Page 1


2 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018


THIS WEEK // 5.16.18-5.22.18 // VOL. 32 ISSUE 7 COVER STORY

SELL OFF

[12]

Jacksonville and MOCAJax to auction a multimillion-dollar JOAN MITCHELL painting STORY BY GEORGIO VALENTINO

FEATURED FE EATURED ARTICLES

SEVEN STAGES OF DUVAL BY CLAIRE GOFORTH A transplant becomes a LOCAL

[4]

BUTTWHOOPIN’

BY A.G. GANCARSKI Why Jax City Council went to bat for SPANKING

[8]

REAL TALK ABOUT TARIFFS [39] BY DR. JOHN N. O’BRIEN An open letter to FLORIDA’S CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION

COLUMNS + CALENDARS FROM THE EDITOR MAIL/B&B OUR PICKS FIGHTIN’ WORDS NEWS AAND NOTES NEWS BITES NEWS

4 5 6 8 9 10 11

MUSIC FILM ARTS LISTING ARTS LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR DINING BITE-SIZED

15 16 17 18 25 28 30

PINT-SIZED CHEFFED UP PET PARENTING CROSSWORD/ASTROLOGY WEIRD/I SAW U CLASSIFIEDS BACKPAGE/M.D.M.J.

31 32 34 36 37 38 39

GET SOCIAL visit us online at

FOLIOWEEKLY.COM PUBLISHER • Sam Taylor sam@folioweekly.com / 904.860.2465 ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER • T. Farrar Martin fmartin@folioweekly.com / ext. 112

EDITORIAL

EDITOR • Claire Goforth claire@folioweekly.com / ext. 115 SENIOR EDITOR • Marlene Dryden mdryden@folioweekly.com / ext. 131 A&E EDITOR • Madeleine Peck Wagner madeleine@folioweekly.com / ext. 128 CARTOONIST • Tom Tomorrow CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Rob Brezsny, John E. Citrone, Josue Cruz, Julie Delegal, Susan Cooper Eastman, Marvin Edwards, A.G. Gancarski, Dan Hudak, Shelton Hull, MaryAnn Johanson, Mary Maguire, Keith Marks, Pat McLeod, Nick McGregor, Jake Gerken, Kara Pound, Dale Ratermann, Nikki Sanders, Matthew B. Shaw, Chuck Shepherd, Brentley Stead, Chef Bill Thompson, Marc Wisdom VIDEOGRAPHERS • Doug Lewis, Ron Perry EVENTS DIRECTOR • James Harper entertainmentandproductions@gmail.com / ext. 155

DESIGN

ART DIRECTOR • Madison Gross madison@folioweekly.com / ext. 145

BUSINESS & ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS MANAGER • Lorraine Cover fpiadmin@folioweekly.com / ext. 119

DISTRIBUTION

Bobby Pendexter cosmicdistributions@gmail.com / ext. 150

ADVERTISING

PUBLISHER Sam Taylor sam@folioweekly.com / (904) 860-2465 MULTIMEDIA ACCOUNT MANAGERS CJ Allen cjallen946@gmail.com / ext. 140 Kathrin Lancelle klancelle@folioweekly.com / ext. 124 Pat Ladd pat@folioweekly.com / ext. 151 Heidi Pace heidi@folioweekly.com / ext. 130 Lisa Philhower lisa@folioweekly.com / ext. 147 FOLIO WEEKLY MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY THROUGHOUT NORTHEAST FLORIDA AND CAMDEN COUNTY, GEORGIA. It contains opinions of contributing writers that are not necessarily the opinion of this publication. Folio Weekly Magazine welcomes editorial and photographic contributions. Calendar information must be received two weeks in advance of event date. Copyright © Folio Publishing, Inc. 2018. All rights reserved. Advertising rates and information are available on request. An advertiser purchases right of publication only. One free issue copy per person. Additional copies and back issues are $1 each at the office or $4 by U.S. mail, based on availability. First Class mail subscriptions are $48 for 13 weeks, $96 for 26 weeks and $189 for 52 weeks. Please recycle Folio Weekly. Folio Weekly Magazine is printed on 100% recycled paper using soy-based inks. Application to mail at Periodicals Postage Prices is Pending at Jacksonville, FL. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Folio Weekly at 45 W Bay Street, #103, Jacksonville, FL 32202-3632

thefolioweekly

@folioweekly

@folioweekly

For the best in Live Music, Arts, Sports, Food and Nightlife, download our DOJAX Mobile App by texting “Folio” to 77948

45 West Bay Street Suite 103 Jacksonville, Florida 32202 PHONE 904.260.9770 FAX 904.260.9773 MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 3


FROM THE EDITOR

SEVEN STAGES

OVER A COUPLE PINTS THE other night, my good friend Sally Parker quipped that becoming a Duvallian is like falling in love with a friend. You start as strangers, gradually get acquainted until one day you realize that you can’t imagine life without them—warts, The Landing and all. Here are excerpts from Sally’s diary describing her seven stages of Duval. Stage 1. Holy mother of God. It is HOT. Not hot like a Fourth of July barbecue, hot like the engine of a Ford Mustang when the radiator breaks in the middle of a drag race across the Valley of Fire. And so wet you can hardly breathe. My hair hasn’t been dry in so long, I wouldn’t be surprised if my scalp started growing mold. But things sure are green here, so green that it feels like a hallucination. ‘Kodachrome’ don’t do it justice. After a few weeks, I broke down and asked someone where the hell the city is. All I see is strip malls, palm trees and sand. Don’t look like no city to me. Plenty of traffic, though. Where is everyone going? Stage 2. The high finally got below 90, so we celebrated by going to a football game. Mis-take. Not only was it at least 115 degrees in the stadium, them Jaguars fans kept yelling ‘Duval’ for some reason I can’t quite figure. Maybe they were too hot to yell ‘Jacksonville.’ On the bright side, my team won—though to be honest, the home team gave them about as much competition as a middle school powder puff squad. Nothing against the powder puff squad. Afterwards, we went Downtown for a few, since we were so close. It was like Children of the Corn with skyscrapers. We drove around and around, then parked and walked for an hour, but couldn’t figure out where everyone was, so we just went home. This is the weirdest city I’ve ever been to. Where are all the people? Stage 3. Good news: I’ve conquered my fear of bridges. Somebody said that we had to get boiled peanuts from a man on Heckscher, and I’ve never been shy about eating, so off we went. We didn’t realize until it was too late that we were gonna have to cross that Dames Point Bridge. You wanna talk about a whiteknuckle grip; shoot, I ’bout wet myself driving over that sum bitch. Speed limit’s 60, but I barely cracked 25 mph. We made it to the other side, praise be.

I can’t lie, I was feeling a little skeptical that peanuts could be worth all the trouble, but after six or seven of the Cajun kind, I understood what all the fuss was about. Next thing I know, the bag was empty and I had to drive back across that bridge. This time, I just hit the gas and let ’er rip. Even snuck a peek around at the top—ocean to the left, city to the right and river below. I might could get used to this. Stage 4. Today I learned that it gets cold in Florida. Whodda thunk it? Had to dig through the closet to get my wool sweater, socks and shoes. Even called one of my friends up north to tell them the news; they were in the middle of a blizzard, so were less than impressed. Bundled up (kind of) for lunch under one of them warmers on a patio overlooking the water; had to admit—this sure beats shoveling snow. For the first time since moving here, I felt like Jax could be home. Stage 5. Summer’s in full swing and I don’t mind one bit. There’s A/C every 100 yards or so, anyway. Plus, everywhere you go there’s water to cool off in. At first, we’d just go the pier all the time, but now I know there’s a beach, riverbed or creek for every mood. And I’ve even got used to the sprawl; I swear, you can get anywhere in this town in 20 minutes. Stage 6. Now, I’ll admit, I wasn’t sure about the Jumbo Shrimp. What kinda name is that, right? Well, after few rounds of Mayport shrimp at Singleton’s or one of them fish camps, you’ll get it. I sure do. Somebody told us to go to Downtown Art Walk: We found the people! Music, art, dancers, culture—it was a hoot and a holler. I’m pleased to report that the Jaguars are scrappy this season! I ordered a Myles Jack jersey—that kid’s gonna be a star, you wait. Stage 7. We invited everyone to Florida for the holidays. We’re gonna watch football, eat oysters, chocolate popcorn, boiled peanuts (my favorite) and barbecue and wash it all down with local brews. Best gift of all, the Jags made the playoffs! Duuuuuvaalll! Much love for all y’all.

OF DUVAL A TRANSPLANT becomes a LOCAL

4 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22 2018

Claire Goforth claire@folioweekly.com @clairenjax


THE MAIL THE OTHER SIDE OF ART REPUBLIC RE.: “Tangled,” by Madeleine Peck Wagner, April 25 I WAS EXTREMELY UPSET BY YOUR REPORTING ON Art Republic and Jessica Santiago. What you failed to mention was all the good, the international attention and beauty that AR and Jessica has [sic] brought to Jacksonville. It wasn’t that long ago that Art Basel was just a vision and now an international event with positive economic impact to Miami. The same could happen for Jacksonville. You failed to note the magnificent murals around Jacksonville and the fact that many art lovers travel here to see these works of art. You failed to mention the positive economic impact that [the murals] and AR have on Jacksonville. It’s also interesting that your article portrays Jessica in an extremely negative light by commenting on where she stays and [what she] does with the obvious intention to discredit her. What you should be doing is supporting AR for the all good it does, not on the disagreement on payments between Krista Kim and Jessica Santiago. I worked with both women. I found Jessica to be honest and supportive of art and the artists of Jacksonville. I found her a pleasure to work with and extremely dedicated to the art community and art. You also failed to mention the Artist Development Program and all the positive commencements about the work Jessica has done and continues to do for artist [sic]. This article helps no one. It is best [for] a disagreement to be played out in court, not your magazine. Jacksonville is getting attention in the art community; articles like your one-sided and apparently biased do not help anyone. If AR fails it will [be] a loss for Jacksonville, artist[s] and the art community.

Ron Episocopo via email

GRANNY’S GOT A BUZZ RE.: “High and Rising,” by Shelton Hull, May 9 THE ARTICLE SHOWS HOW MUCH MONEY WILL BE extorted from the people of Florida by the new drug cartels in the state. The economically inept Florida legislature looks for more revenue; the growers/ retailers of marijuana ride this new economic wave and the medical profession that gave up its soul when it became a business. These three groups could all

be curtailed if not eliminated from this extortion by a simple herb planted in Granny’s garden.

M.H. Hammond via email

OVERSET

DOWN WITH TESTS & SPORTS, UP WITH BOOKS RE.: “Where’s the Outrage?” by Chris Guerrieri, May 2 SPORTS SHOULD BE PROVIDED BY THE COMMUNITY associations. Unfunded mandates should be done away with. The majority of state testing should go away. Parents should be required to volunteer. There are many ways to filter money back to actual education.

Lisa A. McGlothlin Dasher via Facebook

A QUESTION OF PRIORITIES RE.: “Where’s the Outrage?” by Chris Guerrieri, May 2 HOW ABOUT PUTTING MORE MONEY INTO SCHOOLS? I know, wild idea. But it just might work.

Kayla Laffin via Facebook

TOP 8(ISH) REASONS TO DISTRUST ZUCK IT IS HARD TO BELIEVE THAT MARK ZUCKERBERG would be stupid enough to entrust any personal information of consequence to his alleged Facebook page, knowing full well that his personal information would be doled out for a sufficient gain. It’s not hard to believe that 87 million users, less one, would be foolish enough to entrust their privacy to an ethically challenged company attempting to cover its primary and ravenous profit motives with a veil of social service. And it’s even more foolish to think that a Republican-dominated Congress would elect to serve the privacy interest of consumers by imposing financial penalties, enacting adequate regulations to protect their privacy of consumers, or connecting the dots to Cambridge Analytic and its ties to Kremlinlinked Lukoil, which showed interest in how the company “could tailor messaging to American voters.” Why take remunerative action against a potentially major source of campaign “contributions” and muchneeded assistance in the face of a Democratic rout in the mid-term elections?

Ted Mikalsen via email

LEND YOUR VOICE If you’d like to respond to something you read in the pages of Folio Weekly, please send an email (with your name, address, and phone number for verification purposes only) to mail@folioweekly.com, visit us at folioweekly.com or follow us on Twitter or Facebook (@folioweekly) and join the conversation.

BRICKBATS + BOUQUETS BOUQUETS TO CATHEDRAL ARTS PROJECT According to a release, CAP was recently approved to receive a $100,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The grant is earmarked for administering and publishing a survey, analysis and report of arts education in the region. CAP advocacy arm, Any Given Child Jacksonville, will execute the project. BRICKBATS TO MANATEE MURDERERS OK, murderer might be a tad too strong a word, but with 318 deaths as of May 13, 18 of which are local, WJXT reports that the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission is predicting a four-year high of manatee deaths, it’s hard to think of a better one. The primary culprits: boaters. So obey no-wake zones and slow down in shallows! FWC also suggests wearing polarized glasses when you’re on the water. BOUQUETS TO DELORES BARR WEAVER FUND The charitable works of the philanthropic organization in recent months include a $100,000 matching challenge for new donors to the Betty Griffin Center, an emergency shelter for abused women and children, and a $60,000 matching gift (the largest donation in the organization’s history) to Her Song Jacksonville, a local nonprofit serving female human trafficking survivors. DO YOU KNOW SOMEONE WHO DESERVES A BOUQUET? HOW ABOUT A BRICKBAT? Send submissions to mail@folioweekly.com; 50 word maximum, concerning a person, place, or topic of local interest. MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 5


ROLLER DISCOS & OLYMPIANS XANADU

Inspired by the 1947 Rita Hayworth film, Down to Earth, Xanadu is the tale of Clio, one of the lovely and precocious Greek muses. She puts on roller skates, leg-warmers and an Australian accent (à la Olivia Newton John) to help Sonny Malone, a chalk artist with half a brain and a heart of gold. The 1980 film didn’t get rave reviews, but the 2007 Broadway musical did! It opens 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 17, and runs through May 26 at Amelia Musical Playhouse, 1955 Island Walkway, Fernandina Beach, $15-$20, ameliamusicalplayhouse.com.

OUR PICKS

THU

17 REASONS TO LEAVE THE HOUSE THIS WEEK

Image provided courtesy of Black Magic Live

HE RAN INTO MY KNIFE

RETURN OF THE BLACK HIPSTER BLACK MAGIC 2 LIVE ART MUSEUM

Tiffney Funches, Chelsey Pough, Ashley Dickerson, Mia Davis and Ceterija Barney present and curate the event that weaves together culture and community. The artists won’t reveal their work until the event, so expect surprises! Music by DJ Beast Mode; special features include Rex-D, Unprinted, Kiation, Aset and Tia Ray; 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at Wonderland Jax, 700 Union St., Unit 2-1, Springfield, $10-$15, eventbrite.com.

CHICAGO Set in Prohibition-era Chicago, the smash hit is based on a 1926 play of the same name by reporter Maurine Dallas Watkins, who wrote of actual criminals and crimes. It’s murder most foul accompanied by high kicks and high jinks! It opens 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 17 and runs through May 20 at the T-U Center, 300 Water St., Downtown, $43-$99, fscjartistseries.org.

SAT

19 TUE

22

ART SAVES LIVES

A CONVERSATION An informal discussion about art in the juvenile justice system with Tony Rodrigues, Cathedral Arts Project art educator, winner of Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville’s 2018 Art Educator of the Year Award, and Laura Lambert of the State Attorney’s office, about how art can impact young lives. 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 22 at Main Library, 303 N. Laura St., Downtown, free, jaxpubliclibrary.org.

THU

17 Pictured: A collaboration between two students, U.J. & A.W. Roy und Zah, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 36”x 48”. FRI

18

STEEL HORSES

RIDING INTO HISTORY This vintage motorcycle Concours d’Elegance has a focus on charity, K9s For Warriors. Events include Adamec Harley-Davidson charity ride, dinner with Grand Marshals Bill Werner and Scott Parker, a Grand Marshal Historic Vintage Lunch Grand Tour: ride your vintage bike through historic Florida back roads and the Concours itself. It all starts 9 a.m. Friday, May 18 and runs through Sunday, May 20 at World Golf Village, St. Augustine; $15 to view the bikes; other events require registration and separate fee; ridingintohistory.org.

6 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018


MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 7


FOLIO VOICES : FIGHTIN’ WORDS Why Jax City Council went to bat for SPANKING

BUTTWHOOPIN’

8 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018

MICHEL FOUCAULT’S DISCIPLINE AND PUNISH WAS AN examination of how French prisons developed and, in turn, how the governing aesthetic of the prison bled down into cultural institutions. The administration of implicit violence and explicit subjugation bled down into culture itself, essentially. And this is something we see in our own society, with schools becoming more indistinguishable from minimum security prisons with each passing news cycle. The only debate now is how much to pay the jamokes holding guns over the kids, even as their academic skills languish behind kids in first-world and now second-world countries with each passing year. Violence and the ability to control it are the ultimate means of control. Both physical violence and ideological violence, such as falling in line with whatever the acceptable modalities are at a given time. Society is predicated on the assumption that there is always improvement to be made on this front; in reality, there are always demonized groups, and taboo modes of expression. Mob rule predominates everywhere. Even, perhaps especially, on the Jacksonville City Council, which spent the last month shredding a seemingly harmless, symbolic bill, in what was a ritualized defenestration of the most vulnerable member of that august legislative body: Garrett Dennis. Dennis filed a “Hit-Free Zone” bill simple in its intent: People shouldn’t hit each other on city property. This includes parents or guardians tanning the hides of their young charges in public parks or buildings, like those majestic halls in which the best and brightest in local government ministrate. Oh, my, the reaction. Bills that legislators want to kill are often described as “loved to death.” By the time Dennis’ bill went through two rounds of committee hearings to refine it and two separate council hearings, it had been loved so much, it had a substance abuse issue, sported pustules from six communicable diseases and owed three people at City Hall support payments. It’s finally lost that loving feeling. It’s dead for a year at least. You should’ve heard the discussion. Worries about the encroaching maw of big guvmint surfaced. And about using support staff as a delta force to block spankings before they happen. About risk management and legal liability. And on and on. The measure was merely symbolic; every time a committee got ahold of it, a tooth was yanked, until by the final iteration, the resolution was just flapping gums and bloody

drool. No matter! Killed with a 9-9 vote, under the watchful eyes of Mayor Lenny Curry’s chief lieutenants. The things that stood out weren’t the good ol’ boys chopping up Dennis’ latest broken dream. They were the defenses and apologias in hearing after hearing for spanking itself. Councilmen (all men) lauded the palliative powers of an asswhoopin’. It makes you a better person, teaches the difference between right and wrong, and so on. In that discussion, Dennis even said he might have paddled once or twice. Implicit to this discussion: Reasonable people theoretically know the difference between a good ol’ asswhoopin’ and physical abuse. That’s not necessarily so. In homes where one or more parties are inclined to physical violence and not especially stable, spanking is part of a larger toolkit of physical and psychological abuse. This is a reality for lots of kids in this story, born in what euphemistically are called “oneparent homes,” where the maternal figure very often is negotiating relationships with unstable people who become quasi-parental as they start to throw in on bills. Too often, violence becomes one of those “look what you made me do” scenarios … familiar in the abusive dynamics that predominate when lives become ad hoc choices and “choose your own adventure” contingency plans. What comes of that? Obviously, the people on council turned out fine. But what of the kids who don’t power through? What dynamics are learned when discipline becomes a matter of who can hit who the hardest? I know what happened to me. Decades of struggle. Always the behavioral problem, the squandering of the potential flashed on standardized tests. I kept getting shunted into more dumbed-down classes, the penalty box for not having that support system that would make me a sure bet to succeed. And soon enough, I shut down to where I lived in my own head and couldn’t focus at all. How much of that was born of the violence and uncertainty of my day-to-day? That question seems moot at this point. But physical violence and power imbalances engender questions we can’t answer. Dennis’ bill was dead as soon as he sponsored it. But it got to an issue: We are governed by, and apologists for, violence. Why?

A.G. Gancarski mail@folioweekly.com @aggancarski


NEWS AAND NOTES: FILED UNDER MATTERS OF THE HEART TOP HEADLINES FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF ALTERNATIVE NEWSMEDIA

ONE HART

>

Conjoined human twins are rare, but conjoined whitetail deer that survive fully to term might be even rarer (scientists can’t fully explain the event). And in the case of a Freeburg, Minnesota discovery, even more heartbreaking: Found by a mushroom hunter, the perfect, tiny, two-headed female fauns never drew breath (stillborn), but there were signs the mother had groomed them. For the curious, the conjoined fawns will soon be on display at the Department of Natural Resources headquarters in St. Paul, reports the Twin Cities’ City Pages. For the deeply curious, a study co-authored by University of Georgia researcher Gino D’Angelo, the DNR’s Louis Cornicelli, and the University of Minnesota’s Christina Clarkson and Arno Wuenschmann is available at bioone.org/ doi/10.1674/0003-0031-179.2.299.

< CHANGE IS WHERE THE HEART IS

“Real change takes work,” said gay rights activist Cleve Jones over breakfast with a writer from the Coachella Valley Independent. Jones is being honored May 18 for a lifetime of fighting for gay rights, with the Harvey B. Milk Leadership Award of the Coachella Valley. Among his achievements, he came up with the idea for the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt (today the memorial weighs in at about 54 tons). These days, Jones is still fighting for change, “Getting people to take the time to focus on political issues and organize is always a challenge.” And though he does think things have gotten better, “I remember when it was illegal for us to dance. Young people have no clue that this is how we lived.” In the CVI article, Jones further discussed the challenges of getting folks together. “As an organizer for LGBT equality—and currently as a labor organizer for hospitality workers’ union UNITE HERE—Jones said it has never been easy to organize people. ‘People have their lives. Most of us lead very complicated and busy lives. [...] I think when people realize we are really under attack, we do respond. I think we’re facing so many different issues that it’s hard to get people to focus— especially when you look at the occupant of the White House.’” Asked if there is hope for change in the “near future,” he replied, “I hope so.”

< MEMORIES OF THE HEART

Modeled after MoMA’s “Meet me at MoMA” program, the Wisconsin Historical Museum hosts a monthly program, Spark, designed for older adults with memory loss and their care partners. Program and special events coordinator Katie Shapiro explained, “We’re not asking people ‘do you remember?’ We’re just trying to start a conversation.” The programming includes music, objects as cues, and looking at art to access feelings, which can spark memories, reports the Isthmus, Madison, Wisconsin’s alternative weekly newsmagazine. “Music is very powerful,” noted Shapiro, about that component of the program. “Rhythm stays with people for a long time.” Angela Johnson, who coordinates Spark! for the Madison Children’s Museum, trained at the MoMA program prior to the Madison launch in October 2010. Johnson said, “It’s sort of best practices for being kind, for being able to engage people and to focus on living in the moment.”

< HARD-HEARTED

The Missoula Independent reports, “Montanans can expect to see yet another push this fall to lift Endangered Species Act protections for grizzlies in the state.” It’s an attempt to delist the bears from the Endangered species list (Removal of the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem Population of Grizzly Bears) that conservationists (and common sense) suggest will allow for the magnificent bears to become just another trophy head on a wall. Andrea Santarsiere, a senior attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity, said, “Grizzlies still occupy less than 5 percent of their historic range and live in five isolated populations in just four states. The Fish & Wildlife Service’s piecemeal approach to recovery is disheartening and runs afoul of the purpose of the Endangered Species Act.” GRRRRoss.

MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 9


NEWS BITESTOP HEADLINES FROM NE FLORIDA & SE GEORGIA NEWSMEDIA MODERN CITIES & WJCT In a piece published by Modern Cities and WJCT, the former’s Ennis Davis writes that the Moncrief neighborhood will at long last lose its food desert status. A grocery store is in the beginning phases of development for the southeast corner of Moncrief Road and Myrtle Avenue. Davis further reports that the Northwest Jacksonville Community Development Corporation (CDC) is developing the property. CDC is also trucking along on the North Point Center Phase II, which Davis says is intended to “economically anchor the District of Soul ….” He writes that the plans underscore problems with local government’s efforts to promote and preserve black history, however, by subjecting these areas to outdated, urban sprawl-based land-use and zoning policies “that largely ignore the uniqueness of Jacksonville’s older unprotected neighborhoods.” He says such isn’t a problem in Riverside and Springfield, which benefit from influence in City Hall. Davis concludes, “In spite of the site design challenges, the 23,800-square-foot project will include a 16,783-square-foot grocery store, eliminating the area’s status as a food desert.”

FIRST COAST NEWS Dangerous rip currents and holiday crowds combined in two deadly incidents on Mother’s Day. Multiple news outlets reported that 18-year-old Jaylen Lott died after being pulled from the waters of St. Augustine Beach. Lott, First Coast News reports, a senior and football player at Lowndes High School in Valdosta, Georgia, went missing while swimming with friends. St. Johns County Fire Rescue found him some time after 5 p.m. on May 13 and transported him to Flagler Hospital, in critical condition. A spokesperson for the school district informed media on Monday morning that Lott had died. Tragedy struck two families in a single incident at St. Simons Island on Sunday, when a woman and toddler struggled to return to shore, multiple outlets report. Good Samaritans rushed to help; one went under and did not resurface. Thirty-four-year-old Aleisha Rankin, the Jesup resident who was pulled from the sea with the child, later died at Southeast Georgia Health SystemBrunswick Campus; the child was reportedly in stable condition. Sadly, a coalition of rescue workers searched throughout the night before eventually locating Gregory Grant, 39, a Brunswick resident who had dived in to help Rankin and the child, in the early morning hours of May 14. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

CLAY TODAY Retired pastor William Henry Randall, 73, was arrested by Clay County Sheriff ’s Office on May 4 for sexual battery on a child between the ages of 12 and 18. Clay Today reports that the alleged victim told police that the sexual encounters began over a decade ago, when she provided cleaning and lawn services at St. Simon Baptist Church, where he was then the pastor, and continued until 2015, when she reported him for “molesting and raping her since 2007.” Randall reportedly denied the allegations in an October 2015 interview with authorities; he was subsequently questioned in September 2017. CT states that Randall has been released on bond.

TRIBUNE & GEORGIAN A federal grand jury has indicted the seven members of the Kings Bay Plowshares accused of breaking into Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay in early April. According to Tribune & Georgian, the anti-nuke activists are locally charged with felonious interference with government property and possession of tools for the commission of a crime, as well as misdemeanor criminal trespass, for allegedly breaking into the base, spray-painting buildings and lettering, removing lettering from a sign and hammering on a display. They also reportedly brought along baby bottles containing their own blood. The seven (whom authorities note did not threaten people or risk weaponry), part of the larger Plowshares movement, a peaceful group that protests by breaking into nuclear weaponry sites, have been held without bond since their April 5 arrest. The federal indictment, T&G reports, charges the seven, whose ages range from 55 to 78, with conspiracy, destruction of property on a naval installation, depredation of government property and trespassing. In a May 4 statement, the Plowshares expressed its confidence that they would be acquitted of all charges, T&G adds, and attorney William Quigley, a Loyola University law professor, said that they “acted in accordance with the 1996 declaration of the International Court of Justice that any threat or use of nuclear weapons is illegal.” 10 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018


FOLIO C COMMUNITY OMMU MMUN NITY ITY : NEWS IT NE EWS WS

READ ALL ABOUT IT— IF YOU CAN FIND IT

Fernandina RESTRICTION ON NEWS BOXES raises constitutional red flag THE NEWS, BY SOME STANDARDS, IS AN UGLY BUSINESS. In Fernandina Beach, where the historic city center fosters turn-of-the-last-century styling through strict development codes, city leaders determined that news racks and boxes, made of several varieties of metals and brightly colored plastic, upset genteel design sensibilities and purged more than half the boxes from local streets. Starting this month, newspapers, real estate guides, auto traders and alternative publications, including Folio Weekly, will be more difficult to find. The City Commission approved an ordinance at its March 20 meeting that sets standards for news racks on color (green), styles (with or without a coin box), and locations (designated sites along or near Centre Street from the waterfront to Seventh Street) and limits the number of boxes to 36. Earlier this month, maintenance workers removed 31 of approximately 60 news racks in the historic district that did not comply with the new design criteria and took them to the city maintenance yard, where they await recycling. Two were Folio Weekly boxes. “This is absolutely an aesthetics issue,” said Arlene Filkoff, who directs Fernandina’s Main Street program, an ongoing effort to clear the clutter and polish the downtown retail and restaurant district. The nonprofit organization’s design council, which includes a couple of city planners, determined the new standards. According to Filkoff, removing the motley assortment of print publication display boxes frees sidewalk space for pedestrians, signage, benches and flowers. “If we have space to put something decorative or functional signage, we will need to use it that way,” she wrote in an email Monday. “Otherwise, we want to open up for walking as much as possible.” Plans to remove news racks and set uniform standards have been in various stages of discussion for more than a decade. Over the years, City Hall has received a steady stream of complaints about overflow, litter and neglected racks covered with rust or grime. The boxes often served as garbage receptacles or were vandalized, never to be fixed. Under the new rules, the racks must be maintained or owners will face fines and possible removal of their street-side display box. The ordinance requires publications to pay for their own racks and secure a $15 permit. The annual fee is waived this year. Commissioner Len Kreger said he’s glad the “trashy” boxes were removed and said by phone Tuesday that “they’ve needed to go for a long time.” The ordinance calls the “proliferation” of news racks “a visual impairment for pedestrians and drivers” and claims—in an eight-point list citing the purpose, intent and criteria—that restrictions on placement, type and appearance will “promote the public health, safety and welfare” within the Centre Street area and

historic district. Maintaining and preserving freedom of the press is No. 4 on the list. “You can put anything you want in them,” City Attorney Tammi Bach said. “I’m real serious about the First Amendment. I don’t want people to be censored.” Still, not all printed material is welcome. “Nothing obscene,” she said by phone Tuesday. “Let’s be reasonable.” The National Newspaper Association in Springfield, Illinois, maintains that reasonable regulations are allowed under the law. “It’s like putting limits on a parade,” said Tonda Rush, the association’s legal counsel. “You’re allowed to march but the permit is not going to let you have the parade at midnight when people are sleeping,” she said. “That’s reasonable.” Rush insists that local governments cannot restrict content. “Absolutely not,” she said. “Publications have the right to free speech.” Rush says limiting access to publications, such as capping the number of news racks, does impinge on First Amendment rights. “If there is information in the news that the public needs to see and they can’t find a paper, then that becomes a problem,” she said by phone from her office in Falls Church, Virginia. Rush also questions the city’s plan to have publications buy replacement news racks. “Smaller publications with limited budgets might not have the money to buy a news rack. Is that a way to limit speech? The issue has been raised before,” she says. Rush asks about the local response, which is best described as apathetic. Attorney Bach says the publisher of the community’s only local newspaper was satisfied with the current ordinance, though Foy Molloy of the Fernandina Beach News Leader, which publishes on Wednesday and Friday, pushed back hard years ago during the city’s first efforts to restrict news racks. While newspapers struggle with paid circulation, advertising revenue and newsroom employment, Fernandina residents are reading the local newspaper. In a citizens’ survey conducted last summer, almost 60 percent of residents told researchers that they get their news from the newspaper. Mike Lednovich, a golf travel writer and former journalist for the Miami Herald, Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel and California’s Orange County Register, who recently filed to run for a seat on the Fernandina Beach City Commission in the November election, wrote in a text message that he had concerns about the ordinance. “If you’re referring to common colors for the racks, that’s fine in keeping with the historic theme,” he wrote. “But limiting the number of racks infringes on a free press and the people’s right to access information and opinions.”

Mary Maguire mail@folioweekly.com MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 11


Jacksonville andand Jacksonville Jacksonville and MOCAJax to auction MOCAJax to auction MOCAJax to au aamultimillion-dollar multimillion-dollar a multimillion-d JOAN MITCHELL JOAN MITCHELL JOAN MITCHEL painting painting painting

SELLOFF OFF SELL SELL OFF

JoanJoan Mitchell, Iva, 1973. Oil1973. on canvas, canvas, 110-1/2-inches Images LTD. 2018. ESTATE JOAN MITCHELL Joan Mitchell, Iva, 1973. Oil1973. on canvas, 110-1/2-inches x 238 inches. of Jacksonville. Jacksonville. Christie’s Images LTD. © 2018. © OF ESTATE OF2018. JOAN MITCHEL Joan Mitchell, Iva, Oil on 110-1/2-inches x 238 inches.City City Christie’s Mitchell, Iva, Oil on canvas, 110-1/2-inches x 238 inches. City of Jacksonville. Christie’s Images LTD. © ESTAT

O O O

involved or perhaps or perhaps because because ofor theperhaps clear of the benefit clear benefi Mousa’s Mousa’s proposal proposal was a big and n March 21, the nMarch March Mayor’s 21,the the Chief Mayor’s Administrative Chief Administrative involved Mousa’s proposal was a bigdeal dealwas andaitbig deal and n 21, the Mayor’s Chief Administrative involved because o Mousa’s proposal it n March 21, Mayor’s Chief Administrative toto a local a local artsarts community community in need. inStill, need. it may Still, it may would require require some some legislative legislative maneuvering. maneuvering. Officer Sam Mousa Officer Sam filed Mousa a white filed paper white paper require some Officer Sam Mousa filed aa white paper to a local arts community in n would require some legislative maneuvering. Officer Sam Mousa filed a white paperwouldwould prove a harmful precedent precedent the coming in theprecedent coming years. years Iva had Ivato had beto to formally behad formally totothe city of to the prove outlining his outlining plan tohis his sellplan plan a city-owned toto sell city-owned a harmful Iva had be formally the city of outlining his to sell aa city-owned prove ainharmful in t Iva toreturned bereturned formally returned city of outlining plan sell a city-owned Jacksonville Jacksonville from from the Museum of Contemporary painting atpainting auction. paintingat at It auction. wasn’t just It wasn’t any just any In any case, some of what was enacted in case, some of what was enacted in of what Jacksonville from the Museum of Contemporary painting auction. It wasn’t just any In any Jacksonville from the Museum of Contemporary at auction. It wasn’t just any In any case, some Art Jacksonville Art Jacksonville (MOCAJax), where it has been painting, however, painting, and however, it wasn’t and it just wasn’t just the resulting Ordinance 2018-193-E had been Ordinance 2018-193-E had been Art Jacksonville (MOCAJax), where it has been painting, however, and it wasn’t just the resulting Art Jacksonville (MOCAJax), where it has been painting, however, and it wasn’t just the resulting Ordinance 2018housed housed sincesince since 2006. 2006. Itsince would It would then then be declared declared any auction. anyauction. auction. foreseen when thegave citythe gave the painting to th foreseen when the city painting tocity gave housed 2006. any auction. housed 2006. Itbe would then be declared any foreseen when the “surplus “surplus to the toCity’s the City’s City’s needs” and authorized for The work, The titled Thework, work, Iva,titled titled is a Iva, Iva, isis aa MOCAJax in 2006. Iva had been city property had been city property in 2006. Iva “surplus to the needs” and authorized for MOCAJax “surplus to the City’s needs” and authorized for The work, titled Iva, is a MOCAJax in 2006. Iva had be auction at Christie’s. at Christie’s. Christie’s. The transaction wouldbe be gigantic oil-on-canvas giganticoil-on-canvas oil-on-canvas triptych,triptych, triptych, auction since 1997, when was donated by Prudentia when it wasitdonated by Prudential at transaction gigantic since 1997, at The Christie’s. Thewould transaction would be gigantic oil-on-canvas triptych, auction auction since 1997, when it was donat exempt fromfrom from the usual the usual competitive solicitation painted by painted American paintedby byAmerican American abstractabstract abstract exempt Insurance to celebrate the opening to celebrate the opening of the of the exempt the competitive solicitation Insurance exempt from the usual competitive solicitation painted by American abstract Insurance to celebrate the ope provisions provisions governing governing thethe disposition dispositionof of public public expressionist expressionist Joan Mitchell Joan Mitchell Mitchell Times-Union Center the Performing Arts Times-Union Center for thefor Performing Arts. provisions governing expressionist Joan provisions governing the disposition of public expressionist Joan Mitchell Times-Union Center for the P property because, because, ironically, Christie’s doesn’t in 1973. Itsin in estimated 1973.Its Itsestimated estimated value is value value isis property MOCAJax received the on work on the condition received the work the condition property because, ironically, Christie’s doesn’t 1973. MOCAJax property because, ironically, Christie’s doesn’t in 1973. Its estimated value is MOCAJax received the work bid forbid bid government for government government surplus. surplus. Finally, Finally,to tomeet meet between $3between between and $5 $3 million. and $5 $5 million. million. that it would be exhibited publicly. (The that it would would be publicly. (The for surplus. Finally, to meet and it be exhibited exhibited (The bid for government surplus. Finally, tothat meet between$3$3 and $5 million. that it publicly. would be exhibited pub the British British auction auction house’s house’s April April999marketing marketing The auction The isauction auction Christie’s is Christie’s Christie’s May May May the British museum currently possesses and is displaying museum currently possesses and is displaying the auction house’s April marketing The is museum currently possesses and is displaying the British auction house’s April 9 marketing The auction is Christie’s May museum currently possesses a deadline, Mousa Mousa advised advised emergency emergencypassage passage of of of sale, a smorgasbord sale,aasmorgasbord smorgasbord of exclusive of exclusive exclusive deadline, another Mitchell, Chord III, a 77-inch by another Mitchell, Chord III, 77-inch by Mousa advised emergency passage sale, of another Mitchell, Chord III, aaMitchell, 77-inch byChord Mousa advised emergency passage of sale, a smorgasbord of exclusive deadline,deadline, another III, a all necessary necessary legislation. legislation. fine art from fine the art20th fromcentury— the 20th 20th century— century— all necessary 44-inch painting from 1986.) 44-inch painting from 1986.) all legislation. fine art from the 44-inch painting from 1986.) all necessary legislation. fine art from the 20th century— 44-inch painting from 1986.) partnership This partnership partnership with with a private—and private—and including the including legendary thelegendary legendary Collection Collection of of This This The problem with that condition The onlyonly problem with that condition was with aa private—and including the Collection of condition waswithwas This partnership with a private—andThe only problem with including the legendary Collection of Thethat only problem tha ultimately ultimately unaccountable—international unaccountable—international Peggy and David Peggyand Rockefeller. andDavid DavidRockefeller. Rockefeller. The onceThe onceonceof piece. the piece. At roughly 10 feet tall thethe sizesize of the At roughly 10 feet tall ultimately unaccountable—international Peggy The the size of the piece. At roughly 10 feet tall ultimately unaccountable—international Peggy and David Rockefeller. The oncethe size of the piece. At rough middleman is unusual is unusual unusual butbut but there therehas hasbeen been no no no in-a-lifetimein-a-lifetime in-a-lifetime New York event New York is anticipated event isis anticipated anticipatedmiddleman and nearly 20 wide, feet wide, Iva be could be mounted and nearly 20 feet Iva mounted is there has been event and nearly Iva could could mounted middleman is unusual but there has been no 20 feet wide, in-a-lifetime New NewYork York event is anticipatedmiddleman and nearly 20befeet wide, Iva co outcry, perhaps perhaps because because of of of the thehigh highstakes stakes to be the biggest tobe beart theauction biggestart art inauction auction U.S. history. in U.S. U.S. history. history. outcry, only in the museum’s atrium, and that space only in the the museum’s atrium, and that space outcry, perhaps because the high stakes to the biggest in only in museum’s atrium, and that space outcry, perhaps because of the high stakes to be the biggest art auction in U.S. history. only in the museum’s atrium,

story by GEORGIO GEORGIO VALENTINO story by GEORGIO VALENTINO story by VALENTINO story by GEORGIO VALENTINO

12 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018


was already slated to be occupied by MOCA’s Project Atrium program for emerging artists. Iva was packed up in 2007. It hasn’t been seen in public since. In some ways, then, last month’s hand-back was long overdue. The proceeds from the auction are to be divvied up between MOCAJax and the city. The legislation stipulates: “Fifty percent (50%) of the auction sales proceeds shall be used to make a one-time gift to MOCAJax for the establishment of an endowment fund to be deposited into the UNF Foundation for MOCAJax to acquire, manage and maintain MOCAJax’s art collection; and fifty percent (50%) of the auction sales proceeds shall be deposited in a separate activity under the Art in Public Places Trust Fund, of which only the annual interest earnings shall be used to maintain the City’s public art.” “In adherence to best practices adopted by museums throughout the world, funds collected from the sale of artwork must be reinvested into the collection,” said city public information officer Tia R. Ford. “Chief Administrative Officer Sam Mousa, following discussions with Mayor [Lenny] Curry, recommended this reinvestment opportunity to help bolster and strengthen our City’s art and culture services and offerings. As cuts to arts and culture make headlines at state and federal levels, the City of Jacksonville has a unique opportunity to demonstrate its commitment to investing in and sustaining art and cultural assets through the sale of this work. It also highlights Jacksonville internationally as a city that is actively serving its community through art and culture.” The sale came as something as a surprise to the Cultural Council. “To be honest,” said Executive Director Tony Allegretti, “Iva wasn’t even a blip on our radar until this year and that’s only because of the city’s decision to sell it.” The Cultural Council may not have seen it coming, but the agency is nevertheless appreciative of the golden opportunity. “We’re a beneficiary should it sell but we weren’t part of the process,” Allegretti said. “We could really use the funds. We have a large collection that needs maintenance and there’s not a lot of capacity in our current account. To make things worse, just this past year we’ve been nailed with some maintenance and conservation emergencies, including Hurricane Irma.” A recent conservation and maintenance

appraisal identified 24 works as Priority No. 1 or No. 2, needing attention either urgently or in the near future. The estimated combined cost of that attention is more than $400,000. The current available funds are around $100,000. In a move to address the shortfall, Allegretti worked with the Mayor’s Office last year to allocate a greater percentage of capital investment to maintenance. His partner at City Hall was none other than Sam Mousa. Allegretti speculates that last year’s request for more maintenance possibly played a part in Mousa’s decision to sell Iva this year. Whatever its impetus, the sale will be a windfall for Allegretti’s organization. The available maintenance funds are limited to the annual interest on the Cultural Council’s half of the final auction selling price, but it will be a gift that keeps on giving. “We’re happy to receive a continual revenue stream to help us take care of the city’s permanent collection going forward,” said Allegretti. The auction’s other beneficiary played a more direct role in the decision to sell Iva. MOCAJax, a cultural institute of the University of North Florida, has been the painting’s home for more than a decade. Its half of the auction revenue will go directly into an endowment for the acquisition, management and maintenance of the museum’s collection. The museum’s current director, Caitlín Doherty, had been serving for a year and a day when Sam Mousa filed the white paper that turned Iva from artwork to asset. According to her, the decision was mutual. “It was an ongoing conversation between the city and the museum,” Doherty said. “And this kind of conversation doesn’t happen in isolation. Priorities change all the time. The climate was never quite right to bring this to the fore in the past. We needed the opportunity to be right.” It was Doherty and her team at MOCAJax who advised Mousa that Christie’s May sale would give Iva maximum exposure—and maximum return. “Everyone has their role in this process,” the director said. “We were able to contribute knowledge about the importance of this event. This year we have Christie’s selling the Rockefeller Collection, specifically for philanthropic causes. The eyes of the collecting world are on New York. Not only is Iva being sold in its natural habitat, it’s also being sold during a marquee sale week.”

Cutline

“Joan Mitchell’s works are at a high point in terms of value and collectors,” she added. “It’s the perfect storm.” For its part, Christie’s has fully embraced Iva. The painting is the headliner of the May 18 Post-War & Contemporary Art Morning Session and it graces signage, brochures and catalog covers. The esteemed auction house has also made the deal financially interesting for the seller. “The sale of Iva will cost the city of Jacksonville nothing,” Doherty said. “Christie’s has waived all associated costs of transporting, conserving, storing, promoting and selling the work. They have waived the seller’s premium and have agreed instead on an enhanced hammer sale of 104 percent. No commission will be charged to the city as a seller and Jacksonville will further receive 104 percent of the hammer price.” This arrangement indicates the prestige attached to both the piece and its painter. Inspired by and named after her beloved German shepherd, painted just as artist and muse were settling into their new French home Vétheuil in 1973, Iva is an example of Joan Mitchell at her most confident.

J

oan Mitchell was never a starving artist. Her landmark New York debut in the early 1950s was followed by a steady rise in press and profits, both at home and in Paris. By the 1970s, Mitchell was a member of the transatlantic art establishment. Vétheuil, where Iva was painted, was no artist’s humble garret. It was a French country villa sprawled out on the banks of the Seine River. The painting’s three panels present that pastoral life in different phases of abstraction, from soft-focus expressionism to full-on bold and chunky. But it’s just as much a labor of love, shot through with emotion for her companion, as it is an experiment in form. Mitchell ultimately sold Iva in 1986. The artist herself wasn’t in particularly good health by then. She endured two hip replacement procedures and treatment for cancer before rallying her strength and producing one final series of critically acclaimed paintings. She died in 1992. Since then, her works (and legacy) have only gathered steam among collectors and critics alike. A Mitchell on the scale of Iva is a coup for Christie’s, hence the incentives

MOCAJax said it’s selling the work to reinvest in the collection, as the painting is rarely seen due to size constraints. photo by Devon Sarian

MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 13


SELL OFF <<< FROM PREVIOUS thrown Jacksonville’s way. The auction house is promoting the painting with a full-court press. The accompanying literature is lurid, even by salesman standards. “A lush, operatic painting of monumental proportions,” the lot essay begins, “Joan Mitchell’s Iva is a painterly tour-de-force, capturing the fleeting effects of nature in all its temperamental glory.” There follow references to “brooding passages of atmospheric reds, maroons, mauves and warm earth tones” as well as “floating fields of soft lavender and delicate cornflower blue” and “fine rivulets of thinneddown pigment trickling down the canvas, like falling rain on weathered stone.” Christie’s May sale, which kicked off on May 8, has already made headlines around the world. On Day One, international bidders lined up and held their paddles aloft in an effort to take home a piece of the Rockefeller legacy. They spent a record-breaking $646,498,750. The sale of Iva is anticipated to add as much as $5 million into the city’s coffers. It takes place in the wake of a recent controversy over the proposed sale and privatization of Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA). The mayor has since ruled out that project, but it’s clear the administration is exploring its revenue options. Tia Ford says the sale of Iva has been discussed and decided in keeping with all due norms of city government. “The city has maintained transparency and accountability throughout this business transaction process,” she said. “In the past few weeks, the MOCA board, representatives of UNF, Cultural Council members, City Council and other stakeholders have all been briefed and offered public input. This very transparent process offers great accountability and value to the people of Jacksonville.” MOCAJax’s Doherty concurs. “There’s no elephant in the room,” the museum director asserted. “We’ve been full, frank and open. This is a good news story, a great news story for the city of Jacksonville, for the artistic community, for the arts as driver of development Downtown and for the long-term stability of our collection.” There is no reason to believe city or museum officials have acted in anything other than good faith. The proceeds from the auction will indeed benefit the arts in Jacksonville and

MOCAJax Director Caitlín Doherty announced the sale at the April meeting of the Art in Public Places committee. She was enthusiastic about the potential ($5 million) sale, as Christie’s has highly incentivized the artwork.

Executive Director of the Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville Tony Allegretti said, “Iva wasn’t even a blip on our radar until this year and that’s only because of the city’s decision to sell it.” photo by Dennis Ho

everything about the process has largely gone according to established norms. The only exceptions are the city’s strict bidding procedures, which have been waived by request to allow Christie’s to act as proxy. This may turn out to be a significant exception because, as far as the citizens of Jacksonville are concerned, the British auction house is a black box. The art market attracts buyers from around the world. They are driven by different motivations, not always the transcendental beauty of oil on canvas. And many of these buyers remain anonymous—even to Christie’s. So, yes, the money will benefit the local arts community, but we may never know where it came from. When asked if the opacity of the art auction might constitute an end-run—intentional or not—around government oversight, Doherty declined comment and deferred to Sam Mousa and city officials. Ford, who answered our questions in lieu of Mousa, deferred in her turn to the prestige and efficacy of the art market. “International museum experts advise that this is absolutely the most appropriate forum for the sale of an internationally significant artwork like Iva,” she explained. “The market for Post-War and Contemporary Art has never been stronger and Christie’s is a market leader. For Joan Mitchell artwork, specifically, Christie’s holds five of the six highest auction prices for the artist, and has the ability to promote the sale with the power of their global reputation and resources, and therefore reach collectors around the world. The city has also placed a reserve price on the art, thereby guaranteeing a minimum sale price.” As the auctioneer’s hammer falls on the morning of May 18, Jacksonville will be watching. Most of the auction’s early sales have outperformed expectations, so it’s unlikely that the modest reserve price of $2.7 million for Iva won’t be met. The real question is, how high will the bidding climb? And where will the painting go from here? This second question may never be answered. Private collectors are often just that: private. And, with an asking price well beyond the acquisition budget of most public institutions, it’s unlikely the painting will hang in a museum again. “Wherever it goes,” Doherty assured, “ Iva will be a loved artwork.”

Georgio Valentino mail@folioweekly.com

____________________________________ 14 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018

To view or bid, go to Christies.com.


FOLIO A + E

DRAWING

FILM 3-D Films ART Cummer's VSA Festival ART Space 42 & Space Gallery LIVE + LOCAL MUSIC CALENDAR

FARAHD ABDULLAH WALLIZADA’S debut EP stirs Jacksonville nostalgia

FROM

MEMORY

J

acksonville native Farahd Abdullah Wallizada may have written, recorded and released his debut EP Tristan under the nom de guerre No Name Hotel, in Los Angeles. But the pensive four-song EP is directly influenced by his upbringing— including the painful divorce his Afghani parents went through before Farahd decided to move out West. Taking his time developing the gauzy electronic ideas on Tristan, which he self-released on May 4, and taking inspiration from creative geniuses as far-flung as Trent Reznor, Radiohead and Miles Davis, No Name Hotel gives rise to a quaking, prismatic nostalgia. For Wallizada, the material directly references and honors the “lost years” he spent at Riverside’s Memorial Park, escaping the feelings of loneliness and confusion that hounded him as an aimless young adult. Folio Weekly: Tell us more about how Tristan came about. Farahd Abdullah Wallizada: When I first got to Los Angeles in late 2015, that was a big turning point for me. The entire goal coming out here was to break myself out of a funk I’d gotten into in Jacksonville and going to the farthest place I could think of. Up until that point, the problem I kept having creatively was that I would make something and throw it away—it would never match up with the idea I had in my head. I was chasing something I couldn’t seem to catch. I knew that wasn’t going to fly if I was going to make a career out of making music. Coming out here was about trying to figure out what it is I was trying to say. Is this EP the first recording you’ve released? A few years ago, I uploaded an EP to Soundcloud, and even though only two people probably listened to it, I was proud of it. It was a huge step for me, even though it wasn’t quite what I was trying to get at it. But after that, I took a long break from music. By the end of 2016, I was really burned out and needed to do a reboot mentally. I spent a couple months working on an idea for a screenplay—I thought if I tried working on a different

PG. 16 PG. 18 PG. 24 PG. 25

art form, it would free up some sort of mental real estate. What changed for you when you returned to music in 2017? What I was doing before felt very mechanical—I was sticking to tropes that were holding me back. So I changed my approach to writing. I heard about this piece of gear called the OP-1, which Justin Vernon used for the last Bon Iver record. He called it the most revolutionary thing since the electric guitar, so I got one and tried it out. Before, I was staring at a screen, whereas the OP-1 is a tiny sampler device. It has no good sounds on it; everything sounds like shit. You’re trying to make the most of what you’ve got. That bare-bones, lo-fi electronic method spoke to what I’ve been trying to say for a long time. I just couldn’t synthesize it until then. The second thing I made on the OP-1 was the loop that became [Tristan’s lead single “Blood on Sky”]. I played the loop back, and it felt interesting and coherent. That blossomed into this thesis that became the EP.

going through a really bad divorce but still living together in the same house. I would go to Memorial Park every evening to be alone and deal with things emotionally and mentally. Telling that human story is a way to undercut the electronic nature of these songs by giving them an organic, tangible quality. I had tried to be more literal in talking about those memories in the past, but with Tristan, it’s much more impressionistic. The story bleeds into the music through osmosis. I went back to Jacksonville while I was mastering the EP and proofed it while riding my bike at sunset through Memorial Park and my old neighborhood. I was a little bit skeptical whether I could write from memory—was I just working off an illusion? But it felt right. I really captured it. So the EP is out—what’s next for No Name Hotel? This is just the beginning—the real start of No Name Hotel. I haven’t done much touring yet; I want to start work on a followup full-length to cement this chapter of my life. This was the first step that sets the stage for the future. Nick McGregor mail@folioweekly.com

__________________________________

Listen to No Name Hotel’s Tristan EP at Soundcloud.com/NoNameHotel.

And that thesis is directly influenced by conjuring up memories of Jacksonville, right? That’s the goal. Jacksonville is fascinating to me. It’s sub-tropical, but it’s nothing like South Florida—it’s more like a part of Georgia. I live in Downtown LA now, and you really couldn’t get farther away from life in an old-fashioned suburb of Florida. I still don’t quite relate to LA—it still feels foreign. Writing Tristan became a defense mechanism, I discovered this fondness for my hometown that honestly didn’t exist prior to my move to LA. Growing up, all of my friends joked about how much we hated home. But you get somewhere else and start to romanticize where you came from. That brought up all these emotions. Which you do a damn good job expressing, particularly on “Blood on Sky.” On that song, I’m describing an area of Memorial Park in Riverside. That’s the epicenter of my music’s narrative. For two or three years, that was my escape spot. I was living with my parents, who were MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 15


FOLIO A+E : MAGIC LANTERNS

BETWEEN THE BLUE & THE RED 3-D films never truly had a LASTING LEGACY

T

16 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018

hough many films (Avengers: Infinity War is one example) continue to be released in 3-D, most of them are post-converted. For film historians, the actual Golden Age of 3-D was very short-lived, beginning in June 1952 with the release of Bwana Devil and concluding in March 1955 with Revenge of the Creature. Altogether, only 50 English-language feature films were made during this period, some of them major productions by giants in the field—like Alfred Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder, John Wayne’s Hondo and the musical Kiss Me Kate. For a while, spurred by James Cameron’s 2009 hit Avatar, it looked like a 21st-century renaissance for films in “stereoscopic vision” was nigh. Alas, the dream died. Last year, Sony, Samsung and LG all announced they would no longer manufacture 3-D TV sets. The silver lining in the dark cloud for us die-hard fans is that 3-D discs continue to be released for home viewing, not only the latest blockbusters but Golden Age classics. The new restoration by the folks at 3-D Film Archive is The Maze (1953), directed by William Cameron Menzies and starring genre fave Richard Carlson, also seen fighting The Creature from the Black Lagoon in glorious 3-D. The Maze has a bare-bones plot. On the eve of his wedding to Kitty Murray (Veronica Hurst), Gerald MacTeam (Richard Carlson) is suddenly summoned to his ancestral Scottish manor in the Highlands. After weeks of silence and unanswered questions from his doting fiancée, the newly titled Sir Gerald abruptly calls off the wedding. Plucky Kitty, along with her no-nonsense Aunt Edith (Katherine Emery), promptly make an unannounced call at Craven Castle to find out what’s what. Visibly aged, Gerald begrudgingly makes them welcome. Still, the ladies note the furtive glances between their host and his servants, and wonder about the mysterious maze abutting the castle and its nocturnal visitants who prowl by candlelight. The original 3-D trailer is included on the disc (as well as the film in standard 2-D), its solemn-voiced narrator intoning questions: “What fearful secret was hidden from the world for 200 years? Why was every door in Craven Castle locked at night?” Before the climactic reveal, Aunt Edith sees “something horrible … the most horrible thing I have ever seen,” yet she’s unable to give any details. The trailer also includes a plea from star Carlson for those who’ve seen the movie to not reveal the “secret of the Maze” to the uninitiated, “for we feel it is truly amazing!” Yeah, well … not really. In fact, the “monster” here may be one of the most ludicrous in horror film history, rivaling even the ridiculous Tabonga the Walking Tree Stump in 1957’s From Hell It Came. Maze is a visual mini-gem in its own right, though. The real star is its production designer/director, the great William Cameron Menzies. Maze was his first and only 3-D film,

and his last feature film as director. He died in ’57 at the age of 60. Menzies might not be familiar to younger viewers, but he was one of the masters of cinematic art and design. One of his earliest achievements was the stunning visual framework for the 1924 Douglas Fairbanks version of The Thief of Bagdad, followed by the first Academy Awards for Art Direction, for 1927’s The Dove and ’28’s Tempest. In 1940, Menzies received an honorary Oscar “for outstanding achievement in the use of color for the enhancement of dramatic mood in the production of Gone with the Wind.” As a director, Menzies is best remembered for his forays into science-fiction, specifically the 1936 adaptation of H.G. Wells’ Things to Come (’36) and the original Invaders from Mars (’53). Things, scripted by Wells and produced by Alexander Korda, is a highlight of ’30s British films and a brilliant example of sci-fi—as both prophecy and philosophy. As for Invaders, those who saw it in the ’50s may never forget the iconic sand-pool and fencelined dune marking the Martians’ landing site. Tobe Hooper’s 1986 remake, by contrast, was anemic, dull and totally forgettable. Both Menzies films, despite budget limits and today’s FX wizardry, are masterworks of design, revealing the filmmaker’s initiation into film during the Silent Era, when a picture was literally worth 1,000 words. The same is true of Maze. Though budget constraints are obvious, Menzies exhibits his ingenuity with set design and his brilliant use of 3-D, in both depth and range of vision. Fans of ’50s sci-fi and horror should check it out. And 3-D fanatics probably have it in their racks already.

Pat McLeod mail@folioweekly.com

NOW SHOWING MOONLIGHT MOVIE Moana runs 9 p.m. May 25 at SeaWalk Pavilion, Jax Beach; free; 247-6100, jacksonvillebeach.org. Bring something to sit on. Popcorn, candy, beverage vendor onsite. No alcohol, skateboards, bicycles or glass. CORAZON CINEMA & CAFÉ Back to Burgundy and Thoroughbreds screen. Throwback Thursday is 1951’s The Great Caruso, with Mario Lanza, noon May 17. Lean on Pete and Keep the Change start May 18. The SAFF film Train Driver’s Diary runs noon May 19. 36 Granada St., St. Augustine, 697-5736, corazoncinemaandcafe.com. IMAX THEATER Avengers: Infinity War and Pandas 3D screen. Deadpool 2 starts May 17. Solo: A Star Wars Story starts May 25. St. Augustine, 940-4133, worldgolfimax.com. SUN-RAY CINEMA RBG, about Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, screens. Avengers: Infinity War and Grace Jones screen. Deadpool 2 starts May 17. Porco Rosso (dubbed) runs May 20 & 21. Solo: A Star Wars Story starts May 24. Check website. 1028 Park St., 359-0049, sunraycinema.com.


ARTS + EVENTS

TRACIE THORNTON’s show Play Play addresses themes of sustainability. It’s on view at Karpeles Manuscript Museum, Springfield, through June. (Pictured: One of the I Get High series kites, 2018).

PERFORMANCE

XANADU Clio, a lovely, precocious Greek muse, puts on roller skates, leg-warmers and an Australian accent to help Sonny Malone, a chalk artist with half a brain and a heart of gold. Opens 7:30 p.m. May 17; through May 26 at Amelia Musical Playhouse, 1955 Island Walkway, Fernandina Beach, $15$20, ameliamusicalplayhouse.com. BUCKETHEAD Though more guitarist than actor, we list Mr. Head here because of his act’s weirdo factor: He wears a white bucket on his head and incorporates nunchucks, robot dancing and toy trading in his performances. 8 p.m. May 16 at Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 1050 A1A N., $33-$38.50, pvconcerthall.com. CHICAGO Broadway’s razzle-dazzle smash on the First Coast has fame, fortune and all that jazz, show-stopping songs and dancing! Opens 7:30 p.m. May 17; runs through May 20 at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts, 300 Water St., Downtown, $32-$97, fscjartistseries.org. A FOX ON THE FAIRWAY A nod to the ’30s and ’40s English farces, this comedy has mistaken identities, slamming doors and romantic shenanigans, reminiscent of Groucho et al. It runs through June 10 at Alhambra Theatre & Dining, 12000 Beach Blvd., Southside, $38-$59, alhambrajax.com.

CLASSICAL + JAZZ

ALL THAT JAZZ An evening of song, 8 p.m. May 18 & 19; 2 p.m. May 20 at The 5 & Dime, 112 E. Adams St., Downtown, $25, eventbrite.com. AMERICAN LANDSCAPES Led by guest conductor Kazem Abdullah, the Jacksonville Symphony and guest cellist Julian Schwartz perform, 8 p.m. May 18 & 19, 3 p.m. May 20 at T-U Center’s Jacoby Hall, $19-$84, jaxsymphony.com. JOHN LUMPKIN & THE COVENANT He’s shared stages with Delfeayo Marsalis, Marcus Roberts, Arturo Sandoval, Curtis Fuller, Marcus Printup, Houston Person, Rufus Reid, Nathan

Davis and David Baker. Lumpkin performs 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. May 25 at Friday Musicale, 645 Oak St., Riverside, free, fridaymusicale.com. LONGINEU PARSONS LIVE RECORDING Catch a glimpse of history in the making, 11:30 p.m. May 24 at Breezy Jazz Club, 119 W. Adams St., Downtown, $10, breezyjazzclub.com. AFTER DARK JAZZ JAM Hosted by the Kelly/Scott Jazz Quintet, 9 p.m.-mid. May 26 at Breezy Jazz Club, 119 W. Adams St., Downtown, 666-7562, breezyjazzclub.com.

COMEDY

CHAD PRATHER Prather, known for his way with words, is a comedian, armchair philosopher, musician and observational humorist, often called ‘the modern day Will Rogers.’ He brings his Star Spangled Banter Tour 7 p.m. May 18 at Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, $36-$58.50, pvconcerthall.com. ADAM FERRARA The comic, host of History Channel’s Top Gear, nominated for best male standup by American Comedy Awards and had three Comedy Central Specials, is on 8 p.m. May 17 & 18; 7:30 & 10 p.m. May 19 at The Comedy Club of Jacksonville, 11000 Beach Blvd., Southside, 646-4277, $9-$150, jacksonvillecomedy.com. KEVIN SMITH & JASON MEWES Jay and Silent Bob have gotten the gang back together and they’re takin’ the show on the road, 7 & 9 p.m. May 17 at The Comedy Zone, 3103 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, sold out, comedyzone.com. MO AMER He’s a global standup comedian from Houston who’s performed hundreds of shows with Dave Chappelle, including the Radio City Music Hall residency. Rolling Stone says he’s a ‘Comedian You Should Know’. He performs 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. May 18 & 19; 7 p.m. May 20 at The Comedy Zone, $18-$114.50, comedyzone.com. JAMES YON, MIKE LEE They’re on 8:30 p.m. May 19 at Jackie Knight’s Comedy Club, Gypsy Cab Company’s Corner

MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 17


FOLIO A+E : ARTS

DISABLED DOES NOT

The Cummer’s VSA FESTIVAL gives specially abled kids arts exposure

MEAN UNABLE T

Images courtesy of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

18 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018

wo weeks ago, a visually impaired child ran his hands over replicas of famous international statues, a physically impaired child finger-painted and made a collage from his wheelchair, a young boy pressed clay into the shape of a bird with his palm and the one finger he has on each hand, and more than 2,300 specially abled children had similar meaningful experiences leading to thousands of smiles during a fourday period. Having just completed its 23rd year at The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, the VSA Festival (formerly known as ‘Very Special Arts’) is an integral experience during the year for thousands of children, teachers and caretakers. Founded in 1974 by Jean Kennedy Smith, sister of President John F. Kennedy, VSA currently serves seven million people in 52 countries and hundreds of cities around the world, providing arts and educational programming for youth and adults with a range of abilities. “At VSA, our goal is to bring forth the lasting values of community, caring, understanding, tolerance and appreciation,” said Smith during a video on the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts website. “Every day, we demonstrate that ‘disabled’ does not mean ‘unable,’ that artists with disabilities and their work profoundly enrich all of our lives.” In 2011, Smith was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama for her lifetime commitment and legacy of work with VSA. Locally, The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens is home to the Jacksonville VSA affiliate, inviting area students on any spectrum of ability (visual, hearing, autistic, learning or physically limited) to visit the museum for a multiple arts experience and tour the galleries and gardens, making eight scheduled stops over a two-hour time frame, allowing the children to paint, sculpt, create music, sing, dance and build collages. “When the Education Department develops projects for the festival, we always consider the abilities of student participants, ensuring they can be successful,” said Cummer Museum Educator and Accessibility Coordinator Matthew Patterson. “As the festival has grown, we have also made sure to balance the activities by introducing more music and movement experiences and emphasize the idea of ‘process over product’ with all of our volunteers. We want them to know that beyond the painting and drawing and gardens and music, the most important parts of VSA are the interactions that they have with the students. Their enthusiasm and encouragement is what makes the day meaningful.” More than 1,450 volunteers in addition to most of Cummer staff brought this year’s four-day festival alive, creating a 1:1 ratio

between students and volunteers. Drums greeted students, teachers and caregivers as they arrived and met their tour guides, whose colorful headbands signified which group went with which guide through the museum. All volunteers wore shirts with artwork created by students from one of the schools. Jacksonville Dance Theater provided movement education in the garden. Musician Arvid Smith presented Wood and Wire, exposing the kids to several stringed instruments (including a Japanese Shamisen made with a snakeskin). Ajamu Mutima played the Cora, an African stringed instrument, as well as a thumb piano also known as a Kalimba, African drum and flute, and sang a song with the words, “It makes me so happy when I see you smile.” Museum educators and volunteers led collage, weaving, painting and sculpture workshops. “VSA represents the best of this kind of inclusive programming and also gives us a glimpse at the broader outreach of the Cummer’s amazing education department,” said VSA volunteer Pam Ingram. “Since we moved back to this area 12 years ago, we have been increasingly impressed by the community outreach of the Cummer.” For many students involved in VSA, the excursion is the only field trip for the year, and their only opportunity to make art. The majority of their time is spent at home or in isolated classes within their schools. Their participation in VSA is a chance to experience a range of arts and interact with strangers smiling and excited to see them, unlike many of their experiences with strangers in public. For volunteers, some use vacation days year after year to participate, some take their children out of school so they can volunteer,

too, and all are moved by the many stories extolling the impact of the arts and social interaction on the kids, whose lives aren’t as artistically and socially enriched as some. “Most of [the teachers] are overwhelmed to see how many people have come out to support them and their students,” said Patterson. “The festival presents a rare opportunity for the community to recognize the tremendous dedication of these teachers and to show these students that they are valued.” Keith Marks mail@folioweekly.com _____________________________________ For more information about the program, go to cummermuseum.org.


30th Annual Memorial Day RiverFest Monday, May 28 • 10:00AM-9:00PM • Historic Spring Park SORED B ON Y P S

Paid for by Clay County Tourist Development Tax Funds

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ALL DAY

100 Craft & Food Vendors • Fireworks • Contests • Kids’ Zone

MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 19


Live Music 12:15-12:45PM Sondra Hunt 12:45-1:15PM Hal Hill Dance Party 1:15-1:30PM

Steve Amburgey

1:30-1:45PM

Rubber Duck Race in Spring Run

1:45-2:00PM

Steve Amburgey

2:00-2:20PM

Academy of Music & Arts

2:20-2:40PM

Emily O’Neal

2:40-3:00PM

Blue Lotus

3:00-3:20PM

Alexis Smith

3:20-3:40PM

Ashton Taylor Roberts

3:40-4:00PM

Katryna Alexis

4:00-4:30PM

Buck

4:30-4:45PM

Kian Sanchez

4:45-5:00PM

Jaelyn Jackson

5:00-5:20PM

LeeAnn Purvis

5:20-5:40PM

Hallie Davis

5:40-6:00PM

Mac Ganoe

6:00-6:20PM

Abigail Carpenter

6:20-6:40PM

Stephen Hipsher

6:40-7:00PM

Katie Ondrejicka

7:00-8:00PM

Miss Marie’s Kids

8:00-8:30PM

Southern Sass (Kelby Cornman & Cassida Kinsman)

8:30PM

National Anthem Stephen Hipsher

8:45 PM

Zambelli Fireworks Display

20 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018 20 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018


MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 21 APRIL 25-MAY 2, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 21


T

he Annual Memorial Day RiverFest is held on Monday, Memorial Day! There are an average of 100 food and craft vendors, a kids’ zone that includes pony rides, bounce houses & slides, train rides, face painting, and more. There is live entertainment throughout the day and fireworks at night, but the best part of the day is when we honor our veterans for their service to our country! How awesome it is to see men and women, both young and old, come forward to share!

The KIDS ZONE will have WATER SLIDES this year! $8 wristbands will be sold that day!

1:30 PM

10:00 AM

SPRING RUN 4th Annual Rubber Duck Races ($1.00 per ticket • on sale 11am-1pm • City Info Booth)

SPRING PARK GAZEBO Opening Ceremonies & Veterans Tribute Musical Performance by Clay County Community Band Aerial Flyover - “Dreamland Squadron” from Haller Air Park SPRING PARK Arts & Crafts, Food Vendors, Kids’ Activities Tribute to Fallen Soldiers Display

3:00 PM

SPRING PARK GAZEBO 4th Annual Hot Dog Eating Contest Sponsored by “Tasty Dog” (Sign up by 2pm • City Info Booth)

5:30 PM

5:00 PM CITY INFO BOOTH Hula Hoop Contests (All Ages • City Info Booth)

CITY INFO BOOTH 4th Annual Baked Apple Pie Judging (Bring copy of recipe)

8:45 PM

OVER THE ST. JOHNS RIVER Zambelli Fireworks Display

22 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018


ARTS + EVENTS Bar, 828 Anastasia Blvd., St. Augustine, 461-8843, $12, thegypsycomedyclub.com.

CALLS & WORKSHOPS

FLORIDA BIENNIAL Artists living in Florida and working in any media may submit original works. Juror is Sarah Fritchey, curator and gallery director at Artspace, New Haven. Deadline June 1; $50 to apply, artandculturecenter.org. SMOTHERED IN BLUE What does “blue” mean to you? All mediums accepted, no larger than 3’x5’; submit 11 a.m.5 p.m. May 21-30 at TAC Gallery at the Landing, Downtown, tacjacksonville.org. AUDITIONS: THE ADDAMS FAMILY Held 11 a.m.-2 p.m. May 19 at Amelia Community Theatre, 207/209 Cedar St., Fernandina, ameliacommunitytheatre.org.

ART WALKS + MARKETS

DIG LOCAL NETWORK Weekly network hosts farmers’ markets: Beaches Green Market, 2-5 p.m. Sat., Jarboe Park, Florida Boulevard & A1A, Neptune Beach; Midweek Market, 3-6 p.m. Wed., Bull Park, 718 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach; ABC Market, 3-6 p.m. Fri., 1966 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach. ST. AUGUSTINE AMPHITHEATRE FARMERS MARKET Live music, yoga (bring mat, water bottle), flowers, baked goods, art, artisan wares, local produce, 8:30 a.m. every Sat., 1340 A1A S., 209-0367. RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET Local/regional art, produce, snacks, live music–Luke Peacock, Robert Lester Folsom, Sam Pacetti, My Monster Heart–10 a.m. May 19 under Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com. FERNANDINA BEACH MARKET PLACE Farmers, growers, vendors, local goods, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. every Sat., North Seventh Street, Historic District, fernandinabeachmarketplace.com. JACKSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET Open daily dawn to dusk, Beaver Street farmer’s market has an art gallery, food, crafts, etc., at 1810 W. Beaver St., Westside, 354-2821, jaxfarmersmarket.com. BERRY GOOD FARMS MOBILE MARKET Accepts WIC and SNAP, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. every Mon. at Pearl Plaza, 5322 N. Pearl St., Brentwood.

MUSEUMS

AMERICAN BEACH MUSEUM 1600 Julia St., Amelia Island, 510-7036. Artifacts and information about the journey of vision, struggle, joy and triumph of this historic site, and its contemporary inhabitants. CRISP-ELLERT ART MUSEUM 48 Sevilla St., St. Augustine, flagler.edu/crispellert. Selections from the Guidi Collection on view through June 15. CUMMER MUSEUM OF ART & GARDENS 29 Riverside Ave., 356-6857, cummermuseum.org. Ritz Chamber Players perform 2 p.m. May 9. Talks & Tea: a discussion of the Japanese printmaking exhibit, is 1:30 p.m. May 16, $6 nonmembers; free members. Art Adventures: Japanese Printmaking, kids ages 6-12 create woodblock prints May 19, $10 members, $15 nonmembers. Thomas Hart Benton & the Navy, through June 3. Fields of Color: The Art of Japanese Printmaking through Nov. 25. BEACHES MUSEUM & HISTORY PARK 381 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach, 241-5657, beachesmuseum.org. Lana Shuttleworth’s Nature Reconstructed, through June 3. KARPELES MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY MUSEUM 101 W. First St., Springfield, 356-2922. Play Play, new works by Tracie Thornton, display through June. LIGHTNER MUSEUM 75 King St., St. Augustine, 824-2874, lightnermuseum.org. Decorative and fine art and relics of the Victorian era are on display. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART JACKSONVILLE 333 N. Laura St., 366-6911, mocajacksonville.unf.edu. Project Atrium artist is Anila Agha. A Patterned Response is on view, and A Dark Place of Dreams revisits monochromatic assemblages of Louise Nevelson alongside contemporary artists Chakaia Booker, Lauren Fensterstock and Kate Gilmore; through Sept. 9. MOCA book clubs meet to discuss Eric Larson’s The Devil in the White City, 5:30 p.m. May 17, $7, eventbrite.com. MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & HISTORY 1025 Museum Cir., Southbank, 396-6674, themosh.org. Hands-on exhibit NANO shows basics of nanoscience and engineering, through June 17. Jim Smith’s Improbable Sci-Show, through June 28.

GALLERIES

THE ART CENTER COOPERATIVE 2 Independent Dr., The Landing, tacjacksonville.org. Picasso Kids Art Show, through May 18. Jacquelyn Pfaff-Pratt is May’s featured artist. BREW 5 POINTS 1024 Park St. Blakeley Miller exhibits a collection of prints–relief, woodblock, linocut and intaglio etching–and monotype processes; through May. CATHEDRAL ARTS PROJECT 207 N. Laura St., Ste. 300, Downtown, 281-5599. Salamat Datang-Welcome to Malaysia, new works by Dennis Ho, exhibits. An opening reception is 5:30 p.m. May 17. GALLERY 725 725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 5, Atlantic Beach, 345-9320, gallery725.com. Works by Peter Max and Romero Britto exhibit through May 20. Artist reception 6-8 p.m. May 19; 1-3 p.m. May 20, RSVP suggested. HIGH TIDE ART GALLERY 850 Anastasia Blvd., St. Augustine, thehightidegallery.com. New works by Erin Finney, Jami Childers and others exhibit. SOUTHLIGHT GALLERY 1 Independent Dr., Downtown, southlightgallery.com. Collaborative gallery exhibits

and sells works by regional artists. UNF Art & Design Portfolio Projects in Ceramics & Photography is on view; photographer Garry McElwee’s work is featured through May. THE SPACE GALLERY 120 E. Forsyth St., Downtown. Wyatt Parlette, Matthew S. Bennett and Nathan Eckenrode exhibit new works and site-specific installations in Other Places, through May. SPACE 42 2670 Phyllis St., Riverside, spacefortytwo.com. Luisa Posada Bleiers presents new works, through May. ST. AUGUSTINE ART ASSOCIATION 22 Marine St., staaa.org. St. Augustine Plein Air Exhibit: Where Art Meets History is up through May. THE YELLOW HOUSE 577 King St., Riverside, yellowhouseart. org. Voices Unearthed celebrates Élan Literary Magazine, which gives voice to young writers and artists on a journey through origin, influence and self-identity. Curated by Douglas Anderson School students Evelyn Alfonso, Elma Dedic, Lex Hamilton, Ana Shaw, Kathryn Wallis and Lexey Wilson; through May 19.

EVENTS

LaVILLA SCHOOL OF THE ARTS SHOWCASE The best that the school of the arts’ student body has to offer, 7 p.m. May 17 & 18 at LaVilla School of the Arts, 501 N. Davis St., Downtown, $10-$25, 633-6069. KATHY STARK BOOK SIGNING Stark, maker of luminous, detail-filled watercolors, chats about her book, The Wilderness of North Florida’s Parks, 6:30 p.m. May 17 at Mandarin Community Club, 12447 Mandarin Rd., free, 268-0784. MEMOIR WORKSHOP Dr. Milinda Jay Stephenson, FSU Panama City creative writing professor, leads a handson workshop to help turn family stories into better stories (by which we of course mean fiction), 9 a.m.-4 p.m. May 17 at Ponte Vedra Branch Library, 101 Library Blvd., $85, fhbookfest.com. DESTINATION LOCATION: WHY JAX? A panel discussion about why Jax is becoming a chosen destination for new businesses. Panelists are Katharine Deen Way, Lyndsay Rossman Hill, Michelle Calloway, Michael Bone; moderated by Greg Keblish, 6 p.m. May 17 at 1662 Stockton St., Riverside, $15-$25, 904tix.com. WILD AMELIA NATURE FESTIVAL The festival includes the release of a rehabilitated sea turtle to its ocean home, a nature cruise, silent auction fundraiser and family-friendly events, May 18-20, times, event prices and locations vary, wildamelia.org. JOYCE GABIOU The artist presents The Art of Layering with Collage & Mixed Media, demonstrating techniques that have won her recognition, at the May meeting of the Society of Mixed Media Artists, 10 a.m. May 19 at Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra, 50 Executive Way, milonbarbara3@yahoo.com. FASHION PROJECT Local designers and models are paired in a competition/display. The results are on view 6:30 p.m. May 19 at WJCT Studios, 100 Festival Ave., Northbank, $40-$70, 904tix.com. CAMP CONGRESS FOR GIRLS JACKSONVILLE A leadership program introduces girls ages 10-15 to politics. Girl Scouts will receive a Citizen Legacy badge. 8 a.m.5 p.m. May 19 at 4670 Lenoir Ave., Southside, $120-160, eventbrite.com. STUDIO 54 JAX An exclusive night celebrating the glamour of the infamous private parties at Studio 54 nightclub in New York City...just imagine what the night holds. 8 p.m. May 19 at The Florida Theatre, 128 W. Forsyth St., Downtown, $150, floridatheatre.com. DANCIN’ IN THE STREET The 32nd annual celebration of the Beaches community. This year’s event has food trucks, arts & crafts, and 16 musical acts including Wes Cobb, Briteside, Kim Reteguiz & the Blackcat Bones, Gov Club, Japanese Peanut, Little Dolls, Mojo Roux and many more. 11 a.m.9:30 p.m. May 19 at Beaches Town Center, 200 First St., Neptune Beach, beachestowncenter.com. APPLEONE JACKSONVILLE JOB FAIR To fill several dozen permanent positions for an international manufacturing company opening a new plant on the Westside of Jacksonville, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. May 18 at 14601 Whirlwind Ave., Northside, appleone.com. SECRET SUPPER CLUB Manifest Distilling, The Happy Grilled Cheese and Good Dough combine for a delicious, one-of-akind dinner event, 6 p.m. May 22 at Manifest Distilling, 960 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 904tix.com. ART IN THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM: A CONVERSATION An informal discussion with Tony Rodrigues, Cathedral Arts Project art educator, and Laura Lambert, of the State Attorney’s office, about the role of arts in the juvenile justice system. 5:30 p.m. May 22 at Main Library, 303 N. Laura St., Downtown, free, facebook.com.events. MARY ALICE MONROE An active conservationist, the writer uses the power of story to raise awareness about important issues impacting the wild. Her new book, Beach House Reunion, is set during the endangered loggerhead sea turtle’s nesting season. She signs books and mingles at this fundraiser for Authors in Schools literacy program, 5:30 p.m. May 23 at The Boo Loft, 503 Centre St., Fernandina, $50, ameliaislandbookfestival.org. __________________________________________ To list an event, send the time, date, location (street address and city or neighborhood), admission price and contact number to print to Madeleine Peck Wagner; email madeleine@folioweekly.com or mail 45 W. Bay St., Ste. 103, Jacksonville FL 32202. Items run as space is available. Deadline noon Wed. for next Wed. printing.

I KNOW TEXT ISN’T PERFECT YET, WAITING TO SEE SIZE OF IMAGE

MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 23


FOLIO A+E : ARTS

PLAYFUL

UNIVERSE

A

24 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018

rtwork that exemplifies playful humor can live in even the most worn and tired spaces. Buildings stripped of their initial intent emphasize the ideas in the artwork. Space 42 and Space Gallery epitomize this effect, as the artworks inside seemingly come alive of their own volition and that of dynamic energy generated by their occupation of a given arena. Space 42 presents itself as a gallery that appreciates the enmeshment of visual art and technology. Local painter, sculptor and printmaker Luisa Posada Bleier showcases her experimental work there. Her art functions as an unrestrained celebration of disarray and distorted facsimiles. It’s experimental, but not gratuitously so; rather, her work is an exploration into exuberant juxtapositions that clash and push against one another in curious, cantilevered ways. Untitled #17 and Untitled #39, wherein a crate of haphazardly colored sticks of wood seem to erupt from a white wall and picture frame painted off-white, with its surface sagging, reflect on disrupted order and spontaneous shifts in presumed, predestined design. The pieces also wink at Donald Judd, Carl Andre and Sam Gilliam. In a video that played during the exhibition’s opening night, Bleier describes her work as “informal.” That word choice, informal, shaped my experience as I examined it. Funnily enough, many of the formally dressed viewers strolling through Space 42 that night did not match that sense of informality that Bleier’s work and even the building embody. Clashing elements of shape, form, color, texture and light existed in every fabric of Bleier’s solo show. These contrasts, while bizarre and imbalanced, inform the sense of humor encompassed in her paintings, sculptures, prints and installations. Looking out from the Riverside space at the neighboring residential area, glancing at the houses, prompted me to consider how Space 42 is itself an anomaly in an average workingclass, predominantly black community. It was then that I realized that the asymmetry and contrasts exemplified in Bleier’s oeuvre carry over to other concepts and concerns. Instances of experimental play and comedy can lead to profound questions regarding the complexities of life. These observations and explorations into the imbalances of our world are also apparent in the current exhibition at Space Gallery. Other Places is the final exhibition in this incarnation of the gallery and it

Installation by Matthew Bennett . Photo by Francess Grant

TWO ART SHOWS: Luisa Posada Bleier, Space 42 & Other Places, Space Gallery

features the work of Wyatt Parlette, Matthew S. Bennett and Nathan Eckenrode. The three artists, all of whom focused mainly on installation art for this exhibition, utilize the ragged building that houses the gallery as vessel to investigate materials as a means of expression. Parlette’s Place I (The Beginning) #1-3 is a glimpse into the recollections of an imagined childlike scenario limited by a faux treehouse and precarious ladders that lead into a foreboding place of instability. Bennett’s installations are makeshift, temporal pieces that involve shifting lights, mirrors and corrugated plastic sheets formed into domes. Eckenrode’s mixed-media installation grips the front of the gallery and embraces its lack of functionality (evidenced by the small wheel that is motionlessly suspended). Much like those in the exhibit Luisa Posada Bleier, the pieces of Other Places present a world of variance and stark differentiation. Though they share a visual language (e.g., materials, forms, colors, etc.), each work’s differences are so drastic that those equivalences are severely negated. The pieces have a transformative effect on the environment of Space Gallery; the artwork and the room of the gallery present a twilight world where artists Parlette, Bennett and Eckenrode create vestiges of stability from the ruins of chaos. I felt immersed in the realm developed by the installations as I roamed the area. The work welcomed me to carefully observe the intricacies of knotted rope, Mardi Gras beads and one-sided mirrors. It’s evident that the artists were deeply engaged in their work and they transferred that engrossing sentiment into this show. While Luisa Posada Bleier viewed playful experimentation as an external concern, Other Places addressed the absurdity of the experimental as an internal issue. These external and internal negotiations impact the nature of the gallery as a domain that informs and supports the artwork. Aged buildings like Space 42 and Space Gallery can be given purpose through art and that renewed design can create thought-provoking standpoints for the art itself. Frances Grant mail@folioweekly.com _____________________________________ Space 42’s Luisa Posada Bleier and Space Gallery’s Other Places are free and open through June, with varying hours. Before you go, check websites spacefortytwo.com and thespacegalleryjax.com.


Firebrand STEVE EARLE performs with THE DUKES, 8 p.m. May 19 at Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $53.50-$73.50.

LIVE + LOCAL MUSIC CONCERTS THIS WEEK

ODESZA, KASBO, TROYBOI 7 p.m. May 16, Daily’s Place (Dailys), Downtown, 633-2000, dailysplace.com, $40-$69. BUCKETHEAD 7 p.m. May 16, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall (PVCHall), 1050 A1A N., 209-0399, pvconcerthall.com, $33. DEAD EYES ALWAYS DREAMING, TODAY’S LAST TRAGEDY, ALBERT THE CANNIBAL 7 p.m. May 16, Jack Rabbits (JackRabbs), 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, 398-7496, $8. MUSIC BY THE SEA: ADAM & JANINE 7 p.m. May 16, St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org. THE SUPERVILLIANS, COLIN PATERSON, MATT HENDERSON 9 p.m. May 16, Surfer the Bar (Surfer), 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, 372-9756, $10-$15. LOVE MONKEY 9 p.m. May 17, Cheers Park Avenue (Cheers), 1138 Park Ave., Orange Park, 269-4855, $3. RAY CALENDAR, BRIDGE STREET VIBE 6 p.m. May 17, Prohibition Kitchen (ProhibitKitch), 119 St. George St., St. Augustine, 209-5704. GREAT DAMES 8 p.m. My 17, Whiskey Jax (WhiskeyJB), 950 Marsh Landing Pkwy., Jax Beach, 853-5973. COMPLICATED ANIMALS 6:30 p.m. May 17, House Concert; socialitefiascomusic.com/complicatedanimals, free. SAVAGE MASTER, BEWITCHER 8 p.m. May 17, JackRabbs, $12. DYNOHUNTER, UNIVERSAL GREEN, PILOTWAVE, CHARLIE HUSTLE 8 p.m. May 17, 1904 Music Hall (1904MH), 19 N. Ocean St., 1904musichall.com, $10. YOWSAH 8 p.m. May 18, WhiskeyJB. ALBERT SIMPSON 8 p.m. May 18, Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park (SpiritSuwannee), 3076 95th Dr., Live Oak, musicliveshere.com. FRATELLO 8 p.m. May 18, Whiskey Jax (WhiskeyBay), 10915 Baymeadows Rd., 634-7208. BLISTUR 9 p.m. May 18, Cheers, $3. DiCARLO THOMPSON, STACEY BENNETT 6 p.m. May 18, Seachasers Lounge (Seachase), 831 First St. N., Jax Beach, seachaserslounge.com. G. LOVE ACOUSTIC 9 p.m. May 18 & 19, Original Café Eleven (Cafe11), 501 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, theoriginalcafe11.com, $35-$40. PAUL IVEY & SOULS OF JOY 7 p.m. May 18, Hyperion Brewing Co. (Hyperion), 1740 N. Main St., Northside, 518-5131. R-DENT, CONJURE RELEASE SHOW, PSYCHO HILL May 18, Nighthawks (Nighthawks), 2952 Roosevelt Blvd., Riverside. CHAD PRATHER 7 p.m. May 18, PVCHall, $36-$58.50. DIALECTABLE BEATS, NICKFRESH 8 p.m. May 18, 1904MH, $10. THE STEELDRIVERS, SALT & PINE, DAVIS LOOSE, SAILOR JANE & THE SWELL, WARM THE KITCHEN 9 p.m. May 18, ProhibitKitch, sold out. RACHEL McGOYE Album Release Show 8 p.m. May 18, BlueJay Listening Room (BlueJay), 2457B S. Third St., Jax Beach, bluejayjax.com, $15.

J.C. JR 6:30 p.m. May 18, Vito’s Italian Restaurant, 116 Bartram Oaks Walk, Ste. 101, St. Johns. R-DENT, CONJURE, PSYCHO HILL 8 p.m. May 18, Nghthwks, $10. The ELLAMENO BEAT, LITTLE BIRD 9 p.m. May 18, Surfer. JIVE KATZ COLLECTIVE, LUV U 6 p.m. May 19, ProhibitKitch. LUKE PEACOCK, ROBERT LESTER FOLSOM, SAM PACETTI, MY MONSTER HEART 10:30 a.m. May 19, Riverside Arts Market, 715 Riverside Ave., 389-2449. UNCLE JOHN’S BAND 9 p.m. May 19, SpiritSuwannee. PRIDELSS/RIVER CITY SOUND SYSTEM 8 p.m. May 19, JackRabbs, $8. STEVE EARLE & THE DUKES, THE MASTERSONS 8 p.m. May 19, PVCHall, $53.50-$73.50. CHELSEY MICHELLE, HIGHWAY JONES 1 & 6 p.m. May 19, Hyperion. BIG JOHN, BILLY BUCHANAN 6 p.m. May 19, Seachase. KYLE JENNINGS 7 p.m. May 19, BlueJay, $25. ZANDER 9 p.m. May 19, Surfer. THRIFTCRAFT PROM NITE 8 p.m. May 19, Nighthawks. NEW ROCK SOUL 9 p.m. May 20, Surfer. MATISYAHU 9 p.m. May 20, ProhibitKitch, $50-$600. OPERATION HOME FRONT 7 p.m. May 20, 1904MH, $12-$18. THE SUEDES 8 p.m. May 20, BlueJay, $15. ROB STERLING, DOUG & HEATHER 1 & 5 p.m. May 20, Hyperion. TBA BIG BAND 7:30 p.m. May 21, Mudville. AARON LEBOS REALITY, MATT HENDERSON, COLIN PATERSON 8 p.m. May 21, JackRabbs, $8. SAM PACETTI 6 p.m. May 21, ProhibitKitch. LINCOLN DURHAM, THE GHOST WOLVES 8 p.m. May 22, JackRabbs, $10. SHANNON McNALLY 7 p.m. May 22, Mudville, $10. TREVOR BARNES 8 p.m. May 22, Surfer. THE BUNNY, THE BEAR, IT LIES WITHIN 8 p.m. May 23, Nighthawks, $10-$15. COLTON McKENNA 6 p.m. May 23, ProhibitKitch. THE SILVERPALMS, FONTAINE 8 p.m. May 23, 1904MH, $10-$12. WEST BROOK & FRIENDS 8 p.m. May 23, BlueJay. TAD JENNINGS 9 p.m. May 23, Surfer. PIONEERS of ROCK ’N’ SOUL 7 p.m. May 23, Limelight Theatre, 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine, limelight-theatre.com, $15. WINDWORDS, BEGGARS 9 p.m. May 23, Sarbez, 115 Anastasia Blvd., St. Augustine.

UPCOMING CONCERTS

RAMONA TRIO May 24, ProhibitKitch MORGAN HERITAGE, JEMERE MORGAN, E.N. YOUNG May 24, JackRabbs DiCARLO THOMPSON, SMOKESTACK May 25, Seachasers NOUVEAUX HONKIES May 25, Café11 FLORIDA FOLK FESTIVAL: BILLY DEAN, PRESTAGE BROTHERS, BULLARD BROTHERS, TC CARR & BOLTS OF BLUE, JOHN

CARTER CASH, WILD SHINERS, JOHN MCEUEN & THE STRING WIZARDS, more May 25-27, Stephen Foster Folk Center State Park MIKE SHACKELFORD, STEVE SHANHOLTZER, TOM & NATALIE May 25, Mudville DAMON FOWLER May 25, BlueJay THE INTRACOASTALS May 25, Surfer CBDB, DOVETONSIL May 25, JackRabbs DON’T CALL ME SHIRLEY May 25 & 26, Flying Iguana RADIO LOVE, CHILLULA May 25, ProhibitKitch MATTYB & THE HASCHAK SISTERS May 25, PVCHall TERRY COLE BAND May 25, SpiritSuwannee EVERCLEAR, MARCY PLAYGROUND, LOCAL H May 25, Mavericks BIG JOHN, CAT McWILLIAMS, MAMA BLUE May 26, Seachasers GUTTER VILLAIN, BLURG, CONCRETE CRIMINALS, STARGOON May 26, Nighthawks THE BIRD TRIBE May 26, BlueJay RAISIN CAKE ORCHESTRA, RAMONA May 26, ProhibitKitch SOULSHINE BAND May 26, SpiritSuwannee BIG SAM’S FUNKY NATION May 27, 1904MH MONK May 27, Myth AZUL’S ALLSTARS May 27, Seachasers THE B-SIDES May 27, Surfer CHELSEA SADLER, DIAMOND DIXIE May 27, ProhibitKitch DAVID CROSBY, JAMES RAYMON, MAI AGAN, JEFF PEVAR, STEVE DISTANISLAO, MICHELLE WILLIS May 27, PVCHall FLIPTURN, SKYVIEW, SOUTH POINT May 27, JackRabbs BRANDON McCOY May 27, BlueJay DIRTY HEADS, AWOLNATION, JUDAH & THE LION, THE FRONT BOTTOMS, AJR May 27, StAugAmp SNAKE BLOOD REMEDY May 27, SpiritSuwannee BIG BOI May 28, 1904MH KEVIN JONES, CLAY COUNTY COMMUNITY BAND, SONDRA HUNT, STEVE AMBURGEY, EMILY O’NEAL, BLUE LOTUS, LEEANN PURVIS, HALLIE DAVIS, ABIGAIL CARPENTER, SOUTHERN SASS, STEPHEN HIPSHER, more May 28, Spring Park, Green Cove WILLOWWACKS May 28, ProhibitKitch ASLYN & THE NAYSAYERS May 29, ProhibitKitch HYMN FOR HER, DIXIE RODEO May 30, BlueJay THE COATHANGERS, THE WOOLLY BUSHMEN, MERCY MERCY May 30, JackRabbs NICK IZZARD May 30, Surfer LUKE PEACOCK May 31, Mudville COURTNIE FRAZIER, WHO RESCUED WHO May 31, ProhibitKitch MATTHEW BRIAN KIRKLAND May 31, BlueJay PURPLE HATTER’S BALL June 1 & 2, SpiritSuwannee AMPLE ANGST June 1, Mudville CHASING JONAH, LANNDS, GABE DARLING June 1, JackRabbs

MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 25


LIVE + LOCAL MUSIC SAM BURCHFIELD June 1, BlueJay HONEY HOUNDS June 1, Surfer BILLY & BELLA, EMILY ALDRIDGE, JEAN STREET SOUND, ALLIE & THE KATS June 1, 1904MH J. COLE June 2, Mavericks SONDRA HUNT June 2, SpiritSuwannee LONGINEU PARSONS June 2, Mudville BREAKING THROUGH, BLEEDING IN STEREO June 2, Cheers BOBBY LEE RODGERS TRIO June 2, BlueJay LEE BRICE, RANDY RODGERS BAND, LAUREN DUSKI, HA HA TONKA, CARLTON ZEUS June 2, Naval Station Mayport DANCE GAVIN DANCE, I SEE STARS, ERRA, SIANVAR June 2, PVCHall DR. NEU & BLUJAAFUNK June 2, Mudville THE DICKIES, THE QUEERS, BLURG, FRIENDLY FIRE June 3, JackRabbs SALT & PINE June 3, BlueJay DISCORD CURSE, BECOMES ASTRAL June 4, JackRabbs GRANT PEEPLES, JAIMEE HARRIS June 5, Café11 JOHN FOGERTY, ZZ TOP, RYAN KINDER June 5, StAugAmp THE ASSOCIATION, THE TURTLES, CHUCK NEGRON, GARY PUCKETT, MARK LINDSAY, THE COWSILLS June 7, FlaThtr LEE HUNTER June 7, Mudville COMMUNITY CENTER June 7, RainDogs HARRY CONNICK JR. June 8, StAugAmp CHATHAM COUNTY LINE June 8, Café11 SNACKS BLUES BAND June 9, BlueJay KELLEN VINCENT June 9, SpiritSuwannee PERPETUAL GROOVE June 10, 1904MH SIXES, HOLLOW LEG June 10, JackRabbs JOHN PARKERURBAN & FRIENDS June 10, BlueJay BLUEPRINT, WILLIE EVANS Jr., GEEXELLA June 10, RainDogs SOCCER MOMMY, PARAMORE, FOSTER the PEOPLE June 12, StAugAmp THE HOLOPHONICS June 12, RainDogs LA LUZ, TIMOTHY EERIE June 14, Root Down DAVID RYAN HARRIS June 15, Café11 JUKEBOX OLDIES June 15, SpiritSuwannee DANKA June 15, Surfer CYCLOPEAN BLOOD TEMPLE, BURN TO LEARN June 15, RainDogs MERE WOODARD June 15, BlueJay McFARLAND June 15, JackRabbs SALT N PEPA, SPINDERELLA, KID ’N’ PLAY, COOLIO, TONE LOC, THEA AUSTIN, C&C MUSIC FACTORY, FREEDOM WILLIAMS June 16, StAugAmp BLUE HORSE June 16, Mudville COME BACK ALICE June 16, Surfer STARBENDERS, 5 CENT PSYCHIATRIST June 16, JackRabbs CHAMPAGNE JERRY June 16, 1904MH ALPHA QUADRANT, MOONDRAGON June 16, RainDogs PHIL KEAGGY June 16, Murray Hill Theatre BRIT FLOYD ECLIPSE WORLD TOUR June 17, FlaThtr TIMOTHY EERIES, THE YOUNG STEP, REELS June 17, Sarbez JESUS WEARS ARMANI, IN CONFIDENCE June 19, JackRabbs SUMMER OF LOVE TRIBUTE: MUSIC OF LAUREL CANYON & MONTEREY POP, RETHREADED BENEFIT June 20, BlueJay COMBICHRIST, WEDNESDAY 13 June 20, Mavericks LATE NIGHT SPECIAL June 21, JackRabbs JUNCO ROYALS June 21, BlueJay SOUTHERN BURN BAND June 22, SpiritSuwannee SUMMER SURVIVORS June 22, Surfer LUKE BRYAN, JON PARDI, MORGAN WALLEN June 22, VetsMem

MATISYAHU, he of Talmudicly-inflected reggae, performs 9 p.m. May 20 at Prohibition Kitchen, St. Augustine, pkstaug.com, $50.

26 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018

CHARLIE FARLEY June 22, JackRabbs LYN AVENUE June 22, BlueJay THE CONCH FRITTERS June 23, Anastasia State Park BOBBY TARANTINO, NF, KYLE June 23, Dailys URBAN PIONEER, CAIN’T NEVER COULD June 23, Nighthawks SONG BOOK JAX SHOWCASE June 23, BlueJay LOGIC June 23, Dailys PIXIES June 24, FlaThtr ANNIE GUTHRIE June 24, BlueJay REBELUTION, STEPHEN MARLEY, COMMON KINGS, ZION I, DJ MACKLE June 24, StAugAmp CITY IN THE CLOUDS, MODEST IMAGE June 24, JackRabbs JOHN THOMAS GROUP June 25, Mudville INANIMATE EXISTENCE, THE LAST OF LUCY, FIELDS OF ELYSIUM June 25, JackRabbs ANGEL VIVALDI, HYVMINE June 26, 1904MH AMERICAN AQUARIUM, TRAVIS MEADOWS June 27, JackRabbs FRED HEINTZ & LATE NIGHT SPECIAL June 27, BlueJay BELLE & the BAND June 28, Mudville UNDERHILL ROSE June 28, BlueJay TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND, DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS, MARCUS KING BAND June 29, Dailys MELODY TRUCKS BAND, BONNIE BLUE June 29, 1904MH MIKE SHACKELFORD June 29, Mudville BOY GEORGE & CULTURE CLUB, B-52S, TOM BAILEY June 29, StAugAmp DION TIMMER June 29, Myth CHEAP TRICK, POISON June 30, Dailys SANDRA LYNN June 30, Ritz Theatre LUKE PEACOCK June 30, Mudville THE TOASTERS June 30, 1904MH COPPER BONES June 30, RainDogs THIRTY SECONDS TO MARS, WALK THE MOON, MISTERWIVES, JOYWAVE July 1, Dailys DONNY & MARIE OSMOND July 1, StAugAmp TERRAIN, SATYR (GA), FRIENDLY FIRE, PROBLEM ADDICTS July 1, 1904MH STABLE SHAKERS July 5, BlueJay DAN & PHIL July 5, StAugAmp BARENAKED LADIES, BETTER THAN EZRA, KT TUNSTALL July 6, StAugAmp SACRED OWLS BEWARE! TAKE CARE!, DOUGIE FLESH & the SLASHERS, APPALACHIAN DEATH TRAP July 6, Nighthawks 3 DOORS DOWN, COLLECTIVE SOUL July 7, Dailys FAITH EVANS, LALAH HATHAWAY, JON B July 7, VetsMemArena SOMEDAY HONEY July 7, BlueJay COHEED & CAMBRIA, TAKING BACK SUNDAY July 8, Dailys NIGHTHAWKS, DEAD BOYS, YOUNG LOUD & SNOTTY at 40 July 8, Nighthawks CHRISTINA VANE, MADI CARR July 8, BlueJay ADVENTURES OF ANNABELLE LYN July 12, Mudville JUNCO ROYALS July 12, BlueJay WRONG WAY, CRANE July 13, Surfer LOWERS ORDERS, SMART BOYZ July 13, RainDogs AJ GHENT July 13, BlueJay ORDINARY BOYS, KISSES ONLY July 14, 1904MH CRAIG WAYNE BOYD July 14, Ritz Theatre ALLEGRA KRIEGER July 14, BlueJay REMEDY TREE, MADI CARR July 15, BlueJay STEPHEN PIGMAN July 18, BlueJay SLIGHTLY STOOPID, PEPPER, STICK FIGURE July 19, StAugAmp RASCAL FLATTS July 19, Dailys

MYSTIC DINO, FAMILY ONE BAND July 20, Surfer OAK RIDGE BOYS July 20, Thrasher-HorneCtr STEVE MILLER BAND, PETER FRAMPTON July 20, StAugAmp SONDRA HUNT July 21, SpiritSuwannee KALEIGH BAKER July 21, BlueJay VIOLENT FEMMES, ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN July 21, StAugAmp CHICAGO, REO SPEEDWAGON July 22, Dailys FRACTURED FAIRYTALES July 26, JackRabbs JESSE MONTOYA, LUKE PEACOCK July 26, BlueJay DON McLEAN July 27, PVCHall POCO, PURE PRAIRIE LEAGUE, ORLEANS July 27, FlaThtr MIKE SHACKELFORD July 27, Mudville The FRITZ July 28, 1904MH SUN-DRIED VIBES July 28, Surfer DISPATCH, NAHKO, MEDICINE FOR THE PEOPLE, RAYE ZARAGOZA July 29, StAugAmp DONAVON FRANKENREITER July 30, Surfer LAURYN HILL Aug. 2, Dailys HIPPIEFEST 2018: VANILLA FUDGE, BADFINGER, JOEY MOLLAND, MITCH RYDER & THE DETROIT WHEELS, RICK DERRINGER Aug. 2, Thrasher-HorneCtr VANS WARPED TOUR: 30H!3, THE INTERRUPTERS, KNUCKLE PUCK, MAYDAY PARADE, REEL BIG FISH, STATE CHAMPS, THIS WILD LIFE, WATERPARKS, LESS THAN JAKE, THE MAINE, MOVEMENTS, REAL FRIENDS, SIMPLE PLAN, TONIGHT ALIVE, WE THE KINGS, AMITY AFFLICTION, CHELSEA GRIN, DEEZ NUTS, ICE NINE KILLS, KUBLAI KHAN, MYCHILDREN MYBRIDE, SHARPTOOTH, TWIZTID, WAGE WAR, AUGUST BURNS RED, CROWN THE EMPIRE, DAYSEEKER, EVERY TIME I DIE, IN HEARTS WAKE, MOTIONLESS IN WHITE, NEKROGOBLIKON, AS IT IS, ASSUMING WE SURVIVE, CAPSTAN, DON BROCO, PALACE ROYALE, SLEEP ON IT, STORY UNTOLD, TRASH BOAT, WITH CONFIDENCE, FAREWELL WINTERS, LIGHTERBURNS Aug. 2, Old Cypress Lot near Met Park COUNTING CROWS, LIVE Aug. 4, Dailys POWERGLOVE Aug. 4, 1904MH O.A.R. Aug. 5, Dailys 311, THE OFFSPRING Aug. 7, Dailys ATTILA, SUICIDE SILENCE, VOLUMES Aug. 10, Mavericks LONELY HIGHWAY BAND Aug. 11, SpiritSuwannee MARIE MILLER Aug. 12, Café11 JASON MRAZ, BRETT DENNAN Aug. 17, Dailys UMPHREY’S McGEE, SPAFFORD Aug. 18, StAugAmp LINDSEY STIRLING, EVANESCENCE Aug. 20, Dailys JEFF BECK, PAUL RODGERS, ANN WILSON Aug. 23, Dailys STEPHANIE QUAYLE Aug. 25, Ritz Theatre SING OUT LOUD FESTIVAL Sept. 1-23, St. Augustine venues DANIEL CHAMPAGNE Sept. 4, Café11 Kick Out the Jams Anniversary Tour: MC50 Sept. 6, StAugAmp DEEP PURPLE, JUDAS PRIEST Sept. 12, Dailys ROGER McGUINN Sept. 19, PVCHall LEE ANN WOMACK Sept. 21, PVCHall JASON ISBELL & THE 400 UNIT, THE DECEMBERISTS, LUCERO Sept. 22, StAugAmp HERE COME THE MUMMIES Sept. 22, PVCHall DAVID BYRNE Sept. 26, FlaThtr KIM RICHEY Sept. 27, Café11 NEEDTOBREATHE, JOHNNYSWIM Oct. 2, Dailys DELBERT McCLINTON Oct. 5, PVCHall ARCH ENEMY, GOATWHORE, UNCURED Oct. 6, 1904MH (HED)PE Oct. 7, 1904MH SUWANNEE ROOTS REVIVAL Oct. 11-14, SpiritSuwannee GENE WATSON Oct. 13, PVCHall


LIVE + LOCAL MUSIC WELCOME TO MOCKVILLE Oct. 13, 1904MH STEEP CANYON RANGERS Oct. 14, FlaThtr ANDERSON EAST Oct. 16, Mavericks DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE, CHARLY BLISS Oct. 20, StAugAmp OTTMAR LIEBERT, LUNA NEGRA Nov. 11, PVCHall JENNIFER KNAPP Nov. 14, Café11 KATHLEEN MADIGAN Nov. 15, FlaThtr STRAIGHT NO CHASER Nov. 18, FlaThtr PIANO GUYS Nov. 26, FlaThtr DAVE KOZ, MINDI ABAIR, JONATHON BUTLER, KEIKO MATSUI Nov. 29, FlaThtr OLD DOMINION Nov. 30, StAugAmp IRIS DeMENT Dec. 8, PVCHall PETER WHITE CHRISTMAS: RICK BRAUN, EUGE GROOVE Dec. 11, PVCHall SWINGIN’ LITTLE CHRISTMAS: JANE LYNCH, KATE FLANNERY, TIM DAVIS, THE TONY GUERRERO QUINTET Dec. 17, Ritz JEANNIE ROBERTSON Jan. 26, FlaThtr INDIGO GIRLS Feb. 9, PVCHall PINK March 5, VetsMemArena ELTON JOHN March 15, VetsMemArena

LIVE MUSIC CLUBS

AMELIA ISLAND, FERNANDINA

FLEMING ISLAND

BOONDOCKS, 2808 Henley Rd., Green Cove, 406-9497 Marty Farmer May 17. Lyndie Burns, Black Creek Ri’zin May 18. Redfish Rich, Old Dixie May 19. Matt Knowles May 24 WHITEY’S FISH CAMP, 2032 C.R. 220, 269-4198 Ivan Pulley 6 p.m. May 16. Jimi Graves Duo 9 p.m. May 17. Van Go 9 p.m. May 18. Conch Fritters, Julia Gulia May 19. Cliff Dorsey, Jonathan Lee May 20

INTRACOASTAL

CLIFF’S BAR & GRILL, 3033 Monument Rd., 645-5162 Duval Co. Line 9 p.m. May 16. Ivey League 9 p.m. May 18 & 19 JERRY’S, 13170 Atlantic Blvd., 220-6766 Boogie Freaks 8:30 p.m. May 18. Retro Kats 8:30 p.m. May 19

MANDARIN

ENZA’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT, 10601 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 109, 268-4458 Brian Iannucci May 16 & 20 IGGY’S, 104 Bartram Oaks Walk, 209-5209 X-Hale 7 p.m. May 18. Smooth McFlea May 19. Duval Station 7 p.m. May 26 TAPS BAR & GRILL, 2220 C.R. 210, St. Johns, 819-1554 Ken McAnlis 9 p.m. May 16. Don’t Call Me Shirley 9 p.m. May 18. Ginger Beard Man 9 p.m. May 19

GREEN TURTLE TAVERN, 14 S. Third St., 321-2324 Buck Smith every Thur. Dan Voll every Fri. Yancy Clegg every Sun. Vinyl Nite every Tue. SLIDERS SEASIDE GRILL, 1998 S. Fletcher Ave., 277-6652 King Eddie & Pili Pili May 16. Tad Jennings May 17. Hupp de Huppman 2 p.m., Michael Hulett 7 p.m. May 18. Cyrus & Lyndzy 2 p.m., Radio Love 7 p.m. May 19. JCnMike, Michael Hulett May 20. Mark O’Quinn May 22

ORANGE PARK, MIDDLEBURG

AVONDALE, ORTEGA

PONTE VEDRA

CASBAH CAFÉ, 3628 St. Johns Ave., 981-9966 Goliath Flores every Wed. Jazz every Sun. Live music every Mon. ECLIPSE, 4219 St. Johns Ave. KJ Free every Tue. & Thur. Indie dance every Wed. ’80s & ’90s dance every Fri. MONTY’S/SHORES LIQUOR, 3644 St. Johns Ave., 389-1131 Vegas Gray 10 p.m. May 18 . DJ Keith 10 p.m. every Thur.

THE BEACHES

(All venues in Jax Beach unless otherwise noted)

BLUE JAY LISTENING ROOM, 412 N. Second St., 834-1315 West Brook & Friends May 16 & 23. Rachel McGoye album release show 8 p.m. May 18. Kyle Jennings May 19. The Suedes May 20 CULHANE’S IRISH PUB, 967 Atlantic Blvd., AB, 249-9595 DJ Heather every Wed. DJ Hal every Fri. & Sat. Michael Funge every Sun. FLYING IGUANA, 207 Atlantic Blvd., NB, 853-5680 Evan Michael & the Well Wishers 10 p.m. May 18 & 19. Samuel Sanders 8:30 p.m. May 20 GREEN ROOM BREWING, 228 Third St. N., 201-9283 Matt Henderson May 18. Beach City May 19 GUSTO, 1266 Beach Blvd., 372-9925 Groov 7:30 p.m. every Wed. Michael Smith every Thur. Milton Clapp every Fri. LYNCH’S IRISH PUB, 514 First St. N., 249-5181 Stank Sauce 10 p.m. May 18. Trev Barnes 6 p.m., Jay Ivey & the Souls of Joy 10 p.m. May 19. Different Folk every Fri. MELLOW MUSHROOM, 1018 Third St. N., 241-5600 Felix Chang 9:30 p.m. May 17 MEZZA RESTAURANT, 110 First St., NB, 249-5573 Gypsies Ginger every Wed. Mike Shackelford, Steve Shanholtzer every Thur. Mezza Shuffle every Mon. Trevor Tanner every Tue. RAGTIME TAVERN, 207 Atlantic Blvd., AB, 241-7877 Billy Bowers 7 p.m. May 16. Billy Buchanan May 17. Paul Lundgren May 18 & 19. Live music May 20 SEACHASERS, 831 First St. N., 372-0444 DiCarlo Thompson, Stacey Bennett May 18. Big John Austill, Billy Buchanan May 19. DiCarlo Thompson, Smokestack May 25 SOUTHERN GROUNDS Courtyard, 200 First St., NB, 249-2922 Julie Freeman May 17 SURFER THE Bar, 200 First St. N., 372-9756 The Supervillians, Colin Paterson, Matt Henderson 9 p.m. May 16. Ellameno Beat, Little Bird May 18. Zander May 19. New Rock Soul May 20. Trevor Barnes May 22. Tad Jennings May 23 WHISKEY JAX, 950 Marsh Landing Pkwy., 853-5973 Never Too Late May 16. Great Damers May 17. Yowsah May 18. Jerry Maniscalco 7 p.m. May 20. Acoustic Women every Tue.

CAMDEN COUNTY, GEORGIA

J’S TAVERN, 711 Osborne St., St. Marys, 912-882-5280 Two Dudes from Texas open mic every Wed.

DOWNTOWN

1904 MUSIC Hall, 19 Ocean St. N., 345-5760 Dynohunter, Universal Green, Pilotwave, Charlie Hustle May 17. Dialectable Beats, Nickfresh May 18. DV3, Trvpfonikz, Xander, Dyvision May 19. Operation Home Front May 20. Devil in the Details, Danny Attack May 21. The Silverpalms, Fontaine May 23 DOS GATOS, 123 E. Forsyth St., 354-0666 DJ Brandon every Thur. DJ NickFresh every Sat. DJ Randall every Mon. DJ Hollywood every Tue. JAX LANDING, 353-1188 Jason Evans Band May 18. Jinxx Band 8 p.m. May 19. Van Go Band 5 p.m. May 20. Marcus Click Band 5 p.m., Katz Takeover Night 9 p.m., Katz Downstairz 9:45 p.m. May 25 MAVERICKS LIVE, Jax Landing, 356-1110 Everclear, Marcy Playground, Local H 8 p.m. May 25 MYTH NIGHTCLUB, 333 E. Bay St., 707-0474 Amtrac, Chay, Brox b2b, Walley Meskel 8 p.m. May 16. Adam Harris Thompson Band 6 p.m., SkyHye 9 p.m. May 18. DJ Alekz Vibration, Lil Yankee May 23

OVERSET

CHEERS, 1138 Park Ave., 269-4855 DJ Capone May 16. Love Monkey May 17. Blistur May 18 & 19 THE HILLTOP, 2030 Wells Rd., 272-5959 John Michael on the piano every Tue.-Sat. THE ROADHOUSE, 231 Blanding Blvd., 264-0611 Comfort Zone 10 p.m. May 18. Robbie Litt 10 p.m. May 19. DJ Keith every Tue. DJ Covert every Thur. MEDURE, 818 A1A, 543-3797 Ace Winn May 16 & 23. Ryan Campbell May 17 & 24. Will Hurley May 18. The Groov May 19

RIVERSIDE, WESTSIDE

ACROSS THE STREET, 948 Edgewood S., 683-4182 Bill Ricci 5:30 p.m. May 18 NIGHTHAWKS, 2952 Roosevelt Blvd. Black Calla 9 p.m. May 16. R-Dent, Conjure Release Show, Psycho Hill May 18. Thriftcraft Prom Nite May 19. The Bunny, The Bear, It Lies Within May 23 RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET, 715 Riverside Ave., 389-2449 Luke Peacock, Robert Lester Folsom, Sam Pacetti, My Monster Heart 10:30 a.m. May 19

ST. AUGUSTINE

ARNOLD’S LOUNGE, 3912 N. Ponce de Leon, 824-8738 Cottonmouth 9 p.m. May 19. DJ Alex every Fri. MARDI GRAS, 123 San Marco Ave., 823-8806 Old Enough 2-Know Better 7 p.m. May 16. Circus 9 p.m. May 18 & 19 ORIGINAL CAFÉ ELEVEN, 501 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 460-9311 G. Love Acoustic 8:30 p.m. May 18 & 19 PROHIBITION KITCHEN, 119 St. George, 209-5704 Ray Callandar, Bridge Street Vibe May 17. The Steeldrivers May 18. Jive Katz Collective, Luv U May 19. Matisyahu 9 p.m. May 20. Sam Pacetti May 21. Colton McKenna May 22 SARBEZ, 115 Anastasia Blvd., 342-0632 Windwords, Beggars 9 p.m. May 23 TRADEWINDS, 124 Charlotte St., 829-9336 Spanky 9 p.m. May 18 & 19

SAN MARCO

JACK RABBITS, 15280 Hendricks Ave., 398-7496 Dead Eyes Always Dreaming, Today’s Last Tragedy, Albert the Cannibal 7 p.m. May 16. Savage Master, Bewitcher May 17. River City Sound System, Prideless May 19. Aaron Lebos Reality, Matt Henderson, Colin Paterson May 21. Lincoln Durham, Ghost Wolves May 22. Morgan Heritage, Jemere Morgan, E.N. Young May 24 MUDVILLE MUSIC ROOM, 3104 Atlantic Blvd., 352-7008 Atlantic City Boys, Abagail, Jax Silhouettes, Mac Ganoe May 19. TBA Big Band May 21. Shannon McNally May 22 RIVER CITY BREWING CO., 835 Museum Cir., 398-2299 Aaron Koerner 5:30 p.m. May 17. Cain’t Never Could May 20

SOUTHSIDE, BAYMEADOWS

MELLOW MUSHROOM, 9734 Deer Lake Ct., 997-1955 Barrett Jockers May 17. Cortnie Frazier May 18. Brian Ernst May 19 WHISKEY JAX, 10915 Baymeadows Rd., 634-7208 Fratello May 18. Paul Lundgren May 19. Mojo Roux May 20. Melissa Smith open mic every Thur.

SPRINGFIELD, NORTHSIDE

CROOKED ROOSTER BREWERY, 148 S. Sixth St., Macclenny, 653-2337 DJ Toy 6 p.m. every Wed. HYPERION BREWING CO., 1740 N. Main St., 518-5131 Paul Ivey & Souls of Joy 7 p.m. May 18. Chelsey Michelle 1 p.m., Highway Jones 6 p.m. May 19. Rob Sterling 1 p.m., Doug & Heather 5 p.m. May 20 PALMS FISH CAMP, 6359 Heckscher Dr., 240-1672 Taylor Shami May 16. Cassidy Lee May 17. Eric Alabasio May 18 & 20. Michael Ward Band May 20 _________________________________________ To list a band’s gig, send time, date, location (street address, city/neighborhood), admission and a contact number to print to Madeleine Peck Wagner, email madeleine@folioweekly. com or by the U.S. Postal Service, 45 W. Bay St., Ste. 103, Jacksonville FL 32202. Events run on space-available basis. Deadline noon Wed. for next Wed. publication.

MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 27


FOLIO DINING Serving Southern classics in an understated Downtown setting, BELLWETHER's chef/owner Jon Insetta fixes on flavor for the seasonal menu. photo by Devon Sarian

AMELIA ISLAND + FERNANDINA BEACH

BRETT’S WATERWAY CAFÉ, 1 S. Front St., 261-2660. On the water at Centre Street’s end. Southern hospitality, upscale atmosphere; daily specials, fresh local seafood, aged beef. $$$ FB L D Daily CAFÉ KARIBO, 27 N. Third St., 277-5269, cafekaribo.com. F Family-owned café in historic building. Worldly fare, made-from-scratch dressings, sauces, desserts, sourcing fresh veggies, seafood. Dine in or al fresco under oakshaded patio. Microbrew Karibrew Pub brews beer onsite; imports. $$ FB K TO R, Su; L Daily, D Tu-Su in season THE CRAB TRAP, 31 N. Second St., 261-4749, ameliacrabtrap.com. F For nearly 40 years, family-ownedand-operated. Fresh local seafood, steaks, specials. HH. $$ FB L Sa-M; D Nightly LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 474272 S.R. 200, 844-2225. F SEE ORANGE PARK. MOON RIVER PIZZA, 925 S. 14th St., 321-3400, moonriverpizza. net. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. Authentic Northern-style pizzas, 20-plus toppings, pie/slice. Calzones. $ BW TO L D M-Sa THE MUSTARD SEED CAFÉ, 833 Courson Rd., 277-3141, nassauhealthfoods.net. Casual organic eatery, juice bar, in Nassau Health Foods. All-natural organic items, smoothies, juices, herbal teas, coffees, daily specials. $$ K TO B L M-Sa

DINING DIRECTORY KEY AVERAGE ENTRÉE COST $ $$

$

< $10

$$$

10- $20

$$$$

$

20-$35 > $35

ABBREVIATIONS & SPECIAL NOTES BW = Beer/Wine

L = Lunch

FB = Full Bar

D = Dinner Bite Club = Hosted Free Folio Weekly Bite Club Event F = Folio Weekly Distribution Spot

K = Kids’ Menu TO = Take Out B = Breakfast R = Brunch

To list your restaurant, call your account manager or call or text SAM TAYLOR, Folio Weekly publisher, at 904-860-2465 (email: staylor@folioweekly.com). 28 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018

POINTE RESTAURANT, 98 S. Fletcher Ave., 277-4851, elizabethpointelodge.com. 2017 BOJ winner. In awardwinning inn Elizabeth Pointe Lodge. Seaside dining; in or out. Hot buffet breakfast daily, full lunch menu. Homestyle soups, specialty sandwiches, desserts. $$$ BW K B L D Daily The SALTY PELICAN Bar & Grill, 12 N. Front St., 277-3811, thesaltypelicanamelia.com. F 2017 BOJ winner. 2nd-story outdoor bar. T.J. & Al offer local seafood, fish tacos, Mayport shrimp, po’boys, cheese oysters. $$ FB K L D Daily SLIDERS SEASIDE GRILL, 1998 S. Fletcher Ave., 277-6652, slidersseaside.com. F 2017 BOJ winner/ favorite. Oceanfront. Award-winning handmade crabcakes, fried pickles, fresh seafood. Open-air 2nd floor balcony, playground. $$ FB K L D Daily T-RAY’S BURGER STATION, 202 S. Eighth St., 261-6310, traysburgerstation.com. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. Family-owned-and-operated 18+ years. Blue plate specials, burgers, biscuits & gravy, shrimp. $ BW TO B L M-Sa

ARLINGTON + REGENCY

LARRY’S Giant Subs, 1301 Monument Rd., Ste. 5, 724-5802. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE ORANGE PARK.

AVONDALE + ORTEGA

FOOD ADDICTZ GRILL, 1044 Edgewood Ave. S., 240-1987. F Family-and-veteran-owned place is all about home cooking. Customer faves: barbecued pulled pork, blackened chicken, Caesar wrap and Portobello mushroom burger. $ K TO B L D Tu-Su HARPOON LOUIE’S, 4070 Herschel St., Ste. 8, 389-5631, harpoonlouies.net. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. Locally owned & operated 20+ years. American pub. 1/2-lb. burgers, fish sandwiches. Local beers, HH. $$ FB K TO L D Daily MOJO NO. 4 URBAN BBQ & WHISKEY BAR, 3572 St. Johns Ave., Ste. 1, 381-6670, mojobbq.com. F 2017 BOJ winner/ favorite. Pulled pork, Carolina-style barbecue. Delta fried catfish. Avondale’s Mojo has shrimp & grits, specialty cocktails. $$ FB K TO L D Daily PINEGROVE MARKET & DELI, 1511 PineGrove Ave., 389-8655, pinegrovemarket.com. F 2017 BOJ winner/ favorite. 40+ years. Burgers, Cubans, subs, wraps. Onsite butcher, USDA choice prime aged beef. Craft beers. Fri. & Sat. fish fry. $ BW TO B L D M-Sa RESTAURANT ORSAY, 3630 Park St., 381-0909, restaurantorsay.com. 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. French/ Southern bistro; local organic ingredients. Steak frites, mussels, pork chops. $$$ FB R, Su; D Nightly SIMPLY SARA’S, 2902 Corinthian Ave., 387-1000, simplysaras.net. F Down-home fare from scratch: eggplant fries, pimento cheese, baked chicken, fruit cobblers, chicken & dumplings, desserts. BYOB. $$ K TO L D Tu-Sa, B Sa SOUTH KITCHEN & SPIRITS, 3638 Park St., 475-2362, south.kitchen. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. Southern classics: crispy catfish with smoked gouda grits, familystyle fried chicken, burgers, vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free options. $$ FB K TO L D Daily


DINING DIRECTORY BAYMEADOWS

AL’S PIZZA, 8060 Philips Hwy., Ste. 105, 731-4300. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE INTRACOASTAL. INDIA’S, 9802 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 8, 620-0777, indiajaxcom. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. Authentic cuisine, lunch buffet. Curries, vegetables, lamb, chicken, shrimp, fish tandoori. $$ BW L M-Sa; D Nightly LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 8616 Baymeadows Rd., 739-2498. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE ORANGE PARK. METRO DINER, 9802 Baymeadows Rd., 425-9142. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE SAN MARCO. NATIVE SUN Natural Foods Market & Deli, 11030 Baymeadows Rd., 260-2791. 2017 BOJ favorite. SEE MANDARIN. PATTAYA THAI GRILLE, 9551 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 1, 646-9506, ptgrille.com. F 2017 BOJ favorite. Since 1989. Family-owned place has an extensive menu of traditional Thai, vegetarian, new-Thai; curries, seafood, noodles, soups. Low-sodium & gluten-free. $$$ BW TO L D Tu-Sa THE WELL WATERING HOLE, 3928 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 9, 737-7740, thewellwateringhole.com. Local craft beers, glass/bottle wines. Meatloaf sandwich, pulled Peruvian chicken, vegan black bean burgers. Gluten-free pizzas, desserts. HH specials. $$ BW K TO L M-F; D Tu-Sa WHISKEY JAX, 10915 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 135, 634-7208, whiskeyjax.com. F 2017 BOJ favorite. Popular gastropub has craft beers, gourmet burgers, handhelds, signature plates, tacos and–sure–whiskey. HH M-F. $$ FB B Sa & Su; L F; D Nightly

BEACHES

(Venues are in Jax Beach unless otherwise noted.)

AL’S PIZZA, 240 Third St. N., Neptune Beach, 853-6773, thecraftpizzaco.com. F Al Mansur re-opened good ol’ Al’s, in a new spot. Dine inside or out. $$ BW L D Daily ANGIE’S SUBS, 1436 Beach Blvd., 246-2519. ANGIE’S GROM SUBS, 204 Third Ave. S., 241-3663. F 2017 BOJ winner. Fresh ingredients, 25+ years. Huge salads, blue-ribbon iced tea. Grom has Sun. brunch, no alcohol. $ K BW TO L D Daily BOLD BEAN COFFEE ROASTERS, 2400 S. Third St., Ste. 201, 374-5735. 2017 BOJ winner. SEE RIVERSIDE. BREEZY COFFEE SHOP WINE BAR, 235 Eighth Ave. S., 241-2211, breezycoffeeshopcafe.com. Local beachy coffee & wine shop by day; wine bar by night. Fresh baked pastries, breakfast sandwiches all day. Grab-n-Go salads, cheeses, hummus. $ BW K TO B L D Daily

GRILL ME

LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 6586 GA. Hwy. 40 B6, St. Marys, 912-576-7006. F 2017 BOJ favorite. SEE ORANGE PARK. OUTERBANKS SPORTS BAR & GRILLE, 140 The Lakes Blvd., Ste. H, Kingsland, 912-729-5499. Fresh seafood, burgers, steaks, wings. $$ FB TO D Nightly

DOWNTOWN

BELLWETHER, 100 N. Laura St., 802-7745, bellwetherjax.com. Elevated Southern classics in an understated setting, with chef/owner Jon Insetta’s focus on flavors, and chef Kerri Rogers’ culinary creativity. The Northeast Florida menu changes seasonally. Rotating local craft beers, regional spirits, cold brew coffee program. $$ FB TO L M-F CASA DORA, 108 E. Forsyth, 356-8282, casadoraitalian. com. F Serving Italian fare, 40+ years: veal, seafood, pizza. Homemade salad dressing. $ BW K L M-F; D M-Sa ELEMENT BISTRO & CRAFT BAR, 333 E. Bay St., 438-5173. Inside Myth Nightclub. Locally sourced, organic fare with fresh herbs and spices. HH $$ FB D, Tu-Su OLIO MARKET, 301 E. Bay St., 356-7100, oliomarket.com. F Scratch soups, sandwiches. Duck grilled cheese, seen on Best Sandwich in America. $$ BW TO B R L M-F; D F & Sa SPLIFF’S GASTROPUB, 15 N. Ocean St., 844-5000, spliffsgastropub.com. 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. Music venue has munchie apps, mac & cheese dishes, pockets, gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches. HH M-F. $ BW L D M-Sa URBAN GRIND COFFEE COMPANY, 45 W. Bay, Ste. 102, 516-7799, urbangrind.coffee. F 2017 BOJ favorite. Locally roasted whole bean brewed coffees, espressos, pastries, smoothies, bagels. Chicken/tuna salad, sandwiches. WiFi. $ B L M-F URBAN GRIND EXPRESS, 50 W. Laura St., 516-7799. F 2017 BOJ favorite. SEE ABOVE. ZODIAC BAR & GRILL, 120 W. Adams St., 354-8283, thezodiacbarandgrill.com. 16+ years. Mediterranean cuisine, American fare, paninis, vegetarian dishes. Lunch buffet. Espressos, hookahs. HH M-F. $ FB L M-F; D W-Sa

FLEMING ISLAND

GRASSROOTS NATURAL MARKET, 1915 East-West Pkwy., 541-0009. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE RIVERSIDE. MOJO Smokehouse, 1810 Town Ctr. Blvd., Ste. 8, 264-0636. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE AVONDALE. WHITEY’S FISH CAMP, 2032 C.R. 220, 269-4198, whiteysfishcamp.com. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. Real

JONATHON ADDINGTON

Sun-Ray Cinema

1028 Park St. • Riverside Born in: Arcadia, Ohio Years in Biz: 20 Favorite Restaurant: Wild Cow (Nashville) Favorite Cuisine Style: Creole, Indian and comfort Go-To Ingredients: Garlic, tumeric, curry, paprika - all the spices Ideal Meal: One of everything at a vegan restaurant, curry dishes or pizza. Will Not Cross My Lips: Foie Gras Insider’s Secret: Think outside the box & be weird! Celebrity Seen at Your Restaurant: John Waters, Peaches Christ & more! Culinary Treat: Sweet Theory :)

EUROPEAN STREET Café, 992 Beach Blvd., 249-3001, europeanstreet.com. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE RIVERSIDE. FLYING IGUANA Taqueria & Tequila Bar, 207 Atlantic Blvd., NB, 853-5680, flyingiguana.com. 2017 BOJ winner. Latin American: tacos, seafood, carnitas, Cubana fare. 100+ tequilas. $ FB TO L D Daily GUSTO, 1266 Beach Blvd., 372-9925, gustojax.com. F Classic Old World Roman fare, big Italian menu: homestyle pasta, beef, chicken, fish delicacies; open pizza-tossing kitchen. Reservations encouraged. $$ FB TO L R D Tu-Su HAWKERS ASIAN STREET FARE, 241 Atlantic Blvd., NB, 425-1025. 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE RIVERSIDE. LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 657 Third St. N., 247-9620. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE ORANGE PARK. METRO DINER, 1534 3rd St. N., 853-6817. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE SAN MARCO. MOJO KITCHEN BBQ Pit & Blues Bar, 1500 Beach Blvd., 247-6636. 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE AVONDALE. M SHACK, 299 Atlantic Blvd., AB, 241-2599, shackburgers.com. 2017 BOJ winner. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, shakes. Dine indoors or out. $$ BW L D Daily NATIVE SUN Natural Foods Market & Deli, 1585 N. Third St., 458-1390. 2017 BOJ favorite. SEE MANDARIN. RAGTIME TAVERN Seafood & Grill, 207 Atlantic Blvd., AB, 241-7877, ragtimetavern.com. F 34 years and counting, the iconic seafood place serves blackened snapper, sesame tuna, Ragtime shrimp. Daily HH, brunch Sun. $$ FB L D Daily WHISKEY JAX, 950 Marsh Landing Pkwy., 853-5973. F 2017 BOJ favorite. SEE BAYMEADOWS.

CAMDEN COUNTY, GEORGIA

CAPTAIN STAN’S SMOKEHOUSE, 700 Bedell Dr., Woodbine, 912-729-9552. Barbecue, sides, hot dogs, burgers, desserts. Dine in or out on picnic tables. $$ FB K TO L & D Tu-Sa

fish camp. Gator tail, catfish, daily specials, on Swimming Pen Creek. Tiki bar. Boat, bike or car. $ FB K TO L Tu-Su; D Nightly

INTRACOASTAL WEST

AL’S PIZZA, 14286 Beach Blvd., Ste. 31, 223-0991. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. 30 years of awesome gourmet pizza, baked dishes. All day HH M-Th. $ FB K TO L D Daily LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 10750 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 14, 642-6980. F BOJ favorite. SEE ORANGE PARK.

MANDARIN + NW ST. JOHNS

AL’S PIZZA, 11190 San Jose Blvd., 260-4115. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE INTRACOASTAL. ATHENS CAFÉ, 6271 St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 7, 733-1199, athenscafejax.com. 2017 BOJ winner. 20+ years of Greek fare, serving dolmades (stuffed grape leaves), baby shoes (stuffed eggplant), Greek beers. Vegetarian-friendly. Full bar. Early bird menu Mon.-Fri. $$ FB L M-F; D M-Sa FIRST COAST DELI & GRILL, 6082 St. Augustine Rd., 733-7477. Pancakes, bacon, sandwiches, burgers, wings. $ K TO B L Daily JAX DINER, 5065 St. Augustine Rd., 739-7070, jaxdiner. com. Chef Roderick “Pete” Smith, a local culinary expert with nearly 20 years under his apron, uses locally sourced ingredients from area farmers, vendors and the community for American and Southern dishes. Seasonal brunch. $ K TO B L M-F, D F METRO DINER, 12807 San Jose Blvd., 638-6185. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. Dinner. SEE SAN MARCO. MOJO BAR-B-QUE, 1607 University Blvd. W., 732-7200, mojobbq.com. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE AVONDALE. NATIVE SUN Natural Foods Market & Deli, 10000 San Jose Blvd., 260-6950, nativesunjax.com. BOJ favorite. Organic soups, baked items, sandwiches, prepared foods. Juice, smoothie, coffee bar. All-natural beer/wine. $ BW TO B L D Daily

MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 29


DINING DIRECTORY BITE-SIZED

Family-and-veteran-owned Avondale spot FOOD ADDICTZ GRILL is all about home cooking: pulled pork, chicken, Caesar wrap and Portobello mushroom burger.

INTERNATIONAL DELIGHTS photo by Brentley Stead

photo by Devon Sarian

Riverside’s Bakery Ribault is a TREASURED discovery WHEN YOU’RE IN THE MOOD FOR ITALIAN COFFEE and French pastries, step into the European-style café Bakery Ribault. Tucked into 5 Points, Ribault has a fabulous selection of pastries, coffees and teas, and a small raised patio area reminiscent of the tilting street-side dining of Italian cafés. There’s plenty of inside seating, but I recommend sitting outdoors as long as the weather holds. The later you go, the less chance they’ll have a full pastry case, so that’s two reasons to get up early. Everything’s made fresh daily, so when they’re out, they’re out. Ribault (perhaps named for the area’s famous explorer, Jean Ribault?) makes its pastries inhouse, outsourcing only the bread for sandwiches and dessert case items–a variety of cakes and chocolate delicacies. My top two choices were Almond Pastry ($3.50) and Pain au Chocolat ($3.50). Both were buttery, flaky and delicious. The Pain au Chocolat is heavier and so rich, it’s similar to fried dough–chocolate heaven. If you get there early enough, they may still be warm–yet another reason to get up! The lighter almond had a generous portion of almond paste in the center and was sprinkled with sliced roasted almonds, creating a flavor explosion in each bite. To accompany your pastry, order a Lavazza coffee, Ghirardelli hot chocolate or tasty teas from China and India–hot or iced; Ribault has got your

BAKERY RIBAULT

813 Lomax St., 683-5074, Riverside, bakeryribault.com

back. There are also dairy-free soy, almond and coconut milks. Ever the Earl Grey lover, I took a chance with London Fog tea; it perfectly suited my tastes that day. The Fog, a sweeter version of fragrant Earl Grey, brought out more notes from tea mix. I’m also a sucker for glass mugs, so it was a delight when my London Fog arrived in one. The sandwich selection did not disappoint; I’ll probably find my way back to try a few more. They serve a variety of both vegetarian and meaty paninis, but this gal can rarely turn down a muffalatta ($9.99). One tap of the bread and I was sold. The flawless buttered, crisp crust housed a juicy, cheesy interior of Black Forest ham, Genoa salami, provolone cheese, nut-free pesto, olive tapenade and tomato. I don’t think I’ve ever seen tomato on a muffalatta, but the addition made for a lighter version than the heavier, oily standard. I’ve avoided the elephant in the case because it will conquer everything. Holy croissant, Batman. This is the real deal. Beneath a light outer crunch lie layers and layers of buttery flakiness. Get these gold-kissed, U-shaped beauties for breakfast or lunch with a little extra tszuj of ham or bacon and egg, chicken salad or avocado. If you can croissant it, they’ll do it. I wasn’t totally sold on the mayoand-mustard combo on the ham-and-egg croissant sandwich ($6.61) but, again, it didn’t disappoint. Next time you’re on the prowl for a good café, do yourself a favor and explore Bakery Ribault. Brentley Stead biteclub@folioweekly.com ____________________________________ If you have a recommendation, shoot me an email at biteclub@folioweekly.com. 30 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018

SUSHI CAFÉ, 2025 Riverside Ave., Ste. 204, 384-2888, sushicafejax.com. F Monster, Rock-n-Roll, Dynamite Roll. Hibachi, tempura, katsu, teriyaki. Patio. $$ BW L D Daily

ST. AUGUSTINE

AL’S PIZZA, 1 St. George St., 824-4383. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE INTRACOASTAL. The CORAZON CINEMA & CAFE, 36 Granada St., 679-5736, corazoncinemaandcafe.com. F Sandwiches, combos, salads and pizza are served at the cinema house, showing indie and first-run movies. $$ Daily DESSERT FIRST BISTRO, 121 Yacht Club Dr., 417-0468, dessertfirstbistro.com. It’s all made from scratch: breakfast, lunch, desserts. Plus coffees, espressos, craft beers, wine, hot teas. $ BW K TO B, L Tu-Su The FLORIDIAN, 72 Spanish St., 829-0655, thefloridianstaug.com. Updated Southern fare; fresh, local ingredients. Vegetarian, gluten-free options. Signature fried green tomato bruschetta, blackened fish cornbread stack; grits w/shrimp/fish/tofu. $$$ BW K TO L D W-M GYPSY CAB COMPANY, 828 Anastasia Blvd., 824-8244, gypsycab.com. F 34+ years. Varied urban cuisine menu changes twice daily. Signature: Gypsy chicken. Seafood, tofu, duck, veal. $$ FB R Su; L D Daily MARDI GRAS SPORTS BAR, 123 San Marco Ave., 347-3288, mardibar.com. F Lively spot has wings, nachos, shrimp, chicken, Phillys, sliders, soft pretzels. $$ FB TO L D Daily METRO DINER, 1000 S. Ponce de Leon Blvd., 758-3323. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. Dinner nightly. SEE SAN MARCO. MOJO OLD CITY BBQ, 5 Cordova St., 342-5264, mojobbq. com. F 2017 BOJ winner. SEE AVONDALE. SALT LIFE Food Shack, 321 A1A, 217-3256. F SEE BEACHES. SARBEZ, 115 Anastasia Blvd., 342-0632, planetsarbez.com. Local music venue has gourmet grilled cheese: Sarbez melt: smoked mozzarella, turkey, bacon, signature sauce on locally baked sourdough. Local craft beers. $ BW L, D Daily WOODPECKER’S Backyard BBQ, 4930 S.R. 13, 531-5670, woodpeckersbbq.weebly.com. F Smoked fresh daily. Brisket, ribs, pork, sausage, turkey: in sandwiches, plates by the pound. 8 sauces, 10 sides. $$ TO L D Tu-Su

OVERSET

SAN MARCO + SOUTHBANK

ORANGE PARK

THE HILLTOP, 2030 Wells Rd., 272-5959, hilltop-club.com. Southern fine dining. New Orleans shrimp, certified Black Angus prime rib, she-crab soup, desserts. Extensive bourbon selection. $$$ FB D Tu-Sa LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 1330 Blanding Blvd., Ste. 165, 276-7370. 1545 C.R. 220, 278-2827. 700 Blanding Blvd., Ste. 15, 2723553. 5733 Roosevelt Blvd., 446-9500. 1401 S. Orange Ave., Green Cove, 284-7789, larryssubs.com. F 2017 BOJ favorite. Larry’s piles ’em high, serves ’em fast; 36+ years. Hot & cold subs, soups. Some Larry’s serve breakfast. $ K TO B L D Daily METRO DINER, 2034 Kingsley Ave., 375-8548. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. Dinner nightly. SEE SAN MARCO. The ROADHOUSE, 231 Blanding Blvd., 264-0611, roadhouseonline.net. F 2017 BOJ favorite.Sandwiches, wings, burgers, quesadillas for 35+ years. 75+ imported beers. Live music. $ FB L D Daily SPRING PARK COFFEE, 328 Ferris St., Green Cove Springs, 531-9391, springparkcoffee.com. F Cozy shop; freshroasted Brass Tacks coffee, handcrafted hot & cold drinks, specialty lattes, cappuccino, macchiato, teas, pastries, sandwiches, breakfast. $ B L D Daily

PONTE VEDRA BEACH

AL’S PIZZA, 635 A1A, 543-1494. F 2017 BOJ winner/ favorite. SEE INTRACOASTAL. LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 830 A1A N., Ste. 6, 273-3993. F 2017 BOJ favorite. SEE ORANGE PARK. M SHACK NOCATEE, 641 Crosswater Pkwy., 395-3575. F 2017 BOJ winner. SEE BEACHES. METRO DINER, 340 Front St., Ste. 700, 513-8422. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE SAN MARCO.

RIVERSIDE, 5 PTS + WESTSIDE

13 GYPSIES, 887 Stockton St., 389-0330, 13gypsies.com. 2017 BOJ winner. Authentic Mediterranean cuisine: chorizo, tapas, blackened cod, pork skewers, coconut mango curry chicken. Breads from scratch. $$ BW L D Tu-Sa, R Sa AL’S PIZZA, 1620 Margaret St., Ste. 201, 388-8384. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE INTRACOASTAL. BIG OAK BBQ & CATERING, 1948 Henley Rd., Middleburg, 214-3041. 1440 Dunn Ave., 757-2225, bigoakbbqfl.com. Family-owned-and-operated barbecue joints have smoked chicken, pulled pork, ribs, sides and stumps, which sounds damn good. $$ K TO L D M-Sa BLACK SHEEP, 1534 Oak St., 355-3793, blacksheep5points. com. 2017 BOJ winner. New American, Southern; local source

ingredients. Specials, rooftop bar. HH. $$$ FB R Sa & Su; L M-F; D Nightly BOLD BEAN COFFEE ROASTERS, 869 Stockton St., Ste. 1, 855-1181, boldbeancoffee.com. 2017 BOJ winner. Smallbatch, artisanal approach to sourcing and roasting singleorigin, direct-trade coffees. Signature blends, hand-crafted syrups, espressos, craft beers. $ BW TO B L Daily CORNER TACO, 818 Post St., 240-0412, cornertaco.com. Made-from-scratch “Mexclectic street food,” tacos, nachos, gluten-free, vegetarian options. $ BW L D Tu-Su CUMMER CAFÉ, Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., 356-6857, cummer.org. 2017 BOJ winner. Light lunch, quick bites, locally roasted coffee, espressobased drinks, sandwiches, desserts, daily specials. Dine in or in gardens. $ BW K L D Tu; L W-Su EUROPEAN STREET CAFÉ, 2753 Park St., 384-9999. 2017 BOJ winner. 130+ import beers, 20 on tap. Sandwiches. Dine outside at some E-Sts. $ BW K L D Daily GRASSROOTS Natural Market, 2007 Park St., 384-4474, thegrassrootsmarket.com. F 2017 BOJ winner. Juice bar uses certified organic fruits, veggies. Artisanal cheeses, 300 craft, import beers, organic wines, produce, meats, vitamins, herbs, wraps, sides, sandwiches. $ BW TO B L D Daily HAWKERS ASIAN Street Fare, 1001 Park St., 508-0342, hawkerstreetfare.com. 2017 BOJ winner. Authentic dishes from mobile stalls: BBQ pork char sui, beef haw fun, Hawkers baos, chow faan, grilled Hawker skewers. $ BW TO L D Daily JOHNNY’S Deli & Grille, 474 Riverside Ave., 356-8055. Casual spot offers made-to-order sandwiches, wraps. $ TO B L M-Sa LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 1509 Margaret St., 674-2794. 7895 Normandy Blvd., 781-7600. 8102 Blanding Blvd., 779-1933. F 2017 BOJ favorite. SEE ORANGE PARK. METRO DINER, 4495 Roosevelt Blvd., 999-4600. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE SAN MARCO. MOON RIVER PIZZA, 1176 Edgewood Ave. S., 389-4442. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. SEE AMELIA ISLAND. M SHACK, 1012 Margaret St., 423-1283. 2017 BOJ winner. SEE BEACHES. SOUTHERN ROOTS Filling Station, 1275 King St., 513-4726, southernrootsjax.com. 2017 BOJ winner. Fresh vegan fare; local, organic ingredients. Specials, on bread, local greens/ rice, change daily. Sandwiches, coffees, teas. $ Tu-Su SUN-RAY CINEMA, 1028 Park St., 359-0047, sunraycinema. com. 2017 BOJ winner. First-run, indie and art films screened. Beer, local drafts, wine, pizza–Godbold, Black Lagoon Supreme–hot dogs, hummus, sandwiches, popcorn, nachos, brownies. $$ BW Daily

The BEARDED PIG Southern BBQ & Beer Garden, 1224 Kings Ave., 619-2247, thebeardedpigbbq.com. F 2017 BOJ favorite. Barbecue joint Southern style: brisket, pork, chicken, sausage, beef; veggie platters. $$ BW K TO Daily BISTRO AIX, 1440 San Marco Blvd., 398-1949, bistrox.com. F Mediterranean/French inspired menu changes seasonally. 250+ wines. Wood-fired oven-baked, grilled specialties: pizza, pasta, risotto, steaks, seafood. Hand-crafted cocktails, specialty drinks. Dine outside. HH M-F. $$$ FB L D Daily BOLD BEAN COFFEE ROASTERS, 1905 Hendricks Ave. 2017 BOJ winner. SEE RIVERSIDE. EUROPEAN STREET CAFÉ, 1704 San Marco Blvd., 398-9500. F 2017 BOJ winner. SEE RIVERSIDE. FUSION SUSHI, 1550 University Blvd. W., 636-8688, fusionsushijax.com. Upscale; fresh sushi, sashimi, hibachi, teriyaki, katsu, seafood. $$ K L D Daily HAVANA-JAX Café/CUBA LIBRE Bar, 2578 Atlantic Blvd., 399-0609, havanajax.com. F 2017 BOJ winner. Bite Club certified. Cuban sandwiches are big, thick, flattened. Traditional fare: black beans & rice, plantains, steaks, seafood, chicken & rice, roast pork. Spanish wine, drink specials, mojitos, Cuba libres. Nonstop HH. $ FB K L D Daily METRO DINER, 3302 Hendricks Ave., 398-3701, metrodinercom. F 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. Original upscale diner in a historic 1930s-era building. Meatloaf, chicken pot pie, soups. This one serves dinner nightly. $$ B R L D Daily TAVERNA, 1986 San Marco Blvd., 398-3005, tavernasanmarco.com. 2017 BOJ winner/favorite. Chef Sam Efron’s authentic Italian; tapas, wood-fired pizza. Seasonal local produce, meats. Craft beer (some local), award-winning wine. $$$ FB K TO R L D Daily

SOUTHSIDE + TINSELTOWN

ALHAMBRA THEATRE & DINING, 12000 Beach Blvd., 641-1212, alhambrajax.com. 2017 BOJ winner. Open 50 years. Executive Chef DeJuan Roy’s themed menus. Reservations. $$ FB D Tu-Su EUROPEAN STREET CAFÉ, 5500 Beach Blvd., 398-1717. F 2017 BOJ winner. SEE RIVERSIDE. LARRY’S SUBS, 3611 St. Johns Bluff Rd. S., 641-6499. 4479 Deerwood Lake Pkwy., 425-4060. F 2017 BOJ favorite. SEE ORANGE PARK. MARIANAS GRINDS, 11380 Beach, Ste. 10, 206-612-6596. F Pacific Islander fare, chamorro culture. Soups, stews, fitada, beef oxtail, katden pika; empanadas, lumpia, chicken relaguen, BBQ-style ribs, chicken. $$ TO B L D Tu-Su M SHACK, 10281 Midtown Pkwy., 642-5000. F 2017 BOJ winner. SEE BEACHES.

SPRINGFIELD + NORTHSIDE

ANDY’S GRILL, 1810 W. Beaver St., 354-2821, jaxfarmersmarket.com. F 2017 BOJ favorite. Inside Jax Farmers Market. Local, regional, international produce. Breakfast, sandwiches. $ B L D M-Sa LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 12001 Lem Turner Rd., 764-9999. F 2017 BOJ favorite. SEE ORANGE PARK. UPTOWN Kitchen & Bar, 1303 Main St. N., 355-0734, uptownmarketjax.com. F Bite Club certified. Fresh fare, innovative menus, farm-to-table selections, daily specials. $$ BW TO B L Daily


PINT-SIZED Booze at your doorstep with a few TAPS and SWIPES

PARTY

SAVIORS

IT’S HAPPENED TO ALL OF US. YOU’RE ALL SET TO throw a rockin’ backyard party when you realize you forgot beer. You’re scrambling to get the yard ready and the guests will be arriving any minute. You don’t have time for a beer run. That’s when the plethora of new beer and alcohol delivery services can really save the day. National players like Drizly, Minibar and Instacart let buyers order brews online or through an app and have purchases delivered a short time later. Even brewery giant Heineken is jumping in the fray. Drizly got its start when then-college students Nick Rellas and Justin Robinson asked the age-old question: “Why can’t I get beer delivered?” The answer, they found after an all-night Google search, was that it was legal—except no one actually did it. A light bulb went off in their heads: Drizly was born. That was 2012; six years on, the company services more than 70 markets in the U.S. and Canada, including Jacksonville. Drizly partners with local liquor stores to deliver the brew, charging consumers a fee. A year after Drizly’s launch, rival service Minibar hit the streets. Founders Lindsey Andrews and Lara Crystal launched in New York City where nearly everything is delivered, except alcohol. Identifying a potential opportunity, the two developed an app and went to market. Unlike Drizly, Minibar does not charge consumers; instead, it collects a small percentage of the sale from its retail partners. Minibar also offers bartender-booking service in a few markets. Unfortunately, Jacksonville is not among them yet.

OVERSET Instacart is better known locally for its grocery shopping and delivery service through Publix supermarkets, but it’s also pleased to deliver alcohol if the need–or desire–arises. The services work like most other online delivery services. Download an app, put in a credit card number and address and start shopping. Once you have what you want in your cart, pay and wait for delivery. All these services require someone at least 21 years old to be present to accept delivery. For most, the delivery person will ask for a valid state ID and require the consumer to sign for the beer. (Drizly actually scans the ID with a proprietary in-app tool to check its validity.) If no one there is 21 or older to accept delivery, the items are returned to the service’s retail partner and a hefty cancellation fee is levied on the customer’s credit card. Why have alcohol delivery services come to the forefront now? For the retailer, it’s a way to get product out the door without customers actually going to the store. And, with more than 75 million millennials now old enough to drink, the ease of using an app to buy and get delivery of booze as effortlessly as ordering an Uber is very attractive. So the next time you find the ol’ beer fridge emptying out, consider getting a few six-packs delivered. Oh, and put some clothes on before the delivery person rings the bell.

Marc Wisdom marc@folioweekly.com

PINT-SIZED PI NT-S NT SIZ ZED B BREWERS’ REWE WERS COMMUNITY COMM MMUNITY AARDWOLF BREWING COMPANY 1461 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville

BOTTLENOSE BREWING 9700 Deer Lake Ct., Ste. 1, Jacksonville

OLD COAST ALES 300 Anastasia Blvd., St. Augustine

AMELIA TAVERN RESTAURANT & BREWPUB 318 Centre St., Fernandina Beach

DOG ROSE BREWING CO. 77 Bridge St., St. Augustine

PINGLEHEAD BREWING COMPANY 12 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park

ANCIENT CITY BREWING 3420 Agricultural Ctr. Dr., St. Augustine

ENGINE 15 BREWING CO. DOWNTOWN 633 Myrtle Ave. N., Jacksonville

RAGTIME TAVERN SEAFOOD & GRILL 207 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach

ANHEUSER-BUSCH 1100 Ellis Rd. N., Jacksonville

ENGINE 15 BREWING CO. 1500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 217, Jax Beach

RIVER CITY BREWING COMPANY 835 Museum Cir., Jacksonville

ATLANTIC BEACH BREWING COMPANY 725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 3, Atlantic Beach

GREEN ROOM BREWING, LLC 228 Third St. N., Jax Beach

SEVEN BRIDGES GRILLE & BREWERY 9735 Gate Pkwy., Jacksonville

BOG BREWING COMPANY 218 W. King St., St. Augustine

HYPERION BREWING COMPANY 1740 Main St. N., Jacksonville

SOUTHERN SWELLS BREWING CO. 1312 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach

BOLD CITY BREWERY 2670 Rosselle St., Ste. 7, Jacksonville

INTUITION ALE WORKS 929 E. Bay St., Jacksonville

VETERANS UNITED CRAFT BREWERY 8999 Western Way, Ste. 104, Jacksonville

BOLD CITY DOWNTOWN 109 E. Bay St., Jacksonville

MAIN AND SIX BREWING COMPANY 1636 Main St. N., Jacksonville

WICKED BARLEY BREWING COMPANY 4100 Baymeadows Rd., Jacksonville

MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 31


CHEFFED-UP

THE NAME

GAME

Move over, Taco Tuesday, A NEW DAY D AY hhas as ccome ome I LOVE THE IDEA OF ATTACHING THEMES TO DAYS of the week and even dates in the month. This phenomenon has been around for a while, but I really don’t pay much attention to other people or the world around me. In fact, if it weren’t for Instagram, I’d have no clue at all. For example, I missed Star Wars Day, “May the Fourth be with you,” this year (probably because it doesn’t involve food). Other favorites include Taco Tuesday, Pi Day and, most definitely, Meatball Monday. Anyone surprised that my version is NOT Meatless Monday? Probably not. Here’s another alliterative idea and, noooo, it’s not Tofu Thursday, wise guy. How ’bout Skewered Saturday? The skewers could consist of any item cooked on a stick, ranging from satays to shish kabobs. Cooking food over fire on a stick is a method warm weather societies share. There’s just something primal about the smell of meat caramelizing as it sizzles and browns over an open fire. Yum, cave-man food. With Kilauea blowing up the news, we’re all thinking of Hawaii. With Hawaii, three things usually come to mind: volcanos, giant waves and luaus. Since I don’t surf— why would I own a board that I don’t cut meat on?—and there aren’t any volcanos around the 904, the magnificent Hawaiian version of open-fire cooking comes to my hungry mind. That’s right, luau-style cuisine. The Hawaiian Islands have a great culinary tradition. First, a seafaring fellow fond of cartography and exploring named Cook discovered them for the West. That should be enough to warm foodies’ little hearts, but that’s not all. Captain Cook originally named the Hawaiian Islands—are you ready for this!?—The Sandwich Islands! The story goes that, when captain and crew first landed, they stumbled upon the natives eating a lunch of their traditional submarine sandwich. How about that? OK, that’s only half-true. Captain Cook really did name Hawaii the Sandwich Islands, but that was because one of his backers was the Earl of Sandwich—the same Earl of Sandwich responsible for creating sandwiches, but that’s another story. For Skewered Saturday, I combined

flavors of island fusion cuisine to create delectable chicken skewers. Thanks to some butchering I did for a recent class, I just happened to have a few (20) chicken tenders lying around, so I put together a marinade based on Huli Huli chicken. After marinating them overnight, I threaded the little beauties onto skewers with a chunk of pineapple at each end. While the skewers grilled, I made a wok of Cheffed-Up fried rice using dried Spanish chorizo (didn’t have any Spam), assorted vegetables, more pineapple and eggs. And how was it? Well, let’s just say the flavors ERUPTED in my mouth!

CHEF BILL’S HAWAIIAN CHICKEN MARINADE Ingredients • 1/2 cup fresh pineapple juice • 1/4 cup tamari sauce • 1/4 cup ketchup • 2 tbsp. ginger, grated • 1/4 cup mirin • 2 tbsp. sugar • 2 tbsp. honey • 2 tbsp. rice wine vinegar • 1/4 cup water • 1 tbsp. sriracha • 6 scallions, sliced; use white parts for • marinade and green tops for garnish • 20 chicken tenders, or any chicken • parts you like Directions 1. Whisk all ingredients except the 1. chicken in a large bowl. 2. Reserve 1/2 cup of marinade 1. for basting. 3. Place the chicken in a Ziploc bag 1. and pour the marinade over top. 1. Marinate overnight. Until we cook again, Chef Bill Thompson cheffedup@folioweekly.com ___________________________________ Email Chef Bill Thompson, owner of Fernandina’s Amelia Island Culinary Academy, at cheffedup@folioweekly.com, for inspiration and to get Cheffed-Up!

CHEFFED-UP CHEF CH EFFE FED D-UP UP G GROCERS’ ROCE RO CERS RS’ S COMMUNITY COMMUN CO NIT ITY BUYGO 22 S. Eighth St., Fernandina Beach EARTH FARE 11901-250 Atlantic Blvd., Arlington JACKSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET 1810 W. Beaver St., Westside NATIVE SUN 11030 Baymeadows Rd., Jacksonville 10000 San Jose Blvd., Mandarin 1585 N. Third St., Jax Beach 32 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018

PUBLIX 1033 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine ROWE’S 1670 Wells Rd., Orange Park 8595 Beach Blvd., Southside THE SAVORY MARKET 474380 S.R. 200, Fernandina Beach TERRY’S PRODUCE Buccaneer Trail, Fernandina Beach WHOLE FOODS 10601 San Jose Blvd., Mandarin


MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 33


PET PARENTING MUST LOVE FOLIO LIVING DEAR

DAVI

DOGS

Honoring puppy love in all its DELIGHTFUL WEIRDNESS

A WISE PERSON ONCE SAID, “PETS ARE humanizing. They remind us we have an obligation and responsibility to preserve, nurture and care for all life.” May is Responsible Animal Guardian Month. Well, isn’t every month? There’s actually a whole month set aside as a time for pet parents to honor their cherished pets. In celebration, let’s bark about some of the fascinating–and a bit neurotic—traits that make pet guardians truly remarkable, quirky humans: You appear to be a little crazy. I can’t speak for all pets, but my mom finds it physically impawsible to refrain from giving me a human voice. It’s true that dogs are expressive creatures, so it must feel instinctual to verbalize what our derpy little faces are trying to communicate to you. To non-pet people, this is a bizarre phenomenon they absolutely do not understand. But that’s OK, your pet gets it.

SET

YOU’RE GREAT AT SHARING SPACE.

There’s an unspoken rule that when your pet is sleeping on you, you don’t move. Ever. Nuzzling is just one of the sweet ways we say, “I love you.” Making your pet move from your lap or a spot on the couch is not an option. If your dog, cat or even pig is cozied up, wedge into an open space and snuggle together.

YOU LOOK LIKE YOUR PET—AND IT’S NOT ON PURPOSE. It’s often said that

people eventually end up looking exactly like their pets, or vice versa, each making the same facial expression at the same time. Which is not creepy at all. When people tell me that I’m a canine version of

my mom, I take it as a compliment. Pets and their owners are just like married couples—they get more alike over time. The longer an animal has been with an owner, the more likely it is to acquire that person’s characteristics. If you don’t know anyone who resembles their furry friend, you’re not paying attention.

YOU SHARE PHOTOS OF YOUR PETS ON SOCIAL MEDIA. If I do something funny,

embarrassing or straight-up awesome, my mom uploads a picture immediately. Pet parents are shameless, flooding their social media pages with pics of furry friends, and the comments are proof positive that these peeps are also pet peeps and totally get you.

YOU TAKE THE DAY OFF TO CARE FOR THE ILL. Your animal companion is sick or

just had surgery, so you call in sick to work because, well, you don’t feel good if they don’t feel good. Logical to loving animal guardians? Absolutely! The responsibility of pet ownership also includes keeping us safe, healthy and loved. My mom reminds me of this every time she catches me eating something from the street or sniffing the garbage. It’s because she loves me and doesn’t want me to get sick. And though I may get miffed, I know in my heart she means well—and may be a little smarter than I am, sometimes. Davi mail@folioweekly.com ____________________________________ Davi is a most responsible and dedicated pet parent guardian.

PET PE ET TI TIP: P: TA TAST TASTY STY ST Y BA BABI BABIES BIES BI ES BRACE THYSELF, ANIMAL LOVERS: Cat mommas sometimes eat their kittens. And you thought your mom was tough. Cannibal kitty doesn’t scarf a bellyful of baby ’cause she’s hungry; it’s usually because the kitten is unhealthy or otherwise physically infirm, the mother is stressed or in poor health herself, which can be brought on by birthing back-to-back litters in a short period of time. Survival of the fittest and all that. Still, our softhearted A&E editor spent part of an afternoon intermittently gagging and crying upon learning of the feline proclivity for chowing down on their progeny. 34 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018


LOCAL PET EVENTS PET CANCER AWARENESS • Petco teams with Blue Buffalo to increase awareness about pet cancers. Learn about detection signs and preventive measures. Reminder cancer check magnets and half-off coupons are distributed. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at Petco, 430 CBL Dr., St. Augustine, 824-8520; petco.com.

ADOPTABLES

RED

Three legs, four years old. That’s right, I’m a proud tripod pup. I’ve been in the shelter for a while and can’t wait to finally have a family and home to call my own! I’m a big fan of stuffed toys, cookies and playing catch. I love all people—especially kids—and I’m a great kisser! To meet me, just stop by Jacksonville Humane Society, 8464 Beach Blvd., Southside. Open every day!

10TH ANNUAL ROYAL YAPPY HOUR • The 2017 King and Queen transfer their titles to the new rulers at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Dr., Downtown. Registration is held 2-3 p.m. Sunday, May 20; the canine pageant starts at 3:30 p.m. and wraps up at 5 p.m. Dress your beloved best friend in his/her finest for the catwalk … umm, the DOGwalk! Competition categories are Bio, Attire, Appearance, and Overall. Live music, vendors, free giveaways (is that redundant?), prizes, drink specials, more. Free admission. B.Y.O.D. (Bring your own dog.) 353-1188, jacksonvillelanding.com. MEGA PET ADOPTION • First Coast No More Homeless Pets, Petco Foundation, Jacksonville Animal Care & Protective Services, Nassau Humane Society, Friends of Clay County Animals, Jacksonville Humane Society and other organizations offer more than 1,000 pets for adoption, from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, June 8, 9 and 10 at Jacksonville Fairgrounds, 510 Fairground Place, Downtown. Free entry, free parking. The $20 adoption fee includes spay/neuter, microchip, vaccines and city license, jaxadoptapet.org, fcnmhp.org. BE AN ANGEL • Help the many deserving felines of Cats Angels live better lives–donate cat food, litter, toys and cleaning supplies. Or choose a sponsorship level: Whisker-Licking Good Level, $25; Helping Paw, $50; Gold

Mouse, $110; and Cheshire Cat Level, $200. To find out more, stop by Cats Angels Inc. SPCA Thrift Store & Adoption Center, 709 S. Eighth St., Fernandina Beach, 321-2267, catsangels.com. CAMP CRITTERS PART I: REPTILE ROUND UP • Kids are sheriffs-in-training at PetSmart Junction, where they learn about Wild West creatures and maybe even hold a bearded dragon, noon-3 p.m. Saturday, June 9 at PetSmart, 356 Monument Rd., Regency, 724-4600; 9515 Crosshill Blvd., Ste. 113, 777-8688; 8801 Southside Blvd., 519-8878; 10261 River Marsh Dr., 997-1335; 11700 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 19, 831-3466; 1956 Third St. S., Jax Beach, 853-2135; 1919 Wells Rd., Orange Park, 579-2362; 13141 City Station Dr., 696-0289; 1779 U.S. 1 S., St. Augustine, 495-0785, petsmart.com. Parts II and III are held in July and August, respectively. KATZ 4 KEEPS ADOPTION DAYS • Adoption hours and days are 11 a.m.-3 p.m. May 19 and 20 and every Saturday and Sunday at 935B A1A N., Ponte Vedra, 834-3223, katz4keeps.org.

ADOPTABLES

PLUM

You’ll be plum(b) in luck when you adopt me! I’m a three-year-old expert-level purr-ist and really love pats and chin rubs. My tail is only a couple inches long, and folks tell me it’s adorable—but I think it makes me look fierce, like a lynx! See my profile at jaxhumane. org or stop in for a while. I’ll be hangin’ with my kitty roommates in Group Room 2.

PET ADOPTION • More than 60 cats and kittens and more than 40 dogs and puppies are looking for forever homes at Wags & Whiskers Pet Rescue, 1967 Old Moultrie Rd., St. Augustine, 797-1913, 797-6039, petrescue.org. Animals are spayed or neutered and are fully up-to-date on shots when they leave the facility. _________________________________ To list an event, send the name, time, date, location (complete street address, city), admission price, contact number/website to print, to mdryden@folioweekly.com MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 35


FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

DALE RATERMANN’s Folio Weekly Crossword presented by

PEANUT BUTTER, BEING GROOVY, QUEEN VICTORIA & SIMONIDES

Serving Excellence Since 1928 Member American Gem Society

San Marco 2044 San Marco Blvd. 398-9741

Ponte Vedra

THE SHOPPES OF PONTE VEDRA

330 A1A North 280-1202

Avondale 3617 St. Johns Ave. 388-5406

FOLIO WEEKLY CROSSWORD 1

2

3

4

14

5

6

7

8

10

11

12

13

16

15

18

17 19 22

9

23

20 25

24

28

29

32

33 36

26 31

34

35

37

38

39

42

46

48

51 56

59

65

66

67

ACROSS 31 Fabricated 35 White House inits. 38 Happens 14 Irrational fear 16 On the A-list 17 SANG HITS in a dissolved city of St. Johns County? 18 Coggin auto 19 They can take a yoke 20 Put in stitches 21 72, at TPC Sawgrass 22 Mellow Mushroom ingredient 25 Beach Bowl woe 27 Soft ball 28 Punk subgenre 30 Scull mover 31 Dune makeup 32 Jags punt path 33 “Give it a ___” 35 Vinyl stack 36 A CABINET LATCH in an oceanfront town? 41 Navy ship inits. 42 High plateau 43 Seafowl 45 Horse’s gait 47 Sweetwater developer Webb 48 Hot to trot, e.g. 50 Kind of mail

53 57

60

64

51 Vision improver 53 Seminoles game channel, maybe 54 Adult ed. class 55 Dixie veggie 56 Afrikander 58 Some UF sorority women 60 A PELICAN in a U.S. 1 golf course community? 64 Boring bits 65 Gucci and Vespucci 66 Big name in small swimwear 67 Survey marks 68 Hart Bridge feature

31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 10 11 12 13 15

44

49

52

55

54

40

43

47

50

58

27

30

41 45

21

61

62

63

68

20 “Aye, aye ___!” 22 JIA ID checker 23 Jacksonville Farmers Market pods 24 Non-fiction 26 SoCal daily 27 Cape Canaveral org. 29 Wipe clean 31 Pickle piece 34 Type widths 35 Scale meas. 37 The Joy ___ Club 38 Like a virgin 39 Florida keys 40 Camel’s bulge

44 45 46 47 49 50 51 52 55 57 59 60 61 62 63

Newsman Amaro Kind of popsicle Declare Rodman Reservoir sight Organ rupture Test runs Rodeo rope Tropical nuts EverBank Field unit Fish dish Peg of the LPGA Selfies, e.g. Nimnicht lot buy Biz abbr. Fire proof

DOWN

SOLUTION TO 5.9.18 PUZZLE

Daytona 500 stat Battery buy Mayo VIPs Go to Gusto Sharpens I-10 marker JU prof’s aides Four pairs ___ mein Playfully shy Grand Slam event Delay progress Gobble down Say no to

A T O D D S

36 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018

B A R R E L

C H U S P T R E I C G O

S S A P M L I V E C O E U T C R C H I E E P S R R S L A G E N E A G L F E

T H A I

A E T N A

H I S P P A O R U S S E T E R

G M T

H O T F R F R O R E D I S E N D N O I D D S O P U W I R H U G O M E

E P E E S N A N O T E E N

R E S Y E N E R N S E S T E M T B Y T E E R V E L E T O F U S U L N A T I E D M A D S S E Y E N

ARIES (March 21-April 19): According to my astrological omen assessment, your duty now is to be a brave observer, fair-minded intermediary and honest storyteller. Your people need you to help them do the right thing. They need your influence to make good decisions. If you encounter lazy communication, dispel it with clear, concise words. If you find foggy thinking starting to infect discussions, inject clear, concise insights.

anywhere she pleased, so she was able to talk to him after the show. “You’re a genius,” she told him, impressed with his artistry. “Perhaps, Your Majesty,” Paderewski said. “But before that I was a drudge.” He meant that he’d labored long and hard before reaching the mastery the Queen attributed to him. My astrological omen analysis says you’re in an extended “drudge” phase. That’s good! Take advantage to slowly and surely improve your skills.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Chemist Marcellus Gilmore Edson took out a patent for peanut butter in 1894. Businessperson George Bayle sold peanut butter as a snack in 1894. In 1901, Julia David Chandler published the first recipe for a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. In 1922, another pioneer found a new way to produce peanut butter that made it taste better and last longer. In 1928, two trailblazers invented sliced bread, setting the stage for the ascension of the peanut butter and jelly sandwich to its full glory. You’re partway through a process of generating a practical marvel, at a phase equal to Chandler’s original recipe. Onward!

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Ancient Greek poet Simonides was among the first of his profession to charge a fee for services, making money by composing verses on demand. Once, he was asked to write a stirring tribute to a mule race winner. He declined, saying his sensibilities were too fine to create for such a vulgar activity. In response, his potential patron dramatically upped the proposed price. Soon, Simonides produced a rousing ode that included the phrase “wind-swift steeds.” The poet is your role model for the next few weeks. Be flexible about what you’d do to get a reward you’d like.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A popular candy in North America is Milk Duds, the oddly shaped globs of chocolate caramel. When they were invented in 1926, the manufacturer planned to make perfect little spheres. But the rather primitive technology available back then made it impossible. The finished products were blobs, not orbs. They tasted good, though. Workers jokingly suggested the new confection’s name include “dud,” meaning “failure” or “flop.” They’ve sold well for more than 90 years, proving success doesn’t require perfection. Who knows? Maybe dud-ness is part of their charm. There’s a metaphorical version of Milk Duds in your future. CANCER (June 21-July 22): In my vision of your life in the weeks ahead, you hunt for intimate power lost a while back. After many twists and trials, you find it almost by accident in a seemingly unimportant site, a place to which you’ve paid little attention. When you recognize it, and realize you can reclaim it, your demeanor transforms. Your eyes brighten, your skin glows, body language galvanizes. A vivid hope rises in you: how to make a once-lost, rediscovered power alive again. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The etymological dictionary says the English slang word “cool” meant “calmly audacious” as far back as 1825. The term “groovy” was first used by jazz musicians in the ’30s to signify “performing well without grandstanding.” “Hip,” which was originally “hep,” was also from the jazz community. It meant “informed, aware, up-to-date.” These are your words of power in the weeks ahead. You can and should be as hip, cool and groovy as you can be. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Seek influences to give you grinning power over worries. Be daring enough to risk a breakthrough in service to your most demanding dream. Make an effort to understand yourself as your best teacher might understand you. Find out how to summon more faith in yourself–not rooted in lazy wishes, but a rigorous self-assessment. My prediction: You will fulfill at least one directive, probably more. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Polish pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski once performed for England’s Queen Victoria. She could go

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Here’s a nice new operative metaphor that you should pay attention to right now: You’re like a painter who’s had a glimpse, a vision of an interesting work of art you really feel that you could create–but you lack some of the paint colors needed to actualize it. You may also need several new kinds of brushes. Be aggressive when you go tracking missing ingredients or tools to let you to accomplish the so-far imaginary masterpiece. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Useful revelations and provocative epiphanies are headed your way, but they may not arrive sheathed in sweetness and light, with tinkling swells of celestial music. More likely, they’ll barge in with a clatter, bringing bristly marvels and rough hope. In a related matter: At least one breakthrough is in your imminent future, but it’s more likely to resemble a mud wrestle than a mountaintop dance. Not a problem! Enjoy rugged but interesting fun. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): One of humanity’s saddest aspects is the disparity between love and romance. Real love is hard work. It’s unselfish, unwavering and rooted in generous empathy. Romance, though, tends to be capricious and inconstant, and it’s often dependent on the moods of those involved, as well as chemistry fluctuations. What can you do about this crazy-making problem? Maybe arrange for romantic experiences to be more suffused with unconditional love’s primal power? It’s a realistic request, especially in the weeks ahead. You may potentially draw in more compassion and spiritual affection. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In accordance with astrological omens, you should dream up new rituals. Traditional observances and ceremonies handed down from family and culture may bring comfort and nostalgia, but not renewal and reinvention. Imagine celebrating homemade rites of passage designed for the new person you’ve become. You may see how much power they have to shape your life’s long-term cycles. Create a new ritual: Take a piece of paper and write two fears that inhibit your drive to succeed. Then burn that paper and those fears in the kitchen sink, chanting “I am a swashbuckling incinerator of fears!” Rob Brezsny freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com


NEWS OF THE WEIRD MAYBE WE SHOULD TRY THAT HERE …

Jaywalkers, beware: The city of Daye, in Hubei province China, installed water sprayers and an electronic screen at a crosswalk to stop folks crossing on a red light. Five pylons were put along the road April 16, China Daily reported; three identify offenders using sensors and spray them with water vapor. Other pylons “photograph people crossing against red lights,” explained Wan Xinqiang of Daye public security bureau, and “a large electronic screen at the intersection will instantly display their photos. ... If the equipment works well, we’ll utilize it throughout the city.”

DON’T TREAD ON ME

In the seaside village of Lytham St Annes, England, Douglas Cholmondley Travis, an 88-year-old member of the local Neighborhood Watch, was on patrol on the evening of Oct. 10, 2017, when he and an 87-year-old watch colleague saw a van going into Lytham Park Cemetery. Thinking something was up, they began taking pictures of it until van driver Antony James, visiting family graves, got mad and stopped, according to Metro News. James got out of the van to confront Travis, causing a panic, according to defense attorney Robert Castle, resulting in James getting knocked down by the Neighborhood Watch vehicle and Travis being charged for reckless driving and assault. “This is all terribly sad,” Castle told Blackpool Magistrates Court in late April, as his client is “one of the eyes and ears of the police.” Travis was fined £40 plus court costs.

SHE’S NOT HUUUUGE

Dolores Leis, 64, of Nanton in Galicia, Spain, is a modest wife and potato farmer. But thanks to the internet, she has found fame as “Trump’s Galician sister.” The Associated Press reports a journalist researching farming posted a photo of Leis at her farm on Instagram, and the striking resemblance between her and the U.S. president caught the attention of the web. “I say that it must be because of the color of the hair,” Leis told La Voz de Galicia on April 24. She not overwhelmed by the sudden attention because, unlike her doppelganger, she doesn’t

use a mobile phone and isn’t much interested in online chatter. “I look at everything that my daughters show me, but it never stung my curiosity to have a [phone],” she said.

Folio Weekly helps you connect with the paramour of your dreams. Go to folioweekly.com/i-saw-u.html, fill out the FREE form correctly (40 words or fewer, dammit) by 5 p.m. Friday (for the next Wednesday’s FW) – next stop: Bliss!

HUNGRY, HUNGRY DUMBASS

On April 4, a homeowner in the Longton area of Stoke-on-Trent, England, came home to find a man bathing in his tub and enjoying a cup of Oxo (broth), according to the BBC. When cops arrived, the naked 36-year-old tried to flee but was caught and arrested. The unhappy homeowner complained: “He ate me crisps, had five rounds of corned beef and sauce, ate a jar of pickles, had two ice creams and a can of Coke.”

RING AROUND THE GREYHOUND

Greyhound Bus passengers were frustrated on April 19 after their trip to New York was delayed by mechanical trouble and navigational challenges. The ride started in Cleveland, with a scheduled departure time of 2:30 a.m., passengers told WEWS-TV, but the bus didn’t leave until 6 a.m. After crossing into Pennsylvania, the bus turned around, and the driver explained he was returning to Cleveland because of mechanical difficulties. However, the driver missed Cleveland and drove all the way to Toledo before realizing the mistake and heading back to Cleveland. “We were on this bus for seven hours just going in a circle,” said passenger Morgan Staley.

AGAIN, IT DOES NOT PAY

In October 1981, Stephen Michael Paris escaped from Jess Dunn Correctional Center in Muskogee, Oklahoma, where he’d been serving a nine-year sentence for drug possession and distribution. Using the name Stephen Chavez, Paris evaded authorities until April 12, when investigators finally tracked him down, thanks to his mother’s obituary, at an office in Houston where he was working. Now 58 years old, Paris was mentioned as a surving family member in his mother’s tribute, using his alias, the Associated Press reported. After confirming his identity with fingerprints, U.S. Marshals Service returned him to custody.

weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

Hey! Thursday, May 17 is PACK RAT DAY. Monday, May 21 is WAITERS & WAITRESSES DAY. Tuesday, May 22? WORLD GOTH DAY! So, Pack Rat Day? She’s in denial. Waiters & Waitresses? Not PC–aren’t they people-pleasers? So it’s WORLD GOTH DAY. Put on seven or eight raggedy pieces of black clothing from Goodwill (’cuz your pose today is streetwise punk), grab those $170 Doc Martens (’cuz you’re no more street punk than Grammy) and skulk around 5 Points or San Marco looking for true love. Drop the disguise, comb your hair and find eternal love, not damnation. Grab a digital device, go to folioweekly.com/i-saw-u.html and take these easy steps: One: Write a five-word headline so the person recalls that perfect moment, like: “ISU going through the dumpster at AngelAID.” Two: Describe the person, like, “You: Squealed, then held up a black lace bustier–or straightjacket–I can’t be sure which.” Three: Describe yourself, like, “Me: Trying on a pair of beat-up Grinders two sizes too small, determined to Cinderella the damn things or die.” Four: Describe the moment, like, “We knew we were destined/doomed to be when we paid with dirty, crumpled dollar bills instead of plastic.” Five: Meet, fall in love, go to the mall. No proper names, emails, websites, etc. Fewer than 40 words. Find love with Folio Weekly ISUs at folioweekly.com/i-saw-u.html! BLUE-EYED GEMINI BOY My Favorite Blue-Eyed Gem, you were leaving; you left me behind. I think about you all the time. We used to read these ads and laugh together. Miss you; hope you’re smiling. Love, Your Florida Gem. When: Aug. 8, 2017. Where: Downtown under the Blue Bridge. #1698-0516 BEARDED WET MAN POST-5K You: Tall man, dreamy eyes, black shirt, running shorts, talked of running with my black goldendoodle. Me: Dripping wet brunette, pink tank, black yoga pants, enjoyed chocolatecovered strawberry. Never got your name. Wanna get wet again? When: April 7. Where: 1st Place Sports, San Marco. #1697-0411 BEAUTIFUL EYES BARISTA You: Work at Bold Bean. Me: Hot and Iced Vanilla Latte every few days. Caught your gaze, couldn’t get away from your beauty. Care for a cup of … coffee? Or just a nice lazy afternoon? When: Wednesday, March 21. Where: Bold Bean San Marco. #1696-0328 HANDSOME T OF OHIO You: Baseball cap, T-shirt under shirt, khakis, eating pizza. You came to our table. We thought you worked there. We were going to Brix; you didn’t show. Looking for you. When: March 10. Where: Flask & Cannon, JB. #1695-0314 STUNNING AUSTRALIAN BLOND You: Long blond hair, black leggings, awesome accent, cruising store. Me: Brown hair, red shorts, clueless in store. Crossed paths, left chatting about Vegemite. Let’s continue over a cold beverage. Cheers, diplomatic relations! When: 10:30 a.m. March 1. Where: Whole Foods San Jose. #1694-0307 DNDANGGG I was a Warlock; you, a Fighter. I cast the spells, you beat the NPC to oblivion. You had a French braid; I was impressed with your strength modifier. We campaigned six times; let’s roll a critical hit together:) When: June 2017. Where: Riverside. #1693-0221 BEAUTIFUL MAN AT DAILY’S You: Filling truck. Me: Shy blonde washing windshield. You asked, “Do you want help with that?” I was speechless; second chance? When: Feb. 1. Where: Bartram Park Daily’s. #1692-0221

CHOCOLATE STUD You: Tall, chocolate man drinking a PBR by the dance floor. Me: Tall, hot brunette, covered in ink, drooling, watching you drink your beer. Will you marry me? When: Dec. 31, 2014. Where: Birdies. #1691-0214 BLACK VELVET KITTYCAT SLIPPERS 7 a.m., didn’t want to be at Quest Diagnostics till you walked in. You: Beautiful, tiny, long, dark hair, big black horn-rimmed glasses. Me: Stocky, black NY cap, black sweatshirt, Adidas high-tops. Regret no “Hello.” Dinner? When: Feb. 2. Where: Beach Blvd. Quest Diagnostics. #1690-0207 TACO TUESDAYS We were feeding bottomless pits (our kids). You snagged last inside table, offered to share. You: Confident, beautiful, loving, enthusiastic mother. Me: Getting my head examined for not getting your number. Tacos again next week? When: Jan. 30. Where: Tijuana Flats Bartram Park. #1689-0207 MISSED YOUR LAST MESSAGES Waxed non-poetic on Sponge Bob, versions of ‘What a Fool Believes’. Easy, sweet conversation; missed messages before you ditched app (saw notifications; didn’t open). Silly to think you left number for me; feel you did. When: Dec. 28. Where: Tinder in the Duval. #1688-0117 PHOTOBOMB LIONS FOUNTAIN SAN MARCO The photographer turned into my path; I was a jerk, raised my hands. I got closer, you turned and faced me. I sat, put my arm around you; she took our picture. Lunch? Dinner? Drinks? When: Jan. 2. Where: San Marco Square. #1687-0110 HOGWARTS EXPRESS You: Stunning smile, blonde highlights, left hand tattoo. Me: Long hair, glasses, buying brother Hedwig mug. Talked about your Universal experience. I’d be honored to wait in butter beer line with you. When: Dec. 24. Where: Jax Beach Books-AMillion. #1686-0103 HANDSOME ELEVATOR DUDE Rode in elevator with you, leaving. I remember your blue eyes. We were with friends. I liked you. Let’s have a drink together. Me: tall(er)?, long hair, floral dress, combat boots. Think you wore a suit. When: Dec. 15. Where: River & Post. #1685-1227 MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 37


CLASSIFIEDS EDUCATION/TRAINING

HEALTH

AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE – Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 www.IncomeCentral.net (AAN CAN)(5/16/18)

LUNG CANCER? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 844-898-7142 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. (AAN CAN)(6/6/18) PENIS ENLARGEMENT PUMP. Get Stronger & Harder Erections Immediately. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently & Safely. Guaranteed Results. FDA Licensed. Free Brochure: 1-800-354-3944 www.DrJoelKaplan.com (AAN CAN)(5/16/18)

ROOMMATE WANTED LUXURY OCEANFRONT CONDO, Jacksonville Beach. Share with professional woman. Unfurnished bedroom, office, studio. Share chef’s kitchen, dining room, living room, balconies. $2000 month, 1/2 utilities. 678-472-5858 PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1,000 a Week Mailing Brochures from Home! No Experience Required. Helping homeworkers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! AdvancedMailing.net (AAN CAN)(5/28/18)

38 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 16-22, 2018

YOUR PORTAL TO REACHING 95,000+ READERS WEEKLY

MISCELLANEOUS HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET - 25mbps starting at $49.99/mo! FAST download speeds. WiFi built in! FREE Standard Installation for lease customers! Limited Time, Call 1-800-490-4140 (AAN CAN)(6/6/18) DENIED CREDIT?? Work to Repair Your Credit Report with the Trusted Leader in Credit Repair. Call Lexington Law for a FREE credit report summary & credit repair consultation. 855-6209426. John C. Heath, Attorney at Law, PLLC, dba Lexington Law Firm. (AAN CAN)(6/6/18) DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Call Now: 1-800-373-6508 (AAN CAN)(5/28/18)

DATING LIVELINKS – CHAT LINES. Flirt, chat and date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now! 844-359-5773. (AAN CAN)(5/23/18)


M.D. M.J.

RIGHT-WING

WEED Some of the strongest winds of legalization waft from CONSERVATIVE CORNERS

ANYONE FAMILIAR WITH THE VAGARIES OF SOCIAL media in Northeast Florida—or anywhere else, for that matter—will readily attest to the truthiness of the old cliché. You can see several examples of that dynamic in play in relation to the medical marijuana issue, which has begun to draw support from what may be considered the most unlikely places. These places only seem unlikely, however, if you’re a noob. The latest example was provided by disgraced current Attorney General Jeff Sessions, whose continued recalcitrant rants against decriminalization has drawn scorn on a bipartisan basis—even from Fox, the closest thing to state media America has ever seen. On the Fox Business Network, former MTV “Alternative Nation” host Kennedy, née Lisa Kennedy Montgomery, cited a recent Quinnipiac University poll showing 63 percent of Americans are in support of legalization. “There is no fuzzy math here. It’s very straightforward, and [Sessions] and his anti-pot crusade are on the losing side of the argument,” Kennedy said. She went on to mention two studies showing “direct correlation” between decriminalization and decreased rates of both opioid prescriptions and overdose deaths. “And what does Jefferson Beauregard Sessions say about that?” she asked, the snark rising to a fever pitch. “He kind of shrugs and says he doesn’t think that will be sustained in the long run. Jeff Sessions won’t be sustained in the long run, because his assbackwards anti-liberty thinking is the very thing that’s getting people killed!” And boom goes the dynamite. In taking this stand, Kennedy affixes herself to the tail end of a tradition that began with my old pen pal William F.

Buckley Jr., the lunatic wordsmith and right-wing provocateur who founded National Review in 1955, which is largely credited with launching the conservative revolution. Buckley steered his ship firmly athwart the prohibitionist tide in the ’90s, alienating many conservatives while making legalization officially a bipartisan concern. (Buckley also opposed the Iraq War, making him correct on America’s two biggest screw-ups in the modern era.) His pot writings are well worth revisiting, both for the smooth precision of his language and the timelessness of the position he articulates. You can bet that Kennedy, an out conservative in her early 20s, stationed at ground zero of the counterculture at that time, read every word of it. “The more we study cannabis,” she concluded, “the more it can be refined and used to treat medical conditions, and boredom. The longer we protract the immoral Drug War, the more decimation we’ll see in inner cities and rural communities hit hardest by supply-side drug combat that has proved fruitless. “Jeff Sessions needs to do the right thing and admit he’s wrong, but he won’t so, instead, at some point he’s got to go. Hopefully the next AG will be a force for good, and not a cesspool of backward thinking, bad drug policy ….” Truer words could not have been spoken and, given the source, it’s an indictment more damning than anything Robert Mueller has produced so far. (So far.) Shelton Hull mail@folioweekly.com ___________________________________ Got questions about medical marijuana? Let us answer them. Send inquiries to mail@folioweekly.com.

FOLIO VOICES : BACKPAGE EDITORIAL An OPEN LETTER to Florida’s Congressional delegation

REAL TALK OVERSET ABOUT TARIFFS

AT FIRST BLUSH, THE IMPOSITION OF TARIFFS ON China may not appear to significantly impact Florida. However, in retaliation, China has initiated a trade war imposing import tariffs on our goods, which will have a very dire effect on our state. Florida has 15 major ports that deal in international commerce, employing more than 1.8 million Floridians. We have 12 international airports employing tens of thousands of workers. Almost 300,000 Florida jobs are supported directly by exports alone. Annually, more than $143 billion in international commerce runs through Florida’s transportation hubs, more than $33 billion in metropolitan Miami alone. Our state exports more than $60 billion a year in goods; agricultural products accounting for $3.6 billion, which is nearly 40 percent of Florida’s total agricultural production and now being targeted by China for retaliatory tariff restrictions. If international trade is compromised by imposing tariffs, Florida’s agricultural sector will be devastated, as will other important sectors of our economy. Florida employment will suffer substantially. As I’m sure you understand, a trade deficit does not cost American jobs. Those jobs have already been lost and that should be dealt with as discussed below. A trade deficit is also not, as President Trump has described it, something that causes us to “lose” the dollar amount of the deficit. Put simply as a vignette, if my mother decides she would like to buy a vase from a neighbor across the street and pays $50 for that vase, she does not “lose” $50. In fact, she received something that she believes is of higher value than $50 or she would not have purchased it. And if she had gone to the store and paid $75 for that vase, she would have 25 fewer dollars to make another purchase, thus reducing her income. Did her trade deficit with her neighbor really hurt her in any way? In fact, she gained $25 of income by not buying it in a store, and bought a vase worth more than $50 to her. Likewise, when we run a trade deficit of $60 billion with Mexico, we receive more than $60 billion in goods that we have chosen to purchase. By not purchasing goods produced domestically, we have added to our national income. In this case, the government is saying it doesn’t care what we choose to do. Our government is telling us that we cannot buy those goods at the price we want to pay. In a free country, the government can’t forbid it,

so it just makes it more costly and sends our money to the federal treasury through a tariff, i.e., the added cost is a tax increase. More important, the job losses that accrue through these trade transactions should be addressed directly by creating programs and systems to effectively assist displaced workers. Those programs can be painlessly paid for by sharing the economic benefits of international trade and putting displaced workers back into the labor market through training and financial assistance. We currently have no effective program to do that. Using the example above, why not take a small portion of that $25 my mother saved and use it to help the vase makers who lost their jobs? By splitting the savings, Mom receives $12.50 in income and the displaced workers receive $12.50 in assistance. Win-Win. Our nation saves (read: receives income of) more than $1.5 trillion a year by purchasing imported goods. Why impose a tariff to prevent potential future job losses and forsake that income when we should be using a portion of that income to help those who have already lost their jobs, by helping them re-enter the labor market? On top of that, why reduce our national income by more than a trillion dollars a year? If this seems absurdly simple, please realize it is. The president’s obsession with trade deficits is very badly flawed. Imposing tariffs and starting a trade war is a misguided policy that will only cause harm—especially for the state of Florida. It’s the job of our representatives in Congress to address this issue, regardless of political party or the political repercussions of such advocacy. I personally prepared and presented a Special Report detailing how to resolve these issues to Congressional offices last April. The proposed system has been vetted by thought leaders on the topic, including the Cato Institute and the U.S. Department of Labor. I would be happy to visit again to discuss the use of the legislative proposal to counter the administration’s perceived need for tariffs and bringing displaced workers back into the labor market. This action is necessary to protect the Florida economy and your constituents. Dr. John N. O’Brien mail@folioweekly.com _____________________________________ O’Brien is the CEO of Vista Energy Group and a professor of public administration at Flagler College.

FOLIO WEE FOLIO WEEKLY KLY welcom welcomes lc es BBackpage ackkpage sub submissions. bmis i sions i They should Th h be 11,200 200 words rds or fewer and on a topic of local interest and/or concern. Send submissions to mail@folioweekly.com. Opinions expressed on the Backpage are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Folio Weekly. MAY 16-22, 2018 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 39


05/16/18 Sell Off  
05/16/18 Sell Off