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2 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019


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THIS WEEK // 4.24.19-4.30.19 // VOL. 33 ISSUE 4

15

MAIN FEATURE

THE BEST OF THE BEACHES

Our readers of influence head to the coast About the cover: “BEACH DAY,” by

LAURA LACAMBRA SHUBERT (acrylic on canvas, 11˝x14˝, 2018) Stellers Gallery at Ponte Vedra is a boutique art gallery featuring fine art by the best regional and local artists. The gallery offers consultation, installation and framing. Gallery owner Hillary Whitaker has been in the art industry for more than 22 years and takes pride in the development and nurturing of strong relationships with Stellers clients and artists, rooted in integrity.

COLUMNS + CALENDARS MAIL/B&B FROM THE EDITOR POLITICS OUR PICKS KIDS PICKS SPORTS PICKS LIBERTY PICKS LATIN PICKS WELLNESS PICKS

5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14

FEATURE MUSIC FILM ARTS + EVENTS CONCERTS FOOD COOKING BEER PETS

30 32 34 35 37 39 41 41 42

NEWS OF THE WEIRD 43 CROSSWORD 43 I SAW U 44 FREEWILL ASTROLOGY 44 WEED 45 CLASSIFIEDS 46 BACKPAGE 47

GET SOCIAL visit us online at

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EDITORIAL

EDITOR • Georgio Valentino georgio@folioweekly.com / ext. 115 SENIOR EDITOR • Marlene Dryden mdryden@folioweekly.com / ext. 131 CARTOONISTS • Ed Hall, Mike Konopacki, Jen Sorensen CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Susan Clark Armstrong, Rob Brezsny, Scottie Brown, Nicole Carroll, Josué Cruz, A.G. Gancarski, Davi, Julie Delegal, Chris Guerrieri, Dan Hudak, Janet Harper, Josh Hodges, Shelton Hull, Jason Irvin, Danny Kelly, Tristan Komorny, Mary Maguire, Pat McLeod, Jennifer Melville, Dale Ratermann, Ryan Reno, Alan Sculley, Brentley Stead, Chef Bill Thompson, Madeleine Peck Wagner, Dima Vitanova Williams, Marc Wisdom

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THE MAIL

ADAPT & REUSE

RE: “Hart High Line,” by Scott Gaillard, April 17 $40 MILLION IS AN ESTIMATE, NOT TO build a single thing but to demolish a useful, adaptive reuse structure. As for Shad Khan, he may own a losing football team and make average car bumpers, but he has shown himself to be even more seriously lacking in community or civic development. One Spark, anyone? Edgewood Bakery? I’m sure there are more lackluster examples. Dennis Hamilton Jr. via Facebook Seriously! I wish we weren’t always so quick to demolish everything. A Jax High Line would be awesome! Jennifer Reneé via Facebook Don’t hold your breath. Imagination is not a strong suit. Jim Draper via Facebook

APPLES & ORANGES

RE: “Hart High Line,” by Scott Gaillard, April 17 WHEN THE AUTHOR DEFINES THE sweep-and-clear approaches, the contrast is made between cities like Charleston, Savannah and Atlanta, with their unique historical structures. But unlike those cities, Jacksonville’s Hart Bridge ramp is not what I consider a historic structure. Atlanta’s Excelsior Mill, Lizzie Chapel and Colony Square–these buildings are beautiful historic structures that are woven into the fabric of their communities, not a steeland-concrete connecting ramp. Regarding the NYC High Line, the writer points out the project has transformed the area into a worldwide tourist destination. The fact that NYC is a perennial award-winner of “world’s best” destination happens regardless of The High Line’s transformative existence. Answering Bill Bishop’s wish for a version of Toronto’s Bentway Park, I’d ask Mr. Bishop to visit and enjoy Jacksonville’s River City Arts Market [sic], which currently hosts events similar to the former. I applaud Mayor Curry and Mr. Khan’s vision of creating a Sports Complex. The fact that Jacksonville is one of 32 cities with an NFL franchise, plus the close proximity to Veterans Memorial Arena and the Baseball Grounds, demonstrates a creative and maximized plan for the area. Lastly, Jacksonville is not an urban destination akin to New York, Miami or Toronto. Nor is Jacksonville considered a historic destination in any sense compared to Charleston or Savannah. In closing, I consider the creative and adaptive reuse of structures a wise idea. But if those ideas are rooted on the misguided pretension that a ramp from a 52-year-old bridge, somehow, is synonymous with historical architecture or globally renowned tourist destinations, I simply cannot follow the logic. Randy Lane via email

LEND YOUR VOICE If you’d like to respond to something you read in the pages of Folio Weekly, please send an email (including name, address and phone number for verification purposes only) to mail@folioweekly.com, visit us at folioweekly.com or follow us on Twitter or Facebook (@folioweekly) and join the conversation.

BRICKBATS + BOUQUETS BRICKBATS TO BRIAN HUGHES It’s been a busy couple of weeks for Mayor Lenny Curry’s chief of staff. The Tallahassee consultant-turned-mayoral right-hand-man (also, coincidentally, appointed interim chief of Downtown Investment Authority and, most recently, Chief Administrative Officer of the City of Jacksonville) deleted his Twitter account after City Councilman Matt Schellenberg alleged that Hughes threatened him politically for criticizing the DIA. BOUQUETS TO THE AMP St. Augustine’s open-air music venue has officially banned single-use plastics and introduced a new system of reusable cups. The Amp’s Green Hands Program joined forces with r.Cup, a national vendor of rentable and reusable cups, to minimize waste and maximize sustainability. Concertgoers pay a $3 deposit for each cup, which can be returned for a refund or taken home, so it can be brought back and reused at the next event. BRICKBATS TO FERNANDINA BEACH CITY COMMISSION On April 16, in the presence of 100 indignant neighbors, commissioners voted 3-to-2 to approve the development of Amelia Bluff, a controversial 32-home subdivision sited next to the 300 protected acres of Egans Creek Greenway. The process began in February, when the plot’s future land-use was changed from conservation to residential–by another 3-to-2 vote. Now some concerned citizens are mulling a lawsuit to reverse that designation and halt construction. DO YOU KNOW SOMEONE WHO DESERVES A BOUQUET? HOW ABOUT A BRICKBAT? Send submissions to mail@folioweekly.com; 50 word maximum, concerning a person, place, or topic of local interest. APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 5


FROM THE EDITOR

AN OPEN LETTER TO NICK CAVE

Don’t become aggrieved entitlement’s new spokesman LAST WEEK, AUSTRALIAN ROCK PERSONALITY

Nick Cave muttered into the ether of the internet, and—through the magic of vague controversy, channeled through the medium of an enterprising publicist on a slow, pre-Mueller Report news day—we heard him. “Issue #35” on Cave’s fanengagement website, The Red Hand Files, went quasi-viral after it was fed to news and culture outlets like The Guardian, presumably to promote his upcoming Europe/UK speaking tour. The writing prompt: A fan asks Cave about “the current trend of connecting the shortcomings of an artist’s personal conduct and the art they create” His response begins on a fairly thoughtful note. “As musicians,” he observes, “we are always in danger of becoming obsolete and superseded by the next generation’s efforts, or by the world itself and its big ideas.” Evolution? Check. Progress? Check. Accountability? Check. Humility? Check. But then, alas, Cave trots out the apocalyptic alt-right talking points: “Not so long ago, the big idea in the world was freedom of expression. It looks like the new big idea is moralism. Will rock music survive this one? We shall see.” The “new big idea” is actually inclusion, but it might very well look like something else to those already inside. After all, whatever it is, it threatens to make the white male rock star (writ large) obsolete. At the very least, the current push for inclusion—“the new moral zealotry,” according to Cave—checks white male rock star entitlement: a freedom of “transgression” that he mistakes for “freedom of expression.” “Transgression,” Cave goes on to proclaim, quite possibly beating his chest as he types, “is fundamental to the artistic imagination ... It is the artist who steps beyond the accepted social boundaries who will bring back ideas that shed new light on what it means to be alive. This is, in fact, the artist’s duty—and sometimes this journey is accompanied by a certain dissolute behavior, especially in rock ’n’ roll.” So there it is. All that objectification, exploitation and general douchebaggery, about which newly empowered women, queer and ally artists are fussing—and about which artists of color have been fussing ever since Chuck Berry jumped the color barrier and Elvis Presley cashed the check—all those broken eggs are but necessary byproducts of Nick Cave’s bold, Nietzschean omelet. Deal with it. And if you can’t, ye “enemies of the imagination,” you don’t deserve art. “Perhaps a painful reckoning is needed ... [P]erhaps rock music needs to die for a while, so that something powerful and subversive and truly monumental can rise up out of it.” Strong stuff. The melodrama is even 6 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019

worthy of a Nick Cave song. It would go something like this: After a tumultuous, decades-long courtship, the singer finally attains the object of his desire—just in time for the inconstant lover to surrender to the embrace of a new generation of suitors with their newfangled ideas about inclusion and respect. I can almost hear Cave bleat, “Rock ’n’ roll, if I can’t have you, no one will!” before dropping a rock (poetic justice!) on the unfaithful art form’s head. But before you put rock ‘n’ roll in its grave, Mr. Cave, we ask you first to understand the thing on its own terms, not just yours. Rock ’n’ roll was never about transgression for its own sake. (And, anyway, white male rock star “transgression” is an oxymoron. The white male rock star “transgresses” with impunity. In fact, he’s rewarded for it. Chuck Berry, on the other hand, spent years in prison for his transgressions. Why? Take one guess.) Enough talk of transgression. As part of the great pop project of the 20th century, rock ’n’ roll was born from a utopian impulse. Yes, it challenged the prim moralism of a bygone Victorian age, and it did so in the name of experience—but it was everyone’s experience. It was a reclamation of art from the rarefied atmosphere of the elites. It was a democratic assertion that everyone matters, even the disenfranchised: from white workers and farmers, women and teenagers to people of color and marginalized folks of all stripes. That promise has always been problematic, of course. And so rock ’n’ roll has undergone periodic upheavals, as you pointed out. Your own punk generation took it to task for its many shortcomings. In fact, your early career was a smart subversion of rock’s faded glory. Good times. Somewhere along the way, however, you dropped that gloriously knowing caricature of rock ’n’ roll decadence and broken promises; now you’re at real risk of becoming the thing itself: a living dinosaurrock blowhard. That’s disappointing enough. But now is not the cultural moment to be so dangerously out of touch. Your throwaway comments, published on a vanity site to express overwrought annoyance at some minor criticism of your oeuvre (and you know you’ve been given a pass all these years), are music to the ears of the nationalist internationalist, those alt-right culture warriors who are co-opting art’s Nietzschean élan for a future showdown with scapegoats of their choosing. It happened once already, last century, and it didn’t end well. Wake up, maestro: There’s a difference between playing devil’s advocate in song and serving as Steve Bannon’s useful idiot IRL. Georgio Valentino georgio@folioweekly.com @thatgeorgioguy


FOLIO VOICES : POLITICS

CONVERSATION PIT

JACKSONVILLE LANDING circles drain, but WHAT’S NEXT?

JACKSONVILLE HAS A GRAND TRADITION of “community conversations” that lead nowhere. Recall the series of events around the subject of the Human Rights Ordinance and its extension to the LGBT+ community. It was great theater, fueled by strident opposing voices, but they accomplished little except to expand the public profile of certain preachers (at least one of whom is out of state now, in lockdown, for reasons that don’t bear mentioning here). Newly re-elected, Mayor Lenny Curry is functioning as if he won a March election with almost 60 percent of the vote. He’s engaging aggressively in the remaining City Council races, and he’s moving forward on key policy priorities. Among them: finding a way forward, past The Jacksonville Landing era. As so many things do, that era began auspiciously and ended with an ignominious coda. If The Landing were a human being, it would be on life support right now. Vacancy rates are sky-high. New species are forming in the primordial grime of the bathrooms. But at least Hooters is still open. That Hooters was a popular spot to watch candidate Donald Trump rally in 2015, when he graced The Landing courtyard. That’s called historical value. But a 30-year-old-plus mall, especially in this town, is like a 30-year-old-plus running back. And The Jacksonville Landing, like former Jags back Jamaal Charles, has long since eroded and decayed below the threshold that would’ve made it a real destination. Can you imagine a family from the Kernan Boulevard area or deep Westside driving to The Landing at this point? The question answers itself. In any event, money has already been appropriated for the city to take back The Landing—or at least bury it. The Curry Administration seeks to move forward with demolition ahead of repurposing, clearing the structure to drive a future-use vision. However, there is resistance! Incoming Councilmember Matt Carlucci, who got nearly 70 percent of the vote against two other Republicans in March, wants a “charrette” to discuss the future of the space. As reporter Dave Bauerlein explained in The Florida Times-Union, the process would involve a “trained facilitator,” with small groups discussing. From there, the ideas would be aggregated ... and eventually there would be recommendations. As Bauerlein notes, this was tried with the last mayor. Alvin Brown sought to demolish The Landing; discussion led to a mixed-use concept, one that may or may not have jibed with the

visions of actual developers. Now, a halfdecade later, some want more discussions, involving the same experts (without any real political constituency) that would, theoretically, reach different conclusions. The mayor’s not down with this. “Elected officials afraid to make a decision because they are gunning for a political future has been the bane of our city. No more retreading,” Curry tweeted. Senior staffer Jordan Elsbury chimed in also: “Policy-makers, constituents, and COJ/DIA had this discussion, then all but 1 voted to demo it for new development/use ... Thx, next.” Those votes notwithstanding, people seek a pause: a scenario reminiscent of local efforts on pension reform. Recall that John Peyton’s plan for pension reform was turfed by the Brown Administration, pushing back the timeframe. His administration had its own plan, which was slow-walked by the City Council for political purposes. Only after Curry was elected did Council finally pass a bill. This city does an amazing job of hitting the reset button every four years, or every time an administration has some bad news cycles or—as in this case—when a councilmember who has wanted to be mayor for decades now wants to stake out the populist lane on a question already resolved by the body he has yet to join. The Landing issue will be one by which the Curry Administration will be judged. If he caves to the charrette concept, how long does the process take? How many quarters do we have before money gets tight? Pressures in consumer markets and housing markets suggest that, as with the exploration of selling JEA, movement is time-sensitive. Wait too long and the question becomes moot, as the asset loses what is an ephemeral, situational bubble in valuation. The old “elections have consequences” cliché applies here. Those coming up behind Curry are looking to create narratives that he’s failed—and there are more of those folks every day. Matt Schellenberg has issue with the Berkman re-dev that went bust. Anna Brosche has issue with Brian Hughes becoming CAO. And Matt Carlucci is the latest. Curry assumes all of them are driven by political ambitions at his expense. As someone who capsized a popular mayor many said couldn’t be beaten, Curry knows how that game works. A.G. Gancarski mail@folioweekly.com @aggancarski

APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 7


WED

1 HAVE YOU SEEN ME? MILK CARTON KIDS

Formed around the acoustic duo of Joey Ryan and Kenneth Pattengale, the LA-based project evolved into a full band with last year’s milestone album, All the Things That I Did and All the Things That I Didn’t Do. 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 1, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, pvconcerthall.com, $35.

OUR PICKS FRI

26 THRILLING CONCLUSION

AMELIA ISLAND CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

The season finale of the festival’s 18th edition stars violinist Anne Akiko Meyers (pictured) and Grammy Award-winning classical guitarist Jason Vieaux. 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 26, Ritz-Carlton Amelia Island, aicmf.com, $65.

THIS WEEK’S BIGGEST & BEST HAPPENINGS

THU

25 SHINE ON

JACKSONVILLE LANTERN LIGHT FESTIVAL

The tradition of crafting these massive lantern sculptures goes back 2,000 years. This six-week celebration of Chinese art and culture is soon coming to an end, so experience it while you can. 6-11 p.m. Thursdays-Sundays through May 5, Morocco Shrine Auditorium, Southside, lanternlightfestival.com, $16 & up.

SAT

27 PARTING IS SUCH SWEET SORROW JAX POETRY FEST CLOSING DAY

The month-long poetry extravaganza draws to a close with one final day of creative versifying and an evening celebration hosted by (the formerly local) playwright, poet and NPR personality Al Letson (pictured). 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Saturday, April 27, Hemming Park, Downtown, jaxpoetryfest.org, free. 8 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019

SAT

27 PULL ME UNDER

DREAM THEATER

Formed in the 1980s and now celebrating the release of their 14th studio album, the veteran progressive metal outfit is the missing link between Black Sabbath and Tool. 8 p.m. Saturday, April 27, Times-Union Center, Downtown, timesunioncenter.com, $47-$72.


APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 9


PICKS

BY JENNIFER MELVILLE | KIDS@FOLIOWEEKLY.COM

FRI

26 CHARGE!

LIVING HISTORY WEEKEND

What was Jacksonville like in 1864? That history is revisited as re-enactors exhibit how battles were fought and raids were run, as well as the usual goingson of daily town life. Watch demos of open-fire cooking, candle-making, sewing and quilting. Bring a picnic lunch and make a day of it. Friday, April 26 is Student Experience Day, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. & Sun., April 27 & 28, Camp Milton Historic Preserve, 1225 Halsema Rd. N., Northside, free.

SAT

27 BOUNCE & PLAY FAMILY FUN FEST 2019

The fourth annual all-day festival is packed with activities for the whole family! There’s so much to see, taste and experience–“Be the Hamster,” snow cones, face-painting, clowns, fire trucks, crafts, golf activities, Jumperama, costumed characters, drum circles, food trucks and live music. Cheer for Team Obstacle Challenge Course contestants or get into the Extreme Nerf Battle. Proceeds benefit Alpha-Omega Miracle Home programs for homeless women and children. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Sat., April 27, Francis Field, 25 W. Castillo Dr., St. Augustine, 823-8588, aomh.org, oastaug.com, $5 adults; $3 seniors/military/first responders, free younger than 12.

SAT

27 LET’S EXPLORE! WILD WONDERS

Time for hands-on science! Mike Rossi’s “The Kapok Tree” introduces kids to a variety of small critters in an interactive presentation, featuring dance, storytelling and humor. Stay for a family-friendly 2.2 mile hike or try your hand at geocaching. It’s an ideal day for adventure! 1 p.m. Sat., April 27, Dutton Island Preserve, Dutton Island Rd. W., Atlantic Beach, coab.us, free. 10 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019


PICKS

BY DALE RATERMANN | SPORTS@FOLIOWEEKLY.COM

THU

25 THE JAGUARS SELECT … NFL DRAFT

Who will the Jaguars get for their NFL Draft seventh pick? Find out first at the Jaguars’ draft party. 7 p.m. Thur., April 25, Daily’s Place, TIAA Bank Field, jaguars.com, free; registration required.

SAT

27 CAN YOU DIG IT?

SPRING CLASSIC INVITATIONAL

Teams from throughout the Southeast compete on the volleyball court, featuring skilled young women (ages 12-18) battling for the win. 8 a.m. Sat. & Sun., April 27 & 28, JJVA Training Facility, 8457 Western Way, Southside, jjva.com, $11 (one day), $19 (two days).

SAT

27 YO, ROCKY! GUNS ’N’ HOSES

This looks like fun, but these fellas are serious. Serious about raising funds for local charities, that is. For the 21st annual event, local police officers get in the boxing ring with local firefighters … nice! 6:30 p.m. Sat., April 27, Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., 398-7010, gunsnhosesjax.com, general admission $15. APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 11


PICKS

BY STEPHANIE THOMPSON | MAIL@FOLIOWEEKLY.COM

THU

25 MEET NEW PEOPLE MILITARY SPOUSE NIGHT OUT

The fourth annual event is a way to meet new people who can relate to the challenges and triumphs of a military spouse. There will be more than 1,000 guests in attendance. 5-8 p.m. Thursday, April 25, Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 A. Phillip Randolph Blvd., militaryspousenightout19.eventbrite.com, free with registration.

TUES

30

Must Have Base Access

GET A GRIP

STRESS MANAGEMENT 101

Stress is a fact of life. Some is good, but too much can be overwhelming and even debilitating. This course will help reduce stressors by building work and life strategies to suit any personality. 8 a.m.-noon Tuesday, April 30, Fleet & Family Support Center, Building 554, Child Street, Naval Air Station Jacksonville; register at 542-5745. Must have base access. 12 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019


PICKS BY ADRIANA NAMUCHE | LATIN@FOLIOWEEKLY.COM

FRI

26 BORICUA IN JAX GUAYNAA

The breakout Puerto Rican regaetton musician, known for his colorful 1980s-inspired attire, performs hits like “ReBoTa.” 9 p.m. Friday, April 26, Mojitos Bar & Grill, 8206 Philips Hwy., Baymeadows, facebook.com/WhiteLionPromotions, $25-$30.

FRI

26 WAPHA!

JORGE LOPEZ: THE WALL

Focusing on racism, politics and his own childhood, the beloved MexicanAmerican sitcom star returns to the stage for a night of standup comedy. 8 p.m. Friday, April 26, The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Ste. 300, Downtown, floridatheatre.com, $39-$75.

SAT

27 PA’RRIBA

RUEDA AT THE PARK

Dance Salsa Jax hosts this rueda class, and you’ll be clapping, stomping and shouting, “Pa’rriba!” while enjoying spectacular views of the St. Johns River. 5-7 p.m. Saturday, April 27, Memorial Park, 1600 Riverside Ave., Riverside, dancesalsajax.com, free. APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 13


PICKS BY BRIAN CASTELLANI | WELLNESS@FOLIOWEEKLY.COM

FRI

26 MEOWMASTE! YOGA WITH CATS

Beth Jordan, of Beth Trains 4 Life, helps you tap into your inner feline spirit. Bring your own mat; Beth will bring the kitties. 5:45-6:45 p.m. Friday, April 26, Jacksonville Humane Society, 8464 Beach Blvd., jaxhumane.org/yoga, free.

FRI

26 HAPPY HOUR MAKE & TAKE WINE, DETOX FOODS AND ESSENTIAL OILS

Nurse practitioner and health coach Angie Bascom hosts this healthy happy hour, a chance to sample detox food and drink as well as essential oils. 6:30–8 p.m. Friday, April 26, Funkytown Fitness, 105 Southpark Blvd., St. Augustine, bit.ly/HappyHourEssentialOils, $5.

TUE

30 LEARN TO LIVE

DIABETES EDUCATION CLASS & SUPPORT GROUP

Held every first and third Tuesday of the month, this free 1-hour class covers basic diabetes self-management. Attendees get support and learn about nutrition, medications and exercise to prevent complications. 9:30-10:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 30, Flagler Wellness Center, 400 Health Park Blvd., St. Augustine, flaglerhospital.org, free. 14 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019


A

s spring turns to summer, our readers of influence naturally look to the beaches for fun and sun. But our beach communities offer so much more. Some of Northeast Florida’s finest shops, restaurants and service providers can be found east of the Intracoastal Waterway. Some of the area’s most indefatigable activists, innovative artists and generous philanthropists reside there. Our very first beaches-oriented readers’ poll celebrates these people, places and organizations. From Atlantic Beach to Vilano, from the mouth of the St. Johns River to Porpoise Point, this is the Best of the Beaches.

APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 15


BEST MARGARITA

FLYING IGUANA TAQUERIA & TEQUILA BAR

BEST MARGARITA FLYING IGUANA TAQUERIA & TEQUILA BAR No surprises here. The perennial Best of Jax winner defends its margarita title.

AUTOMOTIVE

Fourth Place Sutra Salon Fifth Place Suede Salon

BEST AUTO BODY SHOP

BEST HAIR STYLIST

FIRST PLACE Oceanside Collision Second Place Caliber Collision Third Place Auto Clinic Engine & Body Work

BEST AUTO DETAILER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Beaches Car Wash & Gift Gallery Clean Getaway Car Wash & Detail Center Taylor Mobile Detail AAA Mobile Detailing Tortuga Rehab and Detail

BEST AUTO SERVICE / REPAIR SHOP FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

BEST USED CAR DEALERSHIP

}

3WAY TIE!

BEAUTY

BEST BARBER

Bob’s Barber Shop Atlantic Beach Old School Barber Shop Don’s Barber Shop TIE! Luxury Hair Studio For Men Big Jim’s Stateman Barber Shop & Hair Styling

}

BEST DAY SPA FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

The Spa at Ponte Vedra Inn & Club Youthful Medical Spa Frenchy’s Wellness Spa Picasso Day Spa

BEST HAIR SALON FIRST PLACE Cortello Hair Salon Second Place Ten Salon Third Place Bellezza Salon & Boutique 16 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019

LASH JAX Studio The Lash Lounge Jax Beach Picasso Day Spa Velvet Lash Studio

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Amy’s Nails & Spa Jax Beach Luxury Nail & Spa of Ponte Vedra Beach Nail Spa 1 Jacksonville Jackie’s Nail Salon Le Cheval Nail & Skincare

BEST TANNING SALON

FIRST PLACE Autoline Preowned Second Place Brightway Auto Sales Third Place Rick’s Used Cars & Auto Detail

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

FIRST PLACE Youthful Medical Spa PVB Second Place Ponte Vedra Vein Institute Third Place Laser Skin Solutions

BEST NAIL SALON

Beaches Car Wash & Gift Gallery Gate Express Carwash Clean Getaway Car Wash & Detail Center Dog & Car Wash, Jax Beach Tire Kingdom DeSalvo Tire & Auto Repair Beachside Tire & Auto Services Goodyear Auto Service Tires Plus

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BEST LASER HAIR REMOVAL

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

BEST TIRE STORE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Third Place

Kayla Beck, Cortello Hannah Lagosh, Cortello 3Jonna Frontiero Mills, Bellezza WAY TIE! Sheila Powers, Ten Salon JoElle Bretz, Spectre Hair Design

BEST LASH EXTENSIONS

RPM Automotive at The Beaches Beach Plaza Auto Care Beachside Tire & Auto Services Coastal Auto Bell’s Automotive Services

BEST CAR WASH FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Second Place Fifth Place

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Sol US Tanning The Tan Cabana Fiji Tan Sun Spa Tan Like A Celebrity Spray Tan Jacksonville

BEST WAXING STUDIO FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

LASH JAX Studio Solé Spa Wellness Center Inc. Frenchy’s Wellness Spa La Bella Mi

EDUCATION

BEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Neptune Beach Elementary School Seabreeze Elementary PVPV/Rawlings Elementary School San Pablo Elementary School Ocean Palms Elementary School

BEST HIGH SCHOOL FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Duncan U. Fletcher High School Ponte Vedra High School Marine Science Education Center St. Joseph Academy St. Johns Technical High School

BEST KINDERGARTEN FIRST PLACE

Atlantic Beach Elementary School


Second Place Second Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}

Ponte Vedra Palm Valley TIE! San Pablo Elementary School Jacksonville Beach Elementary School Ocean Palms Elementary School

BEST MIDDLE SCHOOL

Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

Jason Evans Band VOX Not Quite Dead

BEST BAND – ORIGINAL MUSIC

FIRST PLACE Duncan U. Fletcher Middle School Second Place Mayport Middle School Third Place Alice B. Landrum Middle School

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

BEST PRESCHOOL

BEST COMMUNITY THEATER

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

Christ Episcopal Preschool St. Paul’s Catholic Early Learning Center Palms Preschool Beaches Episcopal School KinderCare, Atlantic Beach

BEST ACTOR FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}

Brian Matthews TIE! David Girard Austin Kelley Matias del la Flor Brandon Hines Holly Gutshall Erin Barnes Sadie Akers Barbara Colaciello Jamie King

BEST ART FESTIVAL FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Fourth Place

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}TIE!

Jax Beach Art Walk Beaches Art Fest Jax Beach Summer Arts Market Jax Beach Sandcastle Contest

}TIE!

BEST ART GALLERY FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

Stellers Gallery of Ponte Vedra Holly Blanton Art Gallery 725 Village Arts Framing & Gallery Archway Gallery & Framing

BEST BAND – COVER BAND FIRST PLACE The Chris Thomas Band Second Place Roger That

Players by the Sea All Beaches Experimental Theatre The First Act Children’s Community Theatre Inc. Ponte Vedra Concert Hall SeaWalk Pavilion Blue Jay Listening Room Surfer [the Bar]

BEST DANCE SCHOOL

BEST ACTRESS FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

The Litt Family Band Sidereal Jason Evans Band Walk with Wolves

BEST CONCERT VENUE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

ENTERTAINMENT

}TIE!

Polly B Dance Academy Atlantic Coast Dance Studio First Coast Center for the Arts Planet Ballroom St. Augustine Dance Academy

BEST MUSICIAN FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE Third Place

Mama Blue Robbie Litt Tracy Morris

FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}

Blue Jay Listening Room Lynch’s Irish Pub Ragtime Tavern Poe’s Tavern, Atlantic Beach The Wine Bar

BEST VOCALIST – FEMALE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

Mama Blue Ruthann Litt Savannah Bassett Melissa Smith

BEST VOCALIST – MALE FIRST PLACE Robbie Litt Second Place Jason Evans

BEST VISUAL ARTIST FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

FIRST PLACE Monkey’s Uncle Tavern Second Place The Wine Bar Third Place Brass Anchor Pub

FIRST PLACE Beaches Museum & History Park Second Place The Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Third Place Rhoda L. Martin Cultural Heritage Center

BEST MUSIC FESTIVAL FIRST PLACE Springing the Blues Festival Second Place Community First SeaWalk Music Festival Third Place Sweet Life Music Fest

FIRST PLACE Lucky’s Market Second Place Native Sun Natural Foods Market

BEST PLACE TO HEAR LOCAL MUSICIANS FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Holly Blanton Heather Blanton Jenny Hager TIE! Tim Jaeger Susanne Schuenke

}

BEST PUBLIC ART FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

Third Place Trader Joe’s Fourth Place Native Sun Natural Foods Market Fifth Place Winn-Dixie

BEST HEALTH FOOD STORE

Ragtime Tavern, Seafood & Grill The Ritz TIE! The Shim Sham Room Brix Taphouse The Wreck Tiki Lounge

FIRST PLACE #duvalsfinest Second Place #zoooval Third Place #Rattown records

BEST KARAOKE NIGHT

}TIE!

BEST NIGHTCLUB

BEST HASHTAG

BEST MUSEUM

}TIE!

Fourth Place Great Atlantic Country Music Fest

UNF Seaside Sculpture Park Beaches Town Center North Beaches Art Walk North Beaches Art Walk Association Inc.

HEALTH & FITNESS

BEST 5K

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Tony’s Turkey Trot The Player’s Donna 5K Never Quit Scottish Games Chariots of Fur 5K run/ walk, 1 mile Fun Run Seagate Shuffle 5K & Youth 1 mile

BEST GYM FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

Orangetheory Fitness F45 Jacksonville Beach CrossFit Black Hive Focus Fitness TIE! TitanUp Fitness

BEST MASSAGE STUDIO FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}

Massage Envy, Jax Beach Solé Spa Wellness Center Inc. Kudos Massage Therapy Shine Massage & Spa Harmonious Bliss

BEST YOGA STUDIO FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fourth Place

Big Fish Power Yoga Yoga Mix Discovery Yoga Center TIE! Bella Vida Yoga MBody Yoga, Neptune Beach

}

BEST PILATES STUDIO

GROCERY

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

FIRST PLACE

HOME IMPROVEMENT

BEST GROCERY STORE

Publix Super Market, Seminole Shoppes Neptune Beach Second Place Lucky’s Market

Pure Barre, Jax Beach Pilates on 3rd A Pilates Studio Transformation Pilates Studio Coremotion Wellness

BEST BATHROOM REMODELER FIRST PLACE

All Florida Custom Homes

APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 17


BEST JEWELER

UNDERWOOD JEWELER

Photo by Devon Sarian

BEST JEWELER UNDERWOOD JEWELERS Underwood’s master jewelers follow up last year’s Best of Jax triumph with another trophy. (L to R: Sarah Merkling, Vickie Brown, Vicki Lynn Marra, Kelli Roberts, John Rutkowski, Ali Walker) BEST ROOFING CONTRACTOR

FIRST PLACE Third Place

The Batts Company Fisette Construction

Third Place Fifth Place

Mathieu Builders Inc. Dean Russell Custom Homes Inc.

& Remodeling Company

}TIE!

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fifth Place

BEST CARPET CLEANING SERVICE FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}

Heaven’s Best TIE! ServePro C&C Carpet Care Love’s Carpet & Floor Maintenance The Noble House of Jacksonville

BEST FLOORING/CARPET STORE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

Beaches Flooring & Decorating 2 Builders Discount Floor Covering Bold City Flooring Handy Andy Custom Wood Flooring TIE! Rahaims Walls & Floors

}

BEST GARDEN STORE/NURSERY FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Rockaway Garden Center Turner Ace Hardware Proctor Ace Hardware MOS Home & Garden & Gifts The Home Depot Donovan Heating & Air Coastal Heating & Cooling Charlie’s Tropic Heating & Air Conditioning Buehler Air Conditioning Air Waves Heating & Cooling

BEST HOME IMPROVEMENT CONTRACTOR FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

Peggy Cornelius Sam McGuinness Frank Tucker Russell Fisette Chris Sanders Construction

BEST KITCHEN REMODELER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

}

TIE!

Fisette Construction & Remodeling Co. Dean Russell Custom Homes Inc. All Florida Custom Homes TIE! Coastal Improvement Corporation Mathieu Builders Inc.

}

Nader’s Pest Raiders Bug Out Nature’s Way Natural Pest Control Perschel & Meyer Pest Management Big Wave Pools LLC

BEST POOL MAINTENANCE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place 18 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019

SurfSide Pools The Batts Company Andy’s Pools Inc. Big Waves Pool LLC Epic Pool

BEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY

FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

BluWater Apartments Pablo Towers The Coast, Ponte Vedra Lakes Ocean Oaks Apartments Surfside Apartments

}TIE!

BEST CONDO COMMUNITY FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Belleza at Ponte Vedra Cloister Condominiums TIE! Ocean’s Edge The Palms, Marsh Landing Pier Point

}

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Home Goods World Market Turner Home Fine Coastal Furnishings Pearl Home Michelle Walsh Designs

BEST MOVING COMPANY FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Smooth Moves, Inc. Beaches Moving & Storage Ponte Vedra Movers First Coast Movers Inc. Here 2 There Movers

BEST NEW COMMUNITY

BEST PEST CONTROL FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

HOUSING

BEST HOME DÉCOR STORE

BEST HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING COMPANY FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Schultz Roofing Co. Inc. K&D Roofing & Construction Co. Inc. Neligan Construction & Roofing LLC D.S. Killian Roof

}TIE!

FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE Third Place

}TIE!

Palm Island, Jax Beach The Enclave at Ponte Vedra Beach The Preserve at Palm Valley

BEST REAL ESTATE AGENCY FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

Keller Williams Realty Atlantic Partners Watson Realty All South Realty Inc. TIE! Yellowfin Realty Moving with Margaret

}

BEST REAL ESTATE AGENT FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Kim Sessions, Keller Williams Realty Jeanell Wilson, All South Realty Jennifer Martin Faulkner Luke Morris Dawn Engle

BEST RESIDENTIAL BUILDER FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE Third Place Third Place Third Place

}

David Weekley Homes Design Center TIE! Signature Homes & Development 27 South Home Group 3Aurora Custom Homes Inc. WAY TIE! Lennar Homes

}


ISSUES

Fifth Place

BEST CATEGORY WE DIDN’T THINK OF

BEST CAUSE Crime Reduction Reducing Single Use Plastic Pollution Relief efforts for those in need Environmental Health Healthy Beaches Program

BEST NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol Inc. Beaches Go Green The McKenzie Noelle Wilson Foundation The Harvey Bernhardt Foundation Inc. The Public Trust Environmental Legal Institute of Florida Inc.

BEST REASON TO LOVE THE BEACHES FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

The Beach Community Night Life Fishing The Water Sports

}TIE!

Rebuilding the sand dunes Stormwater system repairs A 200-car parking facility in Jax Beach CRA Funding redistribution More Jax Beach Pier entryway plans

BEST VOLUNTEER EFFORT FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

B.E.A.M., Jax Beach Deck The Chairs Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol Beaches Go Green Jacksonville Beach Woman’s Club

WORST ENVIRONMENTAL ABOMINATION FIRST PLACE Litter Second Place Joe’s Crab Shack FIRST PLACE

Over $500,000 spent on artificial field turf surface Second Place Video Surveillance Cameras

KIDS & FAMILY FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE Third Place Third Place

BEST KID-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

}TIE!

The Loop Pizza Grill The Mini Bar Beachside Seafood Restaurant European Street Cafe TIE! Surfing Sombrero

BEST KIDS’ CLOTHING STORE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

TIE!

}

Sunrise Surf Shop Amy’s Turn Consignment Shop Kyds, Neptune Beach Marshall’s Spotted Stork

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Adventure Landing Jump Street Jax Surf & Paddle Birthday Parties Beaches Rock Gym SaltAer – Circus Arts

BEST LOCAL ATTRACTION FOR KIDS FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

The Beach Beaches Museum, 1911 Train Engine Adventure Landing Opening of The Beaches Parade Mayport Ferry

LAWYERS

BEST CRIMINAL LAWYER FIRST PLACE

John Phillips, Law Offices of John M. Phillips Second Place D. Finley Williams Jr., Law Offices of John M. Phillips

WORST WASTE OF LOCAL PUBLIC MONEY

BEST CHILDCARE

Moonlight Movies, SeaWalk Pavilion St. Paul’s Catholic Church/ School Spring Carnival Third Place Adventure Landing Jax Beach Fourth Place Captain Dave’s Fishing Adventure Fourth Place Jump Street

BEST KIDS’ PARTY SPACE

BEST USE OF LOCAL PUBLIC MONEY FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}

FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE

FIRST PLACE Interior Design Second Place Psychotherapists Third Place Home Inspection Company FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

La Petite Academy

BEST FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT

Third Place Christopher J. Anderson Fourth Place Malcolm Anthony Fifth Place David Willis

BEST DIVORCE LAWYER FIRST PLACE

}

Atlantic Beach KinderCare TIE! Montessori Tides School Lighthouse Christian Preschool TIE! The Playgarden

}

Matthew C. Hunt,

Partner, Law Offices of John M. Phillips

Second Place Nancy Harrison, Attorney at Law Third Place Heather Quick, Florida Women’s Law Group Fourth Place Kurt A. Simpson, Simpson & Paull

BEST NIGHTCLUB TIE!

RAGTIME TAVERN

Photo by Devon Sarian

BEST NIGHTCLUB RAGTIME TAVERN Sarah, Katie, Brittany, Aaron, Terrie and Troy help make Ragtime Tavern the place to be after hours. APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 19


BEST BAKERY

CINOTTI’S BAKERY

Photo by Devon Sarian

BEST BAKERY CINOTTI’S BAKERY The Cinotti’s crew bask in their fresh-baked victory. (L to R: Kenzie Sawyer, Michelle Cinotti Vining, Kayla Vining, Chef J.W. Davis, Kenny Folette, David Sawyer, Mike Cinotti) Fifth Place

Fourth Place Brett Hastings Fourth Place Marc Hardesty

Roberts & Reiter, PA

BEST DUI LAWYER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

D. Finley Williams Jr. John Phillips Malcolm Anthony David Willis TIE! Jonathan Lucas

BEST FAMILY LAWYER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

MEDICAL

BEST ACUPUNCTURIST

}

Matthew C. Hunt Nancy Harrison, Attorney at Law Allen C. Jenson Lisa A. March

BEST LAW FIRM/LAWYER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place

Law Offices of John M. Phillips Rock Solid Law Justin Drach TIE! Willis Lucas Law Group, PA

BEST MARIJUANA LAWYER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

D. Finley Williams Jr. John Phillips Darin C. Gardner Malcolm Anthony W. Alan Winter

BEST PERSONAL INJURY LAWYER FIRST PLACE John M. Phillips Second Place Kirby Johnson Third Place Kris Nowicki

}TIE!

}

FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE

Blue Lotus Acupuncture Dr. Kimberly Rue,

Third Place Third Place

Debbie Young Pat Wallace, Beaches

Fifth Place

Taylor Winn

}TIE!

Jacksonville Acupuncture Wellness

}TIE!

Acupuncture & Wellness Center

BEST ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Anthem Lakes Vicar’s Landing Beach House Assisted Living The Palms at Ponte Vedra Ashford Court

BEST CHIROPRACTOR FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE Fourth Place Fifth Place

}

Edgar Vesce, DC 3WAY First Coast Chiropractic TIE! McGuffin Smith Chiropractic Dr. Sean Tracy, New Life Healthcare Dr. Nick Baiata, Surfside Chiropractic

BEST COSMETIC SURGEON FIRST PLACE Dr. C. Cayce Rumsey Second Place Dr. Robert Burk Third Place Dr. Brett Snyder

BEST VOLUNTEER EFFORT

B.E.A.M.

Photo by Devon Sarian

BEST VOLUNTEER EFFORT B.E.A.M. Volunteer coordinator Colleen Brennan is grateful that our readers of influence chose to shine a spotlight on B.E.A.M. The nonprofit also won Best Antique Store and Best Gift Store. 20 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019


BEST MEDICAL MARIJUANA CLINIC

Fourth Place Dr. Roberto Garcia Fifth Place Dr. Hollie Hickman

BEST DENTIST FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

Eric L. Townsend, DDS Michael J. Jumber, DMD John Della Porta, DMD Dr. Michael Dukes, Island Dentist Kevin L. Neal, DDS

BEST DERMATOLOGIST FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Dr. Alison Moon Christine Ng, MD Dr. Clarence E. Boudreaux Scott Warren, MD Dr. Chelsy Marty

FIRST PLACE

Morris S. Dees III, MD, Beaches Internal Medicine Jorge A. Aguilar, MD, Beaches Internal Medicine

FIRST PLACE McIver Clinic Fourth Place Anthony L. Capasso, MD,

}

3WAY TIE!

North Florida Medical Associates

Fifth Place

Razvan I. Balotescu, MD, Family Care Partners

BEST EYE CLINIC FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Atlantic Eye Institute Ponte Vedra Eye Associates Schneider Eye & Wellness Center Bowman Optometry Pearle Vision

BEST HEARING AID STORE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Gilliom Audiology Clear Ear Medical Hearing U.S. Hearing Aid Centers Jax Beach Ponte Vedra Hearing Associates Connect Hearing

BEST LASIK EYE DOCTOR FIRST PLACE

Dr. Timothy Schneider, Schneider Eye & Wellness Center

Second Place Neil T. Shmunes, M.D., Atlantic Eye Institute

Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

}

Third Place

Fourth Place Matthew Modansky, MD,

Medical Marijuana Treatment Clinics of Florida, Jax Beach

BEST MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARY FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place

Dr. Amit Chokshi, Florida Eye Specialists TIE! Dr. Karim J. Samara, Atlantic Eye Institute Dr. Akbar Hasan, Florida Eye Specialists

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

Ponte Vedra Plastic Surgery Youthful Medical Spa Ponte Vedra Vein Institute OBI Bioaesthetic Institute TIE! Thin MD MedSpa

}

}

Great Expressions Dental Centers Lazzara Orthodontics

TIE!

Rick K. Harrison, DMD, PA

Jax Beach Cosmetic & Family Dentistry

Second Place Ross H. Fishman, DMD, MS, Fishman Pediatric Dentistry

Dr. Holly Nadji, DMD,

Jacksonville Gentle Dentistry

Fourth Place Dr. Susana Perry,

Ponte Vedra Family Dentistry

Kristopher R. Harth, DMD,

Ponte Vedra Complete Dentistry

BEST PEDIATRICIAN FIRST PLACE Dr. Barbara O’Reilly, Oceanside Pediatrics Second Place Rebecca Cooper, MD, JD, FAAP, Beaches Pediatrics

Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

}TIE!

Dr. Bonnie K. White Dr. Laura Nance Beverly Dr. Aylin Ozdemir,

Pediatric Associates of Jacksonville

BEST PHYSICIAN FIRST PLACE

Dr. David M. Johnson,

Persephone Healing Arts Center

}

TIE!

CareSpot Urgent Care of Neptune Beach Baptist Health Clinic, Walgreens, PVB Minute Clinic, CVS, Ponte Vedra Beach Walk in Medical Care

MONEY

BEST PEDIATRIC DENTIST

Fifth Place

Dr. Schaeffer-Pautz,

BEST URGENT CARE CLINIC

The Brace Place Orthodontics

Third Place

Baptist Primary Care

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

FIRST PLACE Dr. Shreena Patel, Beaches Orthodontics Second Place Randolph J. Hayes, DMD, MS Third Place Joshua Goldknopf, DDS,

FIRST PLACE

BEST COUNTY COMMISSIONER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

FIRST PLACE Invisible Ink Tattoo Removers FIRST PLACE Laser Skin Solutions Jacksonville Second Place East Coast Worldwide

}

PEOPLE

TIE!

BEST TATTOO REMOVAL

Curaleaf Surterra Wellness Knox Medical TIE! Trulieve

BEST ORTHODONTIST

Third Place Fifth Place

Beaches Internal Medicine

Fifth Place

Fourth Place Certified Marijuana Doctors

BEST MEDICAL SPA

BEST ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION CLINIC FIRST PLACE

Second Place Graciela Diez-Hoeck, MD, Baptist Health Second Place Jorge A. Aguilar, MD, PA,

of Florida, Jax Beach

}TIE!

}

FIRST PLACE Marijuana Compassionate Care Second Place Medical Marijuana Treatment Clinics

BEST BANK

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

SunTrust Bank Ameris Bank Wells Fargo BB&T Bank Bank of America Financial Center

BEST CREDIT UNION FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

VyStar Credit Union Community First Credit Union Navy Federal Credit Union Jax Federal Credit Union Fidelity Bank

BEST INSURANCE AGENT & AGENCY FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Brightway, Ponte Vedra Beach First Beaches Insurance LLC Ocean State Insurance Inc. GreatFlorida Insurance A-Auto Insurance

BEST MORTGAGE/HOME LOAN PROVIDER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Fidelity Bank Pablo Beach Mortgage Chase Mortgage Movement Mortgage, Carlos Wilcox Jim Steen, First Option Mortgage

Chris Hoffman, At-Large, Seat 1 Jeb Smith, Vice-Chair Commissioner Henry Dean, Commissioner, District 5 Jeremiah Ray Blocker, Commissioner James K. Johns, Commissioner, District 1

BEST COMMUNITY ACTIVIST FIRST PLACE Rory Diamond Second Place John Phillips Third Place Davey Hartzel, Director of Fund

BEST ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVIST FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

Sea Shepherd Conservation Society Beaches Oktoberfest Post-Event Cleanup Jessica Bontempo TIE! Rachel Sadowski Nico Recore, Nico on the Scene

}

BEST FEMALE SURFER FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Anne Katie Sullivan Addison Dahlen TIE! Ali Robert Jewls Wicker Kelly Barrera, District 4

}

BEST HERO FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

John Phillips, Law Offices of John M. Phillips Mayor Charlie Latham Detective Dustin Kling, JBPD Shalah Romine, environment friendly Nancy O’Byrne, Floridians for Alternative

BEST MALE SURFER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

Thomas Dean Cody Thompson Joe Stelma Mason Burk

BEST PHILANTHROPIST FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

John Phillips, Law Offices of John M. Phillips John Baker Autumn Combs Kathleen Shaw, M.Ed. Michael Schmidt

North Florida Medical Clinic

APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 21


BEST CAR WASH

BEACHES CAR WASH & GIFT GALLERY

Photo by Devon Sarian

BEST CAR WASH BEACHES CAR WASH & GIFT GALLERY Owners Brian Martin (middle) and David Johnson (left) stand with general manager Greg Johns (right) to celebrate a clean win. BEST SKATEBOARDER

Fifth Place

PET PARENTING BEST ANIMAL HOSPITAL FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Beaches Animal Hospital Oceanview Veterinary Hospital Shoreline Veterinary Hospital Sawgrass Animal Clinic Jacksonville Community Pet Clinic

BEST DOG-FRIENDLY BEACH FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Atlantic Beach Jacksonville Beach Neptune Beach Mickler’s Beach, Palm Valley Vilano Beach

BEST DOG PARK

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

Fluffy Cuts Bath House Pet Grooming Tina’s Pet Grooming Bath & Bows Pet Grooming EarthWise Pet Jax Beach

FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE Third Place Third Place Third Place

Pet Supermarket PetSmart EarthWise Pet Jax Beach Pet Supplies Plus Petco Winner

BEST VETERINARIAN FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

}

BEST DOG TREAT BAKERY

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}

BEST PET ACCESSORIES STORE

}

B.E.A.M. Thrift Atlantic Beach Arts Market China Cat Antiques European Market Antiques Inc. Violet Ray

BEST BOOKSTORE

BEST BOUTIQUE

BEST PET DAY CARE / OVERNIGHT BOARDING FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Fourth Place

BEST ANTIQUE STORE

FIRST PLACE The BookMark Second Place Books-A-Million Third Place Second Read Books

FIRST PLACE PetSmart Second Place Salty Paws TIE! Second Place Woof Gang Bakery & Grooming Fourth Place PetCo Fifth Place EarthWise Pet JaxBeach Beach Bark Beaches Animal Clinic TIE! Waggin’ Tails Dog Daycare Rover.com, Jax Beach Dog Sitters

}

}

3WAY TIE!

Shoreline Veterinary Hospital Atlantic East Animal Clinic Coral Reef Animal Hospital TIE! Jacksonville Community Pet Clinic Veterinary Acupuncture & Wellness

RETAIL

Salty Paws Healthy Pet Market Woof Gang Bakery Pawfection Bakery Black Dog Bakers TIE! Earthwise

}TIE!

BEST PET STORE

FIRST PLACE Atlantic Beach Dog Park Second Place Paws Park at Wingate Park Third Place Dog Park at Veterans Park FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

22 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019

Animal Care of Ponte Vedra

BEST PET GROOMER

FIRST PLACE Connor Lerian Second Place Garrett Mantle Third Place Andrew Weinstein

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Salty & Soulful Rosie True Scout & Molly’s A’propos Boutique Emma Rose

BEST CBD OIL STORE FIRST PLACE Lucky’s Market Second Place Botanical Boutiques


BEST HOME IMPROVEMENT CONTRACTOR

PEGGY CORNELIUS

Photo by Devon Sarian

BEST HOME IMPROVEMENT CONTRACTOR PEGGY CORNELIUS Peggy Cornelius is the people’s choice for home design and renovation. BEST FROZEN YOGURT/ICE CREAM

Third Place Your CBD Store Fourth Place New Start Vapor Fifth Place Smoke City

BEST CONSIGNMENT STORE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

Fifi’s Fine Resale Apparel of Ponte Vedra Hope’s Closet Amy’s Turn Consignment Shop TIE! Goodwill Store Luxury for Less in Ponte Vedra

}

BEST CUPCAKE STORE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Cinotti’s Bakery Alleycakes Bakery The Ugly Cupcake Muffinry & Cafe Panera Kelsey’s Cookies

BEST FLORIST FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Liz Stewart Floral Design Seahorse Florist Boutique Kuhn Flowers Floriade Florist Floral Emporium II & Greenhouse

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Whit’s Frozen Custard Homespun Kitchen Sweetfrog Premium Frozen Yogurt Yobe Frozen Yogurt Christy’s Dream

BEST FURNITURE STORE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

T Gregory Imports J. Turner & Co. Turner Home Pearl Home Mrs. Howard

BEST GIFT SHOP FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Cottage by the Sea Shorelines Gift Shop Driftwood Bali Cargo Company Aqua East Surf Shop

BEST JEWELER FIRST PLACE Underwood Jewelers Second Place Monahan’s

BEST LAW FIRM/LAWYER

LAW OFFICES OF JOHN M. PHILLIPS

Photo by Devon Sarian

BEST LAW FIRM LAW OFFICES OF JOHN M. PHILLIPS Phillips and friends hit the sand to show off their trophy. (L to R: William Walker, Emina Sehovic, John Phillips, Matt Hunt, Kirby Johnson, Finley Williams) APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 23


24 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019


APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 25


BEST FRIED CHICKEN

COOP 303

BEST NEW RESTAURANT, BEST NEW BAR, BEST FRIED CHICKEN COOP 303 Named Best New Restaurant in Best of Jax 2018, COOP 303 continues its winning streak with a handful of new titles. Here’s a sneak peek at its award-winning fried chicken. (That beer looks pretty good, too!)

SPIRITUAL

Third Place Jay Lubeck Fourth Place Miriam’s Fifth Place Espling Jewelers

BEST CHURCH

BEST LIQUOR STORE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

Broudy’s Fine Wine & Spirits ABC Fine Wine & Spirits, Jax Beach Ponte Vedra Liquors TIE! Winn-Dixie Liquor Store AAW Wines & Liquor

}

BEST MATTRESS STORE FIRST PLACE Mattress Firm Second Place Mattress One

BEST MEN’S CLOTHING STORE FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE Third Place Fourth Place Firth Place

}

Aqua East Surf Shop TIE! Rosenblum’s Jos. A. Bank John Craig Clothier JT Vinso, Custom Clothier

BEST SMOKE SHOP FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Smokers Bay Smoke City Blackhat Vapor Company Wade’s World Smoke Shop The Hot Spot 2

BEST THRIFT STORE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

B.E.A.M. Thrift, 7 North Hope’s Closet Goodwill Society of St. Vincent de Paul St. Paul’s

BEST VAPE SHOP FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

Smoke City The Vape Deck Blackhat Vapor Company Kick Butts Vapor TIE! Kings Vapor

BEST WINE SHOP FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}

Wine Warehouse Atlantic Beach Royal Palm Village Wine & Tapas Tim’s Wine Market Cost Plus World Market Parker’s Wine Racks

BEST WOMEN’S CLOTHING STORE FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Aqua East Surf Shop Jaffi’s TIE! Salty & Soulful Rosie True Penelope T

}

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

The Church of Eleven22 Our Lady Star of the Sea Parish Beach Church Jax Palms Presbyterian Church Redeemer Church

BEST SYNAGOGUE FIRST PLACE Beth El The Beaches Synagogue Second Place Chabad @ the Beaches

SPORTS & RECREATION BEST BAIT & TACKLE SHOP FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

B & M Bait & Tackle Palm Valley Outdoors Rick’s Bait & Tackle & Marine North Guana Outpost Ponte Vedra Bait & Tackle

Fourth Place The Fig Tree Inn Fifth Place Castle Gate Vilano Beach

BEST KAYAK SHOP

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Jax Surf & Paddle Adventure Kayak Florida TIE! North Guana Outpost West Marine Paddleboard Kayak Surf Skate

}

BEST PUBLIC PARK

WEDDINGS

FIRST PLACE Jax Beach Skate Park Second Place Oceanside Rotary Skateboard Park Third Place The Skate Yard FIRST PLACE FIRST PLACE Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Aqua East Surf Shop Jax Surf & Paddle Jax Beach Surf Shop North Guana Outpost Beach Life Rental

BEST DIVE SHOP

BEST SURFING SPOT

FIRST PLACE Atlantic Pro Divers Second Place Offshore Dive Charters

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

BEST FISHING CHARTERS FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Capt. Dave’s Sport Fishing Charters Beaches Fishing Charters North Guana Outpost Fishdaflats Inshore Fishing Charters Enterprise Fishing Charters

BEST FISHING TOURNAMENT FIRST PLACE

El Cheapo Sheepshead

Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

King Buster Jacksonville Premier Trout Tournament Full of Bull Redfish Tournament Florida Surf Casters

Fishing Tournament

BEST GOLF COURSE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

TPC Sawgrass Jacksonville Beach Golf Club Ponte Vedra Inn & Club Sawgrass Country Club Atlantic Beach Country Club

BEST KARATE STUDIO

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWN GUEST

BEST SKATE PARK

BEST SURF & PADDLE RENTAL

}TIE!

One Ocean Ponte Vedra Inn & Club Hotel Palms Sawgrass Marriott Four Points by Sheraton Jacksonville Beachfront

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

South Beach Park & Sunshine Playground Second Place Dutton Island Preserve Third Place Jarboe Park Fourth Place Nease Beachfront Park Fifth Place Howell Park

FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Bird Legs Bicycles Bike & Beach Ponte Vedra Bikes Planet Bicycle Cycle Spectrum

BEST HOTEL/MOTEL

FIRST PLACE

BEST BICYCLE SHOP

FIRST PLACE Ludus Martial Arts Second Place Asian Dragon Martial Arts 26 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019

Second Place Karate America Fourth Place Shobukan Martial Arts Academy Fifth Place 5 Star Martial Arts Academy

}TIE!

Mayport Poles Jacksonville Beach Pier Mickler’s Palm Valley Coral Street, Atlantic Beach Huguenot Park

TOURISM BEST ATTRACTION FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

BEST BRIDAL/FORMAL WEAR FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

Love, a Bridal Boutique Ling’s Alterations & Formal Wear Black Tie Formals Calvet Couture Bridal TIE! Sharon Batten

BEST PLACE TO GET MARRIED FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}

Beaches Museum Chapel Casa Marina Ponte Vedra Inn & Club The Fig Room Castle Otttis

BEST RECEPTION DINNER RESTAURANT FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Eleven South Ocean 60 3 Palms Grille Azurea Vernon’s/Marriott

Beaches Museum & History Park The Players Championship Kathryn Abbey Hanna Park Jax Beach Pier Adventure Landing

BEST RECEPTION ENTERTAINMENT

Atlantic Beach Jacksonville Beach Neptune Beach Ponte Vedra Beach Vilano Beach

BEST RECEPTION LOCATION

BEST BEACH FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Beaches Town Center Beaches Museum Lemon Bar K.A. Hanna Park Sawgrass Village

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Bread & Butter Chillula Bay Kings Band Ramona LUVU

BEST BED & BREAKFAST/INN

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

FIRST PLACE Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant Second Place Ponte Vedra Inn & Club Third Place Hotel Palms

FIRST PLACE Cinotti’s Bakery Second Place Alleycakes Dessert Company

Ponte Vedra Inn & Club TPC Sawgrass Coastal Occasions Sawgrass Marriott Golf Resort & Spa Serenata Beach Club

BEST WEDDING CAKE BAKERY


APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 27


BEST MEDICAL SPA

BEST KAYAK SHOP

PONTE VEDRA PLASTIC SURGERY

Photo by Devon Sarian

Photo by Devon Sarian

BEST MEDICAL SPA PONTE VEDRA PLASTIC SURGERY The PVPS team are elated to be your choice for cosmetic enhancement. Third Place Classic Cakes Bakery Fourth Place Samantha Mayfair Cakes Fifth Place Sweet ’N’ Flour Pastries

BEST BARISTA

BEST WEDDING FLORIST FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

Liz Stewart Floral Design Rose of Sharon European Florist A Happily Ever After Floral TIE! Simply Elegant Event Florist Amazing Wedding Productions

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BEST WEDDING PHOTO SPOT FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

Ponte Vedra Inn & Club Atlantic Beach TPC Sawgrass Castle Otttis TIE! Vilano Beach

}

Nicole Piper Photography Once Like a Spark Photography Ebert Images Lavish Touch Photos TIE! Lili Lu

BEST WEDDING PLANNER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

}

Monica Bernhardt Coastal Occasions Simply Elegant Event Bella Events Diamonds and Pearls Events

}TIE!

BEST ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BUFFET FIRST PLACE Casa Marina Second Place Nineteen Third Place Vernon’s

BEST AMERICAN RESTAURANT Poe’s Tavern, Atlantic Beach Coop 303 Ragtime Tavern Bonefish Grill Nineteen

BEST BAGELS FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Bagels R Us Cinotti’s Bakery & Sandwich Shop Panera Bread Delicomb Ellen’s Kitchen

BEST BAKERY FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Cinotti’s Bakery & Sandwich Shop Alleycakes Dessert Company Pie Heaven Bakery Cafe Le Macaron French Pastries Classic Cakes

BEST BARBECUE RESTAURANT FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Kelly, Bold Bean Asa Rees, Southern Grounds Melissa Lindsey, Breezy Coffee Shop Trevor Charles, Pura Bean

BEST BARTENDER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Drew, Hoptinger Jax Beach Kat Michaels, Caffe Andiamo Meredith Kepler, The Fish Company Michael Capote, Flying Iguana Danny Wells, Azurea

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Lemon Bar Lynch’s Irish Pub Ragtime Tavern, Seafood & Grille The Shim Sham Room Surfer [The Bar]

BEST BREAKFAST FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Metro Diner Beach Diner Jax Beach Brunch Haus Maple Street Biscuit Company Delicomb

BEST BREWERY

WINE & DINE

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

BEST BEACH BAR

BEST WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

JAX BEACH SURF & PADDLE

Mojo Kitchen, BBQ Pit & Blues Bar Memphis Jax BBQ Bono’s Pit Bar-B-Q Down South Barbecue Woody’s Barbecue

28 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Green Room Brewing, LLC Engine 15 Brewing Atlantic Beach Brewing Company Southern Swells Brewing Co. Reve Brewing

BEST BRUNCH FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant Jax Beach Brunch Haus Nona Blue Modern Tavern First Watch Flying Iguana Taqueria & Tequila Bar

BEST BURGER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Poe’s Tavern, Atlantic Beach M Shack, Atlantic Beach The Blind Rabbit Col. Mustard’s Phat Burgers Smashburger

BEST BURRITO FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Burrito Gallery, Jax Beach Cantina Louie Campeche Bay Cantina Chipotle Surfer [The Bar]

BEST CATERING FIRST PLACE

Gregory Paul’s

Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

TacoLu Catering Homespun Kitchen Taste! Catering on the Boulevard A La Carte Catering & Event Planner

Freshly Prepared Meals & Catering

BEST CHEF FIRST PLACE Kevin Gaston, Eleven South Second Place Garrett Ley, The Fish Company Third Place David Medure, Restaurant Medure

BEST KAYAK SHOP JAX BEACH SURF & PADDLE Meet the smiling faces behind Jax Beach’s go-to gear shop. (L to R: Carmel Laserna, Tiffany Oliser, Leila Denmark) Fourth Place Christopher Polidoro, Restaurant Doro Fifth Place Ted Peters, Azurea

BEST CHICKEN WINGS FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

The Fish Company V Pizza Mojo Kitchen, BBQ Pit & Blues Bar Dick’s Wings & Grill, Nocatee Beachside Seafood Restaurant & Market

BEST COCKTAIL SELECTION FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Ocean 60 The Shim Sham Room Aqua Grill Nona Blue Azurea

BEST COFFEEHOUSE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Southern Grounds & Co. Bold Bean Breezy Coffee Shop Delicomb Pura Bean Coffee Company

BEST DESSERTS FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

The Fish Company Alleycakes Bakery Pie Heaven Bakery Cafe Lucy’s Sweet Shop The Ugly Cupcake

BEST DINER FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Beach Diner Ellen’s Kitchen Beach Hut Café Bacon in the Sun Cafe 3rd Street Diner

BEST DIVE BAR FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Pete’s Bar Monkey’s Uncle Tavern Ginger’s Place Mango’s Beach Bar & Grille Harbor Tavern

BEST DOUGHNUT SHOP FIRST PLACE Cinotti’s Bakery & Sandwich Shop Second Place The Mini Bar Third Place Dunkin’ Donuts

BEST FAMILY RESTAURANT FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

The Fish Company Culhane’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Mellow Mushroom Trasca & Co. Two Dudes

BEST FINE DINING RESTAURANT FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

Eleven South Restaurant Medure Azurea TIE! Doro Vernon’s First Coast Kitchen

}

BEST FISH CAMP FIRST PLACE Palm Valley Fish Camp Second Place Safe Harbor Seafood Restaurant Jax Beach

Third Place North Beach Fish Camp Fourth Place The Fish Company Fifth Place Palm Valley Outdoors Bar & Grill

BEST FRENCH FRIES FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Cruisers Grill Poe’s Tavern, Atlantic Beach Five Guys M Shack Graffiti Junktion

BEST FRIED CHICKEN FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

Coop 303 Hangar Bay Café Metro Diner Angie’s Grom Southern Kitchen & Bar

BEST GASTROPUB FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}TIE!

Hoptinger Bier Garden & Sausage House European Street Café, Jax Beach Engine 15 Brewing Co. Whiskey Jax Ruby Beach

BEST GLUTEN-FREE MENU FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

Plantology Café, Jax Beach Homespun Kitchen Buddha Thai Bistro TIE! Florida Juice & Bowl Jax Spice

}

BEST HAPPY HOUR FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

The Fish Company 3 Palms Grille Sliders Oyster Bar, Neptune Beach Pusser’s Bar & Grille The Shim Sham Room

BEST HOT DOG FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Hot Dog Hut Ritz Dogs M Shack Cinotti’s Bakery & Sandwich Shop Flaming Seafood & Shao Kao BBQ

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Caffe Andiamo Poppy’s Italiano Mezza Restaurant & Bar Gusto Italian Restaurant Napoli’s Pastaria

BEST JAPANESE RESTAURANT FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Kamiya 86 Hawker’s Asian Street Fare Sake House Beach Sushi Palace, Jacksonville Beach Kazu Sushi Burrito


BEST LATE NIGHT MENU FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

The Shim Sham Room Flying Iguana Taqueria & Tequila Bar Nona Blue Modern Tavern Poe’s Tavern, Atlantic Beach The Blind Rabbit

BEST LOCALLY OWNED RESTAURANT FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

TacoLu, Baja Mexicana Caffe Andiamo TIE! The Fish Company Dwight’s Bistro RP’s Fine Food & Drink

}

Flying Iguana Taqueria & Tequila Bar Cantina Louie Casa Marina Aqua Grill Nona Blue

BEST MARTINI FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Ocean 60 The Fish Company 3 Palms Grille Bonefish Grill Azurea Angie’s Subs, Jax Beach Biggie’s Pizza Beach Hut Café Maple Street Biscuit Company Hangar Bay Cafe

}TIE!

TacoLu, Baja Mexicana Flying Iguana Taqueria & Tequila Bar Cantina Louie Mezcal of Ponte Vedra Casa Leon

BEST NEW BAR FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fourth Place FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}

Coop 303 Jumpin Jax House of Food, Atlantic Beach Southern Kitchen & Bar Que Pasa Mexican Kitchen Tokyo Ramen & Poke

FIRST PLACE Delicomb Second Place House of Leaf & Bean,

An Organic Restaurant & Cafe

Third Place Florida Juice & Bowl Fourth Place Native Sun Natural Foods Market Fifth Place Plantology Café

BEST OYSTERS The Fish Company Safe Harbor Seafood Restaurant Sliders Oyster Bar, Neptune Beach Marker 32 TIE! North Beach Fish Camp

BEST PASTRIES FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

}

}TIE!

Cinotti’s Bakery & Sandwich Shop Southern Grounds & Co. Le Macaron French Pastries Panera Bread Pie Heaven Bakery Café

BEST PIZZA FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

V Pizza, Jax Beach Biggie’s Pizza Al’s Pizza DaVinci’s Pizza Tony’s Pizza

BEST PUB FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

BEST SMOOTHIE FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Tropical Smoothie Cafe Florida Juice & Bowl Native Sun Natural Foods Market Vitality Bowls Jacksonville Plantology Café

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Tavern on 1st Street Sneakers Sports Grille Philly’s Finest Mulligan’s Pub Yummy Crab Seafood Restaurant & Sports Bar

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Ruth’s Chris Steak House Longhorn Steakhouse North Beach Bistro Outback Steakhouse Bonefish Grill

BEST SUB SANDWICH Angie’s Subs, Jax Beach D&LP Subs Sun Deli Larry’s Giant Subs Jimmy John’s

BEST SUSHI RESTAURANT

BEST ORGANIC RESTAURANT

FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Fourth Place Fourth Place

FIRST PLACE Safe Harbor Seafood Restaurant Second Place The Fish Company Third Place Beachside Seafood Restaurant & Market Fourth Place Roy’s Restaurant Fifth Place Beaches at Vilano

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Coop 303 Surfer [The Bar] Southern Swells Brewery Reve Brewing TIE! SALT Jax Beach

BEST NEW RESTAURANT

The Fish Company Safe Harbor Seafood Restaurant North Beach Fish Camp Aqua Grill Beachside Seafood Restaurant & Market

BEST STEAK PLACE

BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

BEST SPORTS BAR

BEST MEAL UNDER $10 FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Third Place Fifth Place

BEST SEAFOOD RESTAURANT

BEST SHRIMP

BEST MARGARITA FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Third Place Bono’s Pit BarBQ Fourth Place Roy’s Restaurant Fifth Place Nona Blue Modern Tavern

Culhane’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Lynch’s Irish Pub The Fly’s Tie Irish Pub Southern Swells Brewing Co. Mulligan’s Pub

FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Kamiya 86 Fancy Sushi Sushi Palace Sake House Beach Samurai Japanese Steakhouse

BEST TACOS FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

TacoLu, Baja Mexicana Flying Iguana Taqueria & Tequila Bar Cantina Louie Mr. Taco Truck

BEST VEGAN/VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place

Native Sun Delicomb Florida Juice & Bowl House of Leaf & Bean,

Fifth Place

Simply Tasty Thai

An Organic Restaurant & Cafe

BEST WATERFRONT DINING FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Cap’s on the Water Valley Smoke Azurea Casa Marina Southern Kitchen & Bar

BEST WINE BAR FIRST PLACE Second Place Second Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Royal Palm Village Wine & Tapas Caffe Andiamo TIE! Ocean 60 The Wine Bar 3 Palms Grille

}

BEST WINE LIST FIRST PLACE Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Caffe Andiamo Royal Palm Village Wine & Tapas Eleven South Ruth’s Chris Steak House Azurea

BEST RESTAURANT SERVER FIRST PLACE Jojo at Medure Second Place Tyson Nilly at Bonefish Grill

BEST RIBS FIRST PLACE Valley Smoke Second Place Mojo Kitchen, BBQ Pit & Blues Bar APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 29


FOLIO: FEATURE

ONE MAN’S TREASURE

The Lightner Museum mounts unconventional Degas exhibition

Lightner Museum Curator Barry Myers (photo by Alex Harris)

story by JENNIFER MELVILLE 30 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019


Edgar Degas & August Clot Before the Race (1895)

‘A

rt is not what you see, but what you make others see,” said French Impressionist painter Edgar Degas. Art challenges us to see life anew or to notice beauty in the minute, like the graceful movement of a dancer or a smile’s seductive curve. Art enchants us. It inspires. And if it’s great, it draws a crowd. Edgar Degas is coming to St. Augustine, or at least his artwork is. The exhibition Edgar Degas: The Private Impressionist features more than 100 original works by Degas and his contemporaries, including Mary Cassatt, Édouard Manet, Jean-Léon Gérôme, Alfred Stevens, Camille Pissarro and Paul Cézanne. Degas himself painted 50 pieces, which span his entire creative life. The show, which the Lightner Museum opened April 12, is up through June 16. The Lightner’s third-floor mezzanine is a stunning locale for the gilt-framed artwork lining its grand corridors. “Half of art is presentation,” Bob Harper, Lightner Museum executive director, explained to me. It’s true. It’s visually breathtaking. Visitors can trace young Degas’ nascent drawing skills, catch glimpses of future famous masterpieces in his sketches, and uncover notes of the depression and despair that engulfed his tumultuous later years. Edgar Degas (1834-1917) is celebrated for the revolutionary ways in which he captured light and movement in his art, though he’s nearly as famous for his cantankerous personality as he is for his depictions of dancers. He’s considered a founder of the Impressionist Movement, yet Degas didn’t identify as an Impressionist. He regarded himself as a Realist; he aimed to represent life as he saw it. Portraiture fascinated him, as did horses and horse-racing. Degas

was prolifically creative, with a legacy of hundreds, perhaps thousands of drawings, prints and sculptures. More than 100 years after his death, the name is still widely recognized and the work graces museums and private collections worldwide. The works featured in The Private Impressionist are all from one such private collection, that of Robert Flynn Johnson, a professor and curator of collections at Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts & the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco for more than 40 years. Johnson purchased his first Degas print in 1973 and hasn’t stopped collecting since. “This is a totally different type of exhibit. It appeals to a totally different audience,” Bob Harper told Folio Weekly. “The collection is interesting because it’s an individual’s collection. You won’t see major pieces by Degas, but you’ll see a great sample of his work.” “This is important as a collection,” added Lightner curator Barry Myers. “You get real insight into the mind of a collector and into the real passion of someone who has built a collection and knows it intimately.” These aren’t major pieces—they’re purchased on a curator’s salary—but they’re intriguing and unique. St. Augustine is among several cities selected to host the collection. Johnson’s treasures include drawings, lithographs and monotypes by Degas, the artist’s personal photographs, a letter Degas wrote to another artist, and a bronze sculpture. There’s Jockey on Horseback in Profile, a rough graphite sketch on tracing paper (ca. 1860-’65). Achille Degas is a portrait of Degas’ favored brother in graphite on textured, dark cream-tone paper (ca. 1853). Before the Race (ca. 1895) is distinctly Impressionistic in style, a color lithograph on lightweight tan wove paper by Edgar Degas and Auguste Clot.

Somewhat surprisingly, not many ballerinas are seen here; one exception is Danseuse Prés du Poêle, a delicate lithograph with chine appliqué on thin wove paper from the portfolio Quinze Lithographies by Degas and George William Thomley (ca. 1888-’89). This is a collection to be savored slowly and considered carefully. “If you read the labels, you understand what this exhibit is all about and the interrelationship of the artist and his friends,” Myers explained. “It’s important to keep that history alive. It’s important for St. Augustine, in that Edgar Degas is a really well-known artist and it’s important to bring a little bit of that history to the local level.” This isn’t the first time the Lightner Museum has hosted a major traveling exhibition. Dressing Downton–Changing Fashion for Changing Times (October 2017-January 2018) featured costumes, accessories and jewelry from the hit PBS TV show Downton Abbey. It was an immense success. “We wanted to keep the momentum going with special exhibits; it took us a while to find something we felt would be appropriate for us,” said Myers. “One of the things that sold me on this exhibit is the fact that, even though we don’t have any of Degas’ paintings in the collection, we have several of his contemporaries’ [paintings], people he was friends with, and minor works by those artists are in this exhibit. We have some major works by those artists. What I’ve done is incorporate a lot of things from the museum collection in the show.” Myers has worked at Lightner Museum for 25 years, and has been its curator for 15 years. He loves the collection and the historic former Alcazar Hotel that houses it. He also loves bringing great art—and great artists—to Northeast Florida and finding novel ways to make history come alive for a new generation. The Edgar Degas exhibit pushes the Lightner slightly outside its St. Augustine historical niche, triangulating a course among classical 19th-century art and contemporary pop culture and modern art—of which Degas is universally considered a pioneer. “The Degas exhibit—sort of like the Downton Abbey effect—it’s a big name that will draw people. Everyone knows who Degas was, just about,” Myers explained. “But they’re not familiar with his contemporaries. Degas is a household name. Alfred Stevens, maybe not so much, or Jean-Léon Gérôme. These were really well-known artists in their day, but they don’t have that cachet today. When we’re looking back at 19th-century art, those artists aren’t as well known today. Like Pablo Picasso—everybody knows

what a Picasso looked like, but not everybody knows what an Alfred Stevens looked like.” Despite a legendary moodiness, Degas had a far-reaching and deeply interconnected social circle. “I love the fact that Degas was so in touch with other artists in his time period,” Myers said. “When you read labels on this collection and see how he interacted with other artists, his influence on other artists, and their influence on him, it’s really fascinating.” Collector Johnson must have felt much the same because, as his fascination with Degas grew, he expanded his collection to include works by the artist’s closest friends. Very few portraits from life exist. Visitors have the rare chance to see two of them: Portrait of Degas (ca. 1890) in black crayon and Degas in Old Age (ca. 1917) in black crayon on blue wove paper, both by PierreGeorges Jeannoit. Another interesting point of contemplation can be found in Portrait of Edgar Degas in Old Age and Portrait of Mary Cassatt in Old Age, both by Joseph Goldyne (ca. 1983). The works are displayed side by side, though facing away from each other. Degas and Cassatt shared a deep friendship and working relationship for 40 years. Does the odd portrait placement imply something about their relationship in the dusk of life? Perhaps that’s a question to ask Johnson himself when he visits his treasures on May 2. The collector discusses “Chasing Degas: My Four Decades Collecting This Artist and His Circle.” Attendees will hear firsthand about Johnson’s passion for all things Degas and the wild adventures he’s experienced while amassing this collection. Myers hopes this Degas exhibit will encourage new guests to visit Lightner Museum and regulars to visit more often. “It’s a beautiful exhibit. We seldom get visitors from Jacksonville into the museum, up until Downton Abbey. We had so many comment that they didn’t even know we existed and how did they not know us?” Myers recalled. “It’ll be good to bring them down to be exposed to the museum. Even if it weren’t Degas, it’s a fabulous collection. I think it’s an untapped resource. People just don’t know that we exist and I want to get the word out that we have this fabulous collection.”

EDGAR DEGAS: THE PRIVATE IMPRESSIONIST – WORKS ON PAPER BY THE ARTIST AND HIS CIRCLE Lightner Museum, 75 King St., St. Augustine, 824-2874, lightnermuseum. org, members free; nonmembers $5 over admission. Degas exhibit closes 4:30 p.m. Subscribe to the Folio Weekly Newsletter at folioweekly.com/newsletters APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 31


FOLIO A + E T

he four members of Jacksonville’s Glazed are of that rare breed: successful self-made musicians. And, after more five years together, the pop-punk veterans are off to a promising 2019, with a SXSW co-headlining tour with Atlanta’s Blis and a new EP set to be released this summer. Glazed is Justin Belichis (guitar, vocals), Brian Wright (bass), Reid Johnson (guitar) and Liam Murphy (drums). The band members came together slowly in the tweens of our millennium, having known each other from previous projects— including a proto-Glazed outfit called Locals. The name “Glazed” crept up on them. It was first deployed as the title of a Locals demo in 2013. Belichis in particular was haunted by the word. “I think Glazed is a feeling,” he told Folio Weekly. “It’s how I felt being a college freshman going to FSCJ South Campus on weekdays, delivering pizza at nights, and falling in love with the budding Jacksonville DIY scene that I’ve grown to love so much.” That 2013 cassette demo was a watershed moment with the new players and new sounds. A new name was inevitable. “We are aware of and appreciate the music we’ve made in the past,” Murphy said. “But we are always looking forward to develop it in better ways.” Locals had seen the future, and it was Glazed. The band was rechristened in 2014, and that’s when they released an official Glazed debut EP, & Confused. (Ha!) The

FILM TEEN SPIRIT ARTS & EVENTS CONCERTS LIVE & LOCAL

NOT

DONUTS Jacksonville’s GLAZED put the POP back in PUNK

six-song set was able to hold its own as a straightforward emo record from the era. Their sound might be indebted to the vocal stylings of Taking Back Sunday and the rhythmic hooks of Title Fight, but the result is all Glazed. They followed up in 2016 with You’ve Changed, a full-length that broke Bandcamp and made Glazed the flavor of the year among Jacksonville punk purveyors. That name on a flyer made any show an automatic must-see. Glazed became part of the Bughouse clique and often shared stages (and living room floors) with hardworking scene bands like Intervention and Teen Divorce. Part of the reason You’ve Changed was such a success: Belichis, a journalism major, and Johnson, a creative writing major, collaborated to craft lyrics that spoke to real issues. Belichis cited Kanye West as an influential lyricist and trailblazer; as West challenged pop-rap tropes of wealth and

fame, Glazed consciously strayed from the eye-rolling tales of heartbreak that take up valuable real estate on most emo records. Years of gigging together have cemented an enviable bond among the crew. Their camaraderie extends beyond the music: They’ve cliff-jumped together in Nashville and moshed with Blake Anderson of Comedy Central’s Workaholics. They’re like The Beatles in all those goofy films, but real. Riffing on shared experiences and influences, members bring ideas to the table, and help workshop lyrics and song structures. They like to keep each track under the radio standard of 3:30. “We hate filler, so adding another verse or chorus or whatever to beef up songs isn’t our style unless it feels genuine,” explained Johnson. Glazed recently teased their upcoming album with a digital single. If “New York City” is any indication, the new disc will be their most polished release. The making-of story is classic emo. “I wrote most of the songs holed up in my one-bedroom apartment in Virginia

PG. 34 PG. 35 PG. 37

Beach in 2016,” said Belichis. “Isolating myself with a tiny interface, a stage microphone and my guitar, when not working as a radio news journalist in the daytime, did something to my songwriting.” When the singer got back to Jax, Glazed went to work recording with Josh Cobb, ex-guitarist of Palm Coast’s My Getaway. “We decided to hire Josh Cobb to track and produce the new songs at Rockbot Studios in Riverside,” Belichis said. “It was comfy there and we’ve always looked up to Josh as a musician.” Indeed, Belichis and Johnson used to listen to My Getaway in the Myspace Stone Age. The new Glazed, tentatively titled 1999, drops this summer. The band will celebrate with two extensive tours: a West Coast exercise with fellow Jax rockers Runner’s High and a fall New England tour. In the meantime, Glazed has two shows this week. On Saturday, April 27, they (and Sleepless) are the entertainment for a graphic novel signing at Coliseum of Comics in Riverside. (The book is Nicholas Aflleje and Sarah DeLaine’s Little Girls, released by Image Comics.) On Tuesday, April 30, Glazed opens for touring Ohio emo band Heart Attack Man at 1904 Music Hall. It’s a reunion of sorts, according to Johnson. “Heart Attack Man is held kinda close to our hearts,” he said, “because we had the pleasure of opening for [Heart Attack Man singer Eric Egan’s former band] Ages at Burro Bar back in the day.” Tristan Komorny mail@folioweekly.com Subscribe to the Folio Music Newsletter at folioweekly.com/newsletters

Photo by Leighton Hoey

LITTLE GIRLS NATIONAL BOOK TOUR WITH GLAZED, SLEEPLESS • 5 p.m. Saturday, April 27, Coliseum of Comics, Riverside, coliseumofcomics.com, free SEAWAY, FREE THROW, HEART ATTACK MAN, GLAZED • 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 30, 1904 Music Hall, Downtown, 1904musichall.com, $15-$18 32 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019


APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 33


FOLIO A+E : FILM

IT’S the SINGER, NOT the SONG

ELLE FANNING takes POP MUSIC to ASTONISHING NEW HEIGHTS

W

e’ve seen the story plenty of times: an unknown ingénue from nowhere makes it big in show business. So a shoulder shrug for yet another version of the moth-eaten tale is understandable. It’s also presumptuous. Teen Spirit excels at every predictable turn, engaging us to gamely root for the protagonist to triumph, even though we already know she will. Shy Violet (Elle Fanning) (maybe even shrinking?) lives with her religious mother (Agnieszka Grochowska) on a farm on the Isle of Wight in the U.K. They’re poor— they sell eggs at a flea market—and Violet works at a bar, where she moonlights as a singer. She loves to sing, in fact, and is really quite good at it (Fanning does all her own voice work and she’s quite good) according to Vlad (Zlatko Buric), a husky local who’s not as he seems. An opportunity appears. The singing competition “Teen Spirit” (like “American Idol”) is holding try-outs in the village. You know this part: She goes, thinks she does terribly, actually does quite well, and to her surprise and no one else’s, advances in the competition. Vlad’s singing experience is a plus as he manages her climbing career, and soon she has the entire Isle of Wight community supporting her. Writer/director Max Minghella uses several artistic flourishes to keep things peppy and rolling along. For example, a montage of Violet’s initial audition is nicely packaged; later, the judges are deep in the dark when they speak to Violet on stage. To her, this makes them more ominous and scary, and because we see the ordeal through her, we feel her fear. There’s also an impressive, extensive, tracking shot as Violet walks the halls to the stage. Note the movement toward and away from her as a purple strobe light pulses behind her while she sings. Minghella has taken the standard moments of this film genre and artistically elevated them in interesting, new ways—kudos to him for bringing something sparkly

34 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019

fresh to the story. He includes a pop-filled soundtrack, including the timely use of No Doubt’s “Just a Girl” in the beginning, underscoring the sense of being trapped that Violet has in her routine of work, school, home, work. The lyrics “I’m just a girl, living in captivity” enlarge the spirit of the scene perfectly. As for Fanning, she handles herself well in this first musical. She speaks Polish, has a natural singing voice, and depicts Violet’s transition from an unknown to the bright lights of opportunity with just the right balance of nerves and ambition. In the end, when her otherwise dour character smiles, she lights up the screen with an exuberance we can’t help but share. Teen Spirit is Minghella’s directorial debut. It’s far from groundbreaking, but it is impressive and intelligent in all the ways it should be to be successful. Here’s hoping he’ll grow and do something more daring and original next time. He’s earned the right to try. Dan Hudak mail@folioweekly.com Subscribe to the Folio Film Newsletter at folioweekly.com/newsletters

NOW SHOWING CORAZON CINEMA & CAFÉ Woman at War and Diane run. Throwback Thursday: Gunga Din, noon April 25. 36 Granada St., St. Augustine, 679-5736, corazoncinemaandcafe.com. The U.S. premiere of Walking in the Opposite Direction starts May 3; a concert by Secret Cigarettes, featuring Georgio Valentino, playing Adrian Borland’s songs, is 7 p.m. May 4. Game of Thrones 9 p.m. every Sun. WGHF IMAX THEATER Penguins, Pandas, Great Bear Rainforest and Great Barrier Reef screen. Avengers: EndGame starts April 25. World Golf Hall of Fame, St. Augustine, 940-4133, worldgolfimax.com. SUN-RAY CINEMA Climax, Her Smell, The Brink and Diane screen. Penguin Highway runs April 24. Avengers: EndGame starts April 25. The excellent biopic about Aretha Franklin, Amazing Grace, starts April 26. 1028 Park St., 5 Points, 359-0049, sunraycinema.com.


ARTS + EVENTS

Photo by Frank Ruchalski

PERFORMANCE

SHEN YUN This acclaimed dance and acrobatic troupe tells a colorful history of 5,000 years of Chinese culture and civilization, 7:30 p.m. April 24 and 2 p.m. April 25 at Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts’ Moran Theater, 300 Water St., Downtown, 354-5547, shenyun.com/fl, ticketmaster.com; $80-$150. I HATE HAMLET Paul Rudnick’s dramedy involves an unemployed TV star with a lovely sweetie (who’s a little loony) and a great NYC apartment–haunted by John Barrymore. He has a chance to play the Prince of Denmark in Central Park but he abhors the play, or the man, or Shakespeare’s entire oeuvre. It’s staged 7:30 p.m. April 25 & May 2; 8 p.m. April 26 & 27 and May 3 & 4 and 2 p.m. April 28 & May 5 at Theatre Jacksonville, 2032 San Marco Blvd., 396-4425, theatrejax.com; $26; $21 senior/student/military (Thur. & Sun.) ANDREW LIPPA’S WILD PARTY The Jazz Age was indeed a wild era, what with all those gangsters and illegal hooch and silly dances–and murder. This musical hits all the right notes, and Players by the Sea opened the speakeasy Club Manifest, an interactive experience before the show, 7-8 p.m. April 26 & 27, May 3, 4, 10, 11, 17 & 18; $50. The musical Wild Party is staged 8 p.m. April 26 & 27, May 2-4, 9-11 & 16-18 and 2 p.m. May 5 at Players by the Sea, 106 Sixth St. N., Jax Beach, 249-0289; playersbythesea.org; $28 general admission, $25 senior/student/military. DANCING WITH THE STARS The audience and a panel of judges cast votes for eight local celebrities (and their pro dance partners) in competition, including performances by Jacksonville Children’s Chorus and dancers from A Social Affair Dance Studio, 8 p.m. April 27, Lazarra Hall, University of North Florida, Southside, 353-1636 ext. 2, $35$150; proceeds benefit Jacksonville Children’s Chorus, jaxdwts.com, jaxchildrenschorus.org. SMALL MOUTH SOUNDS The 5 & Dime presents Bess Wohl’s play about six cityfolk who go to the woods to seek … they’re not sure, and they don’t talk; they listen to a mediator. You may end up hearing the incessant cacophony of life differently. It’s staged at 8 p.m. April 26 and 27 and at 2 p.m. April 28 and May 5 at 112 E. Adams St., Downtown, the5anddime. org; $22 advance; $25 door. BIG THE MUSICAL Based on the film, this comedy about growing up fast–way too fast– runs at 6 p.m. April 24-28 & 29 and May 1-5; at 11 a.m. April 27 and May 4; and at noon April 28 and May 5 at Alhambra Theatre & Dining, 12000 Beach Blvd., Southside, 6411212, $38-$61, alhambrajax.com. FREAKY FRIDAY Remember when your mom started acting like you, and you began to crave the stuff she liked? Us neither, but Apex Theatre Studio does and so presents this musical take on the old switcheroo story, with a cast of local high school and college students. Staged 7:30 p.m. April 26, 1:30 & 7:30 p.m. April 27 and 2 p.m. April 28 at Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 1050 A1A N., 209-0399, apextheatrejax.com, pvconcert hall.com, $25. AN EVENING WITH DAVID SEDARIS Who’s more observant and funny and introspective and

THE CODA OF A MASTER Associate conductor Nathan Aspinall (pictured) leads the Jacksonville Symphony in a performance of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s final symphony, No. 41 in C Major, JUPITER. 8 p.m. Friday & Saturday, April 26 & 27; 3 p.m. Sunday, April 28, Times-Union Center, Downtown, jaxsymphony.org, $19-$86. ironic than the brilliant humorist, writer and truth-spreader Sedaris? No one, which is why you’ll be at the Times-Union Center’s Terry Theater at 7:30 p.m. April 25, 300 Water St., Downtown, 630-3900, fscjartistseries. org, $42-$121.50. If he shares tales of his brother Paul, you’ll be getting a Sedaris tattoo the next day. We sure as hell did. UKULELE GATHERING Ukulele means leaping flea–that’s how your fingers act–and enthusiasts, as well as singers and acoustic instrument players, jam at 6 p.m. April 25 and every fourth Thursday in The Courtyard, 200 First St., Neptune Beach, 612-4975.

CLASSICAL, JAZZ

MOZART’S JUPITER Jacksonville Symphony’s Masterworks Series continues with this remarkable production of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s last work, Symphony No. 41 in C Major, Jupiter. The program includes Maurice Ravel’s Le Tombeau de Couperin, a suite honoring the French Baroque era, and Sir Edward Elgar’s Variations on an Original Theme (Enigma), Opus 36. Associate Conductor Nathan Aspinall leads, 8 p.m. April 26 & 27 and 3 p.m. April 28 at Times-Union Center’s Jacoby Hall, 300 Water St., Downtown, 354-5547, my.jaxsymphony.org; $19-$86.

BOOKS & POETRY

NORMA JEAN McLEOD BOOK SIGNING Author McLeod reads from and signs copies of her book, Amelia Wild and Wonderful, 1-4 p.m. April 26 at The Book Loft, 214 Centre St., Fernandina, 261-8991, thebookloft.com. JAX POETRY FEST It’s Party in the Park with Al Letson, The Performers Academy, Hope at Hand and Florida Humanities Council, with poets Ebony Payne-English, Love Reigns,

Matthew Cuban Hernandez, Kia Flow and more. DJ Monsta spins 5 p.m., Universal Green plays 8:30 p.m. April 27, Hemming Park, Downtown. Food trucks and adult beverages, too; VIP $30. hemmingpark.org. CINDI HANDLEY GOODEAUX The local author signs her two books, Grandpa Moon and The Adventures of Princess Jellibean series, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. April 27, San Marco Bookstore, 1971 San Marco Blvd., 396-7597, sanmarcobookstore.com. INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORE DAY CELEBRATION Storytime is held at 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. April 27; local authors discuss and sign their works at Story & Song Neighborhood Bookstore & Bistro, 1430 Park Ave., Fernandina, 601-2118, storyandsong bookstore.com. INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORE DAY The 24th annual celebration of independent bookstores features food, prizes and books, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. April 27 at The BookMark, 200 First St., Neptune Beach, 241-9026, bookmarkbeach.com. TERRI PEEL BECHTOLD BOOK SIGNING Author Bechtold reads from and signs copies of her book, For Infinity andBeyond, 1-4 p.m. April 27 at The Book Loft, 214 Centre St., Fernandina, 261-8991, thebookloft.com.

COMEDY

JORGE LOPEZ The standup star returns, 8 p.m. April 26, The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, $39-$75, floridatheatre.com. THE COMEDY ZONE Huggy Lowdown and Chris Paul appear at 7:30 p.m. April 25 and 7:30 & 10 p.m. April 26 & 27 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, 292-4242, comedyzone.com; $20/$25. APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 35


ARTS + EVENTS JACKIE KNIGHT’S COMEDY CLUB Steve Sabo is on 8:30 p.m. April 26 & 27 at Gypsy Cab Company, 830 Anastasia Blvd., St. Augustine, 461-8843, thegypsycomedy club.com; $12/$15. SEAN FINNERTY Zach Bennet hosts several comics (Finnerty was just on The Tonight Show), 7 p.m. April 26, Corazon Cinema, 36 Granada St., St. Augustine, $15.

ART WALKS, AUDITIONS & FARMERS MARKETS

JACKSONVILLE CHILDREN’S CHORUS Auditions for kids in grades 2-12 are 4:30 p.m. April 30, First Coast Christian School, 7587 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park, 353-1636 ext. 1, jaxchildrenschorus.org. Auditions continue through May 21; get all the details on the website. RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET Local & regional art, produce, crafts and dance by Rhythm Tap Theory, Ballet Arts Center, FSCJ DanceWORKS, In the Midst, Sahara Silk, 10 a.m. April 27, below Fuller Warren Bridge, free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

MUSEUMS

BEACHES MUSEUM & HISTORY PARK 381 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach, 241-5657, beaches museum.org. Author Michael Ray FitzGerald (Swamp Music: Gator Country’s Musical Legacy) discusses Southern rock, 6 p.m. April 25, $5 donation. Sand, Soul & Rockn-Roll: Music at the Beaches displays. The Mother of Beaches History: Celebrating the Life of Jean McCormick is on display. CRISP-ELLERT ART MUSEUM Flagler College, 48 Sevilla St., St. Augustine, 826-8530. Columbia College Chicago philosophy professor Stephen Asma discusses creativity in The Evolution of Imagination: A Lecture and Performance, 7 p.m. April 25, free. CUMMER MUSEUM OF ART & GARDENS 829 Riverside Ave., 356-6857, cummermuseum. org. Free Tuesday is April 30. Carlos Rolón: Lost in Paradise, is on exhibit through Oct. 21. Kota Ezawa: The Crime of Art, shows through Dec. 1. Edmund Greacen & World War I runs through Dec. 15. KARPELES MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY & MUSEUM 101 W. First St., Springfield. Lincoln as

a Boy, examining the 16th president’s early life, with Lloyd Ostendorf’s original illustrations, exhibits through April. LIGHTNER MUSEUM 75 King St., St. Augustine, 824-2874, lightnermuseum.org. Lightner After Hours features Ramona, light hors d’oeuvres and libations, and plein air artists at work, 6-8 p.m. April 25, free. The exhibition, Edgar Degas: The Private Impressionist, is on display through June 16. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART JACKSONVILLE 333 N. Laura St., 366-6911, mocajacksonville.unf.edu. Micro-Macro: Andrew Sendor and Ali Banisadr, Invisible Cities: Paintings by Nathan Lewis, Interior Geography: Mark Lester and Painting the Picture exhibit.

GALLERIES

ALEXANDER BREST MUSEUM & GALLERY, Jacksonville University, , 800 University Blvd. N., Arlington, 256-7371, arts.ju.edu. Division of Visual Arts Annual Thesis Exhibition displays through April 24. BOLD BEAN SAN MARCO 1905 Hendricks Ave., 853-6545. Brook Ramsey’s figurative oil paintings are on display. BREW 5 POINTS 1026 Park St. Kenny Wilson’s No Men Do It Alone is on exhibit. BUTTERFIELD GARAGE ART GALLERY 137 King St., St. Augustine, 825-4577, butterfieldgarage. com. Joseph Paul Getchius’ works display. Laura O’Neal is May’s featured artist; she discusses her process, 6 p.m. May 3. CATHEDRAL ARTS PROJECT 207 N. Laura St., Ste. 300, Downtown, capkids.org. Hiromi Moneyhun’s works, Inside Out, are on exhibit through June 27. THE CULTURAL CENTER AT PONTE VEDRA BEACH 50 Executive Way, 280-0614, ccpvb. org. Grate Works of Art, works by Bobbi Mastrangelo, runs through April 27. CUTTER & CUTTER FINE ART 333 Village Main St., Ponte Vedra, 395-3759, cutterand cutter.com. Award-winning artist Tang Wei Min exhibits his works. HOME STREET GALLERY & STUDIOS 1451 Home St., Southbank, 236-8202. Art is for Everyone features artists Enzo Torcoletti, Allison Watson, Pablo Rivera, Colin Misenar, Terse Mullen Muller, Jeff Luque, Kevin Author,

CREATIVE BRAIN Columbia College Chicago philosophy professor STEPHEN ASMA waxes poetic on the subject of creativity. “The Evolution of Imagination: A Lecture and Performance” is part academic lecture, part artist talk and part live performance (Asma is also a blues guitarist). 7 p.m. Thursday, April 25, Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, Flagler College, St. Augustine, flagler.edu, free. 36 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019

Richard Lundgren, Rebecca Daily and Steven Durden. April Collum, curator. JENNA ALEXANDER STUDIO 73 San Marco Ave., St. Augustine, 850-384-3084, jennaalexander.com. Stripes and Buns exhibits. PAStA FINE ART GALLERY 214 Charlotte St., St. Augustine, 824-0251, pastagalleryart. com. Clint Burbridge is featured in April. ROTUNDA GALLERY St. Johns County Admin. Bldg., 500 San Sebastian View, St. Augustine, 471-9980. Mary Hubley’s Living the Coastal Landscape, through May 23. SOUTHLIGHT GALLERY 1 Independent Dr., Downtown, southlight.com. Brook Ramsey exhibits works. Architect-sculptor David Engdal exhibits lamelliforms on the second floor, through May. Ronald Gibbons shows paintings and drawings, on the second floor, through April. STELLERS GALLERY AT PONTE VEDRA 240 A1A N., Ste. 13, 273-6065, stellersgallery.com. Blush, works by Page Jones Davis, Karin Olah and Laura Lacambra Shubert, through April. Profits benefit Art with a Heart in Healthcare. THE VAULT@1930 1930 San Marco Ave., thevaultat1930.com. Works by Sergei Orgunov display. Artists interested in San Marco Art Festival call 398-2890 for details. THE YELLOW HOUSE 577 King St., Riverside, 419-9180, yellowhouseart.org. An opening reception for the exhibit A Simple Show, featuring the works of Sarah Crooks, Doug Eng, Ali Fernandez, Crystal Floyd, Karen Kurycki, Andrew Kozlowski, Khalil Osborne, Tatitana Phoenix, Lorn Wheeler, Kirsten Williams, One Heart Jax, is 6 p.m. May 3. The show runs through July 20.

EVENTS

THE ST. AUGUSTINE TONIGHT SHOW Folio Weekly editor Georgio Valentino appears on the show with host Jorge Rivera; it’s taped live in a funky furniture store, 7 p.m. April 25, Garrett Bros. Eclectic Home Décor, 1764 Tree Blvd., Ste. 4, St. Augustine, 814-8047, garrettbros.com, free. R.A.P. HOME TOUR The 45th annual selfguided tour, featuring several RiversideAvondale historic homes open to the public, is held 10 a.m.-5 p.m. April 27 and noon-5 p.m. April 28. For details, go to raphometour.com; $30 general admission; $10 for younger than 12. FULL CIRCLE FEST The Keepers of the Coast’s second annual fest, with speakers discussing sustainable living ideas on alternative energy, gardening, recycling and conservation, features music by Brett Bass & the Melted Plectrum, Theo Moon and Nan Nkama, 3-5 p.m. April 27 at The Amp, keepersofthecoast.net. Bring a bag and find unique, plastic-free, eco-conscious items. ART IN THE JU LIBRARY TOUR The 10th annual tour has more than 140 original pieces, many by regional artists, in Carpenter Library, Jacksonville University, ju.edu, free. Tours run through May. HEMMING PARK WALKING CLUB The weekly stroll, led by Friends of Hemming Park, tells of public art and city history. Meet near the “Opposing Forces” sculpture at the corner of Monroe and Laura streets. 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 30, Hemming Park, Downtown, hemmingpark.org, free.


CONCERTS

JERRY’S, 13170 Atlantic Blvd. Yowsah April 26. Vegas Gray April 27

MANDARIN

ENZA’S, 10601 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 109 Brian Iannucci April 24, 30 & May 1 IGGY’S, 104 Bartram Oaks Walk Ryan Campbell April 24. Don’t Call Me Shirley April 26. Yowsah April 27. Ginger Beard Man April 28

ORANGE PARK, MIDDLEBURG

On the eve of his European tour, Jacksonville rock singer RICKOLUS performs Beatles songs with Leroy Copeland. It’s Beatles Brunch! 3-6 p.m. Sunday, April 28, Rain Dogs, Riverside, facebook.com/raindogsjax, free.

Live Music Venues AMELIA ISLAND, FERNANDINA The GREEN TURTLE Tavern, 14 S. Third St. Sam McDonald, Colored Sound, Melody Trucks Band April 27. Buck Smith Thur. Dan Voll Fri. Yancy Clegg Sun. The SALTY PELICAN, 12 N. Front St. Robert Barlow April 24. Davis Turner April 25. Savannah Leigh Bassett, Billy King April 27. Lucas V, Greg Lyons April 28 SLIDERS Seaside Grill, 1998 S. Fletcher Ave. Alan & Terri Campbell, 7 Street Band April 27. Hallie Davis, Island BBs April 28. King Eddie & Pili Pili every Wed. Tad Jennings every Thur. JCnMike every Sun. Mark O’Quinn every Tue. SURF Restaurant, 3199 S. Fletcher Ave. The Macys April 24. JC Hornsby April 26. Davis Turner April 27

AVONDALE, ORTEGA

CASBAH Café, 3628 St. Johns Ave. Goliath Flores every Wed. Jazz every Sun. Live music every Mon.

THE BEACHES (All venues in Jax Beach unless otherwise noted)

ATLANTIC BEACH Brewing Co., 725 Atlantic Blvd. Turntable Tuesdays every week; BYOV BLUE JAY Listening Room, 2457B S. Third St. Heather Gilliss April 25. Andy Zipf April 26. Corey Kilgannon: Transcontinental Residency April 28. Rachel Hillman May 3 COOP 303, 303 Atlantic Blvd., AB Kyle Megna & Ross Catterton April 25. Cyrus Quaranta April 26. Barrett Thomas April 27. DiCarlo Thompson May 3 CULHANE’S Irish Pub, 967 Atlantic Blvd., AB Michael Funge every Sun. FLYING IGUANA, 207 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach Whim April 26. Samuel Sanders April 28. J Crew May 3&4 FLY’S TIE Irish Pub, 177 Sailfish Dr., AB Live music on weekends GREEN ROOM Brewing Co., 228 N. Third St. Mark O’Quinn April 26. The Grace Band April 27 GUSTO, 1266 Beach Blvd. Groov every Wed. Piano Man Murray Goff Fri. Ventura Latin Band every Sat. LYNCH’S Irish Pub, 514 N. First St. Barnes & The Heart April 26. BLUprint April 27. Kristen Campbell April 28. 8th & Red May 3. Dirty Pete every Wed. MEZZA, 110 First St., NB Gypsies Ginger every Wed. Mike Shackelford, Steve Shanholtzer every Thur. Trevor Tanner every Tue. MUSIC in the Courtyard, 200 First St., NB Matthew Henderson, Danka April 26. Al Monte April 27 RAGTIME Tavern, 207 Atlantic Blvd., AB Mark Dennison April 24. The Raisin Cake Orchestra April 25. Austin Park April 26. Cloud 9 April 27. Jimmy Parrish & the Waves April 28 SINGLETON’S Seafood Shack, 4728 Ocean St., Mayport Village Billy Bowers April 28 SOUTHERN SWELLS Brewing, 1312 Beach Blvd. DiCarlo Thompson April 27 SURFER the Bar, 200 N. First St. The Hip Abduction April 27. Danny Worsnop April 30. Hed Pe May 1. Little Bird May 3 WHISKEY JAX, 950 Marsh Landing Pkwy. Sidewalk 65

April 26. Fireball April 27. Chris Thomas Band April 28. Groov Band every Tue. Great Dames every Wed.

DOWNTOWN

1904 MUSIC Hall, 19 Ocean St. N. Max Frost April 25. Ward Davis April 27. Vlad the Inhaler April 28. Heart Attack Man, Young Culture, Free Throw, Seaway April 30. Tauk, The Groove Orient May 1. BREEZY Jazz Club, 119 W. Adams St. Live music most weekends DOS GATOS, 123 E. Forsyth St. DJ Hollywood every Thur. DJ NickFresh every Sat. The FLORIDA Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St. Gary Mullen & The Works: One Night of Queen April 25. The Temptations, The Four Tops April 28. India.Arie April 30. Gov’t Mule May 3 HEMMING Park, 135 W. Monroe St. Beau & The Burners April 26 The JUSTICE Pub, 315 E. Bay St. The Anti-Queens April 24. Jazz Jam Sesh April 25. Heroes & Villains 11 May 4 MAVERICKS Live, Jax Landing Faye Webster, Lord Huron May 1 METRO PARK Welcome to Rockville: Korn, The Prodigy, Wage War, Evanescence, Flogging Molly, Cleopatrick, Dirty Honey, Judas Priest, Yelawolf, Tool, Incubus, Papa Roach, The Struts, Fever 333, While She Sleeps, The Dirty Nil, Chevelle, Shinedown, Bring Me The Horizon, The Cult, In This Moment, Killswitch Engage, Circa Survive, Tom Morello, Mark Lanegan Band, Beartooth, Architects, The Interrupters, Black Label Society, Tremonti, Reignwolf, Badflower, The Damned Things, The Glorious Sons, Dorothy, Black Pistol Fire, Yungblud, Zeal & Ardor, Hands Like Houses, Movements, Hyro The Hero, Light The Torch, Wilson, Amigo The Devil, Pretty Vicious, Demob Happy, Cleopatrick, Shvpes, Hyde, Dead Girls Academy May 3, 4 & 5 MYTH Nightclub, 333 E. Bay St. DJs Nuah, Q-45, Inner-G, Sub-Lo, Kevin Velarde April 26. Gaspo April 27. Drewlface April 28. Elements of d&b April 30. DJs Lil Yankee, Killoala every Wed. DJs Q45, Bird every Thur. DJs Spyderbot, Basilisk every Tue. TIMES-UNION Center, 300 Water St. Dream Theater April 27. Prince Tribute Show: Purple Reign May 3 VETERANS Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd. Dave Matthews Band May 1. Mercy Me May 3 The VOLSTEAD, 115 W. Adams St. Groove Coalition April 26. DJ Pizza Galore April 27. Fun Sick Phony May 1

FLEMING ISLAND, GREEN COVE SPRINGS

BOONDOCKS, 2808 Henley Rd. Scott Perham April 24. Austin Williams April 25. Clint McFarland, Whiskey Heart April 26. Creature of Habits April 27. Robbie Litt May 1 MELLOW MUSHROOM, 1800 Town Ctr. Blvd. Live music some weekends WHITEY’S Fish Camp, 2032 C.R. 220 Paul Ivey April 25. Roger That April 26. DownPine April 27

INTRACOASTAL

CLIFF’S, 3033 Monument Rd. Dillon & DJ Sharon April 24. Julia Gulia April 26. Don’t Call Me Shirley April 27

CHEERS, 1138 Park Ave. Julia Gulia April 27 DALTON’S Sports Grill, 2620 Blanding Blvd. Live music most weekends TThe ROADHOUSE, 231 Blanding Blvd. Live music most weekends m

PONTE VEDRA P

F FIONN MacCOOL’S, 145 Hilden Rd. Ace Winn April 26 PPONTE VEDRA Concert Hall, 1050 A1A N. Freaky FFriday April 26, 27 & 28. The Milk Carton Kids, Darrin BBradburry May 1 RROSCOLUSA Songwriters Fest April 27, Palm Valley TTAPS Bar & Grill, 2220 C.R. 210 Kurt Lanham April 224. Vegas Gray April 26. Chuck Nash April 27

RIVERSIDE, WESTSIDE

NIGHTHAWKS, 2952 Roosevelt Blvd. AK April 24. Duval Shed Sessionz April 25. Order by Chaos preparty April 26. Order by Chaos April 27. Michael Fruend April 28. The Happy Fits, Early Eyes, Former Youth April 30. Rickolus open mic every Mon. RAIN DOGS, 1045 Park St. Beatles Brunch April 28 RIVERSIDE Arts Market, 715 Riverside Mere Rhythm Tap Theory, Ballet Arts Center, FSCJ DanceWORKS, In the Midst, Sahara Silk April 27

ST. AUGUSTINE

The AMP, 1340 A1A Kelsea Ballerini, Brett Young, Brandon Ratcliff April 26. Griz May 3 ARNOLD’S, 3912 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd. DJ Alex April 26. The Remains April 27 CAFÉ ELEVEN, 501 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Aug. Beach Lucy Kaplansky April 26 COLONIAL QUARTER, 43 St. George St. 24th Annual Gamble Rogers Music Festival: Al Poindexter, Amy Hendrickson, Aslyn & the Naysayers, Brett Bass & the Melted Plectrum, Brian Smalley, Chelsea Saddler, Dave Dowling, Davis & the Loose Cannons, Dom Flemons, Doug Spears, Dunehoppers, Eden Rewa, Elaine & Sam Mahon, Fiona Chalmers, Gatorbone Trio, Grant Peeples, Gypsy Wind, Hawktail, Jamie Defrates, Jerry Mincey, Joe Mark, John Dickie IV & Collapsible B, Jordan Foley, Katherine Archer, Krickets, Lon & Lis Williamson, Lonesome Bert & the Skinny Lizards, Michael Jordan, Mr. Aullie, Paradox, Passerine, Phoebe Hunt & the Gatherers, Pierce Pettis, Rachel Grubb, Red Henry & Friends, Remedy Tree, Ron & Bari, Salt & Pine, Sam Pacetti, The Currys, The Obscure Brothers, The Skinny, The Troubadours (Bob Patterson, Jim Carrick, Larry Mangum, Charley Simmons), The WillowWacks, Todd Jones, Uncle Mosie, Verlon Thompson, Wax Wings May 3, 4 & 5 Planet SARBEZ, 115 Anastasia Blvd. The Swell Fellas April 27. The Spring May 9 PROHIBITION Kitchen, 119 St. George St. Ramona, Barnes & the Heart April 25. The Messengers, Laikin Love April 26. Let’s Ride April 27. Sam Pacetti April 28. Wes Cobb April 29 TRADEWINDS Lounge, 124 Charlotte St. Cottonmouth April 26 & 27. Elizabeth Roth every Sat.

SAN MARCO, NORTHBANK

GRAPE & GRAIN Exchange, 2000 San Marco Blvd. Kelly Green Trio April 24. Rachael Warfield April 25. Barrett Thomas April 26. The Chelsey Michelle Band April 27. The Al Maniscalco Quartet May 3 JACK RABBITS, 15280 Hendricks Ave. Scream Blue Murder, Indivision April 24. Brandon Taz Niederauer, Bobby Lee Rogers April 25. Acid Mothers Temple, Yamantaka, Sonic Titan, Darkhorse Saloon April 26. The Kate Rays, Swingers, Brendan Morrison, Pieces Left April 27 MUDVILLE Music Room, 3104 Atlantic Blvd. Joe Popp, Arvid Smith, Roy Peak, Lauren Fincham fundraiser for Lisa King April 24. Mike Shackelford, Steve Shanholtzer, Dean Spry, Great Dames April 26. Belle & Mickey, Tom & Natalie April 27. Michael Johnathon May 2 APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 37


CONCERTS VETERANS UNITED Craft Brewery, 8999 Western Way, Ste. 104 The Bald Eagles April 26 & May 3 WHISKEY JAX, 10915 Baymeadows Rd. Neon Whiskey April 24. Vox April 26. Party Cartel April 27. Mojo Roux April 28. Cassidy Lee April 30

SPRINGFIELD, NORTHSIDE

COPPERTOP Bar, 12405 Main St. Jason Evans April 26 PALMS Fish Camp, 6359 Heckscher Dr. Taylor Shami April 25. Billy Bowers April 26. Eric Alabiso April 27 SJ Brewing Co., 463646 S.R. 200, Ste. 13, Yulee Mile Marker 13 April 27

ELSEWHERE

SPIRIT of the SUWANNEE Music Park, 3076 95th Dr., Live Oak, 386-364-1683 Trace Adkins, Clint Black, Chase Rice, Gretchen Wilson, Craig Campbell, Frankie Ballard, Hank Williams Jr. May 1-4

Upcoming Concerts OAK, BIG YAMI, DEETOR, CIRCLEBOY REED, GEEXELLA May 1, First Wednesday ArtWalk, Downtown KEM & JEFFREY OSBORNE May 4, Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts The FIREWATER TENT REVIVAL May 4, Atlantic Beach Brewing TOM JONES May 6, The Florida Theatre THY ART is MURDER May 6, 1904 Music Hall TAME IMPALA, MDOU MOCTAR May 6, The Amp BRYAN ADAMS May 6, Daily’s TYLER CHILDERS May 7, The Amp Backyard Stage INTERPOL May 7, The Florida Theatre GRETA VAN FLEET May 9, Daily’s JOHN AUSTILL May 9, Grape & Grain Exchange STEVIE STONE, MADCHILD May 9, Surfer the Bar JUICE WRLD, SKI MASK the SLUMP GOD, LYRICAL LEMONADE ALLSTARS May 9, The Amp MADCHILD & STEVIE STONE May 9, Surfer the Bar B2K Millennium Tour: BOOG, OMARION, RAZ B, FIZZ, MARIO May 10, Veterans Memorial Arena BLACK DAHLIA MURDER, TRAITORS May 10, 1904 Music Hall ‘A Little Night Music: MAMA BLUE May 10, Plaza de la Constitución TASH SULTANA, PIERCE BROS. May 11, The Amp St. Augustine BREWERS’ FEST: The FIREWATER TENT REVIVAL, LONESOME BERT & the SKINNY LIZARD May 11, Fountain of Youth STAR TREK LIVE feat. MICHAEL GIACCHINO May 11, Daily’s RUSS LIQUID, BELLS & ROBES May 11, 1904 Music Hall CAMILLE RAE TRIO May 12, Arnold’s Lounge Second Sunday at Stetson’s: WILLIE GREEN May 12, Beluthahatchee, Fruit Cove

BOB SEGER & the SILVER BULLET BAND May 12, Daily’s MARC REBILLET May 13, 1904 Music Hall MURS, LOCKSMITH, COJO May 14, Jack Rabbits G. LOVE, The RIES BROTHERS May 14, Surfer the Bar YHETI, EAZYBAKED, DREWLFACE, SFAM, VLAD the INHALER May 15, Myth Nightclub CLAIRE VANDIVER May 16, Grape & Grain Exchange BRETT BASS & the MELTED PLECTRUM May 17, Blue Jay Listening Room DON’T CALL ME SHIRLEY May 17 & 18, Flying Iguana G-LOVE May 17 & 18, Café Eleven OGINALII, THE DOG APOLLO May 17, Jack Rabbits GARY STARLING QUARTET May 17, Hemming Park The ORIGINAL WAILERS May 17, Surfer the Bar The WILDFLOWERS Tom Petty Tribute Band May 18, Suwannee Music Park CATCH the GROOVE May 16, Grape & Grain Exchange ONE NIGHT in MEMPHIS May 19, Thrasher-Horne Center for the Arts JIMMY EAT WORLD, TAKING BACK SUNDAY, BLUE OCTOBER, FLORA CASH May 19, The Amp BEAR & ROBERT CD Release May 19, Blue Jay FRAMING the RED May 19, Jack Rabbits JOE JACKSON May 21, The Florida Theatre HOZIER May 21, Times-Union Center SPICE & the PO’ BOYS May 24, Grape & Grain Exchange WINEHOUSED: The Amy Celebration May 25, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall FLORIDA FOLK FESTIVAL May 24, 25 & 26, Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park, White Springs STEEL PANTHER, WILSON, TRUE VILLAINS May 28, Mavericks TREY ANASTASIO & his Band May 29, The Amp ART GARFUNKEL May 30, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall RAMONA May 31, Grape & Grain Exchange BEASTO BLANCO May 31, Jack Rabbits LIONEL RICHIE June 1, Daily’s Place The FRITZ June 1, 1904 Music Hall MICKEY AVALON, DIRT NASTY June 1, Jack Rabbits The TURTLES, CHUCK NEGRON, GARY PUCKETT, The BUCKINGHAMS, The CLASSICS IV June 2, Florida Theatre LAKE STREET DIVE, The RAD TRADS June 5, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall STEVE EARLE & the DUKES June 6, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall CREEPING DEATH, PLAGUE YEARS June 6, Nighthawks SLIGHTLY STOOPID, MATISYAHU, TRIBAL SEEDS, HIRIE June 6, The Amp STEPHEN SIMMONS June 7, Mudville Music Room STEVIE STILETTO Memorial Benefit Show: POWERBALL, WHISKEY DOGS, The CHROME FANGS, COLIN McSHEEY, CHARLIE SHUCK, MR. NEVER June 8, Jack Rabbits

“An event for drummers by drummers,” DUVAL SHED SESSIONZ is an open workshop for amateur and professional percussionists. Multiple drummers jam on multiple kits. There’s also a cymbal giveaway and studio time raffle. 7 p.m. Thursday, April 25, Nighthawks, Riverside, facebook.com/nighthawksjax, $7. 38 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019

The CHRIS THOMAS BAND June 8, TIAA Bank Field, Boys & Girls Club Benefit WEIRD AL YANKOVIC June 9, The Amp LIVE FROM MARS: David Bowie Tribute June 12, The Florida Theatre TWENTY ONE PILOTS June 14, Veterans Memorial Arena ROD McDONALD June 14, Mudville Music Room The MIGHTY O.A.R., AMERICAN AUTHORS, HUNTERTONES June 15, The Amp GREAT ATLANTIC Country Music Fest June 15, SeaWalk Pavilion, Jax Beach Free Energy Tour: The HEAVY PETS, ROOSEVELT COLLIER BAND June 16, 1904 Music Hall BRIT FLOYD 40 Years of The Wall June 16, Florida Theatre The NATIONAL, COURTNEY BARNETT June 17, The Amp HIPPO CAMPUS June 17, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall AGENT ORANGE June 18, Surfer the Bar FLOW TRIBE June 22, Hemming Park BOWLING for SOUP, REEL BIG FISH, NERF HERDER June 22, The Amp Backyard Greenwich Village folksinger LUCY KAPLANSKY Stage performs heartfelt tunes from her latest album, JON BELLION, MARC E. BASSY, LAWRENCE Everyday Street. Claire Vandiver opens. 8:30 p.m. June 23, The Amp Friday, April 26, Café Eleven, St. Augustine Beach, TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND, BLACKBERRY originalcafe11.com, $20-$25. SMOKE, SHOVELS & ROPE June 28, Daily’s Place LADY ANTEBELLUM June 28, The Amp YACHT ROCK REVUE June 28, The Florida Theatre t PUDDLE of MUDD, SALIVA, TRAPT, SAVING ABEL, ADAM SANDLER June 30, The Amp TANTRIC Sept. 21, Thrasher-Horne Center ROB THOMAS, ABBY ANDERSON July 6, Daily’s Place ALAN JACKSON, WILLIAM MICHAEL MORGAN Sept. 21, TRAIN, GOO GOO DOLLS, ALLEN STORE July 9, Daily’s Veterans Memorial Arena NEW KIDS on the BLOCK July 12, Vets Memorial Arena SNARKY PUPPY Sept. 24, The Florida Theatre JOJO SIWA July 13, The Amp THOMAS RHETT, DUSTIN LYNCH, RUSSELL MARY J. BLIGE July 14, Daily’s DICKERSON, RHETT AKINS Oct. 4, Veterans Memorial LONG BEACH DUB ALL STARS & AGGROLITES, MIKE Arena PINTO July 14, Surfer the Bar BUILT to SPILL Oct. 9, Jack Rabbits KIRK FRANKLIN July 15, The Florida Theatre Suwannee Roots Revival: OTEIL & FRIENDS, LEFTOVER The Royal Affair: YES, ASIA w/ STEVE HOWE, JOHN SALMON, DONNA the BUFFALO, KELLER WILLIAMS’ LODGE (Moody Blues), CARL PALMER’S ELP LEGACY PETTYGRASS, The HILLBENDERS, JIM LAUDERDALE, with ARTHUR BROWN July 18, The Amp VERLON THOMPSON, REV. JEFF MOSIER, BRETT BASS DIERKS BENTLEY, JON PARDI, TENILLE TOWNES July & MELTED PLECTRUM, CORBITT BROS., JON STICKLEY, 18, Daily’s The LEE BOYS, SAUCE BOSS, WHETHERMAN, BELLE YOUNG the GIANT, FITZ & the TANTRUMS, COIN July & the BAND, QUARTERMOON, PETER ROWAN FREE 19, The Amp MEXICAN AIRFORCE, BRUCE COCKBURN, The SELDOM BRETT BASS & the MELTED PLECTRUM, RUSTY SCENE, HORSESHOES & HAND GRENADES, SAMANTHA SHINE, SALT & PINE July 20, Hemming Park FISH, DUSTBOWL REVIVAL Oct. 10-13, Spirit of the DON McLEAN & HIS BAND July 20, Ponte Vedra Suwannee Music Park Concert Hall CHRIS STAPLETON, KENDELL MARVEL, DAVE COBB, ANUEL AA July 20, Daily’s Place J.T. CURE, DEREK MIXON, MORGANE STAPLETON Oct. SUBLIME with ROME, MICHAEL FRANTI & 10, Veterans Memorial Arena SPEARHEAD, COMMON KINGS July 25 & 26, The Amp MAGGIE ROGERS, JACOB BANKS Oct. 11, The Amp IRATION, PEPPER, FORTUNATE YOUTH, KATASTRO BENISE Oct. 13, The Florida Theatre July 27, The Amp CHEAP TRICK, ZZ TOP Oct. 16, The Amp DONAVON FRANKENREITER July 29 & 30, 1904 ZAC BROWN BAND Oct. 17, Daily’s Place Music Hall CARRIE UNDERWOOD Oct. 20, Veterans Memorial WYNONNA JUDD July 29, Orange Park Freedom Fest Arena IYANLA VANZANT Acts of Faith Remix Tour Aug. 2, ACOUSTIC ALCHEMY Oct. 31, Ponte Vedra Concert Florida Theatre Hall WIDESPREAD PANIC Aug. 2, 3 & 4, The Amp RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE Nov. 2, The Florida Theatre WHY DON’T WE Aug. 2, Daily’s Place JUKEBOX HERO Nov. 10, The Florida Theatre DIRTY HEADS, 311 Aug. 4, Daily’s Place The FAB FOUR The Ultimate Beatles Tribute Nov. 22, MOE., BLUES TRAVELER, G. LOVE Aug. 7, Daily’s Ponte Vedra Concert Hall LYLE LOVETT & HIS LARGE BAND Aug. 9, Florida Theatre SARA BAREILLES Nov. 22, Daily’s Place NICK JORDAN Aug. 13, Jack Rabbits The Guitar Event of the Year: JOE BONAMASSA, REBELUTION, PROTOJE, COLLIE BUDDZ Aug. 14 & 15, ANTON FIG, MICHAEL RHODES, REESE WYNANS, The Amp PAULIE CERRA, LEE THORNBURG Nov. 23, The Amp BRAD PAISLEY, CHRIS LANE, RILEY GREEN Aug. 16, JOHN OATES & the GOOD ROAD BAND Nov. 24, Ponte Daily’s Place Vedra Concert Hall UMPHREY’S McGEE, MAGIC CITY HIPPIES Aug. 17, A PETER WHITE CHRISTMAS: EUGE GROOVE, VINCENT The Amp INGALA, LINDSEY WEBSTER Dec. 10, Ponte Vedra STEWART TUSSING Aug. 17, Mudville Music Room Concert Hall BUSH, LIVE, OUR LADY PEACE Aug. 18, Daily’s Place CELINE DION Jan. 8, Veterans Memorial Arena PENTATONIX, RACHEL PLATTEN Aug. 24, Daily’s KANSAS: Point of Know Return Tour Feb. 1, The Florida VAMPIRE WEEKEND, CHRISTONE ‘KINGFISH’ INGRAM Theatre Aug. 25, The Amp AL STEWART Feb. 14, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall 40th Anniversary Tour: ORCHESTRAL MANOEUVRES in the DARK Aug. 30, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall PETER FRAMPTON, JASON BONHAM Sept. 4, Daily’s To list your band’s gig, send time, date, location (street, BOOK of LOVE Sept. 7, Jack Rabbits city or neighborhood), admission and a contact number CHRIS YOUNG, CHRIS JANSON, LOCASH Sept. 12, to Marlene Dryden, email mdryden@folioweekly.com or Daily’s 45 W. Bay St., Ste. 103, Jacksonville FL 32202. Items BEATLES vs STONES Sept. 16, Ritz Theatre are included on a space-available basis. Deadline is KASEY MUSGRAVES benefit Sept. 21, The Amp noon Wednesday for next Wednesday publication. Photo by Beowulf Sheehan

SOUTHSIDE, BAYMEADOWS


FOLIO FOOD

Photos by Devon Sarian

MEATLESS MEXICAN 1 12”

.5”

blue area is subject to being trimmed as this vegan menu .5” area is used as a margin or bufferTacoLu zoneintroduces to compensate for tr trimmer fluctuation.

T

acoLu has come a long way since its inception in 2008. From relocating to a bigger space on Beach Boulevard six years ago to adding more than 100 staff members, Northeast Florida’s source for Baja-style traditional Mexican tacos has undoubtedly arrived. TacoLu has become a staple in the community—it even won not one, not two, but three categories in our Best of the Beaches readers’ poll. (Best Locally Owned Restaurant, Best Mexican Restaurant and Best Tacos)—and to meet the dietary needs of many of its patrons, TacoLu has decided to release a new vegan menu selection next month. Fear not, TacoLu lovers, the majority of the restaurant’s menu will stay the same. The most notable addition to the list of menu items will be a variety of new vegan tacos, enchiladas and quesadilla alternatives. Owners Debbie and Don Nicol have decided to include these vegan options to make their menu more inclusive. “We realized that vegans are people, too,” Don told Folio Weekly with a hearty guffaw. “Honestly, 80 percent of our menu is already vegan because you can take cheese and meat off anything we offer. I didn’t want to just put a note next to every menu item that could be made vegan, so the new vegan menu was decided upon to simply highlight these options.” In building TacoLu’s newly expanded repertoire, the Nicols let established menu items be their guide. Popular fixings like a cilantro-lime vinaigrette, roasted corn

salsa, pico de gallo and TacoLu verde salsa were combined with new ingredients and—¡ahí está!—the Tempeh Taco, Bangin’ Taco, Vegan Avo, Vegan Veggie and Vegan Chorizo tacos were born. Two new enchilada options are in the works: a basic vegan version and a vegan chorizo enchilada. For those vegans craving the delicious cheesiness that is TacoLu queso, Debbie and Don present “vegan cheese dillas,” vegan cheese-based quesadillas with optional black beans, roasted spinach, corn and mushrooms. “To me, creating this new menu is just our way of expanding the brand and reaching out a little bit further,” Don explained. Though management has always been wary of conforming to any “mainstream” restaurant norms (don’t expect a mac-ncheese taco on the menu anytime soon), this decision has been a long time in the making. Debbie has even dabbled in the world of vegetarianism and vegan cuisine herself. And she is not alone. According to The Vegetarian Resource Group, 37 percent of the national population always or sometimes eats vegetarian (including vegan) meals when dining out. Furthermore, the region with the greatest number of vegetarians and vegans happens to be the South. Having the freedom—and success—to custom-tailor a vegan menu is a luxury the Nicols never imagined they would enjoy. They sold their first restaurant, Sticky 9.5” Fingers, in 2005, convinced that they were

Red area is the bleed a area. Any bleeds should extend to AT LEAST the outside edge of the red area. ANYTHING G contained in this red area WILL be trimmed off. If your bleed does not extend far enough h into the red area, it is possible that, due to triimmer fluctuation, there may be white space lefft after the trim is made. Again, for best results, extend the bleed all the way y to the outside edge e g of the red area.

.5” .5”

APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 39


closed on Mondays so that I have time to done with the restaurant business for good. get absolutely anything done. Like I said, we However, their firm disinterest in working really never expected much, so my business under someone else’s leadership is what plan has steadily remained, ‘Show up every ultimately led them to TacoLu. When they day and try not to screw it all up.’” decided to return to the food service industry, their expectations were low. Success meant Don credits the more than 120 “kids” he earning enough to pay the bills, vendors employs for keeping him and the restaurant and staff ... and possibly save toward their from going “stale.” He added that his kitchen children’s future college tuition. After all, workers are constantly putting together TacoLu is named after their daughter, Lucy. new menu items to sample for themselves, “I think anyone in their right mind who, and that every so often one will “stick.” (For on a whim, decides to open a restaurant example, “The Fabio” is named for a current doesn’t expect for it to be largely successful employee’s creation. Give it a try.) at first, but they obviously hope for it,” “I’ll admit, I’m really in uncharted said Don. “After five or six years, it got to territory. I’ve never been involved in a the point where I just wanted to keep from restaurant as crazy busy as this one before,” screwing this whole thing up. TacoLu became Don admitted. “We teach our staff to stay true either ours to keep, or ours to lose.” to the integrity and mission of our restaurant; While there was interest in in return, they keep us young.” the restaurant from the start, TacoLu Baja Mexicana has TACOLU it took about six months for 1712 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach, succeeded beyond the Nicols’ 249-8226 (like, 249-TACO), the Nicols to be thoroughly wildest dreams. No longer tacolu.com convinced of its impending just a local taco joint, it has success. By their first New become a must-try restaurant, Year’s Eve, Don recalls, he realized the tourist attraction, valued employer and immense potential of TacoLu. He and Debbie community partner. And, if the Beaches decided to have a party for the occasion, and community is going to continuously come the turnout solidified their hopes. out to support their business taco by taco, “At this point, we didn’t necessarily the co-owners deem it is finally time for a have huge numbers, but we were doing more inclusive menu. pretty good,” Don recalled. “That night, we “The biggest, most important thing to ‘cheersed’ each other and I remember my wife us has always been that people keep coming said to me, ‘I hate you for this idea, but I love back to TacoLu. I’m not sure it’s because you for this idea.’” we make an effort to always support our He then shared with us that TacoLu community, but I’m sure that’s part of it,” essentially became their third child. Their Don emphasized. “If a vegan menu is what oldest, Henry, was just six years old, and their the Jacksonville community wants, a vegan youngest, Lucy, was three years old when the menu is what the community gets.” restaurant’s doors opened. Just like their two Lindsey Nolen young children, TacoLu came to require a lot mail@folioweekly.com of time and energy. Subscribe to Folio Weekly’s Food Newsletter “The restaurant was a originally a sevenat folioweekly.com/newsletters day ordeal for us,” said Don. “Today, we’re 40 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019


FOLIO COOKING

FOLIO BEER

KEEP YOUR WIT CLOSE Chef Bill explains why SOFT-SHELL CRABS are all or nothing

GUTS, LIMBS & ALL I JUST CAN’T GET CRABS CRA RABS S OFF MY MIND MIND.

Last week, it was those childhood memories of crab shacks on the Chesapeake Bay. This week, the beautiful sunshine and the fantastic breezes we get off the harbor in downtown Fernandina Beach remind me of my years cooking so many crabs that my subconscious took over. (I suffered recurring nightmares—more on that later!) Perhaps I’m just a glutton, but I’m going to attempt to get my crab obsession out of my system by testifying to y’all several more virtues of the blue crab. In last week’s column, I focused on the boundless joys of hard-shell blue crabs. This week, it’s time to salute soft-shell crabs for the champion crustaceans they are. Soft-shell crabs are the same species as hard-shell blue crabs. Soft-shell crab is a culinary term for crabs that have recently molted their old exoskeleton and are still soft. For a crab to grow, the creature must shed its cramped exoskeleton. Discarding the old, hard shell is known as molting. The crab naturally sheds its hard shell but has a soft shell underneath. Females molt 18 to 20 times to reach their final molt; males molt 21 to 23 times. Crabs are closely monitored in their plush crabby home waters. When they begin to molt, they’re quickly harvested. Once removed from the natural brackish water environment, the shells will no longer continue to harden. The crabbers then pack these delicate little jewels into cardboard boxes lined with newspaper—not very hightech, but kinda fun. I used to enjoy reading the newspaper articles to catch up on the news from whichever Eastern Shore town the crabs originated. Once caught, the crabs are rushed off to chefs up and down the East Coast. When I was a young cook in the D.C. area, soft-shell crabs and shad roe were the true harbingers of spring. Never mind those fancy-shmancy fiddle-head ferns, English peas and fava beans—the soft, luscious crabtreasures from the bay were worshipped and cherished throughout the spring and early summer months. In fact, I used to go through dozens upon dozens of these creatures

preparing i them h for f service i for f my guests. Before I could create scrumptious specials, I had to clean the crabs in a particularly intricate manner. First, I would lift up the side flaps and use scissors to cut out their gills. Fun, right? Next, using the scissors, I cut the faces off to make them ready to cook! (Particularly the eyes, so they can’t watch you as you broil, fry or sauté them.) My nightmares include meeting eyeless, faceless crabs who condemn me to hell. Try not to worry about them peeking at you while you serve pan-fried crabs on a bed of succotash.

CHEF BILL’S SUCCOTASH Ingredients

• 1 cup green beans, trimmed, cut on the diagonal in 1-inch pieces • 1 garlic clove, minced • 1 cup scallions, white & light green parts, sliced • 1 zucchini, small dice • 1 red pepper, skinned, seeded, small dice • 1-1/2 cup corn kernels • 3/4 cup corn stock • 1/2 cup chopped herbs • EVO • Salt & pepper to taste

Directions

• Blanch and shock the beans • Heat EVO, sauté corn, zucchini, garlic, red pepper, scallions • Add corn stock, S&P and reduce • Remove from heat, add herbs

Until we cook again,

Chef Bill Thompson cooking@folioweekly.com _______________________________________ Contact Chef Bill Thompson, owner/chef of Fernandina Beach’s Amelia Island Culinary Academy, by email at cooking@folioweekly. com, to get inspired and be a culinary star!

GRASSROOTS NATURAL MARKET 2007 Park St., Riverside JACKSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET 1810 W. Beaver St., Westside NASSAU HEALTH FOODS 833 T.J. Courson Rd., Fernandina

ON A HOT FLORIDA DAY, THERE MAY BE nothing better than a cold, crisp, satisfying Belgian-style Witbier. Commonly called Wit or White, the popular brew style has a history of highs and lows, ups and downs. Indeed, in the 1950s, the 400-year-old style was all but extinct. Had it not been for Pierre Celis in Hoegaarden, Belgium, this refreshing summer beer style may have been known only from the pages of beer history books. The Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP), the most widely accepted authority on beer styles, describes Witbier as having a “pleasant sweetness (often with a honey and/or vanilla character) and a zesty, orange-citrusy fruitiness. Refreshingly crisp with a dry, often tart, finish.” It’s further characterized as having a pale straw, yet cloudy, appearance with a frothy, fluffy head. And, though some disagree, the BJCP’s guidelines call for up to 50 percent unmalted wheat to be used in brewing the beer. Once the dominant beer style in the areas east of Brussels in Belgium, wit was known as biere blanche in the southern, French-speaking part of the country and wit in the northern, Flemish regions. Louvain, a city about 20 miles east of Brussels, was a powerhouse for the style in the 18th and 19th centuries. As the drinkers’ darling, more than 6,400 barrels were produced and shipped to Brussels and the rest of Europe annually. The beer was so popular in Brussels, it was sold by the cask in an open-air market, appropriately called La Place de Louvain. As the 19th century wore on, the lager revolution began to overtake the traditional regional beer style in popularity. Witbier began to fade along with many other distinctive styles that had once flourished across Belgium and Europe. By the end of World War II, the style was all but a memory in Louvain and the small village of Hoegaarden, where the beer had been an economic staple for years. Peter Jackson, the

Subscribe to Folio Weekly’s Cooking Newsletter at folioweekly.com/newsletters

NATIVE SUN NATURAL FOODS MARKETS 11030 Baymeadows Rd. 10000 San Jose Blvd., Mandarin 1585 N. Third St., Jax Beach PUBLIX MARKETS 1033 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine 2033 Riverside Ave. 4413 Town Ctr. Pkwy., Ste. 100 THE SAVORY MARKET 474380 S.R. 200, Fernandina

ROWE’S 1670 Wells Rd., Orange Park 8595 Beach Blvd., Southside FERNANDINA BEACH MARKET PLACE Art & Farmers Market, North Seventh Street WHOLE FOODS 10601 San Jose Blvd., Mandarin

noted beer expert and historian, reported the style became extinct in the mid-1950s. Ten years on, former milkman Celis took up brewing witbier, in part because he’d worked part-time in his neighbor Louis Tomsin’s brewery, creating that elixir of the gods–witbier–and because he wanted to revive the forgotten style. In 1965, Celis began producing Hoegaarden Wit, first from a washtub in his father’s barn and later with equipment he purchased from an abandoned brewery in Heusden-Zolder. In 1966, he opened Brouwerij Celis and in 1980, he opened Brouwerij de Kluis to expand production. In the late 1980s, bad luck struck when the brewery burned down. The building wasn’t insured, so Celis was forced to sell his brewery and its recipe to InterBrew, now known as A-B InBev. With the deeper pockets of InterBrew, the Hoegaarden brand grew and the witbier style was once again elevated to its proper level of admiration. Today, there are several Belgian wit brews available, including New Belgium’s Snapshot, Allagash White and Florida Cracker Belgian-style White Ale. As a thirst-quencher, wit is a no-brainer. Pop a few in a cooler of ice, put it by a deck chair or—even better—a beach chair, and prop up your feet. Other than a cool sea breeze, there’s nothing better to beat the Florida heat and humidity. Your only worry? Be sure the tide won’t reach your chair. Marc Wisdom marc@folioweekly.com Subscribe to Folio Weekly’s Beer Newsletter at folioweekly.com/newsletters

FOLIO BEER’S BREWERY COMMUNITY AARDWOLF BREWING CO.

FOLIO COOKING’S GROCERY COMMUNITY EARTH FARE 11901 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 250, Arlington

… and your HOEGAARDEN closer

BOLD CITY BREWERY

GREEN ROOM BREWING

1461 Hendricks, San Marco

2670 Rosselle St., Riverside

228 Third St. N., Jax Beach

AMELIA TAVERN BREWPUB

BOLD CITY DOWNTOWN

HYPERION BREWING CO.

ANCIENT CITY BREWING

BOTTLENOSE BREWING

318 Centre St., Fernandina 3420 Agricultural Ctr. Dr.

ANHEUSER-BUSCH

1100 Ellis Rd. N., Northside

ATLANTIC BEACH BREWING COMPANY

725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 3

BEARDED BUFFALO BREWING CO.

1012 King St., Downtown

BOG BREWING COMPANY 218 W. King St., St. Augustine

109 E. Bay St.

9700 Deer Lake Ct., Southside

DOG ROSE BREWING CO.

77 Bridge St., St. Augustine

ENGINE 15 DOWNTOWN 633 Myrtle Ave. N.

ENGINE 15 BREWING CO.

1500 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach

FISHWEIR BREWING CO. 1183 Edgewood Ave. S., Jacksonville

1740 Main St. N., Springfield

INTUITION ALE WORKS

929 E. Bay St., Downtown

LEGACY ALE WORKS

MAIN & SIX BREWING CO.

OLD COAST ALES

300 Anastasia Blvd., St. Augustine

SEVEN BRIDGES BREWERY

9735 Gate Pkwy., Southside

RAGTIME TAVERN

463646 S.R. 200, Yulee

207 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach

REVE BREWING

1229 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach

14965 Old St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 129, Southside 1636 Main St. N., Northside

PINGLEHEAD BREWING CO.

12 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park

RUBY BEACH BREWING 131 First Ave N., Jax Beach

RIVER CITY BREWING CO. 835 Museum Cir., Southbank

S J BREWING CO.

SOUTHERN SWELLS BREWING CO.

1312 Beach Blvd., J.B.

TABULA RASA BREWING

2385 Corbett St., Northside

VETERANS UNITED CRAFT BREWERY 8999 Western Way, Southside

WICKED BARLEY BREWING COMPANY

4100 Baymeadows Rd.

APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 41


FOLIO PETS

LOCAL PET EVENTS & ADOPTABLES SPIRIT THE R.E.A.D. DOG • Kids practice reading to Spirit, a therapy dog who loves to listen, 2:30-3:30 p.m. April 24 at Beaches Branch Library, 600 Third St., Neptune Beach, 241-1141, jaxpubliclibrary.org. PET PHOTO SHOOT • A fundraiser for Pit Sisters, a rescue, rehab and outreach nonprofit facility helping bully-breed dogs, is 6 p.m. April 24, Hotel Indigo, 9840 Tapestry Park Cir., Southside, pitsisters.com. Sign up at agoldphoto.com.

AD ADOPTABLES DOP OPTA TA ABL LES

CHICKEN STRIP

GOOD BREEDING It’s MORE than PROPER ETIQUETTE or STUPID PET TRICKS MY FRIEND, MAX, NEVER NEEDED TO dig into his genetic history or mark his family tree. He says he’s convinced his relatives include the mighty Lassie, Old Yeller, and a distant cousin called Olly, who made a fool of himself at the world’s most prestigious agility competition. Max also believes he has a connection to an Egyptian cat who ruled thousands of years ago, but I can’t give that notion much credence. Most dogs already know they’re unique, but you may be wondering what aspect of your mutt’s makeup makes them so special. Genetic testing could be just the ticket to learn a little more about your best friend. A simple cheek swab, processed in a lab, can shed some light on your dog’s ancestry, give insight into his health and even help explain some of those little quirks, like barking whenever something moves (or doesn’t) past the window. The accuracy of the results, if the dog is mixed with popular breeds, is as high as 96 percent, some companies claim. Obviously, knowing your dog’s genetic background won’t change your love for him. But learning the certain breeds that combined to result in your darling Bingo or Farfel is more important than satisfying curiosity. Being aware of his canine heritage has practice benefits, too. BEHAVIOR Typical behaviors vary from breed to breed. Seeing potential problems early is helpful for a dog’s training, letting you nip those behaviors in the bud, Barney. Of course, individual personalities also affect behavior, but breed genetics can help determine if he’s wacky due to his environment or if he was just born that way. HEALTH RISKS Certain breeds are more prone to some illnesses and diseases. An owner aware of likely health issues can be more attentive to symptoms and proactive in managing charming Charkie’s health. 42 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019

DIET Your dog’s DNA plays a huge role in the nutrients he needs to be healthy. Some doggy DNA tests can help predict Uga’s food and drug sensitivities, so you can design an appropriate diet plan for his genetic makeup. This may reduce chronic health conditions like skin irritation and tummy upset. WELL-BEING Knowing your dog’s lineage can provide clues about his adult size. You’d want to know if your cuddly Hundley is half Irish Wolfhound or half Dachshund, wouldn’t you? The report shows the healthy weight range for Rowlf’s specific breed combo and suggests appropriate food to keep him fit and healthy. BREED IDENTIFICATION Finally, there’s a short answer to the redundant “What kind of dog is that?” Be ready for more questions if the DNA results reveal a surprising mix! Whether screening for health risks, determining the breed mixes of offbeat Wylie Burp, or figuring out food intolerances, dog DNA tests are a fun, informative way to peek into Pongo and Perdita’s histories and help customize their care, possibly preventing problems. Despite our differences, though, we are all in one pack and members of the same species: Canis familiaris. Davi Davi the Dachshund is certain he’s a stellar purebred, an example of fine German engineering. His breed has been allowed in the AKC since 1885—but he grudgingly acquiesces seniority to the noble Chesapeake Bay Retriever (pictured above), a member since 1878. Subscribe to the Folio Pets Newsletter at folioweekly.com/newsletters

LIKE THE SAVORY, CRISPY TENDERS AT PUBLIX DELI, everyone loves me! My social calendar is packed–folks stop by JHS all the time to take me on field trips, and I’ve spent hours hanging out with our camp kids and reading volunteers. I enjoy going to playgroup and goofing around with my doggy pals. Every Wednesday I go to a special training class–this week I mastered sit! Come find me at 8464 Beach Blvd., Ste. 6; we can go for a Puppuccino or just get our cuddle on.

BYOB BOSTON TERRIERS • Bring Your Own Breed event honors this cute pup, 6:30-8:30 p.m. April 26 at Kanine Social, 580 College St., Brooklyn, 712-6363, kaninesocial.com. Noon-2 p.m. April 27, it’s Bring Your Own Labs! April 28, noon-2 p.m., it’s Doodle time. BULLS, BANDS & BARRELS • Barrel-racing, bullriding and live music by Morgan Wallen, Jordan Fletcher & Blane Rudd, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 27 at Jacksonville Equestrian Center, 13611 Normandy Blvd., Westside, 255-4254, jaxequestriancenter. com. Adults $25; 12 years old & younger $12; dirt floor seat $40. SAVING AFRICA’S GIRAFFE: A TALL ORDER • The Jax Zoo’s Conservation Speaker Series presents Julian Fennessy, Ph.D., and Stephanie Fennessy, co-director of Giraffe Conservation Foundation, 6-8 p.m. April 30 at Jax Zoo & Gardens, 370 Zoo Parkway, Northside, 757-4463, $30 members; $35 nonmembers; $10 kids–includes dinner, one drink and presentation, jacksonvillezoo.org. LUAU PARTY & PIG ROAST • Nothing better than beer and good friends–the canine kind. Terrapin Brewing brings the suds, Dos Vatos Tacos roasts the pig, there’s a costume contest and drink specials, 3-7 p.m. April 27 at Kanine Social, 580 College St., Brooklyn, 712-6363, kaninesocial.com.

AD ADOPTABLES DOP OPTA TA

LEO

MEOW! I’M LEO–THE MOST POLITE CAT YOU’LL EVER meet! Cuddles and ear scratches are my fave things. I have grand manners–I’d love to show them off at a five-course fish feast in your home (you do cook, right?). When I’m not busy teaching friends how to bow, curtsey and use the litter box properly, I’m taking a long nap or sun-basking. Are we a match? I’m in a foster home now, but you can email behavior@ jaxhumane.org when you want to meet.

COMMUNITY ANIMAL COMMUNICATION READINGS • Constance Frankenberg offers half-hour readings, $45, at Salty Paws Healthy Pet Market, 677 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, by appointment only, call for dates, 800-588-3659, constancefrankenberg.com.


NEWS OF THE WEIRD BANG A GONG Scientists are aghast at an eBay listing offering a rare baby T-rex fossil for a $2.95 million buy-it-now price. Fossil-hunter Alan Detrich, who discovered the fossil in 2013, is thought to have created the offer in February for the 68-million-year-old artifact, which had been on loan to University of Kansas’ Natural History Museum. CNBC reported the baby is 15 feet long with a 21-inch skull and serrated teeth; Detrich estimates it’s about four years old. The Society of Vertebrate Paleontology is concerned “the fossil, which represents a unique part of life’s past, may be lost from the public trust. ... Only casts and other replicas of vertebrate fossils should be traded, not the fossils themselves.” THE NEKKID MEN EPIDEMIC PT. I Around 8:30 p.m. April 10, things got interesting at an Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Walmart. Lisa Smith, 46, entered the store with her unleashed dog, Bo, according to police, and as Bo distracted shoppers and store staff, Smith pulled apart store displays and put them in her cart. Asked by workers to leave, Smith went to the parking lot and started practicing karate moves. Bo grabbed a box of Jiffy Cornbread Muffin Mix and tried to leave the store. Meanwhile, Smith’s son, Benny Vann, 25, had gone to the back of the store, and stripped naked, exposing himself to shoppers. He grabbed clothes from racks, then tried to run over cops with his scooter. WHO TV reported Smith was charged with disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and misdemeanor bail jumping. Vann was charged with lewd and lascivious behavior, disorderly conduct and retail theft. Cops said Bo got a warning for filching the muffin mix. WE WOULDA USED A SLEDGEHAMMER, PT. II In Cary, North Carolina, Wake County Deputy J. Rattelade, responding to a report of a car crash on April 5, found one driver, Derwood Johnson, 36, of Fort Worth, had gotten out of his car and removed all his clothes, then began to walk across the street. As Rattelade tried to arrest him, Johnson hit her on the head, reported WTVD. With other first responders’ help and pepper spray, Rattelade subdued Johnson. The charge? Assault on a government official. Rattelade wasn’t hurt; Johnson went to a hospital for further evaluation. MOSEYING, PT. III On April 13, a Newtown, Connecticut, family returned from a morning shopping trip to find Joseph Achenbach, 35, wandering around in their home, naked. The Watertown man had crashed his SUV in their backyard and moseyed in via an unlocked

DALE RATERMANN’s Folio Weekly Crossword presented by

glass door. Achenbach’s clothes weren’t found on the scene, leading police to believe he was naked when he crashed. FOX61 reported he was charged with second-degree criminal trespassing and driving while intoxicated.

CAFFEINE JONEZ Crossville, Tennessee, police officers pulled over Sally Selby, 45, at 5 a.m. April 5 as she drove Highway 127 in the slow lane on a Walmart mobility scooter. She was going to Waffle House, she said, to buy a cup of coffee. WTVF reported Selby first told cops she’d built the scooter, but Walmart confirmed it was one of theirs; they had surveillance video of Selby driving the scooter out of the store to back them up. She was arrested for theft. WOULDN’T THE AREA CODE BEEN A CLUE? When the Wilkinson School in El Granada, California, got a bomb threat on April 11, administrators emptied the building of staff and students pronto. But law officers searching the grounds found nothing—because the threatening phone call actually came from 2,100 miles away, in Woodville, Mississippi. That’s where a 15-yearold student intended to threaten her own Wilkinson County High School, reported The San Jose Mercury News, but didn’t check her Google search carefully before dialing. HEY! IT’S A FAUX FOX! A woman in Devon, England, called authorities on April 8 to report a fox she’d been watching hadn’t moved for days, reported Fox News. Ellie Burt, a Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty of Animals officer, suggested the “broom test,” which didn’t make the fox stir, but Burt was told it “tracked them with its eyes and seemed to be breathing well.” Burt arrived and quickly sussed it out: The fox was fake, “stuffed by a taxidermist. He’d been put under a bush outside the houses as a prank,” Burt said. “Someone had been moving it around the neighborhood.” Burt discarded the fox “to avoid any further calls.” NOT MY APRIL ’72 COSMO! A 40-year-old man in Muncie, Indiana, is suing his parents for trashing his stash of porn videos and magazines, which he estimates was worth $29,000. The Associated Press said he’d been living with his parents for 10 months after a divorce. Then he bought a house, and his parents delivered his stuff, minus 12 boxes of porn. The ’rents admitted dumping the collection; in an email quoted by the lawsuit, the father told his son, “I did you a big favor by getting rid of all this stuff.” The son seeks $87,000 in financial damages. weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 43


FOLIO WEEKLY helps you connect with a person you’ve seen and want to get to know. Go to folioweekly.com/i-saw-u.html, fill out the FREE form correctly (40 words or fewer, dammit) by 5 p.m. THURSDAY for the next Wednesday’s FW.

FOLIO W E E K LY M A G A Z I N E

Hey, kids! Tuesday, April 30 is officially designated as

HAIRST YLE APPRECIATION DAY

[unless you’ve had the same style since junior year, high school and then … hell to the no]. Plus! It’s NATIONAL HONESTY DAY. There’s a kinda symmetry to that. So as April slowly oozes into that black hole of misspent time, we say a fond farewell to national welding month and National Karaoke Week. Then … you know it: Find love with FW’s ISUs.

HERE’S HOW, PLUS RULES ’N’ REGS

Each entry must have your real, full name, real address, city, state & ZIP, contact phone number and your real birthday. (It’s an Excel thing.) None of that stuff is printed. Start with a five-word headline so they’ll recall you and/or the event. Then, describe them, yourself, other folks if applicable, and what happened or didn’t happen, so they recognize magical moments. NO MORE THAN 40 WORDS! (We toss ’em if you go over.) Make it interesting. (None of this ‘you were cute. I wore a black T-shirt.’) Tell when and where the ‘sighting’ was and BAM! True love–or a reasonable facsimile–is within your grasp! Email the whole thing to mdryden@ folioweekly.com (a real person); grab the next FW issue and get ready to pitch and woo! Find love with Folio Weekly’s legendary ISUs! ATTRACTIVE CHURCH WOMAN Your group sat in front of me. You: Attractive, long hair, glasses, beverage. We locked eyes near sermon’s end. I’ll sit in same area next few Thursdays. I go to 5:22 Sunday services, too. Coffee sometime? When: March 21. Where: Church of Eleven22, San Pablo. #1725-0417

YOU CAME OUTTA NOWHERE... Want to hold hands again and stroll under the nighttime sky & live that Nick13 song. You make these Kentucky knees weak when you kiss me. Nothing worth having comes easily; you’re worth the wait, W. When: Dec. 2018. Where: Had my sights on you for months now. #1719-0313

BE MY ENDGAME? MCU CAPTURE You: Buttery bowtie alpha stud manager. Me: Thanos purple high-tops, interested in your gauntlet. Rewind time, never stop, soul search this reality, use this space, see where this power takes us? More theories if interested. When: April 3. Where: Regal Avenues 20. #1724-0410

TINSELTOWN LINE FOR PIZZA We were in line, talking. I don’t want anything I can’t have, but I feel like we had a connection. I’d like to talk more. And I forgot to say Happy Valentine’s Day. When: Feb. 14. Where: Tinseltown Cinema. #1719-0220

TRAFFIC CONE TROUBLE You: Trying to lure a pesky orange traffic cone out from under your front bumper. Me: Lent a hand, wrestled an obtrusive pylon out; you cutely muttered of being embarrassed. I’m free next Friday if you run it over again. When: March 29. Where: Gate Parkway Starbucks. #1723-0403 SHRINERS CIRCUS JUMP ROPE MIME You: Being a great guy helping the mime/ clown. Me: Blown away by your jump-roping and your body. The bumbleverse can’t keep up with me, but I think you could. Didn’t see a ring; single? When: March 17, 1 p.m. Where: Shriners Circus. #1722-0403 MAYORS RACE, DONATING BLOOD, LAKEWOOD You: Braces, with dog. Me: Eating clam chowder. Any chance you are free for coffee, breakfast or happy hour? When: March 9. Where: Riverside Publix. #1721-0320 SHE KNOWS WHAT SHE WANTS I’d like to meet a smart, handsome man. I like golf, tennis and disco dancing. I’m retired, no small kids. If you enjoy the same things, let’s meet and see what develops! We’ll discuss when & where when you reply. #1720-0313. 44 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | APRIL 24-30, 2019

DOWNSTAIRS BAR You: Ball cap, T-shirt, shorts. Me: Longlegged woman, shorts, teal tank, sat by you, didn’t like your first name. Our eyes did the talking; love at first sight. You’ve taken my breath away ever since; my moon and stars. When: July 2018. Where: Julington Creek Fish Camp. #1718-0220 BALLSY BLUE TACOMA Me: Brunette walking briskly north, jeans, brown jacket. You: Ballsy man, slowly drove by, whistling. Wish I’d talked ;) you made me smile. I’m more than my excellent arse. Let’s ride off-road! When: 11:40 a.m. Feb. 2. Where: 8th Ave. N., Jax Beach. #1717-0213 DANCING TO MY MUSIC! Me: Parked at Yobe, pink hair. You: With pal, going in Ted’s, jamming to my music; pointed at me, stared. Thought of asking your number; I chickened. I smile thinking about it. When: Jan. 19. Where: Ted’s Montana Grill, OP. #1716-0123 DESSERT, DRINKS, bb’s We moved so you could sit with your friends. Glad you did. My GF gave her number to guy beside us; it’s cool I gave you mine. Like to hear from you. Unmistakable electricity, flirtation; get in touch. When: Dec. 26. Where: bb’s. #1715-0109

FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

MAGIC, CARLOS SANTANA, FRANKENSTEIN & TRUMAN CAPOTE ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the U.S., the day after Thanksgiving usually means a spectacular shopping orgy. On Black Friday, stores sell products at steep discounts and consumers spend money extravagantly. The Cards Against Humanity creators have consistently satirized the tradition. In 2013, they staged a Black Friday “anti-sale,” for which they raised their prices. The next few weeks are ideal to try something like tnat. Are you undercharging for products, services and skills? If so, ask for more. Reassess your true worth and seek appropriate rewards. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Whether or not you believe in magic, magic believes in you. Will you take advantage of the gifts it has to offer? It’s possible you’re not interested to see deeper in the secret hearts of those you love. Maybe you’ll yawn when shown how to recognize a half-hidden opportunity that could bring vitalizing changes. You may say it’s not practical to romance fire and water at the same time. If you’re interested, all that stuff is available. To maximize magic’s effects, believe. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 1815, the most ferocious volcanic eruption in human history exploded from Mount Tambora in what’s now Indonesia. It flung gas and ash all over the planet, causing weird weather for three years. Sunlight dimmed, temperatures plummeted, skies were tumultuous and intense storms proliferated. These conditions ignited author Mary Shelley’s imagination, inspiring her to write her most notable work, Frankenstein. You, too, can generate at least one productive marvel in response to unusual events of the weeks ahead. CANCER (June 21-July 22): For more than 40 years, Cancerian musician Carlos Santana has made music blending rock & roll with Latin and African rhythms. His early creations sold well, but by the mid-1980s, his commercial success ebbed. For a decade, he floundered. His fortunes began to improve after a spectacular meditation session. Santana says he was contacted by the archangel Metatron, who told him how to generate material for a new album. The result? Supernatural, 30 million copies sold, nine Grammys. You may soon have a more modest but still rousing version of Santana’s visitation. Into it? If so, you should expect it in the next seven weeks. Be receptive to its possibility. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Expergefactor” is an old English word that’s not still used. Originally, it meant something that wakes you up, like an alarm clock, thunderstorm or your partner’s snoring. Let’s revive “expergefactor” and expand its meaning. In our new version, it refers to an exciting possibility or beloved goal consistently motivating you to leap from bed and start your day. Your expergefactor could be an adventure you’re planning, a masterpiece you’re working, or a relationship with curiosity and enchantment. In my astrological opinion, the weeks ahead are a great time to identify and fine-tune an expergefactor to serve you well. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): We live in a cultural moment when satire, sarcasm, cynicism and irony are supreme emblems of intelligence. If you say you value earnestness and sincerity, you risk others considering you naïve and unsophisticated. Still, astrological omens suggest you’ll generate good fortune in the weeks ahead by being sincere and earnest. Don’t fall into the trap of relying on satire, sarcasm, cynicism and irony. As much as practical, be kindly frank, compassionately

truthful and sympathetically genuine. It’s a strategy that’ll serve your selfish aims well. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Most people don’t find their creativity,” mourned Libran author Truman Capote. “There are more unsung geniuses that don’t even know they have great talent.” If that describes you even a little, I’m happy to say you’re close to stumbling upon events and insights to change that. If you respond to the prompts of unexpected openings, you will rouse a partly dormant aspect of your genius, a half-inert stash of creativity and a semi-latent cache of imagination. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Do you know the word “sfumato”? It’s Italian, literally meaning “smoked.” When used to describe a painting, it refers to blurred borders between objects or fuzzy transitions between different colors. The forms are soft and hazy. The next few weeks will be a sfumato-like time for you. You may be challenged to make precise distinctions. Future and past, beginnings and endings may overlap. That won’t be a problem as long as you’re willing to go with the amorphous flow. You might connect with influences from which you’ve been shut off. You could blend energies better with folks who’ve been unavailable. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “You have a right to experiment with your life,” declared author Anaïs Nin. I agree. You don’t necessarily have to be what you started out to be. You can change your mind about goals which you may have thought were permanent. You could be at a pivot point right now. Are there experiments you’d like to try? If so, Nin has more advice. It’s possible “you will make mistakes. And they are right, too.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You have one main task to accomplish in the weeks ahead. It’ll be simple and natural if you devote yourself to it wholeheartedly. The only way it could be complicated and challenging is if your focus is diffused by less important matters. Ready? It’s in this poem by Rupi Kaur: “bloom beautifully / dangerously / loudly / bloom softly / however you need / just bloom.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): When the forces of the Roman empire occupied the British Isles from 43 to 410, they built 2,000 miles of roads with sophisticated methods. That’s why few new roads were built in England until the 18th century, and many of the same paths are still visible and available today. In this spirit, and in accordance with astrological omens, make good use of an old system or network in the weeks ahead. It’s one time when the past has blessings to offer the future. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I’m not enigmatic and intriguing enough,” writes Piscean blogger RiddleMaster. He goes on: “I really must work harder. Maybe I’ll start wearing ankle-length black leather coats, billowing silk scarves imprinted with alchemical symbols and wide-brimmed hats. I’ll listen to Cambodian folk songs and read rare books in ancient Sanskrit. When someone dares to speak to me, I’ll utter cryptic declarations like, ‘The prophecies will be fulfilled soon enough.’” Readers, I understand those feelings, I do. Pisceans need mystery like they need food or air. Set aside that insane, intense drive for a few weeks. It’s time to show the world who you are with crisp candor. Rob Brezsny freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com


FOLIO WEED

FIVE ON IT

More HEAD MUSIC from the VAULT TWICE WE’VE DONE COLUMNS THAT

aspired to flesh out the voluminous repertoire of reeferated musics laid out from the earliest days of recorded sound and twice, you, dear reader, have asked for more. Here are a few choice nugs from my personal stash. (New suggestions are always welcome.) BESSIE SMITH “Gimme a Pigfoot” (1933): Smith (1894-1937) was in many ways the female Louis Armstrong, a full-bodied, formidable blues singer with the agility to navigate the swing era. This song is a fun, visceral example of how she fused those styles to become the most potent singer of the 1930s and a key influence on almost all the singers who followed, starting with her greatest disciple … ELLA FITZGERALD “When I Get Low I Get High” (1937): It was clear from her earliest years, in the first half of the 20th century, that Ella (1917-1996) had no real competition in terms of vocal dexterity. She was 20 when she recorded this tune with drummer Chick Webb and his orchestra, the band that dominated in the Swing Era from its base at the Savoy Ballroom. Webb’s merry band of musicmakers took competition victories over Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Jimmie Lunceford, Fletcher Henderson and, most famously, Benny Goodman. The drummer died young, in 1939; Ella, at 22 years of age, took over the band and transitioned into a crossover star for the next 50 years. GENE KRUPA “I’m Feeling High and Happy” (1938): The photograph of Krupa (19091973) sweating through his suit while destroying a set of brushes in battle at

the Savoy is an icon of the era. By that point, he was America’s first celebrity drummer. A year later, he’d start his own band, and this would be one of their first recordings. Krupa was a forceful advocate for integration of jazz bands, first with the Goodman small-groups and then with his own bands. He didn’t even smoke that much, but you couldn’t tell that from his style, which embodied the hipster aesthetic that led directly into bebop and the beat generation. A valet slipped a cache of pre-rolled joints in his jacket pocket in January 1943, precipitating the first notable celebrity drug bust. JULIA LEE “Marijuana” (1947): Arthur Johnston and Sam Coslow wrote this in 1934, and it was first recorded by Dave Harman later that year, but it’s this version that endures. Lee (1902-1958) was another great singer directly influenced by Bessie Smith, and that comes through nicely here. She recorded the song in the same years as “Snatch and Grab It,” which should really be the Trump2020 theme song. AEROSMITH “Reefer Head Woman” (1979): It took me a long time to really appreciate what the young Aerosmith brought to the table. “Walk This Way” is still a perfect song, but it was the Breeders’ cover of “Lord of the Thighs” that precipitated a deep-dive, and oh, what fun it’s been. For all we know, both songs could be about the same person. Wouldn’t that be a book worth reading?

Shelton Hull mail@folioweekly.com

Subscribe to the Folio Weed Newsletter at folioweekly.com/newsletters

APRIL 24-30, 2019 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 45


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THE CHICAGO WAY FLORIDA TEACHERS need to WALK OUT, NOT WALK IN ON O N APRIL IL 118, 8 TEAC TEACHERS CHERS S AC ACROSS CROSS OSS

Florida dressed in red and assembled in front of their schools. Then they “walked in” en masse to show their support for public education. Now, don’t get me wrong: I’m a huge supporter of public education. But I did not participate. What do I think of the walk-in? Well, I learned about the walk-in when I attended a League of Women Voters education symposium on April 13. The speakers discussed all the dreadful things that Tallahassee has already done and is continuing to do to public education. With due respect, I observed that we are not having a policy debate with earnest folks who just happen to have a different point of view; we are in a battle for the future of education, and the Republicans who run Tallahassee aren’t moved by facts and evidence. They don’t care about letters to the editor, or blogs, or symbolic gestures like the walk-in. They don’t even care about public opinion or the will of the people. They don’t have to care anymore because they’ve completely gerrymandered the state (and, FYIGM, all the snowbirds vote R to keep their taxes low). I observed that while we wave signs, they’re dismantling public education and replacing it with a hodgepodge of for-profit charters and voucher-funded private schools. The only reason they haven’t already drowned public education in the bathtub is that they don’t have the capacity to absorb 2.7 million students. But they are building it and building it quickly. Does anybody think Jason Fischer, Aaron Bean or Clay Yarborough— local Republican politicians who funneled millions to their superdonors’ pet charter schools—care if some teachers wear red and symbolically walk into their schools to show support of education? How about the politicians in

Republican-controlled Tallahassee, R p bl bli tr lled dT ll h who would sooner give teachers guns (something the overwhelming majority of teachers don’t want) than a raise? They couldn’t care less. This session has been particularly bad for public education. Now that Governor Ron DeSantis has stacked the state supreme court—he even brags about it—the Republicans are done with their death-by-athousand-cuts strategy; they’ve graduated to using a sledgehammer. I am reminded of Sean Connery’s famous quote from The Untouchables: “You wanna get Capone? Here’s how to get him. He pulls a knife, you pull a gun. He sends one of yours to the hospital, you send one of his to the morgue. That’s the Chicago way! And that’s how you get Capone. Now do you want to do that? Are you ready to do that? I’m offering you a deal. Do you want this deal?” Teachers and supporters of public education are playing the game by the rules, and while Tallahassee has thrown the game on the floor, stomped the board and smashed the pieces while spouting your-mama’s-sofat jokes and poking us in the eye. No, I don’t think much of the walk-in. It’s what nice, polite people do, people who are afraid to get their hands dirty. But the truth is, if we’re going to have any chance at saving public education, we need to get down in the mud and fight back. What does a fight look like? Florida teachers need to put the red shirts back in the closet and claim their right to strike, as teachers in other states have. Maybe, just maybe, that’s something that would make Tallahassee take notice. Chris Guerrieri mail@folioweekly.com _______________________________________

Guerrieri is a Duval County public school teacher.

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