Fall Arts Preview

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THIS WEEK // 9.5.18-9.11.18 // VOL. 32 ISSUE 23 FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2018

FALL ARTS EVENTS CALENDAR 12

From classical and fine art virtuoso events to street-level, high-energy concerts and clubs, this is Northeast Florida’s definitive guide to all things artsy

MAKING THE DREAM WORK 14

Jacksonville Dance Theatre moves the heart & mind

CRUISIN’ FOR A BRUISIN’ 16

UK hard-rock kings Deep Purple bring a metallic wallop to Daily’s Place

50 YEARS A FIREBRAND 20

MC5 co-founder Wayne Kramer sets the record straight about his legendary band and its lasting legacy

COLUMNS + CALENDARS FROM THE EDITOR MAIL/B&B OUR PICKS FIGHTIN WORDS SING OUT LOUD PICKS NEWS & NOTES E PLURIBUS

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FILM LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR DINING BITE-SIZED PINT-SIZED CHEFFED-UP PET PARENTING

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD CROSSWORD I SAW U ASTROLOGY M.D.M.J. CLASSIFIEDS BACKPAGE

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FOLIO WEEKLY MAGAZINE PUBLISHES EVERY WEDNESDAY IN DUVAL, NASSAU, ST. JOHNS, CLAY AND CAMDEN COUNTIES. It contains opinions of contributing writers that are not necessarily the opinion of this publication. Folio Weekly welcomes editorial and photographic contributions. Calendar items must be received two weeks in advance of event date. Copyright © Folio Publishing, Inc. 2018. All rights reserved. Advertising rates and information available on request. Advertiser purchases right of publication only. One free issue copy per person. Additional copies and back issues are $1 each at the office or $4 by U.S. mail, based on availability. First Class mail subscriptions are $48/13 weeks, $96/26 weeks, $189/52 weeks. Folio Weekly Magazine is printed on 100 percent recycled paper using soy-based inks. Please recycle Folio Weekly. Application to mail at periodicals postage prices is pending at Jacksonville, FL. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Folio Weekly, 45 W. Bay St., Ste. 103, Jacksonville, FL 32202-3632.

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FROM THE EDITOR We’re playing RIGHT INTO his hands

DESANTIS’

TRUMP WHISTLE

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LAST WEEK WEEK, JAWS DROPPED WHEN FRESHLY FRESHLYanointed Republican gubernatorial primary victor Ron DeSantis took to Fox News to warn voters not to “monkey this up” and elect “articulate” Andrew Gillum who “performed well” in debates. A bum rush ensued to deem his statement a “racist dog whistle”—as it is. There’s no denying that referring to monkeys when speaking of black people appeals to racists. So abhorrent was his comment that it made national news bigly, all but crowding out the incredible come-from-behind primary win by under-funded Gillum against a pack of wealthy, establishment Democrats. The fact that come November, Florida could elect not only its first black governor, but a liberal with a capital ‘L’, for the first time, gosh, ever, got relegated to also-happened. This is a great strategy if we want Ron DeSantis to be the next governor of Florida. Reach into the way back machine of your memory and recall the 2016 presidential campaign. When Donald Trump won the Republican presidential primary, Democrats celebrated, even laughed. No way, they said, could a verbally incontinent lunatic with zero experience best a born-and-bred stateswoman with serious bona fides. This smug certainty spread with every mockery of a disabled reporter, “grab them by the p*ssy” tape, and incitement of violence at his campaign rallies, which felt something like roadside carnival versions of ’50s America. There was a pattern to the campaign: Trump would say or do something shocking, stupid, blatantly false and/or racist. The media would explode with pearl-clutching and condemnation, playing the clip over and over to give every pancake-makeup-faced pundit a chance to sink their fangs in; meanwhile, his supporters were eating it up like the red meat it was. Plus they were getting increasingly irate at the piling-on of negative press over what, in some cases, wasn’t much of a much. As I took in the avalanche of “monkey this up” tweets and newscasts, I recalled the woman who called me crying a day or two after Trump’s election. She blamed me for the outcome, saying my calling Trump “Cheeto Hitler” a week prior had convinced people to vote for him. Now, I don’t flatter myself into believing that an op-ed by an altweekly editor could possibly sway a national election, but she was right; I helped Trump become president. So did CNN, The New York Times, The Washington Post—basically every major media outlet, plus the vast majority of the local

ones. We gave Trump a platform and he used it, and us, to win. Sure, we were technically doing our job by pointing out the awful things he was saying and doing, but the unnecessary constancy and feverish rabidity convinced a whole hell of a lot of people to vote for Trump, whom they viewed as an underdog unfairly maligned by the liberal elite. Hillary Clinton’s inept campaign had a lot to do with it, of course, but much of Trump’s ground game was supplied by the media. This is not to say that DeSantis’ statement doesn’t deserve to be condemned and covered. But the more we ratchet up into a frenzy that blocks out all else, the less we are covering real stories, and the more we are helping his campaign. If Trump has taught us anything, it should be this. Citizens do need to know when Ron DeSantis says or does something horrible. But they likewise need to know that he proposed legislation to defund the Mueller investigation in August 2017. Since then, there have been 32 indictments in Mueller’s probe, including 26 Russians and four former Trump campaign staffers. Yet even today, DeSantis doesn’t believe the Trump campaign conspired with the Russians. It’s important that people know when a candidate says something appalling. I submit it is also important they know that DeSantis has spoken against football players kneeling the anthem to protest police brutality. I’m sure everyone reading this knows DeSantis is a Trump sycophant. But do they also know he’s pledged to sign a bill banning abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected, at roughly six to eight weeks of pregnancy? And that he wants more guns in schools? Rather than the shock of the day and little else, voters should be informed that the American Conservative Union ranks DeSantis as “the most conservative member of Congress in Florida.” Out of a possible 100, his lifetime rating is 99.17, nearly 20 points higher than John McCain’s; in 2017, he was 26 points more conservative than Mitch McConnell and 20 points more than John Rutherford. He’s also essentially vowed to pack the state Supreme Court with far-right extremists whose views will be a far cry from most who live in this diverse, purply-blue state. Racist dog whistles are worth reporting; speak of such as you must. But when you do, think of the dogs who will trot obediently to the polling booth every time they hear that signal, no matter whose mouth it comes from. Claire Goforth claire@folioweekly.com @clairenjax


THE MAIL BUTTERFLY EFFECT

RE.: “Stepmother of Butterflies,” by Dawn Hudson, Aug. 22 THANK YOU FOR THE ARTICLE ON MONARCH milkweed. We didn’t know that the monarch was an endangered species along with honeybees, so I ordered some free seeds online and made a donation to the Live Monarch Foundation. The reason for the importance of our pollinators in this world is obvious and can’t be stressed enough. Suds Harrison & Elizabeth Cash via email

ANOTHER IDEA

RE: “Lynch Pin,” by Claire Goforth, July 18 WHAT KIND OF DARK MIND THINKS LYNCHING IS A thing to memorialize in a city? OK, in the Alabama museum for that purpose, but a bad idea for Jacksonville. Did the lynchings happen? Yes. Are they acts we need to publicly shame and memorialize 90 years later? No. In that line of reasoning, why not memorialize all those Timucua the Spanish murdered because they wouldn’t accept Jesus? Or the poor souls killed by drunk or bad drivers? How about a pile of handguns representing the unrelenting murders that are the current cancer in Duval’s belly? Weld on another handgun or knife with each new murder, and at a rate of about 140 murders a year, it will soon cover Hemming Park. (This city’s leaders should display some guts and halve the murder rate–at least–before they spend a dime on anything else.) Folio Weekly, how about leading with something positive? Think Statue of Liberty, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Pyramids, the Space Needle even. How about a monument to Duval County teachers? A mixed-race community dinner? Some cool fountain that nods to the river, creeks, lakes and ocean that give this place character? I’d take a statue of a bass dancing with a kingfish over a lynching memorial. The residents of this city need some inspiration, encouragement, something really positive. If you can’t come up with something better than memorializing murder, how about a big honking football? That seems to be about the only thing most everyone in this city

is capable of getting together to support. And if we included, say, a swoosh logo on the ball, I bet Nike would pay for it. So you get a freebie memorial, which seems to be a motivating factor in your yearning for the hideous lynching symbol. Richard Wall via email

OVERSET

READERS REACT TO “MORE TREASON PLEASE,” by Bart Welling, Aug. 15

REASON IS TREASON

TREASON IS GOOD! TRUTH ISN’T TRUTH! DON’T believe what you see and read. This op-ed makes it perfectly clear how Dear Leader Trump (working with Kim Jong Un and a shirtless Putin) will save us all from the perils of liberty and freedom. замечательно! Joe Flowers via Facebook

THE QUIET ONE

MY WORD, HOW SCATTERED, ALL OVER THE MAP. IS Mr. Welling the “ whiner” the “true American patriot”? Or a Ph.D.-holding associate professor who simply cannot hear enough of his dreadfully clever self? Blah, snore, oh, be quiet, please, pleaded the reader. Delia R. Wright via email

NEVER GONNA LET YOU DOWN

CAME FOR THE INTELLIGENT CONVERSATION AND WAS NOT disappointed. Jason Yurgartis via Facebook

SILENCE AIN’T GOLDEN ANYMORE

IT WASN’T HIS BEHAVIOR THAT WAS TREASONOUS; it was the words that he spoke. But, hey, at least we know what was said in the private meeting, well, at least what Putin is saying, because Trump still hasn’t said a word. Creg Morse via Facebook

LEND YOUR VOICE If you’d like to respond to something you read in the pages of Folio Weekly, please send an email (with your name, address, and phone number for verification purposes only) to mail@folioweekly.com, visit us at folioweekly.com or follow us on Twitter or Facebook (@folioweekly) and join the conversation.

BRICKBATS + BOUQUETS BRICKBATS TO THE CITY OF JACKSONVILLE Days after the tragic mass shooting at The Jacksonville Landing, the T-U reports that city inspectors responded to a question about maximum capacity by issuing a “cease and desist” to the business, Chicago Pizza and GLHF, for violating the fire code and blaming it for the shooting.

BOUQUETS TO THE TRUSTEES OF FSCJ A reader writes, “Milt Russos, the DeCicco twins [Erik and Aaron], and all others involved with their success of the past several Annual High School Musical Theatre Experiences and in particular their recent presentation of Young Frankenstein the musical (or is that ‘Stine’?). Thank you FSCJ for bringing us current Broadway instead of the crusty old classics!” BRICKBATS TO RON DESANTIS The day after he won the Republican gubernatorial primary, DeSantis warned voters not to “monkey this up” by voting for Democratic nominee Andrew Gillum. Gillum is black. DO YOU KNOW SOMEONE WHO DESERVES A BOUQUET? HOW ABOUT A BRICKBAT? Send submissions to mail@folioweekly.com; 50 word maximum, concerning a person, place, or topic of local interest. SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 5


REAL *********ING TALK ARIES SPEARS

The comic and celebrity impersonator—we’re here for his treatment of LL Cool Jay (plum juice, indeed). He calls Eddie Murphy his hero, and truly he wears the impression mantle well. Spears appears 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 6; 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Sept. 7 & 8, The Comedy Zone, Mandarin, comedyzone.com, $25-$127.50.

OUR PICKS ALL SOULS TOWARD TRUTH

BEN ADKINS

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MON

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THE LAST FIVE YEARS

Breakin’ up is hard to do ... but in the right writer’s hands, it’s funny, too. The Last Five Years is about a five-year marriage: all the weird ups, downs and uncomfortable spaces in between. It’s staged 7:30 p.m. Sept. 6, 7 & 8 and 2:30 p.m. Sept. 9, Amelia Musical Playhouse, Fernandina, $15, ameliamusicalplayhouse.com, $15-$20.

THU

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MADDEST MEN THE MADS FROM MST3K

Maybe your memories include late nights in a dorm common room, watching a couple of weird guys and their even odder friends deliver, um, commentary over “excellent” films. Perhaps they don’t but you wish they did. Welp, here’s your chance to out-nerd your nerdiest friend, as Mystery Science Theater 3000’s Frank Conniff and Trace Beaulieu skewer bad films live, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 5 & Thursday, Sept. 6, Sun-Ray Cinema, (Different film each night), sunraycinema.com, $30/show, $45/both. WED

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REASONS TO LEAVE THE HOUSE THIS WEEK

Drummer Adkins has been getting a lot of notice lately from his stellar work with Raisin Cake Orchestra to his recent nomination for an Independent Music Award. He’s also working on performing Michael Brecker’s legendary album Time Is of the Essence with saxophonist Seamus Blake in October. Your next chance to catch the musician who describes his sound as “subtle and minimal” is 10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8, The Parlour, San Marco, benadkinsmusic.com.

she hated the Payless boots she wore in deference to her veganism (so reports the NY Times), brings her Ingénue Redux 25th Anniversary Tour to town. Mak Grgic opens, 8 p.m., Sept. 10, The Florida Theatre, Downtown, floridatheatre.com, $35-$75.

LONG GOOD-BYE

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JAZZ LIFE

SAT

KD LANG The incomparable, iconic Lang, who started performing barefoot because

THU


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FOLIO VOICES : FIGHTIN’ WORDS

REVOLUTIONARY ROAD Jax Pols had better get used to the ACTIVIST LEFT

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LAST TUESDAY, FLORIDA DEMOCRATS VOTED UP what could be the most interesting slate of candidates it has fielded in the modern era. For Attorney General, Sean Shaw, a state representative from the Tampa area whose dad was once on the Florida Supreme Court. If you’re looking for an alternative to Pam Bondi and her political progeny, Judge Ashley Moody, Shaw offers it. For Agriculture Commissioner, Nikki Fried, a cannabis industry lobbyist who, as I wrote here the other week, has a future beyond this race. I interviewed Fried a few weeks back, and her understanding of the cannabis industry and the Ag Commissioner’s potential role in destigmatizing adult-use product was obvious. She also represents a sharp break from the Adam Putnam era when it comes to the consumer services part of the job. Jeremy Ring, a former South Florida state senator running for Chief Financial Officer, is blunt and understands that Florida needs to create jobs that pay a living wage. He represents a drastic difference with incumbent Rick Scott appointee Jimmy Patronis. All strong candidates. All of them addressing the issues our readers face in a state where you can work 60 hours a week but still be behind, a state with a robust carceral industry apparatus, and where all the talk is freedom but, beyond gun rights, there isn’t all that much of it. And then there’s Andrew Gillum. The thing about the Gillum campaign was that for months and months it didn’t seem exactly viable. TV wasn’t covering him, the establishment pols weren’t endorsing, and he’d tend to give variants of the same aspirational speech. I noticed a real change a week before the primary, when he spoke to a packed house at 1904 Music Hall. His bus pulled up late (he had been meeting with preachers at a previous stop). Candidates love these bus tours. That stop was the only one I saw this cycle where the candidate couldn’t get off his bus before being greeted by people who weren’t just leaning toward voting for him, they loved him. That love heated up an already August-hot 1904. Onstage, he looked like a headliner as much as a politician: a commanding presence, because he knew his crowd was feeling him in the homestretch. “I walk it like I talk it,” Gillum said (quoting Migos). “Some of my opponents don’t.” It felt like a winning campaign. Gillum going over made Republicans smile (our own mayor tweeted out a smiley

face). But his formula was a simple one. He knew that if he could solve the money problem (which left-wing billionaires Tom Steyer and George Soros did), he could reach “unlikely voters.” The guy in the White House did that in 2016, but a much different subset thereof. Democrats offer a choice, not an echo, this time out. And a big part of that is outside groups taking a Democratic Party ravaged by infighting and unifying it behind the best personal communicator I’ve ever seen in politics. Locally, Gillum cleaned up—over 50 percent, despite Graham and Levine both playing hard here. Those “unlikely voters” are now likely. They want to see weed legalized. They want to protect women’s rights and restore civil rights to those divested of them by the leviathan carceral state. They want to have laws that are tailored more to their street than Adams Street. Can Gillum win? There’s a lot of ball to play, including what could be an FBI October Surprise in the Tallahassee City Hall investigation (a flurry of alleged influencepeddling that thus far hasn’t seen Gillum named as a target). Trouble for GOP is that the president has clowned the FBI and Justice Department for years, and well, that impeaches their credibility just a bit. But even if Gillum doesn’t win, his ideas will. If DeSantis goes over, do you imagine these newly-energized left-wing troops are going away? No, they will redouble efforts just in time for city elections. And they don’t care much what the donors have to say about it. Our pols don’t know what to do with the energy. They shut down City Council public comment last week, a protest after a floor vote to allow speakers to question individual councilors went down, as those bills Garrett Dennis and Anna Brosche push always seem to do. There is a yawning gap between the vision of the billionaires and the people who live here in the half of the city that looks like everything was built 50 years ago and left in ‘set it and forget it’ mode since. “Let the people speak”: that was the Christian Right’s rallying cry when they wanted a referendum on HRO expansion. That call is back. It won’t go away until it is heeded, and that means we’re going to hear it for the next few elections—at least. A.G. Gancarski mail@folioweekly.com @aggancarski


HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE SING OUT LOUD FESTIVAL

SOL PICKS ALL EVENTS FREE FULL LINEUP AT SINGOUTLOUDFESTIVAL.COM

HAVE EARS, WILL LISTEN HAVE GUN, WILL TRAVEL

Since 2006, Bradenton’s alt-folk-rock band Have Gun, Will Travel has been steadily collecting an ardent following. A few minutes into one of the four-man-band’s rollicking, foot-stomping numbers and you’ll get it. You’ll also be dancing. 9:10 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, Colonial Oak Showcase, 33 St. George St., free.

STEP RIGHT UP

THE YOUNG STEP

The Young Step brings a sound that’s rocking and raw one minute, jazzy and funky the next, then *surprise!* dark and punky. No surprise the band calls its music “obscure and mysterious as the Northeast Florida swampland.” Y’all really should use that line in a song. 11:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, Prohibition Kitchen, 119 St. George St., free.

ONE MAN AND A MIC DONNY BRAZILE

Perennial performer Donny Brazile bares his soul every time he steps up to the mic. A gifted storyteller and seasoned performer who’s opened for the likes of Goo Goo Dolls in their heyday, he’s back home and treating us to gifted guitar and pieces of his heart. 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 9, Dog Rose Brewing, 77 Bridge St., free.

LAUGH OUT LOUD

COMEDY OUT LOUD SHOWCASE

Kinda strange to see lol spelled out, idnit? Well, you’ll be lol-ing all over the place at the Comedy Out Loud Showcase with Chris Buck, Heather Shaw, Zach Bennett and more. 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, Limelight Theatre, 11 Old Mission Ave., free. SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 9


NEWS AAND NOTES: BUMMER EDITION

TOP HEADLINES FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF ALTERNATIVE NEWSMEDIA

< AN AMERICAN COUP

In 1896, 87 percent of eligible black people (that’s men only, btw) in Wilmington, North Carolina voted, forming one of the first mixedrace municipal governments in the nation, according to Intelligence Report, Southern Poverty Law Center’s quarterly. Two years later, white supremacists openly urged people to “vote race, not politics.” A local paper joined the effort, running stories of “real and imagined” conflicts between the races, much of which centered on the falsity that black men posed a danger to white women. The editor of black-owned local pub The Daily Record, Alex Manly, fired back in an editorial on Aug. 18, 1898, writing, “If the papers and speakers of the other race would condemn the commission of crime because it is crime and not try to make it appear that the Negroes were the only criminals, they would find their strongest allies in the intelligent Negroes themselves; and together the whites and blacks would root the evil out of both races.” He also pointed out that love knows no race and continued in this misogynistic thread, “We suggest that the whites guard their women more closely,” Manly wrote, “… thus giving no opportunity for the human fiend, be he white or black. You leave your goods out of doors and then complain because they are taken away.” This line drove the white supremacists wild. “They would use the myth of needing to protect the purity of white womanhood, and their outrage that Manly would dare use The Daily Record to challenge them in such a way, to rouse the rabble,” IR writes. Two days after the election, white supremacists led by former Confederate soldier and U.S. Congressman Alfred Moore Waddell stormed the town, burning The Daily Record to the ground and continuing a swath of death and destruction that left as many as 250 black people dead. Thereafter, Waddell declared himself mayor, installed a government comprising his conspirators, and rewrote history. IR states, “The day after the massacre, the local newspaper The Morning Star proclaimed on its front page, ‘Bloody Conflict with Negroes. White Men Forced to Take Up Arms for the Preservation of Law and Order. Blacks Provoke Trouble.’” The incident also led to suppression of the black vote. Today, North Carolina is actively working to correct the errors in the historic record and honor the victims of the only American coup d’état.

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< DISTURBING AUTHENTICITY

According to Minneapolis’ City Pages, the Minnesota Renaissance Festival is a more accurate depiction of the era than most would like. CP reports that manager and longtime performer Carl Hagerman has been charged with raping a woman at last year’s event. Current employees further told CP that Carr has a longtime history of sexual harassment. (He declined comment through his attorney.) Other women said that sexual harassment is de rigueur at the festival, run by Mid-America Festival.

< COAL HEARTED

Trump’s solar tariffs have impacted Oregon’s solar industry in various ways, reports Eugene Weekly. SolarWorld Industries America celebrates the tariffs for making their products more economically competitive; solar manufacturer and distributor Grape Solar derides them as harmful to their business. In the case of SolarWorld, “a co-petitioner in a case that led to Trump’s 30 percent tariffs on solar firms in China,” the tariffs give them a chance to challenge their Chinese competitors. For Grape Solar, on the other hand, the added cost of imported solar cells and modules makes it more difficult to compete. Some view these protectionist policies as a way to help an industry grow—but such policies typically hurt small businesses the most. Worse yet, these tariffs put a damper on clean energy, making it less competitive with dirty energy.

< THE VOICE GOES SILENT

Aug. 31 was a day of mourning in the altweekly universe. A year after discontinuing its print product and going online-only, The Village Voice, founded in 1955 and from whence we all sprung, announced it was ceasing operations. VV owner Peter Barbey released a statement, saying in part, “In recent years, the Voice has been subject to the increasingly harsh economic realties facing those creating journalism and written media. Like many others in publishing, we were continually optimistic that relief was around the next corner. Where stability for our business is, we do not know yet. The only thing that is clear now is that we have not reached that destination.” There is a chance, albeit slim, that a buyer will emerge to resurrect VV from the ashes. One can only hope. Viva la Voice!


FOLIO VOICES : E PLURIBUS JAX

A CLASSROOM CALLED

AMERICA

GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP at San Jose Elementary ON WORLD OF NATIONS DAY EACH MAY AT SAN JOSE Elementary School, each classroom adopts one of the 20 nations represented by the school’s student population, and students bring their passports from one country to another. In just one day, students might travel through Burma, Sudan, Syria, Thailand, Ukraine, Iraq and China, playing traditional

games, celebrating the colorful attire of the Middle and Far East, Eastern Europe, and Africa. “These children make me feel hopeful,” says Principal Paula Smith. “Sometimes when kids are new, Spanish-speaking or Arabicspeaking kids might stick together, but when they feel more comfortable, they acclimate themselves to children from other places. They work together.” Not only does Smith see a true rainbow coalition in the 840 kids who attend San Jose Elementary School, students with backgrounds in at least 13 different languages, but she witnesses daily the incredible adaptability and curiosity of the brains of young children. San Jose offers both an ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) program and a Dual Language program that teaches content equally in both English and Spanish. Some students even work through both programs. One Vietnamese child started in ESOL and once she’d become fluent in English, entered San Jose’s Dual Language program. Though still in elementary school, she’s already trilingual. When Smith was new to the school four years ago, ESOL classes were “sheltered,” kept separate from students who were native speakers of English. Smith restructured the classes to blend ESOL and standard first grade. Some classes have students from seven or eight native languages who all work together to learn English. ESOL students were able to acclimate quickly without the pace of learning slowing down for standard first graders. The explanation is simple, Smith says. “Children are sponges.” She says it’s not uncommon to see “children completely unused to English” at

the start of a school year in August “begin to blossom by December.” The teachers at San Jose work to create “readable classrooms,” Smith says. “Best practices include building word banks, word walls, and thinking maps. Students are encouraged to read the room.” It’s a smaller and safer model of how they’ll one day have to read the world, and with group work, peer collaboration, and learning made fun, San Jose’s students can learn, this early in life, to love the process. It’s also important, Smith points out, that kids aren’t just taught English or Spanish as skills, but taught content in each language they’re learning. Even in college-level standard writing pedagogy, debate has at times raged over whether to teach writing solely as a skill or to teach via content. It’s obvious nobody reads or communicates without listening or having something to say. For example, San Jose’s kindergartners, second graders and fourth graders learn science entirely in Spanish, while first, third, and fifth graders learn science exclusively in English. Students learn math in Spanish the years they don’t learn science in Spanish and the same with English. The result differs greatly from college students taking two courses in Spanish, French or German, but remembering very little of it five years later. “After four years,” Smith says, “students are fluent in both Spanish and English— reading, writing and speaking—and they’ll have learned the traditional course content they would have learned in a different setting as well.” Making such a sophisticated multicultural enterprise work requires a highly educated staff, often under-appreciated and always

underpaid. When I ask Smith how many languages the school’s staff speaks, she says, “At least four,” then her eyes flit upward as she thinks. She quickly amends the statement. “English, Spanish, Burmese—we have about 115 Burmese students here. We have an Arabic translator, a Farsi translator. Oh, one Spanish translator also speaks German, and one or two of them also speak Portuguese.” Obviously, plenty of Florida counties don’t have as wide a mastery of language as the staff at this one Jacksonville elementary school. In the 24 years Smith has worked in Duval County Public Schools, she’s rarely seen the level of family participation she sees at San Jose. In fact, because San Jose offers educational opportunities that often trickle up to the adults in foreign-born and refugee families, sponsors a multitude of cultural event nights to which whole families are welcome, and—as San Jose is a Title I school, meaning a large number of children come from low-income families—grants free or reduced lunches to many of its students, San Jose Elementary has become a pillar of its community. The school sponsors “field trips” to local Publix groceries to help shop, understand pricing, and work budgets. The activity is a standard of refugee education, and besides teaching math and accounting skills, also helps acculturate children and their families. “The kids at this school,” Smith says with a proud smile, “get a great foundation to be global citizens, to be American citizens in a global world.” Timothy Gilmore EPluribus@folioweekly.com _____________________________________ E Pluribus Jax profiles unique individuals and groups that comprise and define our community.

SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 11


It’s that time of year again, when all the artists in NEFLa unveil their newest works, from installations and sculptures to performances and interventions. We’ve taken a look at what’s happening and offer you, dear reader, this edited, arts-focused list. And for those of you all sweaty and excited about the fall concert lineup, we’ve got you covered, too, with the most comprehensive list of live music in all of the land (if not the land, at least on the First Coast). So tear this guide out, mark it up, and don’t nevah say we ain’t got art in The 904. PG. 14 MAKING THE

PG. 16

CRUISIN’ FOR A

DREAM WORK

BRUISIN’

Jacksonville Dance Theatre moves the HEART & MIND story by Madeleine Peck Wagner

UK hard-rock kings DEEP PURPLE bring a metallic wallop to Daily’s Place story by Daniel A. Brown

PG. 20 50 YEARS A

FIREBRAND MC5 co-founder WAYNE KRAMER sets the record straight about his legendary band and its lasting legacy story by Nick McGregor

FALL ARTS EVENTS LISTING Ongoing

Photographer Gideon Mendel’s DROWNING WORLD, on view through Dec. 9; IN THE WATER, waterthemed works from MOCA’s permanent collection through Dec. 16; CLOSE ENCOUNTERS: ADAM’S MADAM, Claire Ashley’s Atrium Project, through Nov. 4; MOCA Jacksonville, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, mocajacksonville.unf.edu. “Oh, the thinks you can think!” with SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL, through Sept. 23, Orange Park Community Theatre, 2900 Moody Ave., $25, opct.org. CIRO QUINTANA, SOPHIE DARE & JOHN WOODS display works through October, Thrasher-Horne Center, 283 College Dr., Orange Park, thcenter.org. Local/regional art, crafts, produce, live music, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. every Sat., RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET, under Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com. THE LOST BIRD PROJECT, through Oct. 21; FIELDS OF COLOR: THE ART OF JAPANESE PRINTMAKING, through Nov. 25; Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., 356-6857, cummermuseum.org. MISSION: JAX GENIUS, 12 local makers encourage curiosity, interactivity and feedback. EARTH EXPLORERS, 12 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

through Sept. 9. NATIVE NETWORKS: CULTURAL INTERACTIONS WITHIN & BEYOND NORTHEAST FLORIDA, through September. HALL OF HEROES opens Sept. 22. SCIENCE ON TAP, Sept. 12. Planetarium Night Live, BIG BANG! NUFF SAID Oct. 19; FROM ATOMS TO ASHES: THE LIVES OF STARS, Dec. 21; all at Museum of Science & History, 1025 Museum Cir., Southbank, 396-6674, themosh.org. PHOTOBOOTH: New Works by Erin Kendrick, runs through Oct. 13, Cathedral Arts Project, 207 N. Laura St., Ste. 300, Downtown, 281-5599. Erin Kendrick’s HER OWN THINGS, through Oct. 3, Yellow House, 577 King St., Riverside, 419-9180, yellowhouseart.org.

September

THE MADS FROM MST3K, Frank Conniff and Trace Beaulieu, screen bad films and trash them, 7 p.m. Sept. 5 & 6, Sun-Ray Cinema, 5 Points, sunraycinema.com, $30-$45. Browse arts & crafts, or grab a snack & drink and wander the Urban Core at FIRST WEDNESDAY ART WALK, 5 p.m. Sept. 5 and every first Wed., Downtown, jacksonvilleartwalk.com.

LUISA POSADA BLEIER’s show closes with a reception, 5 p.m. Sept. 5, Space 42, 2670 Phyllis St., Riverside, spacefortytwo.com. A CLASSIC THEATRE auditions for 1984, 2 p.m. Sept. 5, Ste. 105, 2085 A1A S., St. Augustine, aclassictheatre@hotmail.com.

Musical Playhouse, 1955 Island Walkway, Fernandina, $15, ameliamusicalplayhouse.com. Emily Cohen discusses design in BRUTALLY HONEST, 6 p.m. Sept. 6, MOCAJax, eventbrite.com, $30.

Jacinta Chaminade reads from her new play, PIETÁ, and Joseph Shuck displays works, 6:30 p.m. Sept. 6, CoRK Arts District (North Building), 603 King St., Riverside, artful.ly/store/events/15876, $10.

Folklore, technology, pop culture, technology and racial tensions: Atlanta-based artist Jiha Moon examines these in DOUBLE WELCOME, MOST EVERYONE’S MAD HERE. Artist’s talk 4 p.m. Sept. 7; opening 5 p.m., Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, 74 King St., St. Augustine, flagler.edu/crispellert.

Cummer Museum presents ARTISTS & WORLD WAR I: THE BATTLEFRONT, first in a four-part series examining how artists depicted the Great War and the postwar world, 1-2:30 p.m. Sept. 6, members free; $10 nonmembers, cummermuseum.org.

One of the sweetest stories ever, JAMES & THE GIANT PEACH, directed by Lee Hamby, opens 8 p.m. Sept. 7 and runs through Sept. 23, All Beaches Experimental Theatre, 544 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 249-7177, $12-$25, abettheatre.com.

BIG TICKLE COMEDY SHOWCASE, with local and regional comics, 8 p.m. Sept. 6, Blue Jay Listening Room, 412 N. Second St., Jax Beach, 834-1315, $15.

MICHELLE DAILY shows works inspired by “street lights and sidewalks and just everyday observations,” through October. Opening reception, 6 p.m. Sept. 7, Brew Five Points, 707-7723.

It’s fascinating to see what college art professors find interesting. Jacksonville University holds its FACULTY BIENNIAL EXHIBITION, 5 p.m. Sept. 6-26, Alexander Brest Gallery, 2800 University Blvd. N., Arlington, ju.edu/cfa. Breakin’ up is hard to do ... but in the right writer’s hands, it’s funny, too. THE LAST 5 YEARS chronicles a five-year marriage; runs 7:30 p.m. Sept. 6-9, Amelia

You had us at “girl fights Vikings.” THIS GIRL LAUGHS, THIS GIRL CRIES, THIS GIRL DOES NOTHING is about three children, abandoned by their father in a forest, and how they survive. It runs 7 p.m. Sept. 7, 8, 13, 14 & 15; 2 p.m. Sept. 9, Amelia Community Theatre, 207/209 Cedar St., Fernandina, $15-$25, ameliacommunitytheatre.org.


Renee Spahr’s works HAUNTED EXPECTATIONS opens 7 p.m. Sept. 7, Karpeles Museum, Springfield, kmuseumjax@sol.com. Costumes encouraged.

REFLECT UP? opens 6 p.m. Sept. 12, runs through Oct. 7, Alhambra Theatre & Dining, 12000 Beach Blvd., 641-1212, alhambrajax.com, $38-$59.

DAMSEL screens 1 & 6:30 p.m., THREE IDENTICAL STRANGERS runs 3 and 7:15 p.m., starting Sept. 7. The French film A MAN CALLED OVE screens noon Sept. 8. Prison reformer Wendy Tatter introduces MASS INCARCERATION; a panel discussion follows, 5 p.m. Sept. 9, Corazon Cinema & Café, 36 Granada St., St. Augustine, 679-5736.

Associate Curator Nelda Damiano discusses URBAN SPACES, OPEN SKIES: 20th-CENTURY AMERICAN LANDSCAPE, over a cup of tea and a sweet treat, 1:30 p.m. Sept. 12, Cummer Museum, members free; nonmembers $6, cummermuseum.org.

The MELANIN FEST has music, art and culture (the biggest one yet), 7 p.m. Sept. 7 & 8, DuPont Center, 40 E. Adams St., Downtown, eventbrite.com, $20.

DEEP PURPLE & JUDAS PRIEST take the stage 7 p.m. Sept. 12, Daily’s Place, Northbank, ticketmaster.com, $69.25-$139.25.

THE CRAFT OF ART: A FEMININE APPROACH, curated by artist/attorney Deborah Reid, opens 5:30 p.m. Sept. 7, 1610 Osceola St., Riverside, womenwritingjacksonville.com.

THE ARTIST SERIES KICK-OFF is 5 p.m. Sept. 12, with local food trucks, door prizes, wine-tasting, cash bar, live music by The Chris Thomas Band and a performance from Rodgers & Hammerstein’s The King & I, Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts, 300 Water St., Downtown, fscjartistseries.org.

The faculty percussion recital of new compositions by ANDREA VENET is 6:30 p.m. Sept. 7, University of North Florida’s Fine Arts Center, Southside, unf.edu, free.

A safe space for poets of all stripes to “stretch their voices,” BARDS & BREWS is 9 p.m. Sept. 12, The Silver Cow, 929 Edgewood Ave. S., Murray Hill, free.

A TRIBUTE TO THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE JAZZ & POETRY LEGENDS includes art, poetry and jazz with a 1920s focus, 6 p.m. Sept. 7, FSCJ Kent Campus, 3939 Roosevelt Blvd., Riverside, jazzpoetrycafe.com, $27-$30.

The incomparable documentarian KEN BURNS screens his new film, Faith, Hope, Science. A discussion with the filmmaker follows, 7 p.m. Sept. 13, UNF’s Lazzara Hall, wjct.org, free but registration required.

Printmaker DEBRA MIXON HOLLIDAY, Butterfield Art Garage’s September artist of the month, chats about her process, 6 p.m. Sept. 7, 137 King St., St. Augustine, butterfieldgarage.com.

A regional conference addressing capacity building, public art and the power of artists and arts organizations to affect social change, THE STATE OF THE ARTS NEFLa Arts & Culture Council features speaker Barbara Goldstein, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 13, St. John’s Cathedral, 256 E. Church St., Downtown, culturalcouncil.org, $30.

JACKSONVILLE DANCE THEATRE and Los Angeles-based Nancy Evans Dance Theatre share the stage, with a spectrum of American eclectic modern dance forms, 8 p.m. Sept. 8, Munnerlyn Center for Worship & Fine Arts, Episcopal School of Jacksonville, 4455 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, jacksonvilledancetheatre.org, $12-$25. As part of the Sing Out Loud Festival, ANCIENT CITY POETS hosts a showcase, 6:30 p.m. Sept. 8, Limelight Theatre, 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine, singoutlousfestival.com. A reading of the new play, OK, SIERRA by playwright Adam Nathaniel Davis, 8 p.m. Sept. 8, Phase Eight Theater Company, WJCT Studios, 100 Festival Park Ave., Northbank, writing.voyage/oksierra, donation. It’s PABLO BEACH TRAIN DAY! Celebrating all things train with three operating model layouts, tours of a 1911 steam locomotive, the 1900 Florida East Coast Foreman’s House and the Mayport Depot, 9:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. Sept. 8, Beaches Museum & History Park, 381 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach, members free; nonmembers $5, beachesmuseum.org. AUDITIONS held for Wait Until Dark, a play about a blind woman trying to elude three murderers and survive the night, 2 p.m. Sept. 8, ABET, Neptune Beach, abettheatre.com. AHOY JAX! Ride through history on the St. Johns River with MOSH and St. Johns River Taxi, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Sept. 8 & every Sat., 1025 Museum Cir., Southbank, $12-$15, themosh.org. Fernandina Beach’s SECOND SATURDAY ARTRAGEOUS ARTWALK has photography, pottery, copper, metal, fused and stained glass, watercolors, acrylics, oils and batik, 5 p.m. Sept. 8 and every second Sat., islandart.org. The LAWSON ENSEMBLE performs Mozart, Haydn, Sussmayr and Schickele, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 8, UNF’s Fine Arts Center, unf.edu, free. AL SCORTINO, CHARLEY SIMMONS & SUZ GRANDY perform in the round, Second Sunday at Stetson’s, 2 p.m. Sept. 9, Beluthahatchee Park, 1523 S.R. 13, sundaysatstetsons@gmail.com, $10. Music @ Main’s SUNDAY INTERMEZZO with Ann Adams, Carol Griffin, Artie Clifton, Ted Shistle, Matt Monroe and Angelo Goderre, 3 p.m. Sept. 9, Oct. 14 and Dec. 9, Main Library, 303 N. Laura St., Downtown, free. KD LANG brings her Ingénue Redux 25th Anniversary Tour to town, Mak Grgic opens, 8 p.m. Sept. 10, The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787, floridatheatre.com, $35-$75. Vocalist TODD WEDGE joins JU faculty members Kimberly Beasley and Edith Moore Hubert performing Duparc, Schubert and Delius, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 11, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, free. A coming-of-age tale about the life and love of Eddie and Becky, DO BLACK PATENT LEATHER SHOES REALLY

DIERKS BENTLEY brings his Mountain High Tour to NEFLa, with Brothers Osborne and Lanco, 7 p.m. Sept. 13, Daily’s Place, ticketmaster.com, $60-$90.50. The UNF JAZZ FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP CONCERT, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 13, Robinson Theater, Southside, unf. edu/mastercalendar, $8-$15. The Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach hosts a dinner for internationally recognized Jacksonville-based painter, Dennis Campay, 8 p.m. Sept. 13, Eleven South, ccpvb.org, $150. CORY DRISCOLL releases his new album Tropical Depression, 7 p.m. Sept. 14, Cummer Museum, coryjdriscoll.com. Little old ladies poisoning little old men: ARSENIC & OLD LACE is a beloved farce that’s one of the most produced American plays of all time. It opens 8 p.m. Sept. 14; through Sept. 30, Theatre Jacksonville, 2032 San Marco Blvd., theatrejax.com. HONEYED BRANCHES, featuring works of Kevin Arthur, Justin Brosten, Ana Kamiar and Carolyn Jernigan, opens 6 p.m. Sept. 14, Rain Dogs, 1045 Park St., 5 Points; through November. Classical guitarist BRIAN LUCKETT explores solo and chamber music repertoire of the 20th & 21st centuries, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 14, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, free. THE SONGS OF SONDHEIM, 8 p.m. Sept. 14, The 5 & Dime, 112 E. Adams St., Downtown, $25, the5anddime.org. We don’t get it, either: STING & SHAGGY, THE 44/876 TOUR, 8 p.m. Sept. 14, Daily’s Place, ticketmaster.com, $70.75-$161.25. The JACKSONVILLE FILM FESTIVAL returns! Sept. 14 & 15, details at jacksonvillefilmfestival.com. BRANFORD MARSALIS and the Jacksonville Symphony open the season with Conductor Courtney Lewis, \8 p.m. Sept. 15, T-U Center, Downtown, jaxsymphony.org, $51-$129. The HISPANIC HERITAGE CELEBRATION features LPT and Kim Reteguiz & the Black Cat Bones, 5 p.m. Sept. 15, Hemming Park, Downtown. Friends of the Corazon offer a free screening of THE MOUNTAIN BETWEEN US; read the book, see the film, 4:15 p.m. Sept. 15, Corazon Cinema & Café, 36 Granada St., St. Augustine, 679-5736. RICHARD SHIELDHOUSE discusses William Morgan: Evolution of an Architect, about the much-lauded architect who built, among many iconic structures,

CONTINUES ON PAGE 17 >>> SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 13


MAKING THE

DREAM

Jonah Bokaer performing Curtain. Photo by Liza Voll, courtesy Long Road Projects.

WORK

Jacksonville Dance Theatre moves the HEART & MIND story by MADELEINE PECK WAGNER

14 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

W

e are not a ballet company,” states Jacksonville Dance Theatre’s Executive Director Katie McCaughan. We’re sitting in the small, utilitarian office inside the Florida Theatre Building which is home to the troupe, and we’re talking about what it means, ideologically as well as logistically, to have a professional contemporary dance company in Jacksonville. We laugh a lot, but underneath the laughter is hope, resilience and the knowledge that the only way to help the city embrace contemporary art in all its forms is to put bodies where belief is. “Our aesthetic is informed and shaped by Rebecca Levy and Tiffany Fish’s overarching vision. In terms of our sentiment, our mission, that thing that drives and underlines what we do, is a commitment to each other as friends, artists and diverse bodies … humans who have something to offer,” answers McCaughan when asked about the ideas that shape the way JDT moves through the world. Dancers Tiffany Fish, Rebecca Levy and Katie McCaughan are founders of the nonprofit Jacksonville Dance Theatre. The trio founded the company when all three were dance instructors who weren’t yet ready to give up making art. That was 2012; since then, the troupe has expanded its footprint, arguably becoming the city’s most cutting-edge performers making some of the most compelling art in the Southeast. “We started making work,” recalls Levy, “about summer 2012 … we would make great works together, but we didn’t have a codified company or language. We were just really dedicated to the art form. So when we progressed past that, when we decided to make work for the purpose of a company … it wasn’t, like, one day we were, like, ‘let’s make some art.’ We were already kind of doing it.” That early conversation took place, as the trio recalls it, at McCaughan’s kitchen table over fish tacos and wine. “I asked: ‘Do you guys want to start a dance company?’ And they said yes,” recounts Artistic Director Rebecca Levy, with a chuckle. It wasn’t as happenstance as all that, though. Levy reveals she purchased the domain name before relocating here, while still in Los Angeles. Clearly, Levy had some prescience about what she wanted to do. And though the three are highly respected in Jacksonville’s dance community, they’re not the only dancers who’ve returned, or moved here, for a variety of reasons. Additionally, the dance programs at Jacksonville University and FSCJ (where each of the three now teach or have taught) have strong programs, and the presence of a professional dance company is an opportunity for young dancers to deepen their connection to the craft. When asked what the meat of their mission is, McCaughan leaps in. “We try to value each other and uplift. We try to incubate the younger dancers who are coming up in our company,” she explains. With a track record that includes continued growth, collaborations (national and international), community outreach and grants from The Community Foundation of Northeast Florida, Florida Division of Cultural Affairs, the city of Jacksonville and PNC Arts Alive grant, they’re doing just that. The incremental but steady success JDT has enjoyed is a marker of its deep, abiding commitment to smart, inclusive ideas, often marked with and by collaboration and risk-taking.

I

still remember the first JDT performance I saw, held in the Episcopal School of Jacksonville’s theater. I walked in just as McCaughan was finishing up her opening remarks. Her comments centered around the idea that dance exists only in the moment of its making. It’s a concept that has stuck with me for years: this idea of an utterly fleeting form, that perhaps more than any other art, needs to be witnessed in person. But more than reinforcing the necessity of viewing art—any kind of art—in person, it forcibly removes dance from static presentations so dramatically seen in still photography and represents it as a living form. As I settled into a seat toward the back of the


Stakes is High performed by Jacksonville Dance Theatre at the Florida Theatre, choreographed by James Morrow. Photo by Seth Langer, courtesy of Jacksonville Dance Theatre.

auditorium, this perception lingered but, as the performances started, I felt removed from linear time, as if I were being granted the privilege of watching something sacred and deeply personal unfold. Since then, I’ve tried to make it to as many of JDT’s performances as possible. The result has been that the opportunity to bear witness to the company’s evolution is also a tangible reminder of the value of arts. It’s not so much about dollars and cents, about new condos and convention centers—it’s about the way art impacts the spirit. The way that a heart can soar when a dancer leaps, or convulsions of laughter can grip when a particularly absurd scene (dancing donuts, for instance) is danced.

W

hile we’re here, though, let’s briefly—really briefly—touch on dollars, cents and community engagement. In the approximately five years that JDT has been in operation, it has always been a professional troupe. The dancers are paid, as are any guest artists, collaborators, designers or composers and, according to JDT’s records, because of its professional mien, the company had an economic impact of $83,551 since inception. In terms of business, that number might feel modest, but in terms of what that means for a cultural organization in Jacksonville, it is huge. At a time when the Cultural Council is being lambasted for “mismanaged administrative expenses” and a local museum has sold off a major asset (Joan Mitchell’s Iva) in an attempt to raise funds, to be in the black speaks as much to the tenacity of the troupe as it does to members’ ethics and commitment. Yet, the value of art is essentially ineffable and impossible to quantify. “I am often asked to articulate why art—and specifically dance— is inherently valuable, or to describe what a return on an investment in the arts would look like,” says McCaughan. “These are fine and good questions that I often have a very simple answer for. Why should we value and invest in the arts? So that they exist. So that the people who have dedicated their lives to being in art, teaching that art, producing that art, are valued. And not just valued with praise. Accolades don’t pay rent or support a family. How do we begin to shift the inherent value we give to the arts to a tangible value the artists who contribute their talents and energies to their communities can actually feel? There are very few other professions that we as a society ask people to do for free. I believe in providing sustainable opportunities for dance-making, health and wellness, and community and cultural advancement here in Jacksonville.”

In addition to bringing the kind of contemporary dance most often experienced in larger more cosmopolitan areas, the women rely on the friendships they’ve built to bring singular collaborations to the stage. In September alone, the dance theater is presenting two programs, each of which is a joint effort. With these works, there are opportunities for Jacksonville aficionados to see internationally lauded artists, with significant pedigrees.

O

n Saturday, Sept. 8, JDT takes the stage with the Los Angelesbased Nancy Evans Dance Theatre. It’s especially exciting, explains Levy, because NEDT draws from the dance lineage of Hanya Holm. Holm is considered to be one of the “Big Four” founders of American modern dance, but she’s less well-known to those outside the dance community. Creative Director Tiffany Fish speculates this comes from Holm’s methodology. “For me, what distinguishes Hanya Holm within the pioneers of modern dance is also what makes her one of the less-recognizable members of this distinguished group. Instead of asking her students and performers to copy her codified movement language, she gave them agency to create from their own experience and the freedom to explore what was authentic to them. She was interested in using movement as a form of communication instead of a visual portrayal of form.” Indeed, in She Was Here, a piece Fish choreographed for the company this year, she seems to have taken cues from Holm’s methods. “I didn’t have a lot of time to make a piece that I wanted to be pretty long [it ended up being about 16 minutes], and I only had a month to make it. So I knew I had to generate movement material based off of my performers. I had to allow their bodies to create something in real time and then to take that and instead of being a choreographer ... [I was] choreographic director,” she explains. Later, on Sept. 26, JDT performs the world premiere of the piece Did I Remember, a new work by internationally acclaimed choreographer and media artist Jonah Bokaer. It’s the culmination of a multi-week residency with Long Road Projects. Bokaer has been a professional dancer (dance-maker, as The Australian turned the phrase) since age 18, and a dancer in Merce Cunningham’s company. In addition to his personal practice, in 2007 he and John Jasperse founded the Center for Performance Research in NYC, which gives time and space to dancers

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FALL ARTS PREVIEW

I

t’s a riff so well-known, some now hear it as a joke. But when Deep Purple released the 1972 classic “Smoke on the Water,” it was no laughing matter. That song’s simple opening riff, a kind of rudimentary blues lick, has become a rock signifier and icon in its own right. Part of its appeal is in its ease at being recognizable and for its simplicity mastered by a legion of budding guitarists. “Smoke on the Water” hit No. 4 on Billboard’s Hot 100. Before that success, and like their UK peers Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath, Deep Purple had already taken the blueprint created by the likes of Cream, Jeff Beck Group and Vanilla Fudge and carved out a whole new genre: heavy metal. Formed in Hertford, England in 1968, Deep Purple started out with psychedelic and progressive rock stylings. The first lineup–vocalist Rod Evans, guitarist Ritchie Blackmore, bassist Nick Simper, keyboardist Jon Lord and drummer Ian Paice– released three albums. Those efforts had their moments both artistic and commercial (1968’s “Hush” also hit No. 4 on Billboard’s Hot 100; it’s still a fan favorite), but it wasn’t until the release of ’70’s Deep Purple in Rock that the band dimed out the amps, ramped up the intensity, and began to lay waste to their rock peers. Vocalist Evans and bassist Simper bowed out of the group; in stepped vocalist Ian Gillan and bassist Roger Glover, joining founders Blackmore, Lord and Paice. As they made ready to create In Rock, Blackmore later told journalist Tony Dolan, he thought the band “should be an all-out assault on the eardrums.” Mission accomplished. In Rock opens with “Speed King,” a five-minute whirl that comes across like Little Richard on (more) amphetamines; a readily available clip of the band performing the song on UK TV shows the lineup in destructo mode. The band starts off with a subtle blue riff, Lord playing jazzy filigrees on top, and then all hell breaks loose. They merge into a hive mind; Gillan displays stellar vocal skills, Glover and Paice show that the best rhythm sections know how to murder the beat. At one point, Blackmore flashes his signature move, whipping his Fender Stratocaster around his body in a swift 180-degree swing. Deep Purple didn’t rock; they attacked “Controlled chaos” is a term that’s been played out to the point of irrelevancy. As Led Zeppelin became more byzantine in its albeit highly successful recordings, and Black Sabbath proved time and again that some of the best music is

CRUISIN’ FOR A

BRUISIN’

UK hard-rock kings Deep Purple bring a METALLIC WALLOP to Daily’s Place rendered with one sonic color scheme (uh, “black”), Deep Purple–on stage and in the studio–became masters of aiming for the guard rail without crashing over. Deep Purple’s success could arguably be chalked off to serendipity. Talent aside, at that point in the British rock scene, there were other equally innovative, head-smacking contenders. Lesserknowns like Hawkwind, the Pink Fairies, Fuzzy Duck and Atomic Rooster also played heavy, thumping music that took cues from earlier acid rock yet swapped out LSD for a skin-eating, hydrochloric burn. One thing those groups lacked, however, was songwriting. In Rock featured one of DP’s other definitive classics, “Child in Time,” showing the band’s skill at using an extreme whispering/deafening dynamic of restrained sensitivity-meets-nervous-system murder. A ballad tethered by Lord’s simple, twochord organ vamp, “Child in Time” soon swells up into a … there’s really no other word … majestic buildup by the entire band. A third of the way in, the band accelerates into a solo passage that inexplicably blends Bach riffs with blues boogie and makes it seem natural. The lyrics are refreshingly hopeless. Gillan warns the listener of the “bullets flying” in this world, assuring them to “wait for the ricochet.” Quality, moody stuff, out the same year Ray Stevens’ “Everything Is Beautiful” rode the charts. When the band released Machine Head in ’72, they’d honed their songwriting and conveyance of that craft into a seminal album of hard rock. Along with “Smoke on the Water,” the album had

two more now-classics: brutal road song “Highway Star” and brutal space-flight song “Space Truckin’.” Deep Purple has always enjoyed strong record sales. Their debut album alone, Shades of Deep Purple, sold a million copies. From start to end, Machine Head is a tight-as-a-drum release, free of any early ’70s production wankery or la-dida arrangements. Music fans ate it up: Machine Head sold in the millions and the band played stadium-sized concerts. That same year, Deep Purple released the now-classic live album, Made in Japan, showing off their skills extending and magnifying Machine Head tunes and earlier songs in their catalog. Though artists like Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, James Taylor and Joni Mitchell were the music critics’ darlings, hard rock and metal were routinely bashed. Rock writer Lester Bangs was the apostate, an early (and nearly lone) champion of the directness and artifice-and-bullshit-free stance of bands like Black Sabbath and Deep Purple. In a March 25, 1972 Rolling Stone record review of Machine Head, Bangs wrote: “In between those two Deep Purple classics lies nothing but good, hard-socking music, although some of the lyrics may leave a bit to be desired” of “Highway Star,” “Space Truckin’” and the rest of the album. “I do know that this very banality is half the fun of rock ’n’ roll. And I am confident I will love the next five Deep Purple albums madly so long as they sound exactly like these last three,” he wrote. Inexplicably, as if cursed by Bangs, subsequent Deep Purple albums degraded into ’70s rock glooch-boogie. Gillan and Glover,

DEEP PURPLE, JUDAS PRIEST 7 p.m. Sept. 12, Daily’s Place, Downtown, $69.25-$217.75, dailysplace.com 16 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

who’d just injected some much-needed overdrive, split. Vocalist David Coverdale and bassist Glenn Hughes signed on for 1974’s Burn. The title track was a minor hit, but the rest of the album yawns its way through hard-rock paces. Deep Purple went from being pioneers to bit players. The records of this era sold well but, to be fair, Rick Dees’ 1976 novelty ditty “Disco Duck” also sold millions. By the time DP released its 10th effort, the uninvitingly titled Come Taste the Band, even Blackmore left, starting a new music project, Rainbow. As the ’70s faded, DP bandmembers stayed busy. Blackmore’s Rainbow made some worthy metal albums, Gillan sang vocals on Black Sabbath’s Born Again–a fantastic addition to the metal canon. In 1984, Deep Purple’s classic lineup reunited for Perfect Strangers, ’87’s The House of Blue Light and The Battle Rages On … in ’93. Since then, Blackmore and the others have been locked into a Spinal Tap-style pissing contest–old British rock bands seem to have invented and continue to perfect this lunacy. With Jon Lord’s 2012 death, any hopes of the band caging the lawyers long enough for another reunion were laid to rest. In 1994, American fusion-blues guitarist badass Steve Morse (Dixie Dregs, Kansas) signed on; he’s been crucial in keeping the legacy alive and the sound current. Veteran UK keyboardist Don Airey has been master of the Hammond organ. When the band plays this week with fellow metal legends Judas Priest, fans get to witness not one, but two, of the greatest rock bands ever known– able blast their Marshall stacks to the point of audio derangement. Deep Purple was finally inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in April 2016. Again in Spinal Tap mode, an ego battle was waged before the ceremony. Gillan forbade Hughes, Coverdale, Evans and Blackmore to play onstage. Blackmore blew it all off, i.e., “Smoke on the Lawyer.” Deep Purple is a band defined by successes. Subsequent bands ranging from KISS and Rush to Metallica, The Flaming Lips and Guns ’N’ Roses have acknowledged DP’s influence. Like countless listeners since, those musicians were pulled in by that simple “Smoke on the Water” riff, then worshipped at the altar of 20th-century rock’s true pioneers. Daniel A. Brown mail@folioweekly.com


Rules of the Game the 2016 collaborative work with Jonah Bokaer, Pharell, and Daniel Arsham. Photo by Sharen Bradford, courtesy Long Road Projects.

the now-mutilated Dune House. 1 p.m. Sept. 15, The BookMark, Neptune Beach, bookmarkbeach.com. In the last iteration of ART BATTLE, the brilliant, kind Paul Ladnier won (we’re not even a little surprised); cheer on your favorite, or just watch artists under pressure, 7 p.m. Sept. 15, Hotel Palms, 28 Sherry Dr., Atlantic Beach, eventbrite.com, $15-$20. The KINGS OF POETRY, under the guidance of Moses West, 8 p.m. Sept. 15, B & Sun Art Gallery, 2422 Myrtle Ave. N., Riverside, eventbrite.com, $15. DR. JORDAN B. PETERSON—yes, psychology professor cum culture warrior who believes “The masculine spirit is under assault”—brings the ideas incels love eatre, best to town, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 16, Florida Theatre, floridatheatre.com, $38.50-$103.50. Learn about ANTIQUITIES in the Cummer Museum’s collection, 10:30 a.m. Sept. 18, members free; nonmembers $10, cummermuseum.org.

MAKING THE DREAM WORK <<< FROM PAGE 15 and performers developing contemporary works seated in performance. In a New York Times interview, Bokaer said, “The belief is that the center is a response to crisis, the crisis being that it is really hard to live and to make work here.” Though Bokaer was talking about living in and making work in New York, he could— with a little tweak—be talking about the First Coast. The changed language being, of course, that it’s not hard to live here (we have it on good authority it’s easier here), but to make a living as an artist here, especially an artist doing challenging, hard to monetize, contemporary work, is nigh impossible. So it may be exceptionally poignant and fitting that this extraordinarily committed, compassionate artist is here now. LRP founder Aaron Garvey said, “The partnership of the two organizations is meant to strengthen the contemporary art program in the Southeast U.S. while bolstering the profile of Northeast Florida.” Did I Remember is centered around 1920s jazz club Lenape Tavern, housed within the former Genovar’s Hall in LaVilla. These days, it stands quasi-forgotten, the secondfloor brick walls supported by steel beams, a skeletal nod to bygone dignity. As a failed preservation attempt, it’s an apt metaphor for the quasi-care the city gives LaVilla. For his part, Bokaer reflects, “Friendships, and being present for each other during the big events in life, formed the basis for this collaboration with the new chapter of Aaron and Stevie’s organization, called Long Road Projects. I think this new project in Jacksonville is the first time I have approached a curator (it was me, approaching Aaron) based on a desire for continued work together. I made the initial call because I trust him. Our project will also nurture my two-dimensional work in the visual arts, during a moment when I hope to revisit, expand and commemorate that practice, which is less publicly celebrated. Did I Remember, this new two-part work for stage

JDT+NEDT 8 p.m. Sept. 8, Munnerlyn Center for Worship & Fine Arts, Episcopal School of Jacksonville, $12-$25, jacksonvilledantheatre.org

at Jacksonville Dance Theatre, and on the page with master printmaker Patrick Miko, made in collaboration with my longtime colleague Szabi Pataki, is dedicated to the absent, erased or invisible performing artists who entertained at the now-abandoned building Genovar’s Hall, in a historically African-American area of Downtown Jacksonville. I hope that audiences, artists and citizens will happen upon the performance, the lithographs which trace the performance and a possible “play list” installation in the abandoned Hall of the original singers on tour in Jacksonville, appreciating the rich history of a city that’s coming to life again, thanks to Aaron, Stevie, their organization and all of these rich local partnerships.”

T

he most recent JDT performance was held in May, a wildly joyous event revisiting some of the 2018 performances and showcasing new works. Among the more memorable was The Things They Carried, choreographed by Kristen Sullivan in collaboration with the performer Amalia Rivera. She “wore” a skirt that doubled as a cage. Rivera moved “against” the paper restraints, finally breaking free. But much of the power in the performance was the dancer’s extended stillness: immobile for minutes at a time. As an image, it was compelling and evocative—as a foil to the dance, it was sharp and smart. Contemporary dance can feel intimidating but, really, it’s about looking and feeling. When asked about the place dance occupies as an art form, McCaughan replies, “Dance is an important and historic art form in our country. Modern dance, in particular. It’s associated with the same ideas and energies connected to the American spirit and to American innovation. It’s a rebellion, an act of freedom, a challenge to the ways of the past, and a vision of new ways forward. Modern dance is diverse, dynamic, communal and inherently collaborative. We need to make sure we’re sustaining a diversity of arts here in Jacksonville—including professional modern dance, and we need to ensure those endeavoring to do such a crazy thing are valued.” Madeleine Peck Wagner madeleine@folioeekly.com

DID I REMEMBER 7 p.m. Sept. 26, WJCT Studios, Northbank, $20-$40, jacksonvilledantheatre.org

BHZ (pronounced zed), three improvisers whose works are edgy and sophisticated, performs 7:30 p.m. Sept. 18, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/ cfa, free. ns Powerful drama PHILADELPHIA screens 7 p.m. Sept. 19, Florida Theatre, free, floridatheatre.com. A panel discusses LGBTQ issues after the film. Divine decadence: CABARET lights up St. Augustine, Sept. 20-Oct. 21, Limelight Theatre, 11 Old Mission Ave., $15, limelight-theatre.org. Author KRISTINA McMORRIS discusses her new novel, Sold on a Monday, 7 p.m. Sept. 20, Pablo Creek Library, 13295 Beach Blvd., Intracoastal, 241-1141, free. PIERCE PETTIS’ CD Release Concert, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 20, Mudville Music Room, 3104 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, 352-7008, raylewispresents.com. Experience the Cummer Museum THROUGH THE EYES OF NINAH CUMMER. Multifaceted artist/educator Barbara Colaciello brings Ninah to life, 6 p.m. Sept. 20, members $15; nonmembers $20, cummermuseum.org. Amelia Island’s RENDEZVOUS FILM FESTIVAL has movies, workshops, parties and the chance to mingle with actors and filmmakers, 5 p.m. Sept. 20; through Sept. 22, Amelia Island City Hall, 204 Ash St., eventbrite.com, $10-$150. Comic DAVE STONE appears 8 p.m. Sept. 20, Dahlia’s Pour House, 2695 Post St., Riverside, eventbrite.com, $10. Who can fail to be moved by Celie’s pain and loneliness in THE COLOR PURPLE? The play opens 7 p.m. Sept. 21; mounted through Oct. 14, Players by the Sea, 106 Sixth St. N., Jax Beach, playersbythesea.org, $25-$28. Annual Jacksonville University FACULTY MUSIC SHOWCASE, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21, Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, free. SYLVIA is the story of a heterosexual marriage told from her point of view, his point of view, and the dog’s point of view. It runs Sept. 21-29, Amelia Musical Playhouse, 1955 Island Walkway, Fernandina, $15, ameliamusicalplayhouse.com. The BEACH LEGENDS awards presentation honors well-known beaches community members: Elaine & Dick Brown, Sam Veal and James Roosevelt Stockton Jr., 6:30 p.m. Sept. 21, TPC Sawgrass Clubhouse, Ponte Vedra, $125-$1,500, beachesmuseum.org. The Jacksonville Symphony performs the MUSIC OF JOHN WILLIAMS, conducted by Michael Krajewski, 8 p.m. Sept. 21 & 22, T-U Center, jaxsymphoney.org, $24-$88. The full band RICKOLUS appears, with ROYAL TEETH, THE CATCHING and DBMK, 7 p.m. Sept. 21, Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, 398-7496, jaxlive.com. SMITHSONIAN MUSEUM DAY, all the buildings in Walter Jones Park are open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 22, 12471 Mandarin Rd., mandarinmuseum.net. Bright young local minds perform at TRUTH & PROOF OPEN MIC, 7 p.m. Sept. 22, The Performers Academy, 3674 Beach Blvd., Southside.

With a focus on R&B, funk & flavor, THROWBACK FEST is 3 p.m. Sept. 22, Morocco Shrine Auditorium, 3800 St. Johns Bluff Rd. S., Southside, eventbrite.com, $40-$170. The MINI RENFAIRE celebrates comics, cosplay, arts & crafts and local talent, with a Renaissance tinge, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 22, Mythical Mountain, 11570 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 13, Mandarin, facebook.com/events. Armchair Egyptologists, stop translating hieroglyphics because HERE COME THE MUMMIES!, with honey hounds 8 p.m. Sept. 22, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $38.50-$43.50. WOOFSTOCK: An Evening of Peace & Love for the Animals Animals, benefitting Safe Animal Shelter, 5 p.m. Sept. 22, Thrasher-Horne Center, 283 College Dr., OOrange Park, thcenter.org, $60. As part of Sing Out Loud Fe Festival, JASON ISBELL & THE 400 UNIT, THE DECEMBERISTS and LUCERO perform, 5 p.m. Sept. 22, St. Augustine Amphitheatre, staugamphitheatre.com, $25. A CLASSICAL CONCERT Urban Sp Spaces, Open Skies: 20thCen Century American Landscapes, 1:3 1:30 p.m. Sept. 23, Cummer Mus Museum, members free; nonmembers $10 $10, cummermuseum.org. Michael Krajewski and the JACKSONVILLE SYMPHONY perform John Williams’ (Star Wars, Indiana Jones) hits, 3 p.m. Sept. 23, Flagler College’s Lewis Auditorium, emmaconcerts.com, $40. The band BE EASY plays 6:30 p.m. Sept. 23, The Daq Shack, 10A Blanding Blvd., Orange Park. Euphonist DEMONDRAE THURMAN performs 3 p.m. Sept. 23, UNF’s Fine Arts Center, unf.edu, free. Acclaimed singer/songwriter EG KIGHT, the “Songbird of Georgia,” appears 7 p.m. Sept. 25, Beaches Museum Chapel, 505 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach, $25-$30, beachesmuseum.org. IMPROVISATIONS & COMPOSITIONS, a faculty recital, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 25, UNF’s Fine Arts Center, unf.edu/mastercalendar, free. Retired ambassador Bruce Wharton discusses his time serving in Africa in AFRICA IN FOCUS, 7 p.m. Sept. 25, UNF’s Herbert University Center, unf.edu. JOAN JETT: BAD REPUTATION runs 8:30 p.m. Sept. 26, Corazon Cinema & Café, 36 Granada St., St. Augustine, 679-5736, regular admission. The legendary DAVID BYRNE performs with THE TUNE-YARDS, 8 p.m. Sept. 26, Florida Theatre, floridatheatre.com, $64.50-$150. THE TANNAHILL WEAVERS celebrate 50 years, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 26, Mudville Music Room, St. Nicholas, raylewispresents.com, $20. New choreography by international choreographer, media artist and art-space developer Jonah Bokaer, DID I REMEMBER?, in conjunction with Long Road Projects and Jacksonville Dance Theatre, 7 p.m. Sept. 26, WJCT Studios, 100 Festival Park Ave., Northbank, jacksonvilledancetheatre.org. Critically acclaimed THE COLORED MUSEUM, an indepth exploration of African-American theatrical and cultural past, opens 7:30 p.m. Sept. 27; shows again Sept. 28 & 29, JU’s Swisher Theater, ju.edu/cfa, $5-$10. Lovable comic LOUIE ANDERSON appears 7:30 p.m. Sept. 27, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $41.50-$51.50. Roommates can suck, especially if you’re a cantankerous old bat; in RIPCORD, senior living doyenne Abby goes to surprising lengths to oust an unwanted roomie. The play, opening 7 p.m. Sept. 27, runs through Oct. 13, Amelia Community Theatre, $15-$25, ameliacommunitytheatre.org. Artist & Community Foundation Individual Artist Grant awardee ELENA ØHLANDER’s show, HATENAI YUME ư 셁셅섟̿ (Endless Dream) opens 6 p.m. Sept. 27; through Oct. 18, Space 42, Riverside, spacefortytwo.com.

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The Jacksonville Symphony explores the thread from Beethoven to Strauss in A HERO’S LIFE, conducted by Courtney Lewis, 8 p.m. Sept. 27 & 28, jaxsymphony.org, $19-$81. WHO ARE THE PEOPLE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD, indeed? Meet community organizations along with Jacksonville’s Neighborhoods Department to learn more about city services and how to improve your neighborhood, 5:30 p.m. Sept. 27, Brentwood Library, 3725 N. Pearl St., Northside, jacksonvillelibrary.org. AIGA Jacksonville holds a DESIGN & MUSIC FESTIVAL, with a poster gallery, band performances, cash bar, free popsicles and Dos Vatos Tacos, 5 p.m. Sept. 29, CoRK Arts District, jacksonvilleaiga.org. It’s the best day of the year! Time to get Buddy and Charlie (don’t forget Lucy) gussied up for annual fundraiser STRUT YOUR MUTT, benefiting Friends of Jacksonville Animals, 9 a.m.-noon Sept. 29, Riverside Park, friendsofjacksonvilleanimals.com. When you’re done strutting, don cocktail attire and head to COCKTAILS FOR A CAUSE, benefit for Pit Sisters. Jaguar Brian Sexton emcees, Jack Browning and author Arin Greenwood speak; 5-9 p.m. Sept. 29, Kaluby’s Banquet Ballroom, 8221 Southside Blvd., eventbrite.com, $56.54. RICKIE LEE JONES & ANDERS OSBORNE appear 8 p.m. Sept. 29, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $59-$69. THE OFFICIAL JOHN DENVER CELEBRATION CONCERT reviews the Poet Laureate of Colorado’s best-loved songs, 8 p.m. Sept. 29, T-U Center, fscjartistseries.com, $44-$86.50. Middle School Performing Artists and High School Honor Chorus appear in the eighth annual Jacksonville SINGS finale concert, 6 p.m. Sept. 29, UNF’s Lazzara Performance Hall, unf.edu, $5-$10. Everyone’s favorite germaphobe HOWIE MANDEL appears with Preacher Lawson, 8 p.m. Sept. 29, Thrasher-Horne Center, thcenter.org, $49. DARIUS RUCKER sings his country/college rock sounds, with Russell Dickerson, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30, Daily’s Place, ticketmaster.com, $54.75-$74.75. A community open-mic poetry night, hosted by 100 POETS FOR CHANGE and Ancient City Poets, 3 p.m. Sept. 30, Corazon Cinema & Cafe, 36 Granada St., St. Augustine, corazonecinemaandcafe.com. FLORIDA CHAMBER MUSIC PROJECT begins its sixth season with Turina’s “La Oracion del Torero” and Johannes Brahms’ String Quartet No. 1 in C minor, 2 p.m. Sept. 30, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $12.50-$25.

The legendary DELBERT McCLINTON appears 8 p.m. Oct. 5, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $53-$73, ticketmaster.com. A one-act opera, LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD, directed by Dr. Tyler Alessi, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 5 & 6; 3 p.m. Oct. 7, JU’s Alexander Brest Gallery, ju.edu/cfa, free. Former cop EDDIE MONEY performs, 8 p.m. Oct. 5, Thrasher-Horne, thcenter.org, $39. The big band to beat them all, THE CHRIS THOMAS BAND performs 7:30 p.m. Oct. 6, Flagler College’s Lewis Auditorium, emmaconcerts.com, $40. Beer flows like wine and everyone wears their best lederhosen and dirndls; OKTOBERFEST ON MAIN STREET takes festing to the streets of Springfield, 3 p.m. Oct. 6, Main Street. Still, no one compares to him. 4U A SYMPHONIC CELEBRATION OF PRINCE, by Jacksonville Rock Symphony Orchestra, directed by Questlove, 8 p.m. Oct. 6, Florida Theatre, Downtown, floridatheatre.com, $7.50-$45. Let’s go, let’s go crazy. FRANK STELLA: UNBOUND LITERATURE & PRINTMAKING takes a look at the role literature played in Stella’s print works. Gee, and all this time we just thought he wass looking at his stogies’ smoke trails! 6 p.m. Oct. 6, MOCAJax, mocajacksonville.edu. Adult Art Exploration Series presents THE PRINTED PAGE, 3:30 p.m. Oct. 6, Southeast Library, 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd., 996-0325, free. Sonja Monger reads from and signs copies of her new book, TWO SPOONS OF BITTER, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 6, San Marco Bookstore, 1971 San Marco Blvd., 396-7597. Get out and get or give some love, MOM HUGS (an embrace that says, I love you; I see you; I support you; I accept you) for whoever needs them, 2 p.m. Oct. 6, 5 Points. Eight living members of the WU-TANG CLAN (RZA, GZA, Method Man, Raekwon, Ghostface Killah, U-God, Inspectah Deck & Masta Killa plus honorary member Cappadonna) are in NEFLa 7 p.m. Oct. 7, St. Augustine Amphitheatre, staugamphitheatre.com, $55-$89.

Island Wine Company, 4924 First Coast Hwy., ameliaislandjazzfestival.com, $30. Singer-songwriter TODD SNIDER appears with ROREY CARROLL, 8 p.m. Oct. 10, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $36.50-$41.50, ticketmaster.com. JUMP, JIVE & WAIL featuring The Dynamic Les DeMerle Little Big Band with Bonnie Eisele, Steve Strawley, Clarence Hines, Al Waters, Doug Matthews, Ernie Ealum, 7 p.m. Oct. 10, Sandbar, 910 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina, ameliaislandjazzfestival.com, $30.

JOYFUL SOUNDS, music by Kevin Puts, Morten Laurid Lauridsen, Leonard Bernstein and Steven BBryant, rya 7:30 p.m. Oct. 10, UNF’s Lazzara Hall Hall, unf.edu, $10.

Florida Ballet presents LA BOUTIQUE FANTASQUE & OTHER WORKS, a mixed repertoire performance, 7 p.m. Oct. 13, 2 p.m. Oct. 14, UNF’s Lazzara Hall, floridaballet.org, $22.50-$47.50.

Ala Alabama tribute band TTENNESSEE RIVER appears 6 p.m. Oct. 10-14, Alhambra Theatre, 641-1212, alhambrajax.com, $65. In collaboration with SStrangemen Theatre Company, DD.A. School of the Arts mounts EA EAST OF THE SUN & WEST OF THE MO MOON, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 11-13 & 17220, 0, Blackbox Theatre, 2445 San Diego Rd Rd., datheatreboosters.org. EL NINO & THE LATIN JAZZ KNIGHTS heat up 7 p.m. Oct. 11, Sandbar & Kitchen, Fernandina, ameliaislandjazzfestival.com, $30. SHERRY JOHNSON & RENE GONZALEZ BARRIOS discuss their work in human rights, 7 p.m. Oct. 11, Flagler College’s Lewis Auditorium, flagler.edu. STRING, about a musician, his brother, and their mother, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 11-13, JU’s Philips Fine Arts Building, ju.edu/cfa, free. In ANNA IN THE TROPICS, a visiting lector reads Russian novel Anna Karenina to workers in a CubanAmerican family’s cigar factory. It opens 8 p.m. Oct. 12; runs through Oct. 20, WJCT Studios, 100 Festival Park Ave., Northbank, $20, phaseeight.org. Great jazz guitarist HENRY JOHNSON performs 7 p.m. Oct. 12, Fernandina Beach Golf Club, 2800 Bill Melton Rd., ameliaislandjazzfestival.com, $50-$150.

Ugliness (except in behavior) is a social construct, which makes THE UGLY DUCKLING a rather relevant play, 3 p.m. Sept. 30, Thrasher-Horne Center, thcenter.org, $19.

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY JAZZ ENSEMBLE I, directed by Leon Anderson, performs a free community concert, 2 p.m. Oct. 7, Amelia Park, Fernandina, ameliaislandjazzfestival.com.

October

GARY GULMAN’s Must Be Nice Tour, 8 p.m. Oct. 7, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $43-$53.

Falling in and out of love ain’t easy. A comic discussion of identity and sexuality, COCK examines affairs of the heart … and that other body part; 8 p.m. Oct. 12; through Oct. 28, The 5 & Dime, Downtown, $17-$25, the5anddime.org.

SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE: Mezzo-soprano Brittnee Siemon, pianist Grace Lee and soprano Kimberly Beasley perform Handel, Mozart, Delius and others set to texts by Shakespeare, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 2, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, free. ARTISTS & WORLD WAR I: BEHIND THE LINES, the second in the lecture series about the Great War’s impact on 20th-century artists and art, 1:30 p.m. Oct. 4, Cummer Museum, cummermuseum.org. JAZZ FACULTY IN CONCERT, original compositions and arrangements, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 4, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa. Artist Christopher Nitsche explores PASSAGE/MEMORY/ TRANSITION through the archetypal ship/vessel form “the extant to which history of use [of an object] remains present,” 5-7 p.m. Oct. 4, JU’s Alexander Brest Gallery, ju.edu/cfa. United Nations’ chief correspondent EDITH LEDERER speaks 7 p.m. Oct. 4, Flagler College’s Lewis Auditorium, flagler.edu. 18 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

BEN ADKINS & SEAMUS BLAKE perform jazz legend Michael Brecker’s Time is of the Essence, 6 p.m. Oct. 7, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, $5-$10. Drummer LES DEMERLE & singer Bonnie Eisele perform for the bronze level and above Sponsors Party of Amelia Island Jazz Festival, 7 p.m. Oct. 8, Horizons Restaurant, 5477 First Coast Hwy., ameliaislandjazzfestival.com, $250. Sound and drawing coalesce in CHRISTINE SUN KIM’s works; she discusses her career, 5-7 p.m. Oct. 9, Flagler College’s Lewis Auditorium, flagler.edu. EVERY SINGLE ARTIST LOUNGE is the place to be if you’re creative or just creative-curious, 5:30 p.m. Oct. 9, Space 42, 2670 Phyllis St., Riverside, spacefortytwo.com. The gorgeous, brilliant EDDIE IZZARD tells us about his life, 8 p.m. Oct. 9, Florida Theatre, floridatheatre.com, $49.50-$69.50. DR. BILL PRINCE performs with Doug Matthews at a jazzy wine-tasting, 6 p.m. Oct. 9, Amelia

The exhibit PATTERNS opens with a reception, Oct. 13, Island Art Association, Fernandina, islandart.org. MELINDA LIU, Newsweek’s Beijing Bureau Chief, 1998-2013, discusses how the West got China wrong, 7 p.m. Oct. 13, UNF’s Herbert University Center, unf.edu/lectures.

WILLIE GREEN’S 83rd BIRTHDAY BASH, 8 p.m. Oct. 12, Café Eleven, 501 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, theoriginalcafe11.com, $18 advance, $23 day of.

The ISLAND ART ASSOCIATION accepts submissions for Patterns\ Oct. 1; opening reception is Oct. 13, Fernandina, islandart.org.

SECOND SATURDAY ARTRAGEOUS ARTWALK, 5-8 p.m. Oct. 13, Downtown Fernandina, islandart.org.

Poets of all stripes “stretch their voices,” BARDS & BREWS, 9 p.m. Oct. 10, The Silver Cow, 929 Edgewood Ave. S., Murray Hill, free.

It’s the funnest day of the year! Break out the rainbow gear and grab a camera for the 40th anniversary of RIVER CITY PRIDE, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Oct. 7, Riverside Artist Square, 715 Riverside Ave.

Norman Studios screens THE FLYING ACE (1926), a black-and-white silent film with an all AfricanAmerican cast, 1 p.m. Oct. 7, a directors’ Q&A follows, Main Library, 303 N. Laura St., Downtown.

THE BEACHES FINE ARTS FEST, a juried fine arts & crafts event, features artists and crafts folk from around the nation, over two blocks along Pablo Avenue, Jax Beach, Oct. 13 & 14, hosted by Beaches History Museum, beachesmuseum.org.

It’s opening night for Friday Musicale’s 129th season! Celebrate with MARTIN MELITON, a Spanish piano duo, 7 p.m. Oct. 12, 645 Oak St., Riverside, fridaymusicale.com, free. LATE NIGHT JAZZ JAM SESSION, 10 p.m. Oct. 12 & 13, Dizzy’s Den at Slider’s Beach Bar & Grill, 1998 S. Fletcher Ave., Fernandina, ameliaislandjazzfestival.com. Michael Flatley keeps on dancin’; this year’s theme is DANGEROUS GAMES, 8 p.m. Oct. 12, Florida Theatre, floridatheatre.com, $36-$70. BYRON STRIPLING showcases ragtime masters Scott Joplin and Jelly Roll Morton and blues legends B.B. King and Muddy Waters, 8 p.m. Oct. 12 & 13, T-U Center, jaxsymphony.org, $19-$81. Brazilian/jazz project REQUINTE TRIO (pianist/ arranger John diMartino, percussionist/singer/guitarist Nanny Assis, Manhattan Transfer’s Janis Siegel) performs 7 p.m. Oct. 13, Fernandina Beach Golf Club, ameliaislandjazzclub.com, $50-$150. Eschewing distractions of clothing, THE NAKED MAGICIANS pull rabbits out of thin air (we hope), 8 p.m. Oct. 13, Thrasher-Horne, thcenter.org, $29. Country ballad crooner GENE WATSON appears 8 p.m. Oct. 13, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $38-$58.

The 2018 JAXBYJAX LITERARY ARTS FESTIVAL is 1:30 p.m. Oct. 13, Park & King streets, Riverside, jaxbyjax.com. The inimitable MAXWELL takes the stage 8 p.m. Oct. 13, T-U Center, Downtown, ticketmaster.com, $38-$133. The SEAFOOD & SOUL FEST is noon-7 p.m. Oct. 13, UNF’s Coxwell Amphitheater, facebook.com/events, $10-$25. PADDLE WITH A PURPOSE, the annual Timucuan River Race, is 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 13, St. Peter’s Church, 5042 Timuquana Rd., Ortega River, timucuan.net. NAWLINS’ DIXIELAND JAZZ BRUNCH, grand finale of Amelia Island Jazz Festival, 11 a.m. & 1 p.m. Oct. 14, Horizons Restaurant, ameliaisland.com, $60. Poets “stretch their voices,” BARDS & BREWS, 9 p.m. Oct. 14, The Silver Cow, 929 Edgewood Ave. S., Murray Hill, free. The WORLD OF DANCE tour comes to town, 4 p.m. Oct. 14, Thrasher-Horne, thcenter.org, $50. WALTER RUSSELL MEAD, a Hudson Institute Distinguished Fellow, James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs & Humanities at Bard College and The Wall Street Journal’s Global View Columnist, discusses America’s changing role in the world, 7 p.m. Oct. 16, UNF’s University Center, unf.edu/lectures. The UNF orchestra performs the HARMONY FOR HUMANITIES CONCERT, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 16, Lazzara Hall, unf.edu, free. THE STRUTS, WHITE REAPER, SPIRIT ANIMAL, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 17, Mavericks Live, Jax Landing, 356-1110, mavericksatthelanding.com, $23 advance. John Adams, Ben Franklin and Thomas Jefferson fight for the inalienable rights of almost all “men,” along with insults and bluster in a historical framework; 1776 A MUSICAL REVOLUTION opens 6 p.m. Oct. 17, runs through Nov. 18, Alhambra Theatre, alhambrajax.com, $38-$59. THE HEATHER GILLIS BAND appears 7 p.m. Oct. 18, Beaches Museum Chapel, 505 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach, $25-$30, beachesmuseum.org. Legendary trombonist DAVE STEINMEYER pays tribute to Frank Sinatra, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 18, UNF’s Robinson Theater, unf.edu, $8-$15. Wrap it Up! THE FABULOUS THUNDERBIRDS with KIM WILSON perform 8 p.m. Oct. 18, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $36.50-$56.50, ticketmaster.com. Nearly godlike, BOB DYLAN and his band appear, 8 p.m. Oct. 19, St. Augustine Amphitheatre, ticketmaster.com, $50-$95. BACHTOBERFEST 2018: THE REFORMATION, spanning the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, is performed by Jacksonville Symphony with leading Baroque interpreter Matthew Halls conducting, 8 p.m. Oct. 19 & 20, 3 p.m. Oct. 21, T-U Center, jaxsymphony.org, $19-$81. A tale of ghosts and dark secrets, THE UNINVITED is a great way to celebrate Halloween! Oct. 19-Nov. 4, Orange Park Community Theatre, $25, opct.org. Discover secrets of the ancient world: INTERNATIONAL ARCHAEOLOGY DAY, Dr. Kenneth Sassaman, director


of Lower Suwannee Archaeological Survey, discusses Sea-Level Rise Among the Ancients: Results of the First Decade of the Lower Suwannee Archaeological Survey, 10 a.m. Oct. 20, Beaches Museum, Jax Beach, beachesmuseum.org.

No meat, please. Costumes OK. The annual screening of THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW, hosted by Karissa Wade, live music by Party Cartel, 8 p.m. Oct. 27, The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787, floridatheatre.com, $15.

DR. NAUM G. ITKIN discusses the psychoanalytically oriented approach to painting interpretation, 10 a.m. Oct. 20, CCPVB, ccpvb.org, $15.

The NAS JAX AIR SHOW, birthplace of the Blue Angels (then called the Flight Exhibition Team), thrills and chills with daring routines, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 27 & 28, 6801 Roosevelt Blvd., Westside, free.

Florida’s longest-running pop culture convention celebrating cosplay, video games, anime, tabletop gaming, comics and “all things geek,” WASABICON runs Oct. 20 & 21, 1515 Prudential Dr., Southbank, wasabicon.com, $20-$40. George Frederic Handel’s classic, MUSIC FOR THE ROYAL FIREWORKS, celebrating the end of the War of Austrian Succession (1749), is performed 7:30 p.m. Oct. 20, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, free. Motivational speaker Octavius Davis interviews Vera Jones in THE POP LIFE, a benefit for Jacksonville Arts & Music School, 11 a.m. Oct. 20, Ritz Theatre, Downtown, ritzjacksonville.com, $19.

Don’t miss DWEEZIL ZAPPA’s “Choice Cuts,” 7:30 p.m. Oct. 27, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $63-$93. MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD, with DUSTIN THOMAS & VICTORIA CANAL, appear 6 p.m. Oct. 27, St. Augustine Amphitheatre, staugamphitheatre.com, $37.50-$40.50. The UNF PERCUSSION FALL CONCERT is 6:30 p.m. Oct. 30, UNF’s Lazzara Hall, $5.

November

James Lapine and Stephen Sondheim take storybook characters and bring them together in INTO THE WOODS, directed by Kimberly Beasley and Ben Beck, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 1, 2 & 3; 3 p.m. Nov. 4, JU’s Swisher Theater, ju.edu/cfa, $5-$10. The United States Navy’s COMMODORES JAZZ ENSEMBLE performs 7:30 p.m. Nov. 1, UNF’s Robinson Theater, unf.edu, $10. JU JAZZ COMBOS & JAZZ ORCHESTRA in concert, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 1, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, free. The third part in the WWI series, ARTISTS & WORLD WAR I: THE HOME FRONT examines what was happening in America during the war, 1:30 p.m. Nov. 1, Cummer Museum, members free; nonmembers $10, cummermuseum.org.

Poet WYN COOPER, Chaos is the New Calm, discusses his work 6 p.m. Nov. 1, Markland House, 102 King St., St. Augustine, flagler.edu. The music of Mozart as performed by the LAWSON ENSEMBLE, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 1, UNF’s Fine Arts Center, unf.edu, free. Milwaukee-based artist SKY HOPINKA presents his newest work, a video about the Native American imprisonment periods at Fort Marion (now Castillo de San Marcos) in the 19th century, 4 p.m. Nov. 2, through December, Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, Flagler College, flagler.edu/crispellert. Tipsy adventures abound in THE SAVANNAH SIPPING SOCIETY when four Southern women decide to up-end the sameness of their lives, 8 p.m. Nov. 2; through Nov. 18, Theatre Jacksonville, San Marco, $25, theatrejax.com.

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BRETT ELDREDGE circles through town on The Long Way Tour, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 20, Daily’s Place, ticketmaster.com, $29.75-$55. Orange Park’s FALL FESTIVAL, with 200 artists and vendors and two stages packed with entertainment by regional and local artists, is 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 20 & 21, 2042 Park Ave. DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE takes the stage, 8 p.m. Oct. 20, St. Augustine Amphitheatre, staugamphitheatre.com, $49.50-$55. ToneVendor Records’ annual ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD FAIR, 11 a.m. Oct. 21, St. Augustine Amphitheatre, staugamphitheatre.com, free admission. Artist K.D. TOBIN holds a workshop on Golden Art Colors Acrylic Paint, 6 p.m. Oct. 22, Island Art Association, 18 N. Second St., Fernandina, islandart.org, free; registration required. Learn about EARLY CHRISTIAN & HIGH RENAISSANCE ART, 10:30 a.m.-noon Oct. 23, Cummer Museum, members free; nonmembers $10, cummermuseum.org. PRINTING WORKSHOP, hosted by K.D. Tobin, 10 a.m.4 p.m. Oct. 23 & 24, Island Art Association, Fernandina, islandart.org, $130. Jacksonville University Orchestra opens its season with FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE, a concert of Russian favorites; pianist Scott Watkins performs Rachmaninoff’s Second Piano Concerto, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 23, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, free. Pianist DENISE WRIGHT tickles the ivories 7:30 p.m. Oct. 23, UNF’s Fine Arts Center, unf.edu, free. THE DUDE RANCH, Blink 182 cover band, 8 p.m. Oct. 24, Nighthawks, 2952 Roosevelt Blvd., Riverside, 619-9978, $10 advance. THE SIMON & GARFUNKEL STORY, in a multimedia format, covers the saga of these great troubadours, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 25, T-U Center, Downtown, $44-$86. What could be more horrifying than a dangerous virus spread by literal word-of-mouth? PONTYPOOL CHANGES EVERYTHING tackles this premise, 8 p.m. Oct. 26, Players by the Sea, 106 N. Sixth St., Jax Beach, $25-$28, playersbythesea.org; runs through Nov. 3. SCOTT WATKINS performs music by Schubert, Hanson and Liszt, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 26, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, free. Anthropology professor JOHN WORTH presents Exploring the Franciscan Legacy in Spanish Florida: Historical & Archaeological Evidence, 7 p.m. Oct. 26, Flagler College’s Lewis Auditorium, flagler.edu. ALICE IN CHAINS appears 7:30 p.m. Oct. 26, St. Augustine Amphitheatre, staugamphitheatre.com, $54-$104. The Boss’ beat-keeper MAX WEINBERG presents his JUKEBOX, 8 p.m. Oct. 26, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, $59.50-$100, ticketmaster.com. Aset Ashley Dickerson curates PUSHA, Kings Road Edition, 8 p.m. Oct. 27, Studio Zsa Zsa LaPree, 233 E. Bay St., Downtown. SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 19


FALL ARTS PREVIEW

C

onsider this a correction to the historical record: Wayne Kramer is officially the most interesting man in rock ’n’ roll. In 1964, he co-founded MC5, which many consider the first true punk band in history. Kramer was the first counterculture leftist to celebrate the American flag, painting one on the Fender Stratocaster he thrashed on within an inch of its life for eight years alongside Rob Tyner, Fred “Sonic” Smith, Michael Davis and Dennis Thompson. Kramer and MC5 trafficked in garage rock as much as R&B and free jazz, citing Little Richard and Chuck Berry as initial influences before deviating into abstractions à la Albert Ayler, Sun Ra and John Coltrane. That experimental attitude was at the behest of their manager, Jerry Sinclair who, after expanding the MC5’s profile, joined Kramer in starting the White Panther Party. Such a revolutionary political alignment came naturally to the MC5. During the devastating Detroit riots of 1967, Kramer was arrested, his bedroom telescope mistaken by police for a sniperspotting device. In 1968, while the Democratic National Convention devolved into televised anarchy, MC5 played on, stealing electricity from a hot dog cart to power their equipment. But when Sinclair went to jail, the band fell apart, succumbing to hard drugs and heavy infighting. At just 24 years old, Kramer walked offstage during a hometown gig at Detroit’s Grande Ballroom and never looked back. Calamities ensued, along with, eventually, recoveries. In the ’70s, Kramer became a smalltime gangster, eventually serving a two-year stint in federal prison for selling cocaine. In the ’80s, struggling to get clean, he was a roofer in Brooklyn, a cabinetmaker in Nashville, and a drunk in Key West. By the turn of the century, Kramer finally got sober. Later, passionate about prison-reform advocacy, he started Jail Guitar Doors, a nonprofit that provided instruments to inmates, with English folk-punk icon Billy Bragg. In the ’00s, Kramer started composing for movies (Talladega Nights) and TV shows (Eastbound and Down). He released a few farout solo records. Finally, someone, somewhere convinced him (thank God) to tell his story, his way. This

50 YEARS A FIREBRAND MC5 co-founder Wayne Kramer sets the record straight about his LEGENDARY BAND and its LASTING LEGACY summer, that memoir—Hard Stuff: Dope, Crime, The MC5 & My Life of Impossibilities—finally arrived. A few weeks later, Kramer set out across North America with a supercharged MC50 lineup— Soundgarden’s Kim Thayil, Fugazi’s Brendan Canty, Faith No More’s Billy Gould, Zen Guerrilla’s Marcus Durant and renowned record producer Don Was—to celebrate the 50th anniversary of MC’s acclaimed album Kick Out the Jams. At age 70, Kramer is reenergized, his booming laugh and incisive language flicking like flames at the questions he’s asked. He makes it clear in an interview with Folio Weekly that this is finally his chance to set the record straight, so let’s allow him to do it. WAYNE ON THE CONSERVATIVE RIGHT’S CO-OPTING OF PATRIOTISM: “This situation existed in the ’60s, which is exactly why I utilized the flag [on my guitar] as a symbol of my patriotism. I felt like everything we did as the MC5 was fundamentally patriotic. I saw the country

MC50 KICK OUT THE JAMS 50th Anniversary Tour with Waylon Thornton & The Heavy Hands, 9E 20 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

going in the wrong direction. My understanding has always been that the American experiment in democracy is participatory—it’s something you do, not just a word or an idea. It’s an action. The Framers did a pretty good job coming up with a system that was the best anyone had come up with. It’s certainly imperfect, with a great many shortcomings, but I have no problem honoring the principles it represents.” WAYNE ON HIS LONGTIME FRIEND TED NUGENT: “I found a photograph of my friend Ted on stage with an American flag, an electric guitar and a machine gun, so I took a picture of me—flag, electric guitar and semiautomatic rifle—and sent it to him. I wanted to do an interview where we talked about these symbols and how the same symbols could mean two different things. Unfortunately, Ted didn’t grasp the irony of that. He said, ‘These are great pictures, Wayne!’ He missed the point completely.” WAYNE ON DONALD TRUMP: “There are some things that Trump has done that I kind of like. He’s disrupted international trade and long-standing, status-quo agreements. He has an anarchist streak, even though he doesn’t know it. That’s not much, though, compared to the negativity. The guy is a wretched grifter with utter contempt for the rule of law. Speaking as a guy who

served a federal prison term, I believe in the rule of law. Always have, actually.” WAYNE ON THE CONSEQUENCES OF MC5’S POLITICAL AFFILIATIONS: “As an artist, one of your strong suits is agit-prop. You can disrupt, generating eyes and ears for your art, by being provocative. That’s a tool in the arsenal—how are we going to carry a message? Often, there’s a price to be paid for that. Usually, you’re young enough that you can absorb it.” WAYNE ON RECRUITING THE MC50 LINEUP: “It’s not like they got hired for a job—this is more like a mission. They all understand playing the MC5’s music represents a message of unlimited possibilities, of self-efficacy, and of self-determination—if you go all the way with it and commit completely. They get that. We asked everybody for a sentence or two for publicity purposes, and Marcus [Durant’s] response was that this is biblical for him. He feels like he was born for the role.” WAYNE ON HIS BANDMATES’ SKILLS: “From time to time, I’m guiding them in learning how to play free. Let the beat go. Let the key go. Let preconceived ideas about music go. Let’s just play and see what happens. Don’t worry. [Laughs.] You gotta let go of old ideas. That idea has been fun to share. It clicks, man. These cats are such good players. Everybody’s at the peak of their game. I was so knocked out that it sounded so good and powerful.” WAYNE ON THE PRESSURE OF LIVING UP TO MC5’S 50-YEAR EPOCH: “I didn’t really know if it was going to work. I suspected it was going to work. When we went out on stage for the very first European festival this year, my guess was that half the crowd had no idea who we were—and that half at least had heard of ‘Kick Out the Jams.’ But by the second song, I could see that they got it. They understood that this was balls-to-the-wall rock ’n’ roll. I’m thrilled that the music still connects the way it was designed to connect—and that it’s sustained for 50 years. Who’d a’ thunk?” Nick McGregor mail@folioweekly.com

7 p.m. Sept. 6, St. Augustine Amphitheatre Backyard Stage, staugamphitheatre.com, $35-$40


The LISA KELLY & JB SCOTT JAZZ SEXTET perform 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Nov. 2, Friday Musicale, 645 Oak St., Riverside, fridaymusicale.com, free.

One funny fella, RON ‘TATER SALAD’ WHITE appears 7 p.m. Nov. 10, T-U Center’s Moran Theater, $47-$57, ticketmaster.com.

Appearing here for the first time! TOTO: 40 TRIPS AROUND THE SUN TOUR, 8 p.m. Nov. 3, The Florida Theatre, floridatheatre.com, $39.50-$79.50; VIP $150.

The annual VEG FEST will sate your desire for all things plant-derived, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 10, Riverside Park, jaxvegfest2018.weebly.com.

PORCHFEST, Springfield’s biggest and sweetest event, has live music, craft beer, food trucks & vendors, noon-9 p.m. Nov. 3, Klutho Park, facebook.com/events.

It’s MOLLY HATCHET’s 40th Anniversary Tour; catch them 7:30 p.m. Nov. 10, Thrasher-Horne, thcenter.org, $19.

Get up out of your seat with CRESCENDO AMELIA’s garden concert, 7 p.m. Nov. 3, Cummer Museum, members $20; nonmembers $25, cummermuseum.org. The KINNE TRIO (violinist Marguerite Richardson, cellist Shannon Lockwood, pianist Scott Watkins) performs 7:30 p.m. Nov. 3, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, free. California expressionist artist ELIO CAMACHO holds a painting demo Nov. 3, Island Art Association, Fernandina, islandart.org, free. Statler Brothers tribute band AMERICAN PRIDE performs traditional country music, 6 p.m. Nov. 5 & 6, Alhambra Theatre, alhambrajax.com, $65. ELIO CAMACHO discusses bold color, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 5-8, Island Art Association, Fernandina, islandart.org, $345. Photographer LORI NIX, The Making & The Void, presents her “non-traditional” work Nov. 6 & 7, and gives a lecture 5 p.m. Nov. 7, JU’s Swisher Theater, ju.edu/cfa, free. HOAGY! The Music of Hoagland Howard Carmichael, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 7, MOCA, unf.edu, free. AMY RAY & her band perform with the Danielle Howle Band, 7 p.m. Nov. 8, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pcconcerthall.com, $35.50-$45.50. JOHN NÉMETH creates music that’s personal as well as universal; 7 p.m. Nov. 8, Beaches Museum Chapel, $25-$30, beachesmuseum.org. The seventh annual ELECTROACOUSTIC BARN DANCE, a three-day festival of electronic music and art, opens 7:30 p.m. Nov. 8 and goes on all day Nov. 9 and 10, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, eabarndance.com. AN EVENING CABARET of singer-songwriters is 7 p.m. Nov. 8, UNF Art Gallery, unf.edu/calendar. Shakuhachi flutist RILEY LEE performs, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 8, UNF’s Fine Arts Center, unf.edu, free. PLEAS TO MEAT YOU, new works by Stephen “Cryface” Bunnell, Tyler Lewis-Goshen, Brittany Raja, Matt Jaffe and Randall Royal, opens 6 p.m. Nov. 9, Rain Dogs, 5 Points; up until January. You had us at “full absurdist style, this bizarre and cruel play uses black humor to explore how humans find meaning in a world full of suffering.” One of Beckett’s more important works, ENDGAME is staged 8 p.m. Nov. 9 & 10; 2 p.m. Nov. 11, The 5 & Dime, Downtown, $10, the5anddime.org. Northeast Florida’s most beloved laid-back band, SISTER HAZEL plays, 8 p.m. Nov. 9, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pcconcerthall.com, $32-$35, ticketmaster.com. CAMERON CARPENTER, the biggest name in the organ world, plays the mighty Bryan Concert Organ, conducted by Nathan Aspinall, 8 p.m. Nov. 9 & 10, T-U Center, jaxsymphony.com, $19-$81. The PANGEA CHAMBER PLAYERS appear 7:30 p.m. Nov. 9, UNF’s Fine Arts Center, unf.edu, free. Local/regional art, produce, live music–Buddy Sherwood Dance, Brent Byrd Band, UNF Jazz Ensemble II 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 10–RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET, under Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com. SHEMEKIA COPELAND sings the blues, 7 p.m. Nov. 10, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $27-$30. Using audio clips, music and video, AN EVENING WITH IRA GLASS shares lessons from his life and career in storytelling, 8 p.m. Nov. 10, Florida Theatre, floridatheatre.com, $7.50-$45.

Country crooner VINCE GILL is on 8 p.m. Nov. 11, St. Augustine Amphitheatre, ticketmaster.com, $39.14-$79.14. World War I was ‘The war to end all wars,’ but it wasn’t. BABS’ LAB marks the anniversary of the cessation of hostilities with dramatized writings from the trenches, 4 p.m. Nov. 11, CoRKK Arts District, Riverside, barbaracolaciello.com. Grammy-nominated AMBROSIA appears, 6 p.m. Nov. 12, Alhambra Theatre, alhmbrajax.com, $69. BAROQUE ART is compelling and weird—learn about it, 10:30 a.m. Nov. 13, Cummer Museum, members free; nonmembers $10, cummermuseum.org. Rodgers & Hammerstein’s THE KING & I, about a teacher and her best student, runs Nov. 13-18, T-U Center, Downtown, fscjartistseries.org. D.A.S.o.t.A. presents Lerner & Loewe’s MY FAIR LADY, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 14-16; 2 p.m. Nov. 18, Dubow Theatre, 2445 San Diego Rd., datheatreboosters.org. American Comedy Awards’ Best Female Comedian, KATHLEEN MADIGAN shares her humor (we like her talks about “Cindy” and defensive strategy), 8 p.m. Nov. 15, Florida Theatre, floridatheatre.com, $25-$47.50. A perennial favorite: the annual STUDENT JURIED EXHIBITION—see what tomorrow’s artists are doing today. Opening reception, 5 p.m. Nov. 15, JU’s Alexander Brest Gallery, ju.edu/cfa, free; through Dec. 5. Expert moves and cutting-edge choreography, the SENIOR CHOREOGRAPHY CONCERT features Jacksonville University’s seniors’ work and research, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 15 & 16; 5:30 & 7:30 p.m. Nov. 17, JU’s Swisher Theater, ju.edu/cfa, $5-$10. FALL CHORAL SHOWCASE, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 16, UNF’s Fine Arts Center, unf.edu, $5-$10. Fresh off America’s Got Talent, DIAVOLO’s Architecture in Motion pushes the limits of performance, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 16, Thrasher-Horne, thcenter.org, $39. The play SWEEP AROUND YOUR OWN DOOR BEFORE YOU SWEEP AROUND MINE is staged 7 p.m. Nov. 17, Ritz Theatre, Downtown, ritzjacksonville.com, $36-$46. THONY AIUPPY’s new, experimental works, Piercing the Veil, exhibit 6 p.m. Nov. 17, Yellow House. The show is up through Jan. 19. The FLORIDA CHAMBER MUSIC PROJECT presents works of Mark O’Connor and Dvo ák’s America, 1:30 p.m. Nov. 18, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $12.50-$25. Chip Davis’ MANNHEIM STEAMROLLER CHRISTMAS blows life into the holiday spirit, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 20, T-U Center, fscjartistseies.org, $52-$114.50.

A favorite tradition, the JACKSONVILLE LIGHT BOAT PARADE sails 6:30 p.m. Nov. 24 along the St. Johns River, Downtown. We suggest watching from Riverwalk. Seymour Barab’s LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD is staged, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 27 & 28, UNF’s Fine Arts Center, unf.edu, free. WEST AFRICAN KORA MUSIC, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 28, Beaches Branch Library, 600 Third St., Neptune Beach, 241-1141, free. The UNF orchestra plays THE MIGHTY RIVERS CONCERT, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 28, Lazzara Hall, unf.edu, $10. Things get meta with actor William Gillette, who played Sherlock Holmes on Broadway, when invites the cast in for Christmas Eve; suddenly, everyone’s guilty of something. THE GAME’S AFOOT/ HOL HOLMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS opens 7 p. p.m. Nov. 29; runs until Dec. 15, Amelia Community Theatre, Fe Fernandina, $15-$25, aameliacommunitytheatre.org. FOXFIRE, about Appalachian culture, opens 7:30 p.m. Nov. 29; runs through Dec. 23, Limelight Theatre, 111 Old Mission Ave., St St. Augustine, $15, lim limelight-theatre.org. It’s THURSDAYS @ THRASHER with artis artists, followed by smooth jazz band CATCH THE GROOVE, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 29, ThrasherHorne, $19 (for the band). The oddest of odd jobs—ex-Disney Toontown Mayor Alex becomes manager of Barbra Streisand’s basement mall (whatever that is). BUYER & CELLAR opens 8 p.m. Nov. 30; runs through Dec. 16, The 5 & Dime, $17-$25, the5anddime.org. Rising star conductor GEMMA NEW guides the Jacksonville Symphony in a “journey of French giants,” including The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, 8 p.m. Nov. 30 & Dec. 1; 3 p.m. Dec. 2, T-U Center, jaxsymphony.org, $19-$81. Country vocal group OLD DOMINION presents its Happy Endings World Tour, with MICHAEL RAY & HIGH VALLEY, 7 p.m. Nov. 30, St. Augustine Amphitheatre, ticketmaster.com, sold out. A play within a play, NOISES OFF touches on theater tropes and the backstage crazies. Opens 8 p.m. Nov. 30; runs through Dec. 23, Players by the Sea, Jax Beach, $25-$28, playersbythesea.org. Piano, voice and cello students perform BAROQUE POSTCARDS, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 30, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, free.

December

Celebrate cold weather gods (we’re fond of Boréas, Greek god of the north wind, whose name means “devouring one”) at the 19th annual WINTER CELEBRATION, Dec. 1, Walter Jones Park, 11964 Mandarin Rd., mandarinmuseum.net. MIRACLES: MESSIAH FAVORITES & MYSTERY CAROLES, 3 p.m. Dec. 1, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $10-$20. Grammy-winning Swedish doom metal band GHOST is on its Pale Tour Named Death, 8 p.m. Dec. 1, Florida Theatre, floridatheatre.com, $38.50-$66.60.

The UNF Wind Symphony & the UNF Concert Band present FROM THE HEAVENS, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 20, Lazzara Hall, unf.edu, $10.

AMERICAN LANDSCAPES, music that feeds emotions inspired by the landscape, 3 p.m. Dec. 2, featured soloist is Arthur Robinson, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, free.

MAYDAY PARADE, THIS WILD LIFE, WILLIAM RYAN KEY, OH WEATHERLY, 7 p.m. Nov. 20, Mavericks Live, Jax Landing, 356-1110, mavericksatthelanding.com.

The ISLAND ART ASSOCIATION accepts submissions for My Happy Place, Dec. 3; Diane Hamburg chairs. Opening reception Dec. 8, Fernandina, islandart.org.

A tale of innocence and Yuletide joy, ELF THE MUSICAL is about Buddy, a human raised at the North Pole, unaware he isn’t an elf. Opens 6 p.m. Nov. 21, through Dec. 24, Alhambra Theatre, alhambrajax.com, $38-$59.

MICHAEL STORY, specialist in painting unique qualities of life, holds a workshop on color mixing, color theory and avoiding “mud,” 10 a.m. Dec. 5-7, Island Art Association, islandart.org, $350.

Comic BENJI BROWN brings Kiki on the Run to town— hope she finally gets salt-and-vinegar chips; 7 p.m. Nov. 23, Florida Theatre, floridatheatre.com, $15-$65.

Explore the AFTERMATH of WWI in the final lecture series about the impact of war on art, 1:30 p.m. Dec. 6, Cummer Museum, cummermuseum.org.

COLIN CARR performs the Bach Cello Suite, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 6, UNF’s Fine Arts Center, unf.edu, free. LEIGH NASH (Sixpence None the Richer), 8 p.m. Dec. 6, Café Eleven, 501 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 460-9311, theoriginalcafe11.com, $20 advance, $25 day of. SWAMP CABBAGE, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 7, Mudville Music Room, 3104 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, 352-7008, raylewispresents.com. RARESONG performs truly rare Renaissance songs, 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Dec. 7, Friday Musicale, fridaymusicale.com, free. VOCTAVE presents An A Cappella Holiday, 8 p.m. Dec. 7, Thrasher-Horne, thcenter.org, $19. MAKE WE JOY: Songs of the Season with the JU Choirs & Brass, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 8, JU’s Terry Concert Hall; 6 p.m. Dec. 9, All Saints Episcopal Church, 4171 Hendricks Ave., ju.edu/cfa. SECOND SATURDAY ARTRAGEOUS ARTWALK, 5 p.m. Dec. 8, Downtown Fernandina, islandart.org. MY HAPPY PLACE opens 6 p.m. Dec. 8, Island Art Association, Fernandina, islandart.org. The Civic Orchestra of Jacksonville presents A WINTER’S EVE, music by Delius, Prokofiev and Humperdinck; the Edward Waters College Choir sings, 3 p.m. Dec. 9, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa, free. The annual A PETER WHITE CHRISTMAS with RICK BRAUN & EUGE GROOVE is 8 p.m. Dec. 11, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, $59.50-$100, ticketmaster.com. CHRISTMAS WITH MICHAEL W. SMITH, with MELINDA DOOLITTLE, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 11, The Florida Theatre, floridatheatre.com, $29-$59. YEHUDA HANANI, distinguished cellist from University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music, performs with Shannon Lockwood, Todd Lockwood and Scott Watkins, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 12, JU’s Terry Concert Hall, ju.edu/cfa. The Florida Ballet presents THE NUTCRACKER IN A NUTSHELL, a sweet, abbreviated performance to introduce kids to ballet, 10:30 a.m. Dec. 14, UNF’s Lazzara Hall, floridaballet.org, $10. Local/regional art, produce, live music–Savanna Leigh Bassett, Nikki Talley 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 15– RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET, under Fuller Warren Bridge, free admission, riversideartsmarket.com. The Florida Ballet presents THE NUTCRACKER, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 14; 2 & 7:30 p.m. Dec. 15; 2 p.m. Dec. 16, UNF’s Lazzara Hall, floridaballet.org, $22.50-$47.50. BACKTRACK VOCALS sings a Family Holiday Concert, 3 p.m. Dec. 16, Friday Musicale, fridaymusicale.com, free. A CELTIC CHRISTMAS, with Ed Miller, Jil Chambless and Scooter Muse, 5 p.m. Dec. 17, Beaches Museum Chapel, $25-$30, beachesmuseum.org. The GAINESVILLE ORCHESTRA, with Music Director Haile Evans, performs a traditional holiday Pops concert and sing-along, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 19, Lewis Auditorium, Flagler College, emmaconcerts.com, $5 students/kids, $40 adults. Brand-new show CELTIC THUNDER X celebrates 10 years of traditional and contemporary Irish songs, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 20, T-U Center, fscjartistseries.org, $55-$126. The second annual THE REV. HORTON HEAT’S HOLIDAY HAYRIDE, with JUNIOR BROWN, THE BLASTERS and BIG SANDY, 7 p.m. Dec. 21, The Florida Theatre, floridatheatre.com, $30-$40. Dickens’ A CHRISTMAS CAROL with all the ghosty stuff, is staged 8 p.m. Dec. 21, T-U Center, fscjartistseries. com, $16.04-$53.50. VICTOR WAINWRIGHT & THE TRAIN, 8 p.m. Dec. 28, Café Eleven, 501 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 460-9311, theoriginalcafe11.com, $25 advance, $30 day of. It’s the New Year’s Eve PARTY OF ALL PARTIES when the incomparable Delfeayo Marsalis performs, 9 p.m. Dec. 31, Breezy Jazz Club, 119 W. Adams St., Downtown, eventbrite.com, $100-$125. SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 21


FOLIO A+E : MAGIC LANTERNS TOIL & TROUBLE in creepy new romance

DOUBLE, DOUBLE F

22 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

rench director Francois Ozon is one of the most prolific of contemporary filmmakers, averaging at least one film a year since 1997’s See the Sea. He’s also among the more unpredictable filmmakers as far as subject and approach go, veering from psychological horror to austere romanticism (2017’s Frantz). His other films range from comedies to melodramas to steamy psychological thrillers, the most famous of which is Swimming Pool (’03) with Charlotte Rampling and Ludivine Sagnier. Ozon’s follow-up to Frantz is a gorgeous black-and-white love story set during WWI, Double Lover, a return to outrageous, uninhibited themes and style of Criminal Lovers (’99) and Swimming Pool. Double Lover won Ozon a nomination for the prestigious Palme d’Or at Cannes. It’s worth noting the new film stars Marine Bacth, with whom Ozon worked four years before in Young and Beautiful. She was good then; she’s even better now. Ozon wrote his screenplay based on Joyce Carol Oates’ short 1987 novel Lives of the Twins. Ironies abound because Oates first published the novel under the pseudonym of Rosamond Smith, but when the real author was revealed, Oates said she tried it “because I wanted to escape from my own identity.” The title sequence sets the film’s tone and approach. The camera focuses on a close-up of a young woman with long, black hair combed over her face. From behind this curtain, her eyes observe stare. We soon discern she’s just getting a haircut, a rather drastic one, as it turns out. Chloé (Bacth) is a former model who suffers from severe abdominal pains for which her physician has been unable to find a cause. After several sessions with psychiatrist Paul (Jérémie Renier), Chloé seems on her way to recovery. She’s also fallen in love with Paul and he with her. The couple seem happy and content when, quite by accident, Chloé discovers Paul has a twin brother, Louis, also a psychiatrist, but with a different last name. To get at the truth behind Paul’s deception about his family, Chloé makes an appointment with Louis who, it turns out, is the exact opposite of Paul.

Where Paul is gentle, Louis is rough. Paul is caring, Louis genuinely selfish. Soon she’s sleeping with both men though only Louis knows the truth, a matter about which he openly taunts her, ridiculing Paul’s obtuseness. Whenever Chloé is with one twin, she says, it’s the other one about whom she thinks. She loves Paul, but she can’t seem to do without Louis. Finally determined to pry the secret of Paul’s utter denial of his brother’s existence, she learns of a young woman who once was the victim of both. A visit to the girl’s mother (Jacqueline Bisset) only leads to more confusion and discovery, propelling the film toward its bizarre, surprising and totally unexpected third act. But you can discover that for yourself. Double Lover inevitably recalls David Cronenberg’s unsettling but brilliant Dead Ringers and its tale of twin gynecologists (Jeremy Irons) and Claire (Geneviève Bujold), their lover/patient. There are also elements of Hitchcock in here, Ozon constantly using dual images in mirrors and all other sorts of doubling shots throughout, to evoke the inner world of Chloe’s disturbed psyche. Like Cronenberg (and Hitchcock, for that matter), Francois Ozon is a master of the unexpected. Pat McLeod mail@folioweekly.com

NOW SHOWING JEREMIAH JOHNSON Western Movie Series runs this Western, starring Robert Redford, 4:30 p.m. Sept. 5 at Main Library’s Hicks Auditorium, 303 N. Laura St., Downtown, 630-2544, free. CORAZON CINEMA & CAFÉ Won’t You Be My Neighbor? and Summer 1993 screen. Throwback Thursday: Little Miss Sunshine, noon Sept. 6. Damsel and Three Identical Strangers start Sept. 7. A Man Called Ove runs noon Sept. 8. Prison reformer Wendy Tatter introduces Mass Incarceration 5 p.m. Sept. 9; a panel discussion follows. 36 Granada St., St. Augustine, 697-5736, corazoncinemaandcafe.com. IMAX THEATER Great Barrier Reef, Kin, America’s Musical Journey 3D and Pandas 3D screen. The Nun starts Sept. 6. World Golf Hall of Fame, 940-4133, worldgolfimax.com. SUN-RAY CINEMA Puzzle, Skate Kitchen, The Miseducation of Cameron Post, Eighth Grade and Scotty & the Secret History of Hollywood screen. Mystery Science Theater 3000’s Frank Conniff and Trace Beaulieu skewer bad films live, 7 p.m. Sept. 5 & 6, $30/show, $45/both. 1028 Park St., 359-0049, sunraycinema.com.


SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 23


Guitarist par excellence, bluesrocker JOANNE SHAW TAYLOR performs with JD Simo, 7 p.m. Sept. 11, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $27.

LIVE + LOCAL MUSIC CONCERTS THIS WEEK

24 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

PAUL WANE 6 p.m. Sept. 5, Boondocks Grill & Bar (Boondocks), 2808 Henley Rd., Green Cove, 406-9497. TREVOR BYSTROM 6 p.m. Sept. 5, Prohibition Kitchen (ProKitchen), 119 St. George St., St. Augustine, 209-5704. MATT HENDERSON 9 p.m. Sept. 5, Surfer the Bar (Surfer), 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, 372-9756. BOBBY MESSANO 8 p.m. Sept. 5, Blue Jay Listening Room (BlueJay), 2457 S. Third St., Jax Beach, $10. BURDEN AFFINITY, CHROME FANGS, AUDIOHIVE, DUVAL FOLX 5 p.m. Sept. 5, 1904 Music Hall (1904MH), 19 Ocean St., Downtown, free. Kick Out the Jams 50th Anniversary: MC50 (WAYNE KRAMER, KIM THAYIL, BRENDAN CANTY, DUG PINNICK, MARCUS DURANT), WAYLON THORNTON, The HEAVY HANDS, 9E 6:30 p.m. Sept. 6, St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com, $35-$40. RAMONA TRIO, FAT CACTUS 9 p.m. Sept. 6, ProKitchen. MARK JOHNS 6 p.m. Sept. 6, Boondocks. SAM RIGGS 8 p.m. Sept. 6, Jack Rabbits (JackRabbs), 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, 398-7496, jaxlive.com, $10. MALCOLM HOLCOMBE 7 p.m. Sept. 6, Mudville Music Room (Mudville), 3104 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, 352-7008, $10. 100 WATT VIPERS, LOWRCASE G, HANGMANS CROWN 8 p.m. Sept. 7, JackRabbs, $8. Sing Out Loud Festival: DAVIS & the LOOSE CANNONS, GHOST TROPIC, KALEB STEWART, JACKIE STRANGER, HAVE GUN, WILL TRAVEL, KING PEACH, STRAYIN ANCHORS, GRANT PAXTON, PACO LIPPS, BIG LOGIC & the TRUTH SERUM, DOUG BURNS, MICHAEL JORDAN, KYRA LIVINGSTON, ANDREW BOSSCHER, GYPSY CHIX, AMY HENDRICKSON, WASTED TALENT, 5 CENT PSYCHIATRIST, BRENT BYRD, SPACE HEATERS, The YOUNG STEP, MICHAEL CLAYTOR, KATHERINE ARCHER, PARADOX, LIS WILLIAMSON & JIM QUINE, BOB PATTERSON, POULTRY RUN, LONESOME BERT & SKINNY LIZARD, PINECONE SHAKE, GROOVE COALITION, SALTY DAUG, AMPLE ANGST, LOVECHUNK, EMMA MOSELEY BAND, MELODIME, RYAN JOHNSON, SUGARBEATS, SHEA BIRNEY, BEDSWEATER, BUBBA SPLIFFS, HOT SAUCE DERBY, PILOTWAVE, HOLY HUMAN, SEVERED & SAID, TYLER PESCHEK, The PAUSES, HALF MY HOME, KENNY & the JETS, DYLAN NIRVANA, I LIKE DANDELIONS, LAURIS VIDAL, WILD SHINERS, ZACK SLAUGHTERBECK, HOPE YOU’RE HAPPY, The SKINNY, GREG RUGGIERO, BUFFALO ROSE, MALLORY JEN, BELMONT & JONES, MJ BAKER, PEYTON LESCHER, DONNY BRAZILE, CANADIAN LUNCH MONEY, WHISKEY FACE, DIVEBAR, NO PDA, TELEPATHIC LINES Sept. 7-9, St. Augustine venues, singoutloudfestival.com. ECHELON 6:30 p.m. Sept. 7, Boondocks. GEEJ WILLIAMS CD Release 7 p.m. Sept. 7, Mudville, $10. EARTHKRY 9 p.m. Sept. 7, Surfer. 5 O’CLOCK SHADOW 7 p.m. Sept. 7 & 8, Flying Iguana, 207 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 853-5680. The SUEDES, RADIO LOVE 2 p.m. Sept. 7, Sliders Seaside, 1998 S. Fletcher Ave., Amelia Island, slidersseaside.com. The MESSENGERS, NIGHTCRAWLER 9 p.m. Sept. 7, Nighthawks, 2952 Roosevelt Blvd., Riverside, $6.

BOBBY LEE RODGERS 8 p.m. Sept. 8, BlueJay, $25. COAGULATE 8 p.m. Sept. 8, JackRabbs, $8. SOUTH CITY LIVE 9 p.m. Sept. 8, Surfer. MATT KNOWLES, KEVIN SKI 6:30 Sept. 8, Boondocks. ONYXFest 8 p.m. Sept. 8, 1904MH, $10-$15. The JOSEPHINES 8 p.m. Sept. 9, JackRabbs, $8. AL SCORTINO, CHARLEY SIMMONS, SUZ GRANDY 1 p.m. Sept. 9, Second Sunday at Stetson’s, Beluthahatchee Park, 1501 S.R. 13, Fruit Cove, stetsonkennedy.com, $10. BAY KINGS BAND 8 p.m. Sept. 10, BlueJay. 2 DUDES from TEXAS 6 p.m. Sept. 10, Sliders. K.D. LANG 8 p.m. Sept. 10, The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787, $35-$75. TBA BIG BAND 7 p.m. Sept. 10, Mudville, $10. SPLIFF’S FUNK JAM 9 p.m. Sept. 10, 1904MH, free. DEREK MAINES 6 p.m. Sept. 10, ProKitchen. JOANNE SHAW TAYLOR, JD SIMO 7 p.m. Sept. 11, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 1050 A1A, Ponte Vedra, pvconcerthall.com, $27. MOONWALKER, CITY in the CLOUDS, SHOVEL to the MOON 7 p.m. Sept. 11, JackRabbs, $8. COLIN PATERSON 9 p.m. Sept. 11, Surfer. JEFF WHITE 6 p.m. Sept. 11, ProKitchen. DEEP PURPLE, JUDAS PRIEST 7 p.m. Sept. 12, Dailys RYAN CAMPBELL 9 p.m. Sept. 12, Surfer. BRENNA ERICKSON 8 p.m. Sept. 12, BlueJay, $10. PAUL IVEY 6 p.m. Sept. 12, Boondocks. LEELYNN & DANIELLE, COOKIN’ in da KITCHEN 6 p.m. Sept. 12, ProKitchen. NFFN ARTISTS SHOWCASE 7 p.m. Sept. 12, Mudville.

UPCOMING CONCERTS

SUPERSUCKERS 30th Anniversary Tour Sept. 13, JackRabbs RACHEL WARFIELD, DOPE BOYZ Sept. 13, ProKitchen TAD JENNINGS Sept. 13, Sliders DIERKS BENTLEY, The BROTHERS OSBORNE, LANCO Sept. 13, Dailys The 44/876 Tour: STING & SHAGGY Sept. 14, Dailys BARNES & THE HEART Sept. 14, Surfer AMPLE ANGST Sept. 14, BlueJay Sing Out Loud Festival: BRIDGE STREET VIBE, STEPHEN PIGMAN, The MOTHER GOOSES, The WILLOWWACKS, RAMONA, MAI TATRO’S MOONLIGHT DRIVE-IN, GRIS GRIS BOYS, DIG DOG, OBSERVATORY, STRANGERWOLF, The DOG APOLLO, STARLIGHT, CHELSEA LOVITT, BRENT McGUFFIN, ALEX PERAMAS, BRYCE ALISTAIR, HUMANS in DISGUISE, TBA!, BRANDON STONE, BEARS & LIONS, COLTON McKENNA, SALT & PINE, The RUBIES, ANCIENT CITY SLICKERS, DAVE DECKER, LAST ELECTRIC RODEO, CHARLES ROBERTSON, JAMIE DeFRATES, MADI CARR, TERRI GAMBLE, The OBSCURE BROTHERS, The WETLAND STRINGBAND, JOHN DICKIE, COLLAPSIBLE B, KRISTOPHER JAMES, BLUE DREAM, UNCLE MARTY, GLASS BODY, TOM McKELVEY, MATT FOWLER, PELLICER CREEK BAND, UNCLE MOSIE, DJ RAGGAMUFFIN, TAYLOR OLIN, BIG LO, OK! CHARLIE, GEEXELLA, DARRYL WISE, LIAM JONES, BOB GANLEY, MR. AULLIE, SANDSPURS, DAVE DOWLING, BEARTOE, JOE ROCCO, REMEDY TREE, ROB PECK, BRENT BYRD & the SUITCASE GYPSIES, BRETT BASS,

BILLY BUCHANAN & his Rock n Soul Revue, HONEY HOUNDS, DERON BAKER, CLAIRE VANDIVER, JASON WALL, ZACK SLAUGHTERBECK, WHYTE TYGERS, HARD LUCK SOCIETY, AC DEATHSTRIKE Sept. 14-16, St. Augustine venues SUNNY SWEENEY, MICKEY LaMANTIA, JOSH CARD Sept. 14, 1904MH The GROOVE ORIENT Sept. 14, ProKitchen DIXIE HIGHWAY Sept. 14, Boondocks WIDESPREAD PANIC Sept. 14, 15 & 16, StAugAmp SHAKEN NOT STIRRED Sept. 14, JackRabbs HUPP Sept. 14, Sliders CHUCK NASH BAND Sept. 14 & 15, FlyIguana Hispanic Heritage Celebration: LPT, KIM RETEGUIZ & the BLACK CAT BONES Sept. 15, Hemming Park BLUEPRINT Sept. 15, Surfer STRANGERWOLF Sept. 15, BlueJay CHRIS UNDERAL, CHELSEY CONNELLY Sept. 15, Boondocks COME BACK ALICE Sept. 15, 1904MH JUSTIN SYMBOL’S GOD BOMBS Sept. 15, JackRabbs JORDAN PETERSON Sept. 16, FlaThtr Country Artists Tribute: STEPHEN QUINN, KATIE O, SADIE MILLER Sept. 16, Sounds of the South, Fleming Island VINYL THEATRE, ROYALTEETH, The CATCHING Sept. 16, JackRabbs SAVANNA LEIGH BASSETT Sept. 17, Sliders AARON THOMAS Sept. 18, Surfer MARK O’QUINN Sept. 18, Sliders STEVE CREWS Sept. 19, Boondocks SOULO Sept. 19, Surfer PIERCE PETTIS Sept. 20, Mudville Sing Out Loud Festival: The GOOD BAD KIDS, TIMBERWOOD, BRANDON LUCAS, The PEMBERWICKS, The DRIFTWOODS, SOUTHERN TIDE, LEAH SONG, AMERICAN AQUARIUM, SOUTHERN AVENUE, RISING APPALACHIA, CONSTANT SWIMMER, ORBITER, EXPERT TIMING, WHISKEY & CO, FOLK is PEOPLE, GIRRAFRICA, 86 HOPE, MINIMUM RAGE, DAN PADILLA, NAVIN AVE, FLAT STANLEY, DENNY BLUE, ZF LIVELY, The DEWARS, ANCESTROS CORD, SALTDRIVEN RIDE, TROPIC of CANCER, BICE, IL GATOR, KYLE KELLER, DEWEY VIA, The COPPERTONES, HAFFA HOG, JOHNNY DEBT, CHRISTINA WAGNER, TIM BARRY, AUSTIN LUCAS, CHUCK RAGAN, ASLYN & the NAYSAYERS, DUFFY BISHOP, ROTAGEEZER, RIP CURRENTS, WILDFIRE RISING, The GRAPES of ROTH, LUCERO, The DECEMBERISTS, JASON ISBELL & the 400 UNIT, NICHOLAS ROBERTS, KIM BROWN, DEAD KAREN, DIE ALPS!, LAPECHE, SECRET SMOKER, 12 HOUR TURN, AMIGO the DEVIL, WILLIE EVANS JR., STEAM MECHANICS, STONE ECHO, NOT QUITE DEAD, CATCH the GROOVE, COMPANY MAN, LUIS MARIO’S Latin Jazz Band, SUNSET MONDAY, ADAM LEE, TAYLOR ROBERTS, The DUNEHOPPERS, SKIN & BONZ, FOND KISER, WHETHERMAN, GATORBONE, CHELSEA SADDLER, SAM PACETTI, VERLON THOMPSON, GILT, BITE MARKS, HIRS COLLECTIVE, DAN ANDRIANO, WAR on WOMEN, IRON REAGAN, AGAINST ME!, JESSE’S GIRLS, HEDGES, SUSTO, The COMMONHEART, LEFTOVER SALMON, CHEMTRAILS, DARKHORSE SALOON, MUDTOWN, KID YOU NOT, The YOUNG DEAD, TRASH


LIVE + LOCAL MUSIC FESTIVAL, ENGRAVED, RHYTHM of FEAR, DJ 3CLOPS I Sept. 21-23, St. Augustine venues RICKULOUS Sept. 21, JackRabbs CHILLULA Sept. 21, Surfer WHETHERMAN Sept. 21, BlueJay MT ARMS Sept. 21, Boondocks LUNAR COAST Sept 21 & 22, FlyIguana LEE ANN WOMACK Sept. 21, PVCHall BRUISE, BOUNDARIES, SLEDGE, MINDFIELD, DISDAIN Sept. 21, Nighthawks JASON ISBELL & the 400 UNIT, The DECEMBERISTS, LUCERO Sept. 22, StAugAmp UNCOMMON LEGENDS Sept. 22, Surfer FEW MILES SOUTH Sept. 22, BlueJay ZACH DEPUTY Sept. 22, 1904MH BDW BAND Sept. 22, Boondocks HERE COME the MUMMIES, HONEY HOUNDS Sept. 22, PVCHall TALK ME OFF, DEBT NEGLECTOR Sept. 22, Shantytown DREAMERS, WEATHERS, MORGXN Sept. 22, JackRabbs TWIDDLE Sept. 22, 1904MH The ARTISANALS, The HIGH DIVERS Sept. 23, JackRabbs SAM PACETTI Sept. 24, ProKitchen 2 DUDES from TEXAS Sept. 24, Sliders TREVOR BARNES Sept. 25, Surfer MARK O’QUINN Sept. 25, Sliders FOZZY, ADELITA’S WAY, STONE BROKEN, The STIR Sept. 26, Mavericks TANNAHILL WEAVERS 50th Anniversary Sept. 26, Mudville TAD JENNINGS Sept. 26, Surfer DAVID BYRNE Sept. 26, FlaThtr TROYE SIVAN, KIM PETRAS, LELAND Sept. 26, Dailys HEARTBREAK N8 Sept. 26, JackRabbs Same Mistakes Tour: EMILY KINNEY, PAUL McDONALD Sept. 27, JackRabbs BRIAN SUTHERLAND Sept. 27, BlueJay BILL HECHT Sept. 27, Boondocks KIM RICHEY Sept. 27, Café11 EMILY KINNEY Sept. 27, JackRabbs ZANDER Sept. 28, Surfer EVAN MICHAEL & the WELL WISHERS Sept. 28 & 29, FlyIguana K0U, The MODRN, DJ PRESTON NETTLES Sept. 28, 1904MH AMY HENDRICKSON, BE EASY Sept. 28, ProKitchen The GATORBONE BAND Sept. 28, Cafe11 BONNIE BLUE Sept. 28, BlueJay SWIM in the WILD, STRANGERWOLF Sept. 28, JackRabbs RICKIE LEE JONES, ANDERS OSBORNE Sept. 29, PVCHall TO SATCHMO with LOVE, TRAE PIERCE & the T-STONES Sept. 29, ProKitchen BONNIE BLUE Sept. 29, Surfer HARD 2 HANDLE Sept. 29, Boondocks COLONY HOUSE, TALL HEIGHTS Sept. 29, JackRabbs MAKING SUM NOISE, MTV EXPERIENCE Sept. 29, Jax Landing JASON BIBLE Sept. 29, BlueJay DARIUS RUCKER, RUSSELL DICKERSON Sept. 30, Dailys NEEDTOBREATHE, JOHNNYSWIM Oct. 2, Dailys DRAKE BELL, KIRA KOSARIN Oct. 3, 1904MH JEFF BRADLEY Oct. 4, Mudville ERIC LINDELL Oct. 4, Mojo Kitchen DELBERT McCLINTON Oct. 5, PVCHall BEACH CITY Oct. 5 & 6, FlyIguana

EDDIE MONEY Oct. 5, Thrasher-Horne HOODIE ALLEN Oct. 5, JackRabbs ARCH ENEMY, GOATWHORE, UNCURED Oct. 6, 1904MH DANNY GOKEY, TAUREN WELLS, RILEY CLEMMONS Oct. 6, T-U Ctr CECE TENEAL, SOUL KOMOTION Oct. 6, ProKitchen 4U: A Symphonic Celebration of Prince: QUESTLOVE, MIGUEL ATWOOD-FERGUSON, BRENT FISCHER Oct. 6, FlaThtr SHOVEL to the MOON Oct. 6, JackRabbs WU-TANG CLAN (RZA, GZA, METHOD MAN, RAEKWON, GHOSTFACE KILLAH, U-GOD, INSPECTAH DECK, MASTA KILLA, CAPPADONNA) Oct. 7, StAugAmp (HED)PE Oct. 7, 1904MH AUTHORITY ZERO, RUNAWAY KID, INTHEWHALE, FLAG on FIRE Oct. 9, JackRabbs TODD SNIDER Oct. 10, PVCHall EDDIE IZZARD Oct. 10, FlaThtr MIKE YUNG, JACKIE STRANGER Oct. 10, JackRabbs PETER BRADLEY ADAMS Oct. 11, Café11 SPAYED KOOLIE Oct. 11, JackRabbs BENISE Oct. 11, FlaThtr Suwannee Roots Revival: KELLER WILLIAMS’ PETTYGRASS, The HILLBENDERS, DONNA the BUFFALO, JIM LAUDERDALE, VERLON THOMPSON, LONELY HEARTSTRING BAND, The LEE BOYS, The SAUCE BOSS, BELLE & the BAND, WHETHERMAN Oct. 11-14, SwanneeMusic RANKY TANKY Oct. 12, Ritz ROOTS of REBELLION, LITTLE STRANGER Oct. 12, JackRabbs LUNAR COAST Oct. 12 & 13, FlyIguana GENE WATSON Oct. 13, PVCHall FILMORE, WADE B Oct. 13, 1904MH MARY CHAPIN CARPENTER Oct. 13, FlaThtr 50 Intimate Nights: MAXWELL Oct. 13, T-U Ctr PANDORA & HER BOX Oct. 13, JackRabbs IRATION, COMMON KINGS, KATASTRO Oct. 13, StAugAmp WILLIE GREEN’s 83rd Birthday Blues Bash Oct. 13, Cafe11 WELCOME to MOCKVILLE Oct. 13, 1904MH ISRAEL & NEW BREED Oct. 13, Murray Hill Theatre WEEN Oct. 14, StAugAmp The VEER UNION Oct. 14, Nighthawks STEEP CANYON RANGERS Oct. 14, FlaThtr GLASS HOUSES, SINK the SHIP, DROWNING ABOVE WATER, INDIVISION, A WOLF AMONGST SHEEP Oct. 15, JackRabbs FULL of HELL, OUTER HEAVEN Oct. 15, Nighthawks MUNDY Oct. 16, Culhane’s Irish Pub ANDERSON EAST, SAVANNAH CONLEY Oct. 16, Mavericks LILLIE MAE Oct. 17, JackRabbs SAWYER FREDERICKS Oct. 17, Cafe11 The STRUTS, WHITE REAPER, SPIRIT ANIMAL Oct. 17, Mavericks The FABULOUS THUNDERBIRDS, KIM WILSON Oct. 18, PVCHall SUN DRIED VIBES, The RIES BROTHERS, OOGEE WAWA Oct. 18, Cafe11 HALLOW POINT Oct. 18, JackRabbs BOB DYLAN & HIS BAND Oct. 19, StAugAmp LIVEKILL, DOYLE, NATSUKI, The COVEN Oct. 19, Respectable Street BOB LOG III, SECRET CIGS Oct. 19, JackRabbs MEAN MARY & FRANK JAMES Oct. 19, Mudville COLT FORD Oct. 19, PVCHall

SOUL SHINE & SWAT TEAM Oct. 19 & 20, FlyIguana BRETT ELDRIDGE, ABBY ANDERSON Oct. 20, Dailys DEATH CAB for CUTIE, CHARLY BLISS Oct. 20, StAugAmp THRIFTWORKS, BIT DEFF Oct. 20, 1904MH The BREEDERS Oct. 20, PVCHall DOYLE, AS WE DIE, WORLD ABOMINATION Oct. 21, Nighthawks ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD FAIR Oct. 21, StAugAmp GRIFFIN HOUSE Oct. 23, Café11 NF Oct. 24, StAugAmp The DUDE RANCH Oct. 24, Nighthawks WSTR, PVMNTS, HOLD CLOSE Oct. 25, 1904MH The SIMON & GARFUNKEL STORY Oct. 25, T-U Ctr THUNDERPUSSY, DEMONS Oct. 26, JackRabbs ALICE in CHAINS Oct. 26, StAugAmp MC CHRIS, DUAL CORE, LEX the LEXICON Oct. 26, Nighthawks MAX WEINBERG’S JUKEBOX Oct. 26, PVCHall J CREW BAND Oct. 26 & 27, FlyIguana Suwannee Hulaween: STRING CHEESE INCIDENT, ODESZA, JAMIROQUAI, JANELLE MONAE Oct. 26-28, SwanneeMusic DWEEZIL ZAPPA Oct. 27, PVCHall BRETT BASS & MELTED PLECTRUM Oct. 27, Seachasers CHASE ATLANTIC Oct. 27, JackRabbs MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD, DUSTIN THOMAS, VICTORIA CANAL Oct. 27, StAugAmp Backyard Stage CURSIVE, MEAT WAVE, CAMPDOGZZ Oct. 28, JackRabbs DECENT CRIMINAL, WESTERN SETTING Oct. 29, JackRabbs LIL DICKY, MUSTARD, OLIVER TREE Oct. 29, StAugAmp PALE WAVES Oct. 30, JackRabbs ASSUMING WE SURVIVE, RIOT CHILD, DOSE Nov. 1, JackRabbs RUMOURS of FLEETWOOD MAC Nov. 1, FlaThtr SAN HOLO, BAYNK Nov. 2, Mavericks BRETT DENNEN, NICK MULVEY Nov. 2, PVCHall TOTO Nov. 3, FlaThtr BUMPIN’ UGLIES, TROPIDELIC Nov. 3, JackRabbs SOMO Nov. 3, 1904MH BLUE OCTOBER, KITTEN Nov. 4, Mavericks BAD BAD HATS, PARTY NAILS Nov. 5, JackRabbs WANYAMA Nov. 7, JackRabbs AMY RAY & her Band, DANIELLE HOWLE BAND Nov. 8, PVCHall JAKOB’S FERRY STRAGGLERS Nov. 8, Mudville RBRM: RONNIE DEVOE, BOBBY BROWN, RICKY BELL, MICHAEL BLIVINS Nov. 9, VetsMemArena AQUEOUS, The HEAVYPETS Nov. 9, JackRabbs JASON CRABB Nov. 9, Murray Hill Theatre SISTER HAZEL Nov. 9, PVCHall SHEMEKIA COPELAND Nov. 10, PVCHall MOLLY HATCHET Nov. 10, Thrasher-Horne PROF, MAC IRV, DWYNELL ROLAND, WILLIE WONKA Nov. 10, JackRabbs VINCE GILL Nov. 11, StAugAmp OTTMAR LIEBERT & LUNA NEGRA Nov. 11, PVCHall JOSH HOYER & SOUL COLOSSAL Nov. 11, Café11 ZAHIRA & RISING BUFFALO TRIBE Nov. 13, Café11 JENNIFER KNAPP Nov. 14, Café11 BIG GIGANTIC, FLAMINGOSIS Nov. 14, Mavericks KATHLEEN MADIGAN Nov. 15, FlaThtr Independent Grind Tour: TECH N9NE, DIZZY WRIGHT, FUTURISTIC, DENVER HALL Nov. 16, Mavericks

MELODIME the musicians who make sad Southern swamp rock, perform 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8 at the Colonial Oaks Showcase in concert with the Sing Out Loud Festival, singoutloudfestival.com, free. SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 25


LIVE + LOCAL MUSIC MICHAEL GRAVES Nov. 16, Nighthawks STRAIGHT NO CHASER Nov. 18, FlaThtr NEW POLITICS, SCORE, BIKINI THRILL Nov. 19, JackRabbs STEPHEN STILLS, JUDY COLLINS Nov. 19, FlaThtr MAYDAY PARADE, THIS WILD LIFE, WILLIAM RYAN KEY, OH WEATHERLY Nov. 20, Mavericks BENJI BROWN Nov. 23, FlaThtr MARTINA McBRIDE Nov. 24, FlaThtr ATMOSPHERE, deM ATLAS, The LIONESS, DJ KEEZY Nov. 25, PVCHall MARC BROUSSARD & his Band, KRISTOPHER JAMES Nov. 29, PVCHall DAVE KOZ, MINDI ABAIR, JONATHAN BUTLER, KEIKO MATSUI Nov. 29, FlaThtr OLD DOMINION, MICHAEL RAY, HIGH VALLEY Nov. 30, StAugAmp ORIGINAL HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS Nov. 30, VetsMemArena GHOST PALE DEATH TOUR Dec. 1, FlaThtr JJ GREY, BAY STREET BAND, MILLAJOHN’S BLUE SOUL Dec. 1, Congaree & Penn Farm The FRITZ Dec. 1, 1904MH MOE. Dec. 2, PVCHall EVERY TIME I DIE, TURNSTILE, ANGEL DUST VEIN Dec. 5, 1904MH LEIGH NASH Dec. 6, Cafe11 BRONCHO, YIP DECEIVER Dec. 7, JackRabbs MANDY HARVEY Dec. 8, RitzTheatre IRIS DEMENT, PIETA BROWN Dec. 8, PVCHall HOME FREE Dec. 9, FlaThtr PETER WHITE, RICK BRAUN, EUGE GROOVE Dec. 11, PVCHall TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA Dec. 13, VetsMemArena KENNY G Dec. 13, FlaThtr BREAKING THROUGH, BLEEDING in STEREO, SUNSHINE & BULLETS, COPPER BONES, MINDSLIP, SOUL SWITCH, LOWRCASE G, MARION CRANE, DARK SUMMER, NO SELF, BURDEN AFFINITY, GFM, AUDITORY ARMORY, BROKEN SILENCE, FALLEN SONS Dec. 15, Mavericks FOR KING & COUNTRY: Little Drummer Boy Christmas Tour Dec. 16, VetsMemArena STEVEN WILSON Dec. 16, PVCHall CHRISTMAS with ROCKAPELLA Dec. 19, FlaThtr The REVEREND HORTON HEAT, JUNIOR BROWN, The BLASTERS, BIG SANDY Dec. 21, FlaThtr VICTOR WAINWRIGHT & the TRAIN Dec. 28, Cafe11 DONNA the BUFFALO Dec. 29, PVCHall BRETT BASS & MELTED PLECTRUM Dec. 30, Seachasers BLUE SUEDE (Elvis’ 84th Birthday): MIKE ALBERT, SCOT BRUCE, BIG E BAND Jan. 12, FlaThtr MARCIA BALL & her Band Jan. 12, PVCHall ARLO GUTHRIE Alice’s Restaurant Tour Jan. 23, FlaThtr LUCINDA WILLIAMS, DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS Jan. 25, FlaThtr JEANNIE ROBERTSON Jan. 26, FlaThtr PINK MARTINI Jan. 28, FlaThtr FINN MAGILL & DAVID CURLEY Jan. 29, Mudville JOYCE MANOR, JEFF ROSENSTOCK, REMEMBER SPORTS Jan. 31, 1904MH UNDER the STREETLAMP Feb. 2, PVCHall INDIGO GIRLS Feb. 9, PVCHall MICHAEL BOLTON Feb. 10, FlaThtr KEIKO MATSUI Feb. 14, PVCHall TOM RUSH, MATT NAKOA Feb. 15, PVCHall LOS LOBOS Feb. 19, PVCHall KASEY CHAMBERS & FIREFLY DISCIPLES Feb. 21, PVCHall PINK March 5, VetsMemArena CHRIS BOTTI March 8, FlaThtr ELTON JOHN March 15, VetsMemArena GET THE LED OUT Led Zeppelin Tribute March 15, FlaThtr ROGER McGUINN March 16, PVCHall JUKEBOX HERO the MUSICAL March 17, FlaThtr JOAN OSBORNE Sings Songs of Bob Dylan March 21, PVCHall JERSEY BOYS March 25, T-U Ctr Queen Tribute: GARY MULLEN & the WORKS April 25, FlaThtr The TEMPTATIONS, The FOUR TOPS April 28, FlaThtr The Cry Pretty Tour 360: CARRIE UNDERWOOD, MADDIE & TAE, RUNAWAY JUNE Oct. 20, 2019, VetsMemArena

DOWNTOWN

1904 MUSIC Hall, 19 Ocean St. N., 345-5760 Burden Affinity, Chrome Fangs, Audiohive, Duval Folx 5 p.m. Sept. 5. ONYXFest 8 p.m. Sept. 8. Spliff’s Funk Jam Sept. 10 DOS GATOS, 123 E. Forsyth St., 354-0666 DJ Brandon Thur. DJ NickFresh Sat. DJ Randall Mon. DJ Hollywood every Tue. JAX Landing, 353-1188 Everchange Band 7 p.m. Sept. 5. X Hale Band, Jack Hammer Band 7 p.m. Sept. 7. Boogie Freaks 7 p.m. Sept. 8. Hard 2 Handle Sept. 9 MAVERICKS Live, Jax Landing, 356-1110 Glow Rage Paint Party 9 p.m. Sept. 8 MYTH, 333 E. Bay St., 707-0474 Silent Disco Art Walk Afterparty 8 p.m. Sept. 5. The Crystal Method Sept. 7. Prohibition Exhibition in Gud Company 9 p.m. Sept. 8

FLEMING ISLAND

BOONDOCKS, 2808 Henley Rd., Green Cove, 406-9497 Paul Wane 6 p.m. Sept. 5. Mark Johns 6 p.m. Sept. 6. Echelon 6:30 p.m. Sept. 7. Matt Knowles, Kevin Ski 6:30 Sept. 8. Paul Ivey Sept. 12 WHITEY’S, 2032 C.R. 220, 269-4198 Paul Ivey Band 9 p.m. Sept. 7. Monkey Wrench 9 p.m. Sept. 8. Southpaw 4 p.m. Sept. 9

INTRACOASTAL

CLIFF’S, 3033 Monument Rd., 645-5162 The Party Cartel 9 p.m. Sept. 8

MANDARIN

ENZA’S, 10601 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 109, 268-4458 Brian Iannucci Sept. 5, 9 & 11 IGGY’S, 104 Bartram Oaks Walk, 209-5209 Echelon 6 p.m. Sept. 6. Town 7 p.m. Sept. 12

ORANGE PARK, MIDDLEBURG

The HILLTOP, 2030 Wells Rd., 272-5959 John Michael every Tue.-Sat. The ROADHOUSE, 231 Blanding Blvd., 264-0611 Melt Behind the Wheel 10 p.m. Sept. 15. DJ Keith every Tue. DJ Covert every Thur.

PONTE VEDRA

MEDURE, 818 A1A, 543-3797 Chris Thomas Sept. 7. The Groov Sept. 8 TAPS, 2220 C.R. 210, 819-1554 Robbie Litt 8 p.m. Sept. 5. Red Level 9:30 p.m. Sept. 7

RIVERSIDE, WESTSIDE

MURRAY HILL Theatre, 932 Edgewood Ave., 388-7807 Phil Driscoll 7:30 p.m. Sept. 6. Realife YA Unleashed 7 p.m. Sept. 7 NIGHTHAWKS, 2952 Roosevelt Blvd. The Messengers, Nightcrawler 9 p.m. Sept. 7. Tech Noir Synthwave 9 p.m. Sept. 12 RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET, 715 Riverside, 389-2449 Super Martin Brothers, Allie & the Kats, Wingfield, A#keem Sept. 8

ST. AUGUSTINE

ARNOLD’S, 3912 N. U.S. 1, 824-8738 The Remains 9 p.m. Sept. 8 PROHIBITION Kitchen, 119 St. George, 209-5704 Trevor Bystrom 6 p.m. Sept. 5. Ramona, Fat Cactus Sept. 6. Derek Maines Sept. 10. Jeff White Sept. 11 SARBEZ, 115 Anastasia Blvd., 342-0632 Strangerwolf Sept. 14 TRADEWINDS, 124 Charlotte St., 829-9336 Blistur 9 p.m. Sept. 7 & 8

SAN MARCO

GREEN TURTLE, 14 S. Third St., 321-2324 Live music six nights a week. Vinyl Nite every Tue. SLIDERS, 1998 S. Fletcher Ave., 277-6652 The Suedes, Radio Love Sept. 7. Hupp, Tad Jennings 6 p.m. Sept. 8. JC & Mike Sept. 9. 2 Dudes From Texas Sept. 10. Pili Pili Sept. 11

JACK RABBITS, 15280 Hendricks, 398-7496 Sam Riggs 8 p.m. Sept. 6. 100 Watt Vipers, Lowrcase g, Hangmans Crown 8 p.m. Sept. 7. Coagulate 8 p.m. Sept. 8. The Josephines Sept. 9. Moonwalker, City in the Clouds, Shovel to the Moon 7 p.m. Sept. 11 MUDVILLE Music Room, 3104 Atlantic Blvd., 352-7008 Malcolm Holcombe 7:30 p.m. Sept. 6. GEEJ Williams CD release 7 p.m. Sept. 7. TBA Big Band 7 p.m. Sept. 10. NFFN Artists Showcase Sept. 12

AVONDALE, ORTEGA

SOUTHSIDE, BAYMEADOWS

LIVE MUSIC CLUBS

AMELIA ISLAND, FERNANDINA

CASBAH CAFÉ, 3628 St. Johns Ave., 981-9966 Goliath Flores every Wed. Jazz every Sun. Live music every Mon. ECLIPSE, 4219 St. Johns Ave. KJ Free every Tue. & Thur. Indie dance every Wed. ’80s & ’90s dance every Fri. MONTY’S/SHORES Liquor, 3644 St. Johns Ave., 389-1131 DJ Keith 10 p.m. Sept. 6 & 13

THE BEACHES

(All venues in Jax Beach unless otherwise noted)

26 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

RAGTIME TAVERN, 207 Atlantic Blvd., AB, 241-7877 Live music every night except Monday SEACHASERS, 831 First St. N., 372-0444 Firewater Tent Revival noon Sept. 7. Billy Buchanan 9 p.m. Sept. 8 SURFER the Bar, 200 First St. N., 372-9756 Matt Henderson 9 p.m. Sept. 5. Earthkry 9 p.m. Sept. 7. South City Live Sept. 8. Colin Paterson Sept. 11. Ryan Campbell Sept. 12

BLUE JAY Listening Room, 412 N. Second St., 834-1315 Bobby Messano 8 p.m. Sept. 5. Bobby Lee Rodgers Sept. 8. Bay Kings Band Sept. 10. Brenna Erickson Sept. 12 FLYING IGUANA, 207 Atlantic Blvd., NB, 853-5680 5 O’Clock Shadow 10 p.m. Sept. 7 & 8 GUSTO, 1266 Beach Blvd., 372-9925 Groov 7:30 p.m. Wed. Michael Smith Thur. Milton Clapp Fri. MEZZA, 110 First St., NB, 249-5573 Gypsies Ginger 6 p.m. Wed. Mike Shackelford, Steve Shanholtzer 6 p.m. Thur. Mezza House Band 6 p.m. Mon. Trevor Tanner 6 p.m. Tue.

MELLOW MUSHROOM, 9734 Deer Lake Ct., 997-1955 Cortnie Frasier 8 p.m. Sept. 7 WHISKEY JAX, 10915 Baymeadows Rd., 634-7208 Melissa Smith & Ivan Pulley open mic every Wed.

SPRINGFIELD, NORTHSIDE

CROOKED ROOSTER, 148 S. Sixth St., Macclenny, 653-2337 DJ Toy 6 p.m. Sept. 5 & 12 HYPERION Brewing., 1740 N. Main St., 518-5131 Swing Dancing 8 p.m. every Wed. PALMS Fish Camp, 6359 Heckscher Dr., 240-1672 Taylor Shami Sept. 6. Billy Bowers 6 p.m. Sept. 7. Joe Reid & Heartland Sept. 8 __________________________________________ To list a band’s gig, send time, date, location (street address, city/neighborhood), admission and a contact number to print to Madeleine Peck Wagner, email madeleine@folioweekly. com or by the U.S. Postal Service, 45 W. Bay St., Ste. 103, Jacksonville FL 32202. Events run on space-available basis. Deadline noon Wed. for next Wed. publication.


FOLIO DINING With expert execution and innovative presentation, the sushi—and each menu item—at INDOCHINE reflects the award-winning experience in Thai and Southeast Asian fare in Downtown Jacksonville. photo by Devon Sarian

AMELIA ISLAND + FERNANDINA BEACH

BRETT’S Waterway Café, 1 S. Front St., 261-2660. On the water at Centre Street’s end. Southern hospitality, upscale atmosphere; daily specials, fresh local seafood, aged beef. $$$ FB L D Daily CAFÉ KARIBO, 27 N. Third St., 277-5269, cafekaribo.com. F Family-owned café in historic building. Worldly fare, made-from-scratch dressings, sauces, desserts, sourcing fresh veggies, seafood. Dine in or al fresco under oak-shaded patio. Microbrew Karibrew Pub brews beer onsite; imports. $$ FB K TO R, Su; L Daily, D Tu-Su in season The CRAB TRAP, 31 N. Second St., 261-4749, ameliacrabtrap.com. F For nearly 40 years, familyowned-and-operated. Fresh local seafood, steaks, specials. HH. $$ FB L Sa-M; D Nightly LARRY’S, 474272 S.R. 200, 844-2225. F SEE ORANGE PARK. MOON RIVER Pizza, 925 S. 14th St., 321-3400, moonriverpizza.net. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Authentic Northern-style pizzas, 20+ toppings, pie/slice. Calzones. $ BW TO L D M-Sa The MUSTARD SEED Café, 833 Courson Rd., 277-3141, nassauhealthfoods.net. Casual organic eatery, juice bar, in Nassau Health Foods. All-natural organic items, smoothies, juices, herbal teas, coffees, daily specials. $$ K TO B L M-Sa The POINTE Restaurant, 98 S. Fletcher Ave., 277-4851, elizabethpointelodge.com. ’17 BOJ winner. In awardwinning inn Elizabeth Pointe Lodge. Seaside dining; in or out. Hot buffet breakfast daily, full lunch menu. Homestyle soups, specialty sandwiches, desserts. $$$ BW K B L D Daily The SALTY PELICAN Bar & Grill, 12 N. Front St., 277-3811, thesaltypelicanamelia.com. F ’17 BOJ winner. 2nd-story outdoor bar. T.J. & Al offer local seafood, fish tacos, Mayport shrimp, po’boys, cheese oysters. $$ FB K L D Daily SLIDERS Seaside Grill, 1998 S. Fletcher Ave., 277-6652, slidersseaside.com. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Oceanfront. Award-winning handmade crabcakes, fried pickles, seafood. Open-air upstairs balcony, playground. $$ FB K L D Daily T-RAY’S Burger Station, 202 S. Eighth St., 261-6310, traysburgerstation.com. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Family-

DINING DIRECTORY KEY AVERAGE ENTRÉE COST $ $$

$

< $10

$$$

10- 20

$$$$

$

$

20-$35 > $35

ABBREVIATIONS & SPECIAL NOTES BW = Beer/Wine

L = Lunch

FB = Full Bar

D = Dinner Bite Club = Hosted Free Folio Weekly Bite Club Event F = Folio Weekly Distribution Spot

K = Kids’ Menu TO = Take Out B = Breakfast R = Brunch

To list your restaurant, call your account manager or call or text SAM TAYLOR, Folio Weekly publisher, at 904-860-2465 (email: staylor@folioweekly.com).

owned-and-operated 18+ years. Blue plate specials, burgers, biscuits & gravy, shrimp. $ BW TO B L M-Sa

ARLINGTON + REGENCY

LARRY’S, 1301 Monument Rd., Ste. 5, 724-5802. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE ORANGE PARK.

AVONDALE + ORTEGA

EL JEFE, 947 Edgewood Ave. S., 619-0938, eljefejax.com. Tex-Mex à la Chefs Scott Schwartz and José Solome, plus craft margaraitas, combo meals. $$ FB TO K L, D Daily FOOD ADDICTZ Grill, 1044 Edgewood Ave. S., 240-1987. F Family-and-veteran-owned place offers home cooking. Faves: barbecued pulled pork, blackened chicken, Caesar wrap, Portobello mushroom burger. $ K TO B L D Tu-Su La NOPALERA, 4530 St. Johns Ave., 388-8828. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE INTRACOASTAL. MOJO No. 4 Urban BBQ & Whiskey Bar, 3572 St. Johns Ave., Ste. 1, 381-6670, mojobbq.com. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Pulled pork, Carolina-style barbecue. Delta fried catfish. $$ FB K TO L D Daily PINEGROVE Market & Deli, 1511 PineGrove Ave., 389-8655, pinegrovemarket.com. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. 40+ years. Burgers, Cubans, subs, wraps. Onsite butcher, USDA choice prime aged beef. Craft beers. $ BW TO B L D M-Sa Restaurant ORSAY, 3630 Park St., 381-0909, restaurantorsay.com. ’17 BOJ winner/fave. French/ Southern bistro; local organic ingredients. Steak frites, mussels, pork chops. $$$ FB R, Su; D Nightly SIMPLY SARA’S, 2902 Corinthian Ave., 387-1000, simplysaras.net. F Down-home fare from scratch: eggplant fries, pimento cheese, baked chicken, fruit cobblers, chicken & dumplings, desserts. BYOB. $$ K TO L D Tu-Sa, B Sa SOUTH KITCHEN & Spirits, 3638 Park St., 475-2362, south.kitchen. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Southern classics: crispy catfish with smoked gouda grits, family-style fried chicken, burgers, vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free options. $$ FB K TO L D Daily

BAYMEADOWS

ATHENIAN OWL, 9551 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 21-23, 503-3008, athenianowljaxfl.com. Yiorgos and Marilena Triantafillopoulos show respect for their Greek cuisine and for their customers, by creating authentic Mediterranean fare. Vegetarian dishes, too. $$ K TO L, D M-F, D Sa AL’S Pizza, 8060 Philips Hwy., Ste. 105, 731-4300. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE INTRACOASTAL. INDIA’S, 9802 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 8, 620-0777, indiajax. com. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Authentic cuisine, lunch buffet. Curries, vegetables, lamb, chicken, shrimp, fish tandoori. $$ BW L M-Sa; D Nightly LARRY’S, 8616 Baymeadows Rd., 739-2498. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE ORANGE PARK. METRO Diner, 9802 Baymeadows Rd., 425-9142. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE SAN MARCO. NATIVE SUN Natural Foods Market & Deli, 11030 Baymeadows Rd., 260-2791. ’17 BOJ fave. SEE MANDARIN. PATTAYA THAI Grille, 9551 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 1, 646-9506, ptgrille.com. F ’17 BOJ fave. Since 1989. Family-owned place has an extensive menu of traditional Thai, vegetarian, new-Thai; curries, seafood, noodles, soups. Low-sodium & gluten-free. $$$ BW TO L D Tu-Sa The WELL WATERING HOLE, 3928 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 9, 737-7740, thewellwateringhole.com. Local craft beers, glass/bottle wines. Meatloaf sandwich, pulled Peruvian chicken, vegan black bean burgers. Gluten-free pizzas, desserts. HH specials. $$ BW K TO L M-F; D Tu-Sa

SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 27


DINING DIRECTORY WHISKEY JAX, 10915 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 135, 634-7208, whiskeyjax.com. F ’17 BOJ fave. Popular gastropub; craft beers, gourmet burgers, handhelds, signature plates, tacos and whiskey. HH M-F. $$ FB B Sa & Su; L F; D Nightly

BEACHES

(Venues are in Jax Beach unless otherwise noted.)

AL’S PIZZA, 240 Third St., Neptune Beach, 853-6773, alspizza.com. F Al Mansur re-opened good ol’ Al’s, in a new spot. Dine inside or out. $$ BW L D Daily ANGIE’S SUBS, 1436 Beach Blvd., 246-2519. ANGIE’S GROM SUBS, 204 Third Ave. S., 241-3663. F ’17 BOJ winner. Home of the original baked sub. Locals love Angie’s hot or cold subs for 30+ years. Good news! A real, live chef is at Grom! Chef David ramped up the menu at least three levels: new breakfast items, brunch, specials. Ed says, “Dude is legit.” Still the word: Peruvian. New sub: Suthern Comfert–slowsmoked brisket, chicken, mac & cheese, collards, black-eyed peas on sub roll. Big salads, blue-ribbon iced tea. Grom Sun. brunch. $ BW K TO L D Daily BOLD BEAN Coffee Roasters, 2400 S. Third St., Ste. 201, 374-5735. ’17 BOJ winner. SEE RIVERSIDE. BREEZY Coffee Shop Wine Bar, 235 Eighth Ave. S., 2412211, breezycoffeeshopcafe.com. Beachy coffee & wine shop by day; wine bar at night. Fresh pastries, sandwiches. Grab-n-Go salads, hummus. $ BW K TO B L D Daily EUROPEAN Street Café, 992 Beach Blvd., 249-3001, europeanstreet.com. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE RIVERSIDE. FLYING IGUANA Taqueria & Tequila Bar, 207 Atlantic Blvd., NB, 853-5680, flyingiguana.com. ’17 BOJ winner. Latin American: tacos, seafood, carnitas, Cubana fare. 100+ tequilas. $ FB TO L D Daily GUSTO, 1266 Beach Blvd., 372-9925, gustojax.com. F Classic Old World Roman fare, big Italian menu: homestyle pasta, beef, chicken, fish delicacies; open pizza-tossing kitchen. Reservations encouraged. $$ FB TO L R D Tu-Su HAWKERS Asian Street Fare, 241 Atlantic Blvd., NB, 425-1025. ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE RIVERSIDE. LARRY’S, 657 Third St. N., 247-9620. F ’17 BOJ winner/ fave. SEE ORANGE PARK. METRO Diner, 1534 3rd St. N., 853-6817. F ’17 BOJ winner/ fave. SEE SAN MARCO. MOJO KITCHEN BBQ Pit & Blues Bar, 1500 Beach Blvd., 247-6636. ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE AVONDALE.

ELEMENT BISTRO & Craft Bar, 333 E. Bay St., 438-5173. In Myth Nightclub. Locally sourced, organic fare, fresh herbs, spices. HH $$ FB D, Tu-Su OLIO Market, 301 E. Bay St., 356-7100, oliomarket.com. F Scratch soups, sandwiches. Duck grilled cheese, as seen on Best Sandwich in America. $$ BW TO B R L M-F; D F & Sa SPLIFF’S Gastropub, 15 N. Ocean St., 844-5000, spliffsgastropub.com. ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Music venue has munchie apps, mac & cheese dishes, pockets, gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches. HH M-F. $ BW L D M-Sa URBAN GRIND Coffee Company, 45 W. Bay St., Ste. 102, 516-7799, urbangrind.coffee. F ’17 BOJ fave. Locally roasted whole bean brewed coffees, espressos, lattes, pastries, smoothies, bagels, chicken and tuna salad, sandwiches. $ B L M-F URBAN GRIND Express, 50 W. Laura St., 516-7799. F ’17 BOJ fave. SEE ABOVE. ZODIAC Bar & Grill, 120 W. Adams St., 354-8283, thezodiacbarandgrill.com. 16+ years. Mediterranean cuisine, American fare, paninis, vegetarian dishes. Lunch buffet. Espressos, hookahs. HH M-F. $ FB L M-F; D W-Sa

FLEMING ISLAND

GRASSROOTS Natural Market, 1915 East-West Pkwy., 541-0009. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE RIVERSIDE. La NOPALERA, 1571 C.R. 220, Ste. 100, 215-2223. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE INTRACOASTAL. MOJO Smokehouse, 1810 Town Ctr. Blvd., Ste. 8, 264-0636. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE AVONDALE. WHITEY’S Fish Camp, 2032 C.R. 220, 269-4198, whiteysfishcamp.com. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Real fish camp. Gator tail, catfish, daily specials, on Swimming Pen Creek. Tiki bar. Boat, bike or car. $ FB K TO L Tu-Su; D Nightly

INTRACOASTAL WEST

AL’S PIZZA, 14286 Beach Blvd., Ste. 31, 223-0991, alspizza.com. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. It’s the first Al’s in NEFla–yeah, we didn’t know that, either–celebrating 30 years of awesome gourmet pizza, baked dishes. All day HH M-Th. $ FB K TO L D Daily LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 14333 Beach Blvd., 992-1666, lanopalerarest.com. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. The popular spots have tamales, fajitas, pork tacos. Some LaNops have a full bar. $$ FB K TO L D Daily

GRILL ME!

ERIC FRITSCHE

River & Post

1000 Riverside Ave., Ste. 100 Born In: Virginia Years in Biz: 30+ Favorite Restaurant: Five Points Tavern Favorite Cuisine Style: Depends on my mood Go-To Ingredients: Fresh fish, real tomatoes and garden-fresh veggies. Ideal Meal: Anything on a tropical island in shorts & a T-shirt with a stiff rye old fashioned. Will Not Cross My Lips: Haven’t discovered that yet. Insider’s Secret: Marry a better cook than you are. Celebrity Sighting at Your Bar: The Governor Culinary Treat: My wife’s baby eggplant tikka masala–oh, yeah! M SHACK, 299 Atlantic Blvd., AB, 241-2599, mshackburgers.com. ’17 BOJ winner. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, shakes. Dine indoors or out. $$ BW L D Daily NATIVE SUN Natural Foods Market & Deli, 1585 N. Third St., 458-1390. ’17 BOJ fave. SEE MANDARIN. RAGTIME TAVERN Seafood & Grill, 207 Atlantic Blvd., AB, 241-7877, ragtimetavern.com. F 34 years and counting, the iconic seafood place serves blackened snapper, sesame tuna, Ragtime shrimp. Daily HH, brunch Sun. $$ FB L D Daily SUSHI ONE TWO THREE, 311 N. Third St., 372-9718, sushionetwothree.com. Brand-spankin’-new right in the middle of all the action in Jax Beach, this place offers a twist on how we eat sushi: All You Can Eat. And small plate sushi, all made to order. Rooftop parking; kid-friendly–rugrats younger than eight eat free. $$ FB K TO L, D Daily WHISKEY JAX, 950 Marsh Landing Pkwy., 853-5973. F ’17 BOJ fave. SEE BAYMEADOWS.

CAMDEN COUNTY, GEORGIA

CAPTAIN STAN’S Smokehouse, 700 Bedell Dr., Woodbine, 912-729-9552. Barbecue, sides, hot dogs, burgers, desserts. Dine in or out. $$ FB K TO L & D Tu-Sa LARRY’S, 6586 S.R. 40 B6, St. Marys, 912-576-7006. F ’17 BOJ fave. SEE ORANGE PARK. OUTERBANKS Sports Bar & Grille, 140 The Lakes Blvd., Ste. H, Kingsland, 912-729-5499. Fresh seafood, burgers, steaks, wings. $$ FB TO D Nightly

DOWNTOWN

BELLWETHER, 100 N. Laura St., 802-7745, bellwetherjax.com. Elevated Southern classics in an understated site, with chef/ owner Jon Insetta’s focus on flavors; chef Kerri Rogers’ culinary creativity. Seasonal menu. Rotating local craft beers, regional spirits, cold brew coffee program. $$ FB TO L M-F CASA DORA, 108 E. Forsyth St., 356-8282, casadoraitalian. com. F Serving Italian fare, 40+ years: veal, seafood, pizza. Homemade salad dressing. $ BW K L M-F; D M-Sa 28 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

LARRY’S, 10750 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 14, 642-6980. F ’17 BOJ fave. SEE ORANGE PARK.

MANDARIN + NW ST. JOHNS

AL’S Pizza, 11190 San Jose Blvd., 260-4115. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE INTRACOASTAL. FIRST COAST Deli & Grill, 6082 St. Augustine Rd., 513-4548. Pancakes, sandwiches, burgers, wings. $ K TO B L Daily GIGI’S Restaurant, 3130 Hartley Rd., 694-4300, gigisbuffet.com. In Ramada, Gigi’s serves a prime rib and crab leg buffet F & Sa, blue-jean brunch Su, daily breakfast buffet; lunch & dinner buffets. $$$ FB B R L D Daily JAX Diner, 5065 St. Augustine Rd., 739-7070, jaxdiner.com. Chef Roderick “Pete” Smith, local culinary expert, uses locally sourced ingredients from area farmers, vendors in American & Southern dishes. Seasonal brunch. $ K TO B L M-F, D F La NOPALERA, 11700 San Jose Blvd., 288-0175. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE INTRACOASTAL. METRO Diner, 12807 San Jose Blvd., 638-6185. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Dinner. SEE SAN MARCO. MOJO BAR-B-QUE, 1607 University Blvd. W., 732-7200, mojobbq.com. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE AVONDALE. MOON DOG PIE HOUSE, 115 Bartram Oaks Walk, Ste. 105, 287-3633, moondogpiehouse.com. Wings, apps, subs, calzones–and specialty pizza pies. $$ BW TO K L, D Daily NATIVE SUN NATURAL FOODS MARKET & DELI, 10000 San Jose Blvd., 260-6950, nativesunjax.com. ’17 BOJ fave. Organic soup, baked items, sandwiches, prepared foods. Juice, smoothie, coffee bar. All-natural beer/wine. $ BW TO B L D Daily

ORANGE PARK

BOONDOCKS Grill & Bar, 2808 Henley Rd., Green Cove Springs, 406-9497, boondocksrocks.com. Apps, burgers, wings, seafood, steak, weekend specials, craft cocktails. HH $$ FB TO K D M-F; L, D Sa & Su


DINING DIRECTORY The amiable staff at St. Augustine’s PROHIBITION KITCHEN offers small plates, craft burgers and sandwiches, all made fresh daily. Customers cannot shuck enough of the live local oysters. photo by Devon Sarian

The HILLTOP, 2030 Wells Rd., 272-5959, hilltop-club.com. Southern fine dining. New Orleans shrimp, certified Black Angus prime rib, she-crab soup, desserts. Extensive bourbon selection. $$$ FB D Tu-Sa La NOPALERA, 1930 Kingsley Ave., 276-2776. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE INTRACOASTAL. LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 1330 Blanding Blvd., Ste. 165, 276-7370. 1545 C.R. 220, 278-2827. 700 Blanding Blvd., Ste. 15, 272-3553. 5733 Roosevelt Blvd., 446-9500. 1401 S. Orange Ave., Green Cove, 284-7789, larryssubs.com. F ’17 BOJ fave. Larry’s piles ’em high, serves ’em fast; 36+ years. Hot & cold subs, soups. Some Larry’s serve breakfast. $ K TO B L D Daily METRO Diner, 2034 Kingsley Ave., 375-8548. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Dinner nightly. SEE SAN MARCO. The ROADHOUSE, 231 Blanding Blvd., 264-0611, roadhouseonline.net. F ’17 BOJ fave. Sandwiches, wings, burgers, quesadillas; 35+ years. 75+ import beers. $ FB L D Daily SPRING PARK Coffee, 328 Ferris St., Green Cove Springs, 531-9391, springparkcoffee.com. F Fresh-roasted Brass Tacks coffee, handcrafted hot & cold drinks, lattes, cappuccino, macchiato, pastries, breakfast. $ B L D Daily

PONTE VEDRA BEACH

AL’S Pizza, 635 A1A N., 543-1494. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE INTRACOASTAL. LARRY’S, 830 A1A N., Ste. 6, 273-3993. F ’17 BOJ fave. SEE ORANGE PARK. M SHACK Nocatee, 641 Crosswater Pkwy., 395-3575. F ’17 BOJ winner. SEE BEACHES. METRO Diner, 340 Front St., Ste. 700, 513-8422. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE SAN MARCO.

RIVERSIDE, 5 PTS + WESTSIDE

13 GYPSIES, 887 Stockton St., 389-0330, 13gypsies.com. ’17 BOJ winner. Authentic Mediterranean cuisine: chorizo, tapas, blackened cod, pork skewers, coconut mango curry chicken. Breads from scratch. $$ BW L D Tu-Sa, R Sa AL’S Pizza, 1620 Margaret St., Ste. 201, 388-8384. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE INTRACOASTAL. BIG OAK BBQ & Catering, 1948 Henley Rd., Middleburg, 214-3041. 1440 Dunn Ave., 757-2225, bigoakbbqfl.com. Family-owned-and-operated. Smoked chicken, pulled pork, ribs, sides, stumps. $$ K TO L D M-Sa BLACK SHEEP, 1534 Oak St., 355-3793, blacksheep5points.com. ’17 BOJ winner. New American, Southern; local source ingredients. Specials, rooftop bar. HH. $$$ FB R Sa & Su; L M-F; D Nightly BOLD BEAN Coffee Roasters, 869 Stockton St., 855-1181, boldbeancoffee.com. ’17 BOJ winner. Smallbatch, artisanal approach to sourcing and roasting singleorigin, direct-trade coffees. Signature blends, hand-crafted syrups, espressos, craft beers. $ BW TO B L Daily CRANE RAMEN, 1029 Park St., 253-3282. Ramen done right; vegetarian, vegan items, kimchi, gyoza. Dine in or out. HH. $$ FB K L, D Tu-Su CUMMER CAFÉ, Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., 356-6857, cummer.org. ’17 BOJ winner. Light lunch, quick bites, locally roasted coffee, espressobased drinks, sandwiches, desserts, daily specials. Dine in or in gardens. $ BW K L D Tu; L W-Su EUROPEAN STREET CAFÉ, 2753 Park St., 384-9999. ’17 BOJ winner. 130+ imported beers, 20 on tap. Sandwiches. Dine outside at some E-Sts. $ BW K L D Daily FOO DOG CURRY TRADERS, 869 Stockton St., 551-0327, foodogjax.com. Southeast Asian, Indian inspired fare, all gluten-free, from scratch. Vegan & omnivore. $$ TO L, D Daily GRASSROOTS Natural Market, 2007 Park St., 384-4474, thegrassrootsmarket.com. F ’17 BOJ winner. Juice bar

uses certified organic fruits, veggies. Artisanal cheeses, 300 craft, import beers, organic wines, produce, meats, vitamins, herbs, wraps, sides, sandwiches. $ BW TO B L D Daily HAWKERS ASIAN STREET FARE, 1001 Park St., 508-0342, hawkerstreetfare.com. ’17 BOJ winner. Authentic dishes from mobile stalls: BBQ pork char sui, beef haw fun, Hawkers baos, chow faan, grilled Hawker skewers. $ BW TO L D Daily JOHNNY’S Deli & Grille, 474 Riverside Ave., 356-8055. Made-to-order sandwiches, wraps. $ TO B L M-Sa LARRY’S, 1509 Margaret St., 674-2794. 7895 Normandy Blvd., 781-7600. 8102 Blanding Blvd., 779-1933. F ’17 BOJ fave. SEE ORANGE PARK. METRO Diner, 4495 Roosevelt Blvd., 999-4600. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE SAN MARCO. MOON RIVER Pizza, 1176 Edgewood Ave. S., 389-4442. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE AMELIA ISLAND. M SHACK, 1012 Margaret St., 423-1283. ’17 BOJ winner. SEE BEACHES. SOUTHERN ROOTS Filling Station, 1275 King St., 513-4726, southernrootsjax.com. ’17 BOJ winner. Fresh vegan fare; local, organic ingredients. Specials, on bread, local greens/ rice, change daily. Sandwiches, coffees, teas. $ Tu-Su SUN-RAY Cinema, 1028 Park St., 359-0047, sunraycinema.com. ’17 BOJ winner. First-run, indie/art films. Beer, local drafts, wine, pizza–Godbold, Black Lagoon Supreme–hot dogs, sandwiches, popcorn, nachos, brownies. $$ BW Daily SUSHI Café, 2025 Riverside Ave., Ste. 204, 384-2888, sushicafejax.com. F Monster, Rock-n-Roll, Dynamite Roll. Hibachi, tempura, katsu, teriyaki. Patio. $$ BW L D Daily

ST. AUGUSTINE

AL’S Pizza, 1 St. George St., 824-4383. F ’17 BOJ winner/ fave. SEE INTRACOASTAL. The CORAZON Cinema & Cafe, 36 Granada St., 679-5736, corazoncinemaandcafe.com. F Sandwiches, combos, pizza. Iindie and first-run movies. $$ Daily DESSERT FIRST Bistro, 121 Yacht Club Dr., 417-0468, dessertfirstbistro.com. It’s all made from scratch: breakfast, lunch, desserts. Plus coffees, espressos, craft beers, wine, hot teas. $ BW K TO B, L Tu-Su The FLORIDIAN, 72 Spanish St., 829-0655, thefloridianstaug.com. Updated Southern fare; fresh, local ingredients. Vegetarian, gluten-free options. Signature fried green tomato bruschetta, blackened fish cornbread stack; grits with shrimp, fish or tofu. $$$ BW K TO L D W-M GYPSY CAB Company, 828 Anastasia Blvd., 824-8244, gypsycab.com. F 34+ years. Varied urban cuisine menu changes twice daily. Signature: Gypsy chicken. Seafood, tofu, duck, veal. $$ FB R Su; L D Daily METRO Diner, 1000 S. Ponce de Leon Blvd., 758-3323. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Dinner nightly. SEE SAN MARCO. MOJO OLD CITY BBQ, 5 Cordova St., 342-5264, mojobbq. com. F ’17 BOJ winner. SEE AVONDALE. OCEAN AVENUE Sports Bar, 123 San Marco Ave., 293-9600, a1abar.com. F Lively spot has wings, nachos, shrimp, chicken, Phillys, sliders, soft pretzels. $$ FB TO L D Daily PROHIBITION KITCHEN, 119 St. George St., 209-5704, prohibitionkitchenstaugustine.com. The gastropub offers small plates, craft burgers, sandwiches, live local oysters, mains, desserts and handspun milkshakes. $$$ L D Daily SALT LIFE Food Shack, 321 A1A S., 217-3256. F SEE BEACHES. SARBEZ, 115 Anastasia Blvd., 342-0632, planetsarbez.com. Local music venue has gourmet grilled cheese: Sarbez melt: smoked mozzarella, turkey, bacon, signature sauce, local sourdough. Local craft beers. $ BW L, D Daily WOODPECKER’S Backyard BBQ, 4930 S.R. 13, 531-5670, woodpeckersbbq.weebly.com. F Smoked fresh daily. Brisket, ribs, pork, sausage, turkey: in sandwiches, plates by the pound. 8 sauces, 10 sides. $$ TO L D Tu-Su

SAN MARCO + SOUTHBANK

The BEARDED PIG Southern BBQ & Beer Garden, 1224 Kings Ave., 619-2247, thebeardedpigbbq.com. F ’17 BOJ fave. Barbecue joint Southern style: brisket, pork, chicken, sausage, beef; veggie platters. $$ BW K TO Daily BISTRO AIX, 1440 San Marco Blvd., 398-1949, bistrox.com. F Mediterranean/French inspired menu changes seasonally. 250+ wines. Wood-fired oven-baked, grilled specialties: pizza, pasta, risotto, steaks, seafood. Hand-crafted cocktails, specialty drinks. Dine outside. HH M-F. $$$ FB L D Daily BOLD BEAN Coffee Roasters, 1905 Hendricks Ave. ’17 BOJ winner. SEE RIVERSIDE. EUROPEAN Street Café, 1704 San Marco Blvd., 398-9500. F ’17 BOJ winner. SEE RIVERSIDE. FUSION SUSHI, 1550 University Blvd. W., 636-8688, fusionsushijax.com. Upscale; fresh sushi, sashimi, hibachi, teriyaki, katsu, seafood. $$ K L D Daily HAVANA-JAX Café/CUBA LIBRE Bar, 2578 Atlantic Blvd., 399-0609, havanajax.com. F ’17 BOJ winner. Bite Club certified. Cuban sandwiches, black beans & rice, plantains, steaks, seafood, roast pork. Spanish wine, drink specials, mojitos, Cuba libres. Nonstop HH. $ FB K L D Daily La NOPALERA, 1434 Hendricks Ave., 399-1768. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE INTRACOASTAL. METRO Diner, 3302 Hendricks Ave., 398-3701, metrodiner. com. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Original upscale diner in a 1930s-era building. Meatloaf, chicken pot pie, soups. Some Metros serve dinner. $$ B R L D Daily TAVERNA, 1986 San Marco Blvd., 398-3005, tavernasanmarco.com. ’17 BOJ winner/fave. Chef Sam Efron’s authentic Italian; tapas, wood-fired pizza. Seasonal local produce, meats. Craft beer (some local), award-winning wine. $$$ FB K TO R L D Daily

SOUTHSIDE + TINSELTOWN

ALHAMBRA THEATRE & DINING, 12000 Beach Blvd., 641-1212, alhambrajax.com. ’17 BOJ winner. Staging productions for 50+ years. Executive Chef DeJuan Roy’s theme menus. Reservations. $$ FB D Tu-Su EL TAINO, 4347 University Blvd., 374-1150. A focus on Latin American, Puerto Rican and Caribbean cusine. $$ BW K TO EUROPEAN Street Café, 5500 Beach Blvd., 398-1717. F ’17 BOJ winner. SEE RIVERSIDE. La NOPALERA, 8206 Philips Hwy., 732-9433. 8818 Atlantic Blvd., 720-0106. F ’17 BOJ winner/fave. SEE INTRACOASTAL. LARRY’S, 3611 St. Johns Bluff S., 641-6499. 4479 Deerwood Lake Pkwy., 425-4060. F ’17 BOJ fave. SEE ORANGE PARK. MARIANAS GRINDS, 11380 Beach Blvd., Ste. 10, 206-612-6596. F Pacific Islander fare, chamorro culture. Soups, stews, fitada, beef oxtail, katden pika; empanadas, lumpia, chicken relaguen, BBQ-style ribs, chicken. $$ TO B L D Tu-Su M SHACK, 10281 Midtown Pkwy., 642-5000. F ’17 BOJ winner. SEE BEACHES.

SPRINGFIELD + NORTHSIDE

ANDY’S Grill, 1810 W. Beaver St., 354-2821, jaxfarmersmarket.com. F ’17 BOJ fave. In Jax Farmers Market. Local, regional, international produce. Breakfast, sandwiches. $ B L D M-Sa LARRY’S, 12001 Lem Turner Rd., 764-9999. F ’17 BOJ fave. SEE ORANGE PARK. TIKI ISLAND Tap House, 614 Pecan Park Rd., 403-0776. Casual spot serves hot dogs, burgers, gator tail, gator jerky. Gator pond! $ BW TO D, F; L, D Sa & Su. UPTOWN Kitchen & Bar, 1303 Main St. N., 355-0734, uptownmarketjax.com. F Bite Club certified. Fresh fare, innovative menus, farm-to-table selections, daily specials. $$ BW TO B L Daily

BITE-SIZED

A

NOBLE

NO EVIL on the menu at Beaches restaurant

LUNCH

PLANTOLOGY JUICE BAR & CAFÉ ON ATLANTIC Boulevard is a nice introduction to eating plantbased for those new to meatless. Their offerings are healthy and diverse and the killer smoothies are fresh and very filling. Plantology is run by some of the owners of the previously established Watts Juicery, so you can expect the same great plant-powered zing from the same local ownership. If you’re looking for something to chew, check out the chalkboard specials. I found the hearty Loaded Breakfast Burrito ($13), a wrap full of tofu, veggies, avocado slices and coconut bacon. You’re a fool if you don’t splurge 75 cents for nacho cheese sauce made from cashews and love. The adorbs folks at Plantology offered a small cup of cubed pineapple with a dash of cinnamon, which made for a great, and original, combo. On the regular menu, check out sandwiches like (Un)Tuna Salad Sandwich ($9), my companion’s favorite, though we agreed it didn’t taste like tuna. Perhaps the day’s batch lacked in fishiness, but regardless of un-tuna-ness, the hearts of palm mixture tucked between two slices of bread, with pickled red onion, lettuce and tomato, was delicious. The coconut bacon and eggplant bacon are made in-house; the latter is served with the ELT Sandwich ($9), Plantology’s take on the BLT. It’s so popular, they were out of eggplant—if it’s that good, I’m looking forward to trying it next time. I love that you can add capers, kraut, avocados, pickled onions, coconut bacon, spinach, chopped almonds and coconut yogurt to any dish. These little additions pump up the flavor profile and light up your taste buds. They also satisfy your hunger,

PLANTOLOGY JUICE BAR & CAFÉ

1013 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 372-7818, plantologycafé.com particularly if you’re new to eating vegetarian and worry about feeling full. On to the specialty: juices. You gotta try the housemade almond Mylk (almonds, dates, cinnamon, vanilla, Himalayan pink salt, water). All juices are fresh-squeezed and served in nice bottles that keep well in the fridge. The Jade is the most popular powerhouse green juice; it packs a punch with kale, spinach, cucumber, celery, parsley, fennel, aloe, chlorella, ginger and lime ($10). If you’re looking for something more approachable, check out the lighter, sweeter Nirvana with orange, grapefruit, ginger and cayenne ($9). We left the Thin Mint smoothie ($11) for last, for dessert (there are rules, ya know), and holy smokes! It’s the ultimate of ultimates when it comes to being refreshing and satisfying a sweet tooth. The best part is that with its wholesome ingredients—chocolate protein powder, cacao nibs, mint, frozen avocado and almond milk—it’s actually not terrible for you. Yes, eat this as your meal. It’s definitely filling enough! Gotta love a local company, especially when they support local, too. Plantology uses bread from Ferra Bakery on Philips (who also sell at Beaches Green Market) and they source greens from Atlantic Beach Urban Farm. They’re clearly committed to making the community a place where you can eat good food that’s good for everyone. Brentley Stead biteclub@folioweekly.com SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 29


PINT-SIZED

Cannabis and beer create a BEAUTIFUL UNION

RIBS

CHEFFED-UP

FOR ALL

SEASONS HERBAL

REFRESHMENTS WHAT DO YOU GET WHEN A BOOMING BEER industry and the growing marijuana industry collide? You get beer that Cheech and Chong would totally toss back. As recreational Mary Jane becomes legal in more and more states, the two industries want to capitalize on the popularity of each other. The biggest hurdle to dank brew? Good ol’ Uncle Sam, of course. While there are several hemp-based beers on the market–which we’ll discuss in a bit–there is only one weed beer. Two Roots Brewing Co. of San Diego has successfully brewed non-alcoholic beers that are infused with micro doses of cannabis. The initial lineup includes a lager, stout, IPA and blonde ale. The company will introduce a wheat brew later that not only has the effects of cannabis, but tastes like it, too. “The launch of Two Roots,” says Tim Walters, chief operating officer, “is the culmination of more than two-and-a-half years of research, development, planning and building of not just a product or brand, but an organization with 150,000 square feet of operations across California and Nevada.” The brew, which the company is calling Cannabier (can-na-BEER), employs stateof-the-art brewing technology along with first-of-its-kind cannabinoid infusion to create a fast-acting, natural alternative to alcoholic beer. For now, though, it’s available only in California and Nevada. The company expects to distribute in other states where recreational marijuana is legal in the near future. Until weed-infused beer is legal in more states, there are a few alternatives. Two of craft beer’s largest brewers, New Belgium Brewing Co. and SweetWater Brewery, have recently introduced hemp beers that are

legal and provide potheads and weekend imbibers the taste of ganja without an attack of the munchies. New Belgium recently introduced The Hemperer, an ale akin to an IPA but dubbed an HPA, or hemp pale ale. More than two years of development was stymied by bureaucratic roadblocks because hemp is still considered a Schedule 1 drug, never mind that it contains no THC, the psychoactive substance in pot that gets you high. The original idea was for the beer to be flavored with hemp flowers or leaves, but the Alcohol & Tobacco Tax & Trade Bureau and Drug Enforcement Agency quickly put the kibosh on that idea, so New Belgium had to get inventive. They worked with plant genetics researchers to develop a proprietary brewing process that used legal hemp hearts–the meat of the seed removed from its shell–and several strains of hops. The result carries the unmistakably dank aroma of a Grateful Dead concert in a beer that’s legal in 49 states. Kansas refuses to allow it since it has hemp in it. Atlanta-based SweetWater also has introduced a hemp brew with its 420 Strain G13 IPA. Head Brewer Nick Nock carefully selected hops with terpenes, oils that provide flavor and aroma, closely mimicking the characteristics of the herb with hemp hearts and other botanically derived terpenes. These beverages are just the tip of the iceberg in the coming cannabis/hemp beer onslaught. As laws regulating wacky tobbaccy loosen, so will the fl oodgates on beers that use it as an ingredient. Let’s hope that that happens sooner rather than later. Marc Wisdom marc@folioweekly.com

PINT-SIZED PI NT-S NT -SIZ ZED ED B BREWERS’ REWE WERS ERS R ’ COMM COMMUNITY MM MUN UNIT ITY IT Y AARDWOLF BREWING COMPANY 1461 Hendricks Ave., San Marco

BOTTLENOSE BREWING 9700 Deer Lake Ct., Ste. 1, Southside

PINGLEHEAD BREWING COMPANY 12 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park

AMELIA TAVERN RESTAURANT & BREWPUB 318 Centre St., Fernandina Beach

DOG ROSE BREWING CO. 77 Bridge St., St. Augustine

RAGTIME TAVERN SEAFOOD & GRILL 207 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach

ANCIENT CITY BREWING 3420 Agricultural Ctr. Dr., St. Augustine

ENGINE 15 BREWING CO. DOWNTOWN 633 Myrtle Ave. N., Downtown

RUBY BEACH BREWING 131 1st Ave N., Jax Beach

ANHEUSER-BUSCH 1100 Ellis Rd. N., Northside

ENGINE 15 BREWING CO. 1500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 217, Jax Beach

RIVER CITY BREWING COMPANY 835 Museum Cir., Southbank

ATLANTIC BEACH BREWING COMPANY 725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 3, Atlantic Beach

GREEN ROOM BREWING, LLC 228 Third St. N., Jax Beach

SEVEN BRIDGES GRILLE & BREWERY 9735 Gate Pkwy., Southside

BEARDED BUFFALO BREWING COMPANY 1012 King St., Downtown

HYPERION BREWING COMPANY 1740 Main St. N., Springfield

SJ BREWING CO. 463646 SR 200 #13, Yulee Heights

BOG BREWING COMPANY 218 W. King St., St. Augustine

INTUITION ALE WORKS 929 E. Bay St., Downtown

SOUTHERN SWELLS BREWING CO. 1312 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach

BOLD CITY BREWERY 2670 Rosselle St., Ste. 7, Riverside

MAIN AND SIX BREWING COMPANY 1636 Main St. N., Northside

VETERANS UNITED CRAFT BREWERY 8999 Western Way, Ste. 104, Southside

BOLD CITY DOWNTOWN 109 E. Bay St., Jacksonville

OLD COAST ALES 300 Anastasia Blvd., St. Augustine

WICKED BARLEY BREWING COMPANY 4100 Baymeadows Rd.

30 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

A lighter take on a FATTY FAVORITE is just the ticket

OVERSET

HAVE YOU EVER NOTICED THE COMMERCIALS for the big corporate restaurants? They make a huge deal about their “new” menus. They promote these menus endlessly for months at a time. Upon closer inspection, the “new” menus are usually just a reorganization of the same ol’ offerings: a couple of combo platters, maybe a different seasoning blend on their frozen fries, or a new twist on their bottled ranch dressing. Ugh. Where’s the seasonality? The variety? The fun? Where’s the humanity? I’m a huge proponent of seasonal menus, yet I’m starting to think I’m alone. Even independent restaurants seem to be ignoring seasonality these days, especially upscale places. I can’t figure it out. Maybe diners aren’t interested in variety and change. Perhaps people want to stick with what’s familiar when dining out–especially when the meal is expensive. Eating is FUN. It’s one of my favorite activities, right after cooking, of course. It’s especially fun to eat lighter, spicy, more delicately prepared foods in the summer when the temps outside are sweltering. The best part of changing or lightening your cooking style for the hotter months is that you can continue to enjoy your favorite proteins. Simply change the sides, the cooking techniques, cuts and even portion sizes. The grill is my favorite piece of summer cooking equipment. The mere aromas of charcoal and hard woods burning should be enough to inspire anyone to cook on a grill. When you add the sweet smell of the smoke created by the flare-ups from the fats dripping from the meats and vegetables as they caramelize, you have recipe for a mouthwatering meal! With this in mind, I decided to cook some short ribs the other night. NOT the big, thick, rich, succulent, red-winebraised variety I often enjoy in the winter. Instead I’m cooking a thin, spicy, citrusy, sweet, salty version perfect for grilling: the

brilliant Korean short ribs called Gaibi. First I chose a cut known as flanken. This means they’re cut across the bones, leaving about portion that’s half-inch to one-inch thick, by six to eight inches long. Perfect for quickly absorbing the Gaibi marinade flavors. Plus, they require very little cooking time. To be honest, the short cooking time is actually a disadvantage, considering the amazing aromas wafting up from the grill. Just thinking of the smell makes me salivate. I marinated these ribs for a couple days and served them with kimchi and farmers market vegetable fried rice. Here’s the marinade recipe. I hope it inspires y’all to Chef-Up summer meals and avoid that corporate garbage.

CHEF BILL’S KOREAN SHORT RIBS MARINADE

Ingredients • 3 ounces soy sauce • 3/4 cup brown sugar • 2 ounces mirin • 1 tbsp. sesame oil • 1 tbsp. black pepper • 1/2 tsp. Korean chili powder • 1 onion, julienned • 8 garlic cloves, smashed • 1 Asian pear, peeled, seeded and sliced • 2 tbsp. ginger, peeled and sliced • 1 tbsp. sesame seeds Directions 1. Puree all ingredients, mix with •• the ribs. 2. Refrigerate at least 24 hours and up •• to two days. Until we cook again,

Chef Bill Thompson cheffedup@folioweekly.com __________________________________ Email Chef Bill Thompson, owner of Fernandina’s Amelia Island Culinary Academy, at cheffedup@folioweekly.com, for inspiration and to get Cheffed-Up!

CHEFFED-UP GROCERS’ COMMUNITY BUYGO 22 S. Eighth St., Fernandina EARTH FARE 11901-250 Atlantic Blvd., Arlington GRASSROOTS NATURAL MARKET 2007 Park St., Riverside JACKSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET 1810 W. Beaver St., Westside NATIVE SUN 11030 Baymeadows Rd. 10000 San Jose Blvd., Mandarin 1585 N. Third St., Jax Beach

NASSAU HEALTH FOODS 833 T.J. Courson Rd., Fernandina PUBLIX 1033 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine ROWE’S 1670 Wells Rd., Orange Park 8595 Beach Blvd., Southside THE SAVORY MARKET 474380 S.R. 200, Fernandina TERRY’S PRODUCE Buccaneer Trail, Fernandina WHOLE FOODS 10601 San Jose Blvd., Mandarin


SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 31


PET PARENTING FOLIO LIVING

DEAR D EAR DAVI

A rundown of local breweries with DOGFRIENDLY patios

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ANYONE WHO’S SPENT TIME AT ANY NORTHEAST Florida breweries knows how common it is to see dozens of dogs schmoozing at the pub. Dogs love to be around people, and people like the company—and the potential to post darn cute pictures. On Instagram, #dogfriendlybreweries is a trend. But according to the Duval County Florida Department of Health, bars, bottle shops and breweries are bound by the same health codes as restaurants— tagging beer as food, which means that dogs aren’t allowed inside. The one exception is service animals. Guess a pooch needs a job before it’s allowed to belly up to the bar. So what to do when you want to toss back a few but have your pooch with you? Find a place with an outdoor space. In the Sunshine State, dogs are still permitted on patios and outdoor areas. Here are some of my favorites.

with a large selection of local beers and an outdoor deck for dogs and humans.

AARDWOLF BREWING COMPANY 1461 Hendricks Ave., San Marco. Microbrewery in the heart of San Marco offering unique brews with a good vibe and a paved outdoor patio.

WICKED BARLEY BREWING COMPANY 4100 Baymeadows Rd., Southside. Warm and inviting gastropub that serves bar food and beer, with a pet-friendly waterfront beer garden.

BOLD CITY BREWERY 2670 Rosselle St., Ste. 7, Riverside. Comfortable, friendly place to share a pint or two of craft beer beside your four-legger in the outside seating area. BOTTLENOSE BREWING 9700 Deer Lake Court, Ste. 1, Southside. Cool brewery that serves house and local brews in hip, laid-back digs, with a pet-friendly patio. ENGINE 15 633 N. Myrtle Ave., Springfield. The brewery’s Downtown-adjacent location has been closed for modifications, but due to reopen any day now, which means pups can soon chill at the outside biergarten whilst you play yard games. GREEN ROOM BREWERY 228 Third St. N., Jax Beach. Superchill brewpub at the beach,

HYPERION BREWING COMPANY 1740 Main St. N., Springfield. Nano-brewery with a refreshing taproom experience, serving a rotating lineup of beers. The outside patio is super-cute with sunshades to keep you and your dog cool. KANINE SOCIAL 580 College St., Riverside. A unique venue that combines an indooroutdoor dog park with a beer, wine and coffee bar. It’s a perfect gathering spot for pups and people alike. MAIN & SIX BREWERY 1636 Main St. N., Springfield. A craft beer brewery in Historic Springfield showcasing hop-forward beers, cold-brew coffee, and an outdoor patio where quadrupeds and bipeds can hang out together day and night.

Cracking down on canines in breweries is not-so-great news for local watering holes, but take heart: Jacksonville is a dogfriendly city. There are plenty of places where pups can join their beer-drinking compadres outside. Dogs and beer are huge parts of many lives; a pint glass and a leash go hand-in-hand, literally. The best way to support local businesses that do allow dogs, beyond making purchases, is to follow its rules. Common courtesy can also help to ensure a safe, pleasant experience for everyone and make certain dogs stay part of the community brew experience. Davi mail@folioweekly.com ____________________________________ Davi the dachshund is probs at the bar right now.

PET TIP: OH, RATS! A FOLIO WEEKLY COVER STORY SUBJECT RECENTLY ADOPTED SOME rescue brown rats (yes, really) and was surprised to find that rattus norvegicus make excellent pets (really, again). They’re smart, easily trained, extremely clean and affectionate. Some words of caution from vetstreet.com: Like other fur babies, rats require preventive veterinary care for conditions such as breast tumors, respiratory tract disease and uterine infection. Find a vet familiar with the unique aspects of rat care, but be warned that Splinter won’t be particularly long-lived; rats average only a two-to-three-year lifespan. 32 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

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LOCAL PET EVENTS FIRST WEDNESDAY ART WALK • It’s the Dog Days of Summer Art Walk, 5-9 p.m. Sept. 5, Downtown. Events include Headquarters @ Hemming Park, encouraging you to bring the pups and celebrate animal friends; enter your pet in the Best Dressed Pet Competition, sponsored by Bark Downtown, for a chance to win a prize! The winner is announced at 7:30 p.m. At The Landing, it’s a Yappy Hour meet-up with giveaways, dog merchandise vendors, cold beer, food trucks, live music and artists at #FrontPorchJax.

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Yes, my name is Cheddar Cheese; they call me that because everything is better with me on it! Naps? Better with me by your side. Playing? Enhanced when you’re with me. Eating? Always better with some Cheddar Cheese. You’re missing out on your new best friend! Come on by to 8464 Beach Blvd. to meet me!

MEGA PET ADOPTION • First Coast No More Homeless Pets, Petco Foundation, Jacksonville Animal Care & Protective Services, Nassau Humane Society, Friends of Clay County Animals, and Jacksonville Humane Society offer more than 1,000 pets 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sept. 7, 8 and 9, Jacksonville Fairgrounds, 510 Fairground Place, Downtown. The $20 fee includes spay/neuter, microchip, vaccines and city license, jaxadoptapet. org, fcnmhp.org. Free adoptions for active and retired military, courtesy Doc Tony, doctony.org. DOG PARK GRAND OPENING • The park opens 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Sept. 8, Markland Florida, 2001 International Golf Parkway, St. Augustine, 531-5740, markland.com. Tail-wagging booths, door prizes, food trucks, groomers and live music. Proceeds benefit the St. Augustine Humane Society.

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Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch … because I love fetch! I’m currently looking for the Jack to my Jill to play all my favorite games with. You don’t have to be named Jack; you just have to have a loving heart and a warm lap for me to lay my head in! Come meet me at 8464 Beach Blvd.!

KATZ 4 KEEPS ADOPTION DAYS • Adoption hours and days are 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sept. 8 & 9 and every Sat. & Sun., 935B A1A N., Ponte Vedra, 834-3223, katz4keeps.org. DOGTOPIA • Daycare, boarding and spa facility is open, 1075 Hendricks Ave., Southbank, 600-3810, dogtopia.com/jacksonville-southbank. SATURDAY SAFARI • Tour the conservation center’s wildlife areas, then enjoy a gourmet dinner, 3 p.m. Sept. 15, White Oak Conservation, 581705 White Oak Rd., Yulee, $150 adults, $75 kids 3-12, 225-3396, whiteoakwildlife.org. CAT ADOPTIONS • Adopt a feline friend 10 a.m.4 p.m. Sept. 15, PetSmart, 8801 Southside Blvd., Ste. 3, 519-8878, petsmart.com, fcnmhp.org. MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS NOW • The 20th annual TOAST TO THE ANIMALS is 6-9 p.m. Sept. 22, TIAA Bank Field’s US Assure Club West, Downtown. Tickets $100 in advance. Proceeds benefit Jacksonville Humane Society medical fund. 725-8766, jaxhumane.org. SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 33


NEWS OF THE WEIRD SHOULD’VE USED HIS DRIVER

In Plymouth, Massachusetts, on Aug. 17, a friendly game at Southers Marsh Golf Club turned ugly when Derek Harkins, 46, and an unnamed 57-year-old man got into a brawl on the 18th hole. But you gotta hand it to Harkins: The Patriot Ledger reported he pointedly ended the fight by biting off the other man’s finger up to the knuckle, according to Plymouth Police Chief Michael Botieri. The victim, from Marshfield, was taken to the hospital, but his finger could not be reattached. Harkins was arrested at the scene and charged with assault and battery, mayhem and disturbing the peace.

HOME RUN!

Debbie L. McCulley, 57, of Salem, Virginia, has been banned from all future Floyd County High School sporting events but, on the bright side, her indecent exposure case may eventually be dropped, following an incident area lawyers are calling “moon over Floyd.” McCulley’s husband, Mark, is Glenvar High School’s JV softball coach; charges resulted from Debbie’s unusual reaction to her husband’s team’s loss to Floyd County in May. She “stood on or close to the pitcher’s mound and pulled down her pants with her right hand to expose her right butt cheek,” according to Floyd County Sheriff’s Deputy G.H. Scott. Debbie told the officer her husband had confronted the opposing coach after the game, and she was afraid he would be “attacked,” so she was trying to divert attention from the two men. The Roanoke Times reported Debbie wrote a letter of apology and will be performing community service. Chris Robinson of the Virginia High School League noted crowd behavior at games is “probably leaning a little bit in the wrong direction.”

KEEP AN EYE OUT FOR IT

Recently, United Press International reported a 42-year-old British woman went to her eye doctor when her eyelid was swelling and drooping. After doing an MRI, doctors found a cyst and performed surgery, during which they found a hard contact lens embedded in the eyelid. Turns out the patient had been hit

34 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

in the eye 28 years ago and assumed the lens fell out. She had no symptoms all that time.

AT LEAST IT WASN’T AIDA

After 16 years, neighbors of “Eva N.” in Sturovo, Slovakia, have relief from her particular brand of torment, reported the BBC. From morning to night, the woman played a four-minute aria from Giuseppe Verdi’s “La Traviata” over and over, with speakers on full blast. “The whole street is suffering,” complained one resident. At first, the music-lover played the music to drown out a neighbor’s barking dog, but kept it up until Aug. 6, when she was arrested for harassment and malicious persecution. If found guilty, she could face between six months and three years in prison.

SHOULDA BEEN WEED … LIKE, POTHOLE

A pothole in Toronto, Ontario, got new life as a vegetable garden this summer after area residents grew weary of waiting for the city to repair it. The hole, which is several feet deep, had been expanding for months, neighbors said. So they filled it with tomato plants, now ripening and getting so tall they need wire cages for support. Now, “It’s sort of, like, become the community garden,” resident Bryan Link told CBC Radio. Finally, Mayor John Tory has agreed to not only fill the pothole, but to move the tomato plants to a community garden.

ALL’S WOOL THAT ENDS WOOL

An unnamed Irish teenager’s hike became fodder for bad punsters after the boy was hit by a falling sheep while walking in Northern Ireland’s Mourne Mountains. The sheep fell from a crag on Aug. 17 and landed on the boy, who was treated for potential injuries to his head, neck, back, abdomen and leg. “It is believed the sheep was uninjured and left the scene unaided,” reported Metro News. Punny comments on a social media post made by the Mourne Mountain Rescue Team included: “Mutton been looking where he was going, I bet he’s feeling a little sheepish now” and “Ewe want to be careful on the mountains!!” weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com


DALE RATERMANN’s Folio Weekly Crossword presented by

Serving Excellence Since 1928 Member American Gem Society

San Marco 2044 San Marco Blvd. 398-9741

Ponte Vedra

THE SHOPPES OF PONTE VEDRA

330 A1A North 280-1202

Avondale 3617 St. Johns Ave. 388-5406

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52 Fed. security

63 Not as old

35 Jag foe

54 Gerontology subject

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64 Sicilian peak

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65 iPod type

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67 A couple of bucks

18 Councilor Anderson

68 Shot up

31 “First Coast Connect” host 3 5 Timely query 39 Prefix with “red” or “structure”

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19 Underwood’s gems 20 Area school 23 “____ luck!” 24 Stocking stuffer 25 Fork over

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Folio Weekly helps you connect with the paramour of your dreams. Go to folioweekly.com/i-saw-u.html, fill out the FREE form correctly (40 words or fewer, dammit) by 5 p.m. Friday (for the next Wednesday’s FW) – next stop: Bliss!

Yo! Thursday, Sept. 6 is READ A BOOK DAY. Friday, Sept. 7 is NATIONAL SALAMI DAY! And Tuesday, Sept. 11 is NO NEWS IS GOOD NEWS DAY! Well, we already read books without ceasing. And everyone likes salami, amirite? J! So we honor Confucius, who may or may not have said that no news is good news. Or maybe it was George Armstrong Custer … we forget. Anyway, they can all find love with FW ISUs! So grab a book, any book, and a salami, any salami and ignore bad news (no FOX, no tweets). Just go to folioweekly.com/i-saw-u.html* and do these easy steps: One: Write a five-word headline so the person recalls the moment you met, like: “ISU in Gili’s Kitchen, wistfully gazing at the meat case.” Two: Describe the person, like, “You: Wearing a loaded backpack.” Three: Describe yourself, like, “Me: Carrying my usual, a dogeared copy of Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood.” Four: Describe the moment, like, “You said that book was creepy. I tried to explain that there wasn’t a wasted word in it.” Five: We agreed to disagree, then fell in love. Send a 40-WORD ISU. No names, emails, websites. Find love with our ISUs at folioweekly.com/i-saw-u.html!

*(or email mdryden@folioweekly.com and we’ll work it out together) GOLDEN CORRAL SAN JOSE BLVD. You: dining alone, in booth behind us, blonde hair/beard, gorgeous blue eyes, blue shirt, jeans. Me: With mom, son; brunette, Jaguars shirt, black shorts. You, white van; me, black car. Let’s meet. Single? Coffee? When: Aug. 18. Where: Golden Corral. #1709-0829 PETITE BRUNETTE ON A BICYCLE You: Bicycling. Me: Driving. I stopped and asked you for directions. You seemed shy but friendly. Can we meet at Bold Bean for coffee sometime? When: Aug. 7. Where: Avondale. #1708-0822 SOUTHERN GROUNDS BLEND You: Pretty lady, khaki shorts, print top. You recommended dark roast coffee. Me: Blue shirt, jean shorts. Are you single? Would’ve liked to chat, but was with lady yoga friends. Namaste! When: July 29. Where: San Marco Southern Grounds. #1707-0808 HAWAIIAN SHIRT, GIN & TONIC Outside bar. You said my drink looked good. Me: “Only drink worth bootlegging.” You: Sharp, white slacks, heels, blue blouse; friends were late. Wish they’d stood you up; we would’ve had fun. Try again? When: July 18. Where: PV Pussers. #1706-0725 SUN-RAY FRONT LINE You: Cool couple. Man, patterned button-up. Woman, hip glasses, platform shoes. Us: Tall brunette, floral dress. Man, average height, white button-up. In chaotic Hearts Beat Loud crowd. Bonded over Sun-Ray’s beauty. Dig your vibe; meet again? When: July 8. Where: Sun-Ray Cinema. #1705-0711 5 POINTS FIREHOUSE “O” You: Silver shorts, black hat backwards, orange fingernails. Me: Camo hat, brown T-shirt. Going to approach you as we were leaving but you got away. Thought about you the rest of day. Make it everyday thing? When: 12:30 p.m. June 21. Where: 5 Points Firehouse Subs. #1704-0627 36 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018

BLACK FOUR-DOOR CADILLAC You watched me putting a shot back into the back of my car. You stopped and had your flashers on and I was too shy to stop. I wish I had. When: June 13. Where: Home Depot Lane Ave. #1703-0620 SANDY TOES & A ROSE You: Mocked my princess-wedding dreams, then strode over sand, rose in hand. Young men admired your moxie. Me: Sure you’re a romantic. Hard to surf the pier’s 1-2’ without longboard. Hang yours in my garage? When: May 21. Where: Jax Beach Pier. #1702-0620 EASTER SUNDAY: THIS IS SILLY You: Serving, tall, tattoos, beautiful eyes; sweeping close by on purpose? Me: Dirty blonde, striped dress, dark lipstick, lunch with parents. Eyes met. Should’ve left my number. Can I sit in your section next time? When: April 1. Where: Black Sheep. #1701-0606 ROYAL AUSSIE AIR FORCE Dreamboat RAAF sharing vegan chia pudding with pal. Your flight suit hunkiness make me speechless. We shared a table; I blushed a lot, too shy to say hi; I am now! Meet for pudding? When: May 23. Where: Southern Roots Filling Station. #1700-0530 HOT SILVER WATCH You: Got soda, sat by me; medium height, black manbun, red dress shirt, sexy watch. Me: Tall man, short brown hair, mid20s, gray shirt. I didn’t say hello; too shy. Show me more silver! When: May 22. Where: Lee’s Sandwich Shoppe, Baymeadows. #1699-0530

ISU

Connex Made BLUE-EYED GEMINI BOY Favorite Blue-Eyed Gem, you were leaving; left me behind. I think about you all the time. We read these ads and laughed. Miss you; hope you’re smiling. Love, Your Florida Gem. When: Aug. 8, 2017. Where: Downtown under Blue Bridge. #1698-0516

FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

THE AMAZON, JULIUS CAESAR, SADNESS & GOATS ARIES (March 21-April 19): Now’s a great time to feel, explore, understand and even appreciate your sadness. To get you in the mood, here are novelist Jonathan Safran Foer’s sadnesses: sadness of could-have-been; of being misunderstood; of having too many options; of being smart; of awkward conversations; of feeling the need to create beautiful things; of going unnoticed; of domesticated birds; of arousal being an unordinary physical state; of wanting sadness. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Do you have feral qualities lurking deep inside? Ever had a mad yearning to communicate in howls and yips instead of words? Do you sometimes eschew forks and scoop the food from your plate with your fingers? Ever dreamed of running through a damp meadow under a full moon for the sheer joy of it? Do you experience such strong erotic urges you could weave your body and soul together with the color green, the sound of a rain-soaked river or the moon rising over the hills? Now is a fine time to draw on your feral qualities’ instinctual wisdom. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Close some doors today,” writes novelist Paulo Coelho. “Not because of pride, incapacity, or arrogance, but simply because they lead you nowhere.” In my astrological opinion, practice the rough but fine art of saying NO. It’s time to make crisp decisions about where you belong and where you don’t; where future fulfillment is likely to thrive and where it won’t; which relationships deserve your sage intimacy and which push you toward mediocrity. CANCER (June 21-July 22): To casual observers you may be an amorphous hodgepodge, a simmering mess of semiinteresting confusion, or an amiable dabbler going in too many directions at once. In my opinion, casual observers are wrong. What’s closer to the symbolic truth about you is an image described by poet Carolyn Forché: grapes ripening in the fog. Another image that goes with your current state: sea turtle eggs gestating beneath the sand on a misty ocean beach. One more: bright yellow flowers of the evening primrose, which blooms only at night. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I want to be sure the groove you’re in doesn’t devolve into a rut, so here are questions to spur your imagination in unpredictable directions. Ready? 1. How would you describe untapped riches in the shadowy part of your personality? 2. Is there a rare object you’d like to own because it would foster your feeling that the world has magic and miracles? 3. Imagine the perfect party you’d like to go to and how it might change you for the better. 4. What bird most reminds you of you? 5. What’s your most evocative, inspiring daydream? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): By volume, the Amazon is the world’s largest river. But where does it start? Scientists have squabbled about that for more than 300 years. Everyone agrees the source is in southwestern Peru. But is it the Apurímac River? The Marañón? The Mantaro? Each has a good argument. This question is poetic subtext as we wonder about the origin of your life force. Just like the Amazon, your source has long been mysterious. That’s going to change in the next 14 months. The clarification process begins soon. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): When Warsan Shire was a child, she immigrated to the UK with her Somalian parents. Now she’s

a renowned poet who writes vividly about refugees, immigrants and marginalized people. To give support and inspiration for the part of you that feels like an exile or fugitive, and in accordance with astrological omens, here are words from Shire. 1. “I belong deeply to myself.” 2. “Document the moments you feel most in love with yourself–what you’re wearing, who you’re around, what you’re doing. Recreate and repeat.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Once in a while came a moment when everything seemed to have something to say to you.” So says a character in Alice Munro’s short story “Jakarta.” That message is your horoscope’s key theme, because you’re at the peak of your ability to be reached and communicated with. You’re willing to be keenly receptive, strong enough to be deeply influenced. Is it because you’re anchored in your understanding and acceptance of who you are? SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 1928, novelist Virginia Woolf wrote a letter to friend Saxon Sidney Turner. “I am reading six books at once, the only way of reading,” she confided, “since one book is only a single unaccompanied note, and to get the full sound, one needs 10 others at the same time.” I usually tell Sagittarians to focus on one or two important things instead of several semi-important ones. Adopt Woolf’s approach to books–to everything. Your life in the weeks ahead should be less like an acoustic ballad and more like a symphony for 35 instruments. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Not many goats can climb trees, but there are daredevils in Morocco that do. They climb for the delicious olive-like berries on argan trees. The branches on which they perch may be 30 feet off the ground. They’re your power creature for the weeks ahead. You’re ready to ascend higher in search of goodies. You have the soulful agility needed to transcend earlier levels of accomplishment. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): From 49-45 BC, civil war wracked the Roman Republic. Julius Caesar led forces representing the common people against armies fighting for the aristocracy’s interests. In 45 BC, Caesar brought soldiers to Roman territory in North Africa to launch a campaign against the enemy. As the general disembarked from his ship, he slipped and fell. Thinking fast, he exclaimed, “Africa, I have tight hold of you!” and clasped the ground, implying he’d lowered himself in a ritual gesture of conquest. He changed an apparent bad omen into a positive one. And he won the battle, the turning point that led to victory and war’s end. That’s good role modeling. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Here are sweet words by poets I love. Use them to communicate with anyone primed to be lyrically intimate with you. Reach out! 1. “You look like a sea of gems.” – Qahar Aasi. 2. “I love you with what in me is unfinished.” – Robert Bly. 3. “Yours is the light by which my spirit’s born.” – e.e. cummings. 4. “Tell me the most exquisite truths you know.” – Barry Hannah. 5. “It’s very rare to know you, very strange and wonderful.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald. 6. “When you smile like that you are as beautiful as all my secrets.” – Anne Carson. 7. Everything you say is “like a secret voice speaking straight out of my own bones.” – Sylvia Plath. Rob Brezsny freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com


BETTER THAN

M.D. M.J.

BONGWATER Sweetwater’s newest offering packs SMOKE IN A BOTTLE

LAST MONTH, THIS COLUMN BROUGHT GOOD tidings from the Big Peach, Atlanta, where, on Friday the 13th of July, the SweetWater Brewing Company debuted their 420 Strain: G13 IPA. That stuff went over about as well as you might expect from a high-end craft beer that smells like Laughing Grass, and so it was just a matter of time before the product achieved wider distribution. That day has finally arrived, and the G13 has exploded out into the marketplace like smoke from the door of a hot-boxed van. The company’s official “Talking Head,” Tucker Sarkisian, was gracious enough to send me a few samples of the beer, which we’d slugged with quiet dignity, fresh from the tap at their facility. 420 Strain is now available in 16-ounce bottles and cans; the packaging features an all-black color scheme, with the classic fish in white and gangsta-style lettering on the label. Aesthetically, it’s a marked departure from their usual colorful designs, an understated backdrop for a beer with tons of personality. There is nothing subtle about this beer. It’s strong—6 percent ABV—and slightly bitter, as one might expect an IPA to be. The various ingredients (2-Row, wheat, flaked oats, Columbus and Simcoe hops) combine to give it a kind of sharpness that dances on your tongue and carbonation that sustains. It pours clean, dark and golden, with little head. The gimmick, of course, is the robust aroma and subtle flavor of Flower, Fine Stuff, Fuzzy Lady, if you will, an effect achieved

100 percent legally with the addition of strainspecific terpenes and a proprietary hemp flavor. It’s a head-turner, that’s for sure. The G13 IPA is just the first in a planned line of 420 Strain beers from SweetWater, and clearly the market is primed for it. (See Pint-Sized, page 30.) They sold nearly 10,000 cases in just the first week of release, and they’ve already got it on tap at over 1,300 locations around the country, several of which can be found near you, wherever you happen to be. Participating retailers include Whole Foods, Winn-Dixie, ABC, Total Wine and Broudy’s. You can also find it on tap at establishments like Dick’s, Graffiti Junktion, M Shack and Mellow Mushroom, and more to come throughout Florida and Georgia. The roll-out process is still underway, so it’s best to call your favorite suds spot and ask them if they carry it. If they don’t, suggest that they do. The SweetWater brand is a fixture at many local bars, but the proprietors may not be aware that it exists yet. To find a location near you, or to suggest one, just plug in a zip code at sweetwaternbrew. com, designate a driver and go for it. You won’t regret it, unless you drive tipsy, in which case a DUI will be the least of your problems. Shelton Hull mail@folioweekly.com _________________________________ Got questions about medical marijuana? Let us answer them. Send inquiries to mail@folioweekly.com.

SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 37


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38 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018


FOLIO VOICES : BACKPAGE EDITORIAL

“My professor told me the email was a copy of the letter I sent to Mayor Shaver along with criticism of how Flagler College teaches their students– using my correspondence as an example to indicate that I AM ILLITERATE AND THEY SHOULD BE ‘ASHAMED.’”

IN RECENT MONTHS, THERE HAS BEEN A TREND of white women arming themselves with their womanhood against people of color, specifically black people. While this isn’t new, social media and the urge to record these interactions have put them on such a nationwide scale that these women have been given nicknames, like BBQ Becky and Permit Patty. Frankly, it’s about time people are publicly confronted and shamed for their unwarranted fear of black people. This thread of white supremacy and anti-blackness says to black residents: “I do not give you permission to exist comfortably in this space.” White women are given the autonomy to play the victim and feign innocence when confronted about a wrongdoing, but it’s past time that we stop allowing this to happen. With that being said, it would be wrong and hypocritical for me not to confront these situations in my own life. This past spring break, I went on an alternative trip with an organization at my school, Flagler College. During the trip, we were told by the organization we were working with to write letters to our representatives on a topic we felt passionate about. Since the trip was based on helping the population of people experiencing homelessness in Washington, D.C., many people in the group, including me, decided to write to Mayor Nancy Shaver to discuss the issue of homelessness in St. Augustine. In my letter, I wrote that I believed the people experiencing homelessness in St. Augustine are over-policed and ignored, and that I would not be voting for her in the upcoming election as well as advising my friends not to vote for her. Most of us sent the letters to Shaver’s address and then moved on to sending letters to other representatives of our choosing (I decided to send my second one to the head of the school board in St. Johns County). Time passed, school continued, and I completely forgot about the letter until April 6, when I received a Facebook message from Nancy Shaver at 8 p.m. The message asked if it was me who had sent her the message, because the return address was the school address. That wasn’t to avoid hearing back from her—I just lived on campus at the time. But I told her it was me and we exchanged a few emails. She did send one that was very

MAYORAL SHAMING professional, detailing her role in helping the homeless population and suggesting I help out at an upcoming event. I unfortunately couldn’t help because I already had a service project that day. The only problem I had with that particular email was her saying that the problem was with panhandlers—because to me, panhandlers aren’t a problem; the lack of affordable housing, resources and funding for programs are the true problem. A few days after we exchanged emails, my professor stopped me to talk after class. I assumed he wanted to talk about me not turning in my last assignment and prepared to give my excuse on why my work was late. But he wanted to speak to me about an email from the mayor that was sent to the head of the Communications Department, who at the time was Dr. James Pickett. My professor told me the email was a copy of the letter I sent to Mayor Shaver along with criticism of how Flagler College teaches their students— using my correspondence as an example to indicate that I am illiterate and they should be “ashamed.” This threw me off, because everyone else on the trip I’d spoken with said Mayor Shaver hadn’t reached out to them directly, nor did she to attempt to contact them through other means. In other words, she definitely didn’t email their professors. Yet she singled me out. I was not just angry because she reached out to my professors, but at what the email indicated—the idea that I wasn’t smart, nor deserved my position in school. These are the very same ideas I’ve had to fight against ever since being accepted into Flagler College, as if my blackness and their need for a diversity boost is the only reason I’m a student there. But that wasn’t the only problem: The mayor, who is meant to represent and

acknowledge constituents, and their wants and needs, decided to publicly shame me for a misplaced comma on a handwritten letter sent from an alternative spring break trip that was devoid of laptops and computers. I know that I am privileged to be a college-educated woman and not all of her constituents can say that. Does that mean if they try to reach out to her to address issues they see in their community and make a spelling error or send a handwritten letter, she will attempt to publicly shame them as well? I did respond to Mayor Shaver and voiced my discomfort with her messaging my professors, as well as informed her of the irresponsibility and unprofessionalism she showed in attempting to humiliate a constituent who tried to reach out to her. I informed her that there is a lot of racial tension in St. Augustine right now and that singling out the only black woman to write her from that particular spring break trip could look bad on her part. Her response? To ignore the reason for the letter (emailing the Communications Department), bring up the Confederate monuments, and advise me to learn how politics in St. Augustine works. I, however, was under the impression that residents were supposed to reach out to their representatives so that they can more easily represent them. I’d like to note that since I transferred my voter registration from Atlanta to St. Augustine in my freshman year, nearly four years ago, I am now a resident of St. Augustine and should be acknowledged as such. Sharing this story may seem late and long overdue; I needed time to focus on my schoolwork for the end of the semester. But I’m sharing it now because it’s important for me to tell my story. I refuse to allow white women to weaponize their sensitivity and make black people appear as aggressors. I cannot preach that we must hold each other and others accountable if I do not hold those same women accountable. So here I am, telling my story and trying to be heard. Thank you for hearing me. Hasani Malone mail@folioweekly.com _____________________________________ Malone is a student journalist at Flagler College.

FOLIO WEEKLY welcomes Backpage submissions. They should be 1,200 words or fewer and on a topic of local interest and/or concern. Send submissions to mail@folioweekly.com. Opinions expressed on the Backpage are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Folio Weekly. SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 39


Brett’s Waterway Café

Moon River Pizza

Overlooking Fernandina Harbor Marina, Brett’s offers an upscale atmosphere with outstanding food. The extensive luncheon and dinner menus feature daily specials, fresh Florida seafood, chicken and aged beef. Cocktails, beer and wine. Casual resort wear. Open at 11:30 a.m. daily.

Moon River Pizza treats customers like family. Cooked in a brick oven, the pizza is custommade by the slice (or, of course, by the pie). Set up like an Atlanta-style pizza joint, Moon River also offers an eclectic selection of wine and beer. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Dine in or take it with you.

925 S. 14th Street 904-321-3400

Fernandina Harbor Marina at the foot of Centre Street 904-261-2660

The Mustard Seed Cafe

T-Ray’s Burger Station

833 T.J. Courson Road 904-277-3141

202 S. Eighth Street 904-261-6310

Inside Nassau Health Foods, The Mustard Seed is Amelia Island’s only organic eatery and juice bar, with an extensive, eclectic menu featuring vegetarian and vegan items. Daily specials include local seafood, free-range chicken and fresh organic produce. Salads, wraps, sandwiches and soups are available – all prepared with our staff’s impeccable style. Popular items are chicken or veggie quesadillas, grilled mahi, or salmon over mixed greens and tuna melt with Swiss cheese and tomato. Open for breakfast and lunch, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon.-Sat. nassauhealthfoods.net

T-Ray’s offers a variety of breakfast and lunch items. In addition to an outstanding breakfast menu, you’ll find some of the best burgers you’ve ever put in your mouth. The Burger Station offers a grilled portabello mushroom burger, grilled or fried chicken salad and much more. The spot where locals grab a bite and go! Now serving beer & wine. Open Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Closed Sundays.

The Pointe Restaurant 98 S. Fletcher Avenue 904-277-4851

The Pointe, located at Elizabeth Pointe Lodge, is open to the public daily from 7 a.m.–10 a.m. for breakfast and 11:30 a.m.–2 p.m. for lunch. Sunday brunch is served one Sunday each month from 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Oceanview indoor and outdoor seating is available. Please call the Inn to reserve a table or to enquire further about the restaurant.

Amelia Island is 13 miles of unspoiled beaches, quaint shops, antique treasures and superb dining in a 50-block historic district less than one hour north of Jacksonville