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THIS WEEK // 8.14.19-8.20.19 // VOL. 33 ISSUE 20

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MAIN FEATURE

DEVIL’S ADVOCATE Ed Dean is the new face of talk radio COVER PHOTO BY DEVON SARIAN, STORY BY SHELTON HULL

COLUMNS + CALENDARS MAIL/B&B FROM THE EDITOR OUR PICKS KIDS PICKS SPORTS PICKS LIBERTY PICKS LATIN PICKS

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WELLNESS PICKS MUSIC ART ARTS + EVENTS CONCERTS COOKING PETS

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CROSSWORD NEWS OF THE WEIRD I SAW U 2.OH! ASTROLOGY WEED CLASSIFIEDS BACKPAGE

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EDITOR • Georgio Valentino georgio@folioweekly.com / ext. 115 SENIOR EDITOR • Marlene Dryden mdryden@folioweekly.com / ext. 131 CARTOONISTS • Ed Hall, Jen Sorensen CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Susan Clark Armstrong, Nick Blank, Rob Brezsny, Scottie Brown, Nicole Carroll, Davi, Julie Delegal, Chris Guerrieri, Dan Hudak, Janet Harper, Shelton Hull, Jason Irvin, Tristan Komorny, Mary Maguire, Sarah McLaughlin, Jennifer Melville, Lindsey Nolen, Dale Ratermann, Ryan Reno, Brentley Stead, Chef Bill Thompson, Madeleine Peck Wagner, Jessica Leigh Walton, Dima Vitanova Williams INTERN • Courtney Stringfellow

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THE MAIL F IS FOR FISCHER

RE.: Silence Speaks Volumes by Billee Bussard, Aug. 7 THANKS TO BILLEE BUSSARD FOR HER INSIGHTS on the Charter Revision Commission, which had its first meeting on July 31. The CRC meetings are available on the COJ website. State Rep. Jason Fischer announced recently that he would be sponsoring a bill in the upcoming Legislature to make the Duval County School Board entirely appointive. This is about what we should expect from Fischer, who did “F” work while a school board member and now functions as a conduit for the local elements who seek to undermine public education: GOP, Civic Council, Chamber of Commerce. Fischer was recently characterized in the local media as a “clodhopper,” which does a disservice to a work boot worn by Americans who earn their living by physical labor and require sturdy footwear. The fact is, the children of folk who wear clodhoppers have much to lose, as Fischer and Mayor Lenny Curry’s appointments to the CRC relentlessly seek to strip public education of its assets and transfer them to the private sector. Michael Hoffmann via email

TWEET STORM

ON AUG. 6, MAYOR LENNY CURRY TWEETED: “Local liberal lawyers attempting to usurp the City @Jason_R_Gabriel. Do your homework on this crew,” referring to the three attorneys representing Duval County Public Schools against Curry’s bullying and back-room dealing. Those attorneys: Scott Cairns, Hank Coxe and W.C. Gentry. Yeah, Gentry, who is so bad and liberal that the Currycrats put him on their Charter Review Commission! However, what’s truly chilling about this is that Curry is basically directing the city attorney–who is beholden to Curry for his job, and who should just go where the law takes him–to come up with a ruling that Curry likes, one that favors City Hall over the school board. Chris Guerrieri via email

TOWER OF POWER

RE: If You Build It, They Will Come by Scott Grant, July 24 WHAT A BIG WASTE OF MONEY AN AQUARIUM would be! Now build a tower and they will most certainly come. There is a worldrenowned aquarium just 346 miles away in Atlanta, and SeaWorld is only two hours away in Orlando. It is noticeable the writer of the

aquarium article did not mention the Atlanta Aquarium, which has 100,000 animals, but did praise a lesser aquarium in Chattanooga, with only 10,000 animals (and farther away to boot). If we had a tall tower in Downtown Jacksonville, it’d be unique to the Southeastern United States. It could be a gateway to Florida, like St. Louis’ celebrated Gateway to the West. Can you imagine the view of Jacksonville, our bridges and the St. Johns River from the top of a 1,000-foot-plus Downtown tower? There are four notable towers in North America: The CN Tower (Toronto), The Tower of the Americas (San Antonio), The Stratosphere (Las Vegas) and the Space Needle (Seattle). Not one of these towers is within 1,000 miles of Jacksonville. The number of tourists who would come to see a tower in Downtown Jacksonville would be well worth the investment. Bruce Mize via email

MOSCOW MITCH

HOW CAN MITCH McCONNELL, PENULTIMATE partisan and political obstructionist, muster the hypocrisy to dismiss as partisan ploys two House bills to report and avert illegal foreign meddling in our election process and protect voting apparatus from hacking and manipulation? This is the same man who, when the country was plummeting toward Depression, rather than cooperating for the benefit of the country, treacherously stated that his objective was to obstruct President Barack Obama’s every effort–all to regain political power. So why would Senator McConnell prevent these and several other bills designed to protect the integrity of our election process from reaching the Senate? Perhaps it is because he is the partisan. He sees the residual rewards of throwing in with Donald Trump to protect continuing Russian intervention in our election process with callous disregard for the devastating implications for our democracy. His actions to help lift well-deserved sanctions from Kremlin-linked company Rusal have already been repaid with a new $200 million aluminum processing plant. It is evident that it’s McConnell who is engaged in another partisan ploy without regard for the welfare of our country. Ted Mikalsen via email

LEND YOUR VOICE If you’d like to respond to something you’ve read in the pages of Folio Weekly, please send an email (including name, address and phone number, for verification purposes only) to mail@folioweekly.com, visit us at folioweekly.com or follow us on Twitter or Facebook (@folioweekly) and join the conversation.

BRICKBATS + BOUQUETS BOUQUET TO NATIVE SUN NATURAL FOODS MARKET The pioneering local health-food retailer is closing doors after 23 years. Founder and CEO Aaron Gottlieb cited the arrival and concentration of specialty grocery chains in recent years as the chief reason for Native Sun’s loss of market share. Gottlieb and his wife Erica launched Native Sun in Mandarin before expanding to two more locations and eventually employing some 160 local workers. BRICKBAT TO JASON FISCHER The Florida Representative–and former Duval County School Board member–recently introduced Local Bill J-1, a controversial proposal that would replace Duval County’s elected, accountable school board with political appointees nominated by the mayor. The move is widely seen as part of a coordinated strategy to put Duval County Public Schools under Mayor Lenny Curry’s thumb for the benefit of political donors with financial interests in charter schools. BRICKBAT TO ADAM FANNIN Last week, the pastor of Jacksonville’s Stedfast Baptist Church was called out in a viral tweet by comedian Sarah Silverman. Fannin had made threatening, misogynist and anti-Semitic remarks about Silverman from his pulpit, during a sermon. DO YOU KNOW SOMEONE WHO DESERVES A BOUQUET? OR MAYBE A BRICKBAT? Send your submissions to mail@folioweekly.com; 50-word maximum, concerning a person, place, or topic of local interest.

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FROM THE EDITOR

LET THE PEOPLE VOTE EXOTIC FISCHER BILL IS LATEST SHINY OBJECT TO DISTRACT FROM REFERENDUM

IT’S 3 P.M. THURSDAY AFTERNOON, AUG. 8, and despite the inconvenient hour, dozens of concerned citizens are cramming into a tiny conference room inside the Mandarin Branch Library. It’s the smallest conference room I’ve ever seen—a cell, really or, if you’re feeling lexically generous, a glorified cubicle. Enter Jason Fischer. Not literally, because the state rep never showed—he sent sacrificial staffers in his stead—but he’s the reason all these folks are here. Fischer represents Florida House District 16, which covers much of Southside Jacksonville including affluent Mandarin. These are his constituents, and they’re hoping to have a word with Fischer at his announced joint office hours with Florida Sen. Aaron Bean. They won’t have the chance. Unlucky staffers insist that neither Fischer nor Bean were ever scheduled to actually appear at this session, though public notices make no mention of staff proxies. Fischer’s constituents aren’t buying it; their instinct tells them that their elected representative ducked out to avoid any uncomfortable confrontations. You see, he’s not a very popular figure in his district at the moment. Earlier in the week, Fischer introduced a controversial local bill, J-1, which would impose political appointees on the school board, whose members are currently elected (as per the Florida Constitution) and beholden to no political benefactors. The bill’s designation—J-One—suggests that this is not standard procedure. Local bills create “special laws.” This is an exotic legislative maneuver conceived to further mire us in procedural hairsplitting while the clock runs out on the main play. It’s scandalous. It’s a power grab. But, in tactical terms, it’s a feint. Yes, this is part of a coordinated effort on the part of Jacksonville’s political establishment to usurp the authority (and operating budget) of Duval County Public Schools, whose autonomy and integrity are guaranteed by state constitution. The key to this hostile takeover, however, is the school board’s proposed 2019 infrastructure-tax referendum, which is dying on the vine as Curry and his cohorts throw up shiny object after shiny object in an effort to distract public outrage just long enough to run out the clock on a 2019 special election, which is the last, best hope of protecting the DCPS budget from the interest groups salivating on the sidelines. Said interest groups and their

henchmen in City Hall are deliberately muddying the waters, but the stakes should be clear. This is about the constitutional separation of powers and, in the final analysis, the consent of the governed. Here’s a brief timeline. DCPS presented an infrastructure maintenance plan in the spring. It’s been public for all to see at ourduvalschools.org. Then, in May, the school board exercised its constitutional authority to propose a half-cent sales tax to pay for the work and a November 2019 referendum to give voters, not politicians, the chance to vote the tax up or down. Jacksonville’s Office of General Counsel immediately issued a dubious pseudoopinion that gave City Council final approval on any referendum timetable. Outgoing councilmembers deferred the issue to the incoming City Council, which has disingenuously stonewalled ever since it was installed in late June. Council President Scott Wilson acts like his role is to approve the sales-tax proposal itself, not the referendum, which will give voters the chance to approve or not. In truth, he’s not constitutionally authorized on either count. A scandal erupted when it was revealed that outgoing Chief Administrative Officer Sam Mousa attempted to extort the school board for consulting fees and special interest kickbacks. (The school board declined his services, but no worries, Mousa Consulting Group Inc. won a $120,000 no-bid contract to advise City Hall shortly thereafter. Indeed, government corruption is evident everywhere, from Lot J development incentives to the sale of the JEA.) Now, Fischer further stirs the pot with this provocative bill. To be clear, we can—and must—push back against J-1, but we mustn’t let it distract us from the urgency of the referendum vote. In this deliberate confusion, we need clarity, and by overplaying their hand, the oligarchs who would run this town have helped us find that clarity. This is no longer about education policy; it’s about checks and balances, it’s about power, it’s about democracy. Mind you, there will be a healthy and vigorous policy discussion, but it must take place after the city’s powerbrokers stop waiting out the clock on a 2019 special election. The referendum issue must be resolved immediately. Let the people vote. Georgio Valentino georgio@folioweekly.com @thatgeorgioguy AUGUST 14-20, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 5


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17 ME &

UMPHREY’S McGEE

The Midwestern jam band has been delighting college audiences with improvised riffage since the late 1990s. Miami’s Magic City Hippies open. 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, The Amp, St. Augustine, staugamphitheatre.com, $35.

OUR PICKS

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Photo by Alex Solca

DETHKLOK SIDE PROJECT THE ARISTOCRATS

This rock-fusion trio comprises sidemen who have toured with prog-rock’s top names: Steve Hackett, Steven Wilson and Joe Satriani. Bassist Bryan Beller’s pedigree beats them all, though. He’s a touring member of semifictional Adult Swim metal band (and frequent Illuminati target) Dethklok! 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, Nighthawks, Riverside, nighthawksjax.com, $25.

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17 GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY SPACE GAAM

The Jacksonville gaming and cosplay club throws a space-themed summer convention, complete with art, pageantry, memorabilia, food, drink and–duh!–games. 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, The Schultz Center, Arlington, gaamshow.com, $35-120 6 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | AUGUST 14-20, 2019

THIS WEEK’S BIGGEST & BEST HAPPENINGS

18 JOE BUCK RIDES AGAIN MIDNIGHT COWBOY

The Graduate proved Dustin Hoffman could stutter; this 1969 celluloid classic proved he could act. Jon Voight stars opposite Hoffman’s Ratso Rizzo in one of the greatest buddy movies ever made. 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 18, The Florida Theatre, Downtown, floridatheatre.com, $7.50.

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17 SWEET SUCCESS

HONEY BEE FESTIVAL

Bee Friends Farms celebrates National Honey Bee Day with its second annual artisanal honey festival. More than 60 vendors, local honey tastings, bee-keeping workshops, a Bee a Kid Zone and more. 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, Jacksonville Fairgrounds, Sports Complex, beefriendsfarm.com, free admission, $5 parking.


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PICKS

PICKS

BY DALE RATERMANN | SPORTS@FOLIOWEEKLY.COM

BY JENNIFER MELVILLE | KIDS@FOLIOWEEKLY.COM

08/14/19

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SCIENCE SATURDAY SODA AND MENTOS

Teenage STEM enthusiasts gather at Clay County Public Library’s Fleming Island Branch to experiment with Mentos and soda (which type works the best?), make new friends and have a snack. Explosions guaranteed. No registration required. 2-3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, Fleming Island Library, 1895 Town Center Blvd., claycountygov.libcal.com, free.

D-U-U-U-U-V-A-L JAGUARS VS EAGLES

It’s preseason football (yawn). But it is football–at last! Watch the starters for, like, six plays, then see the rest of the players bust a gut in their attempts to make an NFL roster. The beer is cold, the pools are open and you will be entertained. 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15, TIAA Bank Field, Sports Complex, jaguars.com, $22 and up.

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FIRST IMPRESSIONS

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FAMILY OPEN STUDIO AT THE CUMMER

Check out the stunning French Moderns exhibition before it closes (Sept. 6), then head over to Art Connections for free art-making activities for creatives of all ages. Allow the Impressionist vibe to overtake you and take home your own masterpiece. Free with regular admission. 1-3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 18, Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., cummermuseum.org, admission free-$10.

17 BLOCK THIS! FSCJ VOLLEYBALL

Florida State College at Jacksonville women’s volleyball team hosts a fourteam jamboree that includes women’s college teams of Daytona State, LakeSumter State and Eastern Florida State. 11 a.m., 2 p.m. & 3 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 17, South Campus Fieldhouse, 11901 Beach Blvd., gobluewave.com, free.

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IT’S NOT WHO I AM UNDERNEATH JACKSONVILLE COMIC & TOY SHOW

Kids and kids at heart browse a vast collection of toys, action figures, comic books, pop culture items and oodles more. Whether Archie or Marvel, Golden Age classics or current content, you’ll find a treasure! 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 18, Ramada Hotel & Conference Center, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, freshcomics.us/convention/jacksonville-aug-2019/fljacksonville, $5; $2 military. 8 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | AUGUST 14-20, 2019

17 GET YOUR KICKS

UNF WOMEN’S SOCCER

The Ospreys’ soccer season takes off this week against Lakeland’s Southeastern University. The valiant women’s team welcomes back nine starters from last year’s squad under new head coach Eric Faulconer, a former international pro player. 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, Hodges Stadium, 1 UNF Dr., unfospreys.com, $5.


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BY STEPHANIE THOMPSON | LIBERTY@FOLIOWEEKLY.COM

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Must Have Base Access

SHARK TEETH & SEA SHELLS LEARN HOW TO BEACHCOMB

Walk along the beach and learn how to identify the sea treasures you find Must RSVP. 3:30-5 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15, Seagull Pavilion Walkover, NAVSTA Mayport, 270-5221, free.

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MAY THE FORCE BE WITH YOU BACK TO THE ’70S BINGO

Prizes for Best Period Costume, $1,000 giveaway game, $200 payouts on hard cards and $100 payouts on early birds–and a dessert table! 6:30-9:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16, Beachside Bingo, 244 Baltimore St., NAVSTA Mayport, 270-7204, free.

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20 POLISH YOUR VOICE

SPEAKERS BUREAU TRAINING WORKSHOP

This hands-on professional development workshop includes public speaking instruction, storytelling and networking. RSVP. 2-4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 20, Lecture Hall, Jessie Ball DuPont Center, 40 E. Adams St., Downtown, 390-3200, mail@uwnefl.org, free. AUGUST 14-20, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 9


PICKS BY ADRIANA NAMUCHE | LATIN@FOLIOWEEKLY.COM

FRI

16 REGGAETON & RUMBA JUHN “EL ALL STAR”

Backed by DJ NegroRemix, the up-and-coming Puerto Rican reggaeton musician performs viral hits like “No Te Miento.” 9 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16, Mojitos Bar & Grill, 8206 Philips Hwy., Southside, facebook.com/MojitosBarAndGrillJax, $35-40.

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17 LET’S TACO BOUT IT JAX TACO FEST

Jacksonville’s first-ever taco fiesta brings Latin flavors to Hemming Park. We’re talking live entertainment, art, tequila and (you guessed it) tacos–50 varieties, to be exact. The open-air event is fun for the whole family, dogs included. 1-7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, Hemming Park, 135 W. Monroe St., Downtown, tacofestjax.com, free.

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18 DIVERSIFYING JAX CONEXIÓN CULTURA

This diverse and family-friendly series expands Northeast Florida’s cultural perspective through literature, arts, history and poetry from different parts of Latin American. 2-4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 18, Southeast Regional Library, 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd., jaxpubliclibrary.org, free. 10 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | AUGUST 14-20, 2019


PICKS

BY SARAH McLAUGHLIN | WELLNESS@FOLIOWEEKLY.COM

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14 FOCUS FOR LIFE

MEDITATION FOR HEALING

Acupuncture physician Dr. Michael Kowalski hosts a monthly meditation for all. Learn more about mindfulness, clarity and emotional well-being. 6-7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14, Acupuncture & Holistic Health Center, 4237 Salisbury Rd., Ste. 107, Southside, 5elementinstitute.com, free.

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15 LLUNAR PHASE FUN FFULL MOON PADDLE

17 SAY CHEESE

FREE DENTISTRY DAY

The national event comes to Northeast Florida. If you need AAnastasia Watersports folks lead this sunset paddle as dental care but can’t afford it, this event makes it possible kkayaks, standup paddleboards and boats cruise the Salt to get the care you need. R Run tidal basin under a full moon. Reservations required. 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, Arlington 77:30-9 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15, 850 Anastasia Park Rd.,.,, River Family Dental, 456 University Blvd. N., SSt. Augustine, anastasiawatersports.com, $35. freedentistryday.org, free.

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FOLIO: FEATURE

DEVIL’S

ADVOCATE Ed Dean is the new face of talk radio

E

d Dean keeps crazy hours, to put it mildly. By the time we meet Downtown for lunch, he has already done his radio show and run four miles. You can do things like that when you’re up before dawn. Dean, he usually rises around 3:30 a.m., sometimes four (if he’s feeling lazy). And his day sometimes ends as late as 11 p.m. Work leaves little time for sleep, but it doesn’t seem like he really needs it. The youngest of four, he was born and raised in Cocoa Beach; he still gets down there on an almost weekly basis. “Do I have to tell my age?” he asks, before relenting. “I’m still in my early 40s, born in the ’70s.” He looks much younger, which is part genetics, and part commitment to fitness. He graduated from Riverside Christian Academy in Melbourne, then he had the proverbial cup of coffee at Brevard Community College. He had an early interest in filmmaking, but shifted to print journalism rather quickly. Ultimately, radio commentary is where he would make his mark. Dean’s eponymous show airs locally on WBOB from 6 to 9 a.m. every weekday, but that’s just the beginning of his work day. His broadcast schedule is listed in military time, which speaks to the degree of discipline he applies to his trade. And he needs it, because the job is about much, much more than just talking into a microphone. He’s writing copy, selling advertising and networking with sponsors and station managers. Most of the boring side-work, usually delegated to staff, Dean takes on himself, partly out of necessity (because his is still a small business) but largely out of genuine passion for the work.

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story by SHELTON HULL photos by DEVON SARIAN Ed Dean is a conservative, and his show airs almost exclusively on conservative stations. At a time when American politics is hyper-polarized, however, with both sides giving increasing power to their respective fringes, Dean is carefully charting a new course in the industry—more thoughtful, less dogmatic, more inclusive, less exclusionary. “I love having liberals come on,” he says. “I’m very fair. I get accused by my conservative friends of being too fair.” Dean got his start toiling in print media outlets around the state. That was when he began developing the instincts for politics and people which he eventually applied to his radio work. “I had offers to go work for Fox News Radio,” he says, dutifully mowing down a Caesar salad at Cowford Chophouse, “but I didn’t want to move to South Florida.” He saves the grilled shrimp as a reward for later, throwing an occasional jealous glance at my fish and chips (with a side of fried oysters). Having just lost 42 pounds, he’s trying to be a good boy, but the struggle is real. A hectic schedule keeps Dean on the road for most of the week, massaging his markets from one end of the state to the other. Still, there’s a special place in his heart for Northeast Florida. “I love Jacksonville—love it. I came up here all the time as a reporter. The competition, I get feelers from them, but I’m, like, ‘I don’t need to be in Orlando.’ I love it in Jacksonville.” He gestures with a shrimp for emphasis, then pauses. “Oh, wow. This is really good!”


Among homegrown radio products, Ed Dean is easily the most prominent in Florida. “We’re in every major city, excluding maybe Miami,” he explains. “I’ve had offers to go down to Miami, I say no; I’ve had offers to go down to Tampa, I say no.” This decision was driven by economics, and Dean’s desire to maintain maximum control of his own creative destiny. “There was more money to be made from statewide syndication than from nationwide,” he says, “because there are, like, 100 to 200 radio talk hosts, and only the top 10 or top 20, like Limbaugh or Hannity—those guys make the big bucks. So we were originally in the Central Florida area, and then I sat back in 2014 and said, ‘I want to make more money—I want to be statewide syndicated.’ Nobody had it. Nobody was doing statewide.” “The only difference between a statewide issue and a nationwide issue is the city that you’re in. So we took the opportunity to go full-blown syndicated in 2014.” Northeast Florida was established not long after. “I was in all the markets,” he says, “but Jacksonville was [just] the weekends. We had gone back and forth for a year or two. We came to an agreement in October of 2016. They gave us the morning show, and in the words of Ric Flair, ‘We’ve only just begun’. No one’s touched us.” Even as his radio show took off, Dean maintained a lucrative side-hustle in print media, eventually becoming his own master in that realm as well. “I was always a reporter,” he observes. “I worked for several newspapers, I became an editor with Sunshine State News, and a couple years ago, I wanted to buy them out. They originally said yeah, but they came back and said, ‘Would you keep some of the extra owners?’ And I said, ‘I love ya, but I’m here to make a buck.’ So we started Florida Daily, and the numbers are just huge. We started last June, and every month since October, it’s been at least a quarter-million readers; last month, we had over 400,000. Our biggest markets for readership are Orlando, Tampa, Miami, Jacksonville and Tallahassee. Our biggest for Facebook is Jacksonville, because of the morning show.” This phase of Dean’s career kicked off right as the political scene was morphing into something new, with social media driving the business into a hyperpolarized new era, from Washington on down. Meanwhile, political journalism has undergone massive changes, especially in Florida. Newspapers—and their staffs—are shrinking, leaving fewer reporters to cover more statewide developments. This shift has created an opening in the information market, and

folks like Dean are filling that gap. “When I write articles for our publication, I cover both sides,” Dean explains. “The differences between reporting and covering are night and day sometimes. Some of my conservative friends complain that we don’t cover the story ‘the way it is,’ and I get it. I cover it right down the middle, and they complain that it’s not conservative enough. I do have an opinion, but I try to leave that to the audience.” Like many Floridians, Dean is part of a growing cadre of conservatives who’ve followed Bill Buckley’s lead in supporting the decriminalization of marijuana. “That’s always a hot topic on my radio show,” he says. “I give credit to [Governor Ron] DeSantis. I was a little nervous when he came in, but I like what he said: You can differ with the amendment but, hey, the people voted for it, so just do it. I’ve never [smoked marijuana] myself, because I worry about what it would do to my health. I’m always the designated driver.” Another point of commonality shared by DeSantis and Dean is the environment, specifically the slight moves made by the governor in regard to water quality. “I agree with him on the environment,” Dean says. “We’ve got to clean up our freakin’ water, folks! We used to be able to fish in the St. Johns, or some of the Indian River lagoons. We have runoff—that’s just the way it is, and that’s not some liberal viewpoint. Water is a big deal in this state.” He does, however, take a more nuanced approach to Big Sugar, which has been widely depicted as the villain in public discourse about runoff and corporate responsibility. “Red tide has been around since I’ve been a boy,” Dean shrugs. “Nothing is proven about where it comes from. I don’t know anybody big in Big Sugar. People act like they’re Satan or whatever, or gambling, or the offshore drilling people.” I’m almost convinced, such is Dean’s affable, everyman grace. This virtue has served him well. Building his own network holistically required him to

personally sell his show to each of his member stations, one by one, face to face. This would be a challenge for most conservative talk hosts, who are by nature pushy, ill-tempered and obnoxious (to say nothing of their actual physical appeal, because there is really nothing to be said). Dean, on the other hand, is a natural salesman, with relentless energy and a certain degree of sly charm. Think Eddie Haskell. He’s also tall and reasonably good-looking, which is a refreshing change within the genre. Above all, Ed Dean is not dogmatic. “Though we don’t always agree,” says Claire Goforth, a frequent guest on The Ed Dean Show (and the former editor of Folio Weekly), “I respect his views and always feel as though he respects mine. At first, I thought it was just another gardenvariety conservative talk radio show—full of conspiracy theories, shouting and fake news. But I soon realized that Ed is genuinely thoughtful and informed. He steers clear of that stuff.” For her part, Goforth adds a fierce, funny and progressive perspective that cuts through the conservative orthodoxy like lemon juice through butter. Whether they admit it or not, even conservative callers seem to appreciate Goforth’s snark and sass. “Ed won’t take a position just to rile people up,” she says. “He’s going to push back, even against listeners, if they say things that aren’t true, are bigoted or otherwise ill-informed. In this way, he’s far more responsible and balanced than pretty much any other host in the conservative radio space.” After an hour talking about local and state issues, it was inevitable that talk turned to 2020, and what is already looking to be an exceptionally crazy super-election cycle. “It’s funny,” he says, “because the polls are all over the map. I think Trump could win, but he’s vulnerable, as well.” With Dean being a solid conservative, and almost certain to vote for Trump no matter who his challenger is, I was curious to find out

whom he would nominate if he were running the Democratic Party. His answer reflected the kind of intellectual dexterity for which he’s known: “I think Andrew Yang is credible. He’s a business guy. He’s got some liberal views, like the Universal Basic Income, but he’s a moderate.” As for the president himself, Dean bought the ticket, and now he’s taking the ride, but unlike most conservatives, he doesn’t mind admitting to a little bit of motion sickness. “When you look at conventional wisdom,” he says, “Trump should have never won.” Trump won by subverting standard procedure, exploiting his opposition’s reliance on protocol and optics to keep them perpetually offbalance, whether it was the bland, almost robotic Clinton campaign or a massive Republican field that, in retrospect, never had a chance. Will history repeat itself? Maybe, maybe not, but it doesn’t really matter either way to Ed Dean. His business model is not dependent on the situation in Washington, or Tallahassee, or anywhere else. He’s in this for the long haul, and his machine is built to last. By reaching out to the other side, he is building his base, and encouraging the kind of realistic dialogue that one rarely sees in mass media these days. It’s a risky proposition, but the numbers don’t lie. His vision of a more nuanced approach to the business is paying off, literally, and he’s only just begun. “I give God all the credit,” says the minister’s son. “I’ve been very blessed.” The interview over, Dean strides out of the Chophouse. His gold watch glitters in the noontime sun. It’s been a long day already, but it’s far from finished. His black SUV is parked not far away; he gets in and waves before driving off. He didn’t say where he was going, but he was clearly in no real hurry. On the road, or on the air, he moves at his own speed, which is a good deal faster than most. Subscribe to Folio Weekly’s Newsletter at folioweekly.com/newsletters

AUGUST 14-20, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 13


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FOLIO A + E B

rett Bass, 32, is built like a football player, with large hands and thick fingers that span his guitar’s frets with little effort, but he plays with a startling speed and dexterity that’s been known to leave even seasoned guitarists in a trance-like state. At any of the many gigs he’s playing around the area at any given time, you can always see a couple of them staring. In the tight-knit, cynically insular local guitar-playing scene, Bass is one of those players who commands nearuniversal respect. “I feel like confidence is just something that builds with time and experience,” he tells Folio Weekly. “It’s hard to put an exact timestamp on when I felt like I had a little bit of swagger on stage, versus being nervous. But it was certainly several years of performing before nervousness swaps itself out with confidence.” Bass has spent more than a decade on stages across the Southeast, first as a sideman and later as the leader of his own groups, most recently Melted Plectrum. Either way, he has made a distinct impact on the region’s bluegrass scene. Bass is now promoting the new band’s debut album, which will be unleashed on the general public this Friday night at Mojo Kitchen. It will be the 21st show the band has played since May, and the 40th this year (not counting the leader’s solo sets). Brett Bass was born Oct. 21, 1986 in Naples—the closest hospital to Immokalee, where his family was living at the time. He started playing guitar at 11, training for three years under Al Bermudez while living in Miami. He moved to Jacksonville at 17. His musical style is sometimes branded as revivalist, or even retro but, in reality, the style has stayed fresh, steadily evolving over its eight decades in existence, all the while remaining faithful to certain fundamental concepts. “There’s definitely a set of criteria that people have to meet to fit into the bluegrass genre,” he says, “especially in terms of instrumentation. Bluegrass instruments are acoustic, mostly encompassed by guitar, mandolin, banjo, upright bass, fiddle and dobro. Those are the typical instruments you’ll hear in any bluegrass configuration. And there’s a lot of harmony singing. There’s usually a lot of virtuoso melody-playing of the instruments—they’re not just there to strum. People actually play their instruments.” His skills always kept him steadily employed, but he really began to make his name as the leader of Grandpa’s Cough Medicine, the group that did more than any other to establish the viability of serious bluegrass among hipsters, millennials and the like. “Grandpa’s Cough Medicine was the first band that I actually ever made money playing with,” he says. “When I first started with them, we weren’t busy enough to merit that being my only band, so I played with a couple other local bands.” These included a jam band called Late Night Transfer and an acoustic project called Hoffman’s Voodoo, both of which were based at the Beaches. Bass has since worked hundreds of gigs all over Northeast Florida. “I think the first place that ever gave me a gig was the Ocean Club, back in the day,” he says. He figures he

ART FRENCH MODERNS ARTS & EVENTS CONCERTS LIVE & LOCAL

LEADER OF THE

OLD SCHOOL BRETT BASS IS BACK, WITH A NEW BAND AND A NEW ALBUM

probably played at Fly’s Tie more than any other venue, in part because it’s in Atlantic Beach, where he spent his formative years as a musician. Grandpa’s Cough Medicine distinguished itself by winning the inaugural One Spark event in 2014. Bass and co. somehow managed to play more than 19 hours of music in the course of four days, losing nary a lick of speed or intensity. If anything, they only gained in power, like a distance runner who turns up the heat in the final stretch. Within his peer group, Bass is known for his work, but he’s notorious for his work ethic. His punishing performance schedule sometimes leaves his hands bloody and his tires as bald as his head. “Grandpa’s Cough Medicine” is a euphemism for bootleg liquor, packed in Packards and Dodges that dodged the law. They made their bones playing authentic, old-school-style outlaw bluegrass, coupling digital fidelity with a 78rpm vibe. They were a throwback, killing it with murder ballads that belied their youth. And then it was over.

After several lucrative years together, two well-regarded albums, and multiple tours of the Southeast, Grandpa’s Cough Medicine disbanded. For Bass, the decision was as much about aesthetics as it was about logistics. “I think the whole outlaw thing was closing more doors for me than it was opening, in a lot of ways,” he says. “I did feel pigeonholed, like everything I wrote had to fit within the confines of what outlaw bluegrass is. I don’t know … I just wanted the ability to be myself, and going out under my own name was my way of doing that.” He did a bunch of solo gigs while he plotted out his next move. Everything clicked a few months later. “I knew it was gonna be another bluegrass band,” he says, “because it’s what I love to play. I just didn’t know who was gonna be in it.” This new group has coalesced around Benny McDowell

Photo by Rick Davidson

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on banjo, Joey Lazio on mandolin and Rex Putnam on upright bass. The three share backing vocals behind Bass’ lead. “We’ve been together in this configuration since around Christmastime.” His new band is called Melted Plectrum. “The name came together pretty early, because you gotta have something to tell people,” he says. “I wanted to imply that there was some bluegrass picking going on, but I realize now that I used a three-dollar word in my band name that most people don’t know, and people have to look it up.” A plectrum is more commonly known as a guitar pick, and while he’s never actually melted one on stage, he’s broken enough of them to fill the deepest of pockets. “All the stuff that most bluegrass bands do has something to do with breaking strings, or bending strings, or whatever. I didn’t want to use a string reference, so I went to a plectrum instead. Now I get to spend the rest of my life explaining it, I suppose.” The new band’s debut album, Lost in the Fog, was recorded at GatorBone Studio, run by Lon and Liz Williamson in Keystone Heights. It’s the first album on which he wrote all the songs himself; it features eight songs proper and three instrumentals. Longtime fans of Bass’ music will detect some differences in the sound, mainly the addition of mandolin. They’ll also note vast changes in the lyrical content: “Most of the stuff I’ve written about is fiction, because I’m a law-abiding citizen. So the new project is more me. It’s not pretend, it’s not fictitious. There’s a lot more honesty, me being myself with more of my own true thoughts and feelings, and not some outlaw gimmick.” Recently, too, Bass landed his first endorsement deal, with Preston Thompson Guitars, a boutique luthier outfit based in Sisters, Oregon. Bass joins a roster of nearly 20 top acoustic artists from around the country. The company was a perfect fit for Bass, whose imposing stature belies a lightning-fast picking style that’s almost as compelling to the eye as it is to the ears. Preston is building a custom model for him, handmade, like all their products. Bass has always viewed himself as a sort of ambassador for the style, bringing bluegrass into social circles it might otherwise never reach. He’s noticed subtle growth in its wider profile over the years. “I think it’s expanding,” he says, “but it’s still very much a niche genre of music, like jazz or classical. It’s not on everyone’s radar, because it’s not on the radio. One of the compliments you get a lot, playing in a bluegrass band, is ‘Oh, I never knew I liked bluegrass until I heard you guys!’, but that’s probably because they’ve never been exposed to it, beyond a superficial level.” There’s nothing superficial about this music. It runs as deep as the river, and the sound is almost as refreshing. Shelton Hull mail@folioweekly.com Subscribe to the Folio Music Newsletter at folioweekly.com/newsletters

BRETT BASS & MELTED PLECTRUM CD RELEASE • 10 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16, Mojo Kitchen, Jax Beach, $10; 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, Dog Rose Brewing Co., St. Augustine, dogrosebrewing.com, free 16 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | AUGUST 14-20, 2019


FOLIO A+E : ART

OH LÀ LÀ! N

CUMMER’S SUMMER EXHIBITION STARS MONET AND MATISSE

o need to travel this summer to see excellent fine art. French Moderns: Monet to Matisse, 1850-1950, at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, features more than 60 pieces of mid-19th to mid-20th century French art on loan from the Brooklyn Museum. Monet, Renoir, Cézanne and Degas are all in town and you simply must stop by to see them. “It goes without saying that so many of the movements that are identified with or are a part of this exhibition—Impressionism, PostImpressionism, Symbolism in particular —are fan favorites. Even if people don’t recognize those styles, they recognize the names associated with them: Monet, Matisse, Manet, Degas, Cézanne, etc. All of them are represented in this show,” says Adam Levine, Cummer director and CEO. “It’s an exciting opportunity to see blockbuster names [that] complement the Cummer’s holdings, and [see visitors] draw connections to some of the works that we have in our permanent collection.” As you tour the exhibit, you’re met by Claude Monet’s famous 1882 waterscape, Rising Tide at Pourville. Churning, whitecapped waves of the English Channel crash against the coastline of Normandy in an Impressionist ballet of color and light effects as a stone hut stands sentry on the cliff. One of the most recognizable paintings in the collection, it was selected to be featured on the billboard. There’s no prescribed route through the exhibition. The drawings, paintings and sculptures range in scale, subject matter and style, and one can discern several distinct themes: landscapes, portraits and figures, still lifes, and nudes. The works of 49 artists are featured in this collection. It’s a quiet thrill to be in the presence of a notable painting or sculpture which previously you’ve seen only on the printed page of a coffee-table art book. You’ll likely discover a new favorite. Levine’s favorite piece is by a lesser-known Hungarian artist who studied in Paris for three years and helped introduce the Modernist Movement to his home country. “[He] was very famous in Paris before he ended up moving back to Hungary,” Levine says. The artist is Jozsef Rippl-Rónai; his work is Woman with Three Girls. “It’s this absolutely gorgeous scene which has this sort of flattened canvas. It’s a genre of Symbolism, acknowledging the flatness of the canvas. If you compare this to a ‘realistic painting,’ [in which] you’re trying to create a scene that looks like you’re looking through a window and trying to create a natural perspective—that’s not what this artist is trying to do. But it has these bright, vibrant colors, this tablecloth that’s saturated red. It pops against the vegetative green background with pink flowers. Three girls off to one side, engaging with a woman dressed in triangles of white. Somehow it all coheres into a figural narrative. It’s right at the edge of abstraction and it’s just a beautiful, engaging work. It is hung on a wall which has a nice, offsetting purple color. I hope audiences won’t respond

to just the work, but to what I think is a really beautiful installation.” The collection captures the vibrant, complex Parisian art world, encompassing the period from the 1848 Revolution through World War II. Visitors will be face-to-face with works by Pierre Bonnard, Gustave Caillebotte, Marc Chagall, Jean-Léon Gérôme, Berthe Morisot, Odilon Redon, Auguste Rodin, Édouard Vuillard and others. Each piece has a unique story and invites the viewer to ponder its path to the Brooklyn Museum’s collection, then to the Cummer. A fully illustrated accompanying catalogue discusses each work. The Cummer wants visitors to thoroughly engage with the French Moderns through themed art classes and workshops suitable for all ages throughout the summer. A children’s area is situated just off the exhibition, inviting young artists to construct an impressionistthemed puzzle, participate in a conversationstarter activity, or practice their portraiture skills. Colorful umbrellas suspended from the ceiling of the Impressionist pop-up store delight and invite. “We have made every effort to make this a family experience,” Levine says. “We want everyone who visits the museum to bring their families, to bring their kids of all ages. We intentionally constructed experiences that will thrill each of them. By taking kids to the museum and engaging them with works of art, you’re teaching them history. You’re enhancing educational outcomes. And more than anything, you’re creating better people and you’re creating a better world.” “It’s a complement to our collection, and once this exhibition is gone, you won’t be able to see a painting by Monet [in Jacksonville]. You have until Sept. 6, so if you want to see some of the greatest works of art by some of the greatest artists ever, this is your opportunity,” Levine says. “Exhibitions are opportunities for people who may not regularly engage with museums to do so. If you haven’t been to the Cummer in a while, I encourage you to visit. What I think you will find is an institution, building off so much great work done over many years, which is continuing to open itself up, continuing to diversify its collection and diversify its audiences. It’s engaging the community in authentic and holistic ways. What people will see when they come to the Cummer is a museum that is radically and relentlessly oriented toward quality, that’s actively making itself as accessible as possible, and is committed to making sure the experience is fun for everyone. It has changed and it’s continuing to change. I think people will love what they see.” Monet and his contemporaries are in town for only a few more weeks, so get thee to the Cummer and immerse yourself in this stunning exhibition of fine art—without having to travel the globe. Jennifer Melville mail@folioweekly.com

FRENCH MODERNS: MONET TO MATISSE, 1850-1950

Through Sept. 6, Cummer Museum and Gardens, Riverside, cummermuseum.org, $6-$10. AUGUST 14-20, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 17


ARTS + EVENTS NOCATEE FARMERS MARKET More than 70 local vendors offer organic produce, herbs, spices, crafts, more; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 17 at 245 Nocatee Center Way, nocatee.com.

MUSEUMS

FEEL THE HEAT

Photo by Adrian Buckmaster

Photo: Adrian Buckmaster

Antoinette Johnson and Rashaud Sessoms are among the cast members of Lynn Nottage’s Pulitzer Prize-winning drama SWEAT, currently staged by The 5 and Dime A Theatre Company. Nottage interviewed residents of Reading, Pennsylvania for her play about a once-thriving American community ruined by corporate greed and political apathy. It runs 8 p.m. Aug. 16 & 17 and 2 p.m. Aug. 18 at 112 E. Adams St., Downtown, 637-5100, the5anddime.org, $22 advance, $25 door.

PERFORMANCE

FUN HOME A young girl who grew up in a funeral home tries to memorialize her dead father, 7:30 p.m. Thur.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun., through Aug. 24, Limelight Theatre, 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine, 825-1164, limelight-theatre.org, $26. THE SAVANNAH SIPPING SOCIETY The comedy presumes there’s something amusing about Southern ladies getting together to talk and drink. Why, I never. Staged 8 p.m. Aug. 15, 16, 17, 22, 23 & 24 and 2 p.m. Aug. 22 at Amelia Community Theatre, 207/209 Cedar St., Fernandina Beach, 261-6749, ameliacommunitytheatre.org; $22; $10 students. MAMMA MIA! Here we go again! The global smash musical comedy, about love and friendship, with the soundtrack of ABBA’s greatest hits, is staged through Sept. 15 at Alhambra Theatre & Dining, 12000 Beach Blvd., 641-1212, alhambrajax.com, $41-$67. BE MORE CHILL The musical is staged through Aug. 25 at The Island Theater, 1860 Town Hall Cir., Ste. 54, Fleming Island, 254-1455, $15 adults, students $19, theislandtheater.com. SWEAT The Northeast Florida premiere of Lynn Nottage’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play about friendship and its challenges is staged at 8 p.m. Aug. 16 & 17 and 2 p.m. Aug. 18 at The 5 & Dime, A Theatre Company, 112 E. Adams St., Downtown, 637-5100, the5anddime.org, $27 advance, $30 door.

AUDITIONS & CALLS

AUDITIONS HELD Apex Theatre auditions for the fall studio show Toothless, 1-3 p.m. Aug. 17 and for the kids fall musical production of Aladdin, 4:30-6 p.m. Aug. 20 at 5150 Palm Valley Rd., Ste. 205, Palm Valley, 834-1351, apextheatrejax.com, free to audition. ABET SEEKS ACTORS All Beaches Experimental Theatre auditions for its December production of Twelfth Night, 2 p.m. Aug. 17 at 544 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 249-7177, abettheatre.com. CALL TO ARTISTS The Friends of Ponte Vedra Concert Hall and Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach have teamed up to offer an open-call art contest; submissions are accepted 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Aug. 22 & 23 at 1050 A1A N., 280-0614, ccpvb.org. An awards party announcing the winners is Sept. 7. Check website for details.

CLASSICAL & JAZZ

MATTHEW HALL The pianist plays every Thur., Fri. & Sat. at Corner Bistro & Piano Bar, 9823 Tapestry Park Cir., Ste. 1, Southside, 619-1931. FLORIDA CHAMBER MUSIC PROJECT The local classical ensemble kicks off its seventh season, performing Johannes Brahams’ String Quartet No. 3, Opus 7, at 3 p.m. Sept. 15 at 18 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | AUGUST 14-20, 2019

Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 1050 A1A N., 2090399, flchambermusic.org, pvconcerthall.com, $12.50-$125.

BOOKS & POETRY

POETRY OPEN MIC You are given five minutes at the mic to read your poetry at 5 p.m. Aug. 17 at The Book Loft, 214 Centre St., Fernandina Beach, 261-8991, thebookloft.com. FRIENDS AWESOME BOOK SALE Hardcover and paperback books are available at great prices, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 17, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Aug. 19 and 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Aug. 20 at Main Library, 1960 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd., St. Augustine, 827-6940, sjcpls.org. And it’s 4 Bucks 4 a Bag of Books and Half-Price Sale on Tuesday! DRUNKEN BOOK REVIEW PODCAST Imbibers Caleb, Justin and Jennifer discuss Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven, at 7 p.m. Aug. 14, Chamblin’s Uptown Café, 215 N. Laura St., Downtown, 674-0868. THE OBSCURE BROTHERS Live music by Bob Patterson and Charley Simmons, 7:30 p.m. Aug. 17 at Story & Song Neighborhood Bookstore & Bistro, Fernandina Beach, 601-2118, storyandsongbookstore.com. OPEN MIC NIGHT Hosted by Johnny Masiulewicz, with poetry, spoken word, song & more. Held Aug. 28 and every last Wed., Chamblin’s Uptown Café, 215 N. Laura St., Downtown, 674-0868.

COMEDY

COMEDY ZONE LOL Comedy Night with Sid Porter is at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 14, $10. Hang with popular comic Mark Curry at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 15 and 7:30 & 10 p.m. Aug. 16 & 17, $20-$25. 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, 292-4242, comedyzone.com. JACKIE KNIGHT’S COMEDY CLUB Comedy Showdown features Jane Schlager, Romie Blackshear, Mitchell Strickland, Colin McClow, J-Paw, CJ Hightower, Mike Dossin, Susan Sussman and Spike Yoder at 8:30 p.m. Aug. 16, $15. James Yon and Miquel Colon appear 8:30 p.m. Aug. 17, 830 Anastasia Blvd., St. Augustine, 461-8843, thegypsycomedyclub.com, $15.

ART WALKS, MARKETS

DIG LOCAL NETWORK Weekly farmers’ markets: Beaches Green Market, 2-5 p.m. Sat., Jarboe Park, Florida Boulevard & A1A, Neptune Beach; Midweek Market, 3-6 p.m. Wed., Bull Park, 718 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach; ABC Market, 3-6 p.m. Fri., 1966 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach. RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET Local & regional art, organic produce, works by local craftspeople & music–Rhythm Theory Tap, Strangerwolf, Jessica Pounds Aug. 17–10 a.m. Saturdays underneath Fuller Warren Bridge, free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

ALEXANDER BREST MUSEUM & GALLERY Jacksonville University, 2800 University Blvd. N., 256-7371, arts.ju.edu. MFA in the Works presents the works of grad students, Masters of Fine Arts, including Heather Jones, Devon Variano, Jamal Adjamah, Danielle Doctor and Theresa Rykaczewski. The exhibit runs through Aug. 29. BEACHES MUSEUM & HISTORY PARK 381 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach, 241-5657, beachesmuseum.org. Artist Annelies Dykgraaf’s exhibit Water. Life. Art. is up through Nov. 11. CUMMER MUSEUM of ART & GARDENS 829 Riverside Ave., 356-6857, cummermuseum.org. Family Open Studio features French Moderns, an art-making activity for all to take home their own impressionistic scenes, 1-3 p.m. Aug. 18; free with admission. French Moderns: Monet to Matisse runs through Sept. 6. Carlos Rolón: Lost in Paradise runs through Oct. 21. Kota Ezawa: The Crime of Art, through Dec. 1. Edmund Greacen & World War I runs through Dec. 15. Free Tuesday is Aug. 20. KARPELES MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY MUSEUM 101 W. First Street, Springfield, 356-2992, karpeles.weebly.com. Darwin: On the Origin of Species and Other Matters exhibits through August. MUSEUM of CONTEMPORARY ART JACKSONVILLE 333 N. Laura St., 366-6911, mocajacksonville.unf.edu. Abstraction to Figuration: Works from MOCA is open at the T-U Center, with works by Memphis Wood, Mary Ann Bryan and Nancee Clark; Caitlin Swindell, curator. Camp/Wall/Flock, Khalid Albaih’s new installation, is on exhibit through Oct. 27. Of Many Ancestors exhibits through Dec. 28. MUSEUM of SCIENCE & HISTORY 1025 Museum Cir., Northbank, 396-6674, themosh.org. The science speaker series, Science on Tap JAX, presents University of North Florida’s Dr. Adam Rosenblatt, who discusses What Can Alligators Tell Us About Climate Change. A Q&A follows; 6:30-8 p.m. Aug. 14, at Aardwolf Brewing Company, 1461 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, 396-6674, themosh.org, free. Planetarium Night Live presents From Decadent to Destitute: How Mars Went Bad. Expand your mind and explore cosmic phenomena at immersive discussions and demos, 7-8:30 p.m. Aug. 16; $5 members, $10 nonmembers; suggested for ages 13+. Expedition: Dinosaur is up through Sept. 2. Hands-on exhibit Creation Station is open.

GALLERIES

The ART CENTER COOPERATIVE 9451 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 430, Regency Square, 233-9252, tacjacksonville.org. Works by member artists include oils, acrylics, watercolors, pastels, photography and sculptures in various media. The first show, Nature Abounds, opens Aug. 16. ARTISAN VILLAGE of AMELIA 2188 Sadler Rd., 491-2180, artisanvillageamelia.com. Local artists display their works. Rental spaces, classes, monthly art show. THE ART STUDIO & GALLERY 370A A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 295-4428, beachesartstudio.org. Corey Michael Smithson is the featured artist for August. AVILES GALLERY 11-C Aviles St., St. Augustine, 728-4957, avilesgallery.net. Members are Joel Bagnal, KC Cali, Byron Capo, Hookey Hamilton, Ted Head, Paula Pascucci and Gina Torkos. BOLD BEAN SAN MARCO 1905 Hendricks Ave., 853-6545. Tiffany Manning’s works, Flow State, are exhibited. BUTTERFIELD GARAGE ART GALLERY 137 King St., St. Augustine, 825-4577, butterfieldgarage. com. Per Hans Romnes’ photography and Teri Siewert’s works are currently on exhibit. CATHEDRAL ARTS PROJECT/HEATHER MOORE COMMUNITY GALLERY 207 N. Laura St., Ste. 300, Downtown, capkids.org. By the Water, an


ARTS + EVENTS exhibit of Alma Ramirez’s new works, displays through Oct. 25. The CULTURAL CENTER at PONTE VEDRA BEACH 50 Executive Way, 280-0614, ccpvb. org. Summer Tasting Series features craft beers, 5:30 p.m. Aug. 19; $25; 21+. Compromised Boundaries, works by Society of Mixed Media Artists members, runs through Sept. 21. Art with a Heart in Healthcare’s eighth annual exhibition A World of Their Own, comprising works by pediatric patients of Wolfson Children’s Hospital, is on display. GRAY 1908 GALLERY 73 San Marco Ave., St. Augustine, 850-384-3084. Jenna Alexander’s series, The Flower Map of the United States, is on display. HASKELL GALLERY Jacksonville International Airport, 741-3546, jiaarts.org. Works by Memphis Wood, Charlie Brown and Stephen Heywood are exhibited on the Connector Bridge. MAKERSPACE GALLERY Main Library, 303 N. Laura St., Downtown, 630-2665, jaxpubliclibrary. org. Reclaimed: Life Beyond the Landfill has art made with repurposed waste objects. Artists include Clifford Buckley, Malath Albakri, Keshauna Davis, John Drum, Zac Freeman, Donald Gialanella, Aisling Millar McDonald, Khamil L. Ojoyo, Lana Shuttleworth and Wendy Sullivan. It’s exhibited through Sept. 22, free. MANDARIN MUSEUM & HISTORICAL SOCIETY 11964 Mandarin Rd., mandarinmuseum.net. Third Thursday Lecture Series features St. Johns Riverkeeper Lisa Rinaman, who discusses River UPRising, 6:30 p.m. Aug. 15. Exhibits include Civil War era artifacts recovered from the Union steamship Maple Leaf, items related to Harriet Beecher Stowe, a World War I exhibit, and displays related to the only remaining one-room schoolhouse in Duval County. at Mandarin Community Club, 12447 Mandarin Road, Jacksonville. 268-0784. PAStA FINE ART GALLERY 214 Charlotte St., St. Augustine, 824-0251, pastagalleryart. com. Photographer Julie Noel Smith is August’s featured artist. Her show Intentional is on exhibit. ROTUNDA GALLERY St. Johns County Admin. Bldg., 500 San Sebastian View, St. Augustine, 471-9980. Manila Clough’s mosaics depict native birds and plants, through Sept. 19. SOUTHLIGHT GALLERY 1 Independent Dr., Ste. 113, Downtown, southlight.com. A new exhibit, The Three Graces, features sculpture, abstraction and still lifes by artist Nofa Dixon, Dee Roberts and Nancy R. Schultz. The works’ complementary qualities are not to be missed. MJ Hinson’s expressive canvasses, on the second floor, are up through Sept. 6. SPACE 42 2670 Phyllis St., Riverside, 888-4219222, spacefortytwo.com. Luisa Posada Bleier’s Untitled exhibits through August. ST. AUGUSTINE ART ASSOCIATION 22 Marine St., 824-2310, staaa.org. From Asia to the Americas: The Art of Jean Wagner Troemel exhibit and art sale is ongoing through Aug. 25. WORD REVOLT ART GALLERY 1249 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach, 888-5502, wordrevolt.com. The fine art exhibit CO2 is on display. The exhibit Glass Works welcomes submissions; apply now. The opening reception is 6-9 p.m. Aug. 23.

EVENTS

SCIENCE ON TAP JAX The science speaker series

presents University of North Florida’s Dr. Adam Rosenblatt, who discusses What Can Alligators Tell Us About Climate Change. A Q&A follows. 6:30-8 p.m. Aug. 14, Aardwolf Brewing Company, 1461 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, 396-6674, themosh.org, free. THE COST OF GARBAGE Jax Public Library and North Florida Chapter of U.S. Green Chamber of Commerce lead a panel discussion on recycling, 5:30 p.m. Aug. 14 in Makerspace, Main Library, 303 N. Laura St., 630-2665, jaxpubliclibrary.org. JAX TACO FEST The inaugural fest features food trucks, margaritas and beers, a tequila expo, a taco contest, henna art, taco-themed activities, live music by xx, and … um … tacos. Pet-friendly, kids’ zone. 1-7 p.m. Aug. 17 at Hemming Park, 135 W. Monroe St., Downtown, free admission. GTM’S 20TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION The Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve Center celebrates a milestone–20 years!–with a boat tour, lunch, discussions and guided walks and a reception, with opening remarks from Director Dr. Mike Shirley, a reptile exhibit and an alligator feeding, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 16 at Environmental Education Center, 505 Guana River Rd., Ponte Vedra, 823-4500, gtmnerr.org. JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY The inaugural event, open to all Jewish organizations and temples and hosted by rGEN Jax and Jewish Federation of Jacksonville, includes art activities, a museum-wide scavenger hunt and xx, noon-4 p.m. Aug. 25 at Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., 3566857, cummermuseum.org, jewishjacksonville. org, picatic.com/jewishcommunityday. JACKSONVILLE TATTOO CONVENTION The 15th annual convention is Aug. 16-18 at Renaissance Resort, World Golf Village, St. Augustine; $20/day; $35 weekend; setattoo.com.

SIZZLIN’ SUMMER ROMANCE

Bestselling romance author PRISCILLA OLIVERAS is here as part of Jax Public Library’s book festival, featuring films, activities and writers’ panels. Oliveras reads from and signs copies of her new romance ‘with a Latinx flavor,’ His Perfect Partner, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17 in Main Library’s second floor atrium, 303 N. Laura St., Downtown, 630-2665, jaxpubliclibrary.org, free admission.

NOW SHOWING • NOW SHOWING • NOW SHOWING • NOW SHOWING SUMMER CLASSICS SERIES The series marks the 50th anniversary of Oscar-winner (rated X at the time) Midnight Cowboy, with Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight as stud Joe Buck, 2 p.m. Aug. 18, The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787, floridatheatre.com, $7.50. CORAZON CINEMA & CAFÉ All Is True and Echo in the Canyon screen. Throwback Thursday: Dog Days, noon & 6:45 p.m. Aug. 15. 36 Granada St., St. Augustine, 679-5736, corazoncinemaandcafe.com. WGHF IMAX THEATER Hobbs & Shaw, The Lion King, Great Bear Rainforest and Great Barrier Reef run. Apocalypse Now The Final Cut is Aug. 15 &

18. Superpower Dogs 3D starts Aug. 16. Backyard Wilderness, Aug. 17. World Golf Hall of Fame, St. Augustine, 940-4133, worldgolfimax.com. SUN-RAY CINEMA The Farewell and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood run. Apocalypse Now The Final Cut runs Aug. 21. 1028 Park St., 5 Points, 359-0049, sunraycinema.com. SIZZLIN SUMMER ROMANCE MOVIE Her Alibi, with Tom Selleck and Paulina Porizkova, is 3:30 p.m. Aug. 17, Hicks Auditorium, Main Library, Downtown, 630-2665, free. UNF MOTH FILMS Bag It is 7 p.m. Aug. 15, MOCA Jax, 333 N. Laura St., mocajacksonville.unf.edu, free.

AUGUST 14-20, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 19


IGGY’S, 104 Bartram Oaks Litt Family Band Aug. 15 & 18. Don’t Call Me Shirley Aug. 16. Fireball Aug. 17

ORANGE PARK

CHEERS, 1138 Park Ave. Fratello Aug. 17 The ROADHOUSE, 231 Blanding Blvd. Four Daze Dead, Pandora & Her Box Aug. 16

PONTE VEDRA

TAPS, 2220 C.R. 210 Dennis Miller Aug. 14. Jay Garrett & the Pack Aug. 16. Paul Ivey Trio Aug. 17

RIVERSIDE, WESTSIDE

MURRAY HILL Theatre, 932 Edgewood Ave. Sidecreek, Wild Pines, EJ Hervey, Myles Brandon Aug. 17 NIGHTHAWKS, 2952 Roosevelt Blvd. Them Vagabonds Aug. 14. Rhythm of Fear, Cloak, Wørsen, Xaeus, Dead Scrolls, Plasma Aug. 15. The Aristocrats, Travis Larson Band Aug. 17 RAIN DOGS, 1045 Park St. Christina Wagner, Discordant Generation, Electric Water, DigDog, Single White Herpe & the Aids Aug. 16. Valley Ghouls, Friendly Fire, FFN, Swill Aug. 17 RIVER & POST, 1000 Riverside Ave. HelloCelia Aug. 16 RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET, 715 Riverside Strangerwolf, Jessica Pounds Aug. 17

ST. AUGUSTINE

The AMP, 1340C A1A Rebelution, Protoje, Collie Buddz Aug. 14 & 15. Umphrey’s McGee, Magic City Hippies Aug. 17 ARNOLD’S, 3912 N. Ponce de Leon Neon Whiskey Aug. 17 CAFÉ ELEVEN, 501 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Aug. Beach Stephen Kellogg, Tyrone Wells, Emmanuelle Sasson Aug. 15. Perpetual Groove Aug. 17 Half Factory, half twee and all dreamy, St. Louis-based MUSIC by the SEA, SABeach Pier Grapes of Roth indie quartet FRANKIE VALET delivers the jangle pop. Aug. 14 Also on the bill: Doré, Runner’s High, Vi Viana and PROHIBITION Kitchen, 119 St. George St. Zach Luna Cruise. 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15, Rain Dogs, Chester, Love Chunk Aug. 15. Danny Knicely Trio, Jattara Aug. 16. Soulo Trio, Ramona Aug. 17. Sam Riverside, facebook.com/raindogsjax, $7. Pacetti, Chelsea Saddler Aug. 18. Jeff White Aug. 19. Aslyn & the Naysayers Aug. 20 SHANGHAI NOBBY’S, 10 Anastasia Blvd. Pelican Johnny, The Bitters, Not Your Hero, Danny Attack Aug. 16

LIVE MUSIC VENUES

AMELIA ISLAND, FERNANDINA

SALTY PELICAN, 12 N. Front St. Davis Turner Aug. 15 SJ Brewing Co., 463646 S.R. 200, Ste. 13 Jimmy Beats Aug. 17 SLIDERS, 1998 S. Fletcher Ave. Tad Jennings Aug. 15. Joe King Aug. 19. King Eddie & Pili Pili Wed. Mark O’Quinn Tue. STORY & SONG, 1430 Park Ave. The Obscure Brothers Aug. 17 The SURF, 3199 S. Fletcher XHale Aug. 16. Davis Turner Aug. 17. Savanna Bassett Aug. 18. Kyle Freeman Aug. 20

THE BEACHES

(All venues in Jax Beach unless otherwise noted) BLUE JAY Listening Room, 412 N. Second St. Time Sawyer Aug. 16. Matthew Fowler, Kyle Keller, Jordan Foley Aug. 17. 2nd anniversary: Vendors, vinyl spinning, Selwyn Birchwood Aug. 18 COOP 303, 303 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach Adam Latiff Aug. 16 & 17 FLYING IGUANA, 207 Atlantic Blvd., NB, 853-5680 5 O’Clock Shadow Aug. 16 & 17 GUSTO, 1266 Beach Blvd. The Groov Aug 14 LYNCH’S, 514 N. First St. Let’s Ride Brass Band Aug. 16. Jeff Jarrett, Blistur Aug. 17. Kristen Campbell Aug. 18 MEZZA, 110 First St., Neptune Beach Gypsies Ginger Wed. Mike Shackelford, Steve Shanholtzer Thur. Mezza Shuffle Boxband Mon. MOJO Kitchen, 1500 Beach Blvd. Brett Bass & Melted Plectrum CD Release Aug. 16 MUSIC in the Courtyard, 200 First St., NB Brenna Erickson Aug. 16. Fish Out of Water Aug. 17 RAGTIME Tavern, 207 Atlantic Blvd., AB Random Tandem Aug. 14. Rough Mix Aug. 15. Vegas Gray Aug. 16 & 17. Smith & Banks Aug. 18 SURFER the Bar, 200 First St. N. The TJ Hookers (final show), Concrete Criminals, The Wastedist, Torcher Aug. 17. Jeff White Aug. 20 WHISKEY JAX, 950 Marsh Landing Pkwy. Dalton Ammerman Aug. 14. Pink Paisleys Aug. 15. The Faze Band Aug. 17. Pro Bono Aug. 18. The Groov Aug. 20

DOWNTOWN

1904 MUSIC Hall, 19 Ocean St. N. Jackie Stranger, Jessica Pounds, Madison Grace, Alexander Miller & Mike Carter Aug. 15. Slum Village, Simple Complexity Aug. 16. Mac Sabbath, Okilly Dokilly, Playboy Manbaby, Black Stache Aug. 20 DAILY’S Place, Sports Complex Brad Paisley, Chris Lane, Riley Green Aug. 16. Bush, Live, Our Lady Peace Aug. 18 FLORIDA Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth Brews, Blues & BBQ 2019 Aug. 22 The JUSTICE Pub, 315 E. Bay St. Tyler Cassidy Aug. 21 MYTH Nightclub, 333 E. Bay St. Lil Yankee, Killoala, Vallhalla Aug. 14. DJs Q45, Bird Aug. 15. DJs Mike Shea, FatKat Aug. 17 SPLIFFS Gastropub, 15 Ocean St. DJ Mas Appeal Aug. 17

FLEMING ISLAND, GREEN COVE

BOONDOCKS, 2808 Henley Rd. Scott Elley Aug. 14. Paul Wane Aug. 15. Atlantic Alibi, Dixie Highway Aug. 16. City of Bridges Aug. 17 WHITEY’S Fish Camp, 2032 C.R. 220 Savanna Leigh Bassett Aug. 15. Highway Jones Aug. 16. John Taylor Aug. 17. Paul Ivey Aug. 18

INTRACOASTAL, ARLINGTON

CLIFF’S, 3033 Monument Rd. Andy Toomey Trio Aug. 14. Fratello Aug. 16. Ridestock for Lisa Taylor Aug. 17. Back in Time Aug. 21 JERRY’S, 13170 Atlantic Blvd. HindSite Aug. 16. Party Cartel Aug. 17

MANDARIN

ENZA’S, 10601 San Jose Blvd. Brian Iannucci Wed., Sun. & Tue.

20 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | AUGUST 14-20, 2019

SAN MARCO, NORTHBANK

JACK RABBITS, 15280 Hendricks Josh Ward, J.R. Ward Aug. 15. Teen Divorce, King of Summer, First Case Scenario, Yellow Steve Aug. 16. Archways Album Release: RickoLus, Folk is People, Cory Driscoll, Palimony, Baer & the Lady Aug. 17 MUDVILLE Music Room, 3104 Atlantic Blvd. Kevin Stewart, Gary Tussing, Tom Nordin Aug. 17. TBA Big Band Aug. 19. The Troubadours Aug. 23

SOUTHSIDE, BAYMEADOWS

57 HEAVEN, 8136 Atlantic Blvd. Duval County Line Aug. 17 VETERANS UNITED, 8999 Western Way Derek Maines Aug. 16 WHISKEY JAX, 10915 Baymeadows Rd. Julia Gulia Aug. 16. Bay Street Aug. 17. Mojo Roux, Carol Bristow-Zur Aug. 18

SPRINGFIELD, NORTHSIDE

COPPERTOP BAR, 12405 Main St. Duval County Line Aug. 16 CROOKED ROOSTER, 148 S. Sixth St. Dead Electric Aug. 17 PALMS Fish Camp, 6359 Heckscher Dr. The Last Resort Aug. 14. Taylor Shami Aug. 15. Patrick Rose Aug. 16. Mr. Bill Show, Kent Kirby Aug. 17. Mike Ward, Lisa & the Madhatters Aug. 18

ELSEWHERE

SPIRIT of the SUWANNEE Music Park, 3076 95th Dr., Live Oak Fat Tractor Aug. 16. Fleetwood Mac tribute Aug. 17

U PCOMING CONCERTS CORROSION of CONFORMITY, CROWBAR, QUAKER CITY NIGHT

HAWKS, LO-PAN Aug. 21, 1904 Music Hall TRIBUTE: A Celebration of The ALLMAN BROTHERS Aug. 23, 1904 Music Hall SCUM, The BODY SNATCHERS, LIPZCUM Aug. 23, Nighthawks PENTATONIX, RACHEL PLATTEN Aug. 24, Daily’s Place The ADVENTURES of ANNABELLE LYN Aug. 24, Mudville BREAKING THROUGH, BURDEN AFFINITY, 14 NORTH, The FALLEN SONS Aug. 24, 1904 Music Hall VAMPIRE WEEKEND, CHRISTONE INGRAM Aug. 25, The Amp PANDORA & HER BOX, BLACK MAGIC, FLOWER POWER, 9E Aug. 25, Jack Rabbits JOHN DICKIE, COLLAPSIBLE B, BAD DOG MAMA Aug. 27, The Amp Night Market 68, LISTENER, GREYHAVEN Aug. 27, The Justice Pub SOUTHERN CHAOS Aug. 28, St. Augustine Beach Pier LANGDON McNAMARA Aug. 29, 1904 Music Hall JOHNNYSWIM Aug. 29, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall CHRIS BROWN, TORY LANEZ, TY DOLLA $IGN, JOYNER LUCAS, YELLA BEEZY Aug. 30, Veterans Memorial Arena SAWYER BROWN Aug. 30, Thrasher-Horne Center ORCHESTRAL MANOEUVRES in the DARK Aug. 30, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall SUPERSUCKERS Aug. 30, Jack Rabbits 430 STEPS, FEVER STRIKE Aug. 31, The Justice Pub BARNES & the HEART Aug. 31, Lynch’s Irish Pub Bold City Beer Fest: The FRITZ, ZACH DEPUTY, TRAIL DIVER, BONNIE BLUE, BEN STROK & the FULL ELECTRIC, TALLER TREES Sept. 1, Riverside Arts Market Duval Day Festival: WHOLE WHEAT BREAD, EVERGREEN TERRACE, ROB ROY, SWORDZ, UNIVERSAL GREEN Sept. 4, 1904 Music Hall PETER FRAMPTON, JASON BONHAM Sept. 4, Daily’s Place AL MANISCALCO QUARTET Sept. 6, Grape & Grain

SING OUT LOUD FESTIVAL Sept. 6-29, St. Augustine MOON DUTY Sept. 6, Jack Rabbits HILLSONG UNITED Sept. 7, Veterans Memorial Arena KURT VILE & the VIOLATERS Sept. 7, The Amp Backyard Stage POCO, PURE PRAIRIE LEAGUE, FIREFALL Sept. 7, Florida Theatre BOOK of LOVE Sept. 7, Jack Rabbits SENSI TRAILS, DANKA Sept. 7, Nighthawks RHETT & LINK Sept. 7, The Florida Theatre JENNY LEWIS, The WATSON TWINS, LUCIE SILVAS Sept. 8, The Amp Backyard Stage COLTON McKENNA Sept. 9, The Amp Night Market AMY GRANT Sept. 12, The Florida Theatre The MIDNIGHT HOUR, ALI SHAHEED MUHAMMAD, ADRIAN YOUNGE Sept. 12, 1904 Music Hall CHRIS YOUNG, CHRIS JANSON, LOCASH Sept. 12, Daily’s PROPAGANDHI & the COATHANGERS Sept. 13, Amp Backyard Onyx Fest II: AUDITORY ARMORY, CATCHER & the RYE, AMNESIS, SATYR, DEAD RECKONIONG, CITY of STAGES, DEFY the TYRANT, GOLD FRANKINCENSE & MYRRH, BREATHING THEORY Sept. 14, 1904 Music Hall HOT WATER MUSIC, The MENZINGERS, SUBHUMAN Sept. 14, The Amp Backyard Stage UB40, ALI CAMPBELL, ASTRO Sept. 14, Daily’s Place ST. PAUL & the BROKEN BONES, DIRTY DOZEN BRASS BAND, AARON LEE TASJAN Sept. 15, The Amp Backyard Stage DON FELDER Sept. 16, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall AGENT ORANGE Sept. 16, Surfer the Bar DUBLIN CITY RAMBLERS Sept. 16, Culhane’s AB COLM KEEGAN Sept. 17 & 18, Culhane’s Southside ALL GET OUT, CITIES BURN, MANY ROOMS Sept. 18, Jack Rabbits GEORGE PORTER & RUNNIN PARDNERS Sept. 19, 1904 Music Hall LOCAL NATIVES, DEVON GILFILLIAN Sept. 20, PV Concert Hall LOS STELLARIANS, S.A. MARTINEZ Sept. 20, Surfer the Bar WALTER PARKS Sept. 20, Mudville Music Room KASEY MUSGRAVES Benefit Sept. 21, The Amp Muddfest: PUDDLE of MUDD, SALIVA, TRAPT, SAVING ABEL, TANTRIC Sept. 21, Thrasher-Horne Center STRUNG OUT, The CASUALITIES, INSPECTION 12 Sept. 21, 1904 Music Hall ALAN JACKSON, WILLIAM MICHAEL MORGAN Sept. 21, Veterans Memorial Arena VIRGIL DONATI Sept. 22, Surfer the Bar The GROWLERS, PHOSPHORESCENT Sept. 22, Amp Backyard JEREMY MORRISON Sept. 24, Amp Night Market SACRED REICH, TOXIC HOLIDAY Sept. 26, Nighthawks BRANTLEY GILBERT, MICHAEL RAY, LINDSAY ELL Sept. 27, Daily’s SCOTT BRADLEE’S Postmodern Jukebox Sept. 27, Florida Theatre WHITNEY MORGAN & the 78S, ALEX WILLIAMS Sept. 27, 1904 Music Hall SHOVELS & ROPE Sept. 27, Amp Backyard Stage grandson, nothing, nowhere Sept. 28, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall TOUBAB KREWE Sept. 28, Jack Rabbits NONPOINT, HYRO the HERO, MADAME MAYHEM, ZERO THEOREM Sept. 29, Surfer the Bar SON VOLT Sept. 29, The Amp Backyard Stage GATLIN BROTHERS Sept. 29, The Florida Theatre BAD SUNS, LIILY, ULTRAQ Sept. 30, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall GUNS N’ ROSES Oct. 1, Veterans Memorial Arena SCOTT STAPP Oct. 3, The Florida Theatre THOMAS RHETT, DUSTIN LYNCH, RUSSELL DICKERSON, RHETT AKINS Oct. 4, Veterans Memorial Arena GUIDA, MERCY MERCY Oct. 4, Jack Rabbits PAPADOSIO Oct. 4, The Amp Backyard Stage JOHN MEDESKI’S MAD SKILLET Oct. 5, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall The SLOCAN RAMBLERS Oct. 6, Cafe Eleven MARTY STUART The Pilgrim Oct. 10, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall Suwannee Roots Revival: SAM BUSH, DEL McCOURY BAND, KELLER & the KEELS, SAMANTHA FISH, The TRAVELIN’ McCOURYS, VERLON THOMPSON, DAVID GANS, PETER ROWAN, OTEIL & FRIENDS, LEFTOVER SALMON, DONNA the BUFFALO, KELLER WILLIAMS’ PETTYGRASS, WE BANJO 3, JOE CRAVEN & the SOMETIMERS, JONATHAN SCALES FOURCHESTRA, The HILLBENDERS, JIM LAUDERDALE, REV.

Photo: Destinee Condison

CONCERTS

JEFF MOSIER, BRETT BASS & MELTED PLECTRUM, CORBITT BROS., JON STICKLEY, The LEE BOYS, SAUCE BOSS, BELLE & the Band, The DUNEHOPPERS, The GRASS IS DEAD, BRUCE COCKBURN, The SELDOM SCENE, HORSESHOES & HAND GRENADES, LONELY HEARTSTRING BAND, DUSTBOWL REVIVAL, LIL SMOKIES, BALKUN BROTHERS, SHINY RIBS, KATIE SKENE & the COSMIC BAND, NIKKI TALLEY, JASON SHARP, QUARTERMOON, WHETHERMAN, TORNADO RIDER, The ADVENTURES of ANNABELLE LYNN, LEE HUNTER, JEFF BRADLEY Oct. 11-14, Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park CATFISH & the BOTTLEMEN Oct. 10, The Amp Backyard Stage The TOASTERS, The SCOTCH BONNETS Oct. 10, Surfer the Bar CHRIS STAPLETON, BROTHERS OSBORNE, KENDELL MARVEL Oct. 10, Veterans Memorial Arena BERT KREISCHER Oct. 11, The Florida Theatre MAGGIE ROGERS, JACOB BANKS Oct. 11, The Amp STEVEN PAGE Oct. 11, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall NAHKO & MEDICINE for the PEOPLE, NATTALI RIZE Oct. 12, The Amp Backyard Stage CHEAP TRICK, ZZ TOP Oct. 16, The Amp ZAC BROWN BAND Oct. 17, Daily’s Place The WOOD BROTHERS Oct. 17, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall CHICAGO Oct. 18, Daily’s Place BILLY CURRINGTON Oct. 18, The Amp YOUNG THUG, MACHINE GUN KELLY, KILLY, POLO G, YBN NAHMIR, STRICK Oct. 19, Daily’s Place FACE to FACE, LAGWAGON, H20 Oct. 19, The Amp Backyard Stage CARRIE UNDERWOOD, MADDIE & TAE, RUNAWAY JUNE Oct. 20, Veterans Memorial Arena RUMOURS of FLEETWOOD MAC Tribute Oct. 21, Florida Theatre KYLE COX, ROCKO WHEELER Oct. 21, Jack Rabbits ROTTING OUT, CANDY, SEEYOUSPACECOWBOY, KNOCKED LOOSE Oct. 22, 1904 Music Hall The MOVEMENT, The LATE ONES, ELOVATERS Oct. 23, Surfer The ALLMAN BETTS BAND, JOANNE SHAW TAYLOR, JD SIMO Oct. 24, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall SWITCHFOOT Oct. 24, The Florida Theatre CLINT BLACK Oct. 25, Thrasher-Horne Center POST MALONE, TYLA YAWEH, SWAE LEE Oct. 25, VetsMemArena SQUIRREL NUT ZIPPERS Oct. 26, Prohibition Kitchen WYNONNA & the BIG NOISE Oct. 27, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall ACOUSTIC ALCHEMY Oct. 31, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall SAMMY HAGAR & the CIRCLE, NIGHT RANGER Nov. 1, The Amp HERE COME the MUMMIES Nov. 2, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall OLD DOMINION, SCOTTY McCREERY, RYAN HURD Nov. 2 & 3, The Amp WE WILL ROCK YOU Queen Musical Nov. 3, Florida Theatre ROY ORBISON & BUDDY HOLLY Tribute Nov. 6, Florida Theatre The SIMON & GARFUNKEL STORY Nov. 8, Times-Union Center STING Nov. 8, Daily’s Place ELVIS COSTELLO & the IMPOSTERS Nov. 8, The Amp Porchfest: MAGGIE KOERNER, ALANNA ROYALE, MAMA BLUE, SPADE McQUADE, KING EDDIE & PILI PILI, CHRIS THOMAS BAND, OUIJA BROS., TAD JENNINGS, LET’S RIDE, BRENT BYRD BAND Nov. 9, Springfield porches The RACONTEURS Nov. 9, The Amp .38 SPECIAL, BRETT MYERS, The CURT TOWNE Band, PINTO GRAHAM Nov. 9, Thrasher-Horne Center The DOOBIE BROTHERS Nov. 13, The Amp LED ZEPPELIN TRIBUTE: ZOSO Nov. 14, Surfer the Bar The SAUCE BOSS BILL WHARTON Nov. 15, Mudville GREG GUTFIELD Nov. 16, The Florida Theatre DWIGHT YOAKAM Nov. 17, The Florida Theatre FIVE FINGER DEATH PUNCH, THREE DAYS GRACE, BAD WOLVES, FIRE from the GODS Nov. 18, Vets Memorial Arena MIRANDA LAMBERT, MAREN MORRIS, ELLE KING, PISTOL ANNIES, ASHLEY McBRYDE, TENILLE TOWNES, CAYLEE HAMMACK Nov. 21, Veterans Memorial Arena The FAB FOUR Beatles Tribute Nov. 22, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall SARA BAREILLES Nov. 22, Daily’s Place MASON JENNINGS Nov. 23, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall JOHN OATES, The GOOD ROAD BAND Nov. 24, PV Concert Hall

Fresh off his appearance on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, Jamaican reggae artist PROTOJE is in the Ancient City to open for Rebelution. 6 p.m. Wed. & Thur., Aug. 14 & 15, The Amp, St. Augustine, staugamphitheatre.com, $39.50.


FOLIO COOKING

SUMMER OF

SANDWICHES WHITHER THE OPEN-FACED SANDWICH OPTION? I’M STILL HUNG UP ON SANDWICHES. Last week, I promised to tell what I know about these versatile food items, so I’m sharing fascinating sandwich facts with all my adoring fans. (I think I’m up to seven fans now if you include my children!) If you remember, the whole idea for a sandwich column sprouted from a guest at my restaurant ordering a sandwich open-face style. This used to be a common request back in the last century, but it’s an expression that seems to have gone out of favor now. So I thought it appropriate to break down the basic components of a sandwich and offer a short discourse on the anatomy said item. All sandwiches start with a foundation— just like any well-constructed building. That foundation is the bread. Do not discount the importance of good bread; the type of bread you choose is what determines the type of sandwich you’re constructing. Yes, sandwiches fit into neat categories designated by the bread with which they are built. The Long Roll category includes submarine sandwiches, hoagies, grinders and po’boys—each requires a long roll. The next category is Loaves, which includes any sandwich on sliced bread. I’m speaking of Pullman loaves, of rustic panini loaves, challah loaves, and so forth. The most classic example is the well-constructed club sandwich. Let me make something perfectly clear: A club sandwich is made with three slices of toasted Pullman-style bread! Any sandwich that calls itself a club but isn’t built with three slices of toasted bread is an imposter and should therefore be disdained and admonished as the true fraud it is. Don’t be fooled by corporate marketing hacks. The next category is that of Roll, be it soft white or crispy French or even brioche bun. These rolls are sandwich-sized—fourand-half inches to five inches—simply sliced in two, ready to joyfully receive your fillings of choice. May I pause for a moment to tell you that writing this is making me really

hungry? So hungry. OK, back to work. The next category in this titillating list is Flat Breads. The group includes pitas with or without pockets, naan, tortillas and even pizza dough. Pizza dough is used for the infamous Italian-American favorite: Stromboli, named for a volcano that erupted again this summer! The final category is the one responsible for these last two columns: The Open-faced Sandwich. The open-faced is traditionally served on sliced loaves and, as you might’ve guessed, there’s no top slice. Just one piece of bread on the bottom. (Sometimes the cheekier fans of this type of sandwich refer to it as Topless!) My favorite open-faced items are tea sandwiches. I’m just a sucker for these one or two bite treats from jolly ol’ England. Try this classic tea sandwich—do like I do and sip a tall glass of fine bourbon as a side—beats the hell out of tea.

CHEF BILL’S CUCUMBER & CHIVE CREAM CHEESE TEA SANDWICHES

Ingredients • 2 Tbsp. chives, chopped • 3 oz. cream cheese, room temperature • 1/2 English cucumber • 3 sprigs dill • 1/2 lemon, juiced • White bread Directions 1. Trim the bread crusts, cut into one to two bite squares, rectangles or triangles. 2. Mix cream cheese with chives and lemon juice. 3. Slice ’cumbers on the mandolin, paper-thin. 4. Spread cream cheese mixture on one half of the bread. Put another bread half over that. 5. Garnish with dill sprigs.

Until we cook again,

Chef Bill Thompson cooking@folioweekly.com

Email Chef Bill, owner/chef of Amelia Island Culinary Academy and Island Kitchen, at cooking@folioweekly.com, to get cheffed up! Subscribe to Folio Weekly’s Cooking Newsletter at folioweekly.com/newsletters

FOLIO COOKING’S GROCERY COMMUNITY EARTH FARE 11901 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 250, Arlington GRASSROOTS NATURAL MARKET 2007 Park St., Riverside

NATIVE SUN NATURAL FOODS MARKETS 11030 Baymeadows Rd. 10000 San Jose Blvd., Mandarin 1585 N. Third St., Jax Beach

JACKSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET 1810 W. Beaver St., Westside

PUBLIX MARKETS 1033 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine 2033 Riverside Ave. 4413 Town Ctr. Pkwy., Ste. 100

NASSAU HEALTH FOODS 833 T.J. Courson Rd., Fernandina

THE SAVORY MARKET 474380 S.R. 200, Fernandina

ROWE’S 1670 Wells Rd., Orange Park 8595 Beach Blvd., Southside FERNANDINA BEACH MARKET PLACE Art & Farmers Market, North Seventh Street WHOLE FOODS 10601 San Jose Blvd., Mandarin

AUGUST 14-20, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 21


FOLIO PETS

LOCAL PET EVENTS & ADOPTABLES

PETS LIKE ME

TOOTHLESS

AYLA’S ACRES NO-KILL ANIMAL RESCUE The nonprofit celebrates four years of helping pets find furever homes,with a fundraiser featuring Cypress & Grove Brewing Co., raffles and swag, 6-8 p.m. Aug. 16 at Brewz N Dawgz, 1974 U.S. 1 S., St. Augustine, 686-1956, aylasacres.org.

ADOPTABLES

LILIAN

Behind every good human is an AWESOME PET waiting to share its story

A MEXICAN ‘WALKING FISH’ looks like a toy–and it’s not a fish! USUALLY, DOGS AREN’T MUCH INTERESTED in water monsters—probably because they don’t make noise or play with dogs. But then I met an axolotl. I couldn’t help but lean closer and gaze with open eyes. With its lizard-like limbs, a fancy headdress and a wry little grin, it’s easy to fall in love with this unusual creature. Davi: Tell me something about yourself that most people don’t know. Toothless: I am a salamander larva, which means I’m an amphibian that lives underwater my whole life! I even have pseudo-lungs to gulp the air, in case my environment is lacking oxygen. I also have no teeth, so the way I eat is like a vacuum. The texture inside of my mouth is rough, like sandpaper, to hold on to my food. What foods do you crave most often? Plump, juicy earthworms! And for a snack, I sometimes get brine shrimp and bloodworms. They’re not as nutritious but sure do taste good! Do Axolotls have bad eyesight? I can distinguish shadows and, of course, see my human, especially when it’s feeding time, but I rely mainly on my sense of smell, not sight, to hunt my prey and communicate with others. Tell me about those frilly things on the side of your head. Those are my gills! If my water moves too much, my gills start to curl. That’s how my human knows to refill my tank. So you have any special talents? I can beat anyone in a staring contest— because I have no eyelids. That’s about it; I’m quite sedentary and hide most of the day. What is your best feature? My adorable perma-smile. Must be why my human loves to stare at me so much. What fun activities can you do? I can swim all day! I’m fully aquatic so I 22 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | AUGUST 14-20, 2019

can’t leave my home, unless my human gets me a bigger one! Do axolotls require much care? The only thing we’re picky about is our water temperature and water quality. We prefer very cold water, so our tanks must be kept at 70°F or colder. My favorite temperature is 60°F. If I eat too much and my tummy hurts, my human puts me in the fridge in a bowl for a few hours—aah, the cold water makes my tummy feel so much better. What happens if you lose a limb? I haven’t lost one yet, but if it were to happen, I can regrow whatever is lost without any problems. I’ve heard stories of my friends regenerating portions of their brains. It didn’t make them any smarter, though! What other names do you go by? Where I originate, I’m known as the Mexican walking fish or just the walking fish. My human calls me Toothless because I lack teeth.

SWEET LADY IS A SERENE PEOPLE-FELINE! Six years old–not a silly kitten. I like string toys, naps & my Group Room 5 roomies. Loves: when folks pet me. I’d love to meet you! Visit any day at 8464 Beach Blvd. Go to jaxhumane.org!

WOOFSTOCK Nassau Humane Society celebrates the peace & love vibe with live music, vinyl spinning, food trucks, face-painting, kids’ stuff and vendors, 2-7 p.m. Aug. 17 at the Society, 639 Airport Rd., Ferndndina, 321-1647, nassauhumane.org. All well-behaved dogs are welcome! ST. AUGUSTINE HUMANE SOCIETY FREE SPAY & NEUTER SERVICES The Society’s surgery program, possible through a grant from Florida Animal Friends Inc., offers reduced fee or free services for owners who qualify. Go to the Humane Society, 1665 Old Moultrie Rd., St. Augustine, call 829-2737 ext. 100 or email cbessett@staughumane.org. The program runs through Aug. 20. NATIONAL PET ADOPTION DAYJust what you’ve been waiting for! All area PetSmart stores have adorable pets ready to go home with you. Every adoption includes a free kit! All day long on Aug.

ADOPTABLES

McFLY

In three words, sum up your life. Happy, hungry, aloof. As if I needed another reason to like the axolotl, I learned the name literally means “water dog,” for the dog-headed deity in Aztec mythology. Even though they’re critically endangered, axolotls have a growing fan base in the exotic pet community (there are even some Pokemon inspired by these little dudes) and the cutish amphibian can be a great companion, as long as you keep it comfortable and well-fed—just like dogs or cats, or any pet you love! Davi Davi the Dachshund loves making new friends—of any species, race, creed, color or political affiliation. (Well, most political affiliations … ) Subscribe to the Folio Pets Newsletter at folioweekly.com/newsletters

I’VE SEEN THE FUTURE … MINE’S WITH YOU! I’m an eight-year-old boy who likes walks, treats, making new friends, playing screamin’ guitar. Loves: hoverboards and time travel. Visit jaxhumane.org to learn more about me and find out how to take me home.

17 at PetSmart, 356 Monument Rd., 724-4600; 8801 Southside Blvd., Ste. 3, 519-8878; 13141 City Station Dr., 696-0289; 10261 River Marsh Dr., 997-1335; 11700 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 19, 831-3466; 1919 Wells Rd., 579-2362; 9515 Crosshill Blvd., Ste. 113, 777-8688; 1956 Third St. S., Jax Beach, 853-2135; 1779 U.S. 1 S., St. Augustine, 495-0785, petsmart.com.


NEWS OF THE WEIRD

DALE RATERMANN’s Folio Weekly Crossword presented by

Serving Excellence Since 1928 Member American Gem Society

San Marco 2044 San Marco Blvd. 398-9741

Ponte Vedra

THE SHOPPES OF PONTE VEDRA

330 A1A North 280-1202

Avondale 3617 St. Johns Ave. Voted Best Jeweler in FW’s 388-5406 Best of Jax readers’ poll!

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PEOPLE DIFFERENT FROM US Researchers at London’s St. Mary’s Hospital were stumped. How had 10 British men contracted the rare virus human T-cell leukemia virus type 1? The men weren’t intravenous drug users and hadn’t had transfusions; none displayed any symptoms, but doctors identified the virus through bloodwork. Dr. Divya Dhasmana, co-author of a study published March 13 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, was tipped off to the infections’ source when she saw scars on one man’s back: The men participate in blood-shedding religious rituals, such as cutting or whipping themselves. The rituals the men reported include striking the forehead with a knife, then passing the knife to others; or striking the back with a chain of blades. Dr. Dhasmana told the Associated Press one infected man told her the blades were soaked in a bucket of antiseptic solution between uses, but it didn’t prevent the virus’ spread. “Our message is not ‘Don’t do it,’ ” said Dr. Dhasmana. “Our message is, ‘If you do it, don’t share equipment.’ ”

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INSULT TO INJURY The last thing Ohio defense attorney Aaron Brockler remembers after hearing the judge pronounce a 47-year sentence for his client, David Chislton, 42, was a “swoosh” sound. That was the sound of Chislton’s fist speeding through the air toward Brockler’s face. On Feb. 19, Chislton had pleaded guilty in Cuyahoga County to domestic abuse, aggravated arson, felonious assault and cruelty to a companion animal, and Common Pleas Court Judge Nancy Margaret Russo handed down his sentence as he stood handcuffed next to his lawyer. But before Brockler could tell him that he would try to get the sentence reduced, Chislton had knocked him to the floor. “All I remember is waking up on the floor underneath the table,” Brockler told WKYC TV. Brockler suffered a concussion and a broken nose. Chislton faces additional charges.

45 Like many Corazon Cinema films 47 Get to the point? 48 iCompany 49 Way off 50 ____ mater 51 One with willgotten gains 53 Santa’s time 54 Add staff 55 Sonar image 56 Make of your father’s car, perhaps 58 Florida driver’s license datum 60 Baseball Grounds dugout boss, briefly

EVERY DAY’S A HOLIDAY You don’t need to be celebrating a birthday to get a special cake these days. In Nashville, bakers at Signature Desserts made the news in early March when they filled an order for a woman trying to sweeten the deal for her husband, who was undergoing a vasectomy. FOX 17 reported the cake was decorated with lemons and read, “100% Juice, No Seeds. Happy Vasectomy!” The pleased recipient “loved it!” according to his wife. The news outlet also reports that doctors see a big spike in vasectomies during the NCAA basketball tournament, when men have a constant source of entertainment as they heal.

PRECOCIOUS A preschool student at St. Cyprian Children’s Center in Philadelphia came to school on May 14 with something extra in his pocket: a baggie containing 22 purple plastic bags of crack cocaine. Fox29 News reported a teacher’s aide noticed the bulge in the 5-year-old’s pocket and asked him to take the item out. He told her the person who’d handed him the bag asked him to hide it. Philadelphia police are investigating.. UNCLEAR ON THE CONCEPT Jesse Barner-Walton, 39, of Webster, Massachusetts, got a free ride from police after refusing to leave the Cadillac Ranch bar in Southington, Connecticut, on May 5. But as he sat in the back seat, he repeatedly called 911, according to WTIC. Finally the officers pulled over to make him stop, but he became uncooperative when officers tried to put handcuffs on. BarnerWalton was charged with misuse of the 911 system and interfering with an officer. AWESOME! Cinema’s Freddy Krueger has nothing on a winged resident of the Cascavel city zoo in Brazil. The Amazonian parrot started his life at the zoo about four years ago, after being shot in the upper beak during a raid at a drug den, which disfigured his face and earned him the name Freddy Krueger, reported The Guardian. In April, Freddy survived being bitten on the leg by a (nonvenomous) snake, which resulted in profuse bleeding. Just days later, armed thieves broke into the zoo and stole Freddy, along with another parrot and a cylinder of gas. But true to Freddy form, the parrot made his way back to the zoo, where veterinarian Ilair Dettoni speculated that Freddy’s deformities may have made him less desirable to the thieves. “I don’t know if Freddy is really unlucky or really lucky,” he said. The other parrot and the gas cylinder have not been located. FASHION VICTIM Jarred Randal Womack, 37, agreed to exchange pants with another man in Boulder, Colorado, on Jan. 22, but after the trade, he decided he didn’t like the other man’s pants after all, so Womack stabbed the man in the back. Detectives investigating the incident later found the pants in question soiled with feces, which “could be the reason for the altercation,” according to the police affidavit. The Daily Camera reported that Womack was eventually charged with firstdegree attempted murder, two counts of firstdegree assault and robbery; the stabbing victim sustained life-threatening injuries. weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

SOLUTION TO 8.7.19 PUZZLE R E W I N D

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M B A R A B I S S L E L T O O E N H Y A E N P O D J U M A T I D E V E R

I S N T I D O A B S O R B

B S A P T I H E D L I S D E T O M E W E N N R S I E T C O O D N I O N

A T T A C H O U T L O N E

L A W Y E R

I G N R P I I S T S A F I N E N E M R K W A I O P S I O H N O R I N R R A E T M S S E

S T Y B R O S N O G G I N

AUGUST 14-20, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 23


FOLIO: I SAW U

FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

NASA, TIMBUKTU, HYACINTH, MORAY EELS & TARZAN

Tired of Tinder? Getting bored with Grindr?

Come home to the original matchmaking app: I Saw U. Visit folioweekly.com/isawu to submit a sighting for print or to respond to one of these fine I Saw U suitors. It’s fun, safe and confidential. If you really want to C N B seen, join us at one of our weekly #FindYourFolio Happy Hours. Visit folioweekly.com/happyhour for more information.

Rules ’n’ Regs

Each entry must have your (real) full name, email address and phone number. Don’t worry, none of that stuff is printed. The real fun starts with a FIVE-WORD HEADLINE. Make it short, snappy and accurate so the apple of your eye will recall you and/or the event. Then, describe them, yourself and other folks if applicable, and what happened or didn’t happen, so they recognize a magical moment. Make it interesting! Tell when and where the ‘sighting’ was and BAM! True love (or a reasonable facsimile) is within your grasp!

CURLY-HAIRED GODDESS, CROSS TATTOO Me: After work, in shirt, cerulean blue tie, getting wine. You walk by: amazing dark hair, ink on your back revealed by short top. Our eyes caught for a moment. Did it happen; are you real? When: Aug. 13. Where: Trader Joe’s. #1735-0814 REGRETTING PUSHING YOU AWAY! Hot mom of son, came with friends on boat. I’m dad to a teen girl. Had awesome time. Please forgive me. It must mean you’re a good one! Please let me make it up to you. When: July 22. Where: The Palms. #1734-0814 HARLEY QUINN & THE JOKER You: Stunning woman; sexy hair falls over right eye, amazing laugh; you smiled at me (day 2), I was in love for the last time. Me: A guy who’ll love you better than anyone. Where: Work. When: Aug. 1. #1733-0807 YOU & BELLA Me: Short curly hair, brown eyes, mischievous dog in tow. You: Hanging with your dog and friends. You saved my seat. Would love to sit next to you again. Where: Brewhound, Neptune Beach. When: July 20. #1732-0807 COME LANDSCAPE MY LAWN You looked better than your work truck; maybe FCLC a lawn company? Me: dark pink top, light pink jeans, long brown hair. Parked green jeep beside you. I passed, you smiled, I smiled. Meet for a drink? Where: St. Johns Town Center Target parking. When: June 26. #1731-0703 WAITRESS ZEUS PIZZA Zeus Pizza San Marco waitress, April 21. Where: Zeus Pizza San Marco. When: April 21. #1730-0529 CUTE CHICA @ COFFEE PLACE You: Beautiful, getting coffee w/friend near lunch, verticalstriped pants, white top, short blonde hair. Locked eyes for a second; I got goosebumps. Me: In booth w/friend, red shirt, grey shorts, 24 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | AUGUST 14-20, 2019

short black hair. BE AT SRFS MAY 19, 1 P.M. When: May 10. Where: Southern Roots Filling Station. #1729-0515 SHOPPING 4 LOVE You: Handsome bearded man, in tie, with gallon water bottles. I’ve seen you shop on Fridays after work. Me: Blonde woman, sundress/leggings, purposely going down the same aisles you do. I’m shy, so please say something! When: April 12 & 26. Where: WalmartMarket @ San Pablo. #1728-0515 A GIRL NEEDS CHECKING OUT Bearded, dressed professionally, confident walk that damn near made me gasp. You in holds area, me in red summer dress. You glanced at me; checked out before I could speak. Check me out? When: May 1. Where: Pablo Creek Library. #1727-0508 GYM BODY Over months saw you lose many pounds. Buzz-cut male, weeping angel tattoos on back of legs. Saw you sneaking glances when I did glute exercise. Be a gentleman first and take me to lunch after gym? When: April 20. Where: Bailey’s Gym, Loretto & San Jose. #1726-0501 TONY PACKO’S FAN Pumping gas and my T-shirt amused you. You asked about it and we talked briefly. Would like to talk more. When: April 8. Where: Fleming Island Daily’s/Shell Gas. #1725-0501 ATTRACTIVE CHURCH WOMAN Your group sat in front of me. You: Attractive, long hair, glasses, beverage. We locked eyes near sermon’s end. I’ll sit in same area next few Thursdays. I go to 5:22 Sunday services, too. Coffee sometime? When: March 21. Where: Church of Eleven22, San Pablo. #1726-0417 BE MY ENDGAME? MCU CAPTURE You: Buttery bowtie alpha stud manager. Me: Thanos purple high-tops, interested in your gauntlet. Rewind time, never stop, soul search reality, use this space, see where power takes us? More if interested. When: April 3. Where: Regal Avenues 20. #1724-0410

ARIES (March 21-April 19): How did sound technicians create the signature roar of the monster Godzilla? They slathered pine-tar resin on a leather glove and stroked it against the strings of a double bass. How about Tarzan’s famous howl? Sonic artists blended a hyena’s screech played backwards, a dog’s growl, a soprano singer’s fluttered intonation slowed down, and an actor’s yell. Karen O, lead singer of the band Yeah Yeah Yeahs, periodically unleashes very long screams that may make the hair stand up on the back of her listeners’ necks. In keeping with astrological omens, experiment with creating your own yowl, laugh or whisper in the weeks ahead: a unique sound to boost your wild confidence and give you full access to a primal lust for life. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “If your dreams do not scare you, they are not big enough,” said Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, ex-president of Liberia. In harmony with astrological imperatives, make that your watchword for the foreseeable future. You’re due to upgrade long-term goals. You have the courage and vision needed to dare yourself to an even more fulfilling destiny than you’ve been willing or ready to imagine.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): How did our ancestors figure out that a calendula flower can be a healing medicine for irritated, inflamed skin? It must’ve been a long process of trial and error. Or did the plant somehow “communicate” to indigenous herbalists, telling of its use? This curative herb is only one of hundreds of plants folks somehow came to know had healing properties. “Miraculous” is not too strong a word to describe such discoveries. According to my astrological omen-analysis, you have the patience and perspicacity to engage in a similar process: find useful resources through experiment and close observation–with an assist from your intuition. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Today, Timbuktu in Mali is poor and in the throes of desertification. But from the 14th-17th centuries, it was a great cultural center. Its libraries filled up with thousands of influential books, which remained intact until recently. In 2012, Al-Qaeda jihadists planned to destroy the vast trove–one man foiled them. Abba al-Hadi, an illiterate guard who had worked at one of the libraries, smuggled many of the books out in empty rice sacks. By the time the jihadists started burning, most of the treasure had been relocated. I don’t think problems in your sphere are as dire as these, but I hope you’ll be proactive in saving and preserving valuable resources before they’re at risk of being diluted, compromised or neglected. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Moray eels have two sets of jaws. The front set does the chewing, the second set, usually just behind the first, can be launched forward to snag prey. In invoking this aggressive strategy to serve as a metaphor in the next few weeks, be dynamic and enterprising as you go after what you want and need. Don’t be rude and invasive, of course, but consider being audacious and zealous. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s fairly rare, but now and then people receive money or gifts from donors they don’t know. Relatives they’ve never met may bequeath diamond tiaras, alpaca farms or cash. I suspect you’ll get blessings or help from unexpected sources. To ensure the best possible versions of these acts of grace, be generous in the kindness and attention you offer. Remember this Biblical verse: “Do not forget to show hospitality to strangers, for by so doing some people have shown hospitality to angels without knowing it.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libraborn Ronald McNair was an African American who grew up in a racist town in South Carolina in the 1950s. He rebelled. When he was nine years old, he refused to leave a segregated library, which prompted authorities to summon the police. Years later, McNair earned a PhD in physics from MIT and became renowned for his research on laser physics. Eventually, NASA chose him to be an astronaut from a pool of 10,000 candidates. That South Carolina library? It’s now named for him. You’ll soon receive vindication: a reward, blessing or consecration will reconfigure your past. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio author Zadie Smith wrote, “In the end, your past is not my past and your truth is not my truth and your solution–is not my solution.” It’s fine if you soon speak those words to a person you care about. In saying such a message, don’t be angry or dismissive. Establish good boundaries between you and your ally; you’ll be acknowledging that the two of you are different people with different approaches to life. That will ultimately make you closer. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Nothing fruitful ever comes when plants are forced to flower in the wrong season,” wrote author and activist Bette Lord. That’s not entirely true. For example, skilled, meticulous gardeners can compel tulip and hyacinth bulbs to flower before they would naturally. But as a metaphor, Lord’s insight is largely accurate. You’d be wise to keep it in mind in the weeks ahead. Don’t try to make people and processes ripen before they’re ready. A caveat: You might have modest success making them a bit more ready. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “For though we often need to be restored to the small, concrete, limited, and certain, we as often need to be reminded of the large, vague, unlimited, unknown.” Poet A.R. Ammons formulated that shiny burst of wisdom, and I’m passing it on to you. You tend to have more skill at and a greater inclination toward the small, concrete, limited and certain. That’s why it’s rejuvenating for you to periodically exult in and explore what’s large, vague, unlimited, unknown. Now is one of those times. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Look into my eyes. Kiss me, and you will see how important I am.” Poet Sylvia Plath wrote that and now, in line with astrological omens, I authorize you to say something similar to anyone interested in you who’d benefit from gazing more deeply into your soul and entering into a more profound relationship with your mysteries. In other words, you have cosmic permission to be more forthcoming in showing your beauty and value.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In his Anti-Memoirs, author André Malraux quotes a tough-minded priest who served in the French Resistance during World War II. He spent his adult life hearing his parishioners’ confessions. “The fundamental fact is that there’s no such thing as a grown-up person,” the priest declared. Even if that’s mostly true, my sense is that it’s less true about you right now than it’s ever been. In the past months, you’ve been doing good work to be more of a fully realized version of you. The maturation process is reaching a culmination. Don’t underestimate success! Celebrate it! Rob Brezsny freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com


FOLIO WEED

NEW YORK IS (RIGHT) NOW

ANDREW CUOMO MOVES THE EMPIRE STATE FORWARD

IT’S BEEN A BIG, BOOMING YEAR FOR CANNABIS culture, politically and economically, with widespread advances being made on all fronts. Without question, however, the biggest news yet was made during the last week of July, when Andrew Cuomo, Democratic governor of the Great Empire State of New York, signed legislation into law that, for all practical purposes, effectively decriminalized marijuana. Cuomo, whose father Mario was an icon of their party’s politics for decades, carved his own little niche in history by taking that action, which will have an immediate positive effect on the Big Apple, and beyond. His is the 15th state to decriminalize cannabis; 11 more have fully legalized it. Under the new law, persons caught in possession of an ounce or less of cannabis will be subject to a $50 fine, but will not be faced with the threat of arrest. If caught an amount between one ounce and two ounces, that fine jumps up to $200; the same applies to anyone caught smoking in public. The new law will also effectively nullify prior misdemeanor possession convictions. The FBI says that more than 360,000 New Yorkers were arrested on possession charges between 2008 and 2017, so this measure will easily save millions in man-hours and lawenforcement resources, to say nothing of the boost to that state’s business climate. It remains to be seen if this is a just a step toward full legalization, which

has historically been the case—and that proposal has already received Mr. Cuomo’s approval, though he doesn’t have quite enough votes in the legislature—not yet, anyway. The Democratic majority is split over regulatory nuance, but it will probably take it up again next year. Cuomo himself received the gospel of legalization only in his third term as governor, so it’s possible he could convert sufficient numbers of his peers before that term ends in 2023. He will certainly try—all indications are that he’ll be running for president in 2024. If Trump is re-elected next year, then Cuomo will be competing for an open seat, against a stacked field of Democrats who, for the most part, washed out in the current cycle. We’ve already watched those in this year’s field flailing about, trying to outflank their peers on the weed issue. Joe Biden, in particular, has been flailing around like an earthworm in a tornado. Cannabis continues to be a marquee issue these days, and with legalization being worth an estimated $2 to $4 billion for New Yorkers, we surely have not heard the last word on this from Cuomo. Heck, we’ve barely heard the first. The man likes to talk, and sometimes people listen. Shelton Hull mail@folioweekly.com Subscribe to the Folio Weed Newsletter at folioweekly.com/newsletters

AUGUST 14-20, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 25


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FOLIO VOICES: BACKPAGE

MAKE JACKSONVILLE GREAT ALREADY! CULTURE IS KEY TO CITY’S SUCCESS IF YOU ARE LIKE MANY FOLKS WHO LIVE here, you love Jacksonville and you wish that the city would grow the hell up. We see glimpses of greatness— then we veer off course, our hopes are crushed, and we wonder why we keep ending up in the swamp. There is greatness in us, here in Jacksonville. This city has a vibrant history of music and art. The trouble is, we don’t know it. And neither does anybody else. Jacksonville boasts beautiful beaches, abundant land, scenic waterways, mild winters and an affordable cost of living. Our city should soar, yet it continually falters, weighed down with debt, corruption, stupidity and an almost intentional lack of vision. The destruction of The Jacksonville Landing and the proposed sale of community-owned JEA are two of the most recent—and depressing—chapters in a lengthy history of missed opportunities. LACK OF IDENTITY Jacksonville is a city that looks itself in the mirror and doesn’t know what it sees. Perhaps worse, it doesn’t know what it wants to see. Is this a redneck backwater that happens to have a professional football team, or is it a city on the rise? Do we use our claim to fame as the largest city in the United States (in terms of geographic footprint) to continue to build urban sprawl devoid of character, or shall we embrace the vibrancy within and grow in meaningful ways? Jacksonville is a mix of rural and

urban, a riot of race and ideology, often in close proximity. This is a city of industry, innovation, beauty and creativity, but we are not marketing or monetizing our potential. SYNERGY At dinner with some friends, someone said, “The answer to every question about what’s wrong with Jacksonville is simple: It’s the good ol’ boys.” The good ol’ boys are understandably concerned about staying in power and making money. They resist change because change threatens their positions. But what if the powers that be could see how much more money they could make by embracing change? What if they capitalized on culture? That’s the ticket, because then everybody wins. Culture transforms an ordinary city into a great one, and Jacksonville is leaving money and potential on the table. The only way Jacksonville becomes a great city is if the power brokers become allies and advocates for the arts, if only because they will make more profit. And there is a lot of profit in culture. Ask Austin, Savannah, Nashville and Miami. Art Basel generates a half-billion dollars every year for Miami. For perspective, the wonderful Players Championship brings $151 million to the region. (It’s in St. Johns County, so for Duval, less.) A Super Bowl can bring as much as $50 million to a city, though there are reports that Jacksonville actually lost $12 million hosting its Super Bowl. We can make money with culture, folks.

SHINE A LIGHT There is a certain energy that lives here, a slumbering source of vast untapped power. If you really want to sense this potential, go to Little Talbot Island on a Friday morning; feel the sun on your face and the sand crunch beneath your toes. Marvel at the clear water, then drive down A1A. Take in the wide ocean vistas, spot the silhouettes of Navy ships on the horizon, across the St. Johns River in Mayport. Minutes later, you’ll see the growing Port of Jacksonville, then the city skyline as you hurtle into Downtown. Take a stroll through Riverside in the afternoon. Start out at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, then visit CoRK Arts District and Yellow House. Attend an open story night at Bab’s Lab and listen to live music at Rain Dogs in Five Points. You’ll meet artists, musicians and storytellers. You’ll feel the energy in your soul. Finish the night with a cocktail at Black Sheep’s rooftop bar. Listen to the music spilling out into the streets. Watch the city lights twinkle in the distance. The singing feeling in your chest will bring tears to your eyes. Yes, Jacksonville is a football town, a beach town, the River City, but we should be much more. The arrival of the Jaguars was a wonderful leap forward, but our story is far from finished. Sean T. Smith mail@folioweekly.com ________________________________ Smith, the author of four published novels, is a solar energy consultant.

FOLIO WEEKLY welcomes Backpage submissions. They should be 1,200 words or fewer and on a topic of local interest and/or concern. Send your submissions to mail@folioweekly.com. Opinions expressed on the Backpage are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Folio Weekly. AUGUST 14-20, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 27


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Devil's Advocate  

Devil's Advocate