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SPRING 2007

top picks

memorable wines, beers & coffee

recipes

kentucky brunch dishes gingerbread pancakes

900 plus restaurant listings with reviews & maps

Let’s do Brunch! a celebration of life, good food and good company

$ 4 . 9 9 U. S .

www.foodanddiningmagazine.com


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Choose Your Dealership As Carefully as You Choose Your Car.

You’re Riding On Our Reputation!

The Sam Swope Auto Group is pleased to offer a vast selection of new automobiles from some of the finest manufacturers in the world making us the #1 new car dealer in the region. As the #1 used car dealer, Sam Swope is also The Used Car Authority with over 1,000 vehicles to choose from for immediate delivery. A Sam Swope Premier Pre-owned vehicle offers a quality automobile, at the right price, backed by an exclusive package of owner benefits including a 7 day exchange policy, warranty coverage up to 60 days, and complimentary Emergency Roadside Rescue. You can buy with confidence from a Sam Swope dealership. Quality automobiles. Competitive prices. Outstanding service. Once you see all that the Sam Swope Auto Group has to offer you will understand why‌

Swope Discount AutoCenter I I-64 & S. Hurstbourne Parkway I Louisville, KY 40299

502-499-5000 I www.SamSwope.com


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SPRING 2007 PUBLISHER JOHN CARLOS WHITE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF ROBIN GARR VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS DANIEL F. BOYLE COLUMNISTS ROGER A. BAYLOR JAY FORMAN ROBIN GARR RON JOHNSON DAVID LANGE JERRY SLATER CONTRIBUTING WRITERS GREG GAPSIS SCOTT HARPER MICHAEL L. JONES LEN STEVENS II CONTRIBUTING CHEFS TRACI BADENHAUSEN KATIE PAYNE CHIEF RESTAURANT CRITIC ROBIN GARR CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER DAN DRY MAGAZINE DESIGN & LAYOUT JOHN CARLOS WHITE GRAPHIC DESIGN KATHY KULWICKI STEFAN TAMBURRO COPY EDITORS MARY W. JOHNSON PAUL NAJJAR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES ANNETTE B. WHITE DISTRIBUTION / FACT CHECKING AMANDA HERSCHEL

Food & Dining Magazine ® is published quarterly by Louisville Dining Magazine, Inc. P.O. Box 665, Louisville KY 40201 The publisher and advertisers are not responsible or liable f or misprints, typographical errors or misinformation. The opinions expressed herein are those of the writ ers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the publisher. Food & Dining Magazine® and Louisville Dining Magazine Inc. are in no w ay affiliated with Louisville Magazine® or any of its affiliates. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. All rights reserved.

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Annual Subscription rate $18. Submit subscription requests to: Food & Dining Magazine ® P.O. Box 665, Louisville KY 40201, or call (502) 493-5511 ext. 540 or subscribe online at www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

For Advertising information call (502) 493-5511 ext. 550 ON THE COVER Winston’s Chef John Castro’s seafood omelet with lobster, shrimp, scallops, spinach and tomato, finished with Mornay sauce. (Feature story, page 12) 6

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Photo by Dan Dry


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contents

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SPRING 2007

FEATURES

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LET’S DO BRUNCH

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Brunch is a celebration of life, good food and the company we keep.Writer Greg Gapsis guides us on a tour of Louisville’s best.

RESTAURANT PROFILES: FOUR HIDDEN GEMS These leading local chefs toil at excellent restaurants that are highly regarded and on the rise … and a bit off the beaten path.

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COLUMNS

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COMINGS & GOINGS Every quarter we update you on openings, closings, moves and more activity on the local dining scene.

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HUMOR: Who knew? Being married to a pastry chef has taught writer Jay Forman more than he ever expected to learn about sweets.

ROAD TRIP: Kentucky Inns Ron Johnson reports on some of Kentucky’s most historic and evocative country inns.

LIQUIDS SPIRITS: Brunch beverage best bets Make yours Irish Coffee. Make mine a Bloody Mary. Mixologist Jerry Slater reviews the brunch beverage classics.

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CORK 101: Twenty wonderful wines

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Our panel of wine experts share tips on excellent wines that are hot at Louisville’s restaurants and wine shops.

HIP HOPS: A beer trifecta Brewmeister Roger A. Baylor celebrates the season with these reports on three memorably eclectic brews.

COFFEE: At last, top-notch restaurant coffee America’s coffee palate is becoming more and more refined, and we’re demanding excellence in restaurant coffee service.

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RECIPES TOP CHEF RECIPES: Dishing up brunch Sullivan University chef-instructors Traci Badenhausen and Katie Payne have come up with memorable brunch dishes featuring Kentucky flavors and ingredients.

RESTAURANT FAVORITES: Gingerbread Pancakes

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At Louisville’s Toast on Market, Chef George Morris fashions tender pancakes that will remind you of your grandmother’s gingerbread.

RESTAURANT GUIDE DINING GUIDE

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Our updated, comprehensive listing of over 900 area restaurants complete with reviews.

MAPS Find all of the restaurants in our Dining Guide on 16 area maps.

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news and notes

comings

& goings

Continuing the pace set in the previous quarter, restaurant openings in the Louisville region outpaced closings during the past three months, but only by a relatively slender margin. Nearly two dozen new restaurants opened during the quarter, while 20 spots closed their doors.The numbers, however, are somewhat improved when we count in the 15 new properties established by existing businesses, while only four individual chain units closed. Still, the pace of high-profile restaurant openings before Derby, traditionally an attractive target for new operations, lagged well behind the pace set in the first quarters of 2005 and 2006, raising quiet concerns about the impact of high fuel costs and a shaky economy on the local restaurant business.

OPENINGS One of the city’s hottest new spots is Mojito Tapas Restaurant, 2231 Holiday Manor Shopping Center, filling in the nicely renovated space vacated by La Peche II. A new venture of Fernando and Cristina Mar tinez, owners of Havana Rumba, with co-owners Marcos Lorenzo and Pedro Hernandez, Mojito’s gains excitement as we see young Martinez, who has already established himself as Louisville’s top Cuban chef, spread his wings with a broader Latino menu. Mojito offers a colorful Cuban setting that’s happily reminiscent of Havana Rumba, but it brings a broader Latin appeal with Spanish hot and cold tapas, tablas, paellas and international influences as well as a range of lighter-style Cuban and Caribbean small plates. Mojito jumped out to a quick start, drawing excited crowds with a buzz to match the word-of-mouth surrounding Basa Modern Vietnamese, 2244 Frankfort Avenue, which was featured in last quarter’s openings column but actually opened its doors only at the end of March. In other top restaurant-opening news, the folks who recently reopened Lentini’s and brought it exciting new life with an attractive physical renovation and a tasty authentic Italian menu are expanding fast, with two more restaurants under the same management coming soon.They expect to open Milano Café, 962 Baxter Avenue, before Derby, following a rough battle with 8

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the bureaucrats over its liquor license. Look for a casual venue with the emphasis on pasta, and local delivery on a signature Italian Vespa motor scooter. Out in the East End, DaVinci by Lentini’s, 10430 Shelbyville Road, is on the drawing boards for the former Buckhead Mountain Grill location. Over in the Highlands, Ballyhoo Baja Grill, 1702 Bardstown Road, kicks the fresh-burrito concept up a notch, with excellent Baja California-style fare including splendid fish and shrimp tacos. It’s the first Louisville outpost of Nashville’s Chili Burrito chain. Benny Impellizzeri will be back in business on Bardstown soon, returning the family’s massive signature pies to the Highlands in the former Alameda at Original Impellizzeri’s, 1381 Bardstown Road. (Not to be confused with his brother’s place, Tony Impellizzeri’s in the East End, where they’ve been serving the family pie for a dozen years.) Where Impellizzeri was a leader in developing the Louisville style of piled-high pizza, the simplicity of thin-crust New York City pizza has its fans, too, and aficionados will soon have another source for their favorite at Hero’s New York Pizza Pub, coming soon in a historic Town Square storefront at 10509 Watterson Trail in Jeffersontown. Also in J’town, the big old house at the other end of Town Square, once home to

Sir Churchill’s, has lost its British accent in favor of the American-style food and brews now served at The Gaslight Inn Restaurant & Tap, 10317 Watterson Trail. Other neighborhood eateries new to the community include Sportsville Grill & Bar, 4004 Gardiner Point Drive,

Mojito Tapas Restaurant Chef/Owner Fernando Martinez.


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replacing Duke’s in the Holiday Inn Airport; Woody’s Pub & Grill, 12205 Westport Road, replacing Hoop’s sports bar without much change in menu or decor; Angie’s Café, 4010 Dupont Circle, replacing C.A.P.P.P.’s Deli in the Dupont Professional Tower; and in New Albany, The Lancaster Café, 223 W. Fifth Street, where Troy Lancaster carries on the tradition started by his grandfather,Tommy Lancaster, although the nearby catering house that still bears the Tommy Lancaster name is no longer in family hands. The name alone signals that The Bizarre Café is one of the more offbeat new eateries in town. Now open at 1521 Baxter Avenue (former home of the shortlived Benedict’s Garden), the Bizarre bills itself as “an interactive Ripley’s Believe it or Not with awesome food!” Look for wraps, paninis and salads with lots of veggie options. If a shot of java suits you, add two more coffee houses to your hit list: It’s A Grind Coffee House, 2809 N. Hurstbourne Parkway, is a chain operation in the suburbs; Derby City Espresso, 331 E. Market Street, is a locally owned and operated shop just east of downtown. Topping the long list of new Chinese and Asian eateries is I Ching Asian Café, 893-7171, a new arrival in the Shelbyville Road Plaza, 4600 Shelbyville Road. First Louisville outpost of a popular Lexington spot, it bears some resemblance to Yang Kee Noodle in its upscale fast-Asian-food style. Finally, new Chinese fast-food or buffet arrivals, listed alphabetically, includes China Castle, 7420 Third Street Road; China City Buffet, 9228 Westport Road; Golden Star Chinese Restaurant, 3458 Taylor Boulevard; Hunan Wok, 6445 Bardstown Road; Red Sun Chinese Restaurant, 3437 Breckinridge Lane; Tasty Buffet, 11300 Chamberlain Lane, and Yummy Chinese Restaurant, 8605 Preston Highway. A number of local restaurants and chains have added new locations to their existing proper ties. Topping the list, the old, familiar Frank’s Steakhouse of Jeffersonville is opening another branch, taking over the old Garrett’s location at 9601 Shelbyville Road near Hurstbourne. Look for the new spot to be a bit more upscale and fancy than the down-home comfort of the Hoosier Frank’s. www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007

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The restaurant formerly known as Gumbo A Go-Go, changing its corporate name to J. Gumbo’s to avoid trademark issues as it morphs into a regional chain, is adding four more properties to bring its list up to seven.The new locations are at 6661 Dixie Highway, 3115 S. Second Street, 531 Lyndon Lane, and Fourth Street Live. Another fast-growing local mini-chain, El Nopal, also adds four new properties, at 4214 Outer Loop, 12937 Shelbyville Road, 6521 Paramount Park Drive and 12600 Taylorsville Road. A Cincinnati eatery that long since grew into a chain, Skyline Chili, moves in a new direction with its latest property at 4024 Dutchmans Lane in St. Matthews. Replacing a nearby property, this isn’t your parents’ Skyline: The menu is familiar but the venue is large, bright and attractively furnished, with decor and feel more akin to Panera Bread, say, than a chili parlor. Bearno’s Pizza opens another proper ty at 9207 W. Highway 42 in Prospect; and the following national chains add venues: Chili’s, 9720 Von Allmen Court; Jimmy John’s Sub Shop, 415 W. Jefferson Street, and McAlister’s Deli, 12911 Shelbyville Road.

CLOSINGS It’s always particularly disappointing to see a long-time favorite go, and the region suffered three such losses with the recent demise of Café Kilimanjaro, downtown at 649 S. Four th Street; the Cribstone Pub, 1202 Bardstown Road, and New Albany’s almost historic South Side Inn, 114 E. Main Street. Other high-profile closings included La Rouge, 252 E. Market Street, which sputtered to a halt a few months after the abrupt departure of founding co-chef Rick Adams; a brutal Courier-Journal review came too late to influence the closing but wrote a bitter obituary. Herman’s Delicatessen, 3985 Dutchmans Lane, failed to make it through its first year; Gumby’s Garden Room Café quietly shut its doors in the old Male High School cafeteria at 911 S. Fifth Street, and the colorfully painted Palapa Mexican Restaurant & Grill, 2901 Brownsboro Road, closed suddenly despite apparent good crowds and a popular lunch buffet. Some mystery surrounds the demise of Zap’s, an extremely popular gourmetstyle hot-dog shop at 423 W. Muhammad 10 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com


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Ali Boulevard, where the owners locked the doors and walked away without a word of good-bye at year’s end. Other recent closings, listed alphabetically, include Bluegrass Café, 3255 Bardstown Road; C.A.P.P.P.’s Deli, 4010 Dupont Circle; both ChinaTown buffets, 4000 Dutchmans Lane and 4214 Outer Loop; Chinese Restaurant, 8605 Preston Highway; Duke’s Grill & Bar, 4004 Gardiner Point Drive; Master’s International Coffee, 4806 Bardstown Road; New World Buffet, 9228 Westport Road; On the River Dining, 1902 Victory Lane, and the short-lived Peanut’s on Linn Station Road. In Southern Indiana, closings include China King, Highlander Point Center, Floyds Knobs, and the Groove Café, 1882 Blackiston Mill Road, Clarksville. Chains closing one location while others remained open included Buffalo Madison Coffee Co., in the Riverfront Park Tumbleweed building at 1205 River Road; Hoop’s, 12205 Westport Road; Skyline Chili, 3928 Dutchmans Lane, and Ryan’s Steakhouse, 7405 Preston Highway.

NEWS & NOTES Corbett’s A little too far down the road to list among this quar ter’s openings, we’re excited about the prospects for Corbett’s, the new American regional restaurant and bar that Dean Corbett, chef and owner of Equus and Jack’s Lounge, is building in the historic Von Allmen farmhouse in Old Brownsboro Crossing. Some favorites from Equus will appear on the menu along with new offerings. Says Corbett: “I am bringing in seafood from around the globe, but I will continue to focus on a seasonal menu highlighting Kentucky’s abundance of

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wonderful purveyors.” Opening is set for summer. We can hardly wait. James Beard House One of the crowning jewels for any chef is an appearance at James Beard House in New York City, home of the James Beard Foundation, which invites chefs, winemakers, and cookbook authors from around the world to showcase their culinary art. Louisville’s Anthony Lamas, owner and chef at Seviche, seems to have established a regular spot there: On July 11, he’ll make his fourth trip. Meanwhile, Oakroom Chefs Todd Richards and Duane Nutter, with “mixologist” Jerry Slater, made the trek to New York in March. They’ve also got an episode of “Iron Chef America” in the can; Food Network tells Food & Dining that the show is ready to broadcast but not yet scheduled. Look for it some time after May. Food & Dining Tastings Starting with our next issue, Summer 2007, Food & Dining plans to begin hosting a variety of fun and educational food and drink events, including wine, Bourbon and beer tastings and perhaps cooking classes as well. Plans are underway for events at three fine local establishments: Napa River Grill, L&N Wine Bar and Bistro, and Bourbons Bistro. We’d love to hear from you with ideas about events you’d like to see. Contact Publisher John White with your input — and while you’re at it, comments about the magazine as well. Just call (502) 493-5511 ext. 501 or drop us an E-mail at the address below. Subscribe to Food & Dining Can’t wait to see what’s in the next issue of Food & Dining? Why not subscribe, and get your own copy by mail right off the presses? With our Spring promotion, you’ve rarely had a better deal: Sign up for one year for $18, and we’ll give you four quarterly editions and pay you back in full with $18 in local-restaurant gift certificates. Better still, take two years for just $24, we’ll send you eight issues and add $36 worth of local gift certificates. Subscribe online at: www.foodanddiningmagazine.com F&D

We regret any omissions, but invite the restaurant community to keep us informed. Send information by E-mail to publisher@foodanddiningmagazine.com.

Corbett’s Chef/Owner Dean Corbett.

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about food brunch

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BY GREG GAPSIS | PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAN DRY

Brunch .. A simple but elegant open-face sandwich of fried egg, apple marmalade, arugula, prosciutto and Parmigiano Reggiano from 211 Clover Lane.


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a celebration of life, good food and the company we keep.


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about food brunch

A

t its heart, brunch is a celebration of life, good food and the company we keep.Whether it takes the form of a grand affaire or an intimate tete a tete, brunch has become a much-loved tradition, a way to celebrate special events, enjoy friends or guests, or simply provide a personal, leisurely treat in our hurried modern lives. A good brunch is better defined as a state of mind than a set menu.Whether we gather around the sumptuous groaning board at a restaurant buffet or enjoy a casual get-together at home, this moveable feast is a treat for both guests and chef. Brunch is built on three fundamentals: a selection of food that pleases, space to enjoy company and conversation, and a civilized schedule that leaves plenty of elbow room for recreation or formal events later in the day. Timing is no small part of a brunch’s charm: Guests can relax and enjoy their morning before presenting themselves for duty at the midday feast. This allows hosts ample time to prepare the meal in advance so they can relax and enjoy their company.

Chef Castro’s “Not Brown”: Fried green tomatoes layered with shrimp and crab, topped with peppered bacon and Mornay sauce.

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BY GREG GAPSIS | PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAN DRY

Moreover, the civilized brunch hour leaves afternoon and evening free, a relaxed schedule that well accommodates such occasions as Kentucky Derby or a spring wedding, wherein it’s important to entertain guests while leaving the shank of the day free for the major event.

Genesis of a Great Idea The magisterial Oxford English Dictionary identifies the Victorian-era essayist Guy Beringer as first to articulate both the concept and word “brunch.”The OED traces the word’s first appearance to the British humor magazine Punch, which wrote in 1896 in terms that would be as apt today, “To be fashionable nowadays we must ‘brunch’ … truly an excellent portmanteau word … indicating a combined breakfast and lunch.” Beringer’s new midday meal would replace Sunday’s traditional after-church dinner, which often consisted of roasted meats and savory pies. He urged convening earlier, and amending the bill of fare to include teas and coffee and breakfast breads

with jams and marmalade. The new meal, taken late in the morning, would make life more pleasant for Saturday-night carousers, while providing a broader selection of munchies for early risers returning from services or the hunt. These innovations would have more than a salutary effect, Beringer asserted in his essay, “Brunch: A Plea,” and would work to expand human happiness itself, a point central to his proposal. “Brunch is cheerful, sociable and inciting,” Beringer wrote. “It is talkcompelling. It puts you in a good temper, it makes you satisfied with yourself and your fellow beings, it sweeps away the worries and cobwebs of the week.” As it was then, so it is now.We suggest a modest toast in Beringer’s memory, the next time we brunch. (The noun was not verbed until 1938, when Time magazine first used the term “brunched.”) Old cookbooks do not reveal what exactly was ser ved at early British brunches, suggesting that brunch was the domain of chefs, not home cooks. But


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Seafood omelet from Winston’s Chef John Castro.

period references make it clear that as wealth grew during the 19th century, so did culinary options for breakfast and lunch. Colin Spencer, in British Food: An Extraordinar y Thousand Years of Histor y, reveals that by 1887, among the well-to-do, breakfast had been expanded from typical fare to sideboards holding more varied selections. Pierre Blot, in What to Eat and How to Cook It, in 1863, describes a remarkable listing of foods appropriate for a midday lunch or dinner: “… the following dishes may be served: … headcheese, Mutton Chops,Veal Cutlets, Eggs cooked in any way, Fried Fish, Fruit according to the season, Galantine of Birds, Galantine of Veal, Ham, Cold Meat of any kind, Oysters, Omelets, Pate de foie gras, Meat and Fruit Pies, served cold, Salad of Chicken, Salad of Partridge and other birds, Salad of Lobster, Sandwiches, Sardines, Sausages of any kind, fresh or smoked, Smoked Fish or Meat, Fried Vegetables, Drinks according to taste.”

The American Experience Crossing the Atlantic from Britain, brunch only gradually developed a following in the United States.

In her 1924 tome Mrs. Allen on Cooking, Menus, Service, Ida C. Baily Allen reveals that the concept of entertaining guests with a late breakfast — usually to celebrate a holiday — became acceptable on this side of the water. “Guests are usually invited to luncheon, supper, or dinner, but there is a type of company meal which may be successfully used on holidays — the company breakfast, generally held not earlier than half-past ten or eleven in the morning; the menu is of the same nature as the French dejeuner — or what is laughingly called ‘brunch’ in England — the combination in reality of breakfast and luncheon.” Her descriptions of typical festive menus don’t seem out of line with our idea of brunch: The “winter breakfast” included “grapefruit, thin-slice broiled ham with potatoes au Gratin and buttered toast, complemented with waffles dressed with Maple syrup or strawberry jam.” A “summer breakfast” would include “raspberries or blackberries with cream, shirred eggs, Swiss style (with melted cheese), and popovers or potato flour muffins, butter and coffee.”

But brunch didn’t really catch on in America until the 1930s, according to food historian Evan Jones, who wrote that the Pump Room in Chicago’s Ambassador Hotel began offering the meal, which became popular with actors and industrialists laying over in the Windy City between trains. The idea gradually spread, fired by prosperity following World War II, and today it has become a traditional feature for many hotel and restaurant weekend menus. John Castro, Executive Chef at Winston’s at Louisville’s Sullivan University, gave more insight into brunch’s evolution as a popular par t of American dining tradition. “Brunch gained popularity in the 1950s after World War II because there was a little more hope in the world and people had more income,” Castro said. “It follows on some of the ideas behind English tea and the French petite dejeuner. It’s been redefined many times, and everybody approaches it a little differently, but it tends to be a little more adventurous.” One word sums up what brunch is all about, Castro said: “Variety.” www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 15


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Royal Feasts Restaurant brunch today falls into two broad categories: A lavish, all-you-can-eat buffet with a broad selection; or a menu from which patrons may select the dish of their choice from a range of breakfast and lunch entrees. Both approaches usually offer a choice of traditional breakfast dishes including eggs, pancakes, sausages, bacon, ham, fruits, pastries and cakes, plus — echoing Blot’s 19th century bill of fare — foods more typically associated with lunch or dinner, including roasted meat or poultry, cold seafood, smoked fish, quiches, salads and vegetable dishes. Practical considerations govern both approaches:Will space be available to mount a buffet? Is traffic sufficient to ensure quick turnover and keep offerings fresh? Both variations respond to customer preference, and each format commands strong loyalty. “We have a very high percentage of repeat customers who frequently call ahead to see what our offerings will be,” said Duane Nutter, executive chef at the Seelbach Hotel’s Oakroom, long known for its lavish brunch. “Many are very loyal and even will want to know if their favorite wait person will be on duty.” The Oakroom’s brunch epitomizes elegance, with waffle, omelet and carving stations as well as an expansive buffet of hot and cold offerings. “We try to look at how to serve an individual in this situation,” Nutter said. “You want portions to be small enough to try all, yet knowing one can always return for their favorite.” Part of the delight of buffets is being able to change your choices on a whim. Carving and cooking stations also allow one to interact with staff. “At the omelet station you are face-to-face and collaborating with the cook,” said Tim Smith, executive chef at Café Emilie in St. Matthews. “It becomes a more personal experience.” In addition to stations where you can summon omelets and pancakes made to your order, Smith serves up such classics as Eggs Benedict and Hot Browns, along with many other entrees. “We usually have about 18 items. Ten or 12 will be for breakfast and the rest more lunch,” Smith said. “Our teriyaki salmon with nappa cabbage and our chicken Marsala are popular. We tend away from pastas because they can dry out on the serving table.” The “grazing” nature of a buffet encourages a contemplative approach to the meal, enhancing brunch’s affinity for socializing. Faced with so many choices, there’s no need to rush the experience. Diners can take time to enjoy their tablemates, with leisurely returns to the buffet to explore. “The entire brunch experience is a nice leisure time for people,” Smith said. Doug Gossman, owner of the Bristol Bar & Grille, agrees; and he should know: Gossman was a pioneer in the restaurant renaissance on Bardstown Road when Brian Barber works the brunch carving station at the Oakroom. Surrounding photos show brunch offerings from Café Emilie, 211 Clover Lane, Winston’s and the Oakroom.

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he opened the Bristol in 1977. He launched the restaurant’s long-popular Sunday brunch in 1983. “Other than the Hyatt downtown, very few places offered brunch in the city back then,” Gossman said. “I had been to brunches in Chicago where chamber quartets provided music, and I thought we should give it a try.” A wall crowded with “Best of ” and “Readers’ Choice” awards from local publications testifies Gossman’s success during 24 years of brunch service. He says the key to the buffet experience is its flexibility, both in selection and time. “The beauty of it is you can eat what you want and stop when you want,” Gossman said. “It’s also elastic.You can spend 40 minutes and get on with your day if that’s how you want it, or take two hours to talk with and enjoy your company. We try to let the customer have what he or she wants out of it.” Music remains an important part of the Bristol brunch experience. It often showcases accomplished local jazz musicians, echoing yet another tradition, the New Orleans jazz brunch. As far back as the 1800s, New Orleans’ prosperous Creoles would enjoy a leisurely feast after Mass before attending a matinee at the city’s French Opera House or the theater. In the next century, after developing brunch into a destination event at Brennan’s restaurant in the French Quarter, Ella Brennan hired jazz musicians to stimulate weekend business at the family’s Commander’s Palace restaurant in the Garden District. Much like New Orleans’s signature flaming dessert, Bananas Foster, the jazz brunch, not surprisingly, caught fire and spread.

Studied Menus In contrast with the sumptuous all-you-can-eat buffet, as noted, many restaurants offer a brunch-specific menu.This option best suits dining venues where there’s insufficient space to spare for a buffet presentation, or where the restaurateur prefers a more intimate dining experience that can allow spontaneous and creative special dishes. “You never know what someone is going to want or respond to,” said Castro at Winston’s, which features a popular menu-style Sunday brunch. “We worked up some Thai-spiced, pan fried frog legs once, a very spicy dish, and they just flew out of the kitchen.” If you’re in a breakfast mood at Winston’s brunch, you can enjoy pancakes with ambrosia, French toast stuffed with pumpkin butter and cream cheese, Scotch eggs, waffles or a Greek, country ham or peppered bacon omelet. Less formal lunch-type selections include sandwiches, entrees, and Castro’s iconoclastic “Not Brown.” “My brother Joe was executive chef at the English Grill in the Brown Hotel and we were getting many requests to have a Hot Brown,” Castro said. “I felt people

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Bourbon Ball French Toast, a dish that won national attention in Lynn’s Paradise Café’s victory over Chef Flay on Food Network’s “Throwdown with Bobby Flay.”

18 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

should go there for the original but used the concept to create something different.” In contrast with the original’s turkey-and-bacon on toast under a cheesy Mornay sauce, John Castro’s creation dollops Mornay atop fried green tomatoes layered with shrimp and crab meat with peppered bacon. Speaking of “something different,” Lynn’s Paradise Café on Barret Avenue in the Highlands dishes out difference with a flair. Owner Lynn Winter’s expansive concept of breakfast comes closer to a lavish brunch menu than traditional breakfast fare. “Breakfast is my favorite meal of the day,” Winter said. “There is so much to be done with it. … I long thought of someone who came for breakfast and stays for lunch,” Lynn’s bill of fare, then, consists of solid traditional dishes punched up with indulgent flights of taste in an artful, tongue-in-cheek kitschy environment.The restaurant’s eclectic decorations include large art projects, toys on the tables, and wacky lamps acquired at the State Fair’s “Ugly Lamp” contest. “We want our restaurant to be fun, relaxing and inviting to everyone,” said Patti Boone, the selfdescribed “Chief Instigator.” “It’s not only about the food. We look on breakfast as a high art.” Winter brags that her Bourbon Ball French Toast for example, once “dusted” celebrity Chef Bobby Flay when he took on Lynn’s in his “Throwdown” show on Food Network. The dish starts with a sugared and heavily seasoned cinnamon bread dipped in vanilla nutmeg batter and grilled. It is then garnished with bourbon vanilla custard, fresh strawberries and sugar-spiced pecans accompanied with bourbon whipped cream and chocolate syrup. Such flights of fancy keep customers coming back. “We have a lot of regulars, almost 80 percent,” Winters said. “They include locals, outof-towners and a lot of friends seeing other friends.” Loyalty for menu brunches is strong, says Troy Schuster, executive chef at 211 Clover Lane in St. Matthews, where regular patrons are the norm. Schuster stays focused on local and seasonal ingredients. “We change our menu seasonally, working with what’s looking good,” Schuster said. “Eight options can be enough, as long as they are eight good options. I don’t really like a humongous menu, the chance to lose quality is so much greater.” Cooking food to order is responsive to diners’ tastes and avoids having entrees congealing in chafing dishes, Schuster said. “You don’t have to do anything major crazy. Keep it simple. As long


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as you’re using top-notch ingredients, you can do good food.”

Chef Suggestions Going out to brunch gives the home cook a break, but sometimes you want to enjoy a brunch experience at home. Here are a few insider brunch tips from local chefs: ● Plan ahead so you’ll have time to enjoy brunch with your guests, Castro said. “Use the night before to get a lot done. Things can be easy to reheat or easily cooked. Think of grilled meat and chilled, marinated salads and vegetables.” ● Be creative with seasonal dishes, but don’t get crazy with bizarre dishes or out-of-season ingredients. Said Castro: “Can you tell me what’s with French Toast sticks? Why would anyone want deep-fried bread? And you don’t need crunchy melon or beautiful and flawless strawberries that have no taste.” ● Stick to the basics, advised Café Emilie’s Tim Smith. “Good cooking comes down to fresh ingredients, simple technique and presentation. Be easy on yourself. Get an electric griddle and let guests make pancakes the way they want them. Prepare quiches ahead of time. They are so versatile. It is easy to mix up an egg mixture and build easy to cook egg pies delightful to either meat lovers or vegetarians.” ● Buy good bread from your local bakery. Smith suggests cutting small finger-sandwiches portions from a large hoagie roll or ciabatta bread. “Accompany them with asparagus that you blanch then toss in vinaigrette with tomatoes and pepper and let marinate overnight.” Café Emilie Sous Chef Mark Heil chimed in with another easy dish that’s guaranteed to please.“Sautée some nice shrimp and then marinate them overnight in Bloody Mary mix,” Heil said. “Just take them out of the refrigerator and serve them cold. They’re great.” ● Try something different. “Don’t be intimidated,” Oakroom Chef Nutter advised. “Try something like a prime rib roast and you can have a great experience.” ● Respect local traditions. A grits casserole is a sure-fire winner for Louisville,

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Castro said.“They’re easy to do and hold well. You can make it any number of ways, like with country ham, spinach, some kind of cheese, even vegan.” Traditional dishes like eggs Benedict or the New Orleans classic eggs Sardou, are easy to assemble. Large salads, marinated vegetables like asparagus or green beans, and breakfast meats or even barbecue can make for a manageable yet memorable brunch.

Quo Vadis? Think Ethnic Finally, consider expanding your culinary horizons to include exciting brunch options from other cultures, whether you’re cooking at home or going out. Dim Sum, the classic Chinese brunch, offers an amazing variety of stuffed and steamed buns, dumplings, fried goodies and more substantial offerings like the rice porridge called congee. Dim sum is popular in Chinese restaurants around the world. Louisville’s top dim sum house is Jade Palace on Herr Lane in Lyndon. Latino brunches offer seviches, fajita platters and tapas, not to mention the hearty, spicy and filling beef tripe stew called menudo, a classic south-of-theborder hangover cure, available at many of the city’s more ethnic taquerias on Saturday mornings. Western omelets and breakfast burritos have already broken the ethnic barrier and moved into the mainstream. Antipasto platters at Italian restaurants and Greek salads suggest fresh ways of looking at brunch that are both easy to prepare and that fit the buffet format. As the American brunch tradition continues to evolve, the incorporation of ethnic flavors will become a big part of it, Winston’s John Castro believes. “I expect we’ll see Hispanic seasonings in grits and omelets along with more spiced and marinated dishes,” Castro said. “Here, around the winter holidays for example, we’ll serve Dutch Babies — German-style pancakes with lemon and powdered sugar. We also use sautéed apples with maple syrup, pumpkin pecan butter and crème Anglaise. If the flavor is there, it’s really hard to go wrong.” F&D

Eggs Benedict John Edward Young suggests that Eggs Benedict is “the reigning queen of brunch … lounging luxuriantly on a toasted English muffin throne upholstered with ham, swathed in a gold robe of rich hollandaise sauce.” Here’s how to make yours a regal feast: Poaching: Put no more than 2 inches of water in a broad sauce pan or large skillet with a teaspoon of salt and an ounce of white vinegar, and bring it to a gentle boil. Crack each egg into a separate saucer or cup and slip them gently into the water, cooking them at a bare simmer for 3 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels. You can prepare them the night before and refrigerate them overnight, simply covered with cool water to keep them moist. When it’s time for brunch, put the cold eggs back into simmering salted water and heat for about 40 seconds. Quick Hollandaise: To make 3/4 cup, enough for six servings, combine three egg yolks, 2 tablespoons of lemon juice and 1/4 teaspoon cayenne, and blend in a food processor. Slowly add 1/4 pound melted butter while processing into a smooth mixture, about 15 seconds. If desired, add fresh herbs like dill or tarragon and blend a few seconds more. Assemble: Toast English muffin halves and top each with Canadian bacon sautéed in butter. Put a poached egg on the ham and cover with a dollop of hollandaise sauce. Garnish with chopped parsley and serve hot. Variations: Substitute smoked salmon, poached fish, thinly-sliced roast beef or chicken for the bacon, or make a fully vegetarian version by using cooked, chopped spinach, asparagus, artichoke hearts or sautéed portobello mushrooms instead of meat. www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 19


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BY JERRY SLATER | PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAN DRY

BRUNCH BEVERAGE Best Bets Why do we love brunch? Is it the sleep-in and star t-late attitude that accompanies this leisurely meal? Is it the no-holds-barred variety of sweet and savor y foods that people have dreamed up for this repast that’s not quite breakfast yet not quite lunch? I propose yet another good reason to celebrate this weekend midday treat: It grants us permission to drink great cocktails at lunchtime with no sense of breaking social mores.

W

hen we speak of great brunch cocktails, three classics come to mind: the Bloody Mary, the mimosa, and Irish coffee. Mixologists are becoming as inventive as chefs these days, crafting as many variations of these drinks as there are pastry and egg dishes to accompany them. I’ll begin by presenting each in classic form, then offering some ways to spice it up. Indeed, “spice” is the correct word to highlight our first brunch cocktail, the Bloody Mary. Like most cocktails, its origins are dubious, but its first appearance was around 1939.This is late for a “classic,” but remember that vodka only became popular in the U.S. in the late 1930s and early ’40s. Before that, most American drinks were based on gin or whiskey. Indeed, substituting gin, with its herbaceous character, makes a nice variation on the vodka Bloody Mary, called a Red Snapper. Either way, remember that balance is the key. You want your Bloody Mary to taste spicy or salty, but not at the expense of blotting out the great flavors of sweet tomato and bitter lemon, which makes a fine complement to tomato juice. 20 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

Bloody Mary (original recipe) 11/2 ounces vodka 2 dashes Worcestershire sauce 4 dashes Tabasco Pinch of salt and pepper 1 /4 ounce fresh lemon juice 4 ounces tomato juice Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and roll back and forth to mix. Strain into an iced goblet. Garnish with wedge of lemon and lime on a side plate. A dash of celery salt is a nice touch, and New Yorkers traditionally add horseradish. (Dale Degroff, www.kingcocktail.com) In the recent past, Bloody Marys went through a trend involving elaborate garnishes. I prefer a simple lime and maybe a celery stick to stir, but during this period, it simply was not a Bloody Mary if your favorite restaurant did not add a small deli tray on a bamboo stick. This was a boon for the Bloody Mary drinker. You got an appetizer with your drink that would include, but not be limited to, olives, pickled tomatoes, peppers, cheese, various cured meats, and finally, the piece de resistance, a jumbo shrimp. The last touch I might

mention is the rimmer. Rubbing the edge of an empty glass with lime and running it through a mixture of kosher salt and spices, including cayenne and celery salt, makes for a tasty and attractive addition. If the Bloody Mary is the workhorse of brunch cocktails, providing sustenance and adding a spicy pick-me-up to worldweary morning, the mimosa is its pixie counterpart: It doesn’t just pick you up, it helps you float through the pleasant afternoon. Not only is the mimosa one of the easiest drinks to make, but its bubbles cut through the grease and starch that we love in brunch. The simplicity of the mimosa — usually a two-to-one blend of sparkling wine and orange juice — also lends itself to easy experimentation. Simple suggestions: Substitute cranberry juice for orange or add a favorite liqueur, such as Grand Marnier, for your own spin. Are you more traditional? Trade orange juice for a sugar cube soaked in bitters, and you have the classic Champagne cocktail. A splash of blackcurrant-flavored creme de cassis and a lemon twist makes the traditional Kir royale. The 1917 Seelbach Cocktail is a


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the brunch standard bearer — the Bloody Mary


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a classic — Irish coffee


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Louisville original that has entered the cocktail canon. It is now ser ved in restaurants from Brooklyn to San Francisco. Seelbach Cocktail 3 /4 ounce Bourbon 1 /2 ounce Cointreau 7 dashes Angostura bitters 7 dashes Peychaud’s bitters 4 ounces chilled brut Champagne 1 orange twist, for garnish Shake the first four ingredients and strain them into a Champagne flute. Top with Champagne and add the garnish. Now that we have spruced up our orange juice and tomato juice, coffee is the last breakfast beverage to work on. My favorite adult coffee beverage is Irish coffee.The combination of strong coffee, a little sugar, honey-sweet Irish whiskey and cold whipped cream is perfection in its simplicity. Irish Coffee 11/2 ounces Irish Whiskey (Jameson Irish Whiskey is a good choice) 2 tablespoons sugar Strong black coffee Fresh whipped cream, for garnish I have said it before and I will reiterate here: Green creme de menthe is a cruel joke, probably started by the same fools who started dropping green food coloring into perfectly good beer on St. Paddy’s Day. Leave it out. Liqueurs have also captured people’s imaginations as coffee enhancers.The best recipe is the one that you achieve through your own trial and error. In fact, when you’re brunching at home would be a great time to set up a coffee drink table for your guests. Next to the carafe of steaming coffee, set out liqueurs such as Bailey’s Irish Cream or Amarula, Kahlua or Starbucks liqueur, and Amaretto, Frangelico or Nocello. Your guests can discover their own favorite combination of cream, coffee, and nut-based spirits, and then finish off their concoctions with a large spoonful of fresh whipped cream. Whether you are looking for a tasty resuscitation after a late night of imbibing, or planning an elaborate Derby Day celebration, I hope these suggestions help your morning go quickly and your afternoon last longer. Cheers. F&D www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 23


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BY ROBIN GARR | PHOTOGRAPHS BY EDIS CELIK

EC WONDERFUL WINES

OUR PANEL OF EXPERT WINE TASTERS EACH RECOMMEND FIVE OF THEIR FAVORITE WINES From movie-goers with their Pinot Noir to rappers and their Cristal, wine is hot on the restaurant and retail scene these days. A sought-after, “with-it” wine label can just about jump off the shelf into the diner’s glass with no hard selling needed. We asked three of the region’s top restaurant wine experts to join Food & Dining Editor-inChief Robin Garr to come up with a Top 20 list of excellent wines that are currently popular in Metro Louisville, along with brief descriptions of each and a few thoughts about why they’re hot. Note on prices: Robin’s five wines are shown at the retail prices he paid. The prices in the other contributors’ reviews are those charged on their restaurant wine lists. It is customary for restaurants to mark up wines double the retail price, so expect to pay about half the listed price if you look for these wines at local wine shops.

24 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com


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Robin Garr Along with his duties as Editor-in-Chief of Food & Dining, Robin publishes the international wine-appreciation website WineLoversPage.com. A wine-and-food writer for more than 25 years, he is an international wine judge, having judged wine competitions in the U.S., much of Europe and Down Under; he recently served on the judging panel at Vinitaly in Verona, Italy. Based on the wide popularity of Pinot Noir that followed the popular 2005 movie Sideways, he has chosen five locally available Pinots in the under-$20 price range. Saintsbury 2005 “Garnet” Carneros Pinot Noir

Louis Jadot 2004 Bourgogne Pinot Noir

Tamar Ridge 2005 “Devil’s Corner” Tasmania Pinot Noir

Cartlidge & Browne 2004 California Pinot Noir

Moillard 2004 Bourgogne Pinot Noir Tradition

$18

$18

$15

$13

$15

Ruby, clear and rather light, typical of coolclimate Pinot. Subtle but pleasant red-cherry aromas; crisp and fresh flavor, bright fruit and zippy acidity. Excellent food wine: Pure flavors and good acidic balance serve it well.

Dark garnet with a clear edge. Fresh Bing cherries, clean if simple fruit, gains depth from a stony mineral backdrop that’s impressive for a relatively modest Burgundy. Crisp acidity and soft but perceptible tannins provide balance.

Clear ruby, not overly dark. Light and fresh, restrained wild-cherry aroma carries over on the palate as tart red fruit, light-bodied but well structured with mouth-watering acidity. A distinct red-clay earthy nuance develops with time in the glass.

Its fresh cherry aromas are delicious yet delicate, leading into ripe, juicy flavors of cherries and snappy acidity over a light but velvety texture. Quaffable and appealing, it shows a hint of the classic Pinot character that made Burgundy famous, but this wine comes from the Pacific Nor thwest.

Clear ruby, not too dark. Fresh and delicate aromas focus on red fruit with fresh herbs in the background, whiffs of tarragon and thyme. On the palate it’s crisp, light-bodied but concentrated; red-berry and tart cherry flavors, distinctly acidic, with subtle earthy notes joining the choir in a long finish.

ROBIN GARR www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 25


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BY ROBIN GARR | PHOTOGRAPHS BY EDIS CELIK

Scott Harper Scott, a candidate for Master Sommelier status and a Certified Wine Educator and wine-appreciation instructor at Bellarmine University, is manager and wine expert at the Bristol Bar & Grille-Downtown. He recommends these wines because, well, he likes them and believes diners will, too.Two of the wines — the Chateau LeovilleBarton and the Joseph Drouhin — are not currently on the Bristol wine list, but Scott rates them so highly that he urges you to seek them out at local wine shops. Chateau LeovilleBarton 2000 Saint Julien

Montirius 2005 Côtes Du Rhône

Peter Lehman 2005 Barossa (Australia) Chardonnay

Nozzole 2003 Chianti Classico Riserva

Joseph Drouhin 2005 Chablis

$169

$20

$20

$41

$39

Black currant, cassis, plum, tobacco leaf, cedar, oak, vanilla, mocha, earth and violets give this outstanding red Bordeaux complexity, with well integrated tannins and a full body. This wine is mostly Cabernet Sauvignon with portions of Merlot and Cabernet Franc, dry and very drinkable now but capable of aging for another decade.

A delicious biodynamic (organic) wine made from a blend of mostly Grenache with Syrah and a little Mourvèdre. Red fruits, raspberr y and red cherry, with red licorice and herbes de Provence. Dry and medium bodied with a supple texture and light tannins.

Toasty oak, peach, fig and apple, rich but thankfully not over the top Aussie wine. Dry, medium to full bodied wine with nice acidity. Like many fine wines from down under, it’s closed with a modern, sturdy metal screwcap.

This wine shows ripe red berry and cherry fruit flavors with a touch of earth, anise and oak. Made from the Sangiovese grape of Chianti, it is dry and medium-bodied with a light tannic structure.

Dry, crisp and mediumbodied with the flavors of apple, lemon and lime zest. Limestone minerality and no oak sets this 100 percent Chardonnay apart from many New World Chardonnays.

SCOTT HARPER 26 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com


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Len Stevens II Len, the “L” of Louisville’s L&N Wine Bar and Bistro (his wife Nancy is the “N”), is working toward Master Sommelier certification. With more than 100 wines available by the glass, L&N offers a lot to choose from. Len narrows it down to these five favorites. He recommends them to patrons because they’re a bit different from the usual suspects, inspiring discovery and opening new wine horizons.

Furst 2004 Alsace Riesling

Stone Cap 2004 Columbia Valley (Washington State) Cabernet Sauvignon

Omrah 2005 Western Australia “Unoaked” Chardonnay

Edmunds St. John 2002 “The Shadow” California Syrah

Juan Gil 2004 Jumilla (Spain) Mourvèdre

$31

$26

$33

$30

$34

Most people love Riesling, but it is fun to introduce our guests to the less familiar wines of Alsace. Bone-dry with loads of minerality, this wine shows our guests how the right match of food and wine can lift both.

A lot of guests still haven’t tried Washington Cab. The real twist with this wine is that it never sees oak: It is both fermented and aged in stainless steel, providing a rare opportunity to see how Cabernet fruit tastes without any influence from the barrel.

Two unusual things come into play with this wine. First, it’s an introduction to the less familiar Western Australia and the subtle cool-climate wines that it produces; and this wine is another made without oak influence. It can really open people’s eyes and change their perception of Ozzie wines as “fruit bombs.”

One of my favorite California producers, Steve Edmunds, is a passionate believer in allowing the wine to express its flavor without new oak getting in the way. This par ticular bottling, made only in 2002, is an amazing value because it is a low-price blend of wine from stellar vineyards that he normally bottles separately.

Spain in general, and its Jumilla region in particular, amaze me with increasing quality and stunning value.This bottle features fruit from vines that are over 40 years old, and demonstrates the amazing depth and complexity that Mourvèdre can achieve. With the 2004 vintage coming on to the market, there couldn’t be a better time to discover the “smaller” regions of Spain.

LEN STEVENS II

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BY ROBIN GARR | PHOTOGRAPHS BY EDIS CELIK

Jerry Slater Jerry is director of restaurants and “mixologist” at the Seelbach Hilton. He’s probably best known as a spirits guru, and we’re delighted to have him as regular spirits columnist for Food & Dining.This month, however, he picks up a wine glass to tell us about five picks that are currently highly recommended and selling well on the restaurant’s list. Royal Tokaji 1999 Tokaji Aszu 5 Puttonyos

A to Z 2004 Oregon “Night & Day”

Alma Rosa 2004 Santa Barbara County Chardonnay

$75

$50

$45

A perennial Oakroom favorite, this great Hungarian desser t wine is unctuous, sweet and lingering. A beautiful pairing, great with the likes of foie gras, cheese or desser t, it exhibits desirable “petrol,” orange peel and dried apricot aromas and flavors.

A deep, rich and jammy wine, Night & Day is from the up-and-coming Southern Oregon region. A multi-grape red blend, it starts with the Bordeaux varieties Cabernet Sauvignon, Mer lot and Cabernet Franc, then throws in Nebbiolo, Tempranillo, Petit Verdot, Dolcetto and Syrah for good measure.

From Richard Sanford, formerly of Sanford vineyards (hailed as California’s best Pinot Noir in the movie Sideways), who remains true to sustainable and “green” practices with this new wine venture. His Chardonnay is a great food wine: Stainlesssteel fermented and aged in neutral oak, the fruit and acid of this wine shines through.

JERRY SLATER 28 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com


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[

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sunshine and moonlight, just a sip away...

only at Liquor Barn Egly-Ouriet Tenuta di Trinoro non-vintage Brut 2004 “Le Cupole” Tradition Grand Toscana Cru Champagne

$75 This is a small-farm grower Champagne from the village of Ambonnay. The blend of 75 percent Pinot Noir and 25 percent Chardonnay is entirely sourced from Grand Cru vineyards. A great golden color with full-bodied nuttycitrus flavor and a long finish.

$60 Eccentric winemaker Andrea Franchetti makes two wines in what he calls, “a godfor saken place” in Tuscany; actually it is in a sheep-grazing valley that had not seen vines for a centur y. It is primarily made from the Bordeaux grapes Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon, in that order, but shows a more New Wor ld expression reminiscent of fresh cherries, dried plums and coffee.

Ningaloo Chardonnay and Syrah $8.99 750 ml. $12.99 1.5 L

L ou i sv il le S p r in g h u r s t : 43 01 T ow n e C e nt e r 42 6- 42 22 18 00 S . H u r s t b ou r n e P k w y . 4 91 -0 75 3 34 20 F e rn Va ll e y R d. 9 68 - 16 66 Open: M-Th: 9:00am-10:00pm Fri & Sat: 9:00am-12 M Sun:1:00pm - 9:00 pm prices subject to change Website: www.liquorbarn.com www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 29


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BY ROGER A. BAYLOR | PHOTOGRAPHS BY EDIS CELIK

A BEER TRIFECTA this season’s best bets It takes money, discipline and planning for a microbrewery to make the huge step away from comfortably “eclectic” beer making — as practiced on a brewing kit cobbled together from dairy equipment and machine shops — to more predictably “eccentric” breweries housed in industrial facilities equipped with professional brewing systems, built from scratch at considerable risk and expense. So it was when Bell’s Brewery took the plunge with its gleaming new, state-of-theart facility that opened in 2003 a few miles outside Kalamazoo, Michigan. Understandably, caution was the key to Bell’s business plan. The company’s old favorites — Oberon, Kalamazoo Stout and Expedition Stout — became more consistent and dependable, but the fabled Bell’s creativity seemed to go on hold. HopSlam Double IPA

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Houblon Chouffe Dobbelen IPA/Tripel


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HopSlam Double IPA As it turns out, that creative spark was briefly dimmed, but by no means extinguished. With HopSlam Double IPA, his massive new hop monster, the legendary Larry Bell meets the current generation of “extreme” beers head-on, proving that the Bell’s brewing team can still bring the heat. The effect of HopSlam’s malty viscosity, piney hop resins and hefty 9 percent alcohol is reminiscent of the sensory kick afforded by wasabi, which helps explain why it goes so well with sushi. Finding a sushi slinger who understands this fact might seem daunting, but Jim Huie of Maido Essential Japanese in Louisville gets it. If HopSlam is available on draft in Louisville, Jim will have it. Call him and ask … and give your taste buds proper warning.

Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout

my touring group of 15 beer enthusiasts met at Achouffe. Chris — who has since sold Achouffe to Moortgat (maker of Duvel) and stepped laterally to Les 3 Fourquettes, a brewpub and gastronomical project near his home in Houffalize — met us and personally conducted our visit. Before beginning, he offered a brief remembrance of 9/11 and a moment of silence was observed. It was explained that he and his wife — both longtime aficionados of the Big Apple — had planned a nostalgic anniversary trip to New York City the previous year, one scheduled to conclude with dinner at Windows on the World mere days after the attacks. It was moving and thoughtprovoking testimony, and worth remembering for all those who aspire to genuine world citizenship.

Houblon Chouffe Dobbelen IPA/Tripel

There may be no conscious connection between Chris’s heartfelt Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout only recently became recollection and the release in 2006 of Houblon Chouffe available in the Louisville metropolitan area. Don’t take the name Dobbelen IPA/Tripel, the final masterwork of his tenure at literally, for this beer contains no chocolate, at least not the Achouffe, and yet to me, the two are inexorably linked. The beer confectioner’s kind that sticks to the wrapper of your candy bar. is a delicious anomaly, marrying the malty golden heft of a Rather, chocolate is an essential flavor component of some of signature Belgian Tripel with the firm bitterness and dry, citrusthe specialty malts used to make beers dark — or in this case, to laden character of American hops. make beer black. Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout is an Imperial Stout, and rich flavors like Brooklyn chocolate, licorice, toffee, dark pitted fruits and more are Black Chocolate Stout typical characteristics of the tasty Imperial Stout experience. Whatever the motivation, Brooklyn Brewing’s master Houblon Chouffe illustrates the brewer, Garrett Oliver, has newfound influence of American crafted a textbook example of brewing, and this trend begins at Imperial Stout. (He’s also the home. esteemed author of “The These are halcyon days for Brewmaster’s Table,” an essential Louisville beer enthusiasts, with volume that chronicles savory ever widening availability of and rewarding relationships America’s and the world’s best between food and beer in beers, and more importantly, exhaustive, stimulating detail.) five distinct working breweries, It comes as no surprise that together producing as many this Brooklyn brewing gourmand, as 75 to 100 different beers who was early to import the annually. Continental notion of fine beer Consequently, there’s almost as the ideal accompaniment to always something completely good food, long ago struck up a new fermenting at one of trans-Atlantic friendship with Louisville’s breweries, and often Chris Bauweraerts, co-founder the annually returning seasonals of the revered Brasserie are tweaked with a dash of Achouffe, the deceptively impish darker malt or a spicy new Ardennes brewery that is a hop addition. From barrelhyper-efficient testament to the conditioned stouts to spiced high road in all aspects of Belgians, from absurdly hopped production and marketing. IPAs to coffee-flavored beers … Seeing as I’ve had the good our Louisville breweries provide fortune to meet Chris, therein the freshest and most unique lies a story. beers on the local scene. Exactly a year to the day As the wise man said: Think after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, globally; drink locally. F&D www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 31


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BY DAVID LANGE

At last...

gÉÑ aÉàv{ exáàtâÜtÇà VÉy yxx C

offee has been a staple of American culture ever since settlers boiled “cowboy coffee” over open campfires as their Conestoga wagon trains trekked across the western wilderness. As time went by, strong coffee served in thick ceramic mugs became the hallmark of hometown diners. Of course, it usually came packed in cans or paper bags and was brewed in 10-gallon batches in tall urns, kept hot all day with no consideration for its “shelf life.” You could count on it being hot, and you could usually expect it to taste dreadful. Commercial coffee went through metamorphoses. It was freeze-dried, it became high-yield, it was made in instant form, it was even processed as “coffee crystals.” Such disrespect to a national staple! 32 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

Fortunately, modern coffee society has become more refined. The creation and international spread of Starbucks has taught just about everyone a little about proper coffee etiquette and proper taste profile. Also instrumental has been the rise of independent coffee houses. It has actually become “cool” to enjoy coffee! This refinement in our national coffee palate has also motivated many restaurants to re-evaluate the way they present coffee. Coffee service in restaurants is evolving — you can see for yourself. Go out for dinner tonight, whether to a white-tablecloth establishment or a neighborhood diner, and your server may ask, “What coffee would you like?” No more than five years ago, the question probably would have been, “Would you like coffee?” With so many

knowledgeable coffee drinkers today, restaurants are looking for ways to satisfy more knowledgeable coffee consumers. One way to accomplish this is developing signature coffee blends. It has been my pleasure to work with many of the area’s finest restaurateurs and chefs to develop proprietary blends for their establishments. I am not at liberty to divulge the exact components of specific blends, but I can share the trends that I see emerging. My first observation is that restaurants are using more coffee to produce each pot. Since coffee is 98 percent water, using more grounds translates to more flavor, allowing the drinker to enjoy the complexities, flavors, and components of the coffee.


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Second, we’re seeing more coffees from Indonesia and its Malayan neighbors in proprietary blends. These coffees from Sumatra, Papua New Guinea and Java are known for their intense flavor and full body, adding another dimension to a memorable meal. Coffees from the relatively new growing regions of East Africa are also showing up in new blends. Coffees from Kenya and Ethiopia in the blend will infuse floral, clean flavors that draw out the delicate flavors many chefs employ. Finally, melding all of these components together are the clean and crisp coffees from Central and South America. Coffees from Colombia, Costa Rica, and Guatemala contribute a unifying element that makes each blend complete. No longer need diners suffer the unfortunate reality of a once all-too-typical dining experience: great food, great wine and great service, with not-so-great coffee to finish. Like tripping over the finish line to ruin what would have been a winning marathon run, too many of America’s most celebrated restaurants have fallen short of expectations with the coffee they serve at the end of a great meal. Want to create your own top coffee blend? Try these guidelines: For brightness, briskness, and acidity, add a Costa Rica, Colombia, Guatemala or any high-grown Central American coffee. For body and richness, blend in a dryprocessed Brazilan Santos or estate coffee or a good Sumatra Mandheling. For body and sweetness, use a dryprocessed Brazil Santos or a high grade Indian. For flavor and aroma, blend in a Kenya, Guatemala, New Guinea,Yemen Mocha or Zimbabwe. To add aromatic intrigue at the top of the flavor profile, try an Ethiopia Yrgacheffe or Kenya. To add a bass note of complexity near the bottom of the profile, add a Sumatra Mandheling or traditionally processed Sulawesi.

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To add wine or fruit notes to the blend, make the highlight coffee an acidy Yemen, an Ethiopian Harrar or a Kenyan. There aren’t many real mistakes in blending, but it’s a good idea to avoid combining two coffees that are distinctive or extreme in similar ways. Two coffees with similar bright, winy acidity — such as a Kenya and a Zimbabwe — might produce a pointless blend. On the other hand, a coffee like Brazil Santos is so congenially understated that it gets along with everything. Other, easy-going individualists like Yemen Mocha, wet-processed Ethiopians and most good Central American coffees, manage to mix with almost everybody while retaining their distinction. Combine coffees that complement one another, each contributing a quality that the others in the blend may lack. The world’s oldest and most famous blend, for instance, combines Yemen Mocha and Java. This traditional blend originated when Mocha and Java were the only coffees the world knew. It embodies the sound principle of balancing extremes and complements. Yemen is acidy, fruity and winy; Java is rounder and deeper-toned. Together they make a coffee that may be a bit less striking and distinctive than either component alone, but makes up for it as a more balanced and comprehensive combination. So, when you dine at your favorite restaurant, take a moment to appreciate the care and time that the chef or restaurateur has taken to present that special blend. Ask about the origin, the roast, and the flavor profile that you can expect to enjoy as you wrap up your dining experience. Appreciate the labor, love and time that were taken to develop this “nectar of the gods.” When you culminate a great meal with a special cup of coffee, you extend the glow of the dining experience right out the door. To me, this is the fundamental meaning of the coffee break, the coffee klatch, the happy hour, the after-dinner coffee: These are secular rituals that, in unobtrusive but essential ways, help keep us human. F&D www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 33


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BY JAY FORMAN

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n my younger, more naive days, I held seriously uninformed beliefs concerning the production of sweets. Marveling at their exotic appearance, I did not believe they could be made in a “normal” household kitchen. The idea that they

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might be crafted by a reclusive genius directing a cadre of Oompah Loompahs did not seem too far-fetched. After all, I never came across a recipe for Everlasting Gobstoppers in Gourmet magazine. Nor, try as I might, could I ever find Crunchberries in the produce section of Krogers. Obviously, the manufacture of confections was beyond both my ability and comprehension. Commercials on television don’t exactly clear up my understanding, either. Savory foods are usually advertised in a straightforward manner. A commercial for sausages might show a guy in his backyard working a grill. Simple enough, right? Now take a commercial for sweets, where tiny elves labor in hollow trees to produce “Chips Ahoy” cookies. They operate contraptions that Dr. Seuss would reject as too outlandish to be believable; and five of them put out roughly 100,000 metric tons of product per month. Given this portrayal of elf technology, perhaps it is easier to understand why I used to believe that special machinery was required to make things like marshmallows … that “Jet-Puffed” obviously necessitated the use of jet engines … and that those of us who did

not hold an engineering degree or could not converse with elves could never hope to make such treats. In the face of my ignorance, being married to a pastry chef has been an illuminating experience. Imagine my surprise when I learned that genuine marshmallows can be made at home. I know this now because Megan made them for me one night when I mentioned that some marshmallow topping would go great on my ice cream. She put a couple of ingredients in the stainless steel bowl of an ordinary mixer, flipped a switch, and a cloud of homemade marshmallows arose before my eyes. Surely I must have been dreaming. But what about some of my other favorites, like Magic Shell? I’ve always accepted that this particular delicacy was more chemistry than cooking. I figured it contained few, if any, natural ingredients and could not be made without access to unpronounceable chemicals requiring special permits to buy. Wrong again. Early on in our courtship, Megan made me a batch of homemade Magic Shell, which actually tasted better than the original and was indeed made with natural ingredients. That, more than her ability to speak French, impressed me. As we spent more time together, I began to learn a few things about the pastry world. I learned not all frostings come out of cans, and I found that real buttercream is far superior to shorteningbased products, even if most people accept the shortening-based type as normal and not the other way around. I learned that nuts in desserts can actually


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be a good thing, as evidenced by frangipane. Simply put, there are few things more delicious than the crust of a well-made frangipane, where the exterior has caramelized just enough to allow a terrific complexity of flavors to bloom. The tradeoff has been bittersweet. I’ve lost my innocence about how candies are made, but I am comforted by having ready access to the actual treats. And with my own personal pastry chef (boy, that comment will get me in trouble), even holiday leftovers become exciting. It used to be that cranberry sauce was basically useless. Not any more. This year Megan incorporated it into a Cranberry Panna Cotta. It’s similar to crème brulee, but it is less fattening and, more important, it is conveniently located in my refrigerator. With this added influx of sugary confections, I have to be careful not to gain so much weight that I no longer fit through standard-sized doorframes. My family watches me as if I’m a canary in a coal mine, expecting that at any moment my blood might spontaneously solidify into butter and my heart explode. But my wife takes special pains to prepare nutritious meals for me. I’ve never eaten a healthier diet. Indeed, when I think of what life used to be like and what it is like now, it is a wonder that I survived my twenties. It must be a terrible thing for mothers to raise their boys right and turn them loose, hoping for the best but knowing deep in their hearts that they will head to the beef jerky section of the 7-Eleven for much of their nutritional needs. During that period I was left to fend for myself, and the results were less than impressive. I’m still fascinated by the novel idea that I can have a salad without tacos in it. If it were not for my wife, I’d still be using elaborate rationalization to justify to myself that Funyuns count as a vegetable because they have onions in them. Okay, powdered onions. But I digress. The veil of mystery surrounding the manufacture of sweets has been lifted from my eyes. Pastry and confections are indeed an art form, but one within reach of ordinary people, not mystical tree-elves. But even better than the knowledge I’ve gained is the fact that now, thanks to Megan, I’m always guaranteed a good dessert. F&D

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Celebrating 58 years as Louisville’s hometown favorite for top quality seafood and much, much more.

THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: On the River: 3021 Upper River Road ■ 895-0544 (Just east of Zorn Ave @ I-71)

601 W. Riverside ■ 284-3474 (On the Jeffersonville riverfront across from Louisville)

Around Town: 1610 Kentucky Mills Dr. ■ 240-0700 (Blankenbaker @ 1-64)

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BY RON JOHNSON

Exploring Kentucky’s COUNTRY INNS

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ome of the best weekend getaways are not just located right here in Kentucky, but within an hour’s drive of Louisville. If you’d like to slip away from the urban hustle and bustle, replacing the din of traffic noise with the chirping of crickets, Kentucky’s country inns offer just the ticket. Most offer cozy overnight accommodations, and all have dining rooms that, in some instances, display surprisingly cutting-edge cuisine alongside such familiar favorites as fried chicken and country biscuits. While it doesn’t offer overnight accommodations, the Old Stone Inn is close enough to Louisville that you can enjoy a multicourse dinner and still be back home in time to watch the late news in bed. Located just over the Shelby County line in Simpsonville, the Old Stone Inn has been brought back to life by proprietors Paul and Sally Crump. For many years Paul oversaw controlled restaurant chaos as manager of Porcini Restaurant on Frankfort Avenue. At Old Stone Inn, he has moved about 20 miles straight out US 60, taking that experience to a more genteel and frankly more comfortable venue. His wife, Sally, is a natural hostess, who makes guests feel like family friends. The Crumps re-opened the Inn in 2004 after it had undergone a string of ownership changes. Built in 1817 by slaves who brought its stones from a nearby quarry, the Inn’s 2-foot-thick walls survived a hail of gunfire during the Civil War. Some say the bullet holes are still there. Having served as a raucous tavern, a stop for stagecoaches traveling between Louisville and Lexington, and most recently an inn, the Old Stone Inn has now found its place as an upscale, casual restaurant offering a mix of familiar Kentucky dishes and remarkably cosmopolitan items. A recent menu offered a choice of fried green tomatoes, country ham tortellini and southern fried shrimp among its appetizers. For the main course, diners would be hard pressed to decide among classics like chicken livers, a Hot Brown and shrimp and grits, or modern treats such as smoked paprika-dusted quail, braised short ribs or Bourbon barrel pork chops. Another worthwhile dining destination in Shelby County is Science Hill Inn. The dining room here is located in buildings 36 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

that were part of the Science Hill School for Girls from 1825 to 1939. Set in a historic section of downtown Shelbyville, Science Hill Inn gains ambience from its surroundings in the Wakefield-Scearce Galleries. Namesakes Mark Wakefield and Mark Scearce have built the galleries into a pre-eminent destination for serious collectors of English antiques. As the collection grew to fill 30 rooms of the restored boarding school, it also spun off a row of less pricey antique shops along Main Street, turning the entire area into a bona-fide antique shopping district. The menu is pure Kentucky, loaded with dishes that can be found on most Louisville tables at Thanksgiving. A luscious corn pudding holds its own alongside a super-rich zucchini casserole; but the real stars of the menu are the decadent shrimp and grits and down-home country-fried chicken. We suggest dining at Science Hill Inn at midday, when sunlight streams in through the windows and there is plenty of time before and after to shop for that $20,000 antique chandelier you always wanted. For those who prefer a less opulent setting for lunch or dinner, the Trustees’ Office Dining Room at Shaker Village near Harrodsburg offers a true Kentucky cuisine experience without the conspicuous consumption. It’s a far cry from English antiques to the thrifty workmanlike construction of Shaker furniture, but there is something comforting about the appreciation of simple pleasures that brings people back to Shaker Village. Although the term “set amid the rolling hills of the Bluegrass” has become a cliché for anything near Lexington, Kentucky, it is the most apt way to describe the setting of the Inn at Shaker Village. Because this Inn is more than an hour from Louisville and about 30 miles from Lexington, it is fortunate that there are splendid overnight accommodations available. Fifteen separate 19th century buildings,


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all restored with historical accuracy and preservation in mind, house 81 guest rooms, suites and cottages. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served in the Trustees’ Office Dining Room. In keeping with the historic preservation mission of the Village, all servers are clad in period costumes. Shaker specialties like baked herb chicken, pan fried catfish and sliced pork with apple cider sauce are ser ved by candlelight each evening. Although the Shakers were known for a simple, straightforward lifestyle with abstinence as a highly touted virtue, they were not adverse to pulling out all the stops when it came to food. This is far from the bland cuisine one might expect. For those seeking an even more authentic experience, the Winter Kitchen allows for dining in front of a large working fireplace in the West Family Dwelling Cellar. Call ahead, as the Winter Kitchen is only open for about six weeks starting in January each year. Whatever you do, don’t miss the Shaker Lemon Pie. Combining the best of a full-service restaurant and overnight accommodations, the Dedman family has hit on a winning formula with the Beaumont Inn in Harrodsburg, Kentucky. Located not far from Shaker Village, the Beaumont Inn offers a similar idyllic setting, but adds the enticement of a full wine list and liquor by the drink. After a “wet” vote a few years back, Beaumont Inn was able to add an honest-to-goodness tavern to its operation. In addition to the more formal dining room, the tavern offers an excellent alternative dining option. The Dedman family has run the inn for five generations, dating back to 1917 when they purchased the historic landmark at auction. For those who stay overnight, a splendid southern breakfast is served every morning, included in the room rate. The hot buffet features an enviable spread of southern classics like cheese grits, buttermilk biscuits with real sausage gravy, smokehouse bacon, and some of the best griddle corncakes one could ever hope for. As good as the breakfast is, any trip to the Beaumont Inn ought to include a proper supper in the main dining room. First courses include the ubiquitous fried green tomatoes, served here with a buttermilk dipping sauce, and mushrooms stuffed

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with smoked sausage. All entrees include a choice of garden salad, Beaumont Caesar, hot bread, and three vegetables (including some rather spectacular corn pudding), so it might make sense to bypass the appetizers altogether and head straight to the main event. The kitchen shows off a bit with Parmesan-crusted crab-stuffed trout and filet mignon Beaumont, but how anyone could dine here and pass up the inn’s famous yellow-legged fried chicken or two year old Kentucky cured country ham is beyond me.The yellow legs on the chicken are the result of a rich all-corn diet, but whatever color it is, it’s just good southern fried chicken. For those who can’t decide, the Classic Beaumont Dinner features both chicken and country ham. A more casual menu of burgers, Hot Browns and fried catfish is available in the Tavern. One bit of advice is mandatory before you dine at Boone Tavern: The appropriate response to the query “spoonbread?” is always,“yes, please.” Boone Tavern is a jewel tucked just off the old “Dixie Highway” in Berea, Kentucky, south of Lexington on I-75. Berea is justifiably famous for its furniture and crafts, most produced by local artisans who teach at the college and their precocious students. The tavern, named after Kentucky’s own Daniel Boone, is staffed primarily by Berea College students. The school’s mission is to provide a free education to the rural poor and working-class students from Appalachia and the foothills of east central Kentucky. This is accomplished in part by each student’s commitment to work at least 10 hours per week to earn room and board. Boone Tavern, owned by Berea College, is a full-service hotel with 58 guest rooms. Rooms are furnished with early American furniture reproductions produced by Berea College Woodcraft. There is a complimentary continental breakfast for hotel guests, and the dining room is open to the public for lunch and dinner. It’s not unusual to see state-owned vehicles with Franklin County tags parked out front while the political who’s who from Frankfort mash out political deals over classic Boone Tavern dishes like chicken flakes in a bird’s nest and sage blackened pork … and spoonbread. Lots of moist, warm, fluffy, delicious spoonbread. F&D www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 37


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people and places profiles

BY ROBIN GARR & MICHAEL L. JONES | PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAN DRY

hidden gems In past issues, Food & Dining has profiled chefs who share common interests because they inhabit some of the city’s most familiar dining regions, such as Downtown Louisville and Frankfort Avenue. We’ve introduced you to owner-chefs, ethnic chefs, chefs who own their own restaurants and those we consider rising young stars. In this issue, we’re taking a slightly different perspective as we present four leading local chefs whose common characteristic is neither geographical nor functional. Call them “hidden gems,” if you will: These folks toil in the kitchens of restaurants that are excellent, highly regarded and on the rise, but that are located a bit off the beaten path, just far enough away from Louisville’s established “restaurant rows” that they perhaps feel like loners who can’t simply pop next door to borrow a cup of sugar from a neighbor. 38 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

With writer Michael L. Jones doing the introductions, please extend a warm welcome to these bright lights on the local dining scene: ❖ At Azalea, on Brownsboro Road a long hop, skip and jump north of the busy Frankfort Avenue scene, Chef Dyrol J. Underwood. ❖ At Café Emilie, a little too far out for Frankfort Avenue and a little too far in for the East End ’burbs, owner Emilie Knieriem and Chefs Tim Smith and Mark Heil. ❖ At 211 Clover Lane, tucked away in a tiny mall located on a former lumberyard on the far side of the railroad tracks in St. Matthews, owner Andrew Smith and Executive Chef Troy Schuster. ❖ At L&N Wine Bar and Bistro, a bit to the east of Butchertown and a few blocks west of Clifton, Chef Mark Purzycki and co-owners Len Stevens II and Nancy Richards.


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azalea 3612 brownsboro rd. 895.5493

Food is supposed to be the key to a man’s heart, but apparently it works pretty well on women too. Dyrol J. Underwood found this out as an undergraduate at Youngstown State University in Ohio, where his cooking skills came in handy when he was trying to impress the ladies. “Most of the guys in Youngstown couldn’t cook,” Underwood said. “People always said I had a knack for it.We had community kitchens on every floor in my dorm. After I cooked something, people would come from the other floors to buy my leftovers.” Underwood, 40, is still winning hearts with his cooking. As executive chef at Azalea, he oversees an eclectic bill of fare that combines elements of Asian, Southwestern, Spanish and French cuisine. He says his personal history is as varied as his menu. “My father was in the Air Force, so we moved around a lot. My mother was from Trinidad and my father came from a family that really liked to cook.” This led to an early interest in food that was not diminished by encountering such exotica as goat meat when the family was assigned in Spain. “Without really knowing it, I was picking up things about cooking that I was filing away in my head.” After graduating from Youngstown State University in 1990, Underwood headed to culinary school in Pittsburgh, where he honed his French and Spanish cooking techniques to enhance the basics that he’d picked up on his own. After his mother died in 1998, he moved to Louisville to be near his father, who had relocated here a few years earlier. Azalea was one of the first restaurants where Underwood sought work. “I got the job and I’ve been here ever since,” he said. “As time has gone on, I’ve started learning more about the restaurant and the history of the building. It is a pretty interesting place.” Azalea, 3612 Brownsboro Road, is located in a historic farmhouse that once served as a stop on the Underground Railroad, the series of safe houses that 40 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

Azalea Chef Dyrol “D.J.” Underwood

helped guide runaway slaves to freedom in the North. Underwood said the restaurant still has two large, foot-thick wooden doors that he believes were used to hide fugitives from slave catchers. After the Civil War, the building in 1870 became the home of Bauer’s, an upscale restaurant that specialized in Southern cooking. Descendants of the Bauer family, two elderly sisters, still live in a house next door to Azalea. “They don’t go out much anymore,” Underwood said. “I think one of them is like 98. They use to come in on Saturdays and drink Manhattans. But I haven’t seen them in a while.” In the late ’80s, La Paloma, a Spanish restaurant, took over the space, and Atlanta celebrity chef Tom Catherall opened Azalea in 1994. In the Southern city, Catherall had helped popularize “fusion,” the style of modifying traditional dishes with a combination of ingredients and cooking techniques from different cultures. Although the restaurant has passed through the hands of other owners since then, the fusion concept has left its imprint. “Our menu is still contemporary American food that incorporates a lot of different styles,” Underwood said. “Besides the French and Spanish, there are some

Asian influences, especially in the snapper dish, which is pretty popular. The calamari, grilled salmon and smoked pork chops are other things that we move a lot of. Our menu is almost 80 percent seafood.” Last October, out-of-town owners purchased the restaurant, and they are still making long-term plans. Azalea has been closed for lunch for a few months, but Underwood expects that to change soon. It is an ideal spot for spring and summer because the shady outdoor patio, with its scenic view of the Crescent Hill Golf Course, was made for alfresco dining. There are also two full bars, one inside the restaurant and the other on the patio, and a 100-item wine list. Underwood said Azalea strives to stay contemporar y while at the same time being true to its celebrated past. “The restaurant scene has changed tremendously since Azalea first opened,” Underwood said. “Back then, there was no L&N or Seviche. It’s not like that anymore, but I think the quality has always been consistent. I can’t afford to change the restaurant as much as some of the others do. Once a customer gets a whiff of something they love here, they don’t want it to change.The historical aspect, the patio and the food are always going to make Azalea stand out.”


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Azalea’s Ginger and Tea Roasted Snapper. Roasted snapper marinated in ginger and tea atop a ginger scallion rice cake and served with an orange soy cream sauce.

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Café Emilie has gone through more changes than a chameleon during its relatively short tenure. Five years 3939 shelbyville rd. ago, when Emilie 719.9717 Morris and Charles Knieriem opened the café, it was primarily a coffee house. However, it turned out that the patrons enjoyed the food even more than the coffee, so Café Emilie has matured into a delightful dining oasis, situated at 3939 Shelbyville Road, about midway between the St. Matthews Mall and the Frankfort Avenue restaurant row. Now, Emilie Knieriem, whose new name reveals that she has gone through a little change of her own, thinks Café Emilie is ready for another transformation. The restaurant was recently renovated, and so was the menu, thanks to the arrival of Executive Chef Tim Smith, formerly of the Napa River Grill.With a new look and an ambitious chef, Knieriem thinks the café is ready to compete with the top tables on the Louisville restaurant scene.“Try starting a marriage and a restaurant at the same time; if we can get through that, we can get through this,” she said.“The food is the best advertisement for this restaurant.The food they are putting out of the kitchen is marvelous.” Smith, 33, was going through some changes of his own before the opportunity at Café Emilie presented itself. He had been cooking at Napa River Grill and its predecessor on the property, Mamma Grisanti, for 16 years, working his way up from prep cook to executive chef. A short stint at Avalon on Bardstown Road followed, but Smith says he never felt settled there. It was his sous chef at Avalon, Mark Heil, who first clued him in to what was unfolding at Café Emilie. “Mark had worked for Charlie and Emilie before, so he knew they were good people,” Smith said. “He said they were ready to change the restaurant so they could draw up the nighttime business and attract a younger, hipper crowd. It sounded like a good idea to me.” Café Emilie is located in St. Matthews in a corner of Burdorf Center Home & Office, which Louisvillians invariably identify as the old Bacon’s depar tment store. Owing to city regulations, the restaurant lacks a signature sign facing the congested thoroughfare, so it’s all too easy for passers-by to miss.

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“With Mark and Tim’s culinary expertise we hope to make Café Emilie more of a destination restaurant,” Knieriem said. “The biggest of our growing pains is making customers aware of the change while keeping everybody on board and happy. We have a wonderful following of St. Matthews women and we don’t want to scare them away with our prices.” Smith said he is making changes in small steps. He got rid of most of the appetizers except for the crab cakes and chicken pot stickers, which were popular with the café’s regulars. He also jettisoned the pasta dishes, added more fresh fish to the menu instead. “I’m trying to take some traditional dishes and mold them together,” he said. “We have a pork chop that comes with dueling barbecue sauces.There will probably be a few more changes in the future. They were already doing an okay dinner business, so the goal is to go upscale without shocking the guests.” Other changes include taking some of the tint off the café’s windows to make it more visible from Shelbyville Road, and renovating the bar area. Smith said the overall reaction to the changes has been positive, but of course some customers and staff want Café Emilie to stay just as it was before he came. “People get set in their ways and they go against change,” Smith said.“I know it has been hard on staff because the new food requires different techniques and knife skills. The waiters have to learn a little more in order to sell the food. But I think everyone is on board now.” Knieriem said she is already seeing results from the changes, especially in Café Emilie’s growing weekend brunch business. “The changes have upset some customers and that’s been the hardest part,” she said.“It’s been a teaching and a learning experience. It’s had to be. We are off the beaten path. It’s hard to get people to try something different. But once they do, they realize it was worth their effort.” Through all the changes, Smith says, two things would always be consistent at Café Emilie: good food and great service. “You’ve still got to do your part,” he said. “A new paint job helps with the atmosphere, but it’s the food and the service that keeps people coming back.That’s why our regular customers fell in love with Café Emilie in the first place.” LEFT: Café Emilie’s namesake Emilie Knieriem, Chef Tim Smith (left) and Sous Chef Mark Heil. OPPOSITE PAGE: Café Emilie’s Lavender Duck. Thinly sliced duck breast served with an aromatic glaze of lavender, red wine and honey.


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211 clover lane 211clover lane 896.9570

Andrew Smith and Troy Schuster brought contrasting resumes to 211 Clover Lane. Smith was a service industry novice when he started working at the restaurant as a waiter nearly eight years ago. Now he owns the restaurant. Schuster, on the other hand, had already served at highly regarded local establishments including Azalea and Le Beaujolais, before joining the St. Matthews restaurant as its executive chef. Despite their contrasting backgrounds, the two men have proven to be an extraordinary team. During the five years they have worked together, 211 Clover Lane has attained a high profile on the Louisville restaurant scene.

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“Troy and I both have high expectations for the restaurant and for us,” Smith said. “There are one or two restaurants, which I won’t name, that might be better than us, right now. But we think 211 Clover Lane has the potential to be the preeminent restaurant in Louisville. That’s what we are striving for.” Tucked away in the Colony Center, a small suburban mall built on the site of a former lumberyard, 211 Clover Lane looks a bit like a French farmhouse. Smith said the venue adds to the restaurant’s charm, but also creates a challenge. “We’re a little out of the way,” he said. “You have to be driving down Westport Road looking for us.That’s why we depend a lot on word of mouth. At the same time, our location helps our guests feel like they are outside of Louisville. Restaurants on Bardstown Road or Frankfort Avenue are surrounded by traffic and street noise. At 211 Clover Lane, you can enjoy a good conversation in a relaxed environment.” The intimate feel of the restaurant is reinforced by its division into several small dining rooms, most with plenty of windows

211 Clover Lane’s Petrale sole grenobloise served with sundried tomatoes, spinach and potato puree.

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to take advantage of natural light. The restaurant’s interior is decorated with fine French and American antiques, and a charming patio serves those interested in alfresco dining. “The menu at 211 Clover is small,” Schuster said.“We didn’t want it so big and overwhelming that it takes you an hour to decide what you want. That’s something that I hate when I go out to eat. With too many dishes, quality is bound to suffer. Our menu is also seasonal. Really, I can change it anytime depending on what ingredients I can get.” Smith and Schuster maintain a clear division of labor. Schuster, 32, handles the kitchen duties, which includes overseeing the cooks and keeping up with almost weekly menu changes. Smith, 30, functions as the restaurant’s general manager. He handles reservations, staffing and other business matters. “I think I slept a little better when I was just the manager,” Smith joked. “Basically, I have more to worry about than before. I think the most important lessons I’ve learned are about overbooking and underbooking the place.”


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Smith grew up in Southeastern Ohio, far from fine-dining hotspots. The restaurant bug bit him only after he graduated from Centre College in Danville, Kentucky, in 1999. He spent the summer after graduation living with his sister in Atlanta, where he took full advantage of the opportunity to soak up the city’s culture and culinary scene. “We must have visited the top 20 or 30 restaurants in Atlanta that summer,” he remembered. “I’d always had an interest in food and wine, but I had never considered it as a career before then. In fact, I was trying to decide whether I wanted to go into law or real estate … but all of those restaurants awakened something in me. I moved to Louisville to be with the woman who is now my wife, and I got a job at 211 Clover Lane. I literally worked my way from the ground up.” Smith was general manager in 2001 when a damaging fire in the kitchen closed the restaurant for several months. He oversaw its renovation and reopening, and in November 2004, he finally bought 211 Clover Lane from its founder. One of his goals, he said, was to bring more consistency to the operation. “This restaurant has always been a place where you could get a wonderful meal,” Smith explained. “But there was a little problem with turnover. Staff changes can cause the quality of service to become uneven. That’s something I wanted to avoid.” Since Smith became owner, Schuster said, business has picked up by 40 percent. “He did a lot of advertising when he first took over and that brought in a lot of new guests,” Schuster said. “Since then, we’ve seen a lot of younger people. I do think my being here has added a lot to the consistency of the restaurant. Before that, it had gone through like 10 chefs in 10 years. Restaurants that fly through chefs fail, because the guests don’t know what to expect from the kitchen.” Smith and Schuster say they have even more ambitious plans for 211 Clover Lane. Schuster, who has fresh fish flown in regularly, said more seafood will start turning up on the menu.“What I do is a lot of French and Italian technique with local ingredients,” he said. “I want to push it in some creative ways. As much as we’ve accomplished here, I think we’ve still got room to grow.”

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211 Clover Lane owner Andrew Smith and Chef Troy Schuster (seated).


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L&N wine bar and bistro 1765 mellwood avenue 897.0070

When most Louisvillians think of Detroit, if we think of it at all, we imagine a “rustbelt” burg where you can get good ribs, great Greek food, and stand a fair chance of getting mugged if you turn into the wrong neighborhood. So we shouldn’t be surprised that Chef Mark Purzycki had some pretty wacky ideas about Louisville before he arrived here from the Motor City, too. Having cooked in some exclusive establishments in Detroit’s affluent northern suburbs, Purzycki figured he’d easily impress the Derby City with his big-city chops. “What has surprised me is that the palates here are just as fine as anywhere I’ve been,” he said. “In a city like Detroit, people expect really, really good food. I didn’t think people would have the same expectations in Louisville. I’m happy to say I was wrong.” Not only is he cooking for diners who appreciate good food, but Purzycki,

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executive chef at L&N Wine Bar and Bistro, is doing it at a restaurant that boasts one of the most ambitious wine programs in the country. “At first, I was a little concerned because I am not accustomed to working so closely with wine,” he admitted. “But I enjoy the challenge.” He works closely with restaurant owner Len Stevens II to pair new dishes with different wines, and they work closely with waitstaff to make sure they offer customers a variety of wine choices at each price level. Purzycki arrived at L&N, 1765 Mellwood Avenue, last September, but the restaurant has been around since November 2003. Over the last four years, it has become a gathering place for both novice and experienced wine aficionados. Stevens, who owns the wine bar with his wife Nancy Richards, said some out-oftown visitors make Derby reservations years ahead of time. “A small restaurant is dependent on word-of-mouth,” he said. “We get a high percentage of customers simply through guest recommendations.” L&N serves more than 100 wines by the glass. They also have fruit-infused vodkas, on display in tall, striking cylinders on the bar; and a selection of artisanal and imported beers. But as soon as you step into the restaurant you’ll know that wine is

L&N Wine Bar and Bistro’s Chef Mark Purzycki (right) and co-owners Len Stevens II and Nancy Richards.

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king here. The bar area is dominated by a 54-unit Cruvinet, a wine preservation and dispensing system that dispenses wine under gas pressure to prevent the oxidation that can quickly damage quality wines. “With the Cruvinet, wine stays fresh for up to three weeks,” Stevens said. “Not that a bottle of wine would last that long here.” The L&N is the culmination of a longtime dream for Stevens, 41. His passion for wine started two decades ago when he left the military after serving three years in Japan. “I didn’t know what I wanted to do with my life,” he said.“I got a job bartending at this restaurant, Sarah’s Rose Hill Inn. There was a man there who used to do blind-taste tests. I’d pour a few glasses of wine and he’d take a sip of each of them. He could always tell which bottle the wine came from. That was the most fascinating thing I’d ever seen. I started learning all about wine after that.” Through the years, Stevens worked in both wholesale and retail wine sales. Part of that time was spent running the Zephyr Cove Restaurant, a popular spot on Frankfort Avenue, with his wife. But he was always planning that dream establishment in the back of his mind. “Opening a wine bar, the first one in the state, was my dream,” he said. “But I also realized that a


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wine bar alone wouldn’t make any money, so I knew that it would be a bistro too.” After they closed Zephyr Cove in 2002, Stevens and Richards started looking for the perfect location for their wine bar. They found it on a corner of Mellwood just past Brownsboro Road.The cozy brick building was built in 1869. Stevens says it is as important to L&N’s success as Purzycki’s food and the wine. “This building has a warm feeling,” Stevens said. “It’s the three fireplaces and the exposed brick walls. I don’t believe that you can create ambience. A building either has it or it doesn’t.” L&N later added a patio, and it offers a special dinner sitting for theater-goers.The guests can enjoy a three-course meal and be on their way to Actors Theatre or the Kentucky Center well before the opening curtain. “Food drives a restaurant, we’ve come to that appreciation,” Stevens said.“What we like about Mark is that he is as passionate about food as we are about wine. Everything is made from scratch seven days a week.” Purzycki said it took him a little time to adjust to the local taste preferences. Local diners like their seafood bisque with more cream and less tomato. They also like a lot more things fried than they do in Detroit. “That’s were my sous chefs come in,” Purzycki said with a laugh. “L&N is a bistro, but a bistro with an American flair.We have a duck dish that we serve with butternut squash risotto, brussels sprouts and mushrooms. I call it comfort food, because you feel good after you eat it.” “When I see people in the dining room smiling after eating my food,” he added, “you could pay me $5 an hour and I’d be happy.” F&D RIGHT: L&N Chef Purzycki’s lamb

pops. Four herb encrusted lamb chops with a Bourbon molasses demi-glace and served with Israeli couscous. www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 47


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recipes top chef recipes

PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAN DRY

Kentucky Brunch Dishes “Take your pick,” Food & Dining advised Sullivan University chefs Traci Badenhausen and Katie Payne as we invited them to come up with recipes for this issue’s Top Chef feature: “Give us some scrumptious brunch dishes … or come up with dishes that take advantage of fresh, seasonal local produce.” That was an easy call, the women later disclosed:Why not do both? “We decided to just combine the two: Local products that we can support with brunch ideas,” Badenhausen said with a smile. “Seasonality of product is the key. We looked at everything we could do with asparagus, peas, lamb, all the early products that you can get from your local produce market at this time of year.” With spring and Derby coming up fast, indulgent brunch dishes were a natural choice, and the chefs took care to come up with attractive yet workable dishes that a competent cook can easily replicate at home, using ingredients readily available from local sources. Badenhausen loves Eggs Benedict, the classic combination of poached egg and ham on an English muffin coated with silken Hollandaise, but she gave her new version a distinct Kentucky spin

Chef Traci Badenhausen’s Pan Roasted Lamb Loin with Pomegranate Glaze, Pea and Baby Beet Salads

48 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

by substituting home-fried potatoes for the muffin and adding a regional country-ham vibe to the rich, eggy sauce. Her other main brunch dish, a pan-roasted lamb loin, gains character from an exotic pomegranate paste glaze. (This product, sometimes labeled “pomegranate syrup” or “pomegranate molasses,” is available at Lotsa Pasta, Burger’s and Whole Foods, she said.) Chef Payne said her culinary inspiration jumped immediately to the idea of a personal favorite brunch dish, a big open-face sandwich. Egg salad and smoked salmon is a brunch standard. She localizes the dish and makes it more subtly flavored by using Shuckman’s smoked trout from Louisville. The recipe is simple: A tangy egg salad studded with flecks of smoked trout, served on dark, rich pumpernickel bread with tomatoes and watercress. Her other dish, a goat-cheese scone, turns this usually sweet breakfast pastry into a more savory dish, with a creative tomato “jam” to add a bit of fresh, fruity sweetness without turning the dish into a dessert. “I don’t even like goat cheese myself,” she confided,“but it’s so popular right now, it’s here to stay.”


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Chef Katie Payne’s Open-faced Egg Salad Sandwich with Smoked Trout

Chef Traci Badenhausen’s Kentucky Eggs Benedict with Kentucky Fried Potatoes and Ham Hollandaise

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Add scallions, red bell pepper, salt and pepper and cook 2 minutes. Keep potatoes warm until ready to use.

Guest Chef Chef Traci Badenhausen

Kentucky Eggs Benedict with Kentucky Fried Potatoes and Ham Hollandaise (SERVES 4) 6 tablespoons white wine vinegar or unseasoned rice vinegar 4 to 8 large eggs 3 ounces thinly sliced country ham 1. Pour enough water into each of two large skillets to reach a depth of 1 inch. Bring water to a slow simmer over medium heat. Add three tablespoons vinegar to each skillet. 2. Carefully crack an egg onto a small plate or into a small bowl. Gently slide egg into simmering water. Repeat procedure until you have four eggs in each skillet. Cook until whites are just set, about 4 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to remove poached eggs from water. 3. Divide the Kentucky Fried Potatoes into four equal portions, top each with sliced country ham and one or two poached eggs, and sauce with the Country Ham Hollandaise. For the Kentucky Fried Potatoes 4 tablespoons unsalted butter 2-5 tablespoons vegetable oil 3 large russet potatoes, peeled and diced 2 ounces thickly sliced country ham (about 1/4 inch) diced (about 1/4 cup) 4 scallions, thinly sliced 1 /2 red bell pepper, diced Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 1. In a large nonstick skillet melt butter over moderate heat. Add two tablespoons oil and heat until hot but not smoking. 2. Add potatoes and cook, stirring often, until just browned, about 10 minutes. Add a little more vegetable oil as you cook if the potatoes start to stick. Add country ham and cook, stirring often, 3 minutes. 50 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

For the Country Ham Horseradish Hollandaise 11/2 cups cold unsalted butter 6 large egg yolks 2 tablespoons lemon juice or white wine 1 tablespoon water 3 tablespoons crumbled cooked country ham 2 teaspoons prepared horseradish Salt and black pepper to taste Hot sauce or cayenne pepper to taste 1. Melt butter in a small saucepan, skimming away any white foam that forms. Remove melted butter from heat and keep warm. 2. In a large saucepan bring about 11/2 inches of water to boiling, then turn down to a simmer. 3. In a large stainless-steel bowl whisk yolks, lemon juice and water to a light froth. Place bowl over the simmering water making sure the bowl does not touch the water. 4. Continue to whisk the egg mixture until it thickens — about 4 minutes — being careful not to let the mixture get too hot. Remove the bowl from over the water and continue whisking the sauce until it cools slightly. 5. Gradually add the warm butter, continuing to whisk constantly. Whisk in crumbled, cooked country ham, horseradish, salt and pepper. Season with hot sauce or cayenne. If sauce is too thick, whisk in a few drops of warm water. Keep warm until ready to use.

Pan Roasted Lamb Loin with Pomegranate Glaze, Pea & Baby Beet Salads (SERVES 4) Four 6- to 8-ounce lamb loins Salt and pepper to taste 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 /2 cup pomegranate paste 1. Bring lamb loins to room temperature and season them with salt and pepper. 2. Heat a medium skillet over mediumhigh heat. Add olive oil and heat for a few seconds. Add the seasoned lamb loins to the skillet and sear on all sides until the meat starts to get a nice, brown crust and reaches an internal temperature of 140 degrees.

3. Remove meat from pan and brush all over with pomegranate paste. Let meat sit about 5 minutes before slicing, on the bias, into five or six pieces. Serve. For the Pea Salad with Radishes and Shaved Asiago 2 teaspoons cumin seeds 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice 2 teaspoons honey 1 /4 cup extra virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons chopped, fresh dill 4 cups shelled fresh peas, or 1 pound frozen petite peas 1 bunch radishes, trimmed, halved and thinly sliced 1 cup shaved asiago cheese (may substitute parmesan, goat cheese or feta) 3 cups fresh pea tendrils, coarsely chopped, or pea sprouts (optional) 1. Heat small skillet over medium heat. Add cumin seeds and toast until aromatic and slightly darker, about 2 minutes. Cool, then grind finely in spice mill. 2. Whisk lime juice, honey, and cumin in small bowl. Gradually whisk in oil, then stir in dill. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside. 3. Cook peas in a pot of boiling, salted water until almost tender, about 5 minutes for fresh or about 2 minutes for frozen. Drain, rinse under cold water, then drain well. 4. Put them in a large bowl. Add radishes, goat cheese and dressing, and toss. Season with salt and pepper. For the Roasted Baby Beet Salad 2 pounds yellow or red baby beets 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar Salt and ground black pepper to taste 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 /3 cup small fresh mint leaves, for garnish 1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. 2. Scrub the beets well and wrap them, three or four together, in packets of aluminum foil. Place packets on a baking sheet and roast until the beets are tender when tested with a toothpick, about 1 hour. Open the packets and let the beets cool slightly. 3. Meanwhile, combine the vinegar, salt and pepper in a small bowl.Whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in the olive oil. Continue whisking until emulsified. Set aside. 4. When the beets are cool enough to handle, slip off their skins, which will now come off easily. Halve the beets lengthwise and place them in a bowl. 5. Toss the beets with the dressing. Add the mint leaves and toss again. Serve.


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Guest Chef Chef Katie Payne

Open-faced Egg Salad Sandwich with Smoked Trout (MAKES 4-5 SANDWICHES) 1 cup mayonnaise 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish 2-3 dashes hot sauce 1 tablespoon pickled banana pepper juice Salt and pepper to taste 9 large eggs, hard-boiled 2 scallions, sliced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill 1 stalk celery, diced 1 cup smoked trout, flaked 1 thick slice of pumpernickel bread 1 small cucumber, thinly sliced 1 small tomato, thinly sliced 1 bunch watercress, stems removed 1. Mix mayonnaise, mustard, relish, hot sauce and pickled pepper juice. Season to

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taste with salt and pepper and set aside. 2. Peel and quarter the eggs and put them in the food processor. Pulse eggs to desired consistency. 3. Mix eggs with remaining ingredients and pour dressing over mixture. 4. Stir gently until salad is well dressed. 5. Assemble sandwich.

Goat Cheese Scone with Tomato Jam

5. Add cream and mix until just combined and the dough begins to stick together. Add more cream if dough is too dry. 6. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and roll or pat into two 6-inch rounds. 7. Cut the rounds in half, then cut each half into thirds, yielding 12 equal wedges. 8. Transfer to baking sheet. 9. Brush dough with egg-milk mixture and place in hot oven until golden brown, about 20 minutes.

(MAKES 12 SCONES) 41/2 cups all-purpose flour 1 /4 cup sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 /2 teaspoon baking soda 1 /2 teaspoon salt 3 sticks cold butter, cut into 1/4-inch cubes 2 cups crumbled goat cheese 1 /4 cup chopped, fresh chives 11/4 cups whipping cream 1 egg, beaten with 2 tablespoons milk

For the Tomato Jam 2 tablespoons butter 1 /4 cup sliced shallots 2 tablespoons grated peeled fresh ginger 1 /4 cup sugar 2 tablespoons fresh chopped basil 11/2 tablespoons fresh lime juice 11/2 pounds roma or plum tomatoes, peeled, seeded and diced Salt and pepper to taste

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly grease a large baking sheet. 2. Combine flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large mixing bowl. 3. Add the cubes of butter and cut them into flour mixture with a pastry blender or food processor (pulsing 10 to 12 times) until the mixture resembles cornmeal. 4. Gently stir in goat cheese and chives.

1. Melt butter in medium saucepan over moderate heat. 2. Add shallots and ginger and cook about 5 minutes. 3. Add sugar and stir until it dissolves. 4. Add tomatoes, increase heat and simmer until the jam is thick. 5. Stir in fresh basil and lime juice off heat. Season with salt and pepper to taste. F&D

Chef Katie Payne’s Goat Cheese Scone with Tomato Jam

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recipes louisville’s restaurant favorites

BY ROBIN GARR | PHOTOS BY DAN DRY

Toast on Market’s

GINGERBREAD PANCAKES If brunch is really all about comfort food, a plate of warm pancakes, drizzled with real maple syrup and melted butter, may be one of its most memorable manifestations. At Louisville’s Toast on Market, Chef George Morris adds another delicious down-home dimension to this traditional treat, fashioning thick, tender pancakes from a recipe that’s pleasantly reminiscent of your grandmother’s old-fashioned gingerbread. Morris said he got the recipe from a friend and added a few tweaks of his own to kick up those warm, nostalgic spice flavors. Black coffee adds a rich, dark depth of flavor, and a tangy shot of fresh lemon juice makes the flavors sing.The combination of eggs,

52 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

baking powder and baking soda provides plenty of lift to build a thick, almost cake-like pancake that Morris declares one of Toast’s most popular breakfast options. At Toast, it’s served topped with a dab of cherry compote and a pretty puff of whipped cream piped from a pastry bag, with warm maple syrup on the side. A similar dish at La Note, an excellent Provençal restaurant in Berkeley, Calif., accompanies a short stack of lemon-gingerbread pancakes with poached pears. Frankly, I think they’re good enough to enjoy on their own without additions, although syrup and butter are always welcome.


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Toast on Market’s GINGERBREAD PANCAKES (MAKES ABOUT 12 TO 18)

3 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup dark brown sugar, packed firmly 1 tablespoon baking powder 11/2 teaspoons baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 11/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 11/2 teaspoons ground ginger 1 /4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 /8 teaspoon ground cloves 1 /2 cup water 1 /2 cup strong black coffee (cooled) 4 eggs, lightly beaten 1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, melted and cooled 1 /4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice 1. In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, brown sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and cloves, taking care to blend all the ingredients well. 2. In a large bowl, combine the water, coffee, eggs and lemon juice. Whisk in the melted butter. 3. Add the dry ingredients to the wet — it works best to add about half the flour mixture first, stir, then add the rest, whisking just until combined into a smooth batter. Don’t over-mix, to keep the pancakes tender. Let the batter rest for 15 minutes before continuing. 4. For each pancake, ladle about 1/4 cup of the batter onto a lightly greased griddle or nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Cook on one side for about three minutes; you’ll know it’s ready to turn when bubbles start to appear around the edges and the bottoms are slightly browned. Carefully flip the cake and continue cooking on the other side for about two minutes more. Keep warm until all the pancakes are finished, then serve with your choice of fruit, maple syrup and butter. F&D www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 53


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CUISINE STYLES

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ALPHABETICAL INDEX

dining guide

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ALL RESTAURANTS LISTED ALPHABETICALLY, FOLLOWED BY THE PAGE NUMBER OF ITS REVIEW, IT’S CUISINE STYLE, AND THE CORRESPONDING MAP NUMBER(S). [ ] DENOTES UNMAPPED MULTIPLE LOCATIONS.

RESTAURANT

PAGE #

AFRICAN 74 ASIAN/CHINESE 74 ASIAN/FILIPINO 76 ASIAN/JAPANESE 76 ASIAN/KOREAN 77 ASIAN/THAI 77 ASIAN/VIETNAMESE 77 BAR & GRILL 73 BARBECUE 72 BISTRO/CONTEMPORARY 61 CAFÉS 6 2 CAFETERIAS 68 CAJUN/CREOLE 79 CARIBBEAN/CUBAN 79 CASUAL DINING 64 COFFEE HOUSE 81 DESSERTS/BAKERY 81 ENTERTAINMENT DINING 68 EUROPEAN/BOSNIAN 77 EUROPEAN/GERMAN 78 EUROPEAN/IRISH 78 EUROPEAN/ITALIAN 78 EUROPEAN/SPANISH 78 FINE DINING 58 HOME STYLE/SOUTHERN 67 INDIAN 79 MEXICAN 80 MICROBREWERIES 74 MIDDLE EASTERN 79 PIZZA 69 SANDWICH/DELI 70 SEAFOOD 63 SOUTHWEST/TEX MEX 81 STEAKHOUSE 64 UPSCALE CASUAL 59 54 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

PAGE #/CUISINE STYLE

MAP #

#1 Asian Buffet 74 Asian/Chinese 2 19th Green Pub & Grill 73 Bar & Grill 16 211 Clover Lane 58 Fine Dining 3 610 Magnolia 58 Fine Dining 1 A Little Peace Café 2 62 Cafés A Nice Restaurant 64 Casual Dining 14, 16 A Taste of China 74 Asian/Chinese 1 Al Watan 79 Middle Eastern 4 Amazing Grace Deli 70 Sandwich/Deli 2 American Pizza 69 Pizza 11 Amici´ 78 European/Italian 1 Angelina’s Café 78 European/Italian 5 Angie’s Café 62 Cafés 3 Angilo’s Pizza 69 Pizza 13 Angio’s Restaurant 69 Pizza 4 Ann’s by the River 68 Cafeterias 16 Annie Café 77 Asian/Vietnamese 12 Annie’s Pizza 69 Pizza 1, 13 Another Place 70 Sandwich/Deli 1 Anytimes 64 Casual Dining 7 Applebee’s 64 Casual Dining [9] Appleby’s Café & Wine Bar 62 Cafés 16 Arirang 77 Asian/Korean 9 Arni’s Pizza 69 Pizza 14 Aroma Café 62 Cafés 14 Artemisia 59 Upscale Casual 1 Asian BBQ & Cuisine 77 Asian/Korean 16 Asian Buffet 74 Asian/Chinese 4, 14, 15 Asiatique 59 Upscale Casual 2 Atomic Saucer 81 Coffee House 1 Atrium Café 61 Bistro/Contemporary 5 August Moon 75 Asian/Chinese 2 Austin’s 59 Upscale Casual 7 Avalon 59 Upscale Casual 2 Azalea 59 Upscale Casual 7 Babby’s Steakhouse 64 Steakhouse 16 Backyard Burger 70 Sandwich/Deli 6 Bahama Breeze 79 Caribbean/Cuban 3 Bake’s Barbeque 72 Barbecue 13 The Bakery 81 Desserts/Bakery 4 Ballyhoo Baja Grill 81 Southwest/Tex Mex 2 Bamboo House 75 Asian/Chinese 12 Bank Shot Billiards 70 Sandwich/Deli 1 Barbara Lee’s Kitchen 67 Home Style/Southern 2 Basa Modern Vietnamese 77 Asian/Vietnamese 2 Baxter Station 61 Bistro/Contemporary 2 Bazos Mexican Grill 80 Mexican 3 Bean Street Café 81 Coffee House 14 Bearno’s Pizza 69 Pizza [14] Beef O’Brady’s 73 Bar & Grill 8, 9, 12, 14 Behar Café 77 European/Bosnian 12 Bendoya Sushi Bar 76 Asian/Japanese 1 Bentley’s 64 Casual Dining 1 Bentley’s Sports Grille 73 Bar & Grill 1 Big Dave’s Outpost 73 Bar & Grill 2 Big Hopp’s 64 Casual Dining 1 Big Mama’s Soul Kitchen 67 Home Style/Southern 1 Big Willie’s Pizza Pub 69 Pizza 6 Bistro 301 61 Bistro/Contemporary 1 Bistro New Albany 61 Bistro/Contemporary 14 Blimpie’s Subs 70 Sandwich/Deli 2, 4 BLU Mediterranean Grille 59 Upscale Casual 1 Blue Dog Bakery 62 Cafés 2 Blue Mountain Wine Bar 62 Cafés 1 Blue Mule Sports Café 73 Bar & Grill 6 Bluegrass Bistro 61 Bistro/Contemporary 4 Bluegrass Brewing Co. 74 Microbreweries 1, 3 Bonefish Grill 63 Seafood 5 Bootleg Barbecue Co. 72 Barbecue 11, 12 Bosna-Mak 77 European/Bosnian 4 Bourbon Bros. BBQ 72 Barbecue 2 Bourbons Bistro 61 Bistro/Contemporary 2 Brandon’s Bar-B-Que 72 Barbecue 6, 8, 9 Bravo! 59 Upscale Casual 3 Breadworks 81 Desserts/Bakery 2, 7, 9 Brendans 78 European/Irish 3 Bristol Bar & Grille 59 Upscale Casual 1, 2, 5, 10 Brix Wine Bar 61 Bistro/Contemporary 8 Brownie’s Grille & Bar 73 Bar & Grill 5 Browning’s Brewery 74 Microbreweries 1 Brownsboro Eatery 61 Bistro/Contemporary 7 Bruno’s Pizzeria 69 Pizza 14 Buca Di Beppo 78 European/Italian 6 Buck’s 58 Fine Dining 1 Buckhead Mountain Grill 64 Casual Dining 4, 12, 16

RESTAURANT

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Buffalo Crossing 68 Buffalo Madison Coffee Co. 81 Buffalo Wild Wings 73 Bulldog Café 62 The Butterfly Garden Café 62 Café 360 79 The Café at the Antique Mall 62 Café Emilie 59 Café Fraiche 62 Café J 62 Café Lou Lou 61 Café Magnolia 64 Café Metro 58 Café Mimosa 77 Caffe Classico 81 Cajun Kitchen 79 California Pizza Kitchen 64 Camille’s Sidewalk Café 62 Cancun Mexican Restaurant 80 Captain’s Quarters 64 Cardinal Hall of Fame Café 64 Carly Rae’s 64 Carolina Shrimp & Seafood 63 Carolyn’s 68 Carrabba’s Italian Grille 78 Caviar Japanese Rest. 59 Champions Grill 64 Champion’s Sports Rest. 73 Chatter’s Bar & Grill 73 Check’s Café 68 Cheddar Box Café 62 Cheddar’s Casual Café 64 Cheesecake Factory 59 Chez Seneba African 74 Chicago Grill & Subs 70 Chicago Gyro 70 Chick Inn 64 The Chicken House 68 Chicken King 68 Chili’s 66 China 1 75 China Buffet 75 China Castle 75 China City Buffet 75 China Garden 75 China Inn 75 China King 75 China Sea Buffet 75 Chinese Chef 75 Chinese Express 75 Chong Garden 75 Chopsticks 75 Chopsticks House 75 Chung King 75 Ciano’s 70 Cici’s 69 City Café 62 City Wok 75 Clark Boy Bar-B-Que 72 Clarksville Seafood 63 Cleo’s Coffee 81 Clifton’s Pizza 69 Club Grotto 59 Coach Lamp 59 Coco’s Bakery 81 Coffee Crossing 81 Coffee Pot Café 81 Coffee Treat Café 81 Come Back Inn 78 Corner Café 59 Cottage Café 68 Cottage Inn 68 Crave Café & Catering 62 Cravings a la Carte 68 Crystal Chinese 75 Culver’s 66 Cumberland Brews 74 Cunningham’s 66 Cutting Board Café 61 Cyclers Café 62 Danish Express 70 Danny Mac’s Pasta & Pizza 69 DaVinci by Lentini’s 78 Day’s Espresso 81 DBL Shotz 81 De La Torre’s 78 Del Frisco’s 64 Delta Restaurant 73 Derby Café 62 Derby City Espresso 81 Derby Dinner Playhouse 68 Desserts By Helen 81 Devino’s 70 Diamante 61 Diamond Pub & Billiards 73 Diefenbach Café 62

MAP #

Entertainment Dining 6 Coffee House 14, 15 Bar & Grill 2,3, 6, 8, 9, 13 Cafés 12 Cafés 2 Middle Eastern 2 Cafés 1 Upscale Casual 3 Cafés 7 Cafés 3 Bistro/Contemporary 2 Casual Dining 1 Fine Dining 2 Asian/Vietnamese 2 Coffee House 2 Cajun/Creole 12 Casual Dining 5 Cafés 6 Mexican 4 Casual Dining 10 Casual Dining 12 Casual Dining 1 Seafood 3 Home Style/Southern 13 European/Italian 5 Upscale Casual 1 Casual Dining 16 Bar & Grill 1 Bar & Grill 6 Home Style/Southern 1 Cafés 3, 9 Casual Dining 8, 15 Upscale Casual 3 African 12 Sandwich/Deli 16 Sandwich/Deli 2 Casual Dining 10 Home Style/Southern 14 Home Style/Southern 1 Casual Dining 4, 5, 8, 12 Asian/Chinese 3 Asian/Chinese 15 Asian/Chinese 13 Asian/Chinese 8 Asian/Chinese 12 Asian/Chinese 1 Asian/Chinese 6 Asian/Chinese 9 Asian/Chinese 1 Asian/Chinese 13 Asian/Chinese 13 Asian/Chinese 1 Asian/Chinese 1 Asian/Chinese 1 Sandwich/Deli 9 Pizza 4, 14 Cafés 1, 2 Asian/Chinese 1 Barbecue 13 Seafood 15 Coffee House 14 Pizza 2 Upscale Casual 2 Upscale Casual 1 Desserts/Bakery 12 Coffee House 9, 14 Coffee House 1 Coffee House 1 European/Italian 1, 16 Upscale Casual 5 Home Style/Southern 9 Home Style/Southern 1 Cafés 2 Cafeterias 1 Asian/Chinese 1 Casual Dining 6 Microbreweries 2 Casual Dining 1, 7 Cafés 8 Cafés 2 Sandwich/Deli 3 Pizza 2 European/Italian 5 Coffee House 2 Coffee House 16 European/Spanish 2 Steakhouse 3 Bar & Grill 1 Cafés 12 Coffee House 1 Entertainment Dining 16 Desserts/Bakery 2, 10 Sandwich/Deli 1 Bistro/Contemporary 2 Bar & Grill 3 Cafés 15


RESTAURANT

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Dinner Is Done 68 Dino’s Down to Lunch 71 Ditto’s Grill 61 Dizzy Whizz Drive-In 71 Djuli 77 Dmitri’s Deli 71 D’Nalley’s Restaurant 68 Domino’s Pizza 69 Don Pablos 80 Dooley’s Bagels 71 Double Dragon 75 Double Dragon II 75 Double Dragon 8 75 Double Dragon 9 75 Double Dragon Buffet 75 Dragon Garden 75 Dutch’s Tavern 73 Dynasty Buffet 75 Eastern House 75 Edoya Japanese Restaurant 76 Eggroll Machine 75 El Caporal 80 El Mundo 80 El Nopal 80 El Nopalito 80 El Paso 80 El Rey Mexican 80 El Rodeo Mexican 80 El Tarasco 80 El Toro Resaurante Mexicano 80 Emperor of China 75 Empress of China 75 The English Grill 58 Equus 58 Erika’s German Rest. 78 Ermin’s Bakery & Café 62 Ernesto’s 80 Euro Market 71 Expressions of You 81 Famous Dave’s Bar-B-Que 72 Fast Break Pizza 69 Fat Jimmy’s 69 Fat Tony’s Pizza 70 Federal Hill 62 Feed Bag Deli 71 Ferd Grisanti 78 Fiesta Time Mexican Grill 80 Fifth Quarter 64 Finley’s BBQ 72 Fire Fresh Bar B Q 72 First Wok 75 The Fish House 63 The Fishery 63 The Fishery Station 63 Flabby’s Schnitzelburg 73 The Flagship 58 Flanigans Ale House 73 Fork in the Road 68 Fountain Room 64 Four King’s Café 73 Fox & Hound 73 Frank’s Steak House 64 Frascelli’s N.Y. Deli 71 Fresco Southwest Grill & Pizza 70 Frolio’s Pizza 70 Frontier Diner 68 Fuji Japanese Steakhouse 76 Gasthaus 78 Gavi’s Restaurant 66 Genny’s Diner 68 Germantown Café 62 Gerstle’s Place 73 Golden Buddha 75 Golden Corral 68 Golden Palace 75 Golden Star Chinese 75 Golden Wall 75 Goose Creek Diner 68 Granville Inn 73 Grape Leaf 79 Grapevine Pantry 62 Great American Grill 72 Great Wall 75 Great Wok 75 Habaneros 80 Hall’s Cafeteria 68 Happy Dragon 75 Hard Rock Café 61 Harper’s Restaurant 62 Havana Rumba 79 Hazelwood Restaurant 68 Heine Brothers Coffee 81 Heitzman Bakery & Deli 81 Hero’s New York Pizza Pub 69 Highland Coffee Co. 81 Hill Street Fish Fry 63

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Home Style/Southern 6 Sandwich/Deli 1 Bistro/Contemporary 2 Sandwich/Deli 1 European/Bosnian 12 Sandwich/Deli 1 Home Style/Southern 1 Pizza [20] Mexican 15 Sandwich/Deli 3, 5, 7, 9, 14 Asian/Chinese 2,3 Asian/Chinese 5, 8, 11, 12 Asian/Chinese 1 Asian/Chinese 6 Asian/Chinese 5 Asian/Chinese 2 Bar & Grill 3 Asian/Chinese 7 Asian/Chinese 13 Asian/Japanese 9 Asian/Chinese 2 Mexican 4,6,12,15 Mexican 2 Mexican 6, 8, 9, 12 Mexican 2, 4, 11 Mexican 16 Mexican 4 Mexican 13 Mexican 3, 5, 7, 12 Mexican 6 Asian/Chinese 7 Asian/Chinese 4 Fine Dining 1 Fine Dining 3 European/German 6 Cafés 1, 10, 14 Mexican 3, 5, 6 Sandwich/Deli 8 Coffee House 7 Barbecue 6, 15 Pizza 8 Pizza 1, 2, 5, 9 Pizza 6 Cafés 14 Sandwich/Deli 3 European/Italian 6 Mexican 8 Steakhouse 12 Barbecue 1 Barbecue 1, 4, 5, 9, 11, 13 Asian/Chinese 13 Seafood 2 Seafood 3 Seafood 11 Bar & Grill 1 Fine Dining 1 Bar & Grill 2 Home Style/Southern 13 Casual Dining 1 Bar & Grill 4 Bar & Grill 3 Steakhouse 5, 16 Sandwich/Deli 7 Pizza 1 Pizza 12 Home Style/Southern 13 Asian/Japanese 8 European/German 7 Casual Dining 1 Home Style/Southern 2 Cafés 1 Bar & Grill 3 Asian/Chinese 12 Home Style/Southern 4,12,15 Asian/Chinese 13 Asian/Chinese 13 Asian/Chinese 12 Home Style/Southern 8 Bar & Grill 1 Middle Eastern 2 Cafés 9 Bar & Grill 12 Asian/Chinese 2 Asian/Chinese 1 Mexican 15 Cafeterias 2 Asian/Chinese 1 Bistro/Contemporary 1 Bistro/Contemporary 5 Caribbean/Cuban 3 Home Style/Southern 13 Coffee House 2, 3 Desserts/Bakery 5 Pizza 6 Coffee House 1, 2 Seafood 1

© 2006 RCSH All Rights Reserved

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- RUTH

Louisville 6100 Dutchman’s Lane Kaden Tower, 16th Floor (502) 479-0026 Group Private Dining Available Make Your Reservation Online at www.RuthsChris.com

Charming Ambiance

Over 80 Wines By The Glass — RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED —

Exceptional Cuisine

1765 Mellwood Ave. at the corner of Brownsboro Rd.

Open Nightly at 5:00 pm

897-0070

THEATER MENU 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

www.landnwinebarandbistro.com www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 55


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Hippo Wings 66 Hitching Post Inn 73 Hobknobb Roasting Co. 81 Hometown Buffet 68 Hometown Pizza 70 Honeybaked Café 71 Hong Kong Chinese 75 Hong Kong Fast Food 75 Hoops Grill and Sports Bar 73 Hooters 66 Hot Dog Heaven 71 Howl at the Moon 68 Hunan Wok 75 I Ching Asian Café 75 Ichiban Samurai 76 IHOP 66 Indi’s Restaurant 68 India Palace 79 Intermezzo American Café 59 The Irish Rover 78 Iroquois Pizza 70 Islamorada Fish Co. 63 It’s A Grind Coffee House 81 J. Alexander’s 60 J. Graham’s Café 62 J. Gumbo’s 79 J. Harrods 60 Jack Fry’s 60 Jack’s Lounge 62 Jade Garden Buffet 76 Jade Palace 76 Jake’s & Mr. G’s 73 Jane’s Cafeteria 68 Jarfi’s Bistro 60 Jasmine 76 Jason’s Deli 71 Java Brewing Co. 81 Jay’s Cafeteria 68 Jazz Factory 62 Jeff Ruby’s Steakhouse 64 Jennica’s Café & Wine Bar 62 Jersey Mike’s Subs 71 Jersey’s Café 73 Jerusalem Mediterranean Café 79 Jessie’s Restaurant 68 Jimbo’s BBQ 72 Jimmy and Richie’s 73 Jimmy John’s Sub Shop 71 Jockamo’s Pizza Pub 70 Joe Huber Restaurant 68 Joe Muggs 81 Joe’s Crab Shack 63 Joe’s O.K. Bayou 79 Joe’s Older Than Dirt 66 John E’s 60 JoJo’s Fish Market 63 Jolly Rogers 66 JP’s Pub & Grub 73 Juanita’s Burger Boy 71 Jucy’s Smokehouse 72 Juke Box 66 Jumbo Buffet 76 Just Fresh Bakery & Café 71 Kaelin’s Restaurant 66 Kansai Japanese Rest. 76 Karem’s Grill & Pub 66 Karma Café 66 Kashmir Indian 79 Kayrouz Café 62 Kern’s Korner 66 Kimi’s Asian Bistro 76 King Benny’s Pizza 70 King Buffet 76 King Wok 76 Kings Fast Food 68 King’s Fried Chicken 68 Kingfish 63 Kobe Japanese Steak 76 Koreana II 77 KT’s 60 KY Taco 80 L&N Wine Bar and Bistro 62 La Bamba 80 La Bodega 78 La Gallo Rosso Bistro 1325 78 La Herradura 80 La Monarca 80 La Perla del Pacifico 80 La Rosita Taqueria 80 La Tapatia 80 Le Relais 58 Lee’s Korean 77 Legend’s 66 Lemongrass Café 77 Lentini’s 78 Liang’s Café 76

11:26 AM

MAP #

Casual Dining 1 Bar & Grill 11 Coffee House 14 Home Style/South. 6,8,13,15 Pizza 7, 9, 13 Sandwich/Deli 3, 11, 15 Asian/Chinese 14 Asian/Chinese 12 Bar & Grill 12 Casual Dining 3,12,13,15,16 Sandwich/Deli 7 Entertainment Dining 1 Asian/Chinese 11 Asian/Chinese 3 Asian/Japanese 6 Casual Dining 15 Home Style/Southern 1,3,12 Indian 5 Upscale Casual 1 European/Irish 2, 7 Pizza 13 Seafood 15 Coffee House 8 Upscale Casual 3 Cafés 1 Cajun/Creole 1, 2,5, 6,12,13 Upscale Casual 3 Upscale Casual 2 Bistro/Contemporary 3 Asian/Chinese 2 Asian/Chinese 7 Bar & Grill 5 Cafeterias 4 Upscale Casual 1 Asian/Chinese 9 Sandwich/Deli 5 Coffee House 1, 2, 9, 10 Cafeterias 1 Bistro/Contemporary 1 Steakhouse 1 Cafés 1 Sandwich/Deli 5, 6, 8 Bar & Grill 15 Middle Eastern 1 Home Style/Southern 13 Barbecue 12 Bar & Grill 5 Sandwich/Deli 1, 3 Pizza 1 Entertainment Dining 14 Coffee House 3, 8 Seafood 1 Cajun/Creole 6, 14 Casual Dining 5 Upscale Casual 4 Seafood 4 Casual Dining 16 Bar & Grill 11 Sandwich/Deli 1 Barbecue 5 Casual Dining 14 Asian/Chinese 6 Sandwich/Deli 2 Casual Dining 2 Asian/Japanese 15 Casual Dining 8 Casual Dining 2 Indian 2 Cafés 3 Casual Dining 2 Asian/Japanese 6 Pizza 12 Asian/Chinese 6 Asian/Chinese 3 Home Style/Southern 13 Home Style/Southern 1 Seafood 6, 7, 16 Asian/Japanese 16 Asian/Korean 12 Upscale Casual 2 Mexican 11 Bistro/Contemporary 2 Mexican 2 European/Spanish 2 European/Italian 2 Mexican 15 Mexican 11 Mexican 8 Mexican 14 Mexican 2 Fine Dining 4 Asian/Korean 12 Casual Dining 14 Asian/Vietnamese 2, 3, 9 European/Italian 2 Asian/Chinese 8

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The Lighthouse Lilly’s Limestone Ling Ling Little Caesar’s Pizza Little Chef Liu’s Garden Logan’s Roadhouse Lolitas Tacos Inc. Longhorn Steakhouse Longino’s Lonnie’s Taste Chicago Los Aztecas Los Chubascos Los Indios Mexicano Lotsa Pasta Louisville Pizza Co. Lucky House Buffet Lucky Strike Lanes / Felt Luigi’s Lunch Today Lynn’s Paradise Café Ma Zerellas MacVitte’s Mai’s Thai Restaurant Maido Essential Japanese Main Eatery Main Menu Maker’s Mark Lounge Manchu Wok Manhattan Grill Marcus’ Ribs By The Slab Mark’s Feed Store Market on Market Marrakech Martini Italian Bistro Masterson’s Max & Erma’s Mayan Café Mazzoni’s Oyster Café McAlister’s Deli Melillo’s The Melting Pot Meridian Café Mexican Fiesta Mexico Tipico Michael Murphy’s Mike Linnig’s Milano Café Mimi’s Café Mitchell’s Fish Market Moe’s Southwest Grill Mojito Tapas Restaurant Molly Malone’s The Monkey Wrench Morris Deli & Catering Morton’s of Chicago Mr. Gattis Mr. Lou’s Mr. Z’s Kitchen My Favorite Muffin My Old KY Dinner Train Nancy’s Bagel Grounds Napa River Grill Neil’s Place Nero’s New China New Direction Bar & Grill Nios Nord’s Brown Bag Deli North End Café O’Charley’s O’Dolly’s O’Shea’s Irish Pub The Oakroom Old Chicago Pasta & Pizza Old Louisville Coffee House Old Spaghetti Factory Old Stone Inn Ole Hickory Pit BBQ The Olive Garden Olive’s on Fourth Ollie’s Trolley Omar’s Gyro On the Border Onion Rest.Tea House Orders Up Café & Deli Oriental House Oriental Star Original Impellizzeri’s Osaka Sushi Bar Otto’s Café Outback Steakhouse P. F. Chang’s China Bistro Pa Pa Murphy’s Pizza Palermo Viejo

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73 Bar & Grill 16 58 Fine Dining 2 58 Fine Dining 5 76 Asian/Chinese 5 70 Pizza 6, 8, 11, 12 71 Sandwich/Deli 14 76 Asian/Chinese 9 64 Steakhouse 3, 13, 15 80 Mexican 12 64 Steakhouse 6, 8, 15 68 Home Style/Southern 13 71 Sandwich/Deli 3 80 Mexican 1, 6, 7, 10 80 Mexican 6 80 Mexican 14 71 Sandwich/Deli 3 70 Pizza 6 76 Asian/Chinese 4 68 Entertainment Dining 1 78 European/Italian 1 71 Sandwich/Deli 16 66 Casual Dining 2 70 Pizza 15 73 Bar & Grill 14 77 Asian/Thai 16 76 Asian/Japanese 2 71 Sandwich/Deli 1 66 Casual Dining 14 60 Upscale Casual 1 75 Asian/Chinese 5 66 Casual Dining 1 72 Barbecue 1 72 Barbecue 2, 9, 13, 15 70 Sandwich/Deli 1 79 Middle Eastern 2 78 European/Italian 8 66 Casual Dining 1 66 Casual Dining 6, 8 80 Mexican 1 63 Seafood 4 71 Sandwich/Deli 5, 6, 7, 9, 11,15 78 European/Italian 1 60 Upscale Casual 6 62 Cafés 3 80 Mexican 4, 11 80 Mexican 9, 13 74 Bar & Grill 1 64 Seafood 13 78 European/Italian 2 66 Casual Dining 5 64 Seafood 8 81 Southwest/Tex Mex 3, 6, 9, 15 79 European/Spanish 7 78 European/Irish 2 66 Casual Dining 2 71 Sandwich/Deli 2 64 Steakhouse 1 70 Pizza 1, 4, 5, 12, 13 68 Home Style/Southern 13 62 Cafés 1 81 Desserts/Bakery 4, 5 68 Entertainment Dining 12 71 Sandwich/Deli 2 60 Upscale Casual 3 66 Casual Dining 14 60 Upscale Casual 14 76 Asian/Chinese 9 74 Bar & Grill 8 62 Bistro/Contemporary 2 71 Sandwich/Deli 1 62 Cafés 2 66 Casual Dining 3,6,8,12,13,15 68 Home Style/Southern 13 78 European/Irish 2 58 Fine Dining 1 66 Casual Dining 6 81 Coffee House 1 78 European/Italian 1 60 Upscale Casual 6 72 Barbecue 11 78 European/Italian 6, 8, 15 68 Home Style/Southern 1 71 Sandwich/Deli 1 79 Middle Eastern 2 81 Southwest/Tex Mex 8 76 Asian/Chinese 14 71 Sandwich/Deli 9 76 Asian/Chinese 3 76 Asian/Chinese 12 70 Pizza 2 76 Asian/Japanese 2 66 Casual Dining 1 64 Steakhouse 3, 8, 11, 12, 15 61 Upscale Casual 5 70 Pizza 3, 8, 9, 11, 12, 15 79 European/Spanish 2

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Panda Chinese 76 Panera Bread Co. 72 Papa Johns Pizza 70 Park Place Restaurant 58 Passtime Fish House 64 Pat’s Steak House 64 The Patron 60 Paul’s Fruit Market 72 Penn Station 72 Pepper Shaker Bar-B-Q 72 Perkfection 81 Pesto’s Italian 78 Pho Binh Minh 77 Piccadilly Cafeteria 68 Picnicaters BBQ 72 Pig and a Peppermint 62 Pig City BBQ 72 Pink Door Noodles & Tea Lounge 77 Pit Stop Bar-B-Que 72 Pita Delights 79 Pizza Box 70 Pizza By The Guy 70 Pizza Hut 70 Pizza King 70 Pizza Place 70 Pizzeria Uno 70 Plehn’s Bakery 81 Ponderosa Steakhouse 64 Porcini 78 Portico 58 Prado’s Pizza 70 Primo 78 Proof On Main 58 Prospect Fish Market 64 Pub Louisville 66 Puerto Vallarta 80 Qdoba Mexican Grill 80 Queen of Sheba 74 Queue Café 62 Quick Wok 76 Quizno’s Subs 72 Rafferty’s of Louisville 67 Ramsi’s Café 62 Ranch House 67 Raw Sushi Lounge 76 Ray Parrella’s 78 Red Robin Gourmet Burgers 67 Red Star Tavern 61 Red Sun Chinese 76 Rich O’s Public House 74 Rick’s Ferrari Grille 61 Rite Way Bar-B-Cue House 72 Rockwall Bistro 61 Rocky’s Italian Grill 78 Romano’s Macaroni Grill 78 Rosticeria Luna 80 Royal Garden 76 Rubbie’s Bar-B-Que 72 Ruben’s Mexican Restaurant 81 Ruby Tuesday 67 The Rudyard Kipling 67 Rumors Raw Oyster Bar 64 Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse 64 Ryan’s Steakhouse 64 Saddle Ridge Saloon 74 Saffron’s 79 Saffron’s Buffet 79 Safier Mediterranean Deli 79 Saint’s 74 Sakura Blue 76 Sala Thai 77 Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina 81 Sam’s Food & Spirits 67 Santa Fe Grill 81 Sapporo Japanese Grill 76 Sari Sari Exotic Filipino Cuisine 76 Savino’s Italian Food 78 Schlotzsky’s Deli 72 Scotty’s Ribs 72 Sesame Chinese 76 Seviche A Latin Restaurant 58 Shady Lane Café 72 Shah’s Mongolian Grill 76 Shalimar Indian 79 Shane’s 67 Shanghai Restaurant 76 Shenanigan’s Irish Grille 78 Shiraz Mediterranean Grill 79 Shogun 76 Shoney’s 67 Sichuan Garden 76 Simply Thai 77 Sister Bean’s 81 Skyline Chili 67 Smokey Bones BBQ 72 Snappy Tomato 70

MAP #

Asian/Chinese 10 Sandwich/Deli3, 6, 8, 12, 15 Pizza [30] Fine Dining 1 Seafood 6 Steakhouse 2 Upscale Casual 3 Sandwich/Deli 3, 4, 7, 9 Sandwich/Deli [14] Barbecue 12 Coffee House 16 European/Italian 1 Asian/Vietnamese 12 Cafeterias 5, 6 Barbecue 1 Cafés 10 Barbecue 9 Asian/Korean 2 Barbecue 1 Middle Eastern 1 Pizza 8 Pizza 5 Pizza [15] Pizza 14, 16 Pizza 4 Pizza 11 Desserts/Bakery 3 Steakhouse 7 European/Italian 2 Fine Dining 14 Pizza 9 European/Italian 1 Fine Dining 1 Seafood 10 Casual Dining 1 Mexican 14, 16 Mexican 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 15 African 4 Cafés 6 Asian/Chinese 1 Sandwich/Deli [17] Casual Dining 3, 8 Bistro/Contemporary 2 Casual Dining 14 Asian/Japanese 1 European/Italian 2 Casual Dining 8 Upscale Casual 1 Asian/Chinese 4 Microbreweries 14 Upscale Casual 3 Barbecue 1 Upscale Casual 14 European/Italian 8, 16 European/Italian 5 Mexican 12 Asian/Chinese 11, 12, 13 Barbecue 12 Mexican 15 Casual Dining 3, 6, 15 Casual Dining 1 Seafood 9 Steakhouse 3 Steakhouse 11, 13, 15 Bar & Grill 1 Middle Eastern 1 Middle Eastern 1 Middle Eastern 1 Bar & Grill 3 Asian/Japanese 3 Asian/Thai 6 Southwest/Tex Mex 3 Casual Dining 14 Mexican 12 Asian/Japanese 2, 9 Asian/Filipino 2 European/Italian 13 Sandwich/Deli 8, 9 Barbecue 9 Asian/Chinese 5 Fine Dining 2 Sandwich/Deli 7 Asian/Chinese 6 Indian 6 Casual Dining 16 Asian/Chinese 1 European/Irish 2 Coffee House 2 Asian/Japanese 6, 8 Casual Dining 2, 6, 12 Asian/Chinese 6 Asian/Thai 3 Coffee House 13 Casual Dining 1, 2, 3, 6, 13 Barbecue 6 Pizza [7]


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Sol Aztecas 81 Mexican 2 Soupy’s 72 Sandwich/Deli 4, 6 , 8 , 1 3 Spaghetti Shop 78 European/Italian 11, 14 Spinelli’s Pizzeria 70 Pizza 2 Sports Page Grill 74 Bar & Grill 6 Sportstime Pizza 70 Pizza 14 Sportsville Grill & Bar 67 Casual Dining 12 Stan’s Fish Sandwich 64 Seafood 3 Star Cruises 68 Entertainment Dining 16 Starbucks Coffee 81 Coffee House [27] Starving Artist Café 72 Sandwich/Deli 5 Steak N Shake 67 Casual Dining 4,6,8,12,13,15 Steinert’s Grill & Pub 74 Bar & Grill 14 Stevens & Stevens 72 Sandwich/Deli 2 Steve-O’s Italian Kitchen 78 European/Italian 7 Stoney River 64 Steakhouse 8 Stratto’s 78 European/Italian 15 Strawberry Patch Deli 72 Sandwich/Deli 9 Stumler Rest. & Orchard 69 Entertainment Dining 14 Sub Station II 72 Sandwich/Deli 12 Sully’s Saloon 74 Bar & Grill 1 Sunergos Coffee & Roastery 81 Coffee House 1 Sweet ‘N’ Savory Café 62 Cafés 2 Sweet Peas Southern 62 Bistro/Contemporary 2 Sweet Surrender 81 Desserts/Bakery 2 The Sweet Tooth 81 Desserts/Bakery 3 Tacqueria La Mexicana 81 Mexican 12 Tailgaters Sports Bar 74 Bar & Grill 12 Taste of Jamaica 79 Carribian/Cuban 2 Tasty Buffet 76 Asian/Chinese 8 Tequila Mexican Rest. 81 Mexican 12 Texas Roadhouse 64 Steakhouse 2, 12, 13, 15 TGI Friday’s 67 Casual Dining 1, 6, 7 Thai Café 77 Asian/Thai 7 Thai Siam 77 Asian/Thai 4 Thai Smile 5 77 Asian/Thai 12 Thai Taste 77 Asian/Thai 2 The Back Door 74 Bar & Grill 2 The Bodega 72 Sandwich/Deli 1 The Gaslight Inn 67 Casual Dining 6 The Lancaster Café 68 Cafeterias 14 Theater Square Deli 72 Sandwich/Deli 1 Third and Main Café 62 Cafés 1 Third Avenue Café 62 Cafés 1 Thyme Café 62 Cafés 1 Toast on Market 67 Casual Dining 1 Tokyo Japanese 76 Asian/Japanese 7 Toll Bridge Inn 68 Home Style/Southern 14 Tologono 62 Bistro/Contemporary 3 Tommy Lancaster 67 Casual Dining 14 Tony Boombozz 70 Pizza 2, 3, 8 Tony Impellizzeri’s Italian 70 Pizza 5 Tony Roma’s 72 Barbecue 5 Treet’s Bakery Café 62 Cafés 16 Trellis Restaurant 67 Casual Dining 1 Tucker’s 67 Casual Dining 14 Tumbleweed 81 Southwest/Tex Mex 1,2,4, 6,8,12,13,14,15,16 Twice-Told Café 67 Casual Dining 7 Twig & Leaf Restaurant 67 Casual Dining 2 Uptown Café 61 Upscale Casual 2 Vic’s Café 74 Bar & Grill 1 Vietnam Kitchen 77 Asian/Vietnamese 12 The Villa Buffet 67 Casual Dining 14 Vince Staten’s BBQ 72 Barbecue 10 Vincenzo’s 59 Fine Dining 1 Vito’s Pizzeria 70 Pizza 12 Volare 78 European/Italian 2 W.W. Cousin’s 72 Sandwich/Deli 3 Wagner’s Pharmacy 68 Home Style/Southern 12 Wall Street Deli 72 Sandwich/Deli 1 Webb’s Market 68 Home Style/Southern 1 Westport General Store 67 Casual Dining 7 Whitney’s Diner 62 Cafés 11 Wicks Pizza 70 Pizza 2, 8, 9, 13 Wild Oats Market 72 Sandwich/Deli 3 Windy City Pizzeria 70 Pizza 1 The Wing Zone 67 Casual Dining 12 Wings N Things 74 Bar & Grill 8 Wings To Go 70 Pizza 14 Winston’s 59 Fine Dining 4 Wok Express 76 Asian/Chinese 1 Wonton Express 76 Asian/Chinese 4 Woodford Reserve Grille 74 Bar & Grill 12 Woody’s Pub & Grill 74 Bar & Grill 8 Yaching’s East West Cuisine 61 Upscale Casual 1 Yang Kee Noodle 76 Asian/Chinese 5 Yen Ching 76 Asian/Chinese 6 Yummy Chinese 76 Asian/Chinese 12 You-Carryout-A 76 Asian/Chinese 14, 15, 16 Za’s Pizza 70 Pizza 2 ZaZoo’s 74 Bar & Grill 3 Zen Garden 77 Asian/Vietnamese 2 Z’s Oyster Bar 59 Fine Dining 5

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GUIDE KEY

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$ = Average Entrée under $8 $$ = Average Entrée $9–$14 $$$ = Average Entrée $15–$20 $$$$ = Average Entrée $21 & up

2 11 CL OVER LANE RES TAURANT 2 11 Clo ver Ln., 896-9570. Owner and manager Andy Smith continues to burnish the upscale atmosphere and creative cuisine of this s tylish spot in St. Matthews. It c onsistently r anks among the city’ s top tables. $$$$ p f 610 MAGNOLIA 610 Magnolia A ve., 636-0783. Chef Edward L ee’s dis tinctive, eclectic tak e on cr eative international cookery places his personal signatur e on e very dish at this elegantly c omfortable Old Louisville restaurant. For more than a quart er of a century it has r emained one of the city’ s fines t places to dine. $$$$ p f BUCK’S 42 5 W . Ormsb y A ve., 6 37-52 84. E clectic Victorian with t ongue-slightly-in-cheek, pleasant and not o verstated, this fine dining r oom in the Mayflower Apartments c ombines a w elcoming attitude with high-quality f are and atmospher e that’s frankly stunning. $$$ p e CAFÉ METRO 1700 Bar dstown Rd., 458-4830 . A local tr adition that helped es tablish Bar dstown Road as one of the city’ s “r estaurant r ows” a generation ago , Café Metr o r emains an upscale landmark and c ontinues t o please Metr o’s lo yal fans. $$$ p ENGLISH GRILL 335 W . Br oadway (T he Br own Hotel), 583-1234. This elegant oak-paneled dining room is the same do wntown landmark that our

58 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

RED = Advertiser

p = Full Bar f = Outdoor Dining e = Live Music

grandparents enjo yed. Ne wly arriv ed Chef Laurent Géroli brings a back ground in Caribbean and Florida r esort c ooking t o L ouisville as he assumes the post long held by Joe Castro. $$$$ p EQUUS 122 Sears Ave., 897-9721. Veteran Chef Dean Corbett has quietly built one of the city’ s mos t honored r estaurants in this simple whit e-brick building in St. Matthe ws, Quietly elegant surroundings, splendid servic e and firs t-rate “progressive American cuisine” have won applause from publications like Southern Living. $$$$ p THE FLAGSHIP 140 N. Fourth St., 589-5200. $$$$ e LE RELAIS 2 817 T aylorsville Rd. (Bo wman Field), 451-9020. Another longstanding contender for top rank in L ouisville’s r estaurant r ace, this art dec o spot makes s tylish use of a his toric 19 2 0s airport building to present elegant modern French cuisine from Chef Daniel Stage. $$$$ p f e LILLY’S 1147 Bar dstown Rd., 451-044 7. As a r epeat invitee t o Manhattan’ s James Bear d House , Chef Kathy Cary shar es her K entucky-accented cooking skills with the r est of the nation. Lilly’ s c ombines sophisticated s tyle and Cary’ s cr eative c ookery t o keep this landmark r estaurant one of L ouisville’s dining favorites. $$$$ p e LIMESTONE 10001 Forest Green Blvd., 426-7477. To succeed in the r estaurant busines s, k eep doing what y ou do bes t. Chefs Jim Gerhar dt and Michael Cunha ha ve followed this simple f ormula with c onsiderable suc cess at Limes tone, tr ansporting the c oncept that br ought them

ALL RESTAURANTS ARE LOCATED IN LOUISVILLE (unless noted otherwise) All phone numbers are local calls. When out of the area, use area code 502 for all listings except Indiana, use 812. international culinary k udos at the Seelbach’ s Oakroom with good eff ect in these modern quarters in the East End. $$$ p THE OAKROOM 500 S. Fourth St. (Seelbach Hotel), 585-32 00. Ex ecutive Chef T odd Richar ds has been cutting a swath, with recent appearances at James Bear d House and Ir on Chef America. Richards and right-hand-man Chef Duane Nutt er have made the onc e-staid old Oakr oom one of the city’s most exciting places to dine. $$$$ p PARK PLACE RESTAURANT 401 E. Main St. (Slugger Field), 515-0172. With Anoosh Shariat as e xecutive chef this signatur e r estaurant in L ouisville Slugger Field c ombines culinary cr eativity and comfort in an upscale v enue that ’s sec ond t o none. $$$$ p f e PORTICO Caesars Indiana Casino, Elizabeth, IN, 888766-2648. High-end luxury and s tyle bring a tas te of Las V egas t o Metr o L ouisville in this pric ey, white-tablecloth eatery located on the gr ounds of Caesars Indiana. You don’t have to be a high r oller to enjoy its luxury fare and service. $$$$ p PROOF ON MAIN 702 W. Main St., 2 17 -6360. T his stylish spot in the posh 2 1C Museum Hot el at Seventh & Main has earned a firm plac e in the t op tier of local eat eries. Chef Michael P aley pr eside over a modern American bill of f are with dis tinct Tuscan influences. $$$ p SEVICHE A LA TIN RES TAURANT 1538 Bar dstown Rd., 4 73-8560. Chef Anthon y Lamas has been winning national pr aise f or his cr eative c ookery,


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frequently appearing in national f ood media and making a r egular tr ek t o James Bear d House in NYC. Se viche, as the name implies, specializ es in the Latino seaf ood dish “ cooked” in tart citrus juices. $$$$ p f VINCENZO’S 150 S. Fifth St., 580- 1350. Known f or its suave professional service, high-end Northern Italian fare and many trademark dishes finished at tableside, V incenzo’s c ontinues t o hold its o wn against growing downtown competition. $$$$ p WINSTON’S RES TAURANT 3101 Bar dstown Rd., (Sullivan University Campus), 456-0980. Culinary arts students at Sullivan University staff this finedining r estaurant on the campus, under the guiding hand of Chef John Cas tro. Several of the city’s top chefs got their training here. Open Fri. Sun. Only. Reservations suggested. $$$$ p Z’S O YSTER BAR & S TEAKHOUSE 101 Whittingt on Pkwy., 429-8000. This exciting spot brings a level of fine dining to the suburbs that makes it stand out in the chain-rich en virons outside the W atterson. Splendid steaks, extraordinary seafood, fine service and clubby ambience give Z’s the tools to dominate in the steakhouse competition. $$$$ p

ARTEMISIA 62 0 E. Mark et St., 583-4 177. As the bustling arts sc ene in this eas t-of-downtown blossoms, Art emisia ev olves with it. A f avorite dinner venue in a gallery setting, Art emisia offers fare t o please both v egetarians and omniv ores, plus an attr active alfr esco dining option in its enclosed courtyard. $$$ p f e ASIATIQUE 1767 Bardstown Rd., 451-2749. Chef Peng Looi has w on diners’ r aves and man y culinary awards during Asiatique’ s long local t enure. His innovative Asian-fusion cuisine has w on him invitations to New York City’s James Bear d house and many local accolades. $$$ p f

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AUSTIN’S 4950 US 42, 423-1990. Big, crowded and bistro-style, with heavy emphasis on the bar, this suburban w atering hole taps the same v ein as the national fr anchise boo ze ’n’ beef genr e, and does so w ell, off ering satisfying dining at a f air price. $$ p AVALON 1314 Bardstown Rd., 454-5336. This stylish spot on Bar dstown R oad off ers a fr esh and creative bill of f are that pr esents American and international cuisine with a dis tinct Southern accent. Extra points for the popular outdoor patio that’s open for a good part of the y ear. $$$ p f AZALEA 3612 Br ownsboro Rd., 895-54 93. Another of the city’ s longtime f avorites, Azalea delights with cr eative American and fusion-s tyle f are whether y ou dine in or enjo y the open air of its shady, brick-walled patio. $$$ p f BLU IT ALIAN MEDITERRANEAN GRILLE 2 80 W . Jefferson St. (L ouisville Marriott), 62 7-5045. BL U offers upscale Italian Medit erranean cuisine in striking surr oundings highlight ed b y Me xican limestone and Italian marble . F or those seeking a relaxing libation and a quick er snack, the Bar at BLU offers a more casual alternative. $$$ p BRAVO! 2 06 Bullitt Ln. ( Oxmoor C enter), 32 6-04 91. Management describes the Ohio-based Br avo! chain as “ a fun, whit e-tablecloth casual eat ery … positioned betw een the fine-dining and casual chains.” A R oman-ruin setting houses abundant Italian-American style fare. We particularly enjo yed appetizers and first-rate grilled meats. $$ p f BRISTOL BAR & GRILLE 132 1 Bardstown Rd., 4561702, 300 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 426-0627, 614 W. Main St., 582 - 1995, 6051 T imber Ridge Dr ., 2 9 2 2585, 2035 S. Third St., 634-2723. The Bristol has been a s tar on L ouisville’s bis tro sc ene sinc e it helped kick off the Bar dstown R oad r estaurant renaissance some 25 years ago. Old standards like the gr een-chile w on t ons and the Bris tol Bur ger

are always reliable, and the wine pr exceptional. $$ p f

ogram is

CAFÉ EMILIE 3939 Shelb yville Rd., 7 19-9717. T his French-accented Eas t End eat ery, locat ed in the Burdorf’s Furnitur e s tore in St. Matthews, is w ell worth a visit. Off ering casual f are at lunch and more elegant dining in the e vening. $$ p f CAVIAR J APANESE RES TAURANT 416 W . Muhammad Ali Blv d., 62 5- 3090. Samm y Sa, the genial host of the Fuji restaurants in the East End, adds a do wntown pr esence with this s tylish Japanese eatery next door to the Seelbach Hotel. Eat at the sushi bar , choose a c omfortable table or r eserve the tr aditional Japanese-s tyle Tatami Room for your group. $$$ p CHEESECAKE FACTORY 5000 Shelbyville Rd., 8973933. “Cheesecak e” is its name , and this glitzy shopping-mall eatery offers a wide variety of rich, calorific choic es t o eat in or tak e out. It ’s mor e than just cheesecake, though, with a wide-ranging menu of California, Southwestern and Pacific Rim fare plus full bar servic e. $$ p CLUB GROTTO 2116 Bardstown Rd., 459-5 275. Club Grotto’s stylish and r omantically dim en virons add up to a c omfortable, familiar Highlands spot that ’s worth making a special effort to remember. $$$ p COACH LAMP RESTAURANT 751 Vine St., 583-9165. This urban neighborhood tavern serves “pub grub” for lunch, but C oach Lamp turns int o a serious dining room Wednesday through Saturday evenings with dishes fr om Chef Je rome Pope that r ange from down-home favorites to pastas. $$$ f CORNER CAFÉ 9307 New Lagrange Rd., 426-8119 . There’s nothing fancy or overly elegant about this suburban neighborhood old favorite, but the term “eclectic” fits it well. $$ p INTERMEZZO AMERICAN CAFÉ & CABARET 316 W. Main St., 584- 12 65. T he elegant r estaurant

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space in A ctor’s T heatre of L ouisville’s his toric building features casual American bistro fare in an attractive dining room, plus nightly entertainment in a cabaret style. $$$ p e J. ALEXANDER’S RESTAURANT 102 Oxmoor Court, 339-2 2 06. T his c omfortably upscale v enue, a Nashville-based chain, f eatures “ contemporary American” f are with a br oad menu that r anges from burgers and sandwiches to such upscale eats as grilled tuna or a New York strip steak. $$$ p f J. HARROD’S 7507 Upper Riv er Rd., 2 2 8-4555. J . Harrod’s is discr eetly tas teful and pleasantly comfortable. The food is competitive in both quality and value. It’s an appealing, upscale blend of bis tro fare and old-fashioned country cooking. $$$ p JACK FR Y’S 1007 Bar dstown Rd., 45 2 -92 44. If y ou want t o give visiting friends a one-shot sample of Louisville’s urban dining s tyle, ther e’s no bett er destination than Jack Fry’ s. T his popular spot is always packed. It sa ves jus t a whiff of the r affish aspect of its 1960s-er a predecessor, a local saloon, but upgr ades it with cr eative American f are in a bistro setting. $$$$ p e JARFI’S BIS TRO 501 W . Main St., 589-5060 . T he affable Jeff Jarfi is the epon ymous hos t of this sharp, stylish venue in the K entucky Center for the Arts. Eclectic cuisine—including sushi!—plus popular lunch and pr e-theater buff ets ar e attracting happy crowds. $$$ p JOHN E’S 3708 Bar dstown Rd., 456- 1111. T his old Louisville tradition earns a warm recommendation. From its c ozy setting in a his toric Buechel home to its do wn-home servic e t o its good Americanstyle fare at reasonable prices. $$$$ p e KT’S 2 300 L exington Rd., 458-8888. It ’s har d t o argue with suc cess, and K T’s has earned its popularity by providing good American-style bar and bistro chow for a price that’s fair. $$ p f MAKER’S MARK BOURBON HOUSE & LOUNGE Fourth Str eet Liv e, 568-9009 . Under a lic ensing agreement with the management of Fourth Street Live, K entucky’s Mak er’s Mark Dis tillery lends its name and its signatur e r ed-wax image t o this stylish r estaurant and lounge in the booming downtown entertainment complex. A magis terial bar f eatures mor e than 60 Bourbons, and the menu offers traditional Kentucky fare. $$$ p f MELTING POT 2045 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 491-3125. This Florida-based chain brings back pleasant memories of fondue parties of the ’70s. If you can melt it and dip things in it, the Melting Pot probably has it on the menu. $$$ p NAPA RIVER GRILL 3938 Dupont Circle, 893-0141. This s tylish St. Matthe ws venue spans Calif ornia and the Pacific Rim, earning its reputation as one of the city’ s leading r estaurants on the basis of Innovative wine-country cuisine, excellent service and a fine California-focused wine collection. $$$ pf NERO’S Caesars Indiana Casino , Elizabeth, IN, 888766-2648. Joining Portic o as the sec ond high-end, fine-dining r estaurant at Caesar ’s Indiana, Ner o’s complements Portic o’s all- American s teak-andseafood theme with a br oader int ernational menu that ranges from Tuscan fettuccini to Memphis BBQ pork ribs. $$$ p OLD S TONE INN 6905 Shelbyville Rd., Simpson ville, KY, (502) 722-8200. Under the management of Paul Crump, f ormerly of Por cini, this his toric s tone building (east of L ouisville in Simpson ville) carries on the r eputation that has made the c omfortably nostalgic r estaurant popular f or mor e than a generation. $$$ p f THE P ATRON 3400 Fr ankfort A ve., 896- 1661. Viewed from the perspective of an e vening meal, the P atron off ers some of the bes t c ooking in

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town. Chef Amber McC ool off ers a dinner menu that changes fr equently, based on what ’s available and perhaps the chef’s whim. It’s not just adventurous but civilized. $$ p P.F. CHANG’S CHINA BIS TRO 912 0 Shelb yville Rd., 32 7-7707. T his Ariz ona-based, Chinese themed restaurant off ers a loud, happ y sc ene with Chinese-style dishes. T o its cr edit, e verything is prepared well and service is consistently fine. $$ p RAW SUSHI L OUNGE 52 0 S. F ourth St., 585-5880 (see listing under Asian/Japanese) RED S TAR T AVERN Fourth Str eet Liv e, 568-5656. Billed as “a hip, contemporary version of the classic American ta vern,” this chain oper ation in the rehabilitated former Galleria features steaks, chops and seafood in an atmospher e that’s upscale and clubby, with an e xtensive bar as a k ey part of the action. $$$ p f RICK’S FERRARI GRILLE 3930 Chenoweth Ln., 8930106. Popular local restaurateur Rick Dissell is the amiable host at this St. Matthe ws restaurant that bears his name , and w e don’t mean “F errari.” Excellent libations and upscale American f are make it a popular des tination. $$ p f e ROCKWALL BISTRO 3426 Paoli Pike, Floyds Knobs, IN., 948-1705. This stylish spot takes full advantage of an old r ock-quarry location in sc enic Flo yds Knobs t o off er an atmospheric eat ery, with a creative menu that f eatures a light L ouisiana accent, and an int eresting, affordable wine list. It’s well worth the trip acr oss the Ohio f or one of the area’s most enjoyable dining experiences. $$ p f

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BOURBONS BIS TRO 2 2 55 Fr ankfort A ve., 8948838. Bourbon, K entucky’s tr aditional nectar, owns a plac e of honor in L ouisville eateries and watering holes that sho wcase its pleasur es. Bourbons Bis tro c ombines a fine bar and comfortably upscale-casual restaurant featuring what mus t be the w orld’s mos t c omprehensive Bourbon list. The bill of fare is well-matched with the excellence of its libations. $$$ p f BRIX WINE BAR 12418 La Gr ange Rd., 2 43-112 0. T he use of an e xceptionally obscur e wine t erm (it ’s pronounced “bricks” and refers to the sugar content of ripe gr apes at harv est) hints that the pr oprietors of this ne w wine bar kno w their f ood. Int eresting wines and a short bis tro-style menu mak e it a welcome suburban addition. $ BROWNSBORO EATERY 7511 Hwy 329, 241-8689. $ CAFÉ LOU LOU 1800 Frankfort Ave., 893-7776. Bright and bold and arts y, this Clift on neighborhood restaurant and pub off ers Chef Cla y W allace’s affordable edibles fr om wr aps and calz ones t o handmade pizzas among the best in town. $$ f THE CUTTING BOARD 2929 Goose Cr eek Rd., 4239950. Stylish quarters, an expansive American and international menu with w ell-made and cr eative

fare, plus a dec ent wine lis t, mak e this locally owned suburban spot an Eas t End favorite. $$ p DIAMANTE 2 2 80 Bar dstown Rd., 456- 1705. T his lovable spot mak es adaptiv e use of a 19 2 0s gasoline s tation c onverted int o a c ozy eat ery, where Chef Mik e Driskell off ers an eclectic bill of fare and tr endy libations. Open v ery lat e, it ’s a haven for night owls. $$ f DITTO’S GRILL 1114 Bardstown Rd., 581-912 9 . W ith fresh and gener ous portions, I lea ve s tuffed and happy e very time I visit this s tylish y et casual Highlands f avorite. Chef /Co-owner Domonic Serratore—a pioneer of the local dining sc ene— serves up fr esh and gener ous portions fr om a menu that offers an internationally eclectic bill of fare that r anges all o ver the map . Fr om K ansas City ribs and Ne w England cr ab cak es t o T hai chicken wings or Chinese burrit os. $$ p HARD ROCK CAFÉ Fourth Str eet Liv e, 568-2 2 0 2 . Louisville’s Fourth Street Live opened with a bang amid hammering guitars and happy throngs as the city gained its first branch of this popular shrine t o rock with its giant neon guitar to show you the way. The music sc ene is the dr aw, but y ou’ll ha ve no complaints about Har d Rock’s standard American cuisine. $$ p f e

UPTOWN CAFÉ 162 4 Bar dstown Rd., 458-42 12 . Across the s treet and a s tep downscale from its partner, Café Metro, the Uptown Café (now a nonsmoking venue except f or the bar) off ers similar fare with a bit more of a bistro feel for quite a few bucks less. $$ p f YACHING’S EA ST WES T CUISINE 105 S. F ourth St., 585-4005. Yaching’s promises “an eclectic menu of contemporary Asian fusion cuisine.” It’s an attractive mix of Eas t and W est, sufficient t o give jus t about everyone something t o enjo y, r egardless of which compass point attracts your taste buds. $$$ p

ATRIUM CAFÉ 9940 C orporate Campus Dr . (Embassy Suit es), 42 6-9191. An eclectic bis tro atmosphere in the heart of the hotel. Specials run from their popular cr ab cakes and arr ay of pas ta dishes to a Reuben sandwich or fruit pie . $$ p BAXTER S TATION BAR & GRILL 12 01 P ayne St., 584-1635. T his c ozy spot looks a lot lik ea neighborhood saloon, but the eclectic menu and unique atmospher e tak e it a not ch upscale , and the weatherized patio is comfortable almost yearround. Take particular not e of an impr essive beer list to go with your meal. $$ p f BISTRO 301 301 W. Mark et St., 584-833 7. Quality contemporary American cuisine in a s tylish, recently renovated environment makes Bistro 301 a r easonable alt ernative when y ou’re looking f or upscale-casual dining downtown. $$$ p f BISTRO NEW ALBANY 148 E. Market St., New Albany, IN, (812 ) 94 9-52 2 7. T his r ecent and w elcome addition to downtown New Albany brings casual upscale gourmet dining t o the city’ s old do wntown, with high quality local meats, pr oduce and microbrewery beers. Extra credit, in season, for its inviting French Quarter-style patio. $$ p f e BLUEGRASS BISTRO 3819 Bardstown Rd., 458-6 111. Chefs Sc ott Schamel, f ormerly of the Br own Hotel, and Anthon y L orie bring a ne w, gourmetstyle menu t o this attr active spot in the Derb y City Antique Mall in Buechel (formerly Derby City Café). Open for lunch daily except Sunday. $

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HARPER’S RESTAURANT 871 S. Hurs tbourne Pkwy., 42 5-2 900. Harper ’s dr aws a happ y cr owd of regulars with a lar ge bar and big menu that off ers a wide r ange of American-s tyle f are, with management that takes quality seriously. Gourmet pizzas and fine libations are a specialty. $$ p f JACK’S L OUNGE 12 2 Sears A ve., 89 7-902 6. A sophisticated, elegant bar as sociated with the Equus restaurant next door, Jack’s offers a short but e xcellent menu f eaturing appetiz ers and light bit es, along with a drinks lis t be yond reproach. $ p JAZZ F ACTORY 815 W . Mark et St. ( Glassworks), 992 -32 42 . L ouisville’s r estored Glas sworks building mak es a natur al home f or this edgy , stylish venue for serious, live jazz. Chef Jeff Jarfi’s eclectic and inno vative f are off ers an e xtra incentive for a jazz-filled evening. $$ p e KIMIS A SIAN BIS TRO 1915 Blank enbaker Pk wy., 2 36-1915. R estaurateur John Chung is amiable host at this ne w Eas t End v enture, an upscale Asian bistro that blends tr aditional Japanese fare with Chinese and K orean fla vors, including such Pacific Rim dishes as sushi, Chilean sea bas s with sweet mango and t orched salmon in par chment paper. $$ p L&N WINE BAR AND BIS TRO 1765 Mellwood Ave., 897-0070. If y ou’re enthusias tic about good wine, you’re going t o be excited about L &N. The fruit of the vine takes center stage in a vast, fairly priced wine list and imposing Cruvinet dispenser, with over 100 wines a vailable by the glass. Comfortable exposed-brick atmosphere and excellent bistro fare add to the draw. $$ p f NIOS 917 Baxt er A ve., 456- 7080. Specializing in a selection of “small plates,” a concept akin to tapas or the similar Latino bocaditos, Nios hits a culinary home run in this his toric building that housed Jupiter Grill and later @mosphere. $$$ p f RAMSI’S CAFÉ ON THE W ORLD 12 93 Bar dstown Rd., 451-0700. Small, funk y and fun, this f avorite spot of the Highlands’ Gener ation X cr owd attracts f oodies of all ages with its friendly setting, r easonable pric es and w ell-prepared international cuisine. $$ f SWEET PEA S SOUTHERN 2 350 Fr ankfort A ve., 894-9091. T his c omfortable Cr escent Hill spot features traditional Southern f are with a t ouch of creative innovation. Expansive lunch and weekend buffets offer particularly fine value. $ p f TOLOGONO 3702 L exington Rd., 899-2 005. In an intriguing twist on takeout food, Tologono’s firstrate chefs will mak e you a gourmet-s tyle meal to take out ( or e ven ha ve deliv ered, within a reasonable radius of its St. Matthe ws venue) and enjoy in the c omfort of home . I’v e f ound the dishes fully competitive with local bistro fare, and more than competitive in price. $$

A LITTLE PEA CE CAFÉ 7301. $ f e

1860 Mellw ood Ave., 2 38-

ANGIE’S CAFÉ 4010 Dupont Circle, 895-7064. This small r etail bak ery and deli, hidden a way on the back side of the Dupont Pr ofessional T ower building near Napa Riv er Grill in St. Matthe ws’ Dupont Cir cle shopping dis trict, off ers an affordable option for neighborhood diners. $ APPLEBY’S CAFÉ & WINE BAR 2 01 Spring St., Jeffersonville, IN, 2 83- 3663. Fine dining in a casual atmospher e. F are r anges fr om a wardwinning chili and the “Big St eve” burger at lunch to fine dining at night. T he recently added W ine Cellar offers the same fine fare and classy wine in a more casual atmosphere. $ p e f 62 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

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AROMA CAFÉ Caesars Indiana Casino , Elizabeth, IN, 888- 766-2 648. Gr ab a bit e bef ore hitting the casino . Sandwiches, salads, sides, c old beverages and coffee will fuel you for a night of entertainment. $ BLUE DOG BAKER Y AND CAFÉ 2 868 Fr ankfort Ave., 899-9800 . T his bak ery with its $50 ,000 Spanish wood-fired oven makes artisanal bread as good as you’ll find in the US, and competitive with the best in Eur ope. Its c omfortable, upscale café offers a short selection of tas ty dishes made t o show off the fine breads. $$ f BLUE MOUNT AIN C OFFEEHOUSE & WINE BAR 400 E. Main St., 582 - 32 2 0. Hos t Nicholas Arno adds a Jamaican ac cent, and Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee is the specialty, at this sleek and sophisticated new spot across Main from Slugger Field. A c offee house b y da y, it adds a wine-bar vibe in the evenings. $$ f BULLDOG CAFÉ 10619 W. Manslick Rd., 380-0600. $ f THE BUTTERFLY GARDEN CAFÉ 132 7 Bar dstown Rd., 456-4500. This tasteful little spot off ers teas and light er lunch f are in an attr active old-house setting. $ f THE CAFÉ A T THE L OUISVILLE ANTIQUE MALL 900 Goss Ave., 637-6869. One of the city’ s most attractive spots f or antique , this ca vernous old factory building off ers a similarly attr active plac e to catch lunch while you shop, offering a selection of competently made luncheon fare. $ CAFÉ FRAICHE 3642 Br ownsboro Rd., 894-89 2 9. Cuisine from around the w orld is f eatured at this East End neighborhood café, f eaturing homemade soups, breads and a variety of entrées on a seasonally changing menu. $ CAFÉ J 3600 Dut chmans Ln. ( Jewish C ommunity Center), 459-0660. This authentic delicatessen in the Jewish Community Center offers fully k osher fare including homemade soups, salads and wideranging hot entrées. $ f CAMILLE’S SIDEWALK CAFÉ 2060 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 493-2005 $ f CHEDDAR BO X CAFÉ 12 12 1 Shelb yville Rd., 2 452622, 3909 Chenoweth Sq., 893-2324. Ladies who lunch oft en do so her e, lur ed b y an attr active selection of luncheon soups, salads and sandwiches .and desserts. $ f CITY CAFÉ 1907 S. F ourth St., 6 35-02 2 2 , 505 W . Broadway, 589- 1797, 12 50 Bar dstown Rd., 4595600, 500 S. Pr eston St., 85 2 -5739. Chef Jim Henry, a long-time s tar in the city’ s culinary firmament, brings his cooking skills and insistence on fresh, quality ingr edients to these simple , but excellent, spots for lunch. $ f CRAVE CAFÉ & CA TERING 2 2 50 Fr ankfort A ve., 896-1488. L ogos C offee House is gone , but its proprietor, Ellen Guilford, now joins with Shannon Foster of In Good T aste Cat ering t o off er casual café f are in this c omfortable old fr ame house in Clifton. $ f CYCLERS CAFÉ 2295 Lexington Rd., 451-5152. Is it a bicycle shop or a r estaurant? Well, it ’s both. T his informal spot will sell y ou a firs t-rate sandwich, soup or salad or a tire for your bike—or the whole darn bike! $ f DERBY CAFÉ 704 C entral A ve. (K entucky Derb y Museum), 634-0858. Lunch serv ed year-round in the dining ar ea adjac ent t o the Derb y Museum with such regional favorites as meaty Burgoo, and the Hot Brown. $ f DIEFENBACH CAFÉ 12 8 S. Ne w Alban y St., Sellersburg IN, 246-0686. $$ p e ERMIN’S BAKER Y & CAFÉ 12 01 S. Firs t St., 6 356960, 723 S. F ourth St., 58 7-9390, 454 S. F ourth Ave., 585-5120, 9550 U.S. Hwy 42, 228-7210, 2736 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 941-8674. These

popular bak eries attr act cr owds looking f or an enjoyable soup and sandwich lunch highlighted by French-style breads and pastries. $ FEDERAL HILL 310 Pearl St., Ne w Albany IN, 9486646. $ f GERMANTOWN CAFÉ 1053 Gos s A ve., 6 37-9412 . One of the man y old-f ashioned, simple and welcoming bars serving pub grub in L ouisville’s old Germantown neighborhood is as good a spot as any for a hot burger and a cold beer. $ p f e GRAPEVINE PANTRY & GIFT SHOP 11418 Old Main St., Middlet own, K Y, 2 45-1569. T he Middlet own Historic Dis trict is booming with s torefronts, restaurants and a laid back glimpse of the pas t. The Gr apevine P antry off ers homemade soups, sandwiches and salads, cakes and pies. $ J. GRAHAM’S CAFÉ & BAR 335 W. Broadway (The Brown Hot el), 583- 12 34. T he Br own’s casual café offers an alternative to the upscale English Grill. $ p JENICCA’S CAFÉ & WINE BAR 636 E. Mark et St., 587-872 0. A w orthy edition t o the booming arts district east of downtown, Jenicca’s is sophisticated and stylish, a fine c offee shop and casual wine bar with light fare and an upscale art-gallery vibe . $ f KAYROUZ CAFÉ 12 7 W iltshire Ave., 896-2 6 31. T hose who w ere saddened b y the los s of St. Matthe ws landmark J.P. Kayrouz will be delighted to learn that another K ayrouz gener ation is back in busines s, starting small in the tiny spot that once housed the original Tony Boombo zz. T hey’ve made good use of the spac e, off ering man y of the f amily’s old favorites in a stylishly renovated setting. $ f MERIDIAN CAFÉ 112 Meridian A ve., 897-9703. This little lunch spot oc cupies a c ozy old house in St. Matthews. Servic e is c ompetent and polit e, the place is sparkling clean, and the luncheon-s tyle fare ranges from good to excellent. $ MR. Z’S KITCHEN 869 S. Third St., 584-8504. It’s run by a friendly immigr ant f amily fr om Eas tern Europe, but the f ood is all- American at Mr . Z’ s Kitchen. It offers an appetizing option for a hearty diner-style meal. $ NORTH END CAFÉ 1722 Frankfort Ave., 896-8770. This atmospheric Clift on spot in an artfully redesigned old shotgun house is one of the city’s most popular spots f or upscale casual dining. The eclectic menu off ers div erse tapas and interesting entrées. It ’s an appealing, aff ordable place to dine. $ f PIG AND A PEPPERMINT 9521 US Hwy 42, 292-1245. $ f QUEUE CAFÉ 220 W. Main St. (LG&E Building), 583-0273. $ SWEET ‘N’ S AVORY CAFÉ 1574 Bar dstown Rd., 456-6566. Hearty brunch f are with a v egetarian accent mak es S weet ‘n’ Sa vory a popular destination for the Bardstown Road bunch. $ THIRD AND MAIN CAFÉ Building) 587-6171. $ f

2 2 0 W. Main St. (LG&E

THIRD AVENUE CAFÉ 1164 South Third St., 585-2233. One of m y f avorite plac es f or a casual meal, this exceptionally pleasant neighborhood eat ery is attracting lo yal cr owds with e xcellent f are and a cozy setting that brings you back for more. $$ p f e THYME CAFÉ 711 S. T hird St., 58 7-0400. This spicy eclectic café serv es up big tas te with special tuna, ham and chick en entrées and sandwiches. Fr esh basil tomato soup with the BLT on grilled sourdough is a fast-rising favorite in the neighborhood. $ TREET’S BAKER Y CAFÉ 133 E. Mark et St., Ne w Albany, IN., 945-5440 . T eresa Clancy , whose husband, Da ve Clancy , pr esides as chef of the excellent Bistro New Albany restaurant, goes into friendly c ompetition with her mat e with this casual bakery just across the street. $ f WHITNEY’S DINER 5616 Bardstown Rd., 239-0919. $ f


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BONEFISH GRILL 657 S. Hurs tbourne Pk wy., 4 12 4666. T his fr anchise c oncept fr om the Floridabased Outback St eakhouse chain off ers impressive seafood in a c omfortable setting. Add Bonefish t o y our short lis t of suburban chain eateries that do the job right. $$$ p CAROLINA SHRIMP & SEAFOOD 392 2 W estport Rd., 894-8947. In an Eas t End neighborhood rich with seaf ood eat eries, Car olina off ers a tas ty option within w alking dis tance of do wntown St. Matthews. T his spartan little joint f eatures shellfish and c od, much of it healthfully s teamed, not fried, in an aff ordable family setting. $ CLARKSVILLE SEAFOOD 916 Eas tern Blv d., Clarksville, IN, 2 83-8588. As the only surviving descendant of Louisville’s old Cape Codder chain, Clarksville Seafood upholds a long and honorable tradition. The menu is simple—fried fish and fried seafood, serv ed on paper tr ays—but it is consistently excellent and affordable. $ THE FISH HOUSE 1310 W inter A ve., 568-2 99 3. Louisville is as o verflowing as a w ell-stocked lake with fish-sandwich houses, and The Fish House is right up there with the best. Crisp breading laced with black pepper is the signatur e of Green River fried fish from Western Kentucky. $ f THE FISHER Y 362 4 L exington Rd., 895- 1188. T he original fried-fish eatery in a neighborhood that ’s now awash with them, T he Fishery remains justly popular f or its quick, sizzling hot and aff ordable fish and seafood meals. $ f THE FISHERY STATION 5627 Outer Loop, 968-8363. Family owned and f amily style dining with a wide net of seafood dinners and appetiz ers. Lunch and dinner menus also include such delicacies as fr og legs, shrimp and alligator. $ p HILL STREET FISH FRY 111 E. Hill St., 636-3474. This Old Louisville tradition is small and eas y to miss, but it ’s worth the effort to get by. Its oversize fried whitefish sandwich is the flagship dish, but a v aried menu is also available. $ f ISLAMORADA FISH COMPANY 951 E. Lewis & Clark Pkwy., Clarks ville, IN, 2 18-5300 . Spa wned b y a beachside eat ery in the Florida K eys, Islamor ada Fish Company has locations in many of the nation’s 30 Bass Pro Shops, including Clarks ville’s gigantic entry in the f ormer Riv er F alls Mall. Beach-shack decor adds fun, and its e xpansive menu off ers a broad selection of seafood and fish. $$ p JOE’S CRAB SHA CK 131 Riv er Rd., 568- 1171. T he setting is bright, noisy and fun. But the food is the bottom line , and I’m pleased t o r eport that the seafood at Joe’s uniformly fresh and fine. $$ p f JOJO’S FISH MARKET 2 902 Bar dstown Rd., 4517100. This small Highlands shop , vacant since the closing of the short-lived Highland Fish Market, is frying fish again, with dec or and s tyle so little changed that they’re still using the same sign out front. Fried fish sandwiches, oversized fish tacos and other seafood fare are first-rate and fairly priced. $ KINGFISH RES TAURANT 302 1 Upper Riv er Rd., 895-0544, 1610 Kentucky Mills Dr., 240-0700, 601 W. Riverside Dr., Jeffersonville, IN, 284-3474. Fried fish in a f amily dining setting has made this local chain a popular favorite for many years. Two of its properties—upper Riv er R oad and Riv erside Drive—boast river views. $$ p f MAZZONI’S O YSTER CAFÉ 2 804 Taylorsville Rd., 451-4436. A his tory that dat es t o 1884 mak es Mazzoni’s one of the city’ s longes t-running restaurant acts. It mo ved fr om do wntown t o the suburbs a gener ation ago , but k ept its his toric serving bar and its urban f eeling, with pub grub , cold beer and the famous rolled oyster. $ www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 63


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MIKE LINNIG’S 9308 Cane Run Rd., 937-9888. Mike Linnig’s has been dishing up tas ty fried fish and seafood at f amily pric es sinc e 19 2 5 and r emains immensely popular. There’s indoor seating and a bar, but the picnic grove with its giant shade trees makes Linnig’s a special place in season. $ f

LONGHORN S TEAKHOUSE 2 535 Hurs tbourne Ln., 671-5350, 9 700 V on Allmen Ct., 32 6- 7500, 12 10 Veterans Pk wy., Clarks ville, IN. 2 84-5800 . Oversize steaks and a “big sky” western theme are the draw at this chain eatery, although most of its properties are east of the Mississippi. $$ p

MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET 4031 Summit Plaza Dr ., 412 -1818. T he dec or of this upscale , C olumbusbased chain e vokes the f eeling of a lar ge fish market, with an open kit chen that offers views of chefs at w ork. Quality seaf ood and servic e has made this a popular des tination. $$$ p f

MORTON’S 62 6 W. Main St., 584-042 1. T he steaks are as good as it gets, the atmospher e is elegant without being s tuffy, and the servic e is outstanding. Mort on’s earns a solid thr ee s tars and r anks among the t op tier of L ouisville’s upscale dining choices. $$$$ p

PASSTIME FISH HOUSE 10801 Locust Rd., 267-4633. $fe

OUTBACK STEAK HOUSE 4621 Shelbyville Rd., 895432 9, 65 2 0 Signatur e Dr ., 964-8383, 94 98 Brownsboro Rd., 42 6-432 9 , 8101 Bar dstown Rd., 2 31-2 399, 142 0 P ark Plac e, Clarks ville, IN, 2 834329. The name sugges ts Australia, and so does the shtick at this popular national chain, but the food is pr etty much f amiliar American, and the fare goes be yond jus t s teak t o tak e in chick en, seafood and pasta. $$$ p

PROSPECT FISH MARKET 952 1A US 42 , Pr ospect, 2 2 8-6962 . If y ou’re on the eas tern edge of the metropolitan ar ea, Pr ospect Fish Mark et off ers good, aff ordable fish in a pleasant shoppingcenter setting. $ RUMORS RESTAURANT & RAW BAR 12339 Shelbyville Rd., 2 45-0366. V isualize Hoot er’s without the scantily-clad waitresses, and you’ve drawn a bead on Rumor’s, the original L ouisville home of the buck etof-oysters and impressive raw bar. $$ p f STAN’S FISH S ANDWICH 372 3 L exington Rd., 8966600. T he fish is the thing at Stan’ s, wher e the owner is a perfectionist who won’t sell any but the freshest fish, perf ectly pr epared. I’v e ne ver had a better fish sandwich an ywhere. W atch f or daily specials that take advantage of fresh product. $ Z’S OYSTER BAR & STEAKHOUSE (see listing under Fine Dining)

BABBY’S STEAKHOUSE 108 S. Fourth St., Utica, IN., 2 88-2 411. T his independent-minded s teakhouse is one of the metr o ar ea’s bes t v alues f or e xpertly prepared steaks. They come in all the usual siz es and c onfigurations, but someone in the kit chen has definite opinions about seasoning and grilling. The result is a distinctive approach that rewards a visit. $$ f DEL FRISC O’S 4107 Oechsli A ve., 89 7-7077. Onc e ranked among the city’ s t op s teakhouses, Del Frisco’s r emains s trong in its c ore c ompetency. For deeply marbled, fork-tender prime steaks, it’s still hard to beat on quality points. $$$$ p FIFTH QUARTER STEAKHOUSE 1241 Durrett Ln., 3612363. The Fifth Quarter has that touch of class that evokes family nostalgia and romantic interludes. An attentive staff serves the sirloin y our way. Some of the city’ s bes t iv ory mas ters ar e at the piano t o enhance the dining experience. $$$ p f e FRANK’S S TEAK HOUSE 52 0 W . Se venth St., Jeffersonville, IN, 2 83- 3383, 9601 Shelb yville Rd., 42 9-3714. A longtime north-of-the-riv er f avorite, this neighborhood s teakhouse is kno wn f or comfort and heary meals without pomp or circumstance. Now it s takes its firs t claim on the Kentucky side of the Ohio , planning t o open an upscale, sophis ticated s teakhouse in the f ormer Garrett’s location near Hurstbourne. $$ p JEFF RUB Y’S S TEAKHOUSE 32 5 W. Main St., 5840102. Cincinnati restaurateur Jeff Ruby, who owns five upscale eateries in the upriver city and one at Indiana’s Belt erra Casino , no w hos ts this glitzy Louisville pr operty, an upscale s teak house that bears his name . Fine beef is the main dr aw, with seafood and even sushi as a plus. $$$$ p e LOGAN’S ROADHOUSE 5055 Shelbyville Rd., 89 33884, 5 2 2 9 Dixie Hw y., 448-05 77, 9 70 Hw y. 131, Clarksville, IN, 2 88-9 789. W ith mor e than 100 properties in 17 s tates, this Nash ville-based chain parlays peanut shells on the floor and s teaks on the table into a popular formula. $$ p

64 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

PAT’S S TEAK HOUSE 2 437 Br ownsboro Rd., 8969234. A visit to Pat’s may not be exactly like a trip back to the ‘50s, but when I at e there last, I think I sa w Ozzie and Harriet. A local f avorite, its combination of quality beef and hospitality rank it among the best steak houses in town. Bring cash: No credit cards accepted. $$$$ p PONDEROSA S TEAKHOUSE 11470 S. Pr eston Hw y., 964-6117, 816 S. K Y 53, La Gr ange, K Y, 2 2 2 - 12 2 6. Family-style dining with the r anch theme k ept alive with the open flame fr om the grills. An extensive buff et with hot and c old f oods, salads and desserts is also available. $ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAKHOUSE 6100 Dutchman’s Ln., 479-0026. The Robb Report magazine has declared Rolex the world’s best watch, Armani the best men’s suit, C ohiba the bes t cigar and Ruth’ s Chris the bes t r estaurant. It serv es an e xcellent steak in an atmosphere of elegance that will make you feel pampered, at a price to match. $$$$ p RYAN’S FAMILY STEAKHOUSE 5338 Bardstown Rd., 491-1088, 4 711 Dixie Hw y., 44 7-4781, 6 36 Eas tern Blvd., Clarksville, IN, 282-85 20. This popular North Carolina-based chain off ers f amily dining with good v ariety: Its div erse and e xtensive buff et features over 150 items. $ STONEY RIVER LEGEND ARY STEAK 3900 Summit Plaza Dr ., 42 9-8944. St oney Riv er in the Springhurst shopping center is one of the chain’ s first properties outside its Georgia home. It draws big cr owds with its memor able s teaks and trimmings, with e xtra points f or friendly servic e and a comfortable atmosphere. $$$ p TEXAS ROADHOUSE Green Tree Mall, Clarksville, IN, 2 80-1103, 4406 Dixie Hw y. 448-0 705, 6460 Dutchman’s Pk wy., 89 7-5005, 332 2 Out er L oop, 962-7600. The spirit of the W est sets the theme for this popular s teak house . Salads, v egetables and br eads with hearty side dishes r ound out your meal options. This is family-style dining, with no tray sliding—service at your table. $$ p TUMBLEWEED SOUTHWES T GRILL (17 locations ) (see listing under Southwest/Tex Mex)

restaurant opens at 4 p .m. and begins serving appetizers, salads, entrées and des serts. A s teak dinner is billed as the specialty of the house . $$ p APPLEBEE’S (9 locations ) T his cheery national chain f eatures an eclectic as sortment of salads, steaks, ribs, poultry and pas ta as w ell as full bar service. It ’s as c onsistent as a c ookie cutt er, but competent execution makes it a good bargain for those whose tas tes run t o mainstream American cuisine. $$ p BENTLEY’S 12 0 W . Br oadway (Holida y Inn), 582 2 241. Enjoy a K entucky hot br own or the all- youcan-eat prime rib buff et on Saturday nights. Each day features a pasta dish, a hearty soup and salad bar, as well as favorites from the cutting board and grill. $$ p e BIG HOPP ’S 800 W. Market St., 589-6600 . A wide variety of family-style fare, from fettuccine alfredo to fried chick en, is dished up with friendly , welcoming servic e at this popular local spot, in the busy Glassworks district. $ p f BUCKHEAD MOUNT AIN GRILL 3008 Bar dstown Rd., 456-6680, 4112 Outer Loop, 966-5555, 7 07 W. Riverside Dr., Jeffersonville IN, 284-2919. Buckhead’s combination o f mountain lodge atmospher e and American-style f are mak e these popular destinations. T he lar ge menu f eatures do wnhome staples like meat loaf , pot pies, s teak, ribs, and lighter fare for warm weather dining. The view of Louisville’s skyline from the riv erfront location is not to be missed. $$ p f CAFÉ MA GNOLIA 140 N. F ourth St. ( Galt House ), 589-52 00. T he Galt House’ s quick and casual second-floor dining alt ernative, this spacious venue—formerly the River Grille, offers a range of fare for guests on the go, from bacon and eggs to a late-night burger and fries. $$$ p CALIFORNIA PIZZA KITCHEN 7900 Shelbyville Rd. (Oxmoor C enter), 42 5-512 5. Calif ornia pizza became a tr end when f amous chefs ga ve this simple Italian f are a multi-ethnic spin with nontraditional Pacific Rim toppings. CPK successfully translates this trend for the mass market. $$ p f CAPTAIN’S QU ARTERS 5700 Captain’ s Quart ers Rd., 2 2 8- 1651. One of the city’ s mos t attr active eateries f or atmospher e, Captain’ s Quart ers matches the beautiful setting with quality bis trostyle f are that w on’t disappoint. Summer or winter, it’s a delightful place to dine. $$ p f e CARDINAL HALL OF F AME CAFÉ 2745 Crittenden Dr., 635-8686. This oversize eatery at Gate 4 of the Kentucky Fair & Exposition Center celebrates U of L sports with a “walk of fame” loaded with awards, photos, game balls and lots mor e Car dinal memorabilia. What? Y ou w ant f ood t oo? Sur e! Casual American dining features everything from a “Cardinal Burger” to steaks and prime rib. $$ p CARLY RAE’S 103 W . Oak St., 3 79-432 0. T his attractive Old L ouisville spot has housed a quick series of short-liv ed r estaurants including Chef ’s Table and L eander’s. No w Carly Rae’ s s tarts off strong with a diverse and appealing casual dining menu. $$ p f

Z’S OYSTER BAR & STEAKHOUSE (see listing under Fine Dining)

CHAMPIONS GRILL 505 Marriott Dr . (Holiday Inn), Clarksville, IN., 2 83-44 11. Kno wn b y locals f or its Saturday night buff et of Ne w Y ork s trip, ribe ye and prime rib . Salads, sandwiches, soups and a kid-friendly menu round out the selection. $$ p e

A NICE RESTAURANT 3105 Blackiston Mill Rd., New Albany IN, 945-4321, 2784 Meijer Dr., 280-9160. A Nice R estaurant, billed as “Ne w Alban y’s Finer Diner,” is, well, nice. This sunny corner shop in the Old Mill Shopping C enter specializes in br eakfast and lunch. T he fare is do wn-home and simple , at a price you can afford. $

CHEDDAR’S CA SUAL CAFÉ 10403 Westport Rd., 339-5400, 1385 V eteran’s Pk wy., Clarks ville, IN, 280-9660. This popular Dallas-based chain, drawing big, hungry crowds with its lar ge bar and f amiliar “casual to upscale American” fare. $ p

ANYTIMES A T THE RAMAD A INN 897-5101. Serving dinners only

1041 Z orn A ve., , the spacious

CHICK INN 632 5 Upper Riv er Rd., 2 2 8- 3646. Louisville’s familiar Chick Inn moved into upgraded quarters after a fire several years ago, but regulars still call it the “new place.” The new place is just as


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Z’s steaks are selected from Prime mid-western aged beef, hand-cut to order and cooked the way you like it. Z’s seafood is purchased directly from “day boat fisherman,” prepared simply and cooked to perfection. Don’t call prior to 4:00 p.m. about seafood specials for the evening… Chef is still at the airport… we just don’t know, yet! Z’s oyster lovers can select from both East and West Coast oysters!

Lunch

Monday – Friday

11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Dinner

Monday – Thursday Friday – Saturday Sunday

5:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Louisville’s ◆◆◆◆ Restaurant

2005|2006|2007 America’s Top 10 Seafood Houses

Opened in October 2000, Z’s Oyster Bar & Steakhouse is independently owned and operated.

101 Whittington Parkway Louisville, KY 40222 Telephone (502) 429-8000 Facsimile (502) 339-0335 www.zsoysterbar.com


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comfy as the old (although non-smok ers beware), and the fried chicken is as good as it gets. $$ p f

LIKE YOU

NEVER LEFT

HOME!! HOME Our mashed potatoes have real lumps. Our meatloaf tastes just like Mom’s. And our made-from-scratch pot pie is served piping hot right from the oven. So no matter what kind of mood you’re in, you’ll find comfort in one of our signature recipes. And for a special treat, visit our Jeffersonville location on the river to enjoy amazing views of the Louisville skyline.

5off!

$

On any 2 entrées

WITH A ROOM KEY! Not valid with any other offer. Dine in or carry-out. Minimum purchase of $14.99. Limit one per table, per visit.

A real local restaurant loved by real locals.

Buckhead Okolona Buckhead Jeffersonville 4112 Outer Loop 707 W. Riverside Dr. (easily accessible across (by the corner of Outer Loop and Preston Hwy) the 2nd St. bridge)

812.284.2919

502.966.5555

Buckhead Bardstown Rd. 3008 Bardstown Rd Gardiner Lane Shopping Center (at the Watterson Expressway)

KERN’S KORNER 2 600 Bar dstown Rd., 456-9 72 6. This f amily-owned ta vern has been a popular neighborhood pit s top sinc e 19 78. K ern’s off ers freshly made ham, chick en salad sandwiches and burgers, as w ell as a menu of soups, chilis and appetizers. $ p

CULVER’S 4630 S. Hurs tbourne Pk wy., 6 71-2 001. When the tr ademark it em is called a “ButterBurger” and fr ozen cus tard t ops the dessert menu, you know you’re not in for diet fare. Quality f ast f ood and friendly servic e mak e this chain a popular new East End arrival. $ f

LEGENDS A T CAES ARS Caesars Indiana Casino , Elizabeth, IN, 888- 766-2 648. T he hot and c old short or ders ar e serv ed up with riv erboat hospitality, but in a Las Vegas atmosphere. A well stocked bar and a live stage welcome the best of regional and visiting national acts fr om Wednesday through Saturday nights. $$ p e

CUNNINGHAM’S 630 S. F ourth St., 58 7-052 6, 301 Upper Riv er Rd., 2 2 8- 362 5. Carrying on int o its third c entury in modern quart ers that captur e much of the nostalgia of its history, Cunningham’s vends fine fish sandwiches and pub grub in this downtown location and in a sec ond eat ery on Harrods Creek. $ f FOUNTAIN ROOM A T THE GAL T HOUSE 140 N. Fourth St., 589-5 2 00. T his c omfortable spac e features both buff et and menu dining. One pric e covers the fresh and hot buffet and salad bar. The menu oft en includes r egional and c ontemporary selections and daily chef specials. $ p GAVI’S RES TAURANT 2 2 2 S. Se venth St., 583-8183. This f amily-owned eat ery has been ar ound f or decades. Standard casual American cuisine adds a few Rus sian-style specialties such as homemade borsht soup and beef Str oganoff. Daily lunch specials include lots of fresh vegetable dishes. $ HIPPO WINGS 502 E. W arnock St., 6 34-4477. Proprietor Roy Gifford once played right guard for Middle Tennessee State University, but he’s a U of L fan now: His ne w spot v ends a fine as sortment of wings and other munchies, jus t right f or tailgating at nearby Papa John’s Stadium. $ HOOTERS 412 0 Dut chmans Ln., 895- 7100; 4 948 Dixie Hw y., 44 9-4194; 77 01 Pr eston Hw y., 9681606; 700 W. Riverside Dr., Jeff ersonville, IN, 2 189485; 94 1 Eas t Hw y. 131, Clarks ville, IN 2 84-9464. Hooter’s may draw crowds with its long-s tanding reputation as a party sc ene, but you’ll stay for the food, an appetizing selection of soups, salads, seafood and more. Extra points for the company’s regular involvement in community causes. $ p f e INTERNATIONAL HOUSE OF P ANCAKES 1220 Veterans Pk wy., Clarks ville, IN. 2 85- 172 2 . F ans of this cult classic say the Metro has been without a handy IHOP f or f ar t oo long. R elief is her e with this f amiliar fr anchise’s r ecent opening in Southern Indiana. $ JOE’S OLDER THAN DIRT 8131 New Lagrange Rd., 42 6-2 074. Going s trong aft er man y y ears in this Lyndon location, Joe’ s has gr adually grown from a little house t o a spr awling c omplex of indoor and out door tables with liv e music man y evenings. Excellent barbecue is a specialty, and so is ice-cold beer. $ p e

JUKE BO X Highlander Point Shopping C Floyds Knobs, IN, 923-1435. $ e

KAELIN’S RES TAURANT 1801 Ne wburg Rd., 4511801. This Highlands tradition has been around for almost 7 0 y ears, and their cheek y claim t o ha ve invented the cheeseburger actually seems to have some basis in f act. A spacious patio and r ecent renovations keep it up to date. $ f

KARMA CAFÉ 112 6 Bar dstown Rd., 58 7-0062 . Karma Café s tays open lat e and off ers dinerstyle courses—with a few Middle Eastern dishes

66 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com 326_food_n_dng_ad.indd 1

enter,

KAREM’S GRILL & PUB 9424 Nort ons C ommons Blvd., 327-5646. $ p f

502.456.6680

y and inf ormal

CHILI’S 421 S. Hurs tbourne Pkwy., 425-6800, 3623 Bardstown Rd., 301-8888; 11600 Ant onia W ay, 301-8181,972 0 V on Allmen Ct., 301-8880 . Mor e than just a place to chow down on baby back ribs, this national chain has a wide selection including fajitas, burgers, sandwiches and veggies. $ p

JOLLY ROGERS 850 Main St., Charles town, IN, 2566366. $$ f

EatAtBuckheads.com

for ac cent—in a casually arts setting. $ f

4/13/07 3:36:43 P

LYNN’S PARADISE CAFÉ 984 Barret Ave., 583-3447. One of the mos t popular places in town for brunch (and dinner t oo), Lynn’s Paradise Café lur es happy, hungry crowds with its hearty fare and funky decor. Lynn’s sponsors the Stat e F air’s t ongue-in-cheek Ugliest Lamp C ontest, but ther e’s nothing ugly about the delicious and filling f ood. $$ p MAIN MENU 3306 Plaza Dr., New Albany, IN., 9486501. $$ MANHATTAN GRILL 200 S. 7th St., 561-0024. $ MASTERSON’S 1830 S. Third St., 636-2511. A fine, family L ouisville tr adition, this f amiliar T udor structure near the U of L campus is the s tate’s largest full-servic e r estaurant and the city’ s largest cat erer. Serving a lunch buff et Mon.-Fri., 10am-2pm only. Sunday Jazz Brunch. $ e MAX & ERMA ’S 2 901 S. Hurs tbourne Pk wy., 4 939662 , 39 2 1 Summit Plaza Dr ., 4 12 -52 2 9. Max & Erma’s, a national chain that started in Columbus, Ohio’s German Village in 1972, has grown to nearly 100 pr operties with a s teady f ormula of friendly service and casual-dining f are that r anges fr om specialty bur gers, soups and salads t o mor e weighty entrées. $$ p f MIMI’S CAFÉ 615 S. Hurs tbourne Pkwy., 42 6-6588. This Calif ornia chain, a subsidiary of Bob E vans, goes urban and upscale wher e f armer Bob is folksy and c ountry. This new East End location is drawing crowds, building its r eputation on those familiar with the chain from other places. $$ THE MONKEY WRENCH 1025 Barret Ave., 582-2433. A popular spot in the urban neighborhood wher e the Highlands meet Germant own, T he Monk ey Wrench off ers c omfort f ood with a s tylish spin, accompanied by good music, a r elaxed ambience and exceptionally welcoming service. $ p f NEIL’S PLACE 7611 IN 311, Sellersbur g, IN, 2 46-5456. Best known for the specially seasoned fried chicken. Neil’s also mak es excellent pastas, steaks, seafood, and salads. Homemade soups are created daily and coffee and desserts are always fresh. $$ p O’CHARLEY’S (6 locations ) O’Charle y’s, Inc. c ould serve well as the pictur e in the dictionary ne xt to “American casual dining. ” T he Nash ville-based chain operates 2 06 pr operties in 16 s tates in the Southeast and Midwest, serving a straightforward steak-and-seafood menu with the mott o “Mainstream with an attitude.” $$ p OLD CHICA GO P ASTA & PIZ ZA 9010 T aylorsville Rd., 301- 7700. T his gr owing chain specializ es in both thick Chicago-s tyle and thin tr aditional pizza, plus an imposing lis t of 110 beers fr om around the world. $$ p f OTTO’S CAFÉ 500 S. F ourth St. (Seelbach Hilt on Hotel), 585-3201. Southern cooking with gourmet flair makes Otto’s an intriguing alt ernative to the Seelbach’s more upscale Oakroom. Check out the Southern Br eakfast Buff et and the Ex ecutive Express Lunch Buffet. $ PUB L OUISVILLE Fourth Str eet Liv e 56 9-7782 . Owned b y Cincinnati’ s T he T avern R estaurant


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Group, T he P ub f eatures “nouv eau pub cuisine” ranging from shepherd’s pie and fish and chips to more Continental dishes lik e fried calamari and a seared ahi tuna entrée. $$ p f RAFFERTY’S OF L OUISVILLE 988 Br eckenridge Ln., 897-3900. 3601 Springhurs t Blvd., 412-9000. This full-service, casual dining establishment has a hearty menu. Specialties lik e R ed Alfr edo P asta showcase the gourmet offerings along with some of the lar gest and mos t cr eative salad combinations in town. $$ p RANCH HOUSE 2611 Charlestown Rd., Ne w Albany, IN, 944-9199. The menu and the retro 1950s decor hark back t o the original Bob C olgazier’s restaurants that Baby Boomers remember fondly from days gone by. $ e RED ROBIN GOURMET BURGERS 9870 Von Allmen Ct., 339-8616. The Robin has landed in the Brownsboro Crossings shopping center in the far East End. The highly r egarded Seattle-based chain off ers “gourmet bur gers” and trimmings. Despit e a full bar, it r eportedly attr acts hor des of happ y youngsters. $$ p f RUBY TUESD AY 11701 Bluegr ass Pk wy., 2 6 7-7100, 1354 Veterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN. 288-5010. If success demons trates quality , then Rub y Tuesday’s 600 int ernational pr operties and 30,000 emplo yees can s tand up with pride . They’ve been upholding the slogan “ Awesome Food. Serious Salad Bar ” in L ouisville f or a generation. $$ p e THE RUDYARD KIPLING 42 2 W. Oak St., 6 36-1311. The word “eclectic” fits this Old L ouisville eatery in jus t about e very dimension, fr om its funk y decor to its diverse bill of f are, not to mention an array of ent ertainment that bridges the generations fr om Gener ation X’ ers t o aging hippies. $ p f e SAM’S FOOD & SPIRIT S 3800 P ayne K ohler Rd., Clarksville, IN, 945-9757, 724 Highlander Point Dr., Floyds Knobs, IN, 9 2 3-7979. Opened b y a man named Sam some 16 years ago, the two locations feed an army of happy diners. You’ll find seafood, steaks, pas tas, salads and des serts. T he menu is extensive and child friendly. $$ p SHANE’S 1004 10th St., Jeffersonville, IN, 218-9769. $ SHONEY’S 1890 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 491-6870, 811 Eastern Pkwy., 636-1043, 6511 Signatur e Dr., 9698904. F or nearly 50 y ears, Shone y’s r estaurants have been one of America’ s t op choic es f or f ast roadside dining, and happily they’ve kept up with the times. $ SKYLINE CHILI 12 66 Bar dstown Rd., 4 73-12 34, Plainview V illage C enter, 42 9-5 773, 40 2 4 Dutchman’s Ln., 7 2 1-0093, 6801 Dixie Hw y., 9 37402 0, 42 6 W . Mark et St., 56 1-9999 7 2 1-0093, 402 4 Dut chman’s Ln. L ouisville’s outpos ts of a famous Cincinnati chili r estaurant, these casual eateries off er the r egional f avorite (r eally it ’s Greek spaghetti sauc e, but k eep it quiet) and other fast-food dishes. $ SPORTSVILLE GRILL & BAR 4004 G ardiner Point Dr., 7 53-4413. A r emodeled v enue, a r evamped menu and a sports-bar theme hail the arriv al of Sportsville Grill & Bar at Holida y Inn Airport Eas t, replacing the old Duk e’s as the hot el’s dining room. $$ p STEAK N SHAKE 32 32 Bar dstown Rd., 456-2 6 70, 4913 Dixie Hwy., 448-4400, 4545 Outer Loop, 9663109, 2 717 S. Hurs tbourne Pk wy., 4 91-3397, 10 72 1 Fischer P ark Dr ., 32 6- 362 5, 980 E. Hw y. 131, Clarksville, IN., 2 85- 1154. One of the oldes t f astfood chains in the U .S., St eak N Shak e tr aces its ancestry to an Illinois roadside stand in 1934. It now boasts 400 outlets in 19 states but still sticks to the basics: quality s teak bur gers and hand-dipped shakes served, if you dine in, on real china. $

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TGI FRIDAY’S 9990 Linn Station Rd., 425-8185, 2311 Lime Kiln Ln., 32 7-8443, Fourth Street Live, 5853577. T he original plac e t o loosen the tie and congregate aft er the whis tle blo ws. TGIF carries on its party atmospher e tradition with American bistro dining and libations. T he bill of f are ranges fr om bask ets of appetiz ers on up t o contemporary entrées. $$ p f TOAST ON MARKET 736 E. Mark et St., 56 9-4099. This quaintly his toric old theat er building, mor e recently a junque shop , is no w thor oughly renovated as the buzz-worthy Toast. Chef George Morris is turning out simple yet exciting breakfast and lunch dishes that add a t ongue-in-cheek bistro spin to traditional diner fare. $ p f TOMMY LANCASTER RESTAURANT 1629 E. Market St., New Albany, IN, 945-2 389 . Value and v ariety are the s trong points of this c ommunity tradition and the f are goes fr om bur gers t o lobs ter tails. Friday or Saturday evenings feature a buffet. $ p TRELLIS RESTAURANT 320 W. Jefferson St. (Hyatt Regency), 58 7-3434. Dine on café f are in the Hyatt’s lofty atrium lobb y while y ou tak e advantage of an en vironment made f or peoplewatching. $$ p TUCKER’S 2 441 Stat e St., Ne w Alban y, IN, 9449999. Tucker’s gives you a little bit of e verything with a do wn-to-earth flair, off ering bur gers, ribs, steaks, a variety of appetizers and pastas. $ p TWICE TOLD PERFORMANCE CAFÉ 3507 W. Hwy. 146, LaGrange, 222-4506. An eclectic urban café in a village setting, about 2 0 minut es eas t of downtown in LaGr ange. T he casual menu lis ts sandwiches, fruits and v eggies; daily soups and entrées. $ e TWIG & LEAF RES TAURANT 2 12 2 Bar dstown Rd., 451-8944. A popular Highlands hangout, the ”Twig” is probably at its best for breakfast—whether you’re enjoying it while v enturing out on a leisur ely Sunday morning or heading home v ery lat e on a Saturday night. It ’s a plac e t o gr ab a quick, filling bite, and doesn’t pretend to be more. $ THE GA SLIGHT INN RES TAURANT & T AP 10317 Watterson T rail,2 66- 7112 . T his fine old Jeffersontown f armhouse, f ormerly the home of the v ery British Sir Chur chill’s, r egains an American ac cent with an upscale casual menu and attractive bar. $$ p f THE VILLA BUFFET Caesars Indiana Casino , Elizabeth, IN, 888- 766-2 648. T he V illa Buff et offers an impr essive choic e of int ernational dishes, with some 150 selections. A seaf ood buffet is featured on Fridays. $$ WESTPORT GENERAL S TORE 7008 Hw y 5 2 4, Westport, KY., 222-4626. Only a half-hour ’s drive up the Ohio fr om Louisville, proprietors Will and Laura Cr awford w elcome visit ors t o this c ozy destination, offering a comfortably sophisticated bill of f are that w ould in no w ay be out of plac e in a fancy city bistro. $$ THE WING ZONE 905 Hess Ln., 636-2445. Another new wings emporium situated to catch the fancy of U of L f ans, W ing Z one e xcels with jumbo wings in 25 fla vors, including tr aditional Buffalostyle wings that range from Mild to Nuclear. $ f

BARBARA LEE’S KIT CHEN 2 410 Br ownsboro Rd., 897-3967. Barbara Lee’s has been a lat e-night refuge for years. It’s a reliable standby for those in search of traditional blue-plate special lunch food. Honest grub, honestly priced, in a rootsy atmosphere. $ BIG MAMA ’S SOUL KIT CHEN 4532 W . Br oadway, 772 -9580. Big Mama’ s ma y be the mos t hospitable place in the W est End t o get genuine www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 67


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soul f ood. A diff erent main c ourse is f eatured daily, all home-c ooked f ood, including such goodies as baked chicken, smothered pork chops, meat loaf, catfish … and fried chicken every day. $ CAROLYN’S 3822 Cane Run Rd., 776-9519. The steam table classic, the “meat ‘n’ tw o” gives you the roast chicken, green beans and mashed potatoes. Or pork chops, applesauce and limas. $ CHECK’S CAFÉ 1101 E. Burnett A ve., 637-9515. You can scent a whiff of L ouisville history coming off the old w alls of this quint essential Germant own saloon, along with years of frying grease. The bar food here is about as good as bar f ood gets, and that’s not bad. T he chili and the bean soup ar e particularly recommended. $ p f e THE CHICKEN HOUSE 7180 Hwy. 111, Sellersburg, IN., 2 46-9485. T he parking lot of this whit e fr ame building in rur al Indiana is pack ed on w eekend nights as f amilies from throughout the ar ea wait on delectable fried chick en. This is the v ery heart of American comfort food, including green beans, dumplings, and mashed potatoes. $$ CHICKEN KING 639 E. Br oadway, 589-5464. Spicy , crunchy and sizzling hot fried chick en is the primary draw on a short, aff ordable menu. $ COTTAGE CAFÉ 11609 Main St., Middlet own, 2 449497. This nostalgic old house in the c ountryside offers a tas te of K entucky-style c ookery in an array of lunch specials that r ange fr om homemade soups and sandwiches t o the traditional Louisville Hot Brown. $ COTTAGE INN 570 Eas tern Pk wy., 6 37-432 5. No w, this is down-home dining. Tucked away under big shade trees on Eas tern Parkway not f ar from the University of L ouisville’s Belknap Campus, Cottage Inn has been happily doling out excellent food for more than 70 years. $ DINNER IS DONE 3830 Ruckreigel Pkwy., 267-8686. $ D’NALLEY’S 970 S. T hird St., 583-8015. Dirt-cheap blue-plate specials and hearty br eakfasts bring droves to the c ounters and booths of this clas sic greasy spoon. Satur day morning hours ar e sporadic, but for a quick plate of meat loaf, green beans, and mashed potat oes, D’Nalley’s is a har d place to beat. $ FORK IN THE ROAD RESTAURANT 4951 Cane Run Rd., 448-3903. $ FRONTIER DINER 72 99 Dixie Hw y., 2 71-3663. T he name “ diner” sa ys it all, and this friendly neighborhood spot Dixie High way deliv ers jus t what y ou’d e xpect in do wn-home c omfort f are. The word on the s treet, though, is simple: Go f or the pancakes. They’re worth a special trip. $ GENNY’S DINER 2 2 2 3 Fr ankfort A ve., 89 3-092 3. What’s the difference between Genny’s Diner and a saloon? You can take the kids to Genny’s. Better still, y ou can get a darn good meal at Genn y’s, provided that y ou set y our e xpectations f or hearty, filling and well-prepared diner food. $ p e GOLDEN CORRAL 4032 Taylorsville Rd., 485-0004, 8013 Pr eston Hw y., 966-4 970, 140 2 C edar St., 2 58-2 540. Buff et s tyle family dining—one pric e, all you can eat. Steaks are served beginning at 4 pm. $ GOOSE CREEK DINER 2923 Goose Creek Rd., 3398070. Goose Cr eek Diner off ers old-f ashioned comfort food, as the name “ diner” suggests, but transcendently adds a gourmet tas te t o the down-home eats. $ HAZELWOOD RESTAURANT 4106 Taylor Blvd., 3619104. Whether y ou lik e y our eggs o ver eas y, or your cheesebur gers w ell done , y ou’ll lik e the Hazelwood R estaurant. Standar d short or ders cooked with lots of character and a low price. $ HOMETOWN BUFFET 1700 Alliant Ave., 267-7044, 3710 Chamberlain Ln., 32 6-9 777, 664 1 Dixie Hw y., 9953320, 757 Hwy. 131, Clarksville, IN., 285-1893. This chain 68 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

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serves up nos talgic dishes, cas seroles, meats and desserts that allow you to set an all-American supper table with the all-you-can eat price tag. $ INDI’S RESTAURANT 1033 W. Broadway, 589-7985, 382 0 W. Mark et St., 77 8-5154, 4 901 Poplar L evel Rd., 964-5 749, 3353 F ern V alley Rd., 96 9-7993, 5009 S. T hird St., 36 3-2 535. Gr own fr om a tin y West End tak eout spot t o a mini-chain, Indi’ s vends a v ariety of aff ordable soul f ood and barbecue specialties to take out or eat in. $ JESSIE’S FAMILY RES TAURANT 9609 Dixie Hw y., 937-6332 . C ountry c ooking is Jes sie’s specialty , with hearty breakfast, lunch and dinner platters to fill the inner person. $ KINGS F AST FOOD 2 101 W . Br oadway, 77 2 -7138. This tin y, c olorful W est End eat ery, open f or takeout only , off ers a v ast selection of filling, affordable urban f are that r anges fr om hot-andspicy chicken wings to rib tips and more. $ KING’S FRIED CHICKEN 1302 Dixie Hwy., 776-3013. $ LONGINO’S 1506 Berry Blvd., 361-9153. Don’t let the Italian family name fool you, this local fixture near Churchill Do wns f eatures do wn-home c ooking, mostly, r anging fr om fried gr een t omatoes t o hearty meat loaf to “The Manhattan.” $ MR. L OU’S C OUNTRY C OTTAGE RES TAURANT 5408 Valley Station Rd., 9 33-0806. Biscuits and red-eye gravy, country ham and grits show off Mr. Lou’s c ountry c ooking s tyle. R oast chick en is a dinner favorite, and so are homemade pies. $ O’DOLLYS 7800 Third St. Rd., 375-1690. Homestyle steam-table favorites are available from breakfast through dinner , not t o mention full bar servic e that mak es O’Dolly s a South west L ouisville destination. $ p f OLIVE’S ON FOURTH 570 S. F ourth St., 588-900 3. No matt er what y ou’re hungry f or, chanc es ar e Olive’s has it—fr om s team-table f are t o pizza and calzones. C o-owners Linda Z eisloft and V icky Wright bring long back grounds at Sulliv an University to this comfortable downtown spot $ f SWEET PEA’S SOUTHERN (see listing under Bistro) TOLL BRIDGE INN 3300 North western Pk wy., 77 65505. A rich and c olorful his tory surr ounds the century-old fr ame building in Portland that no w houses the T oll Bridge Inn, a neighborhood favorite for simple, filling down-home fare. $ f WAGNER’S PHARMACY 3113 S. Fourth St., 375-3800. A track-side institution that has as much history as the nearby Twin Spires of Churchill Downs. Soups, sandwiches, shak es, cherry C okes and an early bird “ trainer’s” br eakfast can be enjo yed all y ear round. Racing his tory on the w alls and serv ers who’ll call you “hon.” $ WEBB’S MARKET 944 E. Muhammad Ali Blvd., 5830318. Webb’s is deli sandwich market style dining. Country ham sandwiches and the half-pound cheeseburger are a specialty. $

ANN’S BY THE RIVER 149 Spring St., Jeff ersonville, IN., 2 84-2 66 7. T his bus tling eat ery is caf eteria style dining done well. They serve up the standard steam table meat-and-three menu items as good as any. With the Ohio River a block away, it’s aptly named. $

JANE’S CAFETERIA 4601 Jennings Ln., 454- 72 86. This 40- year-old f amily-owned r estaurant kno ws how t o c ook f or f olks mis sing their home table . Count on an att entive s taff and fr esh southern fare. $ JAY’S CAFETERIA 1812 W . Muhammad Ali Blv d., 583-2 534. Ja y’s modern, w ell-scrubbed building wouldn’t be out of plac e on Hurs tbourne Lane . Hungry diners fr om all o ver t own find a w arm welcome at this popular West End location that ’s now run as a c ommunity-development pr ogram by two local churches. $ PICCADILLY CAFETERIA 2131 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 493-9900, 133 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 423-1733. An east end favorite for variety, Piccadilly offers roast beef, fried chicken, cod, steak and shrimp dinners, a gar dener’s lis t of v egetables and a f ew ethnic dishes for global measure. $ THE LANCA STER CAFÉ 2 2 3 W . Fifth St., Ne w Albany, IN, 944-2400. The Lancaster Café bears a proud old name in New Albany dining: Owned by Troy Lancas ter, gr andson of T ommy Lancas ter, former owner of the catering house that still bears the family name, the Café — locat ed in the small house that w as onc e home t o Pigasus BBQ — offers the kind of do wn-home c omfort f are that the Lancasters made famous. $

BUFFALO CROSSING 1140 Bagdad Rd., Shelb yville, KY, (502) 647-0377. If you’d like to combine a day trip with a culinary adv enture, consider a drive to Buffalo Cr ossing in Shelb y C ounty. T his agricultural amusement park f eatures a 500-head buffalo herd and an o versize dining r oom where you can give this healthy red meat a try. The food here is c ountry-style and so ar e the friendly servers. $$ f DERBY DINNER PLAYHOUSE 525 Marriott Dr., Clarksville, IN, 288-8281. The play’s the thing at Derby Dinner Playhouse, L ouisville’s long-running entry in the dinner-theater s weepstakes … but the e xpansive buffet dinner adds value to the mix. $$$$ e HOWL AT THE MOON Fourth Street Live, 562-9400. What’ll they think of next? How about a nightclub that f eatures a “ dueling” piano bar with tw o pianos and a sing-along c oncept? You’ll find this 4,000-square-foot club at F ourth Str eet Liv e on the ground level. $ p e JOE HUBER F AMILY F ARM & RES TAURANT 2421 Scottsville Rd., Starlight IN, 9 23-5255. A pleasant 2 0-minute driv e fr om do wntown L ouisville, Huber’s has built a solid r eputation f or simple farm fare that’s well-made, fresh and good. Some of the pr oduce is gr own on the pr emises in season. $$ p f e LUCKY S TRIKE LANES / FEL T Fourth Str eet Liv e, 560-1400. An upscale bo wling alle y? A clas sy poolroom? Who knew! These twin concepts from Jillian’s founders Stephen and Gillian F oster light up Fourth Street Live with a stylish blend of ’50sstyle r etro and high-t ech modern, plus a menu that serves much more than mere bar food. $$ p f

CRAVINGS A LA CARTE 101 S. Fifth St. (National City Tower), 589-42 30 . T his thrifty deli off ers a variety of build- your-own sandwiches, a soupand-salad bar, and specialty bars f eaturing baked potatoes, and a monthly ethnic cr eation. $

MY OLD KENTUCK Y DINNER TRAIN 602 N. T hird St., Bardstown, KY, (502) 348-7300. Talk about a nostalgia trip: My Old K entucky Dinner T rain offers a f our-course meal during a tw o-hour voyage along scenic Kentucky railroad tracks near Bardstown in vintage 1940s-er a dining cars. Reservations ar e s trongly r ecommended. All aboard! $$$$ p

HALL’S CAFETERIA 1301 St ory A ve., 583-043 7. Hall’s Cafeteria has been doing a brisk business on the steam tables since 1955, attracting customers from Butchertown’s truck loading docks and from offices downtown. $

STAR CRUISES 151 W. Riv erside Rd., Jeff ersonville, IN, 2 18- 1565. T he Ohio Riv er cruise is the bes t thing about this L ove Boat-s tyle y acht that makes nightly all- you-can-eat cruises up the river. $$$$ p f


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STUMLER RES TAURANT & ORCHARD 1092 4 St. John’s Rd., Starlight, IN, 9 23-3832. Fresh produce is available in the big shed a f ew steps away, and that fresh produce shows up on the tables here in mammoth portions. C ombine that with hones t fried chick en, big ham s teaks, r oast beef , and sandwiches, and you can’t go wrong. $$ f

AMERICAN PIZ ZA 6712 Shepher dsville Rd., 962 8966. $ p e ANGILO’S PIZZA 1725 Berry Blvd., 368-1032. The local favorite is the s teak hoagie , dripping with pizza sauce, pickles and onions. Angilo’ s also off ers a wide selection of hot pizza pies and c old beer. $ ANGIO’S RES TAURANT 3731 Old Bar dstown Rd., 451-5454. T his small Buechel eat ery attr acts a friendly neighborhood crowd with hefty subs and quality pizzas, along with c old beer. $ ANNIE’S PIZZA 2520 Portland Ave., 776-6400, 4007 Cane Run Rd., 44 9-4444. Annie’ s has made-t oorder pizza and a v ariety of s tacked sandwiches such as the Big Daddy Str om with beef , Italian sausage, onions and banana peppers. $ ARNI’S PIZZA 1208 State St., New Albany, IN, 9451149, 3700 Paoli Pike, Floyds Knobs, IN, 923-9805. A favorite Hoosier pizza and sandwich stop. Insist on getting the Deluxe. $ BEARNO’S PIZ ZA 131 W. Main St., 584- 7437, 2 900 Taylorsville Rd., 458-8605, 6 101 Bar dstown Rd., 2 31-2 2 2 2 , 135-F Mark etplace Dr ., 95 7-5100, 10117 Taylorsville Rd., 2 6 7-2 549, 1318 Bar dstown Rd., 456-4556, 8019 Pr eston Hw y., 968-6060 , 9 2 2 2 Westport Rd.,42 3- 12 2 4, 9 2 07 W . Hw y 42 , 2 2 89388, 7 895 Dixie Hw y., 9 37-12 34, 19 2 3 S. F ourth St., 634-5155, 922 Chambers Blvd., Bardstown, KY, 348-4848, 300 2 Charles town Crossing, Ne w Albany, IN, 94 9-7914,2 784 Meijers Dr ., Jeffersonville, IN, 282-3125, $ p BIG WILLIE’S PIZZA PUB 10301 Taylorsville Rd., 2610650. $ BRUNO’S PIZZA 5170 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 944-5050. $$ CICI’S PIZZA 470 New Albany Plaza, Ne w Albany, IN., 944-4 942 , 309 3 Br eckinridge Ln., 45 2 -6700, 52 2 6 Dixie Hw y., 448-8895. Serious bar gainhunters will find Cici’ s culinary offer hard to beat. This Dallas-based chain serv es up all the pizza you can eat for only $3.99. $ CLIFTON’S PIZ ZA 2 2 30 Fr ankfort Ave., 89 3-3730. Clifton’s pizza appeals t o me with its adult s tyle, full of the bold fla vors of herbs and spic es and available with gr own-up t oppings lik e ancho vies and artichoke hearts. All this and funky, fun decor makes it one of m y favorite local pizzerias. $ f e DANNY MAC’S PASTA & PIZZA 1014 Clarks Ln., 6357994. $ DOMINO’S PIZZA (20 locations) $$ FAST BREAK PIZ ZA 682 5 C entral A ve., 2 43-1101. Scott Hack’s new Italian spot, featuring pizza, subs and other Italian- American goodies in a spacious sports bar with a bask etball theme, is luring pizza lovers out to Crestwood for fine traditional pizzas plus such inno vative it ems as the pineappletopped Big Kahuna and, believe it or not, a baconcheeseburger pie. $ FAT JIMMY’S 9901C LaGr ange Rd., 339-8111, 2 712 Frankfort A ve., 891-4555; 2 2 08 Bar dstown Rd., 479-1040; 1382 9 English V illa Dr., 2 44-0840; 5 2 8 S. Fifth St., 589-8559 . This friendly neighborhood nook offers a cold mug of beer and a hot slic e of pizza, along with sub sandwiches, pas ta dishes and salads. The Lyndon spot lures a friendly biker crowd; the Cr escent Hill eat ery reflects its urban setting. $ www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 69


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FAT TONY’S PIZZA 9910 Linn Station Rd., 339-3553. Formerly Brick Ov en Pizza, F at Tony’s has been attracting big lunchtime crowds to Plainview with authentic Ne w Y ork-style pizza, the thin-crus t kind with o versize slices that y ou have to fold in half in order to make a mouth-size portion. Other basic Italian- American pas ta dishes add t o the appeal of this casual, aff ordable spot. $$ FRESCO SOUTHWES T GRILL & PIZ ZA 2 047 L ytle St., 77 6-6077. L ocally o wned and oper ated but with development as a chain in its busines s plan, this comfortable, welcoming spot opened firs t in the city’ s r estaurant-underserved Portland neighborhood, off ering f ast-food s tyle and a choice of w ell-made burritos and other Me xicanstyle goodies and pizza, t oo. $ f FROLIO’S PIZ ZA 3799 Poplar L evel Rd., 456- 1000. Just ar ound the c orner fr om the L ouisville Z oo, Frolio’s is a neighborhood pizz eria with a c ozy, dim Italian- American mood and an all- you-caneat pizza-and-salad lunch special. $$ f HERO’S NEW Y ORK PIZ ZA 10509 Watterson Trail, 261-9339. Just opened in late April, this attractive venue in a his toric building on Jeff ersontown’s Town Square holds pr omise, with Ne w York-style pizzas and other Italian goodies on the bill of fare. $$ p f HOMETOWN PIZZA 11804 Shelbyville Rd., 245-4555, 8442 Dixie Hw y., 9 35-3555, La Gr ange Squar e Shopping C enter, 2 2 2 -4444. P asta dishes, hoagies, s tromboli and c old beer ar e a vailable, and so is the one-of-a-kind Bac on Cheeseburger pizza. $$ IROQUOIS PIZZA 6614 Manslick Rd., 363-3211. $$ JOCKAMO’S PIZZA PUB 983 Goss Ave., 637-5406. Old-timers are delighted to see Jock amo’s Pizza Pub back in business in Germantown, more than a decade after it depart ed Bardstown Road. Some of the original o wners ( except the lat e Da ve Wilder) ha ve r ecreated the s tyle, the mood and the live music, of the original. $$ e KING BENNY’S PIZ ZA T AVERN 634-1003. $$ p f e

1919 S. Pr eston,

LITTLE CAES AR’S PIZ ZA 816 K enwood Dr ., 3665599, 9017 G alene Dr ., 2 6 7-8600, 562 2 Pr eston Hwy. 966-5800 , 6 714 Out er L oop, 966- 3111, 12 418 LaGrange Rd., 2 41-5445. T his Detr oit-based pizzeria chain los t mark et shar e in the ‘90s, but business analysts say the c ompany known f or its two-for-one “pizza pizza” deal has turned things around with a renewed commitment to quality and service. $$ LOUISVILLE PIZZA CO. 3910 Ruckriegel Pkwy., 2671188. Also kno wn as Chubb y Ra y’s, this local pizzeria mak es good, fr esh pizzas and ItalianAmerican sandwiches. $ p f MA ZERELLA S 949 S. Indiana A ve., Sellersburg, IN, 246-9517. Pleasant family-run-for-family-fun establishments. Pizza, pasta, salads and subs serv ed for lunch and dinner seven days a week. $ MR. GATTI’S 5600 S. T hird St., 36 3-2 2 11, 8594 Dixie Hwy., 935-0100, 3319 Bardstown Rd., 451-0540, 1108 Lyndon Ln., 339-8338, 2 2 47 S. Pr eston St., 6 356708, 42 00 Out er L oop, 964-09 2 0. T his A ustinbased chain w as one of the firs t national pizzerias t o r each L ouisville in the 19 70s, and quality ingredients—plus Gattiland playgrounds for the kids—ha ve made its crisp , thin-crus t pizzas a popular draw for nearly 30 years. $$ ORIGINAL IMPELLIZ ZERI’S 1381 Bar dstown Rd., Impellizzeri’s pizza, a L ouisville ic on kno wn and loved f or its mas sive pies f or a gener ation, will soon r eturn t o the Highlands as Benn y Impellizzeri opens his lat est v enture in the quarters vacated by Alameda. $$ p f

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PA PA MURPHY’S PIZ ZA 2 91 N. Hubbar ds Ln., 8956363, 5016 Mud Ln., 962- 7272, 9501 Taylorsville Rd., 2 66-7000, 16 1 Out er L oop, 36 1-3444; 460 7 Out er Loop, 964- 72 72 ; 12 535 Shelb yville Rd., 2 53-9191, 6756 Bar dstown Rd., 2 39-82 82 , 1305 V eterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 280-7272. $$ PAPA JOHN’S PIZ ZA (30 locations ) “P apa” John Schnatter got int o the pizza game as a Southern Indiana high-school student in 1984 and has built his business into a 3, 000-restaurant international chain on the basis of a simple f ormula: traditional pizza, made fr om quality ingr edients in a straightforward style. $$ PIZZA BO X 10331 Champion F arms Dr ., 42 3-0530 . With its modern an ds tylish quart ers in Springhurst, Pizza Bo x is a popular gathering place. Pizzas ar e firs t-rate, although br ew lo vers still mourn serious cutbacks t o its onc e imposing beer list. $ PIZZA BY THE GUY 8109 Lagrange Rd., 426-4044. This locally owned franchise is famous for its extra spicy, hand-t ossed dough. C ome and get it, literally, because ther e’s only a c ozy table f or three at the store and most folks pick up their pie or have it delivered. $ PIZZA HUT (15 locations) $$ PIZZA KING 382 5 Charles town Rd., Ne w Alban y IN, 945-4405, 1066 K ehoe Ln., Jeff ersonville, IN., 2 82 8286. The pizza at Pizza King is bak ed in a s turdy, clay stone oven and hand-tossed with thinner crust where the ingredients go all the way to the edge. $$

wine and beer lis t, in a a s triking “urban loft ” tangerine and jade setting with Italian-made furniture to add an upscale ac cent. $$ p TONY IMPELLIZ ZERI’S 108 V ieux Carr e Dr ., 42 90606. The original Impellizzeri’s Pizza is gone from the Highlands, but this decade-old s trip-center storefront near Hurstbourne houses brother Tony’s venture. If you like the massive, heavily loaded Impellizzeri pizza s tyle, it ’s a tr eat not t o be missed. $$$$ VITO’S PIZ ZERIA 32 13 Pr eston Hw y., 6 34-5400. Reasonable people can diff er on the subject, but Vito’s f ans sa y the sizzling, o ven-charred pies at this downscale little plac e on Pr eston are among the best pizzas in town. $$ WICKS PIZ ZA PARLOR 975 Baxt er Ave., 458- 182 8, 2927 Goose Creek Rd., 327-9425, 12717 Shelbyville Rd., 213-9425, 10966 Dixie Hwy., 995-4333. Wick’s wins popularity with a w elcoming mix of good pizza, a quality beer lis t and a friendly neighborhood feel at all thr ee of its eat eries. The pies ar e straightforward, made with ample toppings. “The Big Wick” is a favorite. $ p WINGS TO GO 4324 Charlestown Rd., Ne w Albany, IN, 941-9464. $ WINDY CITY PIZ ZERIA 2 62 2 S. F ourth St., 6 363708. Stuffed Chicago-style and crispy thin-crust pizzas off er whiche ver option a pizza lo ver desires. $$ ZA’S PIZZA 1573 Bardstown Rd., 454-4544. $$

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PIZZA PLACE 2931 Richland Ave., 458-9700. $ PIZZERIA UNO CHICA GO BAR & GRILL 6501 Bardstown Rd., 239-0079. This successful franchise serves up Chicago s tyle pizza—deep dish with more t oppings than crus t. Steaks, pas tas, sandwiches and bur gers c omplement the full service menu. $$ p PRADO’S PIZZA 12935 Shelbyville Rd., 254-7220. $$ SNAPPY T OMATO (7 L ocations) A gr owing Midwestern pizza-deliv ery chain based in Northern K entucky, Snapp y Tomato mo ved int o the Louisville market this summer, taking o ver all the pr operties v acated in Pizza Magia’ s demise . Pizzas are made with fresh ingredients (including an unusual cinnamon-apple pizza “pie”), and the chicken wings are impressive. $$ SPINELLI’S PIZ ZERIA 614 Baxt er A ve., 568-5665. This tin y s torefront in the city’ s night club z one offers a tas ty option f or the wide-e yed-late-atnight cr owd seeking good cheap eats; it ’s open until 5 a.m nightly fr om W ednesdays thr ough Saturdays. Bett er y et, it giv es L ouisville an authentic taste of Philadelphia specialties: Philly style pizza and real Philly cheese steaks. $ f SPORTSTIME PIZZA 3312 Plaza Dr., New Albany, IN, 944-2 577. T outing “ the bes t pizza in southern Indiana” is quite a boast, but when the pizza biz is part of the Ne w Albanian Br ewing Company, the boast carries w eight. T he N.A.B. C. is the ne west offshoot of Rich O’s, nationally noted for its huge selection of microbrews and hard-to-find imports. Try the “Herbavore” with spinach, sliced tomatoes and roasted garlic for a sizzling start. $ TONY BOOMBOZZ 3334 Frankfort Ave., 896-9090, 1448 Bardstown Rd., 458-8889 . Boombozz wins praise f or e xceptionally high quality pizza and other quick Italian-s tyle f are. T ony’s pizzas include both tr aditional pies and gourmet-s tyle specialties that ha ve w on a wards in national competition. $$ TONY BOOMBO ZZ PIZ ZA & VINO 2 813 N. Hurstbourne Pk wy., 394-0000 . Boombo zz has taken its pizza c oncept t o a ne w le vel with the opening of Pizza & V ino in Springhurs t. The new “fast casual” f acility f eatures the a ward-winning Boombozz pizzas and paninis with a w ell-chosen

AMAZING GRA CE WHOLE FOOD S DELI 1133 Bardstown Rd., 485- 112 2 . If you think “v egan” means only r aw carrots, bean spr outs, seeds and roots, think again. No animals w ere harmed in the making of the tas ty alt ernative sandwiches and other dishes at this neat little deli attached t o a spiffy local organic-foods grocery. $ ANOTHER PLACE SANDWICH SHOP 119 S. Seventh St., 589-4115. If you want to buy a car, go to a car dealer. To buy a carpet, patr onize a carpet shop . And if you’ve got a sandwich on your to-do list, it makes sense to go to a sandwich shop. $ BACKYARD BURGER 1800 Priority Way, 240-9945. The open flame at this c ounter-service diner provides the ne xt best thing t o a f amily cookout. Sandwiches, fresh salads, fruit c obblers and oldfashioned hand-dipped milkshak es enhanc e the nostalgic theme. $ f BANK SHOT BILLIARDS 403 E. Market St., 587-8260. $ BLIMPIE’S SUBS & S ALADS 2020 Brownsboro Rd., 899-7960, 3360 Hik es Ln., 451-5480 . Sublime subs—fast and fr esh. Blimpie’s is all that … and a bag of chips. $ CHICAGO GRILL & SUBS 1626 Spring St., Jeffersonville, IN. 288-5988. $ f CHICAGO GYROS 2317 Brownsboro Rd., 895-3270. $ p CIANO’S 11904 Shelbyville Rd., 245-6997. $ DANISH EXPRES S PASTRIES 102 1/2 Cannons Ln., 895-2 863. Jus t a f ew tables turn this tak eout nook int o a sit-in br eakfast and lunch spot f or a handful of diners at a time . Full br eakfasts and light lunches ar e a vailable, but as the name implies, Danish pas tries ar e the specialty , and they’re fine. $ DEVINO’S 320 Main St., 56 9-3939. Right acr oss the street fr om L ouisville Slugger Field, this s tylish new deli adds another lunch and dinner option to the booming eas t-of-downtown z one. Sandwiches ar e made fr om quality Boar ’s Head meats and cheeses cut on the pr emises, with dining inside and on the patio; pack age beer and wine is also available. $ f


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DINO’S DO WN T O L UNCH CAFÉ 2 39 S Fifth St. (Kentucky Home Life Building) 585-2874. $ DIZZY WHIZZ DRIVE-IN 217 W. St. Catherine St., 5833828. This neighborhood eat ery is an ins titution. It goes back more than 50 years and hasn’t changed much. It opens early and stays open late and offers good value for what you’d expect. $ f DMITRI’S DELI 521 S. T hird St., 584-8060 . A do wntown deli f avorite. Daily specials ar e surr ounded by an impr essive v ariety of sandwiches, soups and salads. $ f DOOLEY’S BAGELCATESSEN 12903 Shelbyville Rd., 245-3354, 216 N. Hurs tbourne Ln., 394-0021, 980 Breckenridge Ln., 89 3-3354, 2 2 41 Stat e St., Ne w Albany, IN, 981-012 4, 2226 Holida y Manor C enter, 42 6-3354. T his c onvenient deli specializ es in bagels, as the name implies. Br eakfast means fresh bagels with an arr ay of cr eam cheese , sausage, eggs and coffee. At lunchtime lines form for sandwiches—subs, panini, wr aps, hot melts and cold cuts. $ EURO MARKET 12 907 F actory Ln., 2 43-0000. It looks like a neighborhood c onvenience store and bottle shop, but when you get inside, it contains a delicious surprise: an appetizing servic e c ounter offers a v ariety of goodies t o take out or eat in. Don’t miss the e xcellent fried-oyster box, as w ell as an intriguing selection of quality beers and fine wines. $ THE FEED BA G DELI 133 Breckenridge Ln., 896- 1899. The grilled salmon bur ger is w orth the visit, as well as the Triple Crown wrap with three meats or a fresh veggie wrap. Soups, des serts t op off the lunch-only schedule. $ FRASCELLI’S NEW Y ORK DELI 62 47 Cr estwood Station, 2 43-9005. S mall and spartan, this tw oroom storefront just out from Pewee Valley offers a broad selection of Italian-s tyle deli sandwiches, plus a shorter list of home-style Italian hot dishes from lasagna to baked ziti. $

Fresh occupied this ne w glass-walled building f or only a short time before leaving it vacant. Now the Just Fresh chain mo ves in, off ering fast-food fare billed as healthy and natural. $ f LITTLE CHEF 147 E. Mark et St., Ne w Alban y, IN, 949-7567. E very city needs a pos tage-stampsized spot that kno ws ho w t o fry potat oes and grill up a burger. In New Albany, the place is Little Chef. Biscuits and gr avy, fried eggs, and bur gers, in a joint that seems lik e a thr owback t o the heartland of America, circa 1940. $ f LONNIE’S BEST TASTE OF CHICAGO 121 St. Matthews Ave., 895-2 380 . T his appetizing oper ation off ers genuine Chicago hot dogs and a tas te of Chicago atmosphere for a price that won’t hurt your wallet. Make Lonnie’s the plac e to go when y ou’ve got a hankering for Windy City fare. $ LOTSA PASTA 3717 L exington Rd., 896-6 361. L otsa Pasta originated as an Italian specialty-food store, and it has been a local f avorite for more than 20 years. It now offers deli meats and cheeses and an eclectic int ernational selection of sausages and cheese. A lar ge sit-do wn section off ers a comfortable plac e t o enjo y c offee, pas try and sandwiches made to order in the deli. $ LUNCH TODAY 590 Missouri Ave., Jeffersonville, IN, 2 82 -1005. T his outfit pr epares its shar e of the soups, salads and sandwiches that the downtown workforce needs to re-energize. $ f MAIN EATERY 643 W. Main St., 589- 3354. Smack dab in the middle of the Main Str eet his toric district, this f ashionable deli lur es the sa vvy business midday crowd. $ f MARKET ON MARKET 445 E. Market St., 568-8810. Sharing the ground floor of the renovated, historic Cobalt building with Primo , this upscale mark et brings gr ocery options t o the gr owing liv e-in population east of downtown, and an inviting deli for sandwiches and salads, t oo. $

MCALISTER’S DELI 10041 Forest Green Blvd., 4258900, 2721 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 671-2424, 2400 Lime Kiln Ln., 339-8544, 6508 Bar dstown Rd., 2 39-9997, 1305 V eterans Pk wy., Clarks ville, IN, 2 82 -3354, 12 911 Shelb yville Rd., 2 44-5133. Emphasizing quality cus tomer servic e, this delicatessen ladles up such soups as gumbo and chicken tortilla along with cutting board favorites. They have a special w ay with a tumbler of s weet iced tea and lemon. $ f MORRIS DELI & CA TERING 2 2 2 8 Taylorsville Rd., 458-1668. Man y locals s till kno w this small, popular Highlands deli as K arem Deeb’s aft er its longtime pr evious o wner. Mos tly f or tak eout—it packs in a f ew cr owded tables—it ’s kno wn f or high-quality, hand-made deli fare. $ NANCY’S BA GEL GROUND S 2 101 Fr ankfort A ve., 895-832 3. A friendly and casual neighborhood gathering spot. Off erings include soups, snacks, coffee drinks and bagels made on the premises to its own rather idiosyncratic formula. $ f NORD’S BROWN BAG PUB & DELI 2100 S. Preston St., 635-6747. This simple little neighborhood spot near the University of Louisville may not be much for atmosphere, but well-fashioned if simple diner fare vaults it into the realm of serious destinations for har d-core “f oodies,” with e xtra cr edit f or friendly, welcoming service. $ OLLIE’S TROLLEY 978 S. Third St., 583-5214. A little piece of f ast-food his tory r emains on an urban street c orner in Old L ouisville. It ’s one of the nation’s f ew surviving tr olleys of the L ouisvillebased chain that spr ead across the nation in the ‘70s. Ov ersize bur gers with a spicy , homemade flavor are just as good as ever. $ ORDERS UP CAFÉ & DELI 1981 Nelson Miller Pkwy., 245-5991. Quick and casual, Or ders Up offers the inviting atmosphere of dr opping in t o someone’s home f or lunch. Soups salads and fr eshly made

HONEYBAKED CAFÉ 4600 Shelb yville Rd., 8956001, 6423 Bardstown Rd., 239-9292, 757 Lewis & Clark Pkwy., Clarksville IN, 284-1799. $ HOTDOG HEAVEN 209 E. Main St., 222-2626. $

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JASON’S DELI 410 N. Hurs tbourne Pkwy., 412-4101. Don’t look f or New York kosher-style deli at this Texas-based chain, but suburbanites are lining up at the ne w Hurs tbourne location f or o versize sandwiches, salads, wraps and more. $ f JERSEY MIKE’S SUBS AND S ALADS 10266 Shelbyville Rd., 2 44-1991, 10519 Fischer P ark Dr ., 42 5-102 5, 9156 T aylorsville Rd., 4 99-9830. Eas t Coast-style sub shop with local faves that includes cheese, ham, pr osciuttini, capic ola, salami, pepperoni and fixings. $ JIMMY JOHN’S SUB SHOP 4000 Shelbyville R oad, 894-3331, 3901 Dutchmans Lane, 894-9393,415 W. Jefferson St., 62 57101. T his Illinois-based sandwich-shop chain off ers a wide selection of standard-issue subs that benefit from fresh quality ingredients. W e’re particularly smitt en with the alternative br ead option, thick -sliced se ven-grain. Try the “Gourmet V eggie Club” f or a v egetarian treat. $ f JUANITA’S BURGER BOY 1450 S. Brook, 635-7410. For a r eal slic e of L ouisville lif e, this w eathered greasy spoon at the corner of Brook and Burnett is the r eal thing. Neighborhood deniz ens drink coffee and cho w do wn on bur gers and br eakfast until the w ee hours (the joint is open 2 4 hours). If Louisville is home to a budding Charles Bukowski, ther e’s a good chanc e he’ s sitting at Juanita’s counter right no w, recovering from last night’s excesses. $ JUST FRESH BAKER Y CAFÉ & MARKET 1255 Bardstown Rd., 451-2 32 4. T he short-liv ed Baja www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 71


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sandwiches ar e unif ormly appetizing, and sandwiches are affordably priced at $5 or les s. $ PANERA BREAD C O. 5000 Shelb yville Rd., 8999992 , 62 2 1 Dut chmans Ln., 895-9991, 601 S. Hurstbourne Ln., 42 3- 7343, 10451 Champion Farms Dr., 42 6-2 134, 3131 Poplar L evel Rd., 6 359164, 1040 V eterans Pk wy., Clarks ville, IN, 2 889400. Warm breads finish-baked on the premises make a tas ty base f or a v ariety of sandwiches. Soups, salads, c offee drinks and a fr ee W iFi hotspot make Panera’s outlets popular gathering places. $ f PAUL’S FRUIT MARKET 3905 Chenoweth Sq., 8968918, 4 946 Br ownsboro Rd., 42 6-5059 , 12 119 Shelbyville Rd., 2 53-00 72 , 3704 Taylorsville Rd., 456-4750. One of L ouisville’s popular sour ces f or produce, cheeses, deli items, and the like. Deli sandwiches and salads are available (takeout only). $ PENN S TATION (14 L ocations). Billed as the Eas t Coast Sub Headquart ers, this sandwich kit chen does a brisk business here in the Louisville area. $ QUIZNO’S SUBS (17 locations ) T oasted br eads, a sandwich selection of meats, v eggies and fish ar e built to fight hunger. Fresh soups are available daily, from chili to chowder; so are salads and desserts. $ SCHLOTZSKY’S DELI 10531 Fischer P ark Dr ., 42 58447, 12915 Shelb yville Rd., 2 44-9069. The original Schlotzsky’s off ered jus t one kind of sandwich— “The Original”— when it opened its firs t eat ery in Austin, Texas, in 1971. Now this national chain vends a full selection of deli-style fare, with one significant improvement on the traditional deli: the servers are invariably polite. $ f SHADY LANE CAFÉ 4806 Brownsboro Center, 8935118. T wo Guys and a Grill is no mor e, but one assumes that the grill r emains on the pr emises of this suburban luncheon spot under its new name $ SOUPY’S 3019 Br eckenridge Ln., 451-532 5, 46 32 S. Hurstbourne Pk wy., 4 99-4404, 4590 Dixie Hwy, 449-2 000, 94 93 W estport Rd, 42 5-2 54 9, 2 9 30 Dr. W illiam W eathers Dr., 774-2 500. In the soup kettles y ou will find such clas sics as chees y potato, bean and ham, br occoli and cheese , chicken and dumplings and mor e. At the cutting board they’ll make you meat, cheese and v eggie sandwiches according to your custom design. $ THE S TARVING ARTIS T CAFÉ & DELI Lagrange Rd., 412-1599. $

8034 Ne w

STEVENS & STEVENS 1114 Bardstown Rd., 584-3354. Sharing space with the popular Ditt o’s, Stevens & Stevens is primarily kno wn f or cat ering and takeout fare. They cook just as w ell if y ou choose to stay in, though, off ering appealing sandwiches and deli fare with a healthy twist. $ STRAWBERRY P ATCH DELI 11616 Shelb yville Rd., 2 54-1440. T his Middlet own deli off ers health y food with a dash of gourmet and a sprinkle of southern. $ SUB STATION II 3101 Fern Valley Rd., 964- 1075. The hardy No . 19 , a six -meat-and-cheese super sub , keeps the store buzzing. An arr ay of sandwiches, salad sides and des serts fill out an appetizing lunch menu. $ THE BODEGA 829 E. Market St., 569-4100. This new entry in the e xciting F elice Plaza eas t of downtown c ombines a small specialty -food market, wine-and-beer shop and deli under one compact r oof. Select fr om Blue Dog br eads, Boar’s Head meats and cheeses and other good things, and the y’ll build y our lunch t o dine in or enjoy on their sunny patio. $ f THEATER SQU ARE DELI 2 2 T heater Squar e, 5840364. T he name has changed (f ormerly Anthony’s), but the mis sion remains pretty much the same: Feed do wntown lunch cr owds quick and affordable deli fare and sandwiches f 72 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

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W.W. C OUSINS RES TAURANT 900 Dupont Rd., 897-9684. T his locally o wned and oper ated eatery looks a lot lik e the national Fuddruck ers chain, but the local bo ys do a bett er job , with huge bur gers on magis terial home-bak ed buns and a Metropolitan Museum of toppings. $ WALL ST. DELI 225 Abraham Flexner Way at Jewish Hospital, 585-4202. Offering New York style with Kentucky flair, this bus y downtown deli will serv e in-house diners or tak e or ders f or deliv eries. Authentic Nathan’s Hot Dogs are a specialty. $ WILD O ATS NA TURAL MARKETPLA CE 4600 Shelbyville Rd., 721-7373. This national natural-food grocery includes a sit-do wn café wher e y ou can order pizzas, sandwiches, or even sushi. $ f

BAKE’S BARBEQUE 542 7 V alley Station Rd., 9 350999. Bak e’s ribs ar e smok ed t o such t ender perfection that the meat slides off the bone . This is four-star barbecue , fully c ompetitive with the region’s best. $$ BOOTLEG BARBECUE COMPANY 9704 Bardstown Rd., 2 39-2 72 2 , 7 508 Pr eston Hw y., 968-565 7. Bootleg Barbecue off ers a t ouch of rus ticity and a good helping of c ountry hospitality, as it dishes out hearty portions of w ell pr epared and affordable smok ed meats and fixin’ s. It ’s one of the f ew plac es in L ouisville wher e y ou can get Western Kentucky-style mutton barbecue. $ f BOURBON BROS. BBQ 2900 Brownsboro Rd., 8962 486. Bourbon Bros. BBQ pr epares w ell-crafted smoked meats including pork ribs that, on their best da ys, appr oach c ompetition quality . An added plus for interesting sauces including at least one that ’s amply dosed with the eat ery’s namesake booze. $ f BRANDON’S BAR-B-QUE 9246 Westport Rd., 4266666, 10 301 T aylorsville Rd., 2 6 1-0650, 7 117 Shelbyville Rd., 7 2 2 -0616. F eaturing hick orysmoked T ennessee-style barbecue sandwiches and filling, aff ordable dinners, this long-time Eas t End f avorite has added tw o more neighborhood locations. $ CLARK BOY BAR-B-Q 672 8 Johnsont own Rd., 9 335577. If it’s a little off the beaten path, there’s nothing the matter with that. Clark Bo y’s reasonably priced Western K entucky-style barbecue is w ell w orth a special trip . Lik e man y mom ’n’ pop eat eries, it accepts cash only, no plastic. $ FAMOUS D AVE’S BAR-B-QUE 8605 Citadel W ay, 493-2 812 , 1360 V eterans Pk wy., Clarks ville, IN, 282-3283. This franchise chain oper ation may be based in the twin cities, but it looks like a Georgia gas station with its e xuberant, if tongue-in-cheek faux country decor. The important thing, though, is the f ood, and Da ve’s e xcels with genuine , hickory-smoked barbecue. $$ p f FINLEY’S HICK ORY SMOKED BAR-B-Q 1500 W . Broadway, 581-0298. Rib tips are the specialty but you’ll find turk ey legs, ham, half-chick ens, pork chops and shr edded beef and pork —all f or dinners or sandwiches, and barbecued pig’ s feet for the BBQ purists. $ f FIRE FRESH BBQ 6435 Bardstown Rd., 2 39- 7800, 3065 Breckinridge Ln., 459-5201, 808 Lyndon Ln., 32 7-6304, 2 11 S. Fifth St., 5401171, 86 10 Dixie Hwy., 995- 7585, 12 2 16 Shelb yville Rd., 2 45-2 2 73. Fire fighters, it is said, eat heartily and well. It’s no coincidence, then, that Fir eFresh Bar B Q pa ys homage to local fire departments in its restaurant’s decor. T he barbecue and c ountry fixin’ s s tand comparison to the best firehouse cuisine. $ f JIMBO’S BBQ 801 Kenwood Dr., 375-1888. This South End barbecue shack, an outpost of a popular spot in C orydon, IN, off ers a fine r ange of barbecue

meats skillfully smok ed on the pr emises, with sauce served on the side as it should be . $ JUCY’S SMOKEHOUSE BAR-B-QUE 7626 Lagrange Rd., 2 41-582 9. Jucy’ s off ers e xceptionally good Texas-style barbecue fr om a little w ooden shack that looks jus t lik e a c ountry BBQ joint should. Highly recommended. $$ f MARCUS’ RIBS B Y THE SLAB 701 Algonquin Pk wy., 637-5333. Long-known as Cleon’ s Rib Shack, this West End f avorite’s ne w name r eflects ne w ownership, but w e’re hearing that one important thing hasn’t changed: It ’s s till a fine plac e t o get manly spare ribs and soulful sides, inner-city style. $ MARK’S FEED S TORE 1142 2 Shelb yville Rd., 2 440140, 1514 Bar dstown Rd., 458- 1570, 10 316 Dixie Hwy., 933-7707, 513 E. IN Hw y. 131, Clarks ville, IN, 285-1998. Named for its first restaurant’s location in a f ormer f eed s tore with that do wn-home country f eel, Mark’ s impr esses with high-quality hickory-smoked pork and chicken, and rich, silken South Car olina barbecue sauc e, the y ellow mustard-based variety. $$ f OLE HICKORY PIT BAR-B-QUE 6106 Shepherdsville Rd., 968-0585. Located in an attractive house not far fr om Gener al Electric ’s Applianc e P ark, this Louisville relative of a f amous Western Kentucky barbecue pit is well worth the trip. $ PEPPER SHAKER CHILI & BAR-B-Q 4912 Pr eston Hwy., 964- 3011. A squadr on of hea vy black -iron smokers burn thr ough c ords of hick ory t o turn out some of the t own’s best barbecue at a pric e that’s right. $ p PICNICATERS BBQ & CATERING 514 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., 584-7427. Located across from Louisville Gardens, this place puts the hot sauce, wings and chops right in the middle of a hungry busines s district. $ f PIG CITY BBQ 12 003 Shelb yville Rd., 2 44-3535. Down-home and hones t, the name of this ne w barbecue eatery in a Middletown shopping center pretty much sa ys it all. Smok e ’em if y ou’ve got ’em—and they do with all cherry w ood. $$ f PIT S TOP BAR-B-QUE 612 S. Fifth St., 584-4054. Genuine T exas barbecue , dry and t ender meat, red-rimmed and savory from hours in the smoker, is the style served here. March up to the window, place your order, bus your own plate. No muss, no fuss, and it is very good. $ f RITE W AY BAR-B-CUE HOUSE 1548 W . St. Catherine St., 584-9 385. Barbecue meis ter Kalvin Brown pr esides at this long-s tanding W est End favorite, kno wn f or its ribs and Southern-s tyle smoked meats since the end of World War II. $ f RUBBIE’S BAR-B-QUE & BREW 6905 Southside Dr., 367-0007. T his South End f amily kno ws ho w t o do BBQ. It ma y be off the beat en path f or some folks but here you’ll find the bounty of secret BBQ recipes. $ p f e SCOTTY’S RIBS AND MORE 14049 Shelbyville Rd., 2 44-6868. Ribs, pork, chick en a la cart e and dinners. The small East End venue moves a lot of pizzas and salads as well. $$ p SMOKEY BONES BBQ 2525 Hurstbourne Gem Ln., 491-7570. A pr operty of Orlando’ s Dar den f astfood chain, which also runs Oliv e G arden, R ed Lobster and Bahama Br eeze, this nois y St ony Brook-area eat ery c onveys mor e of a sports-bar than barbecue concept, but the ribs are fine. $$ p TONY ROMA’S 150 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 327-8500. From the t omato tang t o a smok y Blue Ridge savor, R oma’s adv ertises its ribs as the bes t dressed in t own. Burgers, chicken and s teaks are available as w ell, but w e r ecommend the r acks and baby backs of pork and beef . $$$ p VINCE S TATEN’S OLD TIME BARBEQUE 13306 W. US 42 , 2 2 8-742 7. A uthor V ince Stat en, who


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literally wr ote the book on barbecue (Real Barbecue), has moved on, but his name r emains on this neighborhood joint out the r oad in Oldham County. $

19TH GREEN PUB & GRILL 1740 W illiamsburg Dr., Jeffersonville IN, (812) 284-9088. $ p f BEEF O’BRAD Y’S 2 39 Blank enbaker Pk wy., 2 542 32 2 , 562 8 Bar dstown Rd., 2 39-2 2 2 6, 10000 Brownsboro Rd., 32 7-8881, 3101 S. Sec ond St., 637-3737, 105 LaF ollette, 9 2 3-1316. If y ou think your basic sports pub is only suitable f or guy s guzzling beer, tak e another look: Beef O’Br ady’s puts the “family” in “family sports pub,” offering a wholesome environment. $ BENTLEY’S SPORT S BAR & GRILLE 2 800 Crums Ln., 778-8886. The familiar range of bar and grill fare and libations will mak e the neighbors feel at home in this new West End watering hole. $ p BIG D AVE’S OUTPOS T 1801 Bar dstown Rd., 4599142. This casual, laid-back neighborhood saloon is a popular gathering plac e f or its Highlands neighbors, earning fans for libations, comfort and food that’s a notch above mere pub grub. $ p f e BLUE MULE SPORT S CAFÉ 10301 Taylorsville Rd., 240-0051. Longtime buddies John O’C onnor and Jim “Mule” Riley talked for years about opening a restaurant and sports bar . Riley died bef ore their dream came true . But no w O’C onnor pr oudly presides o ver this 90-seat casual Jeff ersontown eatery and watering hole, and he has named it in affectionate memory of his friend “Mule .” $ p e BROWNIE’S “THE SHED” GRILLE & BAR 237 Whittington Pk wy., 32 6-9830 . Restaurant o wner and namesak e K eith Br own used t o hos t neighborhood gatherings in a shed at his home . Now he brings the same sociable c oncept to his pub and eatery. Louisville’s official home for Cincy Bengals fans, Brownie’s may be the closes t thing Hurstbourne has to a Germantown neighborhood saloon. $ p BUFFALO WILD WINGS (BW-3’S) 6801 Dixie Hwy., 935-1997, 3900 Shelb yville Rd., 899- 7732 , 9134 Taylorsville Rd., 499-2356, 3584 Springhurst Blvd., 394-9596, 12 901 Shelb yville Rd., 2 54-9464, 1055 Bardstown Rd., 454- 3635. As much a sports bar as a restaurant, this national franchise chain offers tasty snack -type f are, including the chain’ s trademark Buffalo chicken wings. $$ p f CHAMPIONS SPORT S RES TAURANT 2 80 W . Jefferson St. (L ouisville Marriott), 6 71-42 46. Another popular option at the s triking ne w downtown Marriott, Champions pr ovides a fun, casual dining alt ernative with a K entucky sports theme—and a gallery of big-scr een televisions to keep the sports action flo wing as fr eely as the libations and upscale pub grub . $$ p f CHATTER’S BAR & GRILL Pkwy., 961-9700. $$ p f

2 745 S. Hurs tbourne

DELTA RESTAURANT 434 W. Market St., 584-0860. It’s not quit e as his toric as Gideon Shry ock’s Jefferson C ounty C ourthouse around the c orner, but this popular bar and short-or der spot seems as if it has been a hangout f or la wyers and the courthouse crowd for just about as long as there’s been a Courthouse. $ p

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FLABBY’S SCHNITZELBURG 1101 Lydia St., 637-9136. Family-owned sinc e 195 2 , Flabb y’s is a quintessential Germantown saloon. It’s also one of the city’ s t op des tinations f or ine xpensive do wnhome eats, fr om authentic German dishes t o fantastic fried chicken on weekends. $ FLANAGAN’S ALE HOUSE 934 Baxt er A ve., 5853700. Gourmet pizzas, hoagies, and an enormous beer selection dr aw Highlands f olks t o this c ozy neighborhood pub . F or a lat e night pizza (the kitchen’s open until 2 a.m.), it ’s one of the bes t options in the city. $$ p FOUR KINGS CAFÉ 4642 Jennings Ln., 968-2 9 30. Steam-table servic e f eaturing spaghetti and meatballs, lasagna and chick en attr act a hungry lunch cr owd at this casual spot, and brunch specialties are just as popular. $ p FOX & HOUND 302 Bullitt Ln., 394-7620. A “British pub” c oncept oper ated b y a W ichita, K ansasbased chain, F ox & Hound’ s fr ee-standing property near Oxmoor C enter f eatures a “midcasual” menu with bur gers, pizza, chick en and pot r oast, in a lar ge v enue with plenty billiar ds tables and an ample supply of lar ge-screen televisions. $$ p f GERSTLE’S PLACE 3801 Frankfort Ave., 899-3609. A popular St. Matthe ws neighborhood ta vern since 1924. Although dining is secondary to booze and sports here, the food goes well beyond mere pub grub. $ p e GRANVILLE INN 1601 S. T hird St., 6 35-6475. A longtime gathering plac e f or U of L s tudents, faculty and f ans, this s turdy r edbrick ta vern jus t north of the univ ersity campus off ers a good variety of bar munchies, sandwiches and simple grilled f are plus pizza. It ’s perhaps bes t kno wn, though, for the signature Granville Burger, widely reputed as one of the bes t burgers in town. $ GREAT AMERICAN GRILL 2 735 Critt enden Dr . (Hilton), 6 37-2 42 4. L ocated in the L ouisville International Airport Hilt on. Salads, bur gers, pastas and sandwiches ar e a vailable f or the casual diner; main entrées include New York strip, filet of salmon and more. $ p f HITCHING POS T INN 7314 F egenbush Ln., 2 394724. In addition t o its full bar and beer gar den, and liv ely c onversation, the Hit ching Pos t Inn offers an arr ay of pub grub , including bur gers, chicken tenders, and sandwiches. $ p HOOPS GRILL AND SPORTS BAR 6733 Strawberry Ln., 375-4667. The name says it all: sports, casual dining and good things t o drink all find their natural meeting plac e at this friendly neighborhood spot wher e hot wings and hoops reign supreme. $ p f JAKE’S & MR. G’S 10432 Shelbyville Rd., 244-0165 $

p

JERSEY’S CAFÉ 1515 Lynch Ln., Clarks ville, IN, 2 882 100. Quality , aff ordable f are that goes w ell beyond pub grub t o include an a wesome smokehouse burger and barbecued ribs so tender, they say, that you can just tap the end of the bone on your plate, and the meat falls off. $ p e JIMMY AND RICHIE’S 813 Lyndon Ln., 423-7774. $$ p f JP’S PUB & GRUB 5610 Outer Loop, 966-8223. $ p f

DIAMOND PUB & BILLIARD S 3814 Fr ankfort Ave., 895-7513. $ p f

THE LIGHTHOUSE 2 02 Main St., Jeff ersonville, IN, 2 83-0077. T his lighthouse has been a beac on of casual, home c ooking and ta vern en vironment f or years. Daily specials, appetiz ers, chick en and fish baskets, salads and desserts round out the menu. $

DUTCH’S TAVERN 3922 Shelbyville Rd., 895-9004. Do y ou lik e guitars with y our grub ? A popular half-way-home hangout f or decades in the heart of St. Matthe ws, this no-frills but all charm pub serves up a hardy plate lunch by day and amps up the action with music by night. $ p e

MACVITTIE’S 106 Sears Ave., 895-2599. An intriguing range of casual, homemade vittles, er , vitties that range from German Jaeger Schnitz el to beef s tew in a bread-loaf “bowl” highlight the bill of fare at this friendly, locally o wned St. Matthe ws spot that f or many years was home to Asiatique. $ p www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 73


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MICHAEL MURPHY’S RES TAURANT 701 S. Firs t St., 587-0013. This full servic e restaurant and bar has accommodated hardy thirs ts and appetit es f or a couple of gener ations. Despit e the Irish appeal, the food is American and lots of it. $ p NEW DIRECTION BAR & GRILL Ln., 243-8429. $ p e

2 630 Chamberlain

P. NUT S SPORT S BAR & GRILL 1506 Lak eshore Ct., 412 -1700. T his ne w w atering hole in Plain view boasts a friendly suburban pub atmospher e, offering bar and grill food with a sports-bar theme. Check out its Club Oasis for a full array of cocktails and a 2 0-it em beer lis t, and enjo y dining on the oversize deck with r oom f or 140 o verlooking Plainview’s small lake. $ p f e SADDLE RIDGE S ALOON Fourth Str eet Liv e, 56 93507. $ p f e SAINT’S 131 Breckinridge Ln., 891-8883. Almos t like two r estaurants in one , Saints f eatures both a small, intimat e, candle-light ed r oom and a lar ger, happily bois terous main r oom with the look and feel of a sports bar. Saints is mostly about the bars and the music, but don’t o verlook its casual f are, from salads to pasta and excellent pizzas. $$ p e

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SPORTS PAGE GRILL 3701 Hopewell Rd., 263-7130 $ p e STEINERT’S GRILL & PUB 2 2 39 Charles town Rd., New Albany IN, 945-8827. This is a cross between an old f ashioned neighborhood ta vern (with an aged and cozy ambience) and a trendy sports bar. Hearty burgers, rich soups, salads, and a full bar make this a hidden gem. $ p e SULLY’S SALOON Fourth Street Live, 585-4100. $$ p f TAILGATERS SPORT S BAR & GRILL 2 787 S. Flo yd St., 6 37-52 41. Billed as a pr emier des tination f or good food and lots of fun, this casual spot ne xt to Papa John’ s Stadium f eatures clas sic American favorites and seaf ood specialties, plus a full bar , TVs and an expansive game room. $ p f e THE BA CK DOOR 2 787 S. Flo yd St., 6 37-52 41. Longtime o wners John Dant and Mik e E wing ar e known for running one of the city’s friendliest pubs at this Mid-City Mall saloon. Limit ed bar f are, but don’t miss the chicken wings. $ p f VIC’S CAFÉ E. Market St., New Albany, IN, 944-4338. $ WINGS N THINGS 2809 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 327-9464. $ WOODFORD RESER VE BAR & GRILLE Louisville International Airport, 363-2526. Named after local

distiller Br own-Forman’s artisanal br and of Bourbon, this is the airport ’s fine-dining f acility, serving K entucky-style dishes in a sit-do wn environment. $ WOODY’S PUB & GRILL 12 2 05 Westport Rd., 32 78002 . F ormer home of a Hoops pub , W oody’s carries on the sports bar c oncept in this East End venue near the Ford Kentucky Truck plant. $ p f ZAZOO’S 102 Bauer Ave., 894-8030. If you’re looking for casual dining, ZaZ oo’s offers a mighty appealing option with its laid-back and w elcoming neighborhood bar feeling. The fare is simple but well prepared, and goes a bit beyond pub grub. $ p f e

BLUEGRASS BREWING COMPANY 3929 Shelbyville Rd., 899- 7070, 6 36 E. Main St., 584-2 739, 2 Theater Squar e, 568-2 2 2 4. A mus t-stop destination f or beer lo vers on the national artisanal-brew tr ail, but it ’s mor e than jus t a brewpub. BBC’ s management giv es equally serious att ention t o both liquid and solid f are, making this a gr eat plac e t o s top in f or both dinner and a beer. $ p f e BROWNING’S BREWERY 401 E. Main St. (Slugger Field), 515-017 4. Making beautiful use of the historic r ed-brick building that houses Slugger Field, Browning’s offers brewpub beers plus Chef Anoosh Shariat’s fare that r anges from pub grub to fancier cuisine. $$ p f e CUMBERLAND BREW S 1576 Bar dstown Rd., 45887 2 7. Giving ne w meaning t o the t erm “microbrewery,” Cumberland Brews may be one of the smalles t eateries in t own. It ’s usually pack ed, earning its cr owds the old-f ashioned w ay b y providing v ery good f ood, friendly servic e, and high-quality hand-crafted artisan beers. $ f e RICH O’S PUBLIC HOUSE 3312 Plaza Dr., New Albany, IN, 94 9-2 804. Dec ent pizza and pub grub mak e Rich O’ s a popular hangout, and his r emarkable beer list of mor e than 100 selections fr om around the w orld—and locally br ewed cr aft beers— attracts beer lovers from all over. $ e

CHEZ SENEBA AFRICAN RESTAURANT 1215 Gilmore Ln., 968-865 9. Add yet another int eresting ethnic cuisine t o L ouisville’s incr easingly int ernational dining sc ene. Friendly f olks serv e gener ous portions of filling, spicy Senegalese cuisine fr om West Africa in this tiny (three-table) eatery. $ QUEEN OF SHEBA ETHIOPIAN 3315 Bardstown Rd., 459-6301. T he r egion’s only fully authentic Ethiopian restaurant, offering a wide selection of intriguing Ethiopian dishes, including a v ariety of vegetarian selections as well as the traditional beef and chicken specialities. Ethiopian fare is made for sharing and eating with the fingers, but the y’ll gladly make forks available for the finicky. $

#1 A SIAN BUFFET 12 50 Bar dstown Rd., 451-60 33. Not jus t another in the her d of all- you-can-eat Chinese buffets, this recent entry in the Mid-City Mall seats 350, boasts a private party room, and, says o wner St even Y uan, is the firs t betw eenthe-coasts outpos t of the original #1 buff et in NYC. $$ A TASTE OF CHINA 1167 S. Fourth St., 585-5582. $ ASIAN BUFFET 3813 Charlestown Rd., Ne w Albany IN, 945-1888, 1305 V eterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 2 85-8888, 3646 Mall Rd., 4 79-9989. C ompetent cookery and car eful management that ensur es buffet off erings s tay fr esh and hot mak es these

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buffets a good choic e among the growing crowd of all-you-can-eat Asian spots. $ p AUGUST MOON 2 2 69 L exington Rd., 456-656 9. August Moon’ s secr et ingr edient is the culinary oversight of Chef Peng L ooi, better known as the force behind Asiatique. Housed in a soaring, open space with a Z en mas ter’s s tyle. C onsistent commitment in the kit chen and fr om the s taff makes it a t op spot f or Asian f are. A lo vely patio at the r ear aff ords an alfr esco dining e xperience overlooking shady Beargrass Creek. $$$ p f BAMBOO HOUSE 4036 Poplar L evel Rd., 451- 3113. An old-timer among local Chinese restaurants, this Southeastern L ouisville spot ma y not off er the trendiest Asian f are, but it ’s a r eliable sour ce f or the familiar Cantonese-American standards. $ CHINA 1 123 Breckinridge Ln., 897-6511. $

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EGGROLL MACHINE 1216 Bardstown Rd., 459-1259. A Highlands s taple for good r eason. This portion of the Mimosa Café does a brisk busines s. T he Sesame Chicken is one of our f avorites. $$ p EMPEROR OF CHINA 2210 Holiday Manor Shopping Center, 42 6- 1717. One of L ouisville’s f anciest and most not eworthy Chinese r estaurants, the Emperor’s quart ers ar e s tylishly s trewn acr oss multiple le vels of a f ormer suburban mo vie theater. Outstanding. $$ p EMPRESS OF CHINA 2249 Hikes Ln., 451-2500. Older sister to The Emperor of China, the Empr ess was one of L ouisville’s firs t serious, authentic upscale Cantonese restaurants, and its f are still stands up to fancy spots in New York’s Chinatown. $$ p FIRST WOK 3967 Seventh St. Rd., 448-0588. $ GOLDEN BUDDHA 8000 Preston Hwy., 968-7700. $

CHINA BUFFET 706 E. Hwy 131, Clarksville, IN, 2888989. Chinese buffets are ubiquitous, but this one is squarely in the upper range. Regularly refreshed steam tables, att entively fried ric e, and pr operly spicy General Tso’s Chicken raise it above the runof-the-mill places typical of the genre. $ CHINA CASTLE 367-4272, 7420 Third Street Rd. $

GOLDEN PALACE BUFFET 161 Outer Loop, 368-2868. $ GOLDEN S TAR CHINESE RES TAURANT 368-1833, 3458 Taylor Blvd. $ GOLDEN WALL 3201 Fern Valley Rd., 968-9717. $ GREAT WALL 2206 Brownsboro Rd., 891-8881. T his Clifton r estaurant r anks high up in the f ast-food

Chinese pack. Offering steaming-hot, competently prepared and flavorful dishes. $ GREAT W OK 2 502 Pr eston Hw y., 6 34-1918. Jus t about every shopping c enter in t own has a f astfood Chinese spot, but this one s tands out, generating a buzz of w ord-of-mouth publicity about its well-crafted Chinese dishes at a bargainbasement price. $ HAPPY DRA GON 2 600 W . Br oadway, 77 8-2 573. Catering to office and r esidential customers, this Chinese r estaurant has serv ed the W est Broadway community for many years. $ f HONG K ONG CHINESE RES TAURANT 345 Ne w Albany Plaza, New Albany, IN., 945-1818. $ HONG K ONG F AST FOOD 5312 S. T hird St., 36 7882 8. One of the man y int ernational eat eries in Iroquois Manor, this fast-food Chinese spot offers Cantonese s tandards hot and f ast and inexpensively. Check the daily specials f or an occasional intriguing item. $ HUNAN WOK 231-0393, 6445 Bardstown Rd. $ I CHING A SIAN CAFÉ 4600 Shelb yville Rd., 89 37171. A popular Lexington eatery adds a Louisville property with the arriv al of this St. Matthe ws

CHINA CITY BUFFET 423-1788, 9228 Westport Rd. $ CHINA GARDEN 7309 Pr eston Hw y., 968-46 72 . A busy r estaurant with the double pleasur e of Chinese and American menu it ems. $ CHINA INN 1925 S. Fourth St., 636-2020. It’s not the posh, private Faculty Club, but this little Asian spot may be one of the mos t popular eat eries around the University of L ouisville’s Belknap Campus. It ’s generally packed with s tudents, professors, and a squadron of campus polic e so lar ge that one wonders who’s watching the campus. $ CHINA KING 3830 Ruckriegel Pkwy., 240-0500. $ CHINA SEA BUFFET 0838. $

12 689 Shelb yville Rd., 2

45-

CHINESE CHEF 2619 S. Fourth St., 634-0979. $ CHINESE EXPRESS 3228 Crums Ln., 448-1360. $ CHONG GARDEN 10341 Dixie Hwy., 935-1628. $ CHOPSTICKS 416 E. Broadway, 589-9145. $ CHOPSTICKS HOUSE 2112 W. Broadway, 772-3231. $ CHUNG KING CHINESE AMERICAN RES TAURANT 110 E. Market St., 584-8880. $ CITY WOK 526 W. Main St., 583-7238. $ CRYSTAL CHINESE 3901 W. Market St., 776-9702. $ DOUBLE DRA GON 12 55 Gos s A ve., 6 35-5656, 318 Wallace Ave., 894-888 7. A s tandout among f astfood shopping-c enter Chinese eat eries, Double Dragon hits on all cylinders, turning out consistently well-prepared and flavorful fare. $ DOUBLE DRAGON II 12480 LaGrange Rd., 241-7766, 9901 LaGr ange Rd., 32 6-0099 , 6832 Bar dstown Rd., 231-3973, 3179 S. Second St., 367-6668. $ DOUBLE DRAGON 8 231 S. Fifth St., 58 7-8686. $ DOUBLE DRAGON 9 9501 Taylorsville Rd., 267-5353. $ DOUBLE DRAGON BUFFET 2 33 Whittington Pkwy., 339-8897. A sizable buff et in a chic Eas t End shopping s trip, off ers a good r ange of Chinese treats on its all- you-can-eat buffet. The fare seems prepared with attention and care. $ DRAGON GARDEN 2120 Bardstown Rd., 459-3311. $ DYNASTY BUFFET 2 400 Lime Kiln Ln., 339-8868. The c ontinuing pr oliferation of look alik e, tas te alike, all-you-can-eat Chinese buffets never fails to amaze me. But I’m happ y to report that Dynas ty Buffet ranks well above the median. $$ EASTERN HOUSE 5372 Dixie Hw y., 568-2 688. Serving Chinese and American f ood fr om the menu or the buffet. $

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dining room, which bears a close r esemblance to Oxmoor’s Yang Kee Noodle with its upscale f astfood pr esentation of quick dishes fr om all o ver Asia. $ f JADE GARDEN BUFFET 1971 Brownsboro Rd., 893082 2 . Y et another lar ge, shin y all- you-can-eat Chinese buffet, this entry c onverts the spac e last occupied by Babylon into a temple of Asian eats, featuring mos tly Chinese dishes with a f ew American-style items and sushi rolls. $ JADE PALACE 1109 Herr Ln., 42 5-98 78. When I’v e got a hank ering f or brunch, I choose Chinese . Jade Palace is a decent place for Chinese food at any time , but don’t mis s it at mid-da y Frida y through Monday, when it off ers the metr o area’s only dim sum (Chinese brunch) menu. $$ p JASMINE 1382 3 English V illa Dr ., 2 44-8896. A charming Asian eat ery, wher e y ou can enjo y familiar Chinese-American plates or indulge y our more adv enturous side with a selection of mor e unusual authentic dishes fr om the “Chinese Menu,” available on request. $ f JUMBO BUFFET 2 731 S. Hurs tbourne Pk wy., 4 950028. Housed in a good-looking dining room, high on Chinatown-style glitz and glitt er, Jumbo off ers a s tandard all- you-can-eat Chinese buff et, with a larger-than-average selection of American dishes for those who want something less exotic. $$

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PANDA CHINESE RES TAURANT 9543 US 42., 2286400. $ QUICK WOK 801 W. Broadway, 584-6519. $ RED SUN CHINESE RES TAURANT 499-7788, 3437 Breckinridge Ln. $ ROYAL GARDEN 5717 Preston Hwy., 969-3788, 6801 Dixie Hw y., 9 37-042 8, 5316 Bar dstown Rd., 4 918228. $ SESAME CHINESE RES TAURANT 9409 Shelbyville Rd., 339-7000. Not jus t another shopping-c enter Chinese r estaurant, this Eas t End eat ery has provided some of the bes t fine-dining Chinese meals I’ve enjoyed in Louisville. $$ p

ICHIBAN S AMURAI 1510 Lak e Shor e Ct., 4 12 -3339. This lar ge Japanese-f armhouse building housed Benihana f or man y y ears. Ne w management offers similar delights, with the tr aditional slic eand-dice f ood sho w and good sushi. Bes t deal, while the off er lasts: All-you-can-eat sushi nightly until the karaoke starts at 9 p.m. $$$ p

SHAH’S MONGOLIAN GRILL Stonybrook Shopping Center, 4 93-02 34. T hirteenth C entury Mongol warriors used t o turn their s teel shields t o use as frying pans over the campfire, using their swords as spoons. Sahn”s carries their spirit f orward. This allyou-can-eat buffet is fun, and the food is fine. $$ p

KANSAI J APANESE S TEAKHOUSE 1370 V eterans Pkwy., Clarks ville, IN, 2 18-9 2 38. T raditional Japanese dishes and sushi ar e available here, but like most Japanese St eakhouses, choose the grill tables with their slic e-and-dice Japanese chef show for maximum entertainment. $$$ p

SHANGHAI RESTAURANT 526 S. Fifth St. 568-8833. $

KIMIS A SIAN BIS TRO 1915 Blank enbaker Pk wy., 2 36-1915. R estaurateur John Chung is amiable host at this ne w Eas t End v enture, an upscale Asian bistro that blends tr aditional Japanese fare with Chinese and K orean fla vors, including such Pacific Rim dishes as sushi, Chilean sea bas s with sweet mango and t orched salmon in par chment paper. $$ p

SICHUAN GARDEN 9850 Linn Station Rd., 42 66767. One of m y f avorite Chinese r estaurants in Louisville and another that has s tood the t est of time, Sichuan G arden offers high-end Chinat own style and w ell-made dishes, plus a f ew T hai specialties to spice up the bill of f are. $ TASTY BUFFET 394-9998, 11300 Chamberlain Ln. $

KING BUFFET 1801 Priority Way, 266-8886. Another in the gr owing niche of glitzy Chinese chr omeand-plastic buffets, King Buff et offers a s tandard selection of all-you-can-eat dishes. $

WOK EXPRES S 2 34 W. Br oadway, 583-8988. T his corner spot has housed a v ariety of r estaurants over the years. The latest tenant isn’t the fanciest, but it might be one of the mos t affordable. $

KING WOK 291 N. Hubbards Ln., 899-7188. Another of the city’s many tiny shopping-center fast-food Chinese eateries, King W ok offers all the f amiliar standards plus a small lunch buff et. $

WONTON EXPRES S 3000 Hik es Ln., 45 2 -2 646. Traditional Chinese f are. F amily-owned-andoperated, this popular neighborhood es tablishment has enjo yed a s teady patr onage f or seventeen years. $

LIANG’S CAFÉ 3571 Springhurs t Blv d., 42 5-0188. Genial host Roland Wong keeps Liang’s in the top tier of local Chinese dining r ooms with both authentic Chinese cuisine and fine ChineseAmerican dishes in this airy, stylish dining room. $ LING LING 10476 Shelbyville Rd., 245-2100. Modern and efficient in its Eas t End shopping c enter location, Ling Ling is a cut abo ve f ast-food Chinese; bett er y et, it adds a f ew V ietnamese dishes to the bill of f are. $ LIU’S GARDEN 11517 Shelb yville Rd., 2 44-9898. Small but charming, with whit e tablecloths and soft Chinese music, f amily-run Liu’ s gains our approval with fr esh, c ompetent c ookery and courteous, friendly service that makes you feel like you’re visiting a Chinese family at their home. $$ LUCKY HOUSE BUFFET 4030 Taylorsville Rd., 4591188. A fr esh idea on Asian dining, this gener ous buffet serves the menu classics from China as well as some Japanese and American entrées. $$ MANCHU W OK 7900 Shelb yville Rd. ( Oxmoor Shopping Center), 429-8207. $

YANG KEE NOODLE 7900 Shelbyville Rd. (Oxmoor Center), 42 6-0800 . T his locally o wned and operated Oxmoor spot is c olorful and s tylish. It offers an intriguing arr ay of appealing noodle and rice dishes fr om all o ver Asia with f ast-food efficiency and pric es happily mat ched b y sitdown restaurant quality and style. $ f YEN CHING 1818 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 491-3581. $ YOU-CARRYOUT-A 1551 E. Tenth St., Jeff ersonville, IN, 2 88-8313, 82 7 Eas tern Blv d., Clarks ville, IN, 282-8881, 3308 Plaza Dr., 944-9866. $ YUMMY CHINESE RES TAURANT Preston Hwy. $

968-7450, 8605

SARI S ARI FILIPINO CUISINE 2 339 Fr ankfort Ave., 894-0585. The city’s sole Filipino eat ery offers a tasty intr oduction t o the Mala yo-Polynesian f are of this Southeas t Asian island nation. Filipino dishes are affordable during the dinner hour and downright cheap on the lunch buff et. $

NEW CHINA 231 Blankenbaker Pkwy., 254-9299. $ ONION RESTAURANT TEA HOUSE 4211 Charlestown Rd., Ne w Alban y, IN, 981-0188. Mas terful Chinese and Japanese cuisine (including magnific ent hotpots, donburi dishes, and w ooden-bucket steamed rice) set this airy restaurant apart from the horde of other Asian spots. $$ ORIENTAL HOUSE 4302 Shelb yville Rd., 89 7-1017. One of the oldes t continuously operated Chinese restaurants in Louisville, this St. Matthews landmark moves up a not ch under ne w o wners, f eaturing both tr aditional Chinese- American and no w, authentic Cantonese. $ p ORIENTAL STAR 4212 Bishop Ln., 452-9898. A longtime area favorite in this hea vy traffic lunch ar ea. This es tablishment is quit e good with L o Mein Noodles, and Sweet and Sour Chicken. $ 76 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

FUJI J APANESE S TEAKHOUSE 3576 Springhurs t Blvd., 339-1978, 12 905 Shelb yville Rd., 2 53-00 36. Part of the fun of sitting at the sushi bar is that you get t o w atch the chef at w ork. P ut in y our order, then sit back, sip y our t ea while the artis t creates edible delights. T his suburban sushi bar does the job well. $$ p

BENDOYA SUSHI BAR 2 17 S. Fifth St., 581-0 700. Adding int ernational flair t o its do wntown neighborhood, Bendo ya Sushi Bar is a genuine , serious sushi bar in a s torefront jus t acr oss the street from the courthouse. $ CAVIAR J APANESE RES TAURANT 416 W . Muhammad Ali Blv d., 62 5- 3090. (See lis ting under Upscale Casual) EDOYA JAPANESE RESTAURANT 15206 Shelbyville Rd., 2 53-9 312 . T he lo vely old f armhouse out pas t Middletown that was home to such admirable past tenants as Lanai and Trattoria Mattei is now home to a r estaurant again, off ering upscale sushi, authentic wasyoku-style Japanese dining and, on weekends, hibachi-grilled fare. $$$

KOBE S TEAK HOUSE 301 S. Indiana A ve., Jeffersonville IN, 2 80-8500 . Southern Indiana’ s first serious Japanese r estaurant is dr awing crowds with its e xceptional sushi bar, with skilled and friendly chefs who can be relied on to fashion fresh and tasty bites that are just about certain to please. $$$ p MAIDO ESSENTIAL JAPANESE 1758 Frankfort Ave., 894-8775. Not jus t another sushi bar , c ool and stylish Maido is L ouisville’s firs t and only “izakaya”-style r estaurant in the s tyle of K ansai, the r egion surr ounding Japan’ s sec ond city , Osaka. It’s also a sake bar, pouring a good variety of artisanal rice wine. $$ f OSAKA SUSHI BAR 2039 Frankfort Ave., 894-9501. This bright and cheery Japanese r estaurant and sushi bar is named after Japan’s second largest city. Local sushi aficionados sa y it ’s los t a s tep sinc e the departure of founding chef James Lae, but it’s still a decent neighborhood Japanese spot. $$ RAW SUSHI L OUNGE 52 0 S. F ourth St., 585-5880 . Raw mak es good use of hip quart ers in a glitzy renovation of the old Marmaduke Building (next to the Seelbach). Diners ma y choose fr om a br oad selection of c ompetent sushi and Japanese f air, plus fine int ernational seafood dishes at dinner , in a sophisticated lounge atmosphere. $$$ p f e SAKURA BL UE 4600 Shelb yville Rd., 89 7-3600. Located in elegant, upscale quart ers in a St. Matthews shopping c enter, Sak ura Blue—dir ect descendant of the old, popular Bonsai—r anks among the city’s top sushi bars. $$ SAPPORO J APANESE GRILL & SUSHI 1706 Bardstown Rd., 4 79-5550. T rendy, e ven glitzy , with har d-edged indus trial dec or—and mos t important, e xcellent f ood—Sapporo r anks in m y ratings as the city’ s No . 1 spot f or sushi and Japanese fare. $$$ p SHOGUN J APANESE S TEAK HOUSE 9026 Taylorsville Rd., 4 99-5700, 4 110 Hampt on Lak e Way, 394-0123. Shogun’s decor is attractive, and quality f ood and servic e mak e it a pleasant dining des tination. It ’s unthr eatening enough t o appeal t o those who find e xotic cuisine “challenging,” but good enough t o satisfy jus t about anyone who craves a Japanese dinner or a bite of sushi. $$$ p TOKYO JAPANESE RESTAURANT 2415C Lime Kiln Ln., 339-7171. It’s appealing, pleasant in atmosphere


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and friendly in servic e, and mos t important, this East End sushi bar serv es e xcellent Japanese treats, pr epared with car e and flair fr om highquality, impeccably fresh ingredients. $$

ARIRANG 12 567 Shelb yville Rd., 2 44-9838. F or many y ears a hidden je wel in the Buechel ar ea, this fine K orean r estaurant-plus-sushi-bar reopened r ecently in the f ormer quart ers of Oriental Express in the Middletown area. $ p ASIAN BBQ & CUISINE 12 07 E. Mark et St., Jeffersonville, IN, 218-9858. An odd but s trangely intriguing mix of K orean, Chinese and American sports-bar fare is the ne w draw in this spot near the Jeffboat f actory that w as onc e home t o the original Rocky’s Sub Pub. $ KOREANA II 5009 Preston Hwy., 968-9686. One of the city’ s f ew r estaurants de voted entir ely t o authentic Korean fare, Koreana is w orth a special trip f or this ethnic cuisine that off ers a hearty , spicy alternative to the more familiar Chinese. $$ LEE’S KOREAN RESTAURANT 1941 Bishop Ln., 4569714. T his little spot has been a secr et sinc e the ’70s, and it jus t k eeps on going. W alk int o what looks lik e a diner in an offic e building, but push past the c ounter t o the back r oom, wher e y ou’ll find gener ous heaps of r eally authentic K orean food for next to nothing. $$ PINK DOOR NOODLES & TEA L OUNGE 2222 Dundee Rd., 2 95-2 441. T his ne w spot r einvents the one-time home of Gibb’ s BBQ in an edgy , high-tech Japanese s tyle, c omplete with a liv e video w all. L ook f or light er Asian f are, noodle dishes and sushi, along with a wide variety of teas, sakes and techno-Japanese cocktails. $ p

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Frankfort-based mini-chain, which has r estaurants in K entucky, Tennessee and Indiana. T he “Smile” represents my reaction to its simple but very well prepared T hai f are. Don’t ask f or the fiv e-chilepepper heat unless you really mean it! $ THAI TASTE 1977 Br ownsboro Rd., 89 7-7682 . T he owner-host of this friendly , casual spot in Crescent Hill had a r estaurant in Bangk ok before moving t o L ouisville, and his e xperience sho ws. The w armth of his w elcome—and the quality of the food—make Thai Taste special. $

ANNIE CAFÉ 308 W. Woodlawn, 36 3-4847. Annie Café r anks not jus t as one of m y f avorite Vietnamese restaurants, but one the city’s best of any variety, particularly when v alue and pric e are taken into account. Authentic Vietnamese food is made with care and served with pride. $ BASA MODERN VIETNAMESE 2244 Frankfort Ave., 896-1016. Michael and St even T on ar e winning raves f or their sleek and upscale ne w r estaurant with its “fusion” blend of V ietnamese and w orld culinary influences, a mix that in vites comparison with San Fr ancisco’s Slant ed Door and Cincinnati’s Pho Paris. $$ p CAFÉ MIMOS A 12 16 Bar dstown Rd., 458-2 2 33. Dating back t o the ‘80s as the city’ s first serious restaurant in the Fr ench-Vietnamese tradition, its current management s till offers a short selection of good Vietnamese food plus Chinese-American fare, as w ell as one of the city’ s more interesting sushi bars. $ p LEMONGRASS CAFÉ 1019 Bardstown Rd., 238-3981, 11606 Shelb yville Rd., 2 44-7110, 106 F airfax A ve., 893-7757. L emongrass Café off ers an appealing blend of V ietnamese, T hai and Chinese f are in a

simple setting that tr anscends an ob viously lo w budget with style and grace. $ PHO BINH MINH 6709 Str awberry Ln., 3 75-92 49. Tiny and lo vably c ozy, this six -table South End spot is true authentic V ietnamese, and so are the proprietors. T here’s some language barrier , but the owners are so friendly, and the food so good, that it’s worth the effort if you love real Asian fare and inexpensive prices. $ VIETNAM KIT CHEN 5339 Mitscher A ve., 36 3-5154. This little South End s torefront is w ell w orth seeking out. T he chef goes be yond the or dinary, preparing authentic Vietnamese dishes of unusual subtlety and flavor. I have yet to be disappointed with the quality of the f ood or service. $ ZEN GARDEN 2 2 40 Fr ankfort A ve., 895-9114. A vegetarian restaurant must pass one simple t est: at the end of the meal, I mus t not miss meat. Zen Garden pas ses this t est with flying w ok and chopsticks. $ f

BEHAR CAFÉ 5600 National T urnpike, 368-5658. This shopping-c enter s torefront has bec ome a popular aft er-work gathering spot f or the city’ s growing c ommunity of immigr ants fr om Bosnia, for whom it ’s a c omfortable place to get a drink, a sausage, and feel at home. $ BOSAN-MAK 382 5 Old Bar dstown Rd., 456- 1919. Friendly and e xceptionally hospitable , f amilyowned BosnaMak c elebrates the heritage of the owners and chefs in Bosnia and Macedonia in the Balkans and picks up a f ew culinary additions from their time in German y. $ f DJULI 5312 S. T hird St., 368-5199 . Bosnian f are is the specialty in this tin y spot in the incr easingly

MAI’S THAI RES TAURANT 1411 E. T enth St., Jeffersonville, IN, 282-0198. With a broad range of well-prepared and authentic T hai dishes, Mai’ s is the eat ery t o beat among the metr o ar ea’s T hai restaurants. For both authenticity and quality , it ’s right up there with the top Thai places I’ve enjoyed in New York, San Francisco and Seattle. $ SALA THAI 9114 T aylorsville Rd. (St ony Br ook Shopping Center), 493-3944. Fine and fancy, Sala Thai off ers L ouisville an upscale T hai alt ernative, presenting ethnic f are in a s tylish setting that places it among the bes t, and c ertainly the mos t upscale, of the city’s cadre of Thai eateries. $$ p SIMPLY THAI 318 W allace A ve., 899-96 70. Owner Mahn Saing is Burmese; his wif e, a clas sically trained chef , is T hai. T hey’ve beautifully made over this little St. Matthews spot, offering a small menu of tr aditional Thai dishes, w ell-made sushi and a f ew upscale T hai-style “fusion” dinner items. $ f THAI CAFÉ 2 2 2 6 Holida y Manor , 42 5-4815. Y ou’ll find this small café tuck ed int o a c orner of the “Holiday Manor W alk.” Owner Cha vantee Sno w and her f amily off er a small but w ell-prepared selection of authentic T hai dishes at v ery reasonable prices. $ THAI SIAM 3002 Bar dstown Rd., 458-68 71. Louisville’s first Thai restaurant, this Gardiner Lane spot has built a lo yal audienc e o ver the y ears, perhaps r esponding t o its r egular visit ors’ preferences with f ood that ’s a bit on the tame side for Thai. $$ THAI SMILE 5 5800 Preston Hwy., 961-9018. The “5” represents the number of r estaurants in this

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international culinary smor gasbord at Ir oquois Manor shopping center. Bosnian immigrants appear to be the primary clientele, but everyone’s welcome to discover this hearty Yugoslavian cuisine. $

ERIKA’S GERMAN RESTAURANT 9301 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy. 4 99-882 2 . F or a city with a s trong German heritage, L ouisville is w oefully short on authentic German r estaurants, but this genuinely Germanic eatery attracts hungry crowds to Hurstbourne. Take care not to miss its former fast-food quarters just off I-64 local access ramp. $$ GASTHAUS 4812 Brownsboro Center, 899-7177. The Greipel f amily c omes s traight fr om Ba varia t o Eastern Louisville with Gasthaus, a destination for local lovers of Germanic f are. T he setting has as authentic a f eeling as the hearty and delicious German dishes here. $$$

BRENDAN’S 392 1 Shelb yville Rd., 895- 12 12 . Owners Tom O’Shea (also of Flannigan’ s and O’Shea’ s in the Highlands) has done a gr eat job of endo wing this old St. Matthe ws saloon with an upscale f eel, gourmet-style dining options and a v ery popular bar. $$ p e IRISH ROVER 2319 Frankfort Ave., 899-3544, 117 E. Main St, LaGr ange, 2 2 2 -2 2 86. A w arm and welcoming pub with an authentic Irish accent, this is a delightful plac e for a tall glas s of Guinnes s, a snack and a bit of Irish music. I r ecommend the fish and chips. $ p f MOLLY MAL ONE’S 933 Baxt er A ve., 4 73-12 2 2 . A carefully c onstructed r eplica of a modern urban Irish pub, Molly Malone’s is worthy addition to the city’s eating and drinking sc ene, as authentically Irish as the Wearin’ o’ the Green. $$ p f e O’SHEA’S TRADITIONAL IRISH PUB 956 Baxt er Ave., 589-7373. A steady schedule of music, and an as sortment of beers ma y be tr aditionally Irish, but the food here is mainstream American pub grub, from the chees y fries t o the Rueben sandwich. $$ p f e SHENANIGAN’S IRISH GRILL 1611 Norris Pl., 4543919. Not just a neighborhood tavern (although it’s a fine neighborhood ta vern), Irish-ac cented Shenanigan’s goes an extra step with an estimable selection of memorable burgers. $ p f e

AMICI´ 316 Ormsb y A ve., 6 37-3167. Restaurateurs Sharon and Sc ott Risinger hos t this in viting Italian-style r estaurant that brings a t ouch of Tuscany to this attractive and historic Old Louisville building. $$ p f ANGELINA’S CAFÉ 1701 UPS Dr ., 32 6-5555. Y ou don’t ha ve t o be an Italian gr andfather t o pla y bocce, now that ther e are several venues around town f or this amiable game . T he six -court suburban Gotcha Bocce, run by sportscaster Bob Valvano, also houses this casual all-Italian eat ery, with dishes based on Bob’s family recipes. $ BUCA DI BEPPO 2 051 S. Hurs tbourne Pk wy., 4 932426. Buca di Beppo’s recipe has all the necessary ingredients: huge portions of excellent food served with flair and the Buca sc ene is fun, a c onscious parody of the e xuberant dec or of f amily ItalianAmerican restaurants of the 1950s. $$ p CARRABBA’S ITALIAN GRILL 617 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 412-2218. Carrabba’s isn’t y our ordinary suburban shopping-center fr anchise eat ery. T his plac e 78 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

dramatically exceeds expectations. From warmed bread dishes with quality oliv e oil t o firs t-rate Italian-American fare at reasonable prices. $$ p f COME BACK INN 909 Swan St., 627-1777, 415 Spring St., Jeff ersonville IN, 2 85- 1777. W ith both its branches located in urban neighborhoods, C ome Back Inn looks pr etty much lik e an y other neighborhood saloon. But unlik e mos t L ouisville neighborhood saloons, this one houses a f amily Italian spot that w ouldn’t be out of plac e in Chicago or Brooklyn. $ p DAVINCI B Y LENTINI’S 10430 Shelb yville Rd. Still under c onstruction at pr ess time , L entini’s ne w owners ar e e xpanding a br anch of the popular Italian-American eat ery int o the old Buckhead Mountain Grill property near Middletown. $$$ p f FERD GRISANTI 10212 Taylorsville Rd., 267-0050. An East End landmark f or 30 y ears, Ferd Grisanti’s is as comfortable as a close friend’ s home. Friendly and unpr etentious hospitality , the quiet but not staid atmospher e, and the fine Italian f ood prompts the c omment, “T hey do e verything so well, and they make it look so easy.” $$$ p LA GALL O ROS SO BIS TRO 132 5 Bar dstown Rd., 473-0015. This small but attractive Highlands spot in the Shoppes on the Alle y, f ormerly home t o Butterfly G arden (which mo ved nearb y), is no w back in busines s with a casual Italian and Continental theme. $$ f LENTINI’S 1543 Bardstown Rd., 4 79-0607. This 45year-old L ouisville f avorite has had its ups and downs sinc e “Sonn y” L entini retired and sold the business in 2001, but it ’s up now, open again with new owners and a skilled Italian chef. Redecorated in classy but comfortable style, its authentic Italian menu is drawing raves $$$ p f LUIGI’S 702 W. Main St., 589-0005. If y ou think one pizza is pretty much like another, you may not have sampled Ne w Y ork City -style pizza, a tr eat that you’ll find on jus t about e very s treet c orner ther e, but only Luigi’s offers in its authentic form here. $ MARTINI ITALIAN BISTRO 4021 Summit Plaza Dr., 3949797. T he American-ac cented Italian f are at this Ohio-based chain might be a little closer to Bayonne, New Jersey than Florence, but it ’s good, featuring a short but div erse selection of hearty pas tas, pizzas and Italian-style entrées. Martini’s quality has quickly built a loyal crowd of regulars. $$ p f MELILLO’S 82 9 E. Mark et St., 540-99 75. Adjacent t o the locally o wned and oper ated Felice Vineyards on Eas t Mark et, Melillo’ s off ers hearty and delicious home-s tyle Italian- American f are—and you can enjoy it with a glas s of vino. $ p f MILANO CAFÉ 962 Baxter Ave. Yet another venture by the entr epreneurial cr ew at L entini’s, Milano Cafe seeks t o succeed in this Highlands pr operty that has housed a s tring of short-liv ed eat eries, most recently Alley Cats Cafe. OLD SPAGHETTI FACTORY 235 W. Market St., 5811070. One of the original v entures of this national firm. Bright and nois y, it offers well-made if basic Italian family fare and dishes it out for surprisingly low prices. $$ p THE OLIVE GARDEN 1320 Hurstbourne Pkwy., 3397190, 9 730 V on Allmen Ct., 42 5- 3607, 12 30 Veterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 218-8304. The top property of the Orlando-based Dar den chain, Olive G arden no w oper ates mor e than 500 properties and bills itself as the leading Italian restaurant in the casual dining indus try. Hearty pastas of all shapes and sauc es, appetizers and combo platters all carry the Italian theme . $$ p PESTO’S IT ALIAN RES TAURANT 566 S. Fifth St., 584-0567. Offic es f or blocks ar ound empty int o

this bus tling Italian eat ery f or w eekday lunches featuring hearty platt ers of lasagna, z esty salads, red wine and ic ed tea. On Satur days, the kit chen switches over to a special Persian menu. $ PORCINI 2 730 Fr ankfort A ve., 894-8686. An expanded dining room and a stylish alfresco patio facing busy Frankfort Ave. make Porcini’s an even more popular des tination, a plac e t o see and be seen—and, while y ou’re at it, enjo y a drink and a decent Italian-American dinner. $$$ p PRIMO 445 E. Market St., 583-1808. Restaurateur Bim Deitrich has been a leader in the city’ s restaurant scene since the 1970s, and this eff ort may be his best y et. W ell-crafted Italian specialties r ange from pizzas and pasta to steak Florentine, with a fine, all-Italian wine lis t t o go along; all serv ed with panache in sleek quart ers dominat ed b y a towering white-tile pizza oven. $$$ p f RAY PARRELLA’S ITALIAN CUISINE 2311 Frankfort Ave., 899-55 75. Old-f ashioned Italian- American family fare is served up with a w arm and casual welcome at Ray Parella’s, the latest venture of a family that ’s been pleasing locals f or a generation. $ f ROCKY’S IT ALIAN GRILL 715 W . Riv erside Dr ., Jeffersonville IN, 2 82 - 3844, 10 2 06 W estport Rd., 339-0808. Now with a second location in Louisville, this longtime Southern Indiana f avorite earns its popularity with fine pizzas, a good selection of bottled beers and a select choic e of ItalianAmerican entrées, with a great view of the city from its riverside location. $ p f ROMANO’S MA CARONI GRILL 401 S. Hurs tbourne Pkwy., 42 3-9 2 2 0. T he Italian-s tyle menu at this casual, Dallas-based f amily chain includes appetizers, salads, pastas, veal and desserts. Chefs entertain while creating wood-fired pizzas. $$ p SAVINO’S ITALIAN FOOD 8533 Terry Rd., 933-1080. $ SPAGHETTI SHOP 4657 Out er L oop, 96 9-5545, 2 669 Charles town Rd., Ne w Alban y, IN, 9445400. Bak ed pas ta dishes, subs, salads and appetizers are prepared while you wait. $ STEVE-O’S IT ALIAN KIT CHEN 42 05 W . Hw y. 146, LaGrange, KY, 222-0300. Outstanding pizzas and fine family-style Italian-American dishes make this casual eatery just off I-71 at Buckner w ell worth a special trip out from the city. $ STRATTO’S 318 W. Lewis & Clark Pk wy., Clarksville, IN, 945- 3496. Sam Anderson—kno wn t o locals from his Sam’s Food & Spirits—offers a full dinner menu with ac cents from all Italy’ s regions, plus a good wine lis t t o mat ch. Str atto’s e xpanded 140-seat patio is a popular plac e on summer evenings. $$ p f e VOLARE 2300 Frankfort Ave., 894-4446. The name evokes Sinatr a, pas ta with t omato sauc e and candles in Chianti bottles, but stylish Volare kicks that image up a not ch. Chef Dallas McG arity and host Majid Ghavami are working hard to position Volare as the city’ s t op spot f or sua ve Italian dining. $$$ p f

DE LA T ORRE’S 1606 Bar dstown Rd., 456-4 955. From C entral Spain, authentic Cas tilian f ood ranging from tapas t o a memor able paella mak e this Highlands s tandby a unique e xperience reminiscent of dining on a squar e in Madrid. $$$ LA BODEGA 1604 Bar dstown Rd., 456-4 955. Ne xtdoor t o the e xcellent De La T orre’s Spanish restaurant, La Bodega off ers diners the city’s most authentic Spanish-s tyle tapas bar , f eaturing the small bites originally invented in the out door cafés of Jerez. $$ p f


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MAYAN CAFÉ 813 E. Mark et St., 566-0651. (See listing under Mexican) MOJITO TAPAS RES TAURANT 2 2 31 Holida y Manor Shopping C enter, 42 5-094 9. T he o wners of Louisville’s popular Ha vana Rumba Cuban restaurant no w launch a sec ond c oncept. Gift ed young chef F ernando Martine z s tretches his culinary legs with a menu f eaturing an int ernational a rray of Spanish inspir ed small plat es (“tapas”) and libations in the much-r enovated East End shopping-c enter quart ers that long housed La Peche II. $ p f PALERMO VIEJO 1359 Bar dstown Rd., 456-646 1. This eatery’s name may sound Italian, but is, in fact, Louisville’s only sour ce of Ar gentinian cuisine . Steaks sear ed on authentic parrillada char coal grills ar e a primary dr aw, but ther e’s e xcellent chicken, seafood and much more. $$ p f

INDIA PALACE 9424 Shelbyville Rd., 394-0490. This longtime local Indian r estaurant, originally on Bardstown R oad and no w housed in this e xoticlooking East End building that has housed a s tring of well-known eateries, is a contender for the city’s top Indian spot. T he expansive lunch buffet is well handled and a particularly good v alue. $$ f KASHMIR INDIAN RES TAURANT 12 85 Bar dstown Rd., 4 73-8765. One of the city’ s mos t popular Indian restaurants, Kashmir is casual, neither posh nor expensive, and it produces an extensive menu of seemingly authentic Indian f are. $$ f SHALIMAR INDIAN RES TAURANT 182 0 S. Hurstbourne Pk wy., 4 93-8899. Modern and sleek in appearance, modest in price, this restaurant has become the patriar ch of local Indian r estaurants. With a substantial lunch buffet and a full r ange of dinner items, it has built a lo yal clientele. $ p

AL WATA N 3713 Klondik e Ln., 454-4406. Clas sic Arabic dishes home-cooked by friendly people in a cozy environment. That’s the recipe that makes Al Watan a des tination f or lo vers of fine Middle Eastern fare. $ CAFÉ 360 1582 Bar dstown Rd., 4 73-8694. T he latest in a long series of eat eries in this pleasant Highland’s building off ers an eclectic and international menu, with Southern fried catfish and Indian lamb biry ani in immediat e juxtaposition. You can get it all, diner-s tyle, jus t about 24/7. $ p f GRAPE LEAF 2 2 17 Fr ankfort A ve., 89 7-1774. Y et another Middle Eas tern eat ery, y et another good ine xpensive sour ce of f ood on Fr ankfort Avenue. $ f JERUSALEM MEDITERRANEAN CAFÉ 1907 S. Third St., 6 35-6767. L ocated jus t off the University of L ouisville’s Belknap Campus, Jerusalem Café speaks Middle Eas tern with a Palestinian ac cent and v ends e xceptionally fine ethnic fare. It adds an exotic hint of the Levant to the storefront space that used to house a branch of City Café. $ f MARRAKECH 1001 Bardstown Rd., 454-4407. This tiny new Highlands spot is strategically situated to offer quick and aff ordable sustenance along the Bar dstown-Baxter ent ertainment s trip. In addition t o the usual Middle Eas tern goodies, look f or a f ew intriguing Mor occan dishes including occasional tagines. $ OMAR’S GYRO 969 Baxter Ave., 454-4888. $

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PITA DELIGHT S 1616 Grins tead Dr., 56 9-112 2 . T his Near Eas tern eat ery in the Highlands off ers a splendid mix of gyr os, f elafel and other pitabased goodies. $ f SAFFRON’S 131 W . Mark et St., 584- 7800. Owner Majid Ghavami has ele vated this Persian (Ir anian) restaurant f ar be yond a mer e ethnic eat ery. Stylish dec or, an intriguingly e xotic menu, and a level of car eful, pr ofessional servic e w orthy of a white-tablecloth dining room. Saffron’s has added a satellite operation, SAFFRON’S BUFFET, 558 S. Fifth St., 58 7-8679, where you can enjo y Persian delicacies on a quick, aff ordable all- you-can-eat lunch-only buffet. $$$ p SAFIER MEDITERRANEAN DELI 641 S. F ourth St., 585-112 5. You can get s tandard American f are at this w elcoming do wntown quick -eats spot, but who’d do that when y ou can enjo y such appetizing Arabian delights as hummus, mutabal, falafels and the gyros-like (only better) shawarma beef-on-pita sandwich. $ f SHIRAZ MEDITERRANEAN GRILL 2 011 Fr ankfort Ave., 891-8854. Offers some of the most authentic Persian (Ir anian) c ooking y ou’ll find an ywhere, Shiraz has grown out of its tiny original location to occupy a bright and colorful storefront in the new Clifton Lofts complex; it s till shines with its chargrilled k ebabs, fine pitas and cr acker-like la vash bread and adds a wider v ariety of Persian delights. $

CAJUN KITCHEN 4645 Outer Loop, 964-5200. $ J. GUMBO’S 2 109 Fr ankfort A ve., 896-4046, 531 Lyndon Ln., 425-0096, 4th Street Live, 589-9245, 3115 S. Sec ond St., 36 3-8888, 666 1 Dixie Hw y., 995-8805. Rapidly e xpanding in its bid t o gr ow into a r egional chain, this e xcellent, aff ordable string of Cajun eateries has changed its corporate name (from Gumbo A Go-Go) to avoid trademark conflicts with a similarly named chain. $ f JOE’S OK BAYOU 9874 Linn Station Rd., 426- 1320, 4308 Charles town Rd., Ne w Alban y, IN, 9482 080. Fine , filling and authentic L ouisiana-style fare is the dr aw at Joe’ s. A length y menu and bayou fishing-shack dec or sho wcases authentic Cajun and Creole chow. $$ p

BAHAMA BREEZE 104 Oxmoor C ourt, 423-9040. It’s a long w ay fr om Oxmoor C enter t o the Florida K eys, but this chain-oper ated eat ery does a good job of bridging the gap , offering a happy beach-joint experience without the ocean view. Bahama Breeze is stylish and upscale, with a good selection of island f are and a gr eat bar. $$ p f e HAVANA RUMBA 4115 Oechsli Ave., 897-1959 A true taste of Old Ha vana. Hos ts F ernando & Chris tina Martinez and Mar cos L orenzo pr eside o ver this bright, in viting Cuban r estaurant, r ecently renovated t o double its dining spac e and add a hopping mojit o bar. Bountiful servings of Cuban fare as good as I’ve enjoyed in Key West or Miami have earned Ha vana Rumba a plac e on m y short list of local f avorites. No w with an e xpanded menu, there is even more to love. $ p f TASTE OF J AMAICA 2 017 Br ownsboro Rd., 8961055. This stylish space in Clifton has a new ethnic flavor, thanks to co-owner Warren Glave, who has returned authentic Jamaican cuisine t o a city t oo long starved for a taste of jerk chicken, curry goat and other such Caribbean goodies. $

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mendation f or f ood, servic e and en vironment. Tex-Mex dishes ar e fine , but sa ve r oom f or the authentic Mexican seafood specialties. $ p f BAZO’S FRESH MEXICAN GRILL 323 Wallace Ave., 899-9600. Baz o’s Fr esh Me xican Grill is an inexpensive, casual spot where you’ll find the best fish tacos this side of San Diego as the highlight of its simple fast-food Mexican fare. $ f CANCUN MEXICAN RES TAURANT 9904 Linn Station Rd., 327-0890. $ e DON PABLOS MEXICAN KIT CHEN 940 E. L ewis & Clark Pkwy., Clarksville, IN, 284-1071. Born in North Texas and no w based in A tlanta, this Me xicanAmerican chain, off ers full bar servic e and a variety of dishes that r ange fr om sizzling f ajitas with portabello mushr oom, beef or chick en t o crisp salads tossed in a fajita shell. $$ p EL CAPORAL 7319 Pr eston Hw y., 96 9-9693, 2 2 09 Meadow Dr ., 4 73-7840, 1901 Blank enbaker Pk wy., 515 E. High way 131, Clarks ville, IN, 2 82 - 7174. Louisville’s growing Mexican-American community has f ostered a happ y tr end: e xcellent, authentic Mexican food. El Caporal bridges the gap between the Latino and Anglo communities. $ p

ERNESTO’S 10602 Shelb yville Rd., 2 44-8889, 62 01 Dutchmans Ln., 89 3-92 97, 77 07 Pr eston Hw y., 962-5380, 4632A S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 671-5291. One of the firs t of the mor e authentic locally owned Me xican r estaurant gr oups, Ernes to’s remains c onsistently r eliable. Fr om the crisp y home-fried chips t o filling Mexican main c ourses and tas ty des serts, it ’s a w orthy des tination f or good Me xican f ood and e xcellent v alue in an enjoyable atmosphere. $ p f e FIESTA TIME MEXICAN GRILL Dr., 425-9144. $ p

1132 0 Maple Br ook

HABANEROS 1415 Br oadway, Clarks ville, IN, 2 808555. T his lar ge, c olorful Me xican r estaurant is becoming a Southern Indiana des tination because they do just about everything right, from excellent f ood, of c ourse, t o c old, o versize margaritas and delicious guacamole made fr esh for you at tableside. $ p f e

EL MUNDO 2 345 Fr ankfort A ve., 899-99 30. T his crowded, noisy little Cr escent Hill s torefront offers creative r enditions of Me xican r egional specialties that mak e mos t diners w ant t o y ell “Olé!” T he setting ma y lack the tr endy flair of Rick Ba yless’s Frontera Grill in Chicago , but the f are mines a similar vein and does so nearly as w ell. $ p f EL NOP AL 9473 W estport Rd., 32 7-6551, 11336 Preston Hwy., 961-9851, 10500 Watterson Tr., 2665956, 5444 Ne w Cut Rd., 380-844 7, 4214 Out er Loop, 968-2566, 12937 Shelbyville Rd., 253-6802, 652 1 P aramount P ark Dr ., 968-9836, 12 600 Taylorsville Rd., 2 40-602 2 . As sociated with the same family that runs the smaller El Nopalit o, (or “the little cactus”), El Nopal (“ the cactus”) off ers similar delicious, authentic and ine xpensive Mexican f are in some what lar ger and mor e comfortable surroundings. $ p f EL NOP ALITO 402 8 T aylorsville Rd., 458- 72 78, 6300 Bardstown Rd., 231-42 49, 2319 Brownsboro Rd., 89 3-9880. T his modes t little eat ery used t o be a Taco Bell, but y ou’ll never find c omidas like this at the Bell! Run b y a f amily from Mexico, it ’s truly authentic and delicious. $ p f EL PASO 700 Riverside Dr., Jeffersonville, IN, 2 800032. Several Mexican restaurants have filled this expansive space in the Jeffersonville Ramada Inn; now El P aso offers a Tex-Mex option jus t off the riverfront. $ p f

LOS AZTECAS “The Best Mexican Food & Margaritas in Louisville” 530 WEST MAIN

502.561.8535 Mon.-Thur. 11am-10pm • Fri. 11am-11pm Sat. Noon-11pm • Sun. Noon-9pm

www.losaztecas.net

EL TARASCO 6100 Cr estwood Station, 2 41-2 32 0, 542 5 Ne w Cut Rd., 368-562 8, 110 F airfax A ve., 895-8010, 9901 LaGrange Rd., 326-9373. Add El Tarasco t o the happ y ne w genr e of r estaurants run b y Latinos and off ering authentic Me xican food and atmospher e, but that r each out t o Anglos and mak e it eas y t o enjo y a South-ofthe-Border culinary adv enture without compromise. $ EL TORO MEXICAN RESTAURANT 1810 Hurstbourne Parkway, 4 91-72 72 . One of the t op Me xican restaurants in the metro, El Toro earns my recom80 Spring 2007 www.foodanddiningmagazine.com

LA MONARCA 6501 Shepherdsville Rd., 969-7938. $ LA PERLA DEL P ACIFICO 2 840 Goose Cr eek Rd., 339-7670. Y ou ma y w ant t o bring a Spanish phrase book to this East End spot, where English is sometimes t entative. It ’s w orth the eff ort though, f or e xcellent authentic Me xican seaf ood and fish dishes that go w ell be yond taqueria status. $$ LA ROSIT A T AQUERIA 1515 E. Mark et St., Ne w Albany, IN, 944- 362 0. One of m y f avorite authentic Mexican eateries in the metr o. Offering indoor and out door seating t o enjo y a short, affordable menu of firs t-rate Puebla-s tyle tac os and other excellent Mexican dishes. $ f LA TAPATIA RESTAURANT 8106 Preston Hwy., 9619153. One of the mos t authentic ethnic Me xican restaurants in Louisville, this little storefront offers memorable tacos and burritos and more. $ p LOLITA’S TACOS 42 2 2 Poplar L evel Rd., 459-4356. This tiny place may look like a fast-food joint, but the f ood is about as authentic Me xican as y ou’ll find. Crisp or soft tac os and burrit os the siz e of paper-towel r olls turn a meal her e int o a r eal bargain. $ f LOS AZTECAS 530 W. Main St., 561-8535, 1107 Herr Ln., 42 6- 3994, 9606 T aylorsville Rd., 2 9 7-8003, 92 07 U .S. Hw y 42 , 2 2 8-2 450. A uthentic Mexican cuisine has bec ome a viable option in L ouisville, thanks to a gr owing immigrant community. With fresh bar and blender off erings, cr eative appetizers and c omfortable seating, L os Aztecas is one of the best, with tasty Mexican dishes good enough to lure us back again and again. $ p LOS CHUBA SCOS 10000 Linn Station Rd., 42 09930. $ p f LOS INDIOS RES TAURANTE MEXICANO 2743 Charlestown Rd., Ne w Alban y, IN, 94 1-9770, 7 30 Highlander Point Dr., Floyds Knobs, IN, 9 23-2929. “Why ha ve T ex-Mex when y ou can ha ve Me xMex?” is asked in fun on the serv ers’ T-shirts. This eatery is w ell worth the trip t o Southern Indiana for high-quality Mexican dishes. $ p MAYAN CAFÉ 813 E. Mark et St., 566-0651. Chef Bruce Ucán earned f our-star pr aise f or y ears with his cr eative tak e on Ma yan (Yucatan/Guatemala) cuisine at Ma yan Gyps y. Now, aft er a brief closing, he’ s back in smaller quarters but the same inspiring cuisine . $$ MEXICAN FIES TA 5414 Bar dstown Rd., 7 62 -0840, 4507 Bardstown Rd., 491-2922 $ MEXICO TIPIC O RES TAURANT 6517 Dixie Hw y., 933-9523, 12401 Shelbyville Rd., 645-8778. One of the r egion’s firs t authentic Me xican eat eries, Mexico T ipico has built a lo yal f ollowing in f or good Me xican f ood and friendly , fully bilingual service; now it reaches the East End with a brandnew property in the Middletown area. $ p e

EL REY MEXICAN RES TAURANT 2 918 Hik es Ln., 454-652 0. Although it ’s more Mexican-American than har d-core ethnic Me xican, El R ey earns m y recommendation for tasty fare, cordial service in a pleasant f ast-Mexican-food en vironment, and affordable prices. $ f EL RODEO MEXICAN RES TAURANT 9070 Dixie Hwy., 995-8722. At El Rodeo, you’ll find a blend of Tex-Mex and other Latin American clas sics fr om salty margaritas to sweet sopapillas. $$

bilingual menu and a smiling s taff make you feel at home.$

KY T ACO 6911 Shepher dsville Rd., 962 -85 2 6. Traditional Mexican fare from the Ramirez family. $ LA BAMBA 1237 Bardstown Rd., 451-1418. La Bamba boasts of its “burritos as big as your head.” It may be L ouisville’s mos t s tartling case of an eat ery that is more than it appears t o be, and that goes for both quality and quantity. Franchised and fastfoodish, it pleasantly surprises with genuine Mexican fare and Latino flair. $ LA HERRADURA 615 Eas tern Blv d., Clarks ville, IN., 2 80-8650. Is it pos sible t o enjo y truly authentic tacqueria cuisine when the management speaks mostly Spanish and y ou speak only English ? These friendly f olks mak e it simple: a handy

PUERTO V ALLARTA 42 14 Charles town Rd., Ne w Albany, IN, 945- 3588, 12 5 Quart ermaster Ct., Jeffersonville, IN, 288-2022. $$ p QDOBA MEXICAN GRILL 1500 Bardstown Rd., 4543380, 9 70 Br eckinridge Ln., 7 2 1-8100, 4059 Summit Plaza Driv e, 42 9-5151, 100 Da ventry Ln., 412 -62 02 , 860 2 Citadel W ay, 4 93-9606, 430 2 Charlestown Rd., Ne w Alban y IN, 94 1-9654. T his chain operation boasts five local outlets plus more in L exington and Fr ankfort. F ast-foodish in s tyle, Qdoba edges out its c ompetitors on the basis of variety and interesting salsas, plus sizable portions at a price you can afford. $ f ROSTICERIA LUNA 5213B Preston Hwy., 962-8898. Tiny and cluttered and very friendly, this little spot


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on Pr eston looks lik e another tac queria but the specialty, Me xican-style r oasted chick en, tak es it to another le vel, juicy and suc culent and r oasted golden br own. Chick en simply doesn’t get an y better than this. $ RUBEN’S MEXICAN RES TAURANT 1370 V eterans Pkwy., Clarksville, IN. 258-0417. $$ p SANTA FE GRILL 3000 S. T hird St., 6 34-3722. This tiny eat ery in a c entury-old r ed-brick South End storefront near Chur chill Do wns ne ver f ails t o satisfy with genuine Me xican tac os and other simple fare at pric es that will lea ve you plenty of change for an exacta bet at the races. $ SOL AZTECA S 2 42 7 Bar dstown R oad, 459- 7776. Saul Garcia, who’s been associated with the local chain of L os Aztecas eateries and the short-liv ed Olmeca’s, brings his br and of authentic Me xican fare t o this Douglas s L oop location. F ans of L os Aztecas will find f amiliar food and mood her e in the same affordable price ranges. $ p TACQUERIA LA MEXICANA 62 01 Pr eston Hw y., 969-4449. T he tac os ar e fine at this tin y storefront, ne xt door t o a Latino gr ocery s tore. This is seriously ethnic s tuff, but Anglos ar e thoroughly w elcome, the s taff is bilingual, and they will happily pr ovide a menu with all the English translations written in. $ TEQUILA MEXICAN RES TAURANT 7803 Old T hird Street Rd., 368-3591. $

BALLYHOO BAJA GRILL 1702 Bardstown Rd., 4522559. Another entry in the fr esh-burrito concept, this new Highlands spot is gaining quick attention, with a Baja-s tyle f ast menu lead b y a filling fish taco that may be the best in town. First Louisville outpost of Nash ville’s popular Chili Burrit o Co., it probably won’t be the last. $ f MOE’S SOUTHWES T GRILL 2 001 S. Hurs tbourne Pkwy., 491-1800, 1001 Br eckinridge Ln., 89 3-6637, 12 001 Shelb yville Rd., 2 45-62 50, 10 2 0 V eterans Pkwy., Clarks ville, IN, (812 ) 2 88-66 37. T he f ood may be mor e f ast-food Me xican-American than authentic South-of-the-Bor der f are, but it is freshly made from quality ingredients and comes in oversize portions, and that’s not a bad thing. $ ON THE BORDER 10601 Fischer P ark Dr., 412-2461. A c ontemporary spin on tr aditional f avorites offers a range of delights from the Ultimate Fajita to mar garitas in a setting that emulat es Old Mexico décor. $$ p f SALSARITA’S FRESH CANTINA 2 85 N. Hubbar ds Ln., 89 7-532 3. Another entry in the hot “Fr esh Mexican” niche that f eatures gigantic burrit os made t o or der. Its c olorful fr ee-standing building houses a sit-in restaurant and an inviting bar. $ f p TUMBLEWEED SOUTHWES T GRILL (17 locations ). Tumbleweed, which s tarted as a humble Me xican restaurant in Ne w Alban y, e ventually came t o dominate L ouisville’s Tex-Mex niche with c olossal margaritas, gigantic burrit os and spicy chili c on queso. But what s tarted as a sideline , mesquit e grilled steaks, chops, and chicken, has become the main dr aw. T hese da ys, diners ar e mor e lik ely t o dig int o a grilled s teak and bak ed potat o than a burrito. With its Southwest focus, large and varied menu and added wine lis t, “The Weed” still draws diners in droves. $$ p f

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Albany, IN, 944-6262. Bean Str eet introduced the Sunny Side to the joys of serious espresso. Like all good c offee shops, the y’re not jus t eat eries, but cultural hangouts. $ f BUFFALO MADISON C OFFEE C OMPANY 701 Eastern Blv d., Clarks ville, IN, 2 18-8559 , I US Campus Libr ary, 94 1-2 699. These locally o wned coffee shops ar e fine plac es t o enjo y a c offee drink and a pastry. $ f

STARBUCKS COFFEE (32 locations) $ f SUNERGOS COFFEE & MICRO-RO ASTERY 2 12 2 S. Preston St., 634-1243. Matthew Huested and Brian Miller used t o r oast their o wn c offee beans as a hobby. Their friends said the y did it so w ell, they should turn pr o—the result is Suner gos C offee, another in the gr owing cadre of espr esso bars in Louisville’s Germantown neighborhood. $

CAFFE CLASSICO 2144 Frankfort Ave., 894-9689. $ f CLEO’S C OFFEE AND MORE Caesars Indiana Casino, Elizabeth, IN, 888-766-2648. $ COFFEE CROSSING 4212 Charlestown Rd., New Albany, IN, 981-2633, 13825 English Villa Dr., 254-7040. $ COFFEE POT CAFÉ 234 E. Gray St. (Medical Tower South), 584-5282 $ f COFFEE TREAT CAFÉ 429 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., 582-2408 $ DAY’S ESPRES SO AND C OFFEE BAR 1420 Bardstown Rd., 456- 1170. Dark and c ozy, with an old-fashioned f eeling, Da y’s has e verything y ou would e xpect in a c ollege-neighborhood c offee shop except a college near by. $ f DBL SHOTZ 1315 Spring St., Jeff ersonville, IN, 2 82 7000. $ DERBY CITY ESPRES SO 331 E. Mark et St., 442 052 3. L ouisville’s r oster of serious c offee shops continues t o gr ow. Pla ying the local car d, it features quality c offee beans r oasted b y Sunergos, A tomic Sauc er and Jackson’ s Or ganic Coffee, plus fine tea and, coming soon, light lunch fare and pastries. $ f e EXPRESSIONS OF Y OU 1800A W. Muhammad Ali, 584-6886. $ f e HEINE BROTHERS COFFEE 2714 Frankfort Ave., 8995551, 1295 Longest Ave., 456-5108, 2200 Bardstown Rd., 515-0 380, 118 Cheno weth Ln., 89 3-5103. Spartan, friendly and aff ordable, with good c offee roasted on the premises and a short lis t of pastries, desserts and panini sandwiches, Heine Br os. has earned its outstanding local reputation. $ f e HIGHLAND C OFFEE C O. 1140 Bar dstown Rd., 4514545, 62 7 S. F ourth St., 540-9909 . Off ering tw o ways t o get wir ed, this c ozy neighborhood c offee shop also functions as one of L ouisville’s t op Internet cafés, wher e y ou can enjo y a hot cappuccino while y ou surf the ‘net in a W iFi hot spot. Funky Seattle-style ambience is a plus. $ f THE HOBKNOBB RO ASTING C O. 3700 P aoli Pik e, Floyds Knobs, IN, 9 2 3-1458. HobKnobb off ers fresh hot coffee, espresso drinks and fresh baked pastries, cakes and cookies. $ f JAVA BREWING COMPANY 9561B US Hwy 42, 2922 710, 516 W . Main St., 568-6 339, 135 S. English Station Rd., 489-56 77, F ourth Str eet Liv e, 56 12 041, 2 309 Fr ankfort A ve., 894-8060 . T hese casual spots boas ts the ambienc e of a friendly old-fashioned book shop , with c omfortable seating, a good selection of pas tries, and quality coffee from Seattle. $

THE BAKER Y 3100 Bar dstown Rd., 45 2 -12 10. Not just a fine bakery but a place where bakers learn their busines s, this e xcellent es tablishment is part of the culinary pr ogram at Sulliv an University. A r ecent renovation adds a t ouch of European s tyle. The deli option is no mor e, but you can’t beat the quality br eads and pas tries offered here to eat in or carry out. $ BREADWORKS 362 8 Br ownsboro Rd., 89 3-32 00, 2420 Lime Kiln Ln., 326-0 300, 2204 Dundee Rd., 452-1510, 11800 Shelbyville Rd., 254-2885. $ COCO’S BAKERY 6915 Southside Drive, 368-9280. $ DESSERTS BY HELEN 2210 Bardstown Rd., 451-7151, 92 19 US Hw y. 42 , 2 2 8-8959 . Helen Friedman has earned a lo yal client ele sinc e the 19 70s with her elegant cak es, t empting pies and t ortes and designer cookies. $ HEITZMAN TRADITIONAL BAKER Y & DELI 9426 Shelbyville Rd., 426- 7736, 428 W. Market St., 5842437. The Heitzman f amily has been baking in the Louisville ar ea sinc e y our gr eat-aunt w as a girl ordering dinner r olls. Made fr esh daily , the pies, cakes, cookies and specialty pas tries provide tasty nostalgia for all who visit. $ MY FAVORITE MUFFIN 3934 Taylorsville Rd., 4850518, 9800 Shelb yville Rd., 42 6-9645. All the muffins are made right in the store, including such popular choices as the Cinnamon Crumb and the Turtle Muffin. $ PLEHN’S BAKERY 3940 Shelbyville Rd., 896-4438. A neighborhood institution, this bakery is as busy as it is nos talgic. Enjo y the homet own soda fountain with ic e cr eam while y ou w ait f or y our hand-decorated birthda y cak e, br eakfast r olls or colorful cookies to be boxed. $ SWEET SURRENDER 1416 Bardstown Rd., 458-6 363. Some of the city’ s bes t des serts and pas tries ar e available at this firs t-rate pas try shop . Now under new management, it hasn’t mis sed a s tep in the transition. $ THE SWEET TOOTH 3110 Frankfort Ave., 895-4554. You’ll find an enticing c ollection of cak es, pies and other homemade goodies, plus e xcellent coffee and a selection of loose-leaf t eas, in this cozy little spot betw een Cr escent Hill and St. Matthews. $

JOE MUGGS 994 Breckenridge Ln. (Books-a-Million), 894-8606, 4300 Towne Center Dr., 426-2252. $ f IT’S A GRIND COFFEE HOUSE 2809 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy., 32 7-2 82 0. W ith 136 pr operties including this recent Louisville arrival, this Calif ornia-based chain declar es itself the nation’ s f astest-growing coffee house company. $ f OLD LOUISVILLE COFFEE HOUSE 1489 S. Fourth St., 635-6660. $ f

ATOMIC SAUCER 1000 E. Oak St., 6 37-5399. $ BEAN S TREET CAFÉ 101 Laf ollette Station, Flo yds Knobs, IN, 9 23-1404, 3003 Charlestown Rd., Ne w

PERKFECTION 359 Spring St., Jeff ersonville, IN, 2180611. $ e SISTER BEAN’S 4956 Manslick Rd., 364-0082. $ f www.foodanddiningmagazine.com Spring 2007 81


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MAP INDEX

MAP INDEX

MAP # DIRECTION PAGE # DOWNTOWN 84 1 Downtown Louisville NEAR EAST 85 2 Highlands – Crescent Hill EAST 86 3 St. Matthews SOUTH EAST 87 4 Hikes Point – Buechel EAST 88 5 Hurstbourne N. – Lyndon SOUTH EAST 89 6 Hurstbourne S. – Jeffersontown NORTH EAST 90 7 River Rd. – Brownsboro Rd. NORTH EAST 90 8 Westport Rd. FAR EAST 91 9 Middletown NORTH EAST 91 10 Prospect SOUTH EAST 91 11 Fern Creek SOUTH 92 12 Airport – Okolona SOUTH WEST 93 13 Shively – Pleasure Ridge Park INDIANA 94 14 New Albany – Floyds Knobs INDIANA 95 15 Clarksville INDIANA 95 16 Jeffersonville

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MAP INDEX

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DOWNTOWN > DOWNTOWN

MAP • 1

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NEAR EAST > HIGHLANDS/CRESCENT HILL

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EAST > ST. MATTHEWS

MAP • 3

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SOUTH EAST > HIKES POINT/BUECHEL

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EAST > HURSTBOURNE N./LYNDON

MAP • 5

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SOUTH EAST > HURSTBOURNE S./JEFFERSONTOWN

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MAP

7 > NORTH EAST > RIVER RD./BROWNSBORO RD. MAP

8 > NORTH EAST > WESTPORT ROAD

MAPS • 7 • 8

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MAP

11 > SOUTH EAST > FERN CREEK

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SOUTH > AIRPORT/OKALONA

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INDIANA > NEW ALBANY/FLOYDS KNOBS

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15 > INDIANA > CLARKSVILLE

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©2

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louisville • 424 south 4th street located at 4th street live! phone: 502-568-2202 • hardrock.com

©2007 Hard Rock Cafe International, Inc. All rights reserved.


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Spring 2007 (Vol. 16)