thai Orchids shows that they have picked up the mantle, pr oviding Jef fersontownarea lovers of southeast Asian cuisine with excellent noodles and curries. $$ ✿ THAI SIAM 3002 Bardstown Rd., 458-6871. Louisville’s first Thai r estaurant, this Gar diner Lane spot has built a loyal audience over the years, per haps responding to its r egular visitors’ pr eferences with food that’s a bit on the tame side for Thai. $$ ✿ THAI SMILE 5 5800 Preston Hwy., 961-9018. Part of a regional mini-chain, Thai Smile 5 ser ves up simple but well-prepared Thai far e. Don’t ask for the fivechile-pepper heat unless you really mean it! $ ✿ THAI TASTE 1977 Br ownsboro Rd., 897-7682. The owner-host of this friendly, casual spot in Crescent Hill had a r estaurant in Bangkok befor e moving to Louisville, and his experience shows. The warmth of his welcome — and the quality of the food — make Thai Taste special. $ ✿

ANNIE CAFÉ 308 W. W oodlawn, 363-4847. Annie Café ranks not just as one of the better Vietnamese restaurants, but one the city’ s best of any variety , particularly when value and price ar e taken into account. Authentic V ietnamese food is made with care and served with pride. $ ✿ CAFÉ THUY V AN 5600 National T urnpike, 3666959. A bit of f the beaten track, this South End spot is true, authentic Vietnamese. Friendly service overcomes any language barrier , and prices ar e hard to beat. Don’t miss the Banh Mi, traditional Vietnamese sandwiches. $ ✿ LA QUE 1019 Bar dstown Rd., 238-3981. Replacing the original Lemongrass in the Highlands (which continues to operate its suburban pr operties), La Que offers a similar blend of Vietnamese and other Asian cuisine. $ f h ✿ LEMONGRASS CAFÉ 11606 Shelbyville Rd., 2447110, 106 Fairfax Ave., 893-7757. Lemongrass Café offers an appealing blend of V ietnamese, Thai and Chinese fare in a simple setting that transcends an obviously low budget with style and grace. $ h ✿

MAI’S THAI REST AURANT 1411 E. T enth St., Jeffersonville, IN, 282-0198. With a broad range of well-prepared and authentic Thai dishes, Mai’ s is the eater y to beat among the metr o ar ea’s Thai restaurants. For both authenticity and quality , it’s right up ther e with the top Thai places in New York, San Francisco and Seattle. $ ✿

PHO BINH MINH 6709 Strawberry Ln., 375-9249. Tiny and lovably cozy , this six-table South End spot is true authentic V ietnamese, and so ar e the proprietors. There’s some language barrier, but the owners are so friendly, and the food so good, that it’s worth the ef fort if you love r eal Asian far e and inexpensive prices. $ ✿

SALA THAI 526 W. Main St., 493-3944. After a move to a smaller , mor e casual downtown venue, Sala Thai continues its run as one of the best Thai restaurants in town. $$ p f ✿

VIETNAM KITCHEN 5339 Mitscher Ave., 363-5154. This little South End stor efront is well wor th seeking out. The chef goes beyond the or dinary, preparing authentic V ietnamese dishes of unusual subtlety and flavor. We have yet to be disappointed with the quality of the food or ser vice. $ ✿

SIMPLY THAI 318 W allace A ve., 899-9670. Owner Mahn Saing is Burmese; his wife, a classically trained RED = ADVERTISER

p = FULL BAR

f = OUTDOOR DINING

e = LIVE MUSIC


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:43 AM

Page 77

ZEN GARDEN 2240 Frankfor t A ve., 895-9114. Vegetarians with a philosophical bent have found a combination guru and den mother in Zen Garden’s owner Coco, who ser ves up sincer e and soulful Asian vegan dishes.$ f ✿

BEHAR CAFÉ 5600 National T urnpike, 368-5658. This shopping-center stor efront has become a popular after -work gathering spot for the city’ s growing community of immigrants fr om Bosnia, for whom it’s a comfor table place to get a drink, a sausage, and feel at home. $ h ✿ BOSNA-MAK 3825 Old Bar dstown Rd., 456-1919. Friendly and exceptionally hospitable, familyowned BosnaMak celebrates the heritage of the owners and chefs in Bosnia and Macedonia in the Balkans and picks up a few culinary additions from their time in Germany. $ f ✿

ERIKA’S GERMAN REST AURANT 9301 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy. 499-8822. For a city with a str ong German heritage, Louisville is woefully shor t on authentic German r estaurants, but this genuinely Germanic eatery attracts hungr y cr owds to Hurstbourne. Take care not to miss its former fastfood quarters just off I-64 local access ramp. $$ GASTHAUS 4812 Br ownsboro Center , 899-7177. Michael and Annemarie Greipel came here with their five kids in 1993, straight fr om Nor th RhineWestphalia to St. Matthews. Tiny lights twinkle from strands of fake red geraniums. But the hearty German fare — schnitzels, sauerbraten and rouladen with red cabbage and dumplings — is the r eal thing. $$$

BRENDAN’S RESTAURANT & PUB 3921 Shelbyville Rd., 895-1212. This St. Matthew outpost of the O’Shea’s Irish bar empir e r eeks with atmospher e. The brick walls look aged, the wood weathered and photos of old St. Matthews line the walls. Irish and non-Irish love the bar and the menu has daily specials, like the lepr echaun hangover bur ger, catfish po’ boy and bison and goat cheese lasagna. $$ p e h ✿ IRISH ROVER 2319 Frankfort Ave., 899-3544, 117 E. Main St, LaGrange, 222-2286. Owner Michael Reidy is the Irish r over, having come to the U.S. from County Clar e in 1984. His saloons ar e as smooth as Guinness, as warm as fish and chips, as genuine as Scotch eggs. The Frankfort Avenue building dates from 1859. $ p f ✿ MOLLY MALONE’S 933 Baxter A ve., 473-1222. A carefully constructed r eplica of a modern urban Irish pub, Molly Malone’s is a worthy addition to the city’s eating and drinking scene, as authentically Irish as the Wearin’ o’ the Green. A second location, 3900 Shelbyville Rd., is set to open in September . $$ p f e h ✿ O’SHEA’S TRADITIONAL IRISH PUB 956 Baxter Ave., 589-7373. One of the most popular watering holes in the entir e Bar dstown-Baxter corridor . Twenty-somethings and Louisville belles love its action. But diners of all ages like its meat loaf, roast beef and Irish stew. When music fills the rooms, it’s great to be Irish, even if you’r e not. $$ p f e h ✿ RI RA IRISH PUB 427 S. Four th St. (Four th Str eet Live) 587-1825. Pr omising patr ons “an authentic Irish experience,” this gr owing chain opened last year in a sizable 9,000-square-foot space in Fourth Street Live. Ri Ra (Gaelic for “celebration and good fun”) decorates its pubs with authentic furnishings from Ireland. $$$ p f e h ✿ SHENANIGAN’S IRISH GRILL 1611 Norris Pl., 4543919. Not just a neighbor hood tavern (although it’s a fine neighbor hood tavern), Irish-accented

h = LATE NIGHT

Shenanigan’s goes an extra step with an estimable selection of memorable burgers. $ p f e h ✿

ADRIENNE’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 129 W. Court Ave., Jef fersonville, IN, 282-2665. The owners of popular Adrienne’ s Baker y in Jef fersonville have recently opened this new sit-down dining spot with an Italian theme. $$ f ✿ AMICI´ 316 W. Ormsby A ve., 637-3167. Scott and Sharon Risinger ser ve satisfying traditional Tuscan dishes in this inter esting — and supposedly haunted — Old Louisville building. Dine inside or on the romantic patio on a lovely summer evening, There’s no extra char ge if the ghosts want to shar e your penne alla Lorenzo or Valpolicella. $$ p f ✿ ANGELINA’S CAFÉ 1701 UPS Dr ., 326-5555. Y ou don’t have to be an Italian grandfather to play bocce, now that ther e ar e several venues ar ound town for this amiable game. The six-cour t suburban Gotcha Bocce, run by spor tscaster Bob Valvano, also houses this casual all-Italian eatery , with dishes based on Bob’s family recipes. $ ✿ BUCA DI BEPPO 2051 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 4932426. Buca di Beppo’ s recipe has all the necessar y ingredients: huge portions of excellent food served with flair and the Buca scene is fun, a conscious parody of the exuberant decor of family ItalianAmerican restaurants of the 1950s. $$ p ✿ CARRABBA’S ITALIAN GRILL 617 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 412-2218. Not your or dinary suburban shopping-center franchise eatery . This place dramatically exceeds expectations. Fr om warmed bread dishes with quality olive oil to first-rate ItalianAmerican fare at reasonable prices. $$ p f ✿ COME BACK INN 909 Swan St., 627-1777, 415 Spring St., Jef fersonville IN, 285-1777. W ith both its branches located in urban neighbor hoods, Come Back Inn looks pr etty much like any other neighborhood saloon. But unlike most Louisville neighborhood saloons, this one houses a family Italian spot that wouldn’ t be out of place in Chicago or Brooklyn. $ p ✿ THE INTERNATIONAL MALL 737 S. Eighth St., 561-8871. $ ✿ LA GALLO ROSSO BISTRO1325 Bardstown Rd., 4730015. This small but attractive Highlands spot in the Shoppes on the Alley ser ves casual Italian and Continental food in a cozy family-style setting. $$ f MARTINI ITALIAN BISTRO 4021 Summit Plaza Dr., 394-9797. The successful formula of this Ohiobased chain featur es hear ty and well-fashioned Italian entrées, pastas and pizzas ser ved up in a comfortable appr oximation of a T uscan trattoria. An open kitchen with wood-fired oven gives a peek at the culinary goings-on. $$$ p f h ✿ OLD SPAGHETTI FACTORY 235 W. Market St., 5811070. One of the original ventur es of this national firm. Bright and noisy , it of fers well-made if basic Italian family fare and dishes it out for surprisingly low prices. $$ p h ✿ THE OLIVE GARDEN 1320 Hurstbourne Pkwy., 3397190, 9730 Von Allmen Ct., 425-3607, 1230 Veterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 218-8304. The top property of the Darden chain, Olive Gar den now operates mor e than 500 pr operties and bills itself as the leading Italian restaurant in the casual dining industry. Hearty pastas of all shapes and sauces, appetizers and combo platters all carry the Italian theme. $$ p ✿ PESTO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 566 S. Fifth St., 584-0567. Of fices for blocks ar ound empty into this bustling Italian eatery for weekday lunches featuring hear ty platters of lasagna, zesty salads, red wine and iced tea. On Satur days, the kitchen switches over to a special Persian menu. $ ✿ PORCINI 2730 Frankfor t A ve., 894-8686. This anchor trattoria of the Cr escent Hill dining scene

✿ = VEGETARIAN MENU ITEMS

 = MENU AVAILABLE ON-LINE ONLY

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 77


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:43 AM

Page 78

situated to of fer quick and af fordable sustenance along the Bar dstown-Baxter enter tainment strip. Look for the usual Middle Eastern far e in a casual, quick-service setting. $$ f h ✿

has been serving up risotto, ossobuco and bistecca since 1992. Crowds wait at the popular bar for one of the tables — or just wait at the bar . $$$ p ✿ RAY PARRELLA’S ITALIAN CUISINE 2311 Frankfort Ave., 899-5575. The Louisville home of authentic “peasant-style” Italian cooking: meatballs, spaghetti, red sauce, garlic br ead. The place is simple, warm and cozy. Brooklyn-born Parrella himself is the consummate Italian host. $$ f ✿ ROCKY’S SUB PUB 715 W . Riverside Dr ., Jeffersonville IN, 282-3844. This longtime favorite earns its popularity with fine pizzas, a good selection of bottled beers and a select choice of Italian-American entrées and a view of the Louisville skyline that’s hard to beat. $ p f ✿ ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL 401 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 423-9220. The Italian-style menu at this casual, Dallas-based family chain includes appetizers, salads, pastas, veal and desser ts. Chefs entertain while creating wood-fired pizzas. $$ p ✿ SAVINO’S ITALIAN FOOD 8533 Terry Rd., 933-1080. $✿ SPAGHETTI SHOP 4657 Outer Loop, 969-5545, 4510 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 944-5400. Baked pasta dishes, subs, salads and appetizers ar e prepared while you wait. $ ✿ STEVE-O’S ITALIAN KITCHEN 4205 W. Hwy. 146, LaGrange, KY, 222-0300. Outstanding pizzas and fine family-style Italian-American dishes make this casual eatery just of f I-71 at Buckner well wor th a special trip out from the city. $$ f ✿ TUSCANY ITALIAN RESTAURANT 165 Outer Loop, 363-0308. Adding an appetizing option to a stretch of the South End that hasn’ t been over -served by restaurants, this good-sized stor efront near New Cut Road boasts a Mexican chef who demonstrates an exper t’s hand with hear ty, r ed-sauced ItalianAmerican fare at a price that’s right. $$ h ✿ VOLARE 2300 Frankfor t Ave., 894-4446. The name evokes Sinatra, pasta with tomato sauce and candles in Chianti bottles, but stylish V olare kicks that image up a notch. W ith a combination of Italian standards and monthly menu updates, Chef Josh Moore and host Majid Ghavami have secur ed Volare as the city’s top spot for suave Italian dining. $$$ p f ✿

BOMBAY GRILL 216 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 4258892. W ith its br oad array of Indian r egional specialties including the r equisite lunch buf fet, this spot in The Forum on Hurstbourne is winning praise for its aromatic flavors and bountiful portions. $$ ✿ DAKSHIN INDIAN RESTAURANT 4742 Bardstown Rd., 491-7412. Owned and operated by the same family that brings us Kashmir Restaurant and Bombay Gr ocery in the Highlands, this addition brings aromatic and spicy Southern Indian far e to the Buechel-Fern Cr eek neighbor hood in the Eastland Shopping Center. $$ ✿ INDIA PALACE 9424 Shelbyville Rd., 394-0490. This longtime local Indian r estaurant is a r egular contender for the city’ s top Indian spot. The expansive lunch buf fet is well handled and a particularly good value. $ f ✿ KASHMIR INDIAN RESTAURANT 1285 Bardstown Rd., 473-8765. One of the city’ s most popular Indian restaurants, Kashmir is casual, neither posh nor expensive, and it pr oduces an extensive menu of seemingly authentic Indian fare. $$ f ✿ SAGE INDIAN REST AURANT 4123 Oechsli A ve., 896-0025. St. Matthews diners now have a local purveyor of fine aromatic Northern Indian meat and vegetarian cuisine in Sage Indian Restaurant. $$p ✿ SHALIMAR INDIAN REST AURANT 1820 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 493-8899. Modern and sleek in appearance, modest in price, this r estaurant has become the patriar ch of local Indian r estaurants. With a substantial lunch buf fet and a full range of dinner items, it has built a loyal clientele. $$ p ✿ SITAR INDIAN RESTAURANT 1702 Bardstown Rd., 473-8889. Named after the Indian stringed musical instrument that Ravi Shankar made famous, Sitar features a full Indian menu and buf fet. It’s the first Louisville property for a tiny new chain with four places in Tennessee and one in Alabama. $$ ✿

A.J.’S GYRO CAFÉ 9280 IN 64, Geor getown, IN, 951-1715, 768 Highlander Point Dr ., Floyds Knobs, IN, 923-4976. A r ecent name change now reflects what this Southern Indiana eater y has always done well, serving up authentic Greek gyros and side dishes. A second location with inside seating has been added in Floyds Knobs. $ f ✿

DE LA TORRE’S 1606 Bar dstown Rd., 456-4955. Authentic Castilian far e includes a majestic paella. but the renewed focus at this Highlands standby is tapas, in such variety that you can have anything on the menu in small-plates form. $$$ ✿

AL W ATAN 3713 Klondike Ln., 454-4406. Classic Arabic dishes home-cooked by friendly people in a cozy environment. That’s the r ecipe that makes Al Watan a destination for lovers of fine Middle Eastern fare. $ h ✿

LA BODEGA 1604 Bardstown Rd., 456-4955. Nextdoor to the excellent De La T orre’s Spanish restaurant, La Bodega of fers diners the city’ s most authentic Spanish-style tapas bar , featuring the small bites originally invented in the outdoor cafés of Jerez. $$ p f h ✿

CAFÉ 360 1582 Bardstown Rd., 473-8694. The latest in a long series of eateries in this pleasant Highland’s building offers an eclectic and international menu, with Southern fried catfish and Indian lamb bir yani in immediate juxtaposition. You can get it all, dinerstyle, just about 24/7. $ p f h ✿

MOJITO TAPAS RESTAURANT 2231 Holiday Manor Shopping Center , 425-0949. An of fshoot of the popular St. Matthews Cuban r estaurant Havana Rumba, Mojitos quickly established its own identity as the East End spot for Spanish-inspir ed small plates with a global taste pr ofile. Always crowded on weekends; no r eservations, but call ahead to get high on the waiting list. $ p f h ✿

CAPTAIN PEPPER JACK’S AERO BISTRO 2810 Taylorsville Rd., 454-2777. This new place has an aeronautical mood to it: the name, the travel posters, the location near Bowman Field. The menu itself flies all over the world, too, fr om American-style fried chicken and bar food to Caribbean plantains with mango marmalade to Middle Eastern kabobs and gyros. $$ p h ✿

PALERMO VIEJO 1359 Bar dstown Rd., 456-6461. Louisville’s best sour ce for authentic Ar gentine cooking: lots of beef (and chicken) slow-cooked over charcoal and Latin versions of Italian dishes, like chicken Milanesa. Palermo V iejo is the Little Italy of Buenos Air es, hometown of owner Francisco Elbl’s father. $$ p f ✿

CASPIAN GRILL PERSIAN BISTRO 1416 Bardstown Rd., 365-3900. Joining the gr owing ranks of Louisville’s Persian restaurants, this small Highlands dining r oom is gaining good wor d-of-mouth for well-prepared food and cordial service. $ ✿

78 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

THE F ALAFEL HOUSE 1001 Bar dstown Rd., 4544407. This small Highlands spot is strategically RED = ADVERTISER

GRAPE LEAF 2217 Frankfor t A ve., 897-1774. Relatively recent renovations and an expanded menu have elevated the Grape Leaf to destination status, placing it well above the generic Middle Eastern eatery niche. Prices remain affordable, while the food and mood now justify a special trip. $$ f ✿ OCEANSIDE RESTAURANT 3707 Klondike Ln., 4543737. This Hikes Point spot, run by a friendly Moroccan couple, offers a variety of fish and seafood dishes (plus chicken wings and other munchies), with a Middle Eastern accent. A couple of Moroccan dinner items are available in the $10 range. $ OMAR’S F AST FOOD REST AURANT 1272 S. Preston St., 637-1515. Comfor t food south-east Asian style. The owner’s wife brings family r ecipes and culinary study in Pakistan to bear on familiar fare such as chicken korma, chicken handi and biryani, and the Omar kebab, made with gr ound beef, onions and tomatoes. $ ✿ PITA DELIGHTS 1616 Grinstead Dr., 569-1122. This Near Eastern eater y in the Highlands of fers a splendid mix of gyr os, felafel and other pita-based goodies. $ f ✿ PITA HUT 1613 Bardstown Rd., 409-8484. A r ecent expansion mor e than doubled this tiny spot, offering mor e diners the chance to enjoy Mediterranean-Middle Eastern favorites, with the addition of a few “American” sandwiches — on fresh pita, of course. $ ✿ ROAD TO MOROCCO 308 W. Chestnut St., 376-5855. You can browse Moroccan arts and crafts and pick up a bottle of Mor occan wine at this little shop in the renovated Henry Clay building downtown, and stay for a light lunch that features Moroccan dishes and a broader range of Middle Eastern fare. $ f e ✿ SAFFRON’S 131 W. Market St., 584-7800. Louisville’s first quality Persian r estaurant is as inter esting as the spice for which it’s named and as smooth as its owner, Majid Ghavami. Roasted duck “fesenjoon” means “food of life,” and life would be much worse without this dish. But you must also tr y the lamb. $$$ p ✿ SAFIER MEDITERRANEAN DELI 641 S. Fourth St., 585-1125. You can get standar d American far e at this welcoming downtown quick-eats spot, but who’d do that when you can enjoy such appetizing Arabian delights as hummus, mutabal, falafels and the gyros-like (only better) shawarma beef-on-pita sandwich. $ f ✿ SHIRAZ MEDITERRANEAN GRILL 2011 Frankfor t Ave., 891-8854, 2226 Holiday Manor , 426-9954, 153 S. English Station Rd., 244-1341, 201 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 426-3440. Of fering authentic Persian (Iranian) cooking, Shiraz quickly gr ew out of its tiny original location to occupy a bright and colorful stor efront in the new Clifton Lofts complex; now it is expanding into a local mini-chain. In all its locations, Shiraz shines with char -grilled kebabs, fine pitas and lavish br ead. $ ✿ ZAYTUN MEDITERRANEAN GRILL 2286 Bardstown Rd., 365-1788. Fine, freshly prepared seafood is part of the draw in this upper Highlands Middle Eastern eatery—excellent gyros kick it up a notch. $ h ✿

FURLONGS 9601 Shelbyville Rd., 327-9299. The many fans of this popular eatery , distraught about its abrupt depar ture fr om Clifton, r ejoiced and returned in droves when Furlong’s reopened in the East end, in the lovely old house that was long home to Garrett’s. The menu offers well-conceived Cajun-style far e with a few surprises. W e suggest

p = FULL BAR

f = OUTDOOR DINING

e = LIVE MUSIC


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:43 AM

Page 79

that make most diners want to yell “Olé!” The setting may lack the tr endy flair of Rick Bayless’ Frontera Grill in Chicago, but the far e mines a similar vein and does so nearly as well. $ p f ✿

you don’t miss the mushr oom stuffed with shrimp and crabmeat on the appetizer list. $$$ p f h ✿ J. GUMBO’S 2109 Frankfor t A ve., 896-4046, 5 31 Lyndon Lane, 425-0096, Fourth Str eet Live, 5899245, 3115 S. Second St., 363-8888, 4005 Summit Plaza Dr., 326-3070, 8603 Citadel W ay, 493-4720. Former jockey Billy Fox has created a popular minichain serving hearty, affordable Cajun cuisine. After a stint focusing on expansion, he is now back in the saddle and in the kitchen again, to the delight of his fans. The drunken chicken is addictive. $ f JOE’S OK BAYOU 9874 Linn Station Rd., 426-1320, 4308 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 948-2080. Fine, filling and authentic Louisiana-style far e is the draw at Joe’ s. A lengthy menu and bayou fishing-shack decor showcases authentic Cajun and Creole chow. $$ p SELENA’S A T WILLOW LAKE T AVERN 10609 LaGrange Rd., 245-9004. New owner Alan Salmon has brought his Cajun/Cr eole food and T ampa Bay experience to the old W illow Lake T avern. The restoration and r enovation were extensive, turning this Anchorage roadhouse into a roomy and inviting restaurant. Shrimp or fish with Manale sauce is a tribute to Pascal Manale’s in New Orleans. And don’t miss the Saturday seafood boils. $$ p f h ✿

CACHITO MIO CUBAN CAFÉ 11316 Maple Br ook Rd., 326-3544. This East End spot is primarily a Cuban-accented coffee shop, but you can also get a fine Cuban sandwich, pastries and empanadas. There’s also a small specialty gr ocery with Cuban and Brazilian goods. $ ✿ HAVANA RUMBA 4115 Oechsli A ve., 897-1959. A true taste of Old Havana, this bright, inviting Cuban restaurant is sibling to the equally popular Mojito T apas Restaurant. Bountiful ser vings of Cuban fare as good as any in Key W est or Miami, not to mention a hopping mojito bar , have earned Havana Rumba a place on our shor t list of local favorites. $ p f ✿

EL NOP AL (10 Locations) These locally owned restaurants have become a gr owing mini-chain, winning popularity on the basis of delicious, authentic and inexpensive Mexican far e in comfortable surroundings. $ p f ✿ EL NOPALITO 4028 Taylorsville Rd., 458-7278, 6300 Bardstown Rd., 231-4249, 2319 Br ownsboro Rd., 893-9880. This modest little eater y used to be a Taco Bell, but you’ll never find comidas like this at the Bell! Run by a family fr om Mexico, it’ s truly authentic and delicious. $ p f ✿ EL REY MEXICAN REST AURANT 2918 Hikes Ln., 454-6520. Although it’ s mor e Mexican-American than har d-core ethnic Mexican, El Rey earns our recommendation for tasty far e, cordial service in a pleasant fast-Mexican-food envir onment, and affordable prices. $ f ✿ EL RODEO MEXICAN REST AURANT 9070 Dixie Hwy., 995-8722. At El Rodeo, you’ll find a blend of Tex-Mex and other Latin American classics fr om salty margaritas to sweet sopapillas. $$ ✿ EL T ARASCO 5425 New Cut Rd., 368-5628, 110 Fairfax Ave., 895-8010, 9901 LaGrange Rd., 3269373, 9606 T aylorsville Rd., 297-8003. Add El Tarasco to the happy new genr e of restaurants run by Latinos and of fering authentic Mexican food and atmosphere, but that r each out to Anglos and make it easy to enjoy a South-of-the-Bor der culinary adventure without compromise. $ p ✿ EL TORO MEXICAN REST AURANT 1810 Hurstbourne Parkway, 491-7272, 10602 Shelbyville Rd., 489-3839. One of the top Mexican restaurants in the metro, El Toro earns our recommendation for food, service and envir onment. Tex-Mex dishes ar e fine,

but save r oom for the authentic Mexican seafood specialties. $ p f ✿ ERNESTO’S 10430 Shelbyville Rd., 244-8889, 6201 Dutchmans Ln., 893-9297, 4632A S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 671-5291. One of the first of the mor e authentic locally-owned Mexican restaurant groups, Ernesto’s r emains consistently r eliable. F rom the crispy home-fried chips to filling Mexican main courses and tasty desserts, it’s a worthy destination for good Mexican food and excellent value in an enjoyable atmosphere. $ p f e ✿ FIESTA TIME MEXICAN GRILL 11320 Maple Brook Dr., 425-9144. $ p ✿ LA BAMBA 1237 Bardstown Rd., 451-1418. La Bamba boasts of its “burritos as big as your head.” It may be Louisville’s most startling case of an eater y that is more than it appears to be, and that goes for both quality and quantity. Franchised and fast-foodish, it pleasantly surprises with genuine Mexican far e and Latino flair. $ h ✿ LA HERRADURA 615 Eastern Blvd., Clarksville, IN., 280-8650. Is it possible to enjoy truly authentic tacqueria cuisine when the management speaks mostly Spanish and you speak only English? These friendly folks make it simple: a handy bilingual menu and a smiling staff make you feel at home.$ ✿ LA MONARCA 6501 Shepherdsville Rd., 969-7938. $ ✿ LA PERLA DEL P ACIFICO 2840 Goose Cr eek Rd., 969-4445. You may want to bring a Spanish phrase book to this East End spot, wher e English is sometimes tentative. It’ s wor th the ef fort though, for excellent authentic Mexican seafood and fish dishes that go well beyond taqueria status. $$ ✿ LA ROSITA MEXICAN GRILL 1515 E. Market St., New Albany, IN, 944-3620, 113 Grant Line Ctr ., 948-7967. Housed in an historic stor efront, this Mexican r estaurant br eaks fr om the pack by presenting traditional Mexican dishes not found

NILE RESTAURANT 5312 S. Third St., 384-9030. $ p h

ARANDAS MEXICAN REST AURANT 7200 Preston Hwy., 969-2492. $ p h ✿ BAZO’S FRESH MEXICAN GRILL 4014 Dutchmans Ln., 899-9600. Now moved fr om the hear t of St. Matthews to Dupont Cir cle, Bazo’s Fresh Mexican Grill is an inexpensive, casual spot for fine fish tacos and simple fast-food Mexican far e. $ f ✿ BUENOS DIAS CAFÉ 1703 Charlestown NA Pike, Jeffersonville, IN, 282-2233. $ ✿ CANCUN MEXICAN GRILL 9904 Linn Station Rd., 327-0890. $ e ✿ DON PABLOS MEXICAN KITCHEN 940 E. Lewis & Clark Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 284-1071. Based in Atlanta, this Mexican-American chain, of fers full bar ser vice and a variety of dishes that range from sizzling fajitas to crisp salads tossed in a fajita shell. $$ p ✿ EL BURRITO DE ORO 1927 Gr eentree Blvd., Clarksville IN, 285-8820. $ ✿ EL CAPORAL 2209 Meadow Dr ., 473-7840, 1901 Blankenbaker Pkwy ., 515 E. Highway 131, Clarksville, IN, 282-7174. Louisville’ s gr owing Mexican-American community has foster ed a happy trend: excellent, authentic Mexican food. El Caporal bridges the gap between the Latino and Anglo communities. $ p ✿ EL MUNDO 2345 Frankfor t A ve., 899-9930. This crowded, noisy little Crescent Hill storefront offers creative renditions of Mexican r egional specialties

h = LATE NIGHT

✿ = VEGETARIAN MENU ITEMS

 = MENU AVAILABLE ON-LINE ONLY

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 79


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:43 AM

elsewhere. The Grant Line spot provides quick but fine taqueria fare. $ f ✿ LA ROSIT A T AQUERIA 1404 Blackiston Mill Rd., Clarksville, IN, 284-1362. $ LA TAPATIA RESTAURANT 8106 Preston Hwy., 9619153. One of the most authentic ethnic Mexican restaurants in Louisville, this little storefront offers memorable tacos and burritos and mor e. $ p ✿ LAS GORDITAS 4756 Bardstown Rd., 492-0112. As Louisville’s small but thriving Latino community grows, it’ s now possible to enjoy an authentic Mexico City-style dining experience at this taco and gor dita wagon that r olls up in the Eastland Shopping Center every Friday thr ough Monday evening. Family owners and chefs Pat and Esperanza Costas and Ofelia Or tiz are completely bilingual, and as friendly as can be. $ f ✿ LOLITA’S TACOS 4222 Poplar Level Rd., 459-4356. This tiny place may look like a fast-food joint, but the food is about as authentic Mexican as you’ll find. Crisp or soft tacos and burritos the size of paper-towel r olls turn a meal her e into a r eal bargain. $ f ✿ LOS AZTECAS 530 W. Main St., 561-8535, 1107 Herr Ln., 426-3994, 9207 U.S. Hwy . 42, 228-2450. Authentic Mexican cuisine has become a viable option in Louisville, thanks to a gr owing immigrant community . W ith fr esh bar and blender offerings, cr eative appetizers and comfor table seating, Los Aztecas is one of the best, with tasty Mexican dishes good enough to lur e us back again and again. $ p ✿ MAYAN CAFÉ 813 E. Market St., 566-0651. Chef Bruce Ucán has r eturned to his original location in the burgeoning NuLu gallery district, and updated it into a stylish bistr o. The distinctive cuisine, fr om Ucán’s native Y ucatan Peninsula, tr eats pork, scallops, mussels and even lima beans memorably. $$ ✿ MEXICAN FIEST A 5414 Bar dstown Rd., 762-0840, 4507 Bardstown Rd., 491-2922 $ ✿ MEXICANO 6911 Shepher dsville Rd., 962-8526. Traditional Mexican fare from the Ramirez family. $ ✿ MEXICO TIPICO REST AURANT 6517 Dixie Hwy ., 933-9523, 12401 Shelbyville Rd., 253-9828. One of the r egion’s first authentic Mexican eateries, Mexico T ipico has built a loyal following in for good Mexican food and friendly , fully bilingual service; now it r eaches the East End with a brandnew property in the Middletown area. $ p e ✿ MY PATRIA 808 Lyndon Ln., 339-9420. $ ✿ PUERTO V ALLARTA 4214 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 945-3588, 125 Quar termaster Ct., Jeffersonville, IN, 288-2022, 7814 Beulah Cur ch Rd., 239-4646. $$ p ✿ QDOBA MEXICAN GRILL 1500 Bar dstown Rd., 454-3380, 970 Breckinridge Ln., 721-8100, 4059 Summit Plaza Drive, 429-5151, 100 Daventr y Ln., 412-6202, 2730 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 4939606, 3021 Poplar Level Rd., 637-5405, 4302 Charlestown Rd., New Albany IN, 941-9654, 1321 Herr Ln., 618-3622, 11910 Standifor d Plaza Dr ., 736-6198. This chain operation extends fr om Louisville to Frankfor t and Lexington. Fastfoodish in style, Qdoba edges out its competitors on the basis of variety and inter esting salsas, plus sizable portions at a price you can af ford. $ f ✿ ROSTICERIA LUNA 5213B Preston Hwy., 962-8898. Tiny and cluttered and very friendly, this little spot on Pr eston looks like another tacqueria but the specialty, Mexican-style roasted chicken, takes it to another level, juicy and succulent and r oasted golden br own. Chicken simply doesn’ t get any better than this. $ ✿ RUBEN’S MEXICAN REST AURANT 1370 Veterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN. 258-0417. $$ p ✿ SANTA FE GRILL 3000 S. Third St., 634-3722. This tiny eater y in a centur y-old r ed-brick South End 80 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Page 80

storefront near Chur chill Downs never fails to satisfy with genuine Mexican tacos and other simple fare at prices that will leave you plenty of change for an exacta bet at the races. $ ✿ SEÑOR IGUANA’S 1415 Br oadway St., Clarksville, IN, 280-8555, 3105 S. Second St., 368-0876. These two Mexican-American eateries — the Indiana venue is in the former Jerry’s — are known for their hearty, well-prepared Mexican food, and plenty of it, in a casually laid-back, comfor table spor ts-bar atmosphere. $ p f ✿ SOL AZTECAS 2427 Bardstown Road, 459-7776, 2350 Frankfort Ave., 895-3333. Saul Garcia, who’s known for the local chain of Los Aztecas eateries, has started this new chain, raising the bar with a broader menu. His many Los Aztecas fans will find familiar dishes, along with some pleasant surprises. $ p h ✿ TACO BUENO 2909 Hwy. 62 Jef fersonville IN, 2844073, 2350 Shane Dr ., 493-2008. This gr owing Texas-based chain, a competitor to Taco Bell, now has two locations in the Louisville metr o. Early reports declare it “better than the Bell.” $ f ✿ TACO TICO 5925 Terry Rd., 449-9888. Founded in Wichita in 1962, the same year as T aco Bell was born in Southern California, The T aco Tico chain has been gone fr om Louisville for mor e than a decade. Its happy r eturn has been drawing remarkable crowds. $ ✿ TACQUERIA LA MEXICANA 6201 Pr eston Hwy ., 969-4449. The tacos are fine at this tiny storefront. This is seriously ethnic stuf f, but Anglos ar e thoroughly welcome, the staff is bilingual, and they will happily pr ovide a menu with all the English translations written in. $ ✿ YELLOW CACTUS 3620 Paoli Pk., Floyds Knobs, IN, 903-0313. Another in a gr owing list of ar ea TexMex r estaurants. New place calls itself a Mexican restaurant and American steakhouse. $ p h ✿

MOE’S SOUTHWEST GRILL 2001 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 491-1800, 1001 Br eckinridge Ln., 8936637, 4652 Chamberlain Ln., 425-3330, 1020 Veterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, (812) 288-6637, 9310 Cedar Center W ay, 614-7722. The food may be mor e fast-food Mexican-American than authentic South-of-the-Border fare, but it is freshly made fr om quality ingr edients and comes in oversize portions, and that’s not a bad thing. $ ✿ ON THE BORDER 10601 Fischer Park Dr ., 4122461. A contemporary spin on traditional favorites offers a range of delights fr om the Ultimate Fajita to margaritas in a setting that emulates Old Mexico décor. $$ p f ✿ SALSARITA’S FRESH CANTINA 285 N. Hubbar ds Ln., 897-5323. Another entry in the hot “Fr esh Mexican” niche that features gigantic burritos made to order. Its colorful free-standing building houses a sit-in restaurant and an inviting bar. $ p f ✿ TUMBLEWEED SOUTHWEST GRILL (15 locations). Tumbleweed started as a humble Mexican restaurant in New Albany and eventually came to dominate Louisville’s Tex-Mex niche with colossal margaritas, gigantic burritos and spicy chili con queso. Southwestern far e adds steaks and grilled far e to the familiar Tex-Mex with a formula that continues to draw diners in dr oves, but the ’Weed doesn’t stray far from its roots. $$ p f h ✿

BEAN STREET CAFÉ 101 Lafollette Station, Floyds Knobs, IN, 923-1404. Bean Str eet intr oduced the Sunny Side to the joys of serious espr esso. Like all good coffee shops, they’re not just an eater y, but a cultural hangout. $ f

RED = ADVERTISER

CAFFE CLASSICO 2144 Frankfort Ave., 894-9689. $ COFFEE CROSSING 4212 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 981-2633. $ COFFEE POT CAFÉ 234 E. Gray St. (Medical Tower South), 584-5282 $ f ✿ DAY’S ESPRESSO AND COFFEE BAR 1420 Bardstown Rd., 456-1170. Dark and cozy , with an old-fashioned feeling, Day’ s has ever ything you would expect in a college-neighbor hood cof fee shop except a college near by. $ f DERBY CITY ESPRESSO 331 E. Market St., 4420523. A highlight in Louisville’ s r oster of serious coffee shops, Derby City featur es quality cof fee from several ar tisanal r oasters, plus fine tea, pastries, and now craft beers. $ f e ✿ EXPRESSIONS OF YOU 1800 W . Muhammad Ali Blvd., 584-6886. $ f e ✿ HEINE BROTHERS COFFEE 2714 Frankfor t A ve., 899-5551, 1295 Longest A ve., 456-5108, 2200 Bardstown Rd., 515-0380, 118 Chenoweth Ln., 893-5103, 1449 Bar dstown Rd., 454-5212, 4123 Shelbyville Rd., 894-9413. Spar tan, friendly and affordable, with good coffee r oasted on the premises and a shor t list of pastries, desserts and panini sandwiches, Heine Br os. has earned its outstanding local reputation. $ f e HIGHLAND COFFEE CO. 1140 Bardstown Rd., 4514545. Of fering two ways to get wir ed, this cozy neighborhood cof fee shop also functions as one of Louisville’s top Internet cafés, where you can enjoy a hot cappuccino while you surf the ’net in a WiFi hot spot. Funky Seattle-style ambience is a plus. $ f THE HOBKNOBB ROASTING CO. 3700 Paoli Pike, Floyds Knobs, IN, 923-1458. HobKnobb of fers fresh hot cof fee, espr esso drinks and fr esh baked pastries, cakes and cookies. $ f JAVA BREWING COMPANY 9561B U.S. Hwy. 42, 2922710, 516 W . Main St., 568-6339, 135 S. English Station Rd., 489-5677, Fourth Street Live, 561-2041, 2309 Frankfor t Ave., 894-8060. These casual spots boasts the ambience of a friendly old-fashioned book shop, with comfor table seating, a good selection of pastries, and quality coffee from Seattle. $ JEWEL’S HOUSE OF TEAS 632 Eastern Blvd., Clarksville, IN, 282-8327. $ JOE MUGGS 994 Breckenridge Ln. (Books-a-Million), 894-8606, 4300 Towne Center Dr., 426-2252. $ f LA VIDA JA VA COFFEE CO. 1301 Herr Ln., 4129393. La V ida Java of fers espr esso drinks and pastries in this welcoming spot in the W estport Village shopping center. $ f MRS. POTTER’S COFFEE 718 W. Main St., 581-1867. $✿ OLD LOUISVILLE COFFEE HOUSE 1489 S. Fourth St., 635-6660. $ f ✿ PERKFECTION 359 Spring St., Jef fersonville, IN, 218-0611. $ e QUARTER REST CAFÉ 3640 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy ., 491-9396. Inside the Hurstbourne Music Center , music lovers can find music-themed br eakfast dishes to for tify them as they shop for instruments or practice their craft. $ f e QUILL’S COFFEE SHOP 930 Baxter Ave., 742-6129. With its r ecent move to Bar dstown Road, Quills has updated its image, but faithful fans find that the joe is still fine, as are the pastries, and everyone lingers, with laptops and books. $ RAY’S MONKEY HOUSE 1578 Bardstown Rd., 4594373. A very nice fit with its crunchy-granola Highlands neighborhood, this “progressive coffee shop and gathering place” is consciously child-friendly . Look for quality or ganic cof fee r oasted on the premises and vegetarian/vegan snacks. $ f e ✿ RED HOT ROASTERS 1402 Payne St., 569-0000. The old drive-thr ough standby, Jackson’s Or ganic

p = FULL BAR

f = OUTDOOR DINING

e = LIVE MUSIC


58-81_Guide_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:43 AM

Coffee, is now Red Hot Roasters, with an expanded menu and new cold-br ewed iced cof fee drinks flavored with mocha, cinnamon and caramel. Note: Don’t look for Red Hot Roasters on Payne Str eet; the entrance is actually on Lexington Road. $ ✿ RIVER CITY COFFEE CAFÉ 2900 Brownsboro Rd., 618-2308. Don’t let the wor d “coffee” in the name fool you: This Cr escent Hill spot isn’ t just a cof fee shop. You can enjoy breakfast and lunch, including a good array of soups, salads, sandwiches and burgers. $ f ✿ SISTER BEAN’S 4956 Manslick Rd., 364-0082. $ f ✿ SONOMA COFFEE CAFÉ 3309 Poplar Level Rd., 384-0044. The first outlet in Kentucky of this franchise coffeteria. $ STARBUCKS COFFEE (35 locations) $ f SUNERGOS COFFEE & MICRO-ROASTER Y 2122 S. Preston St., 634-1243. Matthew Huested and Brian Miller used to r oast their own cof fee beans as a hobby. Their friends said they did it so well, they should turn pr o — the r esult is Suner gos Cof fee, another in the gr owing cadr e of espr esso bars in Louisville’s Germantown neighborhood. $ ✿ TRAILSIDE CAFÉ 1321 Herr Ln., 423-1545 $ VT’S BUBBLE CUP 1043 Bardstown Rd., 452-8899. Tea houses ar e a new rage. This Highlands place features a cute variation, bubble tea — a tapiocabased soft drink. Japanese teens love it. $ h ✿ ZEN TEA HOUSE 2246 Frankfor t A ve., 618-0878. Another entr y in the T ran family’s Frankfor t Ave. restaurant row. There is tea, of course, black, green, and white and herbal infusions, spring rolls, soups, and paninis, all vegetarian. $ f e h ✿

ADRIENNE & CO. BAKER Y CAFÉ 129 W. Cour t Ave., Jeffersonville, IN, 282-2665. If you need something for your sweet tooth and won’ t be denied,

h = LATE NIGHT

Page 81

count yourself lucky if the craving strikes when you’re in the vicinity of this cozy Southern Indiana spot, with its good selection of homemade cakes and treats. $ f ✿ THE BAKER Y 3100 Bar dstown Rd., 452-1210. Not just a fine baker y but a place wher e bakers learn their business, this excellent establishment is par t of the culinary pr ogram at Sullivan University . It’s hard to beat the quality breads and pastries offered here to eat in or carry out. $ ✿ BREADWORKS 3628 Br ownsboro Rd., 893-3200, 2420 Lime Kiln Ln., 326-0300, 2204 Dundee Rd., 452-1510, 11800 Shelbyville Rd., 254-2885. $ ✿ CAKE FLOUR 909 E. Market St., 719-0172. This jewel box shop serves up precious French pastries, quiche, scones and sweets seven days a week. The chef’s all-natural ethos and locavor e connections make for exquisite tastes. $ f ✿ COCO’S BAKERY 6915 Southside Drive, 368-9280. $ COCO’S CHOCOLATE CAFÉ 1759 Bar dstown Rd., 454-9810. Stylish, ar tisanal chocolates and baked goods made on the pr emises make this tiny Highlands spot a stylish place to stop and linger over for a dessert and a cup of cof fee. $ f THE CUPCAKE SHOPPE 3701 Lexington Rd., 8992970. You won’ t need thr ee guesses to name the specialty at this little St. Matthews baker y, which has gained instant popularity for its wide variety of moist, tender cupcakes, always made in house. $✿ THE DESSERT GALLERY 9305 New LaGrange Rd., 326-0700. Y ou’ll find just about anything you could want in the way of a desser t at this East End shopping center storefront, from cakes to brownies and cookies, and it’ s all hand-made fr om natural ingredients. $ DESSERTS BY HELEN 2210 Bar dstown Rd., 4517151, 9219 U.S. Hwy . 42, 228-8959. Helen Friedman has earned a loyal clientele since the

✿ = VEGETARIAN MENU ITEMS

 = MENU AVAILABLE ON-LINE ONLY

1970s with her elegant cakes, tempting pies and tortes and designer cookies. $ HEITZMAN TRADITIONAL BAKERY & DELI 9426 Shelbyville Rd., 426-7736, 428 W. Market St., 5842437. The Heitzman family has been baking in the Louisville ar ea since your gr eat-aunt was a girl ordering dinner r olls. Made fr esh daily, the pies, cakes, cookies and specialty pastries pr ovide tasty nostalgia for all who visit. $ ✿ MY FAVORITE MUFFIN 9800 Shelbyville Rd., 4269645. All the muf fins are made right in the stor e, including such popular choices as the Cinnamon Crumb and the Turtle Muffin. $ NORD’S BAKERY 2118 S. Preston St., 634-0931. This old-school, family-owned baker y on the edge of Germantown has a devoted following, drawn by divine Danish, donuts, and gr eat cof fee fr om the nearby Sunergos micro-roastery — and if you’r e a sucker for over -the-top excess, tr y the caramel donut topped with — yes, it’s true, bacon. $ THE PIE P ANTRY 9208 Dixie Hwy ., 384-0743. Lunch is served at this Southwest Louisville eatery but the main focus — and the str ongest reason to drive out that way — is the dozens of varieties of homemade pies. Por tions ar e lar ge and the selection extensive. $ f ✿ PLEHN’S BAKERY 3940 Shelbyville Rd., 896-4438. A neighborhood institution, this baker y is as busy as it is nostalgic. Enjoy the hometown soda fountain with ice cr eam while you wait for your handdecorated birthday cake, breakfast rolls or colorful cookies to be boxed. $ ✿ THE SWEET TOOTH 3110 Frankfort Ave., 895-4554. You’ll find an enticing collection of cakes, pies and other homemade goodies, plus excellent cof fee and a selection of loose-leaf teas, in this cozy little spot. $ ✿

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 81


82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:44 AM

MAP INDEX

MAP INDEX

MAP # DIRECTION PAGE # DOWNTOWN 84 1 Downtown Louisville NEAR EAST 85 2 Highlands – Crescent Hill EAST 86 3 St. Matthews SOUTH EAST 87 4 Hikes Point – Buechel EAST 88 5 Hurstbourne N. – Lyndon SOUTH EAST 89 6 Hurstbourne S. – Jeffersontown NORTH EAST 90 7 River Rd. – Brownsboro Rd. NORTH EAST 90 8 Westport Rd. FAR EAST 91 9 Middletown NORTH EAST 91 10 Prospect SOUTH EAST 91 11 Fern Creek SOUTH 92 12 Airport – Okolona SOUTH WEST 93 13 Shively – Pleasure Ridge Park INDIANA 94 14 New Albany – Floyds Knobs INDIANA 95 15 Clarksville INDIANA 95 16 Jeffersonville

82 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

Page 82


7/31/09

11:44 AM

Page 83

Bardstown Road 502.456.1702

Downtown

502-582-1995

Hurstbourne 502.426.0627

Prospect

502.292.2585

Jeffersonville 812.218.1995

(Sheraton Riverside Hotel) www.bristolbarandgrille.com www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 83

MAP INDEX

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp


7/31/09

DOWNTOWN > DOWNTOWN

MAP • 1

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp

84 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

11:44 AM

Page 84


11:44 AM

Page 85

MAP • 2

7/31/09

NEAR EAST > HIGHLANDS/CRESCENT HILL

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 85


7/31/09

EAST > ST. MATTHEWS

MAP • 3

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp

86 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

11:44 AM

Page 86


11:45 AM

Page 87

MAP • 4

7/31/09

SOUTH EAST > HIKES POINT/BUECHEL

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 87


7/31/09

EAST > HURSTBOURNE N./LYNDON

MAP • 5

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp

88 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

11:45 AM

Page 88


11:45 AM

Page 89

MAP • 6

7/31/09

SOUTH EAST > HURSTBOURNE S./JEFFERSONTOWN

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 89


MAP

7 > NORTH EAST > RIVER RD./BROWNSBORO RD. MAP

8 > NORTH EAST > WESTPORT ROAD

MAPS • 7 • 8

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp 7/31/09

90 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

11:45 AM Page 90


MAP

11 > SOUTH EAST > FERN CREEK

MAPS • 9 • 10 • 11

11:45 AM

9 > FAR EAST > MIDDLETOWN 10 > NORTH EAST > PROSPECT

7/31/09

MAP MAP

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp Page 91

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 91


7/31/09

SOUTH > AIRPORT/OKALONA

MAP • 12

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp

92 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

11:45 AM

Page 92


11:45 AM

Page 93

MAP • 13

7/31/09

SOUTH WEST > SHIVELY/PLEASURE RIDGE PARK

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 93


7/31/09

INDIANA > NEW ALBANY/FLOYDS KNOBS

MAP • 14

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp

94 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

11:45 AM

Page 94


15 > INDIANA > CLARKSVILLE

MAPS • 15 • 16

Page 95

MAP

11:45 AM

16 > INDIANA > JEFFERSONVILLE

7/31/09

MAP

82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp

www.foodanddine.com Fall 2009 95


82-96_Maps_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

96 Fall 2009 www.foodanddine.com

11:45 AM

Page 96


00_OBC OFC IFC IBC_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:18 AM

Page 4

hungry? like the wolf?

louisville

424 south 4th street 502-568-2202 â&#x20AC;˘ hardrock.com the official food of rock


00_OBC OFC IFC IBC_fall09.qxp

7/31/09

11:17 AM

Page 1

Fall 2009 (Vol. 25)  

Aug - Sep - Oct 2009