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CONTENTS //

MAY 21-27, 2014 • VOLUME 28 • NUMBER 8

EDITOR’S NOTE NOT A SCIENTIST, MAN

T

48

36 MAIL BUZZ 2 MINUTES FIGHTIN’ WORDS

5 6 10 11

SUMMER GUIDE OUR PICKS MUSIC THE KNIFE

12 36 38 40

MOVIES MAGIC LANTERNS ARTS DINING

43 I SAW U ASTROLOGY NEWS OF THE WEIRD CLASSIFIEDS

43 44 47 49

52 52 53 54

Cover Photo: Walter Coker. Cover Design: Dana Fasano PUBLISHER • Sam Taylor staylor@folioweekly.com / ext. 111

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EDITORIAL

DESIGN

EDITOR • Jeffrey C. Billman jbillman@folioweekly.com / ext. 115 SENIOR EDITOR • Marlene Dryden mdryden@folioweekly.com / ext. 131 A&E EDITOR • David Johnson djohnson@folioweekly.com / ext. 128 WRITERS-AT-LARGE Susan Cooper Eastman seastman@folioweekly.com Derek Kinner dkinner@folioweekly.com CARTOONIST Tom Tomorrow CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Rob Brezsny, Daniel A. Brown, John E. Citrone, Travis Crawford, Julie Delegal, AG Gancarski, Nicholas Garnett, Claire Goforth, Janet Harper, Dan Hudak, Shelton Hull, MaryAnn Johanson, Amanda Long, Heather Lovejoy, Nick McGregor, Cameron Meier, Jeff Meyers, Kara Pound, Merl Reagle, Scott Renshaw, Carley Robinson, Chuck Shepherd,

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Folio Weekly is published every Wednesday throughout Northeast Florida. It contains opinions of contributing writers that are not necessarily the opinion of this publication. Folio Weekly welcomes both editorial and photographic contributions. Calendar information must be received two weeks in advance of event date. Copyright © Folio Publishing, Inc. 2014. All rights reserved. Advertising rates and information are available on request. An advertiser purchases right of publication only. One free copy per person. Additional copies and back issues are $1 each at the office or $4 by U.S. mail, based on availability. First Class mail subscriptions are $48 for 13 weeks, $96 for 26 weeks and $189 for 52 weeks. Please recycle Folio Weekly. Folio Weekly is printed on recycled paper using soy-based inks. 27,000 press run. Audited weekly readership 111,191.

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he most important national story two weeks ago was a detailed, legislatively mandated report from the U.S. Global Change Research Program called the Third National Climate Assessment, which found that “independent records from weather stations, satellites, ocean buoys, tide gauges, and many other data sources all confirm that our nation, like the rest of the world, is warming. Precipitation patterns are changing, sea level is rising, the oceans are becoming more acidic, and the frequency and intensity of some extreme weather events are increasing. Many lines of independent evidence demonstrate that the rapid warming of the past half-century is due primarily to human activities.” Many of these changes, the report warned, “are detrimental, largely because our society and its infrastructure were designed for the climate that we have had, not the rapidly changing climate we now have and can expect in the future.” The most important national story last week came from two new scientific papers that reported that major glaciers of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet have destabilized, and their collapse, according to NASA scientists, “appears unstoppable.” When that ice sheet melts, worldwide sea levels could rise up 13 feet, which will be, in a word, catastrophic — and just be the beginning. Scientists estimate that human activities have already set in motion a sea rise of 69 feet, which would fundamentally alter civilization as we know it, especially in low-lying areas like Florida. This stuff is no longer theoretical. It is happening right now, all around us, every day. We can observe it. We can study it. And as temperatures rise and oceans warm and sea ice melts and oceans rise, we will suffer the ramifications. There’s still plenty of room to debate solutions. There is not, however, any more room for climate denialism, not when so much is at stake. Except, of course, if you’re a Republican senator who wants to run for president in a party in thrall to fossil fuel interests. Enter Marco Rubio, who a few years ago dodged a question about the Earth’s age by saying, “I’m not a scientist, man,” but who now feels qualified to tell us that the overwhelming consensus of People Who Know What They’re Talking About is wrong, because he says so: “I don’t agree with the notion that some are putting out there, including scientists, that somehow there are actions we can take today that would actually have an impact on what’s happening in our climate,” the Florida senator told ABC News. A few days later, Rubio tried to walk back that particular idiocy, saying that even if the U.S. took action to address carbon pollution, other parts of the world wouldn’t, so what’s the point? (Fact: The U.S. accounts for 19 percent of worldwide carbon emissions.) And then, in an interview with Sean Hannity (naturally), Rubio inveighed on how prochoice liberals are the ones who actually hate science, because they deny that life begins at conception. (Fact: There’s a difference between life and personhood.) Climate change is the biggest and most important challenge of the 21st Century, not something to be shrugged away. By suggesting that it can be, Rubio only revealed how vacuous he really is. Jeffrey C. Billman twitter/jeffreybillman jbillman@folioweekly.com


MAIL Mindless Liberals

It is pathetic that these mindless liberals [News Buzz, “Keep Calm and Sine Die,” Jeffrey C. Billman and Susan Cooper Eastman, May 7] have a voice in Folio Weekly to spout their teenaged understanding of economics. What other explanation could there be for their lack of awareness that Florida’s debt has declined continuously while Gov. Scott has been in office, unemployment has declined continuously (and not because people have dropped out of the workforce, like Obama’s great accomplishment), and hundreds of thousands of new jobs have been created, all while taxes have been reduced? They complain about the “GOP-dominated Legislature” passing “the largest budget in state history,” but fail to mention that it was passed unanimously in the Senate, which includes 14 Democrats. No, that might make Gov. Scott “less cretinous,” apparently. Gee, calling Gov. Scott a cretin doesn’t sound defamatory at all. They then go on to complain about all the places where the Legislature didn’t spend money. They lament the lack of the expansion of Medicaid for the “working poor,” while ignoring the reality that the federal government only borrows money from future generations to pay for the states’ expanded Medicaid for a period of three years, and then saddles the states with the additional financial burden. They also ignore the abject failure of their (presumed) beloved Obamacare, with more people being kicked off their healthcare insurance plans than have actually been able to sign up and pay (at increased costs) for their replacement plans. All while hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars have been wasted on state exchanges which seem to be giving up on a weekly basis, and passing that burden back onto the federal government, i.e., all taxpayers. So which is it, geniuses? More spending, or less? Oh, I remember now, more taxes for their Marxist utopia, no doubt. They further lament that “it’s still totally cool to fire someone for being gay,” which, of course, it’s not, but that doesn’t fit their narrative. They complain about no online voting (fraud) system being developed to ensure democracy, but love that courts legislate from the bench and overturn the wishes of the voters in numerous states, even the left-coast California, and claim that banning marriage between homosexuals is illegal. They proclaim that the “cretin” Gov. Scott only reduced taxes because it’s an election year and needs to bolster his election changes, but fail to mention real flip-floppers, like Obama and Clinton who were for marriage between a man and a woman before they were against it, in election years, not to mention the complete idiocy of their statement given the flopping fish that is Charlie Crist: Who knows what he’ll be tomorrow or who he’ll sell out for a Senate seat? Their ridiculous opinion piece continues ad nauseam, but you get the idea. Craig Greenhagen

Gimme Weed, Please

I read your article about drug legalization and the vet with PTSD [Editor’s Note, “How Marijuana Saved a Life,” Jeffrey C. Billman, April 30]. I can most definitely relate to it as a disabled war vet myself, having served in the U.S. Navy from 1985-1995. I was in Operation Desert Storm. Needless to say, I saw some nasty stuff. I’ve been going to the VA since 1995. They just diagnosed me with PTSD. Of course, I’m not being compensated for it. All I got was an apology. Beside the trauma I suffered mentally, I have numerous medical problems, including a

broken back, a prosthetic knee and two broken wrists. The VA seems to be stingy when it comes to pain medication, at least in my case. Most doctors won’t prescribe it, or give you something very weak. They also won’t give you enough to actually relieve the pain. I’m not sure why there’s such a problem or stigma when it comes to prescription painkillers. It’s not like my pain is imaginary or made up. I’ve had numerous surgeries, maybe 20 or more, including back surgery in 2010, the knee in 2011, and a cardiac procedure in 2012 and again last week. Since the back surgery, I was getting Percoset and numerous injections in my back from a doctor in town. I stopped getting it about eight months ago. The VA found out, and cut me off from narcotics. Now, I get nothing from them for pain. This forced me back to the pain clinics in town. The problem is the difficulty obtaining painkillers. If you’re not a regular customer at a pharmacy, you won’t be able to get painkillers, period. Sometimes, they just don’t have any, forcing you to wait as long as 10 days. When that happens, you go through withdrawals, which is like kicking heroin. My pain is so severe at times, I broke both my wrists punching steel cabinets to relieve the pain in my back. My primary care doctor at the VA won’t listen to me at all. Now, he looks at me like I’m a junkie just trying to score. If it weren’t for drug screening, I could use marijuana, which I’m sure would help, but I can’t. The government wants to you to buy and use their drugs, but you have to jump through hoops to get them. I really enjoyed your article, and I really hope things change. The money that can be saved from busting people for weed and the revenue and jobs that can be generated from legalization are things we need. Rich E

Correction Last week’s story “Lock ’Em Up,” by Susan Cooper Eastman and Derek Kinner, reported that, in a review of juvenile diversion cases, the Public Defender’s Office found that “almost 40 percent involved batteries or incidents of domestic violence.” That percentage also included charges of resisting arrest without violence. In addition, we reported that Duval County Schools Superintendent Nikolai Vitti signed a 2012 memorandum of understanding supporting the expansion of civil citations. While he does support the expansion, he had not yet taken the position at the school district and was not party to the MOU. Finally, we made mention of 147 non-arrest diversions in addition to the civil citations issued in the Fourth Judicial Circuit. We should clarify that these 147 cases were in Duval County. Data from the circuit’s other counties were not immediately available. If you would like to respond to something that appeared in Folio Weekly, please send an email with your address and phone number (for verification purposes only) to mail@folioweekly.com. We reserve the right to edit letters for grammar, clarity and space.

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 5


NEWS BUZZ Angela Corey, Hackles Up

Angela Corey is not happy — not happy with the Times-Union, not happy with us, just not happy. The state attorney — who, incidentally, once said of a Folio Weekly reporter, “I understand her need to spit venom. I do. I finally saw her for the first time” — believes that she is being unfairly maligned, perhaps maliciously, in the local press over her stances on civil citations for juvenile offenders [News, “Lock ’Em Up,” Susan Cooper Eastman and Derek Kinner, May 14] and transparency [Editor’s Note, “A Culture of Secrecy,” Jeffrey C. Billman, May 7]. From Corey’s perspective, we in the media have it out for her, or we just don’t understand, or we’re stirring up controversy where none exists, or something. And she’s not happy. She pleaded her case last week in a pleasant half-hour conversation with this magazine’s editor (more on that in a second). Her backand-forth with Frank Denton, the TimesUnion’s editor — a conversation documented in emails that became public record — was considerably less pleasant, and liberally dosed with demands for apologies and implicit threats of legal action and over an editorial of which Corey didn’t approve. It’s worth remembering that Corey is a public official, and these are matters of public interest, so the bar for libel is so extraordinarily high that most aggrieved politicians don’t even bother with such threats for anything short of calling them pedophiles. Not so for Angela Corey, possessed as she is of a hair-trigger sensitivity to even the slightest hint of criticism. (Recall the time she threatened to sue Alan Dershowitz and Harvard Law School for his critique of her handling of the Zimmerman case?) And so, on May 1, when the T-U published an editorial slamming Corey for removing one of its reporters from a search committee’s deliberations over candidates for Jacksonville’s new medical examiner, Corey pounced: “It is unconscionable that your newspaper has not taken responsibility for its libelous actions,” she began. She did not “order” the reporter out of the room; no, she “announced the afternoon break and excused your reporter,” which is completely different somehow. “Your obvious malicious agenda has now been further solidifi ed for your readers.” Even though the search committee’s lawyer

6 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

Angela Corey later reached the conclusion that, actually, the T-U had a right to be there after all, Corey insists she’s being maligned because the rules are ambiguous, and they’d received different advice from other lawyers earlier. And anyway, the committee’s recommendation has two more layers to go through — the state Medical Examiners Commission and then the governor — so what’s the big deal? Denton declined her invitation to, um, retract the newspaper’s opinion. The case law, he responded, wasn’t that ambiguous at all. “We referred to the meeting as ‘secret’ because it was — not because the public was unaware of the meeting being held but because the public was barred from the meeting itself — which was ‘kept from knowledge or view,’ to use Webster’s primary definition of secret.” Kicked the hornet’s nest, he did. “I ask you to have someone objective do an honest evaluation of the articles that you have written about me and this office,” Corey snapped, later adding, “Many citizens are now voicing their concern over your obvious biased agenda and wondering why,” and “Are you sure your reporter was really there to get the truth disseminated to the public? … By your opinion piece, you have gratuitously tarnished the good members of this committee and the process in which the committee engaged. We deserve a retraction and an apology. The fact that you


and your lawyers refuse to do so will never obscure the truth for those of us who know, sadly [sic] it will only continue to mislead the readers to whom you owe a duty of accurate and fair reporting.” Jacksonville City Council member Robin Lumb, a member of that committee not named in the editorial, was also less than pleased. “Because you continue to assert your right to smear me and other members of the committee with false charges I will repeat my request for a retraction and apology,” she wrote to Denton. “If you allow the editorial to stand as written you will have branded me, without any proof whatsoever, as someone who knowingly and intentionally violated the law. That is per se libel and defamation.” No retraction or apology (or lawsuit, so far as we can tell) was forthcoming. On May 12, Lumb wrote that, while “the editorial did not paint an accurate picture,” “I consider the matter closed.” In her conversation with us, Corey voiced many of the same objections to the Editor’s Note that made note of that search committee meeting. There was nothing malicious about the committee’s intent, just a difference of opinion on what the law required. The committee was going to discuss the background checks and potential medical issues of the job contenders, and they weren’t sure that stuff should be aired in public. (You could ask — and we did — why, if there’s any ambiguity, the default isn’t toward openness. Corey responded that the committee’s lawyers had previously advised against public deliberations, and they were just acting on that advice.) And because the all-volunteer committee has been subjected to this public scrutiny, Corey frets, next time people won’t be so willing to sign up. “The true facts weren’t getting out there,” Corey says. As for our civil citations story, Corey says that there, too, she is being misrepresented. Yes, she opposes the City Council’s nonbinding resolution to expand their use — a resolution the Council did not vote on as expected last week — but she has long supported the purpose behind them. In 2009, she points out, she called for their expansion outside of the School District and onto the streets, because that’s only fair. Corey also reiterated that she believes her office’s other diversion programs work just as well, so why is everyone so hung up on civil citations? “I’m not sure why it’s still a topic,” she says. Corey also disputed some of the numbers in the story (we double-checked, and they’re correct*), and wondered why no one seems interested in her office’s other diversion programs (which the story mentioned) or the positive results they produce, or the fact that the cops, not her, ultimately make decisions about whom to cite and whom to arrest. “I think this article is not fair to this office,” Corey says. “I really, truly don’t understand it.”

professor of economics at Florida State College of Jacksonville who now runs the consulting firm The Ekonomists. Drawing on One Spark’s data from last month’s festival, Markl offers what he believes is the first quantitative assessment of One Spark creators’ success, essentially comparing creators’ project goals to what they actually received. In total, Markl reports, One Spark creators sought a total of more than $99 million in funding. And in total, they came up $98,667,742 short. “One Spark funding represents 0.36% of the aggregate One Spark project funding goal,” he writes. Only 3 percent of projects reached their goals (and three of those five projects asked for $15 or less). Eighty-six percent, meanwhile, failed to achieve even a quarter of their goals. In comparison, Markl points out, 43.5 percent of Kickstarter projects reach their targets. The result, factoring in supplies and time, is that most creators actually lost money on One Spark. The mean funding level was $598 (the median, $231), whereas most creators spent an estimated $753 to register, set up a booth and sit there (Markl assumes that creators’ time is worth Florida’s minimum hourly wage). Indeed, only 2 percent of projects took home more than $5,000. “That’s a sad reality no one’s talking about,” Markl tells us. There are a few caveats worth noting here: One, creators tended to ask for a lot of money, unrealistic sums, really — the mean goal was $162,881; the median, $24,000. It’s entirely likely that most creators never expected to pull in that much, and many just wanted exposure. In addition, Markl’s analysis doesn’t take into account the $3.25 million in potential capital investments for which creators could vie, because they vied for them alongside non-One Spark entrants. Markl insists he’s not trying to crap on One Spark. Rather, he was intrigued by a quote from Jags owner Shad Khan — “One Spark right now is an idea and it’s a great party … but now it’s got to generate measured results, companies, jobs and economic growth.” Markl says he just wanted to quantify that stuff: “I love One Spark,” he says, “but I was wondering, how much money do these guys get?” With a few exceptions, it seems, not much. “As the data reveal,” Markl’s report (available at onesparkimpact.org) says, “there is a disconnect between the financial needs of a One Spark creator & the financial capabilities of One Spark.” The city as a whole fared a little better. According to a report last week from the University of North Florida, the festival drew 260,000 people and pumped $1.8 million into the local economy — not as big a number as you’d hope from that many people, but it turns out that most attendees were locals and only 1,010 stayed in area hotels.

Money Talking

*Save for one clarification: 147 juveniles who weren’t given civil citations were put into other non-arrest diversion programs in Duval County, not throughout the Fourth Judicial Circuit.

You know who else is not happy, probably? Most of this year’s One Spark creators. At least, according to Chris Markl, a former associate

— Jeffrey C. Billman

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 7


NEWS

ATwenty MIRACLE ON ASHLEY STREET years after the city tried to knock it down, the Clara White Mission is still a storehouse for the people

S

he didn’t know what she was getting herself into. When Ju’Coby Pittman became president of the Clara White Mission in 1993, its West Ashley Street headquarters was trashed, and one of the chief goals of Mayor Ed Austin’s “River City Renaissance” plan was to flatten the LaVilla neighborhood where the Mission had stood for most of a century. “I remember your phone call your first day here, that night after work. You said, ‘Oh my God, what have I done?’” Meg Fisher, the Mission’s vice president since shortly after Pittman took the job, tells Pittman as they sit for an interview on the Mission’s second floor. Pittman had taken the helm of one of the most venerable humanitarian organizations in the city. But when interviewing for the job, she never made her way past the first floor. “There were years of donated items,” Pittman says. “Just stacks and stacks of stuff.” “Floor to ceiling,” Fisher adds. “You couldn’t get off of the elevator on the third floor. There were holes in the roof and rats running through the hallways.” But the deterioration of the Clara White Mission in the two decades after founder Eartha White’s death in 1974 was nothing compared to the threat it faced from the city of Jacksonville. Back then, it was an existential threat from Austin’s Renaissance. More recently, it’s the lingering threat of potentially crippling budget cuts. Through it all, the Clara White Mission has persevered even as LaVilla has all but vanished.

...

In 1902, in her mid-20s, Eartha White founded “the Colored Old Folks’ Home” on the Eastside in answer to a conspicuous absence of care for Jacksonville’s black population. By then, White had already finished a career as an opera singer. Since her mid-teens, she’d toured the United States and Europe singing with the Oriental American Opera Company. She’d returned to Jacksonville only after her fiancé James Jordan died shortly before their wedding in 1896, apparently of tuberculosis. Seventy-four years later, she told a New York Times reporter, “I never married. I was too busy. What man would put up with me running around the way I do?” That “running around” began when she herself contracted the land sale for a black school in Duval County’s far southern community of Bayard, organized the construction of the school and taught the first classes. Later, it included the founding of a tuberculosis hospital for blacks, an orphanage, an adoption agency and a home for “unwed mothers.” It included food and clothing drives, and in 1920 when women won the right to vote, voter registration drives. In 1940, White traveled to Chicago to meet with A. Philip Randolph, whom she’d known through most of his Jacksonville childhood, to help plan a March on Washington. (Randolph called off the march after President Roosevelt met with him and acceded to many of his demands.) White also resisted racist Florida legislation like that of the 1947 “White Primary Bill,” which would have prohibited black citizens from voting in primary elections. (The bill was proposed by Jacksonville state Sen. John Mathews, after 8 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

IN THE GARDEN: Surrounded by the students from the Clara White Mission’s Culinary Apprenticeship Program, Ju’Coby Pittman picks a tomato from White Harvest Farms in Downtown Jacksonville. Photo by Dennis Ho

whom the city would soon name a bridge.) Though the Clara White Mission dates its origin to Eartha White obtaining legal status for charitable work in 1904, she didn’t name her agency for her adoptive mother until 1928, eight years after Clara’s death. In fact, the work of the Mission really began even before the Old Folks’ Home, back in the soup kitchen the two women ran from their home on Eagle Street, now First Street, before the turn of the 20th Century. All throughout Eartha’s childhood, Clara used their home to feed and clothe others and collect gifts for poor children at Christmas. Eartha White’s long-term goal for the Mission was simply to keep evolving the humanitarianism she’d learned from her former-slave mother, whose motto was, “Do all the good you can, in all the ways you can, for all the people you can, while you can.”

...

In promotional materials for the River City Renaissance, Austin claimed his plan would move Jacksonville past “the threshold to become the ‘Next Great American City,’” a promise the city’s mayors have made since before Hans Tanzler dubbed Jacksonville the “Bold New City of the South” in the late ’60s. Austin’s plan required the destruction of nearly 50 square blocks of LaVilla, a blighted, dense and mostly black urban neighborhood that had once been the cultural epicenter of segregated Jacksonville. Dissertations have been written on the musical and theatrical culture of LaVilla. More than a dozen such venues lined West Ashley Street in the 1920s, when blues and ragtime

guitarist Arthur “Blind” Blake recorded “Ashley Street Blues” with vocalist Leona Wilson. In the early 1930s, Eartha White bought the Globe Theater and turned it into the Clara White Mission. By the time Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat in 1955, Eartha was already 79 years old. During the 1960s, Jacksonville Mayor Haydon Burns vowed to fight integration and desegregation in any form, and the city experienced major race riots in 1960, 1964 and 1969. Many of the better-off residents and business leaders in LaVilla left the neighborhood. Throughout the ’70s, poverty and crime increased in LaVilla, and the neighborhood’s great Carpenter Gothic and Victorian houses decayed. The 1980s crack cocaine epidemic hit especially hard. In 1993, Austin saw LaVilla as an ugly “front door” to Downtown from Interstate 95. And city officials saw no reason the razing of LaVilla shouldn’t include the Mission. After all, it had been nearly 20 years since Eartha White had died, and the city had written the neighborhood off as a crack den and hotbed of prostitution. Pittman remembers how Frank Nero, then-director of the Downtown Development Authority, told her and Fisher that if they could get enough people interested in LaVilla, the city might be willing to reconsider. Fisher recalls City Council members suggesting, perhaps paradoxically, that if the Mission wanted to bring the city around, they might not want to have all those homeless people hanging around. The Mission got its reprieve thanks not to the city’s change of heart but to the Jacksonville Historic Preservation Commission, which helped it obtain a historic designation in 1993.

And the Mission found good fortune another way: As United Way prepared to exit its role as the Mission’s last remaining substantial funding source, the Jessie Ball duPont Fund stepped in. The fund still operates as the bequest of one of Jacksonville’s wealthiest residents in its history. The rest of LaVilla was not so fortunate. While the Mission stood, blocks of tall houses, old commercial buildings, theaters, restaurants and bars were demolished. In return for the loss of the neighborhood, the mayor’s office promised an enormous recreation center, stimulus money for new Downtown housing, and a “greenbelt” between the interstate and Downtown. The city delivered only on the greenbelt, and then only in the form of empty fields where all the buildings had once stood. In Eartha White’s time, the Mission was the center of LaVilla and of much of black Jacksonville. The building housed the Works Progress Administration offices to which Zora Neale Hurston and Stetson Kennedy reported, Florida newsrooms for national black news outlets, and everything from daily feedings of the homeless to Red Cross programs and quilting bees. Tragically, little of LaVilla remains, and it’s hard to even imagine the once-thriving urban neighborhood it was. Meanwhile, Ju’Coby Pittman has developed the Mission into a successful nonprofit that works with the Department of Veterans Affairs and other nonprofits — and the very city of Jacksonville that once sought to tear it down.

...

In Pittman’s second year, the Mission hosted a fund-raising block party it called “the


NEWS Miracle on Ashley Street.” They raised $5,000. This Friday, May 23, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Mission celebrates the Miracle’s 20th incarnation. The Mission’s culinary students will prepare and serve the food, and with tickets priced at $25, Pittman expects to raise between $40,000 and $45,000. While the Mission’s board once fretted over the purchase of a single secondhand station wagon for Eartha White, funding allocations today support its culinary and janitorial training programs, daily feedings of the homeless, the two farms it operates on the city’s Northside, and projects like the two historic Beaver Street buildings to be developed into veterans’ services and housing facilities. Twenty years back, Pittman says, “A fundraiser was a fish fry and a car wash.” Now Pittman’s running for the District 9 City Council seat long held by the retiring Warren Jones. She says it was the importance of nonprofit organizations that convinced her to run for City Council — a body that, in tough times, can see their funding as expendable. Last year’s budget cuts threatened to take around $325,000 from the Mission’s $2.6 million annual operating budget. “When the Council put the Mission below the line, and employment numbers above the line, I’m thinking, ‘What’s wrong with this picture?’” Pittman says. Though the funds were reinstated, and none of the Mission’s students was affected, it was a nerve-racking time, Pittman says: “Students who were about to graduate would’ve suddenly had the rug pulled out from under them.” Pittman grew up in Blodgett Homes, at the time a notorious housing project, but she nonetheless remembers a sense of community and her grandmother’s strength and status. It was in part due to the influence of her grandmother that Pittman had the courage to take over an institution seemingly headed for disaster, founded by perhaps the most powerful woman in the city’s history. If she wins Jones’ seat next year, Pittman says, “It will be the second time I’ve stepped into some mighty big shoes.”

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Richard McKissick is almost 90 years old and meticulously fashionable. He wears bow ties and silk vests and spectator shoes. He’s been speaking through an electrolarynx since his battle with throat cancer in the 1990s. More than half a century ago, he managed both the Strand and Roosevelt theaters in LaVilla. “I lived in a tall residential building right behind the Clara White Mission, and I’d see Miss White all the time,” McKissick says. “She had a great deal of influence and power, but you wouldn’t know it to look at her. Her clothes were always tattered. She didn’t eat enough.” Eartha White wore clothes from the Mission’s donation piles, she lived in the Mission among the homeless and dispossessed, and she frequently gave away the meal she was about to eat. These are comments that I’ve heard again and again from people I’ve interviewed, in letters and in documents I’ve unearthed in research for my book about Eartha White, to be released in the fall. Even the story of her naming carried a wonderful Old-Testament-prophet kind of mythos. Supposedly, her mother, the former slave Clara White, had already lost 12 children before becoming pregnant with Eartha. One day, as Clara laundered clothes in an old metal tub outside on her front porch, her aging father and the much-older former-slave preacher Henry Harrison came to Clara to name her

baby. Clara asked them how they knew she was pregnant. Her father wanted his granddaughter named for Mary Magdalene, the repentant prostitute, but Harrison wanted to name the baby after the Earth because, he said, she would become the “storehouse for the people.” Clara told the men that if her baby lived, she would give her “the whole name,” Eartha Mary Magdalene White. But the truth, which University of North Florida historian Daniel Schafer first wrote about in the 1970s, is far different. Eartha White, adopted by Clara, was the daughter of Mollie Chapman, a black servant. Her father was Guy Stockton, a lackluster member of one of the wealthiest families in the area. Legends of wealthy white connections and secret wealth clung to Eartha White all her life. But at her death, what little wealth she had was almost entirely tied up in property, the sale of which barely settled the Mission’s debt.

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Shanek Bostic, a single mother of six children, came to the Clara White Mission because she wanted to take charge of her life and her children’s futures. She enrolled in the Mission’s Janitorial Training & Construction Maintenance program, which, combined with the Mission’s Culinary Apprenticeship Program, has a 71 percent transference rate to employment. Both programs consist of a 20-week full-time intensive session. Bostic’s class did everything from buffing floors to repairing sinks to speaking to the class. They built the tool shed and greenhouse in the culinary garden adjacent to the Mission. They also built and painted a fence out at White Harvest Farms, which the Mission operates on Moncrief Road. When Bostic finished the program, she got a business license to clean homes and do small repairs. “We all worked together like a family,” Bostic says. “We learned a lot, and supported each other, and felt very cared for.” Eartha White operated a laundry and a janitorial service, and supported the poor with gardening and urban farming. In fact, the story of White Harvest Farms is a fitting metaphor for the Clara White Mission’s resurgence. White opened the Moncrief Road property as a black recreational and swimming facility in 1943. Within five years, the city began using land that abutted White’s property to dump incinerator ash full of mercury, lead and other toxins. Nearly six decades later, the Mission and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection worked to rid that property of contaminants and bring healthy soil to Eartha White’s former land. The result is the 11-acre White Harvest Farms, which thrives in the food desert along Moncrief Road. The Mission’s culinary students help plant and later prepare the farm’s crops, and the farm is developing a community garden and attached farmer’s market scheduled to open later this year. Walking through White Harvest Farms, that original naming myth — that Eartha was to be a “storehouse for the people” — resonates beautifully. Pittman and Fisher both say that the Mission’s newest developments all end up returning to Eartha White’s original ideas that, in Fisher’s words, moving forward is like coming “full circle.” “Anytime we think we have a new idea,” Pittman says, “we end up finding out that somewhere along the way, Eartha White had already thought of it.”

© 2014

Tim Gilmore mail@folioweekly.com MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 9


2 MINUTES WITH … // DENNIS HO

LUCKY VON LU, OWNER/MANAGER/PERFORMER,

PROFESSOR WHISKEY’S TRAVELING BIZARRE BAZAAR Folio Weekly: What exactly are you guys? Lucky Von Lu: We are a vaudeville and burlesque producing company. How long have you done burlesque? I’ve been doing burlesque for five years; I’ve had the company for three. Do you recruit performers? We actually do not actively recruit performers. We go through a three-month training program with anyone who contacts us, we train them, we allow them to audition, and if they’re a good fit for the company, we hire them. What does training to be in a burlesque show entail? A lot of sewing! A lot more sewing than you’d expect. We don’t require that everybody have a full dance background because we like to be able to bring in people that have varied talents that wouldn’t normally accept this style of dance. But we do have a lot of sewing, a lot of sequining, and a lot of costume work. Costuming work is the first thing we teach you before we teach you to dance. So you require your performers to come up with their own costumes? We do. In this recent incarnation of burlesque, it’s very DIY. Also, the quality of costume you can get if you do it yourself versus the price is significantly better. Describe the variety of performers who try to get in touch with you. We have had everybody, with people from absolutely zero experience doing anything, people who graduated from art institutes, professional dancers, comedians, basically every walk of life. We have people who work white-collar jobs, we have full-time parents, we have a little bit of everything. Describe your audience. Rambunctious! And fun. We have the best audience in the world. Surprisingly more female than you’d think. Roughly about 65 percent. You’d think that because what we do is more risqué, you wouldn’t think that we get such a respectable audience, but we do. What does burlesque mean to you? All sorts of wonderful things. It’s an art form that deserves respect. I have 10 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

been in the adult entertainment business for many years, and I’ve always craved a certain amount of creativity that I wouldn’t normally get in, say, a traditional club setting. While doing these cabaret-style, vaudeville-style burlesque shows, I have not only the freedom to express myself in a manner I find fitting, but very joyfully, very theatrically. You say adult entertainment — is that what burlesque is? It’s a form of adult entertainment. It is a far end of the spectrum. You have traditional club dancers, which are pole dancers, and then you have ladies of illrepute, and then you have what we do, which is a little more theater-based. So it has a little tinge of naughtiness, but it still has its respectability well intact. How is Professor Whiskey different? When we perform, we add musicians, comedians, magicians, different variety acts in between the burlesque. Not only to give you a visual break from the monotony of seeing naked women all day — terrible, terrible monotony — but we feel it gives the artists more opportunity to express themselves in the same risqué style we promote. What was your first burlesque performance like? I was terrified! But I didn’t realize how addictive burlesque was. How wonderful it could be just to hear the applause. To know that costume that you worked 60 hours on for six minutes of glory was completely worth it. All of the burns from the glues and the soldering irons and the stabs from the sewing needles, totally 100 percent worth it. Have you gotten a lot of blowback from the city? Not at all! I’m not sure the city has noticed yet. But we’ll see. To be perfectly honest, the city doesn’t bother the fringe artists very much. I’m OK with that. Growth in our communities starts with the arts. The artists make everything beautiful and everyone enjoys it, and when they enjoy it they spend money. Dennis Ho dho@folioweekly.com


FIGHTIN’ WORDS

THERE WILL BE BLOOD In Duval, the summer killing season has opened early this year

S

ummer is coming, and if this spring has been any indication, we’ll have yet another active season of shootings in Duval — and some will no doubt be fatal. Shootings everywhere. One at the Trailer Village Trailer Park on North Main a couple of weeks back. A killing out in Longbranch at a corner store. Thirty shots fired with an AK-47 from an Impala one April afternoon on Sixth Street near Myrtle — a fusillade that killed one of the two people shot. All told, April saw 33 shootings in the Bold New City of the South, more than one a day. Seven were fatal. In many cases — too many cases — no witnesses came forward. The cops, however, found a commonality: “Without any doubt, through our investigations we learned that so many of these shootings and murders are related to drugs,” JSO Director Tom Hackney told WJXT-TV. “This is from streetlevel marijuana to larger cocaine — a drug nexus is definitely there.” Indeed, many of the shootings you see — whether they’re on the Westside, off 103rd or in Eureka Gardens, or on the Northside or the Eastside — fall into that nexus. In recent decades, both in Florida and nationwide, we’ve seen an exponential growth in the prison population, much of it related to the nexus, in terms of not just violent crimes that arise from the inherent dangers of widely consumed black market products, but also the massive warehousing of nonviolent drug offenders. This has led global experts — such as those from the London School of Economics who authored a recent report called “Ending the Drug Wars” — to blame drug prohibition and advocate for solutions beyond the current jail-’em-and-fail-’em mentality. “The strategy has failed,” the authors write. “Evidence shows that drug prices have been declining while purity has been increasing. This has been despite drastic increases in global enforcement spending.” Global and local enforcement spending. Activists such as Florida TaxWatch have noted that the state’s prison population has

increased by 400 percent in the last 35 years, with spending up 1,200 percent over the same period. And you wonder why schools are underfunded. All that money spent, all those people in lockdown, and the so-called drug nexus lives on. And while the local murder rate has declined from its peak in 2007, the way 2014 is shaping up, we may well again approximate those dark years. It’s easy to blame drugs. It’s more difficult to find actual solutions. One such solution: increase police presence in perpetual blight zones, with officers standing by in the worst areas to deal with the inevitable. While speed-trap duty on the Southside is laudable, it does nothing to deal with the most hardcore crime in our city (as inherently unpredictable as outbreaks might be). More broadly, given the direct links between streetlevel violence and the lowlevel drug trade, we also need to take a long look at decriminalizing marijuana, which the state’s residents, if not its politicians, seem open to. (The most recent Quinnipiac poll reported that 53 percent of Floridians favored outright legalization, and almost 90 percent favored legalizing medical marijuana.) The best way to attack the drug nexus on Duval streets might be to remove a huge cash crop from the black market. We’ve tried other quick fixes. Recurrent gun buy-back events and gun bounties by the sheriff ’s office are fine. But the problem is, especially with weapons like AK-47s, a $1,000 bounty (or a $50 buy-back amount) simply isn’t sufficient incentive to get them off the street. And even if they did work? New guns would come from somewhere. They always do. As it stands now, the same spots get the same yellow tape and same blue lights on a regular basis, and no one — not the mayor’s office, not the JSO, not the City Council — has anything to say that couldn’t have come out of a press release five years ago. Until the policies change, we’re guaranteed the same results.

“This is from streetlevel marijuana to larger cocaine – a drug nexus is definitely there.”

AG Gancarski twitter/aggancarski mail@folioweekly.com

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 11


…AND THE LIVIN’S EASY

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here’s nothing quite like summer, right? The salty ocean air, the sweaty, suntanned bodies, the electric nights, the big cinematic blockbusters, the pool parties and afternoons on the boat, the barbecues, the kids out of school, the weekends spent lounging on the couch when you should be mowing your yard, because damn it’s hot out there and some basic cable channel is running a Star Wars marathon. There’s a lot to do (or, you know, be lazy and not do). We’re here to help: From sports to arts to movies to booze to food, what follows is our Ultimate Summer Guide, your one-stop-shop for, well, everything that matters. If you don’t have fun this summer, it’s your own fault.

— Jeffrey C. Billman

12 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014


BIGGER THAN A REDBOX

Summer 2014 movies you might actually see in a theaterr

WE HAVE THE perfect summer treat

Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

GODZILLA (May 16)

Full disclosure: I gave the Matthew Broderick Godzilla three stars out of five, mostly because I got this really cool sippy cup at the screening, see. So maybe I’m not the guy you wanna trust to handicap the chances that Warner Bros. has rebooted the big green galoot in a way that will prove more, uh, enduring. From what we’ve seen so far, this one sure looks more like a Godzilla movie than an ersatz Jurassic Park, which is a step in the right direction. But it’s probably too much to hope for that WB has gone all the way past Raymond Burr and back to the Hiroshima-haunted somberness of the franchise’s origins. Either way, get ready for another fun and challenging round of “What Is Ken Watanabe Saying?”

X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST (May 23)

“I’ve watched a lot of people die,” Wolverine snarls in the trailer — a neat reminder of all the Brett Ratner-inflicted canon damage Bryan Singer is going to have to undo here. Hopes are high, given that Singer is the guy who made X-Men and X2: X-Men United (let’s just agree to forget that he then went on to make Superman Returns and that shitty Munsters pilot). And how time flies: Now it’s Jennifer Lawrence inspiring the coos of “Oooooh, they got her back,” while Halle Berry’s fleeting appearances in the promos engender whispers of “Hey, who did that used to be?”

A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST (May 30)

Future Kid: Dad, why did so many people hate Seth MacFarlane? Future Dad: Because us liberals are humorless sons of bitches, just like that tub of lard Limbaugh used to say. Future Kid: Then why did A Million Ways to Die in the West make a bajillion dollars anyway? Future Dad: Because progressives don’t pay for movies, son; we pirate them.

OBVIOUS CHILD

(limited release June 6)

Ex-SNL cast member Jenny Slate portrays an up-and-coming standup comic in a movie that promises to provide a nuanced and sympathetic portrait of one woman’s lot in show business and society. In a world

where In a World actually got the accolades it deserved, maybe there’s room for another feminist hero in our meta-comedies.

22 JUMP STREET (June 13)

Magic Mike might get all the attention, but it was Channing Tatum’s surprisingly sensitive turn in the wonderful 21 Jump Street that showed he was going to be a major force to contend with. Two years later, he and Jonah Hill are back for a follow-up that looks set to do for obligatory sequels what the original did for obligatory reboots. This time, our heroes are on assignment in college, which opens the door to all kinds of winking self-exploitation. In other words, this shit just got unreal.

IVORY TOWER

(limited release June 13)

Learn everything that’s wrong with America’s debt-inducing system of higher education in this probing documentary. NOTE: No student passes accepted for this engagement.

THEY CAME TOGETHER

(limited release June 27)

The latest collaboration between Paul Rudd and filmmaker David Wain (Role Models) is a romcom spoof set in the high-stakes world of candy manufacturing. No matter how the movie turns out, we’re all but guaranteed two ancillary benefits: another airing of the non-Wings nonhit “Love Take Me Down to the Streets,” and Rudd yet again Rick-rolling Conan O’Brien with that ridiculous clip from Mac and Me. Never gets old!

THE PURGE: ANARCHY (July 18)

Last summer’s The Purge was crap with a conscience: home-invasion porn that actually had something worthwhile to say about 21st-century class warfare. Ten months later, its closing line — “This country has taken everything from me” — remains one of the most daring and bracingly honest observations I’ve heard in a major release. The flick made all sorts of serious, unexpected bank, too, which is why there’s already a sequel ready to go. Now, ask yourself: With a schedule that tight, which

element of the original do you think it was easier for the filmmakers to preserve: the wholesale bloodletting or the pithy social commentary? Yeah, me, too.

Come and enjoy a refreshing home made fruit ice pop. All natural dairy and gluten free. Have them dipped in our premium Belgian chocolate by Claude himself at our Hilden location

A MOST WANTED MAN

(limited release July 25)

This indie thriller, based on the writings of John le Carré, represents Phillip Seymour Hoffman’s last starring role to reach theaters. What’s that, you say? You could use a really good punchline here? Hey, then why don’t you make one?

GET ON UP

(Aug. 1)

Chadwick Boseman (42’s Jackie Robinson) is Godfather of Soul James Brown in a biopic directed by The Help’s Tate Taylor. Apparently the role of onetime Brown confidant Al Sharpton is played by no one — hey, just like on TV!

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

(Aug. 1)

While Warner Bros. abandons all hope of ever making a profitable DC Comics movie that doesn’t involve a trip to the Batcave, Disney does the nyah-nyah dance by anointing one of Marvel’s more obscure titles as its end-of-summer hopeful. And whaddaya know, the thing looks like it could be a monster hit, distilling the space opera, caped heroics and funny animalhood that represent the shared character of the Mouse House’s latter-day acquisitions. If those Star Wars sequels underperform somehow, don’t be surprised if Rocket Raccoon gets a makeover as a Disney Princess.

FRANK MILLER’S SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR

(Aug. 22)

A lot has happened in the nine years since the sequel to Frank Miller’s Sin City was announced: Robert Rodriguez fell in love with Machéte, and Miller’s solo directing debut, The Spirit, was such a bust he had to settle for establishing himself as the Islamophobic pariah of comics. So what’s left to anticipate now that a second Sin City is finally limping out of the gate? Well, there’s a featured role for Lady Gaga. And 3-D. And maybe I’ll get a sippy cup. Steve Schneider mail@folioweekly.com

TWO Locations: 6 Granada St., St. Augustine

145 Hilden Rd., Ste. 122, Ponte Vedra

claudeschocolate.com MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 13


Photo by Dennis Ho

SWEAT WORTHY

Sure, we’re a football town. But until the Jags get back on the field, you’ve still got plenty of options JACKSONVILLE SUNS

The Suns are much more sensible in their promotions than other hardball teams — the Seattle Mariners once offered free compost (seriously), and the Chicago White Sox’s Disco Demolition Night inspired a riot. But we still can’t help but chuckle at the Suns’ plans to welcome “Elvis Himselvis” and celebrate Jimmy Buffett Night (players wear Buffettstyle jerseys, which are auctioned off to benefit Wolfson Children’s Hospital), all in the span of three days, June 19-21. The hometown double-A squad is perhaps best known for its regular Thursday Night Throwdowns (“Buds for a Buck” and discounts on cocktails). When paired with College Ticket Discount Night ($5 admission), you can be sure the Baseball Grounds will be rocking every Thursday night, and probably hungover every Friday morning. More than 50 home games remain through Sept. 1 at Bragan Field, 301 A. Philip Randolph Blvd., Downtown, $6.50-$25.50 for single-game tickets, jaxsuns.com.

JACKSONVILLE SHARKS

Local sports fans might feel like the city’s in a football nadir, but they’re looking in all the wrong places. Yes, the Gators were once-in-ageneration awful last season, and the Jaguars remain locked in a very, very long rebuild (Bortles to the rescue!). Meanwhile, like Bruce Willis in an action flick, the Jacksonville Sharks don’t even know how to fail. Since beginning play in 2010, the Sharks have won their division every year. They claimed the 2011 ArenaBowl championship and earlier that season celebrated quarterback Aaron Garcia’s 1,000th touchdown pass (not a misprint!). Some of these Sharks’ stats are so ridiculous, they sound made up (they’re not, I swear). The Sharks got off to a slow start this season, dropping five of their first seven games and sitting at 3-6 after their loss to Orlando on May 17, but don’t worry: They’ve got another nine to get their groove back — including a Monday night home tilt on July 14 against New Orleans also televised on ESPN2. Home 14 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

games are June 7 and 28, July 14 and 26 at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, $12-$133 for single-game tickets, 621-0700, jaxsharks.com.

U.S. SOCCER SENDOFF MATCH

If you were one of the other 44,437 fans in the stands with me in 2012 when Landon Donovan and the U.S. sent those demoralized Scots back across the pond, give yourself one more pat on the back. That scene — raucous as it was — can’t compare to what we’ll experience on June 7, when Team USA takes on the Nigerians in a pre-World Cup sendoff match. The American stars will then be flying to Brazil and that “Group of Death” (scary, right?) with Germany, Portugal and Ghana. Send them off in style by making EverBank Field rumble. And hey, a sellout crowd could put Jacksonville in position to attract a World Cup match the next time FIFA brings the tournament to the U.S. Just don’t act like a hooligan. 6 p.m. June 7 at EverBank Field, 1 EverBank Drive, Downtown, $30-$350, 6336100, jaxevents.com.

THE ST. JOHNS SUP RUSH

If you don’t remember what’s SUP (see what we did there?), we’ll tell you. It’s standup paddleboarding, and you might recall our editor’s struggles with it — recounted in this year’s Outdoors Issue [“The Standing is the Hardest Part,” Jeffrey C. Billman, Feb. 25] — but don’t worry. You’re definitely more coordinated than he is. [Ed. note: Watch it, Johnson.] The three-race SUP Rush series is a collaboration between Black Creek Outfitters and the Rudder Club of Jacksonville (well-known for its 61 years organizing the Mug Race). The SUP series continues with divisions for beginners (1.5 miles), intermediates (3.5 miles) and elites (7 miles), 8:30 a.m. June 7 and Aug. 23 at The Rudder Club, 8533 Malaga Ave., Ortega, thestjohnssuprush.com.

BEACHES FINE ARTS SERIES TRIATHLONS

Artists and athletes might seem a strange combination. But they’ve worked well together since 1986, when the Beaches Fine Arts Series began a triathlon series to support its free concerts, arts exhibits and educational programs. Thousands have competed in a series now sanctioned by USA Triathlon. Even before BFAST added the Olympic distance, I’d watch swimmers come out of the Atlantic Ocean in the sprint triathlons tired but determined, with a 16.8-mile bike and 3.4-mile run still ahead of them. The sprint distance proves the ideal entry point for many of those just joining the sport, but the race has attracted its share of pros as well. Race series continues 7 a.m. June 14 (sprint only) and July 12 (sprint and Olympic) at Naval Station Mayport, $40-$50, bfasracing.org.

GREATER JACKSONVILLE KINGFISH TOURNAMENT

The kingfish tournament out of Sisters Creek is the Granddaddy of Them All — the largest of its kind in the country. But few moments are as entertaining as watching the junior anglers fish their tournament during the week, carrying kingfish bigger than they are off the dock. While the main event attracts massive 30-foot-plus boats, the little guy can still win it all, as Northeast Florida fishing legend Fred Morrow proved in 1995 on his 15-foot skiff. As clichéd as it sounds, the charities are the true winners. Jacksonville Marine Charities organizes the event and reports that it’s raised more than $650,000 over 33 years. Those funds have gone to (among others) the St. Johns Riverkeeper, Jacksonville University’s Marine Science Research Institute and Safe Harbor Boys Home. Tournament week, July 21-26 at Sisters Creek Park & Boat Ramp, 8203 Heckscher Drive, Northside, kingfishtournament.com. David Johnson djohnson@folioweekly.com


GO INSIDE AND CULTURE YOURSELF It’s too damn hot at the beach, anyway

HOMEMADE SANGRIAS

Venus In Fur

BACKDOOR FORMALISM

Growing up, contemporary artist Scott Ingram, known for his work on installations at the Des Moines Art Center and the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, was influenced by revered modern architects in Chicago. Ingram creates paintings, sculpture, photography and functional art, using images from postcards, color plates and books with materials such as wood, limestone and sheetrock. The Atlanta artist’s exhibition Backdoor Formalism examines art and architecture in human environments. Reception with the artist, 6 p.m. May 22, is free at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville’s UNF Gallery, Downtown. The exhibit is on display through Aug. 24. 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

Arianda a Tony in 2012. The clueless Vanda barges in hours late, but somehow convinces the dispirited New York director to let her read before delivering the performance of a lifetime. The play-within-the-play is an adaptation of Venus in Furs, the 1870 novel by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (yes, of masochism). Meanwhile, Vanda apparently shares the name of the character for which she’s auditioning, and the mysteries and motives continue to pile up as the power struggle between director and aspiring actress play out. Daniel Austin, who drew raves for his acting in the stellar Angels in America earlier this year at Players by the Sea, makes his directorial debut. June 6-21 (8 p.m. Thur.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun.) on PBTS’s Studio Stage, Jax Beach, $20, 249-0289, playersbythesea.org.

LES MISERABLES

Theatre Jacksonville concludes its 94th season with one of the world’s most beloved musicals, long overdue for a local stage production. Directed by Michael Lipp, Victor Hugo’s masterpiece is set in 19thcentury France but resonates in 21st-century America more than ever because of its focus on class warfare. The redemption of convict Jean Valjean proves that no deed — good or bad, it seems — can go unpunished, and Les Mis packs an emotional punch unlike any other musical. June 6-22 (7:30 p.m. Thur., 8 p.m. Fri. and Sat., 2 p.m. Sun.) at Theatre Jacksonville, San Marco, $20-$25, 396-4425, theatrejax.com.

VENUS IN FUR

Carl Vorwerk and Amanda Morales star as Thomas and Vanda in this sexy auditionwithin-a-play comedy, which debuted off-Broadway in 2010 and then scored Nina

Uncorked

UNCORKED

AJENNda Productions presents a collaboration of paintings and performance in the first of a planned series of unCoRKed events. Actor Eva Matthews performs excerpts of a memoir now being written by Jennifer Chase, visual artist Tony Wood (best known for works on the human figure) presents paintings inspired by both the performance and written work, and Southern urban folk artist Lauren Fincham joins Chase to play live music. 8 p.m. June 13 and 14 at CoRK North Gallery, 603 King St., Riverside, $10 in advance, $12 at the door, artful.ly/store/events/2806.

33 VARIATIONS

A cast full of fresh faces to the local theater scene brings Moisés Kaufman’s 33 Variations to life for The 5 & Dime, A Theatre Company. After being diagnosed with ALS, musicologist Katherine Brandt (Sinda Nichols) devotes her time to learning what inspired Beethoven’s late-life obsession of creating variations of the Diabelli waltz. Katherine’s focus is a sharp contrast to the philosophy of her spirited daughter Clara (Kristen Walsh), who has commitment issues in her work and romantic life. The action shifts from 2010 to Beethoven’s time, as the ailing composer (Jason Woods) deals with his deafness while writing the variations. Director Lee Hamby and production manager Zeina Salame stage the drama, shifting between the early 19th Century and present day and from New York City to Bonn to Vienna. Performances 7:30 p.m. July 18, 19, 25 and 26 and 2 p.m. July 20 and 27 at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Riverside, the5anddime.org. David Johnson djohnson@folioweekly.com MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 15


COOL OFF WITH THESE 5 LOCAL TREATS

BOOZE THE HEAT AWAY It’s hot out there. Here are four unique summer cocktails to help you chill out

From popsicles to smoothies, we’ve got you covered THE HYPPO (ST. AUGUSTINE) Popsicles There’s no cooler way to escape the fury of a scorching sun than downing a nice, cold popsicle before it furiously drips down your chin. It’s a quintessential summer experience. These locally made artisan-crafted pops tout funky gourmet flavors sure to appease all palates – strawberry datil, pineapple cilantro and Riesling pear, to name a few. Grab one and stick to the shaded areas throughout the historic district of St. Augustine.

NATIVE SUN (SOUTHSIDE, MANDARIN) Raw Tropijito Smoothie What could be better than a little taste of the tropics? This flavorful, hydrating smoothie packs fresh mint, pineapple, mango and lime, along with agave nectar for a little kick of sweetness. The combination of mint and lime really sets this drink apart. Grab a 16-ounce to go and sip it happily by the pool or in the park.

Summer drinks … and some aren’t? Summertime and the drinkin’s easy?

Look, it’s only May, but it’s already soaring past 90 degrees out there, and with the humidity, the air is dense enough to fell an ox. All we’ve got the energy for is bad puns and cocktails. We’re leaving the brown liquors alone until fall, and sticking with clear booze and citrus all summer long.

the syrup has cooled to room temperature, add lime juice, transfer to a clean jar and store in the refrigerator. Whew. OK. Now stir vodka, juice and syrup into a tall, ice-filled glass. Serve with a straw.

THE BIKINI BODY

It’s like a Southside cocktail, but with an Eastern twist thanks to the ginger and Sapphire East (which adds lemongrass and black pepper to Bombay’s usual juniper-forward aromatics). Plus: It’s slushy. 2 ounces Bombay Sapphire East gin 1/2 ounce Cynar (or similar amaro) 1/4 teaspoon ginger paste 3 ounces lemon sorbet 4 ice cubes 2 mint leaves Place everything in a blender pitcher, with mint on the bottom — you want it in the closest contact with the blades. Pulse on the high setting until you have a thick slush. Serve in a Mason jar.

Ever tried that Master Cleanse diet? Well, it turns out the lemonade it has you live on is actually pretty tasty. Especially when you add alcohol. (And skip the nasty sea-salt detox flushes.) 2 ounces sage-and-rosemary-infused vodka 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons Grade B maple syrup 2 tablespoons fresh-squeezed lemon juice 1/10 teaspoon cayenne pepper First, infuse the vodka: Bruise three big sprigs of fresh rosemary and five or six fresh sage leaves by rolling them between your fingers. Place them in a Mason jar with 12 ounces of vodka (which doesn’t need to be an expensive brand). Allow it to steep overnight, then strain out the herbs. Put 2 ounces of the infused vodka into an ice-filled shaker along with the maple syrup, lemon juice and cayenne. Shake well and strain into a stemmed cocktail glass, or pour over one large piece of ice into a rocks glass.

THE PEPPERY DOG

THE BEACH BUM

THE SOUTHEAST SLUSH

More fun than a Salty Dog. (You dog, you.) And hey, Tito’s is expensive but worth it — but don’t let me dictate your buying habits. Just don’t use total swill. 2 ounces Tito’s Handmade Vodka 3 ounces fresh red grapefruit juice 1 ounce black pepper syrup First, the syrup: Take 4 ounces of whole black peppercorns and crack half of them with the blade or butt end of a heavy chef ’s knife. Add those and the remaining whole peppercorns to 3 cups of water in a medium saucepan, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a lively simmer and reduce the liquid by half; heat about 20 or 30 minutes. Remove pan from burner, allow it to cool to room temperature, then strain out the solids. You should have about a cup and a half of pepper-infused water. Pour the liquid back into saucepan, bring it back to a boil, add sugar and stir to dissolve, then remove from heat. When 16 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

Maybe you don’t want to bother with all of these syrups and infusions and blenders and such. There’s no shame in it; lazy bastards gotta drink, too. This is a solution to beach drinking that’s a step above a warm tallboy. (Hey, lazy doesn’t always equal bad taste.) Empty 1-liter bottle Double handful of frozen raspberries 3 shots of Campari 3 shots of gin (I like Hendricks) 2 cans of San Pellegrino blood orange soda, chilled Drop the frozen berries into the bottle, then use a funnel to pour in the booze. Carefully top off with the soda (don’t let it fizz up); leave some headroom, and cap. By the time you get to the beach, your drink will be mixed and chilled. Jessica Bryce Young mail@folioweekly.com

ZESTY INDIA (BAYMEADOWS) Mango Lassi The composition of this popular not-quite-milkshake-butthicker-than-milk beverage closely resembles the texture of a lighter smoothie. Originating in South Asia, it’s a silky blend of yogurt, milk and mango that’s topped with a dash of ground cardamom. Lassis often have a hint of saltiness that offsets the sweetness. If you don’t care for mango, Zesty offers a strawberry variety that should do the trick.

PULP (SAN MARCO, AVONDALE) A-Lot-A-Colada Smoothie Sometimes you just want a tropical drink with an umbrella in it, but alas, you’re stuck at work. Opt for this luscious concoction – a mix of sweet pineapple chunks, refreshing coconut water, pineapple sorbet and shredded coconut. This tropicalesque smoothie can easily take the place of lunch or be a midday treat. And that’s almost as good as sipping it while chillaxing on the beach. Almost.

DREAMETTE (MURRAY HILL, MANDARIN) Dipped Ice Cream Cone I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream – all the time, but especially in summer. Select your soft-serve flavor base – vanilla, chocolate or strawberry – which is then twirled into a handheld cake cone then promptly dipped upside down into the coating of your choice. Butterscotch, toasted coconut, cherry and cake batter are a few of your options. Whatever you fi anlly decide to pick, don’t forget to request the complementary drip guard or you may be wearing your cool concoction. Caron Streibich mail@folioweekly.com


THE PERFECT BACKYARD BBQ We hit up a grilling expert on the secrets to success

T

lhere’s nothing that says summer quite like a backyard barbecue, lounging in the shade with your family and friends, downing a few cold ones or some lemonade, listening to music, letting the aroma of grilled meats wash over you. As easygoing as all that sounds, barbecues are also easy to screw up (trust us). So we went to an expert — Keith Monroe Waller, owner of Monroe’s Smokehouse Bar-B-Q — for an insider’s guide to ’cue success. Folio Weekly: Describe your version of the perfect summer backyard barbecue. Keith Waller: The grill is loaded with marinated chicken breasts, big juicy burgers and a variety of summer sausage links — served with chilled potato salad, coleslaw and baked beans. A great backyard barbecue should consist of lots of “framily” gathered with ice-cold beverages. Should you sauce while the meat’s on the grill? BBQ sauce should only be applied at the end of the grilling process since sugar burns when reaching temperatures of 265 degrees or more. Sauce is always a hotly debated topic. Do you recommend having a variety on the table? Everyone has a favorite type of barbecue sauce. To keep it simple, I recommend a sweet or mild tomato-based sauce and a mild mustard-based sauce. For a good Kansas City-style barbecue sauce, I recommend

Keith Waller Photo by Dennis Ho

Sweet Baby Ray’s, and for a vinegar-based sauce, Stubb’s BBQ. If you like sweet with a little heat, come by Monroe’s and grab a bottle of Monroe Sauce. For the novice, what’s an easy dry rub to concoct at home? A mix of paprika, salt, pepper, granulated garlic, granulated onion, brown sugar, cumin and cayenne pepper. Do you recommend wood-smoked,

internal temp of 170 degrees, or until you can gas or charcoal? turn the end of the leg without resistance. Most barbecue purists would tell you only When the meat is ready to take off the hardwood will impart a deep smoky flavor. If you own a gas-fired or electric smoker, you will smoker, do you let it rest and wrap it in foil, or does how and when you cut into the meat need to burn wood to achieve a smoky flavor. depend on what you’re actually smoking? If you are considering a smoker purchase, get Once chicken has been removed from one that burns charcoal or wood. You want to the smoker, it may be cut into quarters or cut make sure not to use green [freshly cut] wood, eight ways. If using a bone-in pork butt, you as it will produce a foul-tasting creosote in will know if the pork [is cooked] correctly your smoker. Oak, pecan, cherry and apple are if the bone slides freely from the pork and great all-purpose smoking woods. is ready to pull. You may use a pair of large Talk about temperatures. forks to pull the pork apart when it’s hot. After A digital thermometer is a must to check smoking beef brisket, the meat’s internal you should let it rest temperature. For MONROE’S SMOKEHOUSE BAR-B-Q to allow the juices to smaller cuts (pork 10771 Beach Blvd., Southside, 996-7900 draw in and then slice loin and pork butts), 4838 Highway Ave., Westside, 389-5551 or chop, depending on you can pull the monroessmokehousebbq.com meat when at the your preference. desired temperature What sides pair well in the center without with which particular touching the bone. For larger cuts like brisket types of barbecue? or beef roast, you may pull at 5 degrees less Baked beans and coleslaw work well with than the desired temp, because the outside most smoked meats. Potato, pasta and macaroni layers will continue to transfer heat to the salads are great chilled salads to serve. If center. Allow it to rest for about 15 minutes to you’re looking for hot sides, mac and cheese, collards and sweet potato soufflé are excellent draw in the juices. choices. I like to pair smoked chicken wings For pulled pork, you want to get an with pulled pork and beef brisket. Wings are internal temp of 200 degrees, and the bone quicker to smoke and they’re easier to eat than should pull without resistance from the pork. a quartered chicken. Slow-smoked pulled pork For beef brisket, it is best to get the internal is always a favorite, but for those who don’t eat temp around 175 degrees and then wrap it in pork, you can’t beat a well-cooked brisket. foil and finish until 195 degrees. This will give you a good smoked brisket without it drying Caron Streibich out. For chicken, you will need to get an mail@folioweekly.com

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 17


SUMMER SPECIAL

$199

8GetGREAT SUMMER WATERING HOLES a cold drink. Take in the scenery. Relax.

REG.

$399

Mu st m e n t i o n t h i s a d .

LEARN TO DIVE EVERY WEEKEND & GET FULL SCUBA CERTIFIED FOR LIFE!

WEEKEND SCUBA CAMP

Photos by Dennis Ho

AZUREA

1 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-7402 Feeling fancy? Stop into Azurea at One Ocean Resort & Spa in Atlantic Beach. The upscale lounge, located off the hotel’s main dining room, offers handcrafted cocktails served with quite a view. It’s a four-star hotel, so the drinks aren’t cheap (most cocktails will run you about $12), but they’re well worth their price tag, and it’s one of the few places at the beach for a quiet drink oceanside without the riff-raff. During the week, the patrons are mainly hotel guests, but the place fills up with local hopefuls on the weekends, with guys in their finest pastel Polos and boat shoes, and overly bronzed ladies looking to meet their next hedge-fund hubby.

LEMON BAR

120 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 246-2175 The Lemon Bar’s ocean view and laid-back attitude draw droves of locals to its Neptune Beach digs. The bar’s patio extends right to the beach, so you can order a drink with your toes in the sand. Attached to the Seahorse Oceanfront Inn, the bar is right next to the hotel pool and serves up signature frozen cocktails and bar bites. Due to its popularity with beach bums and townies alike, it’s often standing room only, and parking’s limited. If you’re close by, we recommend you pedal your beach cruiser right up to the entrance and park it.

CLARK’S FISH CAMP

12903 Hood Landing Road, Mandarin, 268-3474 Roger Ailes’ propaganda machine finally got something right when Fox News highlighted Clark’s as one of the top five reasons to visit Jacksonville in 2010, and not much has changed at this local restaurant and “largest private taxidermy museum” since then — or even since its opening 30 years ago. Located on Julington Creek in Mandarin, this unique (and utterly bizarre) eatery offers waterfront dining with a large menu of seafood, old-fashioned Florida favorites like frog legs and gator tail, and “call of the wild” options like kangaroo, ostrich and snake. Don’t enjoy your strange cut of meat? Tough. The menu clearly warns diners that there are no refunds or exchanges 18 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

just because the fare is not to their liking. The drinks at Clark’s are no standard fare, either. The signature “Swamp Water” cocktail looks like it sounds, but tastes better and can catch you off guard with its liberal helping of liquor. A few of those in you and you might not feel as strange about eating in the company of hundreds of real stuffed animals. Or you might just want to stick to the restaurant’s large deck right on the creek.

CAP’S ON THE WATER

4325 Myrtle St., St. Augustine, 824-8794 Cap’s is a large, fine-dining restaurant with a casual feel. We came for the full bar, but there’s also an extensive wine list. So extensive, in fact, that the bartender offered us a digital version, which is updated regularly on restaurantprovided iPads. Some wines are offered by the glass, but for a special date night, you can purchase a bottle for upward of $600 (which is, of course, more than the iPad). There’s an indoor bar and several dining rooms, but when the sun is shining, the tables and bar off the wooden deck fill up with locals and vacationers lucky enough to stumble upon this tucked-away gem. Watch the sunset in comfort under expansive old oaks that cover the entire property, growing up under the water and through the restaurant.

BEACHES AT VILANO

254 Vilano Road, Vilano Beach, 829-0589 Vilano Beach is a strange place. Driving onto the little island from St. Augustine feels like traveling back in time to Miami circa 1965. Most buildings are done in the art deco style, painted in bright tropical blues and pinks. Locals call the area “the best kept secret in Florida” because of its sparsely populated beaches and quiet, small-town charm. Most of the people we met hadn’t left the island in years — and it immediately became obvious why when we arrived at Beaches. This Caribbeanthemed seafood restaurant is located directly on the Intracoastal Waterway, and claims to be the only place in the area where you can dine with your toes in the sand. Though the practice might be discouraged, it’s the only place we found where you can order a drink from the outside bar, walk a few steps onto the sand and right into the ocean. Pure paradise.


Lemon Bar

PETE’S BAR

117 First St., Neptune Beach, 249-9158 After the restaurants and waterfront bars shut down, stop into Pete’s for a late night drink in some ice-cold AC. By far the oldest bar in the area, Pete’s has become legendary among locals, keeping the same name and family ownership since 1933. It’s got a comfortable dive bar vibe with pool tables, darts and ping pong, and is the place to go if you want a beer or a stiff drink instead of a fruity frozen cocktail. Try to order a margarita, and even the bartender will tell you, “It’s not very good here.” It’s also probably the only place at the beaches where you’ll hear country music more often than reggae blaring from the juke box speakers.

BO’S CORAL REEF

201 Fifth Ave. N., Jax Beach, 246-9874 Feel like catching a drag show on your way back home from the beach? Bo’s hosts one nearly every night of the week, and offers club-goers a large dance floor and killer DJs to help you sweat out some toxins before driving back into town. The bartenders are superfriendly and keep the entertainment going between shows. If you feel like taking a break from the crowd, you can enjoy a game of pool in the back room or lounge on the tree-covered outside patio.

MANGO’S BEACH BAR & GRILLE

602 First St. N., Jax Beach, 246-4200 Mango’s is a decidedly divey biker bar right off First Street in the heart of downtown Jax Beach. On weekdays, the crowd skews older, mostly burly guys in trucker hats and leathery old ladies worn down by years in the sun. On the weekends, the younger beach-goers come out for karaoke and cheaper drinks than what’s served at nearby clubs. It’s also one of the last holdouts in the war against indoor smoking, so be warned that busy nights can be rough on a non-smoker’s beautifully pink lungs. Janet Harper mail@folioweekly.com MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 19


6 OFF-THE-RADAR (AND NOT FROTHY) BEACH READS Broaden your mind while tanning your body

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ound a beach umbrella into a choice stretch of sand. Unfold a chaise lounge, spread a towel across and stretch out across the length. Have cold drinks close by. Breathe in and soak in the scene. Smell the sand. Smell the salt air. Hear the squawking of seagulls. Watch the waves roll toward you, crest, break and fan over the shoreline followed by flocks of sanderlings pecking at goodies in the sand when the wave recedes. Look out, far out across the expanse of ocean to where water and sky touch in the far distance. Then open a book. A good read dilates a moment, takes you deeper into your senses. Read a couple of pages and look up. Allow a quiet rumination to furl your mind. You don’t have anywhere to be. Read a chapter. Take a walk. Read some more. Float. This is what the right summer beach read offers. Forget frothy. Go deep. Or go Florida. Listen to the way great writers describe her swamps and her springs and her oddities. Delicious summer repast.

MAGIC

100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

This is the summer to read or re-read this masterpiece of magical realism by the Nobel Prizewinning novelist and journalist who died on April 18. Márquez gives flesh to flights of fancy with the sensuous use of detail. A girl so beautiful she must cover her face with a shawl when she goes to mass is lifted from the earth with sheets fluttering, waving goodbye as a gust of wind carries her into the air.

INSPIRATION

The Collected Poems of Federico García Lorca

Spain’s most beloved poet reads modernist and fresh as the color green or a lucent drop of water. Check out this verse from “Ditty of Desire”: “(Soul, turn orange-colored. Soul, turn the color of love.) In the vivid morning I wanted to be myself. A heart. And at the evening’s end I wanted to be my voice. A nightingale.”

GRAPHIC NOVEL

Cruddy by Lynda Barry

“Once upon a cruddy time on a cruddy street on the side of a cruddy hill in the cruddiest part of a crudded-out town in a cruddy state, country, world, solar system, universe … the Cruddy girl named Roberta was writing the cruddy book of her cruddy life and the name of the book was called Cruddy.” (It’s the story of a father/daughter cross-country murder spree.)

FLORIDA

Fringe Florida: Travels among Mud Boggers, Furries, Ufologists, Nudists and Other Lovers of Unconventional Lifestyles by Lynn Waddell

Don’t assume this book is a freak show. The St. Pete-based Waddell is a reporter’s reporter, with a sharp eye and the desire to delve deep, as well as a respect for the people she writes about. She notices, for instance, that at the Holy Land Experience in Orlando, where actors re-enact scenes from the Bible, it seems a blow-up doll was outfitted with a long brown wig to represent the Virgin Mary in the manger scene. She also writes chapters on Tampa’s all-nude strip club king Joe Redner, hard-ass all-women motorcycle clubs and fetishists who dress up like ponies. It’s probably the only book ever published by University Press of Florida that comes with a content warning.

Alligators in B Flat: Improbable Tales from Real Florida by Jeff Klinkenberg

Tampa Bay Times feature writer Klinkenberg has the best job in journalism. He roams the state and writes about its people, its food, its culture and anything else in Florida that strikes his fancy. In this collection, he writes about rabble-rouser, Klan-infiltrator and folklorist Stetson Kennedy; burlesque queen and B-movie star Chesty Morgan, she of the 73-inch bust; and a trip to the Fakahatchee Strand to see a ghost orchid in bloom, as well as many other fascinating things.

Citrus County by John Brandon

It’s is a crime novel and love story set in a hot, emotionally rotting Florida community where a kid on the eighth-grade track team is a sociopath and teen romance goes really wrong and then right. Brandon inverts the genre of the crime novel to his own unpredictable ends. It starts: “There shouldn’t be a Citrus County. Teenage romance should be difficult, but not this difficult. Boys like Toby should cause trouble but not this much.” Susan Cooper Eastman seastman@folioweekly.com 20 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

DROP IT LIKE IT’S HOT 12 early-summer records you totally want to cop HUNDRED WATERS The Moon Rang Like a Bell (May 27, OWSLA)

The Gainesvilleborn avant-gardists sharpen the ethereal focus of their meditative electro-pop on this hotly anticipated second album.

SEUN KUTI & EGYPT 80 A Long Way to the Beginning (May 27, Knitting Factory)

Seun, the son of Afrobeat legend Fela Kuti, taps Dad’s band and guest rappers like M-1 of Dead Prez to craft a socially conscious assault.

SHARON VAN ETTEN

OBN IIIS

Are We There

(May 27, Tic Tac Totally)

(May 27, Jagjaguwar)

The Brooklyn singer-songwriter cuts far closer to the bone than most folkies – and, on this self-produced album, burrows even deeper toward stark, intimate truths.

Third Time to Harm The cover of these Austin garagepunks’ third album says it all: three raised middle fingers that embody the menacing rage of their Stooges-like stomp.

YONATAN GAT

THE DONKEYS

Iberian Passage

Ride the Black

(May 27, Joyful Noise)

(June 3, Easy Sound)

Gat, an Israeli guitarist, spent years shredding in the shadow of his hell-raising Monotonix bandmates, but he’s got his own game now.

Nobody does charmingly lackadaisical country-rock filtered through a gloomy Pacific Northwest lens better.

PARQUET COURTS

FUCKED UP

Sunbathing Animal

(June 3, Matador/Arts & Crafts)

(June 3, What’s Your Rupture/Mom + Pop)

These buzzy, nervy prog-punks have built up a huge head of sophomore-album steam thanks to an alwaysscathing, occasionally snotty, hyper-intelligent approach.

Glass Boys The Canadian hardcore kingpins kick out some of the fiercest and most abrasive jams on the planet; their righteous politics, far-ranging album concepts and life-affirming live shows only add to that throat-shredding luster.

DUB THOMPSON

THE FRESH & ONLYS

9 Songs

House of Spirits

(June 10, Dead Oceans)

(June 10, Mexican Summer)

Fractured, discombobulating noise rock built on industrialized electronic samples and twisted psychedelia – it’s hard to believe this self-assured statement is the LA’s band’s debut.

These prodigious Bay Area rockers do it all – Krautrock, Baroque pop, country jangle, surfy shoegaze – on their knotty, hit-stuffed fifth full-length.

BLACK BANANAS

FIRST AID KIT

Electric Brick Wall

(June 10, Columbia)

(June 24, Drag City)

Ask Folio Weekly contributor Daniel A. Brown about his former Royal Trux bandmate Jennifer Herrema and you’ll get one answer: She rocks. Herrema’s second album as Black Bananas mixes electronic bounce with the trashed-rawk that made her famous.

Stay Gold The Swedish sisters follow up their 2012 smash The Lion’s Roar (and recently singing backup on Conor Oberst’s new record) with more heavenly harmonies and spot-on approximations of ghostly Americana. Nick McGregor mail@folioweekly.com


POOL PARTY PLAYLIST

10 CAN’T-MISS SUMMER CONCERTS

Because no pool party is complete without one

Seriously. Don’t miss these shows

S

Andrew Jackson Jihad

1. ANDREW JACKSON JIHAD and CHEAP GIRLS, JUNE 5, JACK RABBITS

Severely underrated Phoenix duo Andrew Jackson Jihad specializes in a gritty, gratifying folk-punk approach that’s on excellent display on their new album Christmas Island, recorded with punk production icon John Congleton. They play with Cheap Girls, who breathe new life into heartland rock.

2. MY LIFE WITH THE THRILL KILL KULT, JUNE 10, UNDERBELLY

These industrial rock pioneers came up alongside fellow genre progenitors Ministry and KMFDM, yet they’ve never shied away from experimentation or controversy, skewing toward sultry disco, sleazy house and spooky go-go spiked with shocking, sexed-up vivacity.

3. FOXY SHAZAM and LARRY & HIS FLASK, JUNE 13, FREEBIRD LIVE

Cincinnati band Foxy Shazam lives up to its ab-fab name with rhinestone-studded glam rock and over-the-top onstage theatricality. Don’t miss opener Larry & His Flask, who will thrash through punked-up bluegrass.

4. THE ROUGH & TUMBLE, JUNE 17, BURRO BAR

Nashville duo Scott Tyler and Mallory Graham seem sweeter than cherry pie — in 2013, they released two songs per month as part of a “Holiday Awareness Campaign.” Their heartfelt, harmonious take on slightly askew Americana strikes just the right balance between precious and profound.

5. DAVID DONDERO, JUNE 28, SHANGHAI NOBBY’S

This nomadic troubadour swings through Northeast Florida nearly every year, yet his roadweary, emotionally resonant narratives never get old. Dondero himself hates the honor, but don’t pass up the chance to get intimate with a man named as one of NPR’s 10 Best Living Songwriters.

6. THE DUVAL LUAU with GUANTANAMO BAYWATCH and WET NURSE, JULY 5,

UNDERBELLY Replace your red, white and blue with thrashed grass skirts and ironic Hawaiian shirts to celebrate ’Murica with campy Portland surf-rock lunatics Guantanamo Baywatch and sugary Orlando garage-poppers Wet Nurse.

7. RAY LAMONTAGNE and JENNY LEWIS, JULY 15, THE FLORIDA THEATRE

The most high-profile show on this list should also deliver the most diverse night of entertainment: LaMontagne’s coarse-grained soul has matured into a heady mix of psychedelia and R&B, while the heavenly voice of former-child-TV-star-turned-folk-chanteuse Jenny Lewis is a guaranteed crowd-pleaser.

8. JEREMY MESSERSMITH, JULY 18, JACK RABBITS

Elegant voice, sophisticated production, heart-on-sleeve songwriting — consider this Minnesotan the crown prince of baroque pop, or the “Pied Piper of Wuss Rock,” as Messersmith calls himself.

9. ELLIS PAUL, AUG. 8, THE ORIGINAL CAFÉ ELEVEN

If we’re talking music royalty, Ellis Paul is the undisputed king of hyper-literate, Boston-style folk music, which pays equal homage to the genre’s storied past and its progressive present. Very few have done more to advance it into the future.

10. CONNECTION FESTIVAL with KERMIT RUFFINS & THE BBQ SWINGERS, TREME BRASS BAND, LESS THAN JAKE, SURFER BLOOD, WHOLE WHEAT BREAD, ORQUESTRA EL MACABEO, LA QUILOMBERA and more, SEPT. 12-14,

DOWNTOWN JACKSONVILLE This Downtown festival might fall after the unofficial end of summer on Labor Day. But putting together a tasty blend of New Orleans traditionalists, Florida punks and Puerto Rican salsa savants should give off plenty of September heat.

cientific studies show that great parties are enhanced by great music. And if you’re talking wet, hot Northeast Florida pool parties, well, the perfect mix of upbeat partystarters, laid-back grooves and fist-pumping classics can elevate a good time to an ultimate summer blowout that will stand the test of time. We approve the following 50 songs as the finest to ever soundtrack a chlorinated bacchanal — now, everyone in the pool! Vampire Weekend, “Horchata” The Love Language, “Heart to Tell” tUnE-yArDs, “Water Fountain” Secret Cities, “Love Crime” Future Islands, “Long Flight” My Morning Jacket, “Off the Record” Ween, “Voodoo Lady” Jacuzzi Boys, “Glazin’” The Black Keys, “Countdown” The Drums, “Down by the Water” Phoenix, “Listzomania” The Strokes, “Last Night” Little Joy, “Brand New Start” Shannon & the Clams, “Hey Willy” Outkast, “Hey Ya!” Cotton Jones, “Some Strange Rain” Spoon, “I Turn My Camera On” Ferraby Lionheart, “Before We’re Dead” De La Soul, “Dinninit” Black Lips, “Bad Kids” Man Man, “Sparks” Fleet Foxes, “Ragged Wood” Girl Talk, “Play Your Part (Pt. 1)” The Kinks, “Sunny Afternoon” Toro Y Moi, “Low Shoulder” Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeroes, “Home” Generationals, “Spinoza” Gospel Music, “Automobile” Caribou, “Odessa” Pixies, “Where Is My Mind” Kings of Leon, “Happy Alone” Manu Chao, “La Despedida” Dum Dum Girls, “Bedroom Eyes” These United States, “Honor Amongst Thieves” Action Bronson & Party Supplies, “Twin Peugeots” T. Rex, “Mambo Sun” The Flaming Lips, “Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots Pt. 1” The Beach Boys, “I Get Around” Gnarls Barkley, “Gone Daddy Gone” The Dutchess & The Duke, “Reservoir Park” The Darkness, “I Believe in a Thing Called Love” The Growlers, “What It Is” Icy Demons, “Miami Ice” Cayucas, “Cayucos” Natural Child, “Country Hippie Blues” A Tribe Called Quest, “Jam” The Rolling Stones, “She Smiled Sweetly” The White Stripes, “My Doorbell” Father John Misty, “I’m Writing a Novel” LCD Soundsystem, “All My Friends” Nick McGregor

Nick McGregor mail@folioweekly.com MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 21


Ca len d a r o f Even t s PHOTOS BY DENNIS HO

LISTINGS COMPILED BY AMANDA LONG ,TRAVIS CRAWFORD AND DAVID JOHNSON

ONGOING BAY AT THE MOON

Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre presents hometown success story Ian Mairs, in town to direct his play about the ties that bind siblings and the boundaries set to maintain sanity, through May 25 (8 p.m. Thur.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun.) at Adele Grage Cultural Center, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, $15, 249-7177, abettheatre.com.

SEX AFTER DEATH, INTERPRETATIONS OF EROTICA

Two collections of original work by John Pacovsky are on display through June 20. Exhibits are erotic in nature, patrons must be at least 18 years old for entry at Absolute Americana Art Gallery, 77 Bridge St., St. Augustine, 824-5545, absoluteamericana.com.

STEAMSHIP MAPLE LEAF, 150th ANNIVERSARY EXHIBIT

Rare Civil War artifacts are on display through December; open from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., Mandarin Museum, Walter Jones Historical Park, 11964 Mandarin Rd., free, 268-0784, mandarinmuseum.net.

NATURE & WILDLIFE EXHIBIT

First Wednesday Art Walk, the free, self-guided tour held on the first Wednesday of every month, spans more than 15 blocks in Downtown Jacksonville, including more than 40 galleries, museums, cultural venues, restaurants, bars and businesses, plus dozens of artists in Hemming Plaza, street performers and live music.

Works in any medium that celebrate the beauty of the natural world are eligible — wilderness and landscape images, birds, marine life and the diversity of creatures in the great outdoors — for the fifth annual exhibition, held July 26-Aug. 31 at St. Augustine Art Association. Submit up to three images online by June 2; $45, 824-2310, staaa.org.

FUN ON THE FARM

The Florida Agricultural Museum presents a family farm experience, featuring hiking trails, guided tours, horseback riding and more, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Sun., all summer long at 7900 Old Kings Rd., Palm Coast, $9 for adults, $7 for kids 6-12, free for ages 5 and younger, 386-446-7630, myagmuseum.com.

FRENCH IN FLORIDA GALLERY

Digital reproductions of engravings of 16th-century Florida, chronicling France’s attempt to establish a settlement in Florida and the experiences with the Timucua Indians, on display through July 6 at the Museum of Science & History, 1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, 396-6674, themosh.org.

TRIVIA NIGHTS

European Street Café hosts trivia nights at 5500 Beach Blvd., Southside, 398-1717, and at 992 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach, 249-3001, call for details, europeanstreet.com.

UNCOVERING THE PAST: NEW ARCHAEOLOGICAL DISCOVERIES OF NORTHEAST FLORIDA

Native American life before and after European contact in the St. Marys region through artifacts never before seen by the public, displayed through August, at the Museum of Science & History, 1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, 396-6674, themosh.org.

JURIED MEMBER PHOTGRAPHY SHOW

St. Augustine Camera Club’s third annual Juried Member Photography Show is on display through July 24 at St. Johns County Administrative Building’s Rotunda Gallery, 500 Sebastian View, St. Augustine.

LILY KUONEN PLAYNTINGS

An exhibit of paintings by Kuonen is on display through June 20 at Flagler College’s Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, 74 King St., St. Augustine, 829-6481, flagler.edu. 22 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

EX LIBRIS

This exhibit features works by Cara Barer, Doug Beube, Long-Bin Chen, Brian Dettmer, Jessica Drenk, Andrew Hayes, Alexander Korzer-Robinson, Guy Laramee and Francesca Pastine. On display through June 13, it includes pieces made by carving, cutting, folding and assembling books, encyclopedias and other bound literature journals, at J. Johnson Gallery, 177 Fourth Ave. N., Jax Beach, 435-3200.

STREET SERIES & STREET CORNERS

Jacksonville native Keith Doles’ work is on display through June 29 at Haskell Gallery at JAX Airport, located pre-security in the central courtyard, 14201 Pecan Park Rd., Northside, 741-3546, jiaarts.org.

GUIDED WALKING TOURS

In partnership with the Florida State Park Service, EcoMotion Tours provides tours of Kingsley Plantation. Meet at the plantation, Fort George Island State Park, 11676 Palmetto Ave., off A1A and Heckscher Drive. For reservations, call 251-9477, ecomotiontours.com.

TEMARI

Dorian Eng’s exhibit of geometric artwork continues through June 29 in the Connector Bridges Cases at JAX Airport, located pre-security, 14201 Pecan Park Rd., Northside, 741-3546, jiaarts.org.

MINIATURE MARKS

Nearly 100 pieces of art in varied styles and media, none of which is larger than 12 inches, are displayed through June 1 at St. Augustine Arts Association, 22 Marine St., free, 824-2310, staaa.org.

FLYING FISH JET SKI TOURS

Flying Fish Adventures offers one-hour, two-hour or three-hour tours on jet skis, starting at 1 S. Front St., Fernandina Beach. Call for fees and details, 583-3420, flyingfishfun.com.

ECLECTIC COFFEE SPOTS IN PUGET SOUND Marsha Glaziere’s paintings and photographs of the Great Northwest are on display through July 5 in the Concourse Cases at JAX Airport, located post-security, 14201 Pecan Park Rd., Northside, 741-3546, jiaarts.org.

JACKSONVILLE LIFE: THINGS THAT MADE OUR CITY GREAT

Artwork is on display 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon.-Thur. through July 8 at The Art Center Premier Gallery, 50 N. Laura St., Downtown, tacjacksonville.org.

ECO-SHRIMPING TOURS

Amelia River Cruises offers daily tours to several locations at 10:30 a.m. throughout the summer at 1 N. Front St., Fernandina Beach, prices vary per tour, 261-9972, ameliarivercruises.com.

FLORIDA ARTISTS GROUP JURIED EXHIBITION

A fine arts exhibition of works by members of the FLAG organization remain on display through June 1 at St. Augustine Arts Association, 22 Marine St., free, 824-2310, staaa.org.

KAYAK AMELIA

Guided kayak nature tours, Segway tours, bike ecotours, specialty tours or SUP paddles are held daily, leaving from various locations; pricing varies per activity. Kayak Amelia also offers rentals, yoga and SUP, paddling instruction, overnight kayak trips, team building activities and kids summer camp. Open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily at 13030 Heckscher Dr., Jacksonville, 251-0016, kayakamelia.com.

MAY 21 SOCIAL SECURITY

Alhambra Theatre & Dining brings to the stage

Barbara Eden, the star of I Dream of Jeannie, in this musical comedy, 6 p.m. May 21-25, 27-31, June 3-8; 11 a.m. May 24, 29 and 31, and June 7; noon May 25, June 1 and June 8 at 12000 Beach Blvd., Southside, $47-$55, 641-1212, alhambrajax.com.

ACTEEN STAGE LAB

Kids in grades 6-12 learn street style and ambush theater at 6:30 p.m. today and every Wed., Limelight Theatre, 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine, $80 per session, 825-1164, limelight-theatre.org.

JACKSONVILLE SUNS

The Suns, our hometown Southern League baseball team, hits the diamond against the Jackson Generals at 7:05 p.m. tonight (Baseball Bingo, Nassau County Night), on May 22 (Thursday Night Throwdown, Nurses Night), May 23 (Blood Drive, Fireworks), May 24 (Marcell Ozuna Yellow Replica Jersey Giveaway) and on May 25 (Navy Camo Jersey Auction, Fireworks). Then we’re up against the Montgomery Biscuits (best team name ever) at 4:05 p.m. on May 26 (Kids Run the Bases, Military Appreciation Night, Quebec Bar Trio), 7:05 p.m. on May 27 (Folio Weekly 50-cent Family Feast), 1:05 p.m. May 28 (Businessperson’s Special), and 7:05 p.m. May 29 (Thursday Night Throwdown) and May 30 (Dale Murphy Appearance, Scout Night, Fireworks) at Bragan Field, Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, tickets range from $7.50-$22.50, 358-2846, jaxsuns.com.

MUSIC BY THE SEA

Live music by Motown group The Sam Rodriguez Project, with dinner available from Amici Italian Restaurant, 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.


For questions, please call your advertising representative at 260-9

PROMISE OF BENEFIT

STAGES & STEREOS, DARLING PARADE, THE ORPHAN THE POET

SEAHAVEN, ADVENTURES, FOXING, LOCALS

Tallahassee natives bring pop-punk to Jack Rabbits on the Live Free Die Young Tour at 7 p.m., 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

Bluesy California rock band headlines tour to promote its new album Reverie Lagoon: Music For Escapism Only, 7 p.m. at Underbelly, 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, $12, 353-6067, underbellylive.com.

DALE CRIDER, DEL SUGGS, BOB PATTERSON

LET FREEDOM RING

Florida Folk Festival Kickoff concert features Crider celebrating his 50th year of performing folk at 7:30 p.m. at Mudville Music Room, 3104 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, $10, 352-7008, raylewispresents.com.

MUSIC @ MAIN

The acclaimed Ritz Chamber Players perform their last concert of the 2013-’14 season at 7:30 p.m. at Main Library’s Hicks Auditorium, 303 Laura St. N., Downtown, free with reservation, 630-2665, jplmusic.blogspot.com.

FOLIO WEEKLY’S DEEP UNDERGROUND

The unofficial, unauthorized Pre-Jazz Fest Throwdown featuring some of the best local free jazz, improv and avant garde combos around with Fractal, Audio Awakening and Jamison Williams, 8 p.m. at 1904 Music Hall, 19 N. Ocean St., Downtown, free, 1904musichall.com.

MAY 22 FREE ADMISSION THURSDAY & TOURS

Bank of America sponsors free admission to the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, 5-9 p.m. today and every Thur. during The New York Times Magazine Photographs exhibition through Aug. 21. Join MOCA educators any Thur. at 7 p.m. for a 45-minute tour of the exhibition, sponsored by Jessie Ball duPont Fund. Celebrity portraits, wartime reportage, fashion portfolios, studies of Olympic athletes in motion, 9/11 coverage and much more are featured at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

BACKDOOR FORMALISM

Recently named a fellow in the 2013-’14 Working Artist Project at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia, Scott Ingram exhibits a survey collection of drawings and objects, today through Aug. 24. Reception is held 6 p.m. at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, free, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

RYAN RUMMEL & DIOGENES

Enigmatic mixed-media art pieces with approximately 20 pieces per artist are on display through July 3. The exhibit’s opening reception begins at 6 p.m. at Florida Mining Gallery, 5300 Shad Rd., Southside, 425-2845, floridamininggallery.com.

JACKSONVILLE JAZZ PIANO COMPETITION

The Jacksonville Jazz Festival kicks off with five finalists competing for an award, a cash prize and a guaranteed performance during this year’s festival, 7 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, $10, 355-5661.

A Jacksonville Symphony concert celebrating Americana in honor of our county, including Sousa’s “Stars and Stripes Forever,” Gershwin’s “An American in Paris” and “Armed Forces Salute” is performed 7 p.m. at First Street Baptist Church, 1600 S. Eighth St., Fernandina Beach, $15, 261-0105, jaxsymphony.org.

CRANFORD HOLLOW

The four-piece Southern rock band takes the stage at Jack Rabbits, playing songs from its self-titled EP, 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

HUGGY LOWDOWN & CHRIS PAUL

SUPPORT

PALATKA BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL

The 26th annual event features arts and crafts booths, food — and plenty of blue crabs! — and carnival rides. Scheduled live music by Jeff Coffey, Amy Dalley & the Experience, Highway to Hell (AC/DC tribute), Blistur, Fat Cactus, Emma Moseley, The Red River Band, Eric Lee Beddingfield, Big Engine, Mindwalk, Bridget Kelly Band, Toots Lorraine & the Traffic, Tyler Mac, Biscuit Miller and Those Guys. The Fest runs 5 p.m.-mid. today and 10 a.m.-mid. on May 24, 25 and 26 at 210 St. Johns Ave., Palatka, free admission, 386-325-4406.

LEFTOVER SALMON, CANARY IN THE COALMINE, YANKEE SLICKERS

ANTIQUE ANIMALS

JERSEY

MAY 23

NORTHE, SUNSPOTS, HARAKIRI, MATTEO QUMENTO

JACKSONVILLE JAZZ FEST

The festival begins at 5 p.m. today with music by Doc Handy, Bobby Caldwell with Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, Boney James, Airmen of Note, Ester Rada, The Pedrito Martinez Group with Ariacne Trujillo, Just Jazz Quartet, Von Barlow’s Jazz Journey with the Dream Band, Jazz Jam with Lisa Kelly at the Swingin’ Stage at Bay and Marsh Streets, the Groovin’ Stage at Bay and Newnan Streets and the Breezin’ Stage at The Jacksonville Landing.

DOWNTOWN FRIDAY MARKET

Arts and crafts and local produce are offered 10 a.m.-2 p.m. every Fri. at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Dr., Downtown, 353-1188.

MOONLIGHT MOVIES

The 13th annual free Moonlight Movies series wraps up with family-friendly hit Spider-Man 2 at 9 p.m. at SeaWalk Pavilion, Jax Beach. Bring a lawn chair or blanket and a picnic; popcorn, candy and beverages are available. No alcohol, skateboards, bicycles, glass or animals (except qualified service animals). jacksonvillebeach.org

STYX, FOREIGNER, DON FELDER

Take a trip back to the “Best of Times” and find out what love is all about, 6:30 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

Produced by KL

Murray Hill Theatre hosts a local worship rock group and other ministry-driven acts, 7:30 p.m. at 932 Edgewood Ave. S., Murray Hill, $10, 388-3179, murrayhilltheatre.com.

This comedy duo, heard on the The Tom Joyner Morning Show, is on at 8 p.m. May 22-25 and 10 p.m. May 23 and 24 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, $20-$25, 292-4242, comedyzone.com. The local six-piece alternative pop band performs at Mellow Mushroom, 1018 Third St. N., Jax Beach, free, 241-5600.

ASK FOR ACTION

WORTH ROAD, SUMERLIN, AS WE ARE, RYVLS, 3 KNIGHTS AND A ROSE

Colorado slamgrass pioneers perform at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $20, 246-2473, jaxlive.com. The funnyman performs at 8 p.m. tonight and at 7 and 9:30 p.m. May 24 at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Southside, 365-5555, latthirty.com.

The four-piece indie rock band based in Jacksonville headlines at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JAZZ FEST AFTER DARK

Local bands perform free shows after the Jacksonville Jazz Festival, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Fusebox Funk, Herd of Watts and Groove Coalition at Underbelly; The Heavy Pets, Big Something, Squeedlepuss at 1904 Music Hall; The Wobbly Toms, Guy & The Yehuda, Goliath Flores at Burro Bar, The Dog Apollo, Civil Brute, Jeremiah Johnson at Dive Bar, Arvid Smith, Billy Buchanan at The Volstead, Albert Ayler Commemoration at Karpeles Museum.

MAY 24 ED GAW OPEN WATER CHALLENGE

A 5K or 1-mile swimming event is held at 8 a.m., with a post-race breakfast on the beach at Main Beach, 2801 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, $40 entry fee, active.com.

WORLD WAR II COMMEMORATION

Fort Clinch State Park honors WWII soldiers with a Memorial Day Weekend event, today and tomorrow at 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, admission per vehicle with up to eight people is $6; $2 per single person, 277-7274, floridastateparks.org.

OLD CITY FARMERS MARKET

Produce vendors and arts & crafts artisans set up from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. today and every Sat. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., free admission.

RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

Brent Byrd, Savanna Leigh Bassett, Jordyn Stoddard, local and regional art, food artists and a farmers market are featured, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

BEACH WALK

A park ranger leads a walk on the beach at 2 p.m. from Boardwalk No. 1, north beach area, Little Talbot Island, 11257 Heckscher Dr., Northside, 251-2320, free with regular park admission, floridastateparks.org/littletalbotisland. Consecutive homestands against the Jackson Generals and the Montgomery Biscuits have the Jacksonville Suns playing at the Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville’s Bragan Field nightly, through May 30.

MEGALODON: LARGEST SHARK THAT EVER LIVED

A celebration of the grand opening of the summer exhibit includes a beach-themed party with a Beach Boys Cosmic Concert, hula hoop and limbo contests, shark-themed arts and crafts, and more, 10 a.m-2 p.m. at MOSH, MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 23


1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, $5, 396-6674, themosh.org.

JACKSONVILLE JAZZ FESTIVAL

The festival continues at 2 p.m. today with live music by the Jazz Fest Piano Competition Winner, JU Jazz Combo, Delfeayo Marsalis Quintet, Stooges Brass Band, Al Jarreau, a Youth Talent Showcase, Linda Cole & the Joshua Bowlus Quartet, Marcus Johnson, Average White Band, Akia Uwanda, Unique Sound, The Noel Freidline Quintet, and the Katz Downstairs at the Swingin’ Stage at Bay and Marsh Streets, the Groovin’ Stage at Bay and Newnan Streets and the Breezin’ Stage at The Jacksonville Landing.

PRIMITIVE HARD DRIVE, DIRT MESSIAH, SYLENT VYLENTZ A night of hard rock jams at Jack Rabbits, 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

DALTON STANLEY, JOSH & THE MISFITS

Jacksonville singer/songwriter and rock band perform in this Fringe Café Show, 8 p.m. at Murray Hill Theatre, 932 Edgewood Ave. S., Murray Hill, $5, 388-3179, murrayhilltheatre.com.

JAZZ JAM

Lisa Kelly & the Kelly/Scott Quintet perform in the annual Round Midnight Jam Session, 9 p.m. at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Dr., Downtown, free, 353-1188.

JAZZ FEST AFTER DARK

Local bands perform free shows, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., Moon Hooch, S.P.O.R.E., Lumagrove at Underbelly; Dewars, Four Families, Canary in the Coalmine, This Frontier Needs Heroes at 1904 Musical Hall; Snake Blood Remedy, Cougar Barrel, Beau Crum & the Weighted Hands, Christina Wagner at Burro Bar; The Sh-Booms, Mama Blue, Skelton Bros. at Dive Bar, Goliath Flores at The Volstead, Albert Ayler Commemoration at Karpeles Museum.

MAY 25 THE GREAT AMERICAN CRAFT BEER TOUR

Local, regional and national craft beers accompanied by food and live music, noon-5 p.m. at Ponce De Leon Fountain of Youth Park, 11 Magnolia Ave., St. Augustine, $35, $50 VIP, 615400-9531, greatamericancraftbeertour.com.

JACKSONVILLE JAZZ FESTIVAL

The festival concludes with this day full of music beginning at 1 p.m., Traces of Blue, TIZER with Karen Briggs, Kim Waters, Phil Perry, Maysa, MF Production’s Latin Jazz All Stars, JB Scott’s Swinging Allstars, Joey DeFrancesco Trio, Sex in the City with Marion Meadows and Paul Taylor, the Gary Starling Group with Russell George, Jax Jazz Collective, Tropic of Cancer, at the Swingin’ Stage at Bay and Marsh Streets, the Groovin’ Stage at Bay and Newnan Streets and the Breezin’ Stage at The Jacksonville Landing.

THE ICARUS ACCOUNT, HYDRA MELODY, JOSHUA WICKER, ARBOR PARK

Underbelly welcomes Fort Myers acoustic duo of twin brothers, 4 p.m. at 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, $8-$12, 353-6067, underbellylive.com.

JACKSONVILLE JAZZ FESTIVAL OFF JAZZ CONCERT

R&B artist Musiq Soulchild performs at The Florida Theatre, providing an alternative to the jazz events around town, 7 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, $38.50, 355-2787, floridatheatre.com.

OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW

St. Augustine Amphitheatre comes alive with the sounds of fiddles and banjos with this Nashvillebased Americana act, 7 p.m. at 1340 A1A S., $29.75$39.75, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

LUCINDA WILLIAMS, KENNETH BRIAN BAND

The singer-songwriter blends folk rock with some country twang, 8 p.m. at Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 1050 A1A N., $38, 209-0399, pvconcerthall.com.

BOOTSY COLLINS

Singer-songwriter who’s worked with James Brown, Jimi Hendrix, Snoop Dogg and George Clinton, performs at 8 p.m. at Mavericks at The Landing, 2 Independent Dr., Downtown, $25, 356-1110. 24 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

Farmers’ wares, food trucks, street performances, live music and more are all featured in one place, at the Riverside Arts Market from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. every Saturday through December, under the Fuller Warren Bridge in Riverside.

CONCERT ON THE GREEN

The 27th annual concert by the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra includes Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture” and patriotic and American favorites, 8 p.m. at Magnolia Point Golf & Country Club, 3670 Clubhouse Dr., Green Cove Springs, $12-$15 or $75 for dinner package, 278-8448, concertonthegreen.com.

JAZZ FEST AFTER DARK

Local bands perform free shows, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., Tambor, Naughty Professor, Noisebender with Joe Yorio at Underbelly; JacksonVegas, Parker Urban Band, Project Improv, Mondo Mike & the Po’ Boys at 1904 Music Hall; Willie Evans Jr., Paten Locke, Patrick Evan, Co-Alition at Burro Bar; Universal Green, Whole Wheat Bread, All Night Wolves, Riverside Tuba Quartet at Dive Bar; Taylor Roberts at The Volstead, Albert Ayler Commemoration at Karpeles Museum.

MAY 26 BEACHES MEMORIAL DAY PROGRAM

Veterans honor their fallen soldiers and and more than 340 chaplains at 2 p.m. at Beaches Veterans Memorial Park, Atlantic Beach, coj.net.

ADULT ACRYLIC & OIL PAINTING LESSONS Learn technical as well as aesthetic aspects of painting from 2-4 p.m. today and every Mon. at Christ Episcopal Church, 400 San Juan Dr., Ponte Vedra Beach, $15, 838-7317, stjohnsculture.com.

UH HUH HER, DJ KIM ANH

Jack Rabbits welcomes electropop duo to perform songs from its latest album Future Souls, 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $17, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

MAY 27 LOCAL AUTHOR VISIT @ MAIN

Author Daniel L. Schafer discusses his latest book Zephaniah Kingsley Jr. and the Atlantic World: Slave Trader, Plantation Owner, Emancipator (2013), which recently earned the Silver Award for Florida Nonfiction in the 2013 Florida Book Awards, 5:30 p.m. at Main Library’s Multipurpose Room, 303 N. Laura St., Downtown, free, 630-2409, jaxpubliclibrary.org.

FIGURE DRAWING

TAC II offers figure-drawing sessions with a live model at 7 p.m. every Tue. (no session during the week of First Wednesday Art Walk) at 229 N. Hogan St., Downtown, $5-$10, 355-1757, tacjacksonville.org.

Hurston, collected oral histories of Florida folks from different living and economic backgrounds. The program, held at 12:30 p.m. at St. Johns County Main Library, 1960 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd., St. Augustine, is free. Bring a lunch. 827-6940, sjcpls.org.

MAYDAY!, LEGIT

DONOR APPRECIATION CONCERT

This hip hop crew from Miami takes over Jack Rabbits at 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JACUZZI BOYS

The Miami-based garage rock trio performs at Underbelly at 8 p.m. at 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, 353-6067, underbellylive.com.

RICH GUZZI COMEDY SHOW

Participants are invited on stage to be hypnotized in this part-comedy, part-hypnosis show, 8 p.m. tonight and May 28-31 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, $10-$14, 292-4242, comedyzone.com.

MAY 28 WEDNESDAY MARKET

More than 70 vendors feature local produce, arts, crafts, clothing, foods, live music and more, from 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. today and every Wed. at St. Johns Pier Park, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

The Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra invites donors to a free concert at 7 p.m. at the T-U Center, 300 W. Water St., Downtown, free with invitation only, 354-1473, jaxsymphony.org.

MAY 29 MALEFICENT: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE

The World Golf Hall of Fame’s IMAX theater premieres this new treatment of Snow White in 3D, at 1 World Golf Place, St. Augustine, 940-4133, worldgolfimax.com.

MOSH AFTER DARK: UNCOVERING THE PAST A look at Northeast Florida’s rich Native American history through the science of archaeologist Keith Ashley, 6 p.m. at MOSH, 1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, $5, 396-6674, themosh.org.

TARRUS RILEY, DEAN FRASIER, THE BLAK SOIL BAND, AIMA MOSES, DE LIONS OF JAH, DJ KENNY PAGE, DJ RAGGAMUFFIN

The son of reggae singer Jimmy Riley headlines a full night of reggae at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $25, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

STEEZ CLICK, NATHAN RYAN, PHAT J, JJ DAMON, POTENT DA ROCKSTAR, PINKYKILLA, THROWDOWN KID

BLAIR CRIMMINS & THE HOOKERS

Hip-hop and rap artists make a stop at Aqua on the “Smoke Loud! Play Loud!” tour, 5 p.m. at 11000 Beach Blvd., Southside, $15, 997-2063.

The Atlanta musician mixes ragtime and Dixieland jazz with some modern sounds for his own unique music stylings at 8 p.m. at Underbelly, 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, $5, 353-6067, underbellylive.com.

MUSIC BY THE SEA

KEVIN GATES

Live music by classic rock group Those Guys with dinner available from South Beach Grill, 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

STETSON KENNEDY DOCUMENTARY

Sandra Parks presents a documentary film narrated by her late husband, Stetson Kennedy, about the Federal Writers’ Project created by President Roosevelt in 1937 at the start of World War II. Two Florida writers, Stetson Kennedy and Zora Neale

The Louisiana rapper known for his free mixtapes performs at 9 p.m. at Aqua, 11000 Beach Blvd., Southside, $20, 997-2063.

MAY 30 KELLY/SCOTT JAZZ SEXTET

The Northeast Florida jazz sextet, led by vocalist Lisa Kelly and trumpet/flugelhorn player JB Scott, performs at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. at Friday Musicale, 645 Oak St., Riverside, 355-7584, fridaymusicale.com.


LADIES WITH LYRICS: Julie Durden, Rebecca Zapen, Brenda David

Singer-songwriters perform original songs at 7:30 p.m. at Mudville Music Room, 3104 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, $10, 352-7008, raylewispresents.com.

KARL ANTHONY

Comedian Anthony performs at 8 p.m. today and at 7 and 9:30 p.m. May 31 at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Southside, 365-5555, latthirty.com.

GREATER JACKSONVILLE COIN SHOW

The annual coin and more event flips the Morocco Shrine Auditorium today and May 31 and June 1 at 3800 St. Johns Bluff Rd. S., Southside, 315-0349, gjcc.anaclubs.org.

BUFFALO BUFFALO, NOCTURNAL STATE OF MIND, SACK THE CITY, FIFIELD Northeast Florida rock and alt-rock bands perform at 8 p.m. at Murray Hill Theatre, 932 Edgewood Ave. S., Murray Hill, $8-$10, 388-3179, murrayhilltheatre.com.

DAVID LAREAU & THE COPPERPOTS, NEIL ALDAY & FURTHER SOUTH, SIX TIME LOSERS

The Tallahassee band headlines a night of Americana at Underbelly at 8 p.m., 100 E. Adams St., Downtown, $5, 353-4686, underbellylive.com.

BREAD & CIRCUS, DANIEL AMEDEE, BETHANY & THE TROUBADOURS, WEEKEND ATLAS, CATALYST

Local folk acts that competed at One Spark perform at Jack Rabbits at 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JACKSONVILLE ROLLERGIRLS

The Jacksonville RollerGirls present a doubleheader, with the New Jax City Rollers vs. Team Florida and the First Coast Fatales vs. Bold City Bombshells, 6 p.m. at Mandarin Skate Station, 3461 Kori Rd., Mandarin, $10 in advance, $12 at the door, jacksonvillerollergirls.com.

SWITCHFOOT, THOUSAND FOOT KRUTCH, MARK RUSSELL The gospel rock band that achieved fame with the hit “Dare You to Move” performs at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 6:30 p.m. at 1340 A1A S., $25-$65, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

TRAVELIN’ LIGHT, DEE ABOOD

The five-piece Tallahassee folk rock band that mixes in vocal harmonies plays at 7:30 p.m. at Mudville Music Room, 3104 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, $10, 352-7008, raylewispresents.com.

WASTE NOT WANT NOT CONCERT

Orange Park Chorale performs a benefit concert for local charity organization Waste Not Want Not at 8 p.m. at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 7190 U.S. 17, Fleming Island.

BUGZY EVANS, ENIGMA, DENNIS LEE, SKRILLA, DJ CAINE, DJ ZEUS

Palatka rap artist makes a stop with the SailMySoul tour at Jack Rabbits at 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

U2 BY UV

The South Florida tribute band performs U2 hits at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $10, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

GENERATOR, PRIMITIVE HARD DRIVE, PIPESTONE, A NEW DECREE

MARUTA, PANSPERMIA, CUTE & CUDDLY KITTENS, LEPROSY

RICH GUZZI XXXTREME SHOW

JEREMIAH DALY, COREY KILGANNON, ALEXIS RHODE, SUMMER GOODMAN, JACOB HUDSON

The four-piece rock band headlines a night of alternative rock with a touch of metal at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $8, 246-2473, jaxlive.com. This is an outrageous and risqué version of Rich’s comedy hypnosis show, 10 p.m. tonight and tomorrow at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, $20-$25, 292-4242, comedyzone.com.

MAY 31 RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

Jesse Montoya, Pretty Police State, Spiral Bound, Jacob Creel, local and regional art, food artists and a farmers market are featured, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

KIDS’ FREE FISHING CLINIC

The Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission hosts a free fishing clinic for kids ages 5-15 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Ft. Clinch State Park Fishing Pier, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach. Lessons on knot-tying, fishing ethics, tackle, habitat and casting are offered. A free hot dog lunch is provided. 277-7274, floridastateparks.org.

UPTOWN SATURDAY NIGHT

The self-guided tour features galleries, antique stores and shops open 5-9 p.m. and every last Sat. in St. Augustine’s San Marco District, 824-3152.

JACKSONVILLE BREEZE

The Legends Football League — the first “L” originally stood for lingerie — promises 7-on-7 full-contact football “played by some of America’s most beautiful and athletic models,” when the Breeze take the field against the Toledo Crush at 8 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, 630-3900, for ticket details, go to jaxevents.com, ticketmaster.com.

CHICAGO

The American band opens Starry Nights series with the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra at 6 p.m. at Metropolitan Park, 1410 Gator Bowl Blvd., Downtown, $84, 354-5547, jaxsymphony.org.

ARCHAEOLOGY OF TALBOT ISLANDS

A park ranger takes a look into the past at 2 p.m. at Ribault Club, Ft. George Island Cultural State Park, 11241 Ft. George Rd., Ft. George Island. No reservations are needed and the program is free, 251-2320, floridastateparks.org/littletalbotisland.

This Miami grindcore band is accompanied by local hardcore and grindcore groups at 8 p.m. at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Downtown, $5, 353-4686.

The local singer-songwriter, formerly known as The Perfect Measure, releases his debut fulllength album In Our Time at 8 p.m. at Murray Hill Theatre, 932 Edgewood Ave. S., Murray Hill, $8-$10, 388-3179, murrayhilltheatre.com.

THE CRAZY CARLS, DANKA, PRIME TREES

This Orlando pop-rock group promotes its latest album Owl Tattoo at 8 p.m. at 1904 Music Hall, 19 N. Ocean St., Downtown, $8, 1904musichall.com.

DISPLACE, HOLEY MISS MOLEY, K SLAT

Underbelly features this Tampa band that boasts a unique style of “space-funk Instaprov” at 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, 353-6067, underbellylive.com.

JUNE 1 BIG ORANGE CHORUS

Local championship men’s barbershop and a cappella chorus performs its annual concert Excellence in Harmony at 3 p.m. at Terry Theater, Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts, 300 W. Water St., Downtown, featuring quartets Main Street and A Mighty Wind. Admission is $25. bigorangechorus.com

A THOUSAND WORDS: A PHOTO RESPONSE PROJECT

In conjunction with The New York Times Magazine Photographs, Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville visitors have an opportunity to write their own stories and headlines inspired by images from our community. The exhibit runs through Aug. 10 in the Florida Blue Education Gallery. A reception is held at 2 p.m. at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, free, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

MATT HIRES, THE WILD AFTER, KYLE COX

Tampa pop rock singer-songwriter performs tracks from his latest EP Forever at 8 p.m., Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JUNE 2 THE MONGOLOIDS, RUDE AWAKENING, MODERN PAIN, MEAN STREAK

This hardcore straight edge metal band from New MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 25


Jersey headlines at Underbelly at 6 p.m. at 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, $10, 353-6067, underbellylive.com.

The lake behind Black Creek Outfitters is the perfect spot for standup paddleboard lessons, held at 6 p.m. Mondays and Tuesdays and 5 p.m. Sundays. Kayaking lessons are offered at 6 p.m. Thursdays.

AMERICAN AQUARIUM, BRYCE ALASTAIR BAND

The indie band with roots rock flavor stops at Jack Rabbits to promote its latest album Burn.Flicker. Die. at 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $10, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JUNE 3 FOR THE FALLEN DREAMS, OBEY THE BRAVE, I THE BREATHER, REFLECTIONS

A Michigan metalcore band promotes its new album “Heavy Hearts,” at 6 p.m. at Underbelly, 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, $13, 353-6067.

JUNE 4 FLORIDA BLUE FREE ART WALK

Admission to the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville is free during First Wednesday Art Walk 5-9 p.m. at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

FIRST WEDNESDAY ART WALK

An art walk, featuring more than 50 galleries, museums and businesses and spanning 15 blocks, is held 5-9 p.m. today and every first Wed., Downtown, downtownjacksonville.org/marketing; iloveartwalk.com.

OUTSIDE IN

Southlight Gallery’s Summer Series showcases plein air and landscape artists in June, featuring member Mark Howard. Outside In opens with a reception, featuring live music by Jennifer Chase and live painting by Kevin Arthur & Friends from 6-9 p.m. Works by guest artist Jessie Barnes are also on display. The exhibit continues (11 a.m.-3 p.m. Tue.Fri.) through June 27 at Southlight Gallery, 201 N. Hogan St., Downtown, monthly openings are free, 438-4358, southlightgallery.com.

ECHO III

The pop-up photography exhibition is presented by Elena Rodriguez Photography during First Wednesday Art Walk 6-9 p.m. tonight and 6-9 p.m. June 7 at 400 E. Bay St., Ste. 107, Downtown, free, 662-0068, elenarodriguezphotography.com.

MUSIC BY THE SEA

Live jazz music by Rob Peck & Friends is performed with dinner available from Caribbean Sol, 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

JUNE 5 AFFAIR IN THE SQUARE

San Marco businesses offer beer and wine with light snacks, restaurants offer specials and a live band performs in Balis Park Gazebo, 6-9 p.m. in San Marco, free admission.

SOUND EFFECTS: CLARINETISSIMO!

This popular program returns with guest artist Marci Gurnow displaying the versatility and virtuosity of the clarinet. Rhonda Cassano and Philip Pan also welcome back pianist Jihye Chang at 7 p.m. at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, free, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

JACKSONVILLE FOOD FIGHT

The 24th annual event brings together more than 60 area restaurants, with proceeds benefitting Second Harvest North Florida, live music by Be Easy Band, 6:30-9 p.m. at Touchdown Club East, EverBank Field, 1 EverBank Field Drive, Downtown, $60 in advance or $70 at the door, 739-7074, jacksonvillefoodfight.org.

JACKSONVILLE SUNS

The Southern League team faces the Tennessee Smokies at 7:05 p.m. (Thursday Night Throwdown, Shriners Night), June 6 (Duck Dynasty’s Mountain Man, blood drive, fireworks), 3:05 p.m. June 7 (World Cup Soccer day) and June 8 (Country Music Night with Rionn Paige) and at 7:05 p.m. on June 9 (Bellybuster Monday) at Bragan Field, Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, tickets range from $7.50-$22.50, 358-2846, jaxsuns.com. 26 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

ANDREW JACKSON JIHAD, CHEAP GIRLS, DOGBRETH

The Phoenix-based folk-punk band promotes its new album “Christmas Island” at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $12, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

D.L. HUGHLEY

He can be heard on the radio on The D.L. Hughley Show and was a regular on the late-night talk show circuit, 8 p.m. tonight through June 7; 10 p.m. June 6 and 7 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, $20-$25, 292-4242, comedyzone.com.

SUZI TRASH

The grungy garage band tunes it up at 8 p.m. at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Downtown, $5, burrobarjax.com.

JUNE 6 ANNUAL HONORS SHOW

Artists who have won in past St. Augustine art exhibits are invited to display new works in the season finale, today through July 6 at St. Augustine Art Association, 22 Marine St., 824-2310, staaa.org.

FOUR CENTURIES OF KEYBOARD MUSIC

In this second of a series of performances and commentaries, pianist Rosalind J. Elson plays works of Pezold, Frescobaldi, Purcell, Haydn, Grieg and Cruse at 3 p.m. in the Choir Loft of Shepherd of the Woods Lutheran Church, 6595 Columbia Court, Jacksonville, free, 268-6701.

FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK

The tour of Art Galleries of St. Augustine is held 5-9 p.m. tonight and every first Fri., with more than 15 galleries participating, 829-0065.

SUMMER BOOK SALE

Friends of the Library book sale is held today and tomorrow at St. Johns County Main Library, 1960 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd., St. Augustine. Books, CDs, DVDs and VHS tapes are available. 827-6945, sjcpls.org.

CHRISTOPHER CROSS

The five-time Grammy-winning singer-songwriter, accompanied by the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, appears at 6 p.m. at Metropolitan Park, 1410 Gator Bowl Blvd., Downtown, $84, 354-5547, jaxsymphony.org.

RON FEINGOLD

Funnyman Feingold performs at 8 p.m. today and at 7 and 9:30 p.m. June 6 at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Southside, 365-5555, latthirty.com.

GRIM ZIPPER TOUR: Scum, Dmize, Statik of Rx

Italian death metal band is joined by a rap artist from New Mexico at 7 p.m. at Aqua, 11000 Beach Blvd., Southside, $10, 997-2063.

FIRST FRIDAY COSMIC CONCERTS

Laser light show featuring the music of Jimmy Buffett at 7 p.m., Laseropolis at 8 p.m., Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon at 9 p.m. and Metallica at 10 p.m. tonight and every first Fri. (with rotating bands’ music) at MOSH, 1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, $5, 396-6674, themosh.org.

RICKOLUS, LAKE DISNEY, RUFFIANS

Local one-man-band headlines at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $5, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

SONS OF HIPPIES, BASK, APPALACHIAN DEATH TRAP

Psych rock band from Tampa headlines at 8 p.m. at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Downtown, $5, burrobarjax.com.

OLIVER

Half-starved orphan Oliver Twist tries to get away from a life petty crime in the British musical adaption of the Charles Dickens’ classic. 7:30 p.m. June 6-7, 10, 12-14, 19-21, 26-28, July 3-5; 2 p.m. June 8, 15, 22, 29, July 6 on Limelight Theatre’s Matuza Main Stage, 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine, $25, 825-1164, limelight-theatre.org.

WEEZER

Known for hits “Buddy Holly” and “Say It Ain’t So,” Weezer takes a break from recording its ninth studio album to go on tour, appearing here at 7:30 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $49.50-$75, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

JOSH HOWELL & FRIENDS

Local singer/songwriter and founder of GP Productions performs in this Fringe Café Show at 8 p.m. at Murray Hill Theatre, 932 Edgewood Ave. S., $5, 388-3179, murrayhilltheatre.com.

This year’s Never Quit, a series of races, triathlons and fitness challenges, is held on May 30, 31 and June 1 on the sand in Jax Beach.


Imprisoned and exiled for stealing a loaf of bread, Jean Valjean evades capture from police inspector Javer while the French Revolution looms in the classic French drama by Boublil and Schonberg. 8 p.m. through June 21, and at 2 p.m. on June 22 at Theatre Jacksonville, 2032 San Marco Blvd., San Marco, $20-$25, 396-4425, theatrejax.com.

PIRATES OF PENZANCE

When the hero of this comic opera was a boy, his father told his nurse to have him apprenticed as a pilot. She heard “pirate” — thus, the zany troubles begin. 8 p.m. through June 29 at Orange Park Community Theatre, 2900 Moody Ave., $20, 276-2599, opct.org.

DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS, WATER LIARS

The Southern-rock roots band will “Let There Be Rock” at 8 p.m. at Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 1050 A1A N., $27, 209-0399, pvconcerthall.com.

VENUS IN FUR

A mysterious, funny, erotic drama about Thomas, a beleaguered playwright/director, desperate to find an actress to fill the role of Vanda, the female lead in his adaptation of his play-within-a-play. On stage at 8 p.m. June 6-7, 12-14, 20-21 and at 2 p.m. June 15 at Players by the Sea, 106 Sixth St. N., Jax Beach, $20-$23, 249-0289, playersbythesea.org.

APPETITE FOR DESTRUCTION (Guns N’ Roses tribute), RED & WHITE CRUE (Mötley Crüe tribute), Poison’d (Poison tribute)

Rock like it’s 1990 at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $10, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

ARCHNEMESIS, SEMANTIKS, DAMBALLA The electronic artist creates his unique tunes using a diverse group of samples at 9 p.m. at 1904 Music Hall, 19 N. Ocean St., Downtown, $10-$12, 1904musichall.com.

JUNE 7 SUPER GROM SURF FEST 2014

Young surfers, ages 10 and younger, learn to surf with the best surfers at the beach at 9 a.m. today and July 12 and Aug. 9, south of Jax Beach Pier at 503 First St. N., $10, 626-9090, floridasurfing.org.

21st ANNUAL BEACH BASH

Scavenger hunts, sandcastle contests, geo-caching, kite demonstrations and more, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at Anastasia State Park, 1340-A A1A S., St. Augustine, $8 park entrance fee per vehicle, $2 for walking and bicycling individuals, 461-2035, floridastateparks.org.

RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

Kids’ Day at the market, live entertainment on the river stage, local and regional art, food artists and a farmers market are featured, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

SISTERS IN CRIME

The Florida Sisters in Crime gather at 10:30 a.m. at Southeast Regional Library, 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd., Jacksonville. Vic DiGenti, aka Parker Francis (The Suspense is Killing Me), is the featured speaker. Books about crime are discussed at 2 p.m. on the second Fri. of each month at Panera, 9301 Atlantic Blvd., Southside, floridasistersincrime.com.

DRAKE’S RAID

The 28th annual historical re-enactment of Sir Francis Drake’s Raid in 1586 on St. Augustine is presented throughout the city of St. Augustine, 829-9792, drakesraid.com.

MUSEUMS ON US WEEKEND

Bank of America cardholders are admitted free to the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and noon-5 p.m. at 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

SUNSET CELEBRATION

Fun, refreshments and live music are featured from 3 p.m.-sunset at Vilano Beach Pier, 260 Vilano Rd., free, 540-0402, vilanobeachfl.com.

FIFA WORLD CUP SEND-OFF SERIES

The U.S. Men’s National Team plays Nigeria at 6 p.m. at EverBank Field, 1 EverBank Field Dr., Downtown, tickets on sale May 28, 630-3900, jaxevents.com.

P.S. CANCER SUCKS BENEFIT: Parkridge, Rosedale, Winter Wave, Attis on the Pine, A Call for Kylie, Enview

Indie rock and punk bands play to benefit Dear Jack Foundation, 6 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $10, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

BOSTON

After more than 30 years of recording, they prove to be “More Than a Feeling,” at 7:30 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $39.50$125, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

JACKSONVILLE SHARKS vs. SPOKANE SHOCK

Heroes & Villains themed night; game starts at 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 A. Philip Randolph Blvd., Downtown, $12-$133, 621-0700, jaxsharks.com.

SONGWRITER’S CIRCLE ANNIVESARY: Larry Mangum, Mike Shackelford, Jamie DeFrates

Local folk and acoustic singer/songwriters and Emmy award-winning producer and composer perform at 7:30 p.m. at Mudville Music Room, 3104 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, $10, 352-7008, raylewispresents.com.

DENDERA BLOODBATH, BOGGSIE BRIGADE, KING PLYWOOD

Burro Bar offers experimental music at 8 p.m. at 100 E. Adams St., Downtown, $5, burrobarjax.com.

JUNE 8 JACKSONVILLE UNITED FC PRO SOCCER

The local National Premier Soccer League pro team takes on the Storm at 7 p.m. at Patton Park, 2850 Hodges Blvd., Southside. Additional home games are played June 14 and July 3. For details and ticket prices, go to jacksonvilleunited.com.

INTERMEZZO CONCERT @ MAIN

Navy Band Southeast’s Brass Quintet, Windward Brass, performs music ranging from traditional brass quintet literature and patriotic fare to Broadway hits and the popular music of today. The concert includes selections by W.C. Handy, Victor Ewald, John Philip Sousa, Ludwig Maurer, Armed Forces Medley and more, at 3 p.m. at Main Library’s Hicks Auditorium, 303 N. Laura St., Downtown, 630-2665, jplmusic.blogspot.com.

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SUMMER JAZZ SERIES

Three-piece jazz trio The Sax Pack, Bob Baldwin and Clay Benjamin perform at 5 p.m. at Sea Walk Pavilion, 75 First St. N., Jax Beach, free, 247-6157, PROMISE OF BENEFIT jacksonvillebeach.org.

ANIMALS AS LEADERS, CONQUERING DYSTOPIA, CHON

Murray Hill Theatre pulses with progressive metal at 6 p.m. at 932 Edgewood Ave. S., $18, 388-3179, murrayhilltheatre.com.

JUNE 9 CREATIVE DRAMA SUMMER CAMP

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Campers in grades 1-2 explore their dramatic side with age-appropriate theater games, music and dance, improvisation and storytelling, 9 a.m. June 9-13 at Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-7177, abettheatre.com.

GROOVY SUMMER CAMP

This summer camp travels back to the 1960s; as kids sing and dance to the music of Motown, Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons, The Beatles and more. June 9-July 3 (9 a.m. Mon.-Fri.) at Theatre Jacksonville, 2032 San Marco Blvd., San Marco, $500, 396-4425, theatrejax.com.

GOSSAMER FRONTIER

The Texas-based band promotes its album release at 8 p.m. at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Downtown, $5, burrobarjax.com.

JUNE 10 JAX BEACH ART WALK

More than 30 local artists display works, 5-9 p.m. and every second Tue., along First Street between Beach Boulevard and Fifth Avenue North, Jax

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 27


with Ashy Larry, Red Grant, Nod Rodd, Ms. Gin, Shay Clemons, Dr. Doom and PLO at 8 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, $55-$65, 355-5661, floridatheatre.com.

Beach, betterjaxbeach.com/jax-beach-art-walk.html.

PURPLEFEST: G-Mayn-Frost, Askmeificare, XXIIL, Legit, Infamous

Local rap artists perform at Freebird Live at 6 p.m. at 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $10, band package with T-shirt, flag and CD $35, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

MIDNITE, 100% ST. CROIX ROOTS

Reggae roots rock from the Virgin Islands is played at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $20, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

THE PAPER JETS

The three-piece indie rock band promotes its new album We Are All Strange Friends at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

LASTWATCH, URSA MINOR, CLC

Mainstream hard rock group headlines at Murray Hill Theatre at 8 p.m. at 932 Edgewood Ave. S., $8-$10, 388-3179, murrayhilltheatre.com.

THRILL KILL KULT

TICK TICK BOOM

The “Spooky Tricks” tour features electronic industrial rock accompanied by demonic vocals at 7 p.m. at Underbelly, 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, $10, 353-6067, underbellylive.com.

Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre presents the play about Jon, an aspiring composer New York City in 1990, worried he made the wrong career choice to be part of the performing arts in a charming, autobiographical story of Larson, who wrote the award-winning musical Rent. 8 p.m. June 13, 14, 20 and 21; 2 p.m. June 15 and 22 at Adele Grage Cultural Center, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, $15-$20, 249-7177, abettheatre.com.

ARC & STONES

This four-piece Nashville alternative rock band takes the stage at 8 p.m. at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Downtown, $5, burrobarjax.com.

48-HOUR FILM PROJECT

THE CORBITT BROTHERS, LEFTY WILLIAMS BAND, APPLEBUTTER EXPRESS

Filmmakers compete to see who can make the best film in only 48 hours. Each team is assigned a character, a prop, a line of dialogue and a genre. The Jacksonville winning film competes against other films around the world. Screenings June 10-12 at Sun Ray Cinema, 1028 Park St., Avondale, 48hourfilm.com/en/Jacksonville.

Jacksonville natives bring their bluesy rock and outlaw country to Underbelly, 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, 353-6067, underbellylive.com.

JUNE 14

JUNE 11 LITTLE LEARNERS: EARTH, MOON, SUN & TINY TURTLES

Programing for preschool-aged children including interaction with tiny turtles and Earth, moon and sun in the Planetarium, 9-11 a.m. today and every second Wed. at MOSH, 1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, $5, 396-6674, themosh.org.

SHREK THE MUSICAL

A beloved ogre, a chatty donkey and a spitfire princess set out on a fairy-tale adventure to save Shrek’s swamp from the evil Lord Farquaad. 5:30 p.m. June 11-15, 17-22, 24-29; July 1-3, 5-6, 8-13, 15-20, 22-27; 11 a.m. June 14, 21, 28, July 5, 12, 19, 26; noon June 15, 22, 29, July 6, 13, 20, 27 at Alhambra Theatre & Dining, 12000 Beach Blvd., Southside, $38-$55, 641-1212, alhambrajax.com.

MUSIC BY THE SEA

Live blues by The David Gerald Blues Band with dinner available from Tailgate Toby BBQ and Stoked & Smoked BBQ, 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

TREEHOUSE!, SUN DRIED VIBES, WHO RESCUED WHO, DANKA

Jack Rabbits vibes to the sounds of reggae and jam rock at 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

THE EVERYMEN, THE VIVID, THE DULL BLADES

This five-piece Lake Worth rockabilly punk band performs at 8 p.m. at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Downtown, $5, burrobarjax.com.

BEARTOE, PALEFACE

The four-piece indie blues folk band and a threepiece Americana act from North Carolina perform tonight at Underbelly, 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, 353-6067, underbellylive.com.

JUNE 12 FREE ADMISSION THURSDAY & TOURS

Bank of America sponsors free admission to the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville 5-9 p.m. today and every Thur. during The New York Times Magazine Photographs exhibition through Aug. 21. MOCA educators offer 45-minute tour at 7 p.m., sponsored by the Jessie Ball duPont Fund. Celebrity portraits, wartime reportage, fashion portfolios, studies of Olympic athletes in motion, 9/11 coverage and much more at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

BFAST SPRINT SERIES TRIATHLON

CHINA’S FOREIGN POLICY

The ongoing program Great Decisions is designed to engage citizens in learning about the world. Scholars from JU and UNF lead the discussion, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Southeast Regional Library, 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd., Southside, free, 630-4655.

WAR OF AGES, BEYOND THE SHORE, NEVERENDER

The metalcore band promotes its fifth studio album “Return to Life” at 7 p.m. at Murray Hill Theatre, 932 Edgewood Ave. S., $10-$12, 388-3179, murrayhilltheatre.com.

ACOUSTIC ALCHEMY

The London jazz group, performing more than 25 years, is at Ponte Vedra Concert Hall at 8 p.m. at 1050 A1A N., $29-$39, 209-0399, pvconcerthall.com.

SLAUGHTER DAUGHTERS

This band’s “gothgrass” adds a dark tone to Americana roots music at 8 p.m. at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Downtown, $5, burrobarjax.com.

THE FOREIGNER

SEAWALK MUSIC FEST excerpted pages of a memoir in progress written by Jennifer Chase. Paintings inspired by the performance and pages by Tony Wood, with music by Chase and Lauren Fincham. 8 p.m. tonight and tomorrow at CoRk North Gallery, 603 King St., Riverside, $10-$12, artful.ly/store/events/2806.

FOXY SHAZAM, LARRY & HIS FLASK

The Cincinnati glam rockers promotes its new album “Gonzo,” 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $16, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

OTTMAR LIEBERT, LUNA NEGRA

This Grammy-nominated flamenco group appears at 8 p.m. at Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 1050 A1A N., $40-$46, 209-0399, pvconcerthall.com.

KURT GREEN

Comedian Green performs 8 p.m. today and at 7 and 9:30 p.m. June 14 at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Southside, 365-5555, latthirty.com.

BRUCE BRUCE

So nice, he’s named twice. The comedian appears

Live music by Be Easy, Corbitt Bros., Herd of Watts, S.P.O.R.E., Sidereal, Ivey West Band, Woody & the Peckers, plus food trucks, noon10 p.m. oceanfront Jax Beach, free admission, communityfirstseawalkmusicfest.com.

ARCHAEOLOGY & PALEONTOLOGY ROAD SHOW

Bring in found fossils, shells or mystery objects for a panel of scientists to identify, 10 a.m-2 p.m. at MOSH, 1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, free with admission, 396-6674, themosh.org.

FLORIDA COUNTRY SUPERFEST: Luke Bryan, Jason Aldean, Eric Church, Miranda Lambert, Florida Georgia Line, Little Big Town, Big & Rich, Easton Corbin, Colt Ford, Joe Nichols

Country superstars take over EverBank Field today and tomorrow at 1 EverBank Field Dr., Downtown, $35-$275 single day, $60-$500 two-day, 630-3900.

ARTRAGEOUS ART WALK

Downtown Fernandina Beach galleries are open for self-guided tours from 5:30-8:30 p.m. today and every second Sat., 277-0717, ameliaisland.com.

Charlie is a depressed Englishman at a Southern fishing lodge in Georgia. He pretends he can’t speak English, so other lodgers speak freely in front of him. 8 p.m. through June 28 at Amelia Community Theatre, 209 Cedar Street, Fernandina Beach, $10$20, 261-6749, ameliacommunitytheatre.org.

MOVE LIVE

Brother and sister duo Julianne and Derek Hough feature solo, duet and group dance performances at 8 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, $38.50-$68.50, 355-5661, floridatheatre.com.

NIKKI GLASER

She is co-host of MTV’s Nikki and Sara Live and can be seen on Comedy Central Inside Amy skits; she appears here at 8 p.m. tonight and June 13 and 14; 10 p.m. June 13 and 14 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, $20-$25, 292-4242, comedyzone.com.

JUNE 13 EVA, CHASE, WOOD?

A collaborative exhibition of paintings and performance, as actor Eva Matthews performs 28 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

A .25-mile swim, 16.8-mile bike ride and a 3.4-mile run are the challenge, at 7 a.m. at Naval Station Mayport, $60-$75 for adults in individual races; for registration fees, call 270-1771, bfasracing.org.

The Mega Adoption Event, which includes multiple shelters working together, is held at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds on July 18, 19 and 20.

Amelia River Cruises offers daily outings to Cumberland Island, as well as a Beach Creek Tour and a Family Friendly Sunset Cruise. Adult Twilight BYOB Cruises are held at 7 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.


WWE NXT LIVE!

The card, which is subject to change, includes Mojo Rawley, Bo Dallas, Colin Cassady and Tyler Breeze, 7:30 p.m. at Maxwell Snyder Armory, 9900 Normandy Blvd., Jacksonville, $10-$20, wwe.com.

COUNTING CROWS, TOAD THE WET SPROCKET

Alt rock band famous in the ’90s keeps rockin’, 6:30 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $40-$80, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

AMB, PRAY, RAZORZ EDGE

Aqua hosts psycho-metal and shock rock acts at 7 p.m. at 11000 Beach Blvd., Southside, $10, $20 VIP, 997-2063, brewstersmegaplex.com.

ROD MacDONALD

The folksinger-songwriter who took part the Greenwich Village revival in the ’80s visits Mudville Music Room at 7:30 p.m. at 3104 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, $10, 352-7008, raylewispresents.com.

SHAUN PEACE BAND

The four-piece acoustic roots rockers’ mission is to spread peace, 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JUNE 15 BANE, CODE ORANGE KIDS, GIVE, RHYTHYM OF FEAR

Boston hardcore punk act stops at Underbelly on its farewell tour at 6:30 p.m. at 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, $15, 353-6067, underbellylive.com.

JUNE 16 CAMP BROADWAY

The five-day theater camp includes singing, dancing and master classes for kids ages 10-17 taught by New York staff members of Broadway performers, choreographers and musicians, June 16-20 (8:30 a.m. Mon.-Fri.) at FSCJ’s Wilson Center for the Arts, 11901 Beach Blvd., Southside, $550, 442-2932, artistseriesjax.org.

IMPROV-A-THON

This two-week challenging workshop, open to students in grades 8-12, employs theater games and improvisational techniques, integrating visual art with theater. Students explore Cummer Museum’s collection and develop characters and scenes inspired by the art. June 16-27 (9 a.m. Mon.-Fri.) at Players by the Sea, 106 N. Sixth St., Jax Beach, $425, 249-0289, playersbythesea.org.

CAMP-A-GO-GO

This one-week creative drama camp, for kids in grades 1-4, encompasses theater games, storytelling, dress-up, pantomime, singing and dancing. Spaces are limited; register early. 9 a.m. June 16-20 at Players by the Sea, 106 N. Sixth St., Jax Beach, $175, 249-0289, playersbythesea.org.

GET INTO THE CHARACTER ZONE

Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JUNE 18 MUSIC BY THE SEA

Live music by The Committee with dinner available from La Strada, 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

TERRAVITA, J. RABBIT, COMBUSTIBLE

A night of EDM and bass music at Freebird Live at 8 p.m. at 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $15, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

JUNE 19 JACKSONVILLE SUNS

The hometown Southern League baseball team faces the Birmingham Barons at 7:05 p.m. (Elvis Himselvis, Thursday Night Throwdown, Ladies Night), June 20 (Elvis Himselvis, Report Card Night), and June 21 (Christian Yelich Bobblehead Giveaway, Jimmy Buffett Night), 3:05 p.m. June 22 (Racing Day) and 12:05 p.m. on June 23 (Camp Day) at Bragan Field, Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, tickets range from $7.50-$22.50, 358-2846, jaxsuns.com.

NORTH BEACHES ART WALK

Galleries of Atlantic and Neptune beaches are open 5-9 p.m. tonight and every third Thur. from Sailfish Drive in Atlantic Beach to Neptune Beach and Town Center, 249-2222, nbaw.org.

GOO GOO DOLLS, DAUGHTRY, PLAIN WHITE T’s

An alternative rock group that gained fame in the ’90s and an American Idol contestant appear at 6 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $49.50-$79.50, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

U.S. TRADE POLICY

The ongoing program Great Decisions is designed to engage citizens in learning about the world. Scholars from JU and UNF lead the discussion, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Southeast Regional Library, 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd., Southside, free, 630-4655.

ZOSO (Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience) This band plays hits by the legendary English metal/rock band at 7 p.m. at Mavericks, 2 Independent Dr., Downtown, $15, 356-1110, mavericksatthelanding.com.

ANDY GRAMMER

Singer-songwriter Grammer brings his California pop rock flavor to Freebird Live at 7 p.m. at 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $20, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

GYPSY STAR, REBECCA ZAPEN

The Tampa band known for performing a spectrum of international sounds plays at Mudville Music Room along with a jazz violinist, also from Tampa, at 7:30 p.m. at 3104 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, $10, 352-7008, raylewispresents.com.

This one-week camp, open to kids in grades 5-10, builds listening, blocking and projection skills. It’s held 9 a.m. June 16-20 at Players by the Sea, 106 N. Sixth St., Jax Beach, $175, 249-0289, playersbythesea.org.

HUMMING HOUSE

CREATIVE DRAMA SUMMER CAMP

Known for his role in the “Jackass” franchise, Steve-O has launched a successful standup career. He appears at 8 p.m. tonight through June 21 and at 10 p.m. June 20 and 21 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, $20-$25, 292-4242, comedyzone.com.

Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre’s camp, for kids in grades 5-9, lets campers explore their dramatic side through age-appropriate theater games, music and dance, improvisation and storytelling. It’s held June 16-27 (9 a.m. Mon.-Fri.) at Adele Grage Cultural Center, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-7177, abettheatre.com.

JUNE 17 THE ROUGH & TUMBLE

The Nashville folk duo stops at Burro Bar on its tour of the Southeast at 8 p.m. at 100 E. Adams St., Downtown, $5, 353-4686.

PLASTIC PLANETS, SUNSPOTS

The side project of Mutemath’s Roy MitchellCardens and Blue Man Group’s Jeffrey Alan Wright offers an energy-filled intergalactic experience at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San

Jack Rabbits presents this Nashville-based band that mixes blues and folk at 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

STEVE-O

JUNE 20 OKOA REFUGE BENEFIT: Grey Paluszynski, The Band Be Easy

The contestant from The Voice and the Neptune Beach band perform to benefit a project in Masaka, Uganda at 7:30 p.m. at Murray Hill Theatre, 932 Edgewood Ave. S., $20-$30, 388-3179, murrayhilltheatre.com.

KOJO PRINCE

The comedian Prince performs at 8 p.m. today and at 7 and 9:30 p.m. June 21 at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Southside, 365-5555, latthirty.com.

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 29


KID SLIM, ZERO CALORIES, CONFESSION KILLS

The “Just Some Kids Touring” tour stops at Jack Rabbits with Chicago hip hop artist headlining at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JUNE 21 RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

Live entertainment, local and regional art, food artists and a farmers market are featured from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. today under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

TEEN BATTLE OF THE BANDS

Eight bands compete in the ninth annual competition at 1 p.m. at the Main Library, 303 Laura St. N., Downtown, 630-0673, jaxpubliclibrary.org.

JACKSONVILLE AXEMEN

The city’s semi-pro rugby league team plays Central Florida Warriors at 5 p.m. at Hodges Stadium, University of North Florida, 1 UNF Dr., Southside, $8; free for kids younger than 12, 514-8503, jaxaxe.com.

FRENCH IN FLORIDA FILM PREMIER

The premier of a digitally animated short firm based on the historic Jacques Le Moyne and Theodore de Bry engravings of early Florida, narrated by historian Dr. Michael Gannon and musically scored by a string quartet from the University of Florida, is screened at 7 p.m. at MOSH, 1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, 396-6674, themosh.org.

JUNE 22 FOLIO WEEKLY’S FESTIVAL OF BEER

Sample local craft and imported beers, listen to live music and scarf down edible goodies from 1-6 p.m. at Riverside Arts Market, 715 Riverside Ave., under the Fuller Warren Bridge. Admission is free; $5 gets you a souvenir sampling cup and one free drink; $20 for seven beers; $40 for unlimited sampling. (Might be wise to bring a DD.) Proceeds benefi t the St. Johns Riverkeeper. folioweekly.com

BEN’S MEMORIAL BENEFIT: Mr. Al Pete, Dialectable, MJ Baker, Mas Appeal, Dillon, FFJB, Cheech, Will Frazier, Jeremy Baker

Local artists perform to benefit the Hope Foundation at 2 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $10, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

THE CAGE ANIMALS, LAST CHANCE FOR SARAH, DIRTY AUTOMATIC

Upbeat pop punk sextet fuses electronic music with older tunes at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

PAUL McCARTNEY

Legendary musician and member of The Beatles (he’s the cute one!) stops by on his headlining “Out There” tour at 8 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, 379-5196, jaxevents.com.

JUNE 23 MUSICAL THEATER CAMP

This three-week camp concludes with a highenergy musical in which campers sing and dance contemporary hits by Adele, Lady Gaga and Bruno Mars. June 23-July 11 (9 a.m. Mon.-Fri.) at Players by the Sea, 106 N. Sixth St., Jax Beach, $455 (space is limited, register early), 249-0289, playersbythesea.org.

JUNGLE BOOK KIDS

The jungle is jumping with jazz in this Disney classic adapted for the stage for campers in grades K-5. The camp culminates in a performance of the classic. June 23-July 16 (9 a.m. Mon.-Fri.) on Limelight Theatre’s Matuza Main Stage, 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine, $475, 825-1164, limelight-theatre.org.

SOCCER CLINICS

The Real Madrid Foundation and Jacksonville Armada offer Player Development Clinics for kids ages 8-14, in eight one-week sessions starting today and running through Aug. 15. Practices, games, 30 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

Active duty military, active reserve military and veterans and their families celebrate at the Jacksonville Zoo & Gardens on May 24, 25 and 26, with $2 off the already-discounted military admission price, with a military ID.

presentations and special positional sessions with representatives of the Real Madrid Foundation are featured. For details, go to armadafc.com or call 844-227-6232.

CAMP LIMELIGHT

Campers in grades K-5 explore the aspects of theater from acting to dancing, singing and props. June 23-July 16 (12:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri.) on Limelight Theatre’s Matuza Main Stage, 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine, $300, 825-1164, limelight-theatre.org.

JUNE 25 MUSIC BY THE SEA

Amy Alissa & The Soul Operation play Motown; dinner available from Napoli’s, 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

CRANFORD HOLLOW

The South Carolina Southern rock band visits Jack Rabbits at 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JUNE 26 MOSH AFTER DARK: WINE 101 WORKSHOP Learn about the history of wine and how it’s made with David Joudi of Riverside Liquors Village Wine Shop and Royal Palm Village Wine & Tapas at 6 p.m. at MOSH, 1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, $20, 366-6674, themosh.org.

JIM CARRICK, MAJA GIATANA

The fingerstyle guitarist and a gypsy violin and guitar duo perform at 7:30 p.m. at Mudville Music Room, 3104 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, $10, 352-7008, raylewispresents.com.

SUMMER HORNS: Dave Koz, Mindi Abair, Gerald Albright, Richard Elliot

This Grammy-nominated jazz group grooves at The Florida Theatre at 8 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, $50-$70, 355-5661, floridatheatre.com.

AL MADRIGAL

A correspondent on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Madrigal was named Best Stand-Up Comedian by HBO & US Comedy Arts Festival. He appears at 8 p.m. tonight through June 28 and at 10 p.m. June 27 and 28 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, $20-$25, 292-4242, comedyzone.com.

JUNE 27

Randolph Blvd., Downtown, $12-$133, 621-0700, jaxsharks.com.

NEW HORIZONS

GARDEN CONCERT: AN EVENING OF AMERICANA

A personal appearance and exhibition opening of Mike Perry’s new collection are held at 6 p.m. at Stellers Gallery of San Marco, 1409 Atlantic Blvd., 396-9492, stellersgallery.com.

TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE

Canary in the Coalmine, Four Families and The Jacksonville Old Time Jam break out fiddles and banjos for an outdoor concert 7-9 p.m. at Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., $20 members, $25 nonmembers, 356-6857, cummer.org.

The World Golf Hall of Fame’s IMAX theater premieres this newest Transformers movie in 3D, at 1 World Golf Place, St. Augustine, 940-4133, worldgolfimax.com.

SOSOS, RUSTY SHINE

REBELUTION, IRATION, THE GREEN, STICK FIGURE, DJ MACKLE

THE WHOLETONES, THE WILDER SONS

St. Augustine Amphitheatre hosts a night of reggae and rock vibes at 6 p.m. at 1340 A1A S., $27.50 advance, $30 day of show, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

SEVEN HANDLE CIRCUS

Jack Rabbits welcomes a unique form of badass bluegrass at 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

SHOT DOWN IN FLAMES (AC/DC tribute)

The tribute band plays hits by the Australian hard rock band at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $10, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

JUNE 28 RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

Live entertainment, local and regional art, food artists and a farmers market are featured, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. today under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

A night showcasing acoustic roots instruments is held at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com. The four-piece band mixes reggae, metal, hip hop, bluegrass and more at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $8, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

JUNE 29 SUMMER MOVIE CLASSICS

The annual series kicks off with a 75th anniversary celebration of The Wizard of Oz, starring Judy Garland and Bert Lahr, screened at 2 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787. Tickets are $7.50; $45 for 10 films. floridatheatre.com

THE WOODGRAINS

This Georgia-based band showcases its three-part harmonies at Jack Rabbits at 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JUNE 30 BY THE SEA

UPTOWN SATURDAY NIGHT

A collection of ocean-inspired artwork by Miamibased artist Jeanine Maleno and other locally based artists premieres today at Amiro Art & Found Gallery, 9C Aviles St., St. Augustine, 824-8460, amiroartandfound.com.

JACKSONVILLE AXEMEN

JULY 1

The self-guided tour features galleries, antique stores and shops, open 5-9 p.m. today and every last Sat. in St. Augustine’s San Marco District, 824-3152. The city’s semi-pro rugby league team takes on the Atlanta Rhinos at 5 p.m. at Hodges Stadium, University of North Florida, 1 UNF Dr., Southside, $8; free for kids younger than 12, 514-8503, jaxaxe.com.

JAX SHARKS vs. PITTSBURGH POWER

The Jacksonville Sharks celebrate Halloween in June at 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300

I AM THE WITNESS, SECRET KEEPER, AMONGST THE FORGOTTEN, I AM KING, AS ALICE SLEEPS, OUR WALKING DECEPTION Local metalcore bands perform at 7 p.m. at Murray Hill Theatre, 932 Edgewood Ave. S., $10-$12, 388-3179, murrayhilltheatre.com.


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JULY 2 FIRST WEDNESDAY ART WALK

An art walk, featuring more than 50 galleries, museums and businesses and spanning 15 blocks, is held 5-9 p.m. tonight and every first Wed., Downtown, downtownjacksonville.org/marketing; iloveartwalk.com.

THE PURE ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE

Faux Jimmy Page and Robert Plant lookalikes perform “Stairway to Heaven” and other hits at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $10, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

JULY 5

promise of benefit RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

Admission to the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville is free during First Wednesday Art Walk from 5-9 p.m. at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

River Ruckus kicks off St. Johns Riverkeeper’s “Save the Water” campaign. Live entertainment, local and regional art, food artists and a farmers market are featured from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

MEMBERS CHOICE

MUSEUMS ON US WEEKEND

FLORIDA BLUE FREE ART WALK

Southlight Gallery’s Summer Series showcases an open invitational juried by Southlight Gallery Members, featuring member Tayloe McDonald. Members Choice opens with a reception, with blues by Linda Grenville 6-9 p.m. July 2. The exhibit continues (11 a.m.-3 p.m. Tue.-Fri.) through July at Southlight Gallery, 201 N. Hogan St., Downtown, monthly openings are free, 438-4358, southlightgallery.com.

MUSIC BY THE SEA

Oldies and pop by Ain’t Too Proud Too Beg; dinner from Mojo Tacos at 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

JULY 3 CHRIS HENRY

The bluegrass singer and son of bluegrass veterans Red and Murphy Henry plays at 7:30 p.m. at Mudville Music Room, 3104 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, 352-7008, raylewispresents.com.

JULY 4 JACKSONVILLE SUNS

The hometown Southern League baseball team takes on the Chattanooga Lookouts at 7:05 p.m. (Fireworks, Red-White-and-Blue Jersey Auction), July 5 (Fireworks, Red-White-and-Blue Suns Cap Giveaway), at 3:05 p.m. July 6 (Team Card Set Giveaway), 12:05 p.m. July 7 (Camp Day), and at 7:05 p.m. July 8 (Folio Weekly 50-Cent Family Feast Night, Win Dave Matthews Concert Ticket) at Bragan Field, Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, tickets range from $7.50-$22.50, 358-2846, jaxsuns.com.

FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK

The tour of Art Galleries of St. Augustine is held today and every first Fri., with more than 15 galleries participating, 829-0065.

FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS

Three of the biggest displays are in Jacksonville (jacksonvillelanding.com), St. Augustine (floridashistoriccoast.com) and Jacksonville Beach (jacksonvillebeach.org). Hit websites for details.

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Bank of America cardholders are admitted free to Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. today and noon-5 p.m. July 6 at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

SUNSET CELEBRATION

Refreshments, live music and entertainment are featured from 3 p.m.-sunset at Vilano Beach Pier, 260 Vilano Rd., free, 540-0402, vilanobeachfl.com.

JULY 6 SUMMER MOVIE CLASSICS

The annual series continues with a 30th anniversary celebration of The NeverEnding Story, starring Barrett Oliver and Noah Hathaway, screened at 2 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787. Tickets are $7.50; $45 for 10 films. floridatheatre.com

BACKTRACK, HARM’S WAY, EXPIRE, TURNSTILE, SUBURBAN SCUM, DOWNPRESSER, IRON MIND, FREEDOM

A full night of hardcore and metal core is featured at Underbelly at 4 p.m. at 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, $20, 353-6067, underbellylive.com.

© 2014

JULY 7 CREATIVE DRAMA SUMMER CAMP

Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre offers kids in grades 1 and 2 a chance to explore their dramatic side with age-appropriate games, music and dance, improvisation and story-telling, at 9 a.m. weekdays through July 11 at Adele Grage Cultural center, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-7177, abettheatre.com.

SUMMER YOUTH THEATER WORKSHOP

Orange Park Community Theatre offers the workshop for kids ages 7-14, held from 9 a.m.3 p.m. through July 25, Mon. through Fri. The cost is $225 ($215 for additional children in the same family). At the end of camp there are three productions of School House Rock Jr., held at 7 p.m. July 25 and 26 and 2 p.m. July 27. opct.org.

The Great Southern Tailgate Cookoff is held Aug. 22 and 23 at Main Beach Park, Fernandina Beach, featuring professional and local amateur teams competing for bragging rights.

© 2014

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 31

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JULY 16

World of Beer, the Southside’s premier beer bar, holds customer appreciation cookouts on the last Sunday of every month. The next one is on May 25.

JACKSONVILLE SUNS

The hometown Southern League baseball team battles the Pensacola Blue Wahoos at 7:05 p.m. (Baseball Bingo), July 17 (Thursday Night Throwdown), July 18 (Blood Drive, Fireworks, Leprechaun World Wrestling Championships) (really) and July 19 (Bark in the Park), and at 3:05 p.m. July 20 (Kids Run the Bases, Throwback Day) at Bragan Field, Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, tickets range from $7.50-$22.50, 358-2846, jaxsuns.com.

MUSIC BY THE SEA

Live music by Smoke N Mirrors with dinner available from Seafood Kitchen, 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

JULY 17 NORTH BEACHES ART WALK

Galleries of Atlantic and Neptune beaches are open 5-9 p.m. tonight and every third Thur. from Sailfish Drive in Atlantic Beach to Neptune Beach and Town Center, 249-2222, nbaw.org.

FREE ADMISSION THURSDAY & TOURS

ZAK WATERS

California-based pop punk performer and producer visits Jack Rabbits at 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JULY 9 MUSIC BY THE SEA

Steam the Band performs; dinner available from Purple Olive, 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

JULY 10 FOOD AND CLIMATE

The ongoing program Great Decisions is designed to engage citizens in learning about the world. Scholars from JU and UNF lead the discussion, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Southeast Regional Library, 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd., Southside, free, 630-4655.

BLACK & WHITE: PHOTOJOURNALISM PANEL DISCUSSION

Fine art, documentation or both? Photography has been at the forefront of this debate for decades. Who decides whether an image is simply functional or truly artistic? What is more important — the subject matter, the photographer or the technical skill? Experts from journalism, contemporary art and publishing debate these aspects of The New York Times Magazine Photographs exhibition at 7 p.m. at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, free, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

JULY 12 BFAST SPRINT SERIES TRIATHLON

A .25-mile swim, 16.8-mile bike ride and a 3.4-mile run are the challenge, starting at 7 a.m. at Naval Station Mayport, $60-$75 for adults in individual race, for details, call 270-1771, bfasracing.org.

48-HR FILM FESTIVAL BEST OF SCREENING

Top-rated entries in the 48 Hour Film Project air at 7 a.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, $15, 355-5661, floridatheatre.com.

RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

Live entertainment, local and regional art, food artists and a farmers market are featured from 32 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

10 a.m.-4 p.m. under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

JACKSONVILLE AXEMEN

The city’s semi-pro rugby league team plays Tampa Mayhem at 5 p.m. at Hodges Stadium, University of North Florida, 1 UNF Dr., Southside, $8; free for kids younger than 12, 514-8503, jaxaxe.com.

TONCA’S 48TH BIRTHDAY

A birthday bash for the 48-year-old alligator snapping turtle includes party games, animal encounters from 10 a.m-3 p.m. at MOSH, 1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, 366-6674, themosh.org.

ARTRAGEOUS ART WALK

Downtown Fernandina Beach galleries are open for self-guided tours from 5:30-8:30 p.m. tonight and every second Sat., 277-0717, ameliaisland.com.

LEGIT, G MAYN FROST, ASKMEIFICARE, ALCATRAZ, PINKYKILLA, SYLENT VYLENTZ A mix of hip hop and heavy rock is played at Freebird Live at 8 p.m. at 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $8, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

JULY 13 SUMMER MOVIE CLASSICS

“It’s our time, down here.” The annual series continues with a screening of The Goonies, starring Sean Astin, Corey Feldman and Josh Brolin, at 2 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787. Tickets are $7.50; $45 for 10 films. floridatheatre.com

SUMMER JAZZ SERIES

Jazz guitarist and vocalist Nick Colionne, Jessy J and Nate Mitchell perform at 5 p.m. at Sea Walk Pavilion, 75 First St. N., Jax Beach, free, 247-6157, jacksonvillebeach.org.

JULY 14 CREATIVE DRAMA SUMMER CAMP

Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre’s camp, for kids in grades 3-7, features age-appropriate theater games, music and dance, improvisation and storytelling. It’s held July 14-25 (9 a.m. Mon.-Fri.) at Adele Grage Cultural Center, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-7177, abettheatre.com.

THEATRE CAMP

Bank of America is sponsoring free admission to the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville 5-9 p.m. and every Thur. during The New York Times Magazine Photographs exhibition through Aug. 21. MOCA educators offer 45-minute tour at 7 p.m., sponsored by the Jessie Ball duPont Fund. Celebrity portraits, wartime reportage, fashion portfolios, studies of Olympic athletes in motion, 9/11 coverage and much more at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

A three-week play-building program incorporates improvisation games and scene work, for kids in grades 5-12. The camp culminates with a production with set, costumes and lights. Spaces are limited; register early. July 14-Aug. 1 (9 a.m. Mon.-Fri.) at Players by the Sea, 106 N. Sixth St., Jax Beach, $445, 249-0289, playersbythesea.org.

JEREMY MESSERSMITH

CAMP-A-GO-GO

ANCIENT CITY CON

This one-week creative drama camp for kids in grades 1-4 that encompasses theater games, storytelling, dress up, pantomime, singing and dancing is held 9 a.m. July 14-18 at Players by the Sea, 106 N. Sixth St., Jax Beach, $175, 249-0289, playersbythesea.org.

GET INTO THE CHARACTER ZONE

This one-week camp, open to kids in grades 5-10, builds listening, blocking and projection skills. It’s held 9 a.m. July 14-18 at Players by the Sea, 106 N. Sixth St., Jax Beach, $175, 249-0289, playersbythesea.org.

JAX BEACH ART WALK

More than 30 local artists display works from 5-9 p.m. tonight and every second Tue., along First Street between Beach Boulevard and Fifth Avenue North, Jax Beach, betterjaxbeach.com/jax-beachart-walk.html.

JACKSONVILLE SHARKS vs. NEW ORLEANS VOODOO

It’s the next-to-last home game of the season at 8 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, $12-$133, 621-0700, jaxsharks.com.

JULY 18 The indie pop singer-songwriter promotes his new album Heart Murmurs at Jack Rabbits, 8 p.m., 1528 Hendricks Ave., $10, 398-7496, jaxlive.com. Nerds unite! Northeast Florida presents the multigenre fan convention, July 18-20 at Hyatt Regency Riverfront, 225 E. Coastline Dr., Downtown, for tickets and details, go to ancientcitycon.com.

RENT

The pop-culture phenom follows a year in the life of impoverished young bohemians sin New York as they negotiate dreams, loves and conflicts. 8 p.m. July 18, 19, 24, 25, 26 and 31, Aug. 1, 2, 7-9; 2 p.m. July 20, 27, Aug. 3 at Players by the Sea, 106 N. Sixth St., Jax Beach, $25-$28, 249-0289, playersbythesea.org.

JULY 19 RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

Live entertainment, local and regional art, food artists and a farmers market are featured from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

SID THE SCIENCE KID

JULY 15

Visit the award-winning educational and animated science kid from the Jim Henson Company for PBS Kids from 10 a.m-3 p.m. at MOSH, 1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, free with admission, 366-6674, themosh.org.

DAVE MATTHEWS BAND

SNOOZING WITH SHARKS CAMP-IN

The summer “Warm Up” tour stops at Veterans Memorial Arena with one acoustic set and one electric set, at 7 p.m. at 300 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, $38.50-$74, 379-5196, jaxevents.com.

RAY LaMONTAGNE, JENNY LEWIS, THE BELLE BRIGADE

The popular folk artist performs at The Florida Theatre fresh off his new album Supernova at 7:30 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, $39.50$49.50, 355-5661, floridatheatre.com.

Spend the night and get exclusive after-hours access to MOSH’s summer exhibit, Megalodon: The Largest Shark that Ever Lived. Includes pizza and breakfast. Starts at 6 p.m. at MOSH, 1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, $35, 366-6674, themosh.org.

THI’SL, BRINSON, SECKOND CHAYNCE

The St. Louis rapper performs with hip hop artists at 7:30 p.m. at Murray Hill Theatre, 932 Edgewood Ave. S., $12-$16, 388-3179, murrayhilltheatre.com.

GROUNDATION

The progressive reggae group blends genres for an


international sound at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $17, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

JULY 20 AMERICAN IDOL LIVE!

FAME: THE MUSICAL

The Artist Series presents the ninth annual High School Summer Musical Theatre Experience today through Aug. 3 at FSCJ’s South Campus Wilson Center for the Arts, 11901 Beach Blvd., Southside, 646-2222, artistseriesjax.org.

Finalists from the reality TV show perform at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $40.50-$80.50, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

JULY 26

SUMMER MOVIE CLASSICS

Nature in all its forms and the wildlife that live there are celebrated in the fifth annual gallery-wide exhibition held through August at St. Augustine Art Association, 22 Marine St., 824-2310, staa.org.

The annual series continues with a 25th anniversary celebration of Batman, starring Michael Keaton, Jack Nicholson and Kim Basinger, screened at 2 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787. Tickets are $7.50; $45 for 10 films. floridatheatre.com

NATURE & WILDLIFE EXHIBIT

RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

National Dance Day features dance performances on multiple stages. Live entertainment, local and regional art, food artists and a farmers market are featured from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

UPTOWN SATURDAY NIGHT

The self-guided tour features galleries, antique stores and shops open 5-9 p.m. tonight and every last Sat. in St. Augustine’s San Marco District, 824-3152.

SARA BAREILLES

The pop singer/songwriter who gained fame for “Love Song” stops in at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine

Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $29.50-$55, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

JAX SHARKS vs. LOS ANGELES KISS

It’s Christmas in July and Fan Appreciation Night for the last game of the Sharks’ regular season at 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, $12-$133, 621-0700, jaxsharks.com.

EMMYLOU HARRIS

Thirteen-time Grammy-winner Harris, the legendary country singer/songwriter from Alabama, performs at 8 p.m. at the T-U Center, 300 W. Water St., Downtown, $40-$70, 633-6110, jaxevents.com.

ALL NEW ATMOSPHERE

The indie-rockers perform songs from its debut album Some Place Safe, 8 p.m., Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JULY 21 JACKSONVILLE SUNS

The hometown Southern League baseball team takes on the Birmingham Barons at 7:05 p.m. (Clay County Night, Bellybuster Monday), July 22 (Folio Weekly 50-Cent Family Feast Night), 1:05 p.m. July 23 (Businessperson’s Special), 7:05 p.m. July 24 (Thursday Throwdown) and July 25 (Used Car Giveaway, Fireworks) at Bragan Field, Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, tickets range from $7.50-$22.50, 358-2846, jaxsuns.com.

JULY 23 MUSIC BY THE SEA

Oh No! plays pop and oldies with dinner available from Red Frog and McToad’s, 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

JULY 24 OPOSSUMHOLLER, POOR RICHARDS, THE SENSES, SNAKE BLOOD REMEDY

The atmosphere at Jack Rabbits shifts to punk-rock and rockabilly at 8 p.m. at 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

JULY 25 PROJECT ATRIUM: CAROLINE LATHAN-STIEFEL

Since 2000, Lathan-Stiefel’s installation work has focused on rhizomatic structures. Room-sized pieces have been inspired by marine and plant biology, as well as architectural and urban models. She creates an installation based on the rhizomatic networks of the brain. The sculptural work Wider Than the Sky will be made of textile materials: pipe cleaners, wire, thread, yarn, string, fabric, straight pins, plastic and fishing weights. The site-specific piece will transform the microscopic elements of the brain into a monumental floor-to-ceiling installation. Exhibit runs July 26-Oct. 27. A conversation with artist is held 7 p.m. tonight at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

EARTHQUAKE

This comedy legend, with a solid following coast to coast, appears at 7 and 9 p.m. tonight and tomorrow and at 11 p.m. July 26 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, $25-$30, 292-4242, comedyzone.com.

CULTURAL PROFETICA

The reggae roots group — 12 musicians from Puerto Rico — plays at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $25, 246-2473, jaxlive.com.

YING YANG TWINS, DRAZAH & TUNK, BIG BOI MONEYMAKERS

Atlanta hip hop duo known for “Get Low” with Lil’ Jon, “Saltshaker” and other tracks, plays at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $20, 398-7496, jaxlive.com.

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 33


JULY 27 SUMMER MOVIE CLASSICS

The annual series continues with a 30th anniversary celebration of Gremlins, starring Phoebe Cates, Corey Feldman and Hoyt Axton, at 2 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787. Tickets are $7.50; $45 for 10 films. floridatheatre.com

FALL OUT BOY, NEW POLITICS

Pop punk band with the recent hit “My Songs Know What You Did in the Dark (Light ’Em Up)” plays, 7:30 p.m. July 27 at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $35-$45, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

JULY 28 CREATIVE DRAMA SUMMER CAMP

Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre’s camp, for kids in grades 1 and 2, lets campers explore their dramatic side through age-appropriate theater games, music and dance, improvisation and storytelling. It’s held July 28-Aug. 1 (9 a.m. Mon.-Fri.) at Adele Grage Cultural Center, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-7177, abettheatre.com.

JULY 30 MUSIC BY THE SEA

Jimmy Parrish & The Ocean Waves play; dinner from Mango Mango’s, 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

SOULSHINE TOUR: Michael Franti & Spearhead, SOJA, Brett Dennen, Trevor Hall

The funky reggae fusion band headlines this yoga and music tour along with the popular reggae group at 6 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $30.50-$40.50, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

JULY 31 MOSH AFTER DARK: FIRST COAST SHARKS

UNF shark researcher James Gelsleichter discusses sharks in First Coast waterways at 6 p.m. Access to the summer exhibit is included; 1025 Museum Circle, Southbank, $5, 366-6674, themosh.org.

GAVIN DEGRAW, MATT NATHANSON

The pop rock artist known for the One Tree Hill theme song “I Don’t Want to Be” and hit “Chariot” performs tracks from his latest album Make a Move at 6 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $37.50-$57.50, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

AUGUST 1 FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK

The tour of Art Galleries of St. Augustine is held 5-9 p.m. tonight and every first Fri., with more than 15 galleries participating, 829-0065.

AUGUST 2 RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

Live entertainment, local and regional art, food artists and a farmers market are featured, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. today under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

MUSEUMS ON US WEEKEND

Bank of America cardholders are admitted free to the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. today and noon-5 p.m. tomorrow at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

SUNSET CELEBRATION

Vendors, refreshments, live music and entertainment are featured from 3 p.m.-sunset today at Vilano Beach Pier, 260 Vilano Rd., free, 540-0402, vilanobeachfl.com.

DIRTY HEADS, PEPPER

Laid-back reggae hip hop and alt-rock reggae at 6:30 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $24.50-$39.50, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com. 34 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

The Sharks play the Spokane Shock on June 7, the Pittsburgh Power on June 28, the New Orleans Voodoo on July 14 and the Los Angeles KISS on July 26. All games are held at Veterans Memorial Arena.

AUGUST 3 SUMMER MOVIE CLASSICS

The annual series continues with the golf comedy classic Caddyshack, starring Chevy Chase, Michael O’Keefe, Rodney Dangerfield, Bill Murray and Ted Knight, screened at 2 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787. Tickets are $7.50; $45 for 10 films. floridatheatre.com

MAXWELL

The soul singer travels on his Summer Soulstice Tour, performing here at 7:30 p.m. at T-U Center, 300 W. Water St., Downtown, $36-$126, 633-6110.

AUGUST 4 CREATIVE DRAMA SUMMER CAMP

Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre’s camp, for kids in grades 3-7, is held Aug. 4-15 (9 a.m. Mon.-Fri.) at Adele Grage Cultural Center, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, $320, 249-7177, abettheatre.com.

AUGUST 6 JACKSONVILLE SUNS

Our local boys take on the Mississippi Braves at 7:05 p.m. (Baseball Bingo) Aug. 7 (Thursday Throwdown), Aug. 8 (Fireworks) and Aug. 9 (Back-2-School Night, ZOOperstars) and at 6:05 p.m. Aug. 10 (Library Night, Kids Run the Bases) at Bragan Field, Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, tickets range from $7.50-$22.50, 358-2846, jaxsuns.com.

FIRST WEDNESDAY ART WALK

An art walk, featuring more than 50 galleries, museums and businesses and spanning 15 blocks, is held from 5-9 p.m. tonight and every first Wed., Downtown, downtownjacksonville.org/marketing; iloveartwalk.com.

FLORIDA BLUE FREE ART WALK

Admission to the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville is free during First Wednesday Art Walk, 5-9 p.m. tonight, sponsored by Florida Blue, at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Downtown, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.

ALFRED HITCHCOCK’S 39 STEPS

Hitchcock’s masterpiece blends mystery, slapstick and a dash of Monty Python, 6 p.m. Aug. 6-10, 12-17, 19-24, 26-31, Sept. 2-7; 11 a.m. Aug. 9, 16, 23, 30, Sept. 6; noon Aug. 10, 17, 24, 31, Sept. 7 at Alhambra Theatre & Dining, 12000 Beach Blvd., Southside, $38-$55, 641-1212, alhambrajax.com.

THE AUGUSTINES

Southlight Gallery’s Summer Series showcases the Butterfield Garage with featured member Tony Wood. The Augustines opens with a reception held from 6-9 p.m. The exhibit continues (11 a.m.-3 p.m. Tue.-Fri.) through Aug. 29 at Southlight Gallery, 201 N. Hogan St., Downtown, monthly openings are free, 438-4358, southlightgallery.com.

MUSIC BY THE SEA

AUGUST 10 SUMMER MOVIE CLASSICS

The annual series continues with a screening of Disney’s Bedknobs and Broomsticks, starring Angela Lansbury and Roddy McDowell, 2 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., 355-2787. Tickets are $7.50; $45 for 10 films, floridatheatre.com.

The Falling Bones play; dinner from Zaharia’s, 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

AN EVENING WITH CROSBY, STILLS & NASH

AUGUST 7

AUGUST 11

TAYLOR WILLIAMSON

JAX BEACH ART WALK

The legendary folk rock group visits St. Augustine Amphitheatre at 7 p.m. at 1340 A1A S., $39-$99, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

After placing second on America’s Got Talent, he’s headlining on tour; 8 p.m. tonight and 8 and 10 p.m. Aug. 8 and 9 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, $20-$25, 292-4242, comedyzone.com.

More than 30 local artists display works from 5-9 p.m. tonight and every second Tue., along First Street between Beach Boulevard and Fifth Avenue North, Jax Beach, betterjaxbeach.com.

AUGUST 8

AUGUST 12

JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS vs. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS

MOTHERHOOD OUT LOUD

The Jaguars’ first preseason home game is held at 7:30 p.m. at EverBank Field, 1 EverBank Field Dr., Downtown, 630-3900, jaguars.com.

ELLIS PAUL, DONNY BRAZILE

The country-folk singer/songwriter and storyteller headlines at the Original Café Eleven at 8 p.m. at 501 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine, $20, 460-9311, originalcafe11.com.

AUGUST 9 RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

Live entertainment, local and regional art, food artists and a farmers market are featured from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. today under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

ARTRAGEOUS ART WALK

Fernandina Beach galleries open for self-guided tours, 5:30-8:30 p.m., 277-0717, ameliaisland.com.

ULTIMATE ELVIS BASH

Elvis impersonators perform for the 58th anniversary of Presley’s 1956 gig at The Florida Theatre, 8 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., $29.50-$39.50, 355-5661, floridatheatre.com.

This play illuminates life’s humor, raw emotions and rocky roads, shattering traditional notions about parenthood and celebrating personal truths. It’s staged at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 12, 14-16, 19, 21-23, 26, 2830 and 2 p.m. Aug. 17, 24, 31 on Limelight Theatre’s Matuza Main Stage, 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine, $25, 825-1164, limelight-theatre.org.

AUGUST 13 MUSIC BY THE SEA

Live music by Grapes of Roth with dinner available from Salt Life 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

AUGUST 14 GREGORY CREWDSON BRIEF ENCOUNTERS

Featured in The New York Times Magazine Photographs exhibition, artist Gregory Crewdson’s elaborate creative process is the focus of this featurelength documentary. Crewdson constructs surreal suburban environments filled with haunting images of everyday life from 7-8:30 p.m. at Sun-Ray Cinema, 1028 Park St., Five Points, free for MOCA members, $8 for nonmembers, 366-6911, mocajacksonville.org.


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ROCK N’ BLUES FEST: Johnny Winter, Edgar Winter, Vanilla Fudge, Peter Rivera, Kim Simmonds

The third annual fest has a superstar lineup of veteran artists who merge rock ‘n’ roll and blues, 8 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, $39.50-$59.50, 355-5661, floridatheatre.com.

AUGUST 16 RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

Live entertainment, local and regional art, food artists and a farmers market, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

JACKSONVILLE BREEZE

The ladies play 7-on-7 full-contact football against the Atlanta Steam, 8 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, 630-3900, for ticket details, go to jaxevents.com, ticketmaster.com.

PANIC! AT THE DISCO, WALK THE MOON, YOUNGBLOOD HAWKE

The three-piece indie pop band headlines “The Gospel Tour” at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $35, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

AUGUST 17 JACKSONVILLE SUNS

The hometown baseball team battles the Pensacola Blue Wahoos at 6:05 p.m. (Educational Employees Appreciation Night, Kids Run the Bases), Aug. 18 (St. Johns County Night, Bellybuster Monday), Aug. 19 (Folio Weekly 50-Cent Family Feast Night) and Aug. 20 (Baseball Bingo, Grocery Giveaway), and at 7:05 p.m. Aug. 21 (Thursday Throwdown) at Bragan Field, Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, $7.50-$22.50, 358-2846, jaxsuns.com.

SUMMER MOVIE CLASSICS

The annual series continues with a 50th anniversary celebration of Viva Las Vegas, starring Elvis Presley, Ann-Margret and William Demarest, screened at 2 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787. Tickets are $7.50, floridatheatre.com

AUGUST 19 THE OFFSPRING, BAD RELIGION, PENNYWISE, FEAR

The bands arrive here on their Summer Nationals Tour at 5:30 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S. Tickets are on sale May 30, $39.50$59.50, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

AUGUST 20 MUSIC BY THE SEA

All skill levels Ages 6 and up Blues Band and Rockit Fly, atFor Mainquestions, Beach Park, 99 please call your advertising representative at 260-9770. RUN DATE: 04161 Certified Instructors N. Fletcher Ave., Fernandina Beach, $5 admission, FAX YOUR PROOF IF POSSIBLE AT 268-3655 gstailgatecookoff.com. CPR Trained Produced by KAC Max Checked by 24 Student PROMISE OF BENEFIT SUPPORT ASK FOR ACTION THE FRESH BEAT BAND Nickelodeon’s popular preschool music group Professional Staff takes the stage at 6:30 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $29.50-$46.50, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

AUGUST 23 RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

Local and regional art and a farmers market, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

AUGUST 24 SUMMER MOVIE CLASSICS

“If you build it, he will come.” The annual series continues with a 25th anniversary celebration of Field of Dreams, starring Kevin Costner, Ray Liotta and James Earl Jones, 2 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787. Tickets are $7.50; $45 for 10 films. floridatheatre.com

BOB WEIR, RATDOG, CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD

Former Grateful Dead guitarist’s and Black Crowes singer’s side projects co-headline at 5:30 p.m. at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $37.50$59.50, 209-0367, staugamphitheatre.com.

AUGUST 27 MUSIC BY THE SEA

Billy Buchanan & Free Avenue play at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

AUGUST 28 JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS vs. ATLANTA FALCONS

The second preseason game of the Jaguars’ 2014 season is played at 7:30 p.m. at EverBank Field, 1 EverBank Field Dr., Downtown, 630-3900.

JACKSONVILLE SUNS

The hometown Southern League baseball team takes to the diamond against the Mobile BayBears at 7:05 p.m. (Thursday Night Throwdown), Aug. 29 (Fireworks), Aug. 30 (BirdZerk, Christmas in August, Southpaw Snowglobe Giveaway) and Aug. 31 (Fan Appreciation Night, Fireworks). The regular season wraps up at 1:05 p.m. Sept. 1, with the final Kids Run the Bases and free ice cream, at Bragan Field, Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Downtown, $7.50-$22.50, 358-2846, jaxsuns.com. Southern League playoffs start Sept. 4, so come on out and cheer for our local boys of summer.

Live music by Big Lonesome; dinner from Panama Hatties, 6 p.m. food service, concert at 7 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., free, 347-8007, thecivicassociation.org.

AUGUST 30

AUGUST 21

Local and regional art and a farmers market, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com.

NORTH BEACHES ART WALK

Galleries of Atlantic and Neptune beaches are open from 5-9 p.m. tonight and every third Thur. from Sailfish Drive in Atlantic Beach to Neptune Beach and Town Center, 249-2222, nbaw.org.

CARLOS MENCIA

Mencia, known for the Comedy Central hit show Mind of Mencia has a comedic gift for insightful material and precise delivery. He appears at 8 p.m. Aug. 21-23; 10 p.m. Aug. 22 and 23 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, $25-$30, 292-4242, comedyzone.com.

AUGUST 22 GREAT SOUTHERN TAILGATE COOK-OFF

The fifth annual cook-off is held at 3 p.m. today and at 10 a.m. Aug. 23, featuring barbecue teams from across the country competing for cash, prizes and bragging rights, plus live music by The Dirt Floor Krackers, The Swingin’ Medallions, Beech Street

June 9-13 June 16-20 June 23-27 July 14-18 July 21-25 (All Girls) July 28-August 1 August 4-8

RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET

UPTOWN SATURDAY NIGHT

The self-guided tour features galleries, antique stores and shops open from 5-9 p.m. tonight and every last Sat. in St. Augustine’s San Marco District, 824-3152.

AUGUST 31 SUMMER MOVIE CLASSICS

The annual series wraps up with a 50th anniversary celebration of Goldfinger, starring Sean Connery, Honor Blackman, Gert Fröbe and Harold Sakata as Oddjob, that inscrutable man with the deadly bowler, screened at 2 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, 355-2787. Tickets are $7.50; $45 for 10 films. floridatheatre.com

Listings complied by Amanda Long, Travis Crawford, David Johnson and Marlene Dryden. Photos by Dennis Ho.

THE ADDISON ON AMELIA ISLAND The Addison is a disinctive historic property in the heart of Fernandina. The original 1870s antebellum house features sunny en-suite rooms, the majority overlooking a private fountain courtyard. Many have spacious whirlpools and several feature individual private porches. This intimate retreat caters to your every need, whether it be a gourmet breakfast, an individually prepared picnic or afternoon refreshment, or the simple luxury of allowing you to sit back, relax, and watch the world go by slowly on your own porch.

614 Ash Street • (904) 277-1604 www.addisononamelia.com

THE FAIRBANKS HOUSE

Elegant 1885 Italianate villa. Luxury-class inn with upscale amenities. Large rooms, suites, private cottages, Jacuzzis, fireplaces. Gourmet breakfast, evening social hour. Romance Packages, Girls Getaway. Smoke-free!

227 South 7th Street • (904) 277-0500 www.fairbankshouse.com

THE ELIZABETH POINTE LODGE AMELIA ISLAND

• NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC FOR BREAKFAST AND LUNCH.

The Pointe is situated on the beach overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. Focusing upon individualized attention with a staff that wants to exceed your expectations, The Pointe offers overnight guests complimentary full breakfast, Wi-Fi, beach equipment, morning newspaper and parking. Enjoy breakfast, lunch or even a glass of wine on the terrace overlooking the Atlantic. Room service and concierge assistance are available 24 hours.

98 South Fletcher Avenue • (800) 772-3359 info@elizabethpointelodge.com

AMELIA ISLAND WILLIAMS HOUSE

Beautiful antebellum Inn with spacious guest rooms boasting the modern amenities guests love while safekeeping the old world charm. Romantic working fireplaces, antiques from around the world, private baths, whirlpool tubs, spa robes and fresh flowers are a few of the luxuries you may expect. Enjoy our beautifully landscaped gardens, fountains and our sweeping verandahs. Feast on a delicious gourmet breakfast each morning and sip wine ‘neath 500-year-old oak trees. All your worries will drift away.

103 S. 9th Street • (904) 277-2328 www.williamshouse.com

Amelia Island is 13 miles of unspoiled beaches, quaint shops, antique treasures and superb dining in a 50-block historic district less than one hour north of Jacksonville. MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 35


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Our Picks Reasons to leave the house this week

VISUAL ARTS RYAN RUMMEL & DIOGENES

At once ethereal and crudely childlike, Ryan Rummel’s muted illustrations depict seemingly pleasant-looking nudes regarding their disturbing environments with bored or passive expressions. Rummel, owner of Downtown’s Club TSI, creates ink portraits overlaid with acrylic paint and red clay stains. In stark contrast to Rummel’s, Diogenes’ art consists of found objects colorfully painted to look a bit like obscenely freakish faces. His work fuses inorganic and organic, a contrast with an otherworldly appearance – like the set from Killer Klowns from Outerspace, if designed by Marcel Duchamp. Reception, 6-8 p.m. May 22; exhibit runs through July 3, Florida Mining Gallery, Southside, free.

GARAGE ROCK JACUZZI BOYS

Jacuzzi Boys, a Miami psychedelic garage-rock group, caught the eye of punk pioneer Iggy Pop, who called them a band with a “stupid name, but they’ve got great spirit.” The trio headlines a short tour after opening for hugely successful indie darlings Vampire Weekend. After six years playing together, the South Florida natives are finally reaching something approaching mainstream success with their new album, a self-titled and critically well-received collection of fuzzy but polished tunes. They share the Underbelly stage with St. Augustine’s queer garage-rock sweethearts Queen Beef and local postpunks Boggsie Brigade. 9 p.m. May 27, Underbelly, Downtown, $10 at the door.

COMEDY HUGGY LOWDOWN & CHRIS PAUL

OLD-TIME STRING MUSIC OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW

Twenty years ago, Old Crow Medicine Show’s current level of mainstream success was inconceivable. The seven-piece string band collective cut its teeth the old-fashioned way, coalescing around streetcorner busking sessions and mountain-holler hoedowns. A fortuitous (and spontaneous) performance for bluegrass legend Doc Watson in 2000 gave OCMS its fi rst big break, followed in 2004 by a co-author arrangement with Bob Dylan on “Wagon Wheel,” now one of the Great American Songbook’s most prominent entries (despite its ubiquitous treatment by Hootie, sans Blowfi sh). Get ready to stomp your feet and clap your hands because these stadium-level stars, Billboard chart toppers and Grand Ole Opry members have one of the most riveting, authentically revivalist stage presences in the world. 7 p.m. May 25, St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $29.75-$39.75.

You know that one uncle who’s hilarious at family reunions, but outside the family circle his jokes fall flat? That’s about the best way to sum up comedy duo Huggy Lowdown and Chris Paul. They’re staples on the syndicated Tom Joyner Morning Show, bringing their style of humor to more than 8 million listeners every weekday morning. Paul’s shared a stage with comedy heavyweights Chris Rock, Drew Carey and Martin Lawrence. Huggy’s celebrity gossip and Paul’s musical parodies take aim at the night crowd. 8 p.m. May 22-25, 10 p.m. May 23 and 24 at The Comedy Zone, Mandarin, $20-$25.

WWI CENTENNIAL BREAKFAST IN THE PARK

One of Jacksonville’s major claims to fame is having the largest urban park system in the U.S. The most popular and picturesque of these, Riverside’s Memorial Park, an ideal spot for a romantic picnic, is also steeped in Jacksonville history. In remembrance of the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, the U.S. Navy’s Color Guard opens a brief formal ceremony before local author Wayne Wood speaks about the history of the park, dedicated in 1924, and its centerpiece sculpture Life, designed by C. Adrian Pillars (left). 9-10:30 a.m. May 26 at Memorial Park, Riverside, with breakfast treats donated by local merchants, free. A game of Ultimate Frisbee follows the ceremony. 36 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

SURF ROCK THE DELUSIONAIRES

A Portuguese music blogger describes The Delusionaires’ sound as “dirty-rock instrumental played and poorly recorded in a filthy striptease nightclub full of fat drunks throwing up at the bar.” You can’t get much higher praise than that. The sleazy Orlando surf-rock quartet bring their brand of garage-punk mania to Shanghai Nobby’s with their rockabilly do-wop friends The Wild Tones and local heroes Thee Harmonious Fists, best known for their holiday classic, “Merry Fistmas.” 9 p.m. May 24, Shanghai Nobby’s, St. Augustine, $7.


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A&E // MUSIC

EMPIRES THROUGH ATheSHOT GLASS rise of the defiant Lucinda Williams

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38 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

received modest attention, selling 100,000 n the 1970s, Lucinda Williams was too bluesy copies. But when Carpenter put a honeyfor folk. In the 1980s, she was too country for dipped spin on it, the song rocketed up the rock and too alternative for country. In the charts, earning Williams a reputation as an 1990s, it took her six tries to record two albums in-demand songstress. — and the process nearly drove her and all her confidants, band members and significant others Still, solo success eluded her. It wasn’t crazy. But 1998’s Car Wheels on a Gravel Road, until 1998’s Car Wheels on a Gravel Road that released when Williams was 44, represented her Williams finally figured out how to meld her big break, bigger than becoming a songwriter’s mournful roots-rock, fiery electric blues and songwriter, bigger than winning a Grammy for slacker alt-country into a cohesive whole. But Mary Chapin Carpenter’s No. 1 rendition of that album was even harder to finish than her 1992 song “Passionate Kisses,” bigger than Sweet Old World. She recorded 13 songs for being a cult favorite with an alluringly forlorn it three different times over six years. Each voice that one critic described as “the kind that time, she was notorious for walking out of suggests the rise and fall of empires as witnessed sessions, flying collaborators in from all over the world to record through the bottom of a and then scrapping shot glass.” their contributions, Born in Lake Charles, LUCINDA WILLIAMS with and forgetting lyrics Louisiana, Williams had THE KENNETH BRIAN BAND in mid-take she’d sung an upbringing that was 8 p.m. May 25 hundreds of times. aristocratic and Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, $38, 209-0399, “I’m trying to adventurous in an pvconcerthall.com keep the edge on,” she academic way. Her father, explained to the New Miller, was a lauded poet York Times in 1997. (he read at Clinton’s second inauguration) and a literature professor who bounced from teaching And keep it she did. Williams struck an impressive balance between hangdog despair, post to teaching post all over the South and sexual loneliness and kick-ass independence beyond. Lucinda, who started playing guitar throughout the now-classic material. and writing songs at age 12, got kicked out of Between 2001 and 2011, Williams finally high school and dropped out of the University got over her dislike of recording, releasing twice of Arkansas before wood-shedding through as many albums in those 10 years as she did in New Orleans, Austin, San Francisco, Houston, the previous 20. She won another Grammy in Nashville and New York City. She performed 2001 for “Get Right with God” and was named every chance she got and recorded when and the best songwriter in America by Time in where she could; Smithsonian Folkways backed 2002. Today, Williams is a bona fide hero of her first two albums, a collection of country and blues covers and a hesitant collection of originals the music business: a no-nonsense woman who does things her own way at her own pace. called Happy Woman Blues. Her current tour is a victory lap for the 25th Nothing in her future discography would anniversary of her self-titled debut album. ever be so obviously positive again. In the mid-’80s, CBS Records in Los Angeles Life for Lucinda Williams has turned out famously paid for a demo and said it was pretty well. A grueling tour schedule for the too country before sending it to its Nashville last 40 years has helped her beat spinal bifida. division, which found it was too alternative. A lifetime of doomed love was conquered when Further struggles ensued; UK label Rough she married music executive and manager Tom Trade backed her 1988 self-titled breakout, but Overby in 2009. And, past age 60, she hasn’t commercial success didn’t accompany critical given up on life as a hell-raising nomad. success. RCA Records president Bob Buziak As she told The New Yorker in 2009, signed her immediately thereafter; Buziak got “They’re always saying, ‘You must be glad to canned, though, and the creation of 1992’s get back to your own bed again.’ Well, depends on how you look at it. First of all, I need a new Sweet Old World morphed into an exercise in bed. I’m still restless as hell.” near-futility, taking three tries to get right. Sung in Williams’ gravelly, homespun Nick McGregor soprano, lead single “Passionate Kisses” mail@folioweekly.com


A&E // MUSIC CONCERTS THIS WEEK DALE CRIDER, DEL SUGGS, BOB PATTERSON 7:30 p.m. May 21 at Mudville Music Room, 3104 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, 352-7008. STAGES & STEREOS, DARLING PARADE, THE ORPHAN THE POET, URSA MINOR 7 p.m. May 21 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496. FOLIO WEEKLY’S DEEP UNDERGROUND: FRACTAL, AUDIO AWAKENING, JAMISON WILLIAMS 7 p.m. May 21 at 1904 Music Hall, 19 N. Ocean St., Downtown, free. ANTIQUE ANIMALS May 22 at Mellow Mushroom, 1018 Third St. N., Jax Beach, 241-5600. CRANFORD HOLLOW 8 p.m. May 22 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, 398-7496. SEAHAVEN, ADVENTURES, FOXING, LOCALS 7 p.m. May 22 at Underbelly, 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, $12, 353-6067. STYX, FOREIGNER, DON FELDER 6:30 p.m. May 23 at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., 209-0367. WORTH ROAD, SUMERLIN, AS WE ARE, RYVLS, 3 KNIGHTS AND A ROSE 7:30 p.m. May 23 at Murray Hill Theatre, 932 Edgewood Ave. S., $8-$10, 388-3179. LEFTOVER SALMON, CANARY IN THE COALMINE, YANKEE SLICKERS 8 p.m. May 23 at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $20, 246-2473. NORTHE, SUNSPOTS, HARAKIRI, MATTEO QUMENTO 8 p.m. May 23 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496. JAZZ FEST AFTER DARK: FUSEBOX FUNK, HERD OF WATTS, GROOVE COALITION, THE HEAVY PETS, BIG SOMETHING, SQUEEDLEPUSS, THE WOBBLY TOMS, GUY & THE YEHUDAS, GOLIATH FLORES, THE DOG APOLLO, RICKOLUS, CIVIL BRUTE, JEREMIAH JOHNSON, BILLY BUCHANAN, ARVID SMITH, ALBERT AYLER COMMEMORATION 10 p.m.-2 a.m. May 23 at Underbelly, 1904 Music Hall, Burro Bar, Dive Bar, The Volstead, Karpeles Manuscript Museum. BRENT BYRD, SAVANNA LEIGH BASSETT, JORDYN STODDARD May 24 at Riverside Arts Market, 715 Riverside Ave., free, 389-2449. PRIMITIVE HARD DRIVE, SONS NOT BEGGARS, SYLENT VYLENTZ 8 p.m. May 24 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496. DALTON STANLEY 8 p.m. May 24 at Murray Hill Theatre, 932 Edgewood Ave. S., Murray Hill, $5, 388-3179. PALM TREES & POWER LINES 8 p.m. May 24 at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach, $8, 246-2473. JAZZ FEST AFTER DARK: MOON HOOCH, S.P.O.R.E., LUMAGROVE, DEWARS, FOUR FAMILIES, CANARY IN THE COALMINE, THIS FRONTIER NEEDS HEROES, SNAKE BLOOD REMEDY, COUGAR BARREL, BEAU CRUM & THE WEIGHTED HANDS, CHRISTINA WAGNER, THE SH-BOOMS, MAMA BLUE, SKELETON BROS., GOLIATH FLORES, ALBERT AYLER COMMEMORATION 10 p.m.-2 a.m. May 24 at Underbelly, 1904 Music Hall, Burro Bar, Dive Bar, The Volstead, Karpeles Manuscript Museum. GEORGE ACOSTA, KIMBALL COLLINS, MEMORY MACHINE, ROCKS’N’BLUNTS, DAVE BERG May 24, Eclipse Nightclub, 4219 St. Johns Ave., Avondale, 387-3582. BOOTSY COLLINS 8 p.m. May 25 at Mavericks at The Landing, 2 Independent Dr., Downtown, $25, 356-1110. OFF JAZZ CONCERT: MUSIQ SOULCHILD 7 p.m. May 25 at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Downtown, $38.50, 355-2787. THE ICARUS ACCOUNT, HYDRA MELODY, JOSHUA WICKER, ARBOR PARK 4 p.m. May 25 at Underbelly, 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, $8-$12, 353-6067. JAZZ FEST AFTER DARK: TAMBOR, NAUGHTY PROFESSOR, NOISEBENDER & JOE YORIO, JACKSONVEGAS, PARKER URBAN BAND, MONDO MIKE & THE PO’BOYS, PROJECT IMPROV, WILLIE EVANS JR., PATEN LOCKE, PATRICK EVAN, COALITION, UNIVERSAL GREEN, WHOLE WHEAT BREAD, ALL NIGHT WOLVES, RIVERSIDE TUBA QUARTET, TAYLOR ROBERTS, ALBERT AYLER COMMEMORATION 10 p.m.-2 a.m. May 25 at Underbelly, 1904 Music Hall, Burro Bar, Dive Bar, The Volstead, Karpeles Manuscript Museum.

DON’T WAKE ME: Torrance, California-based band Seahaven dropped its sophomore album Reverie Lagoon: Music for Escapism Only in March and carried listeners into a pop-punk fantasy. Seahaven rocks Downtown Jacksonville with Adventures and Foxing on May 22 at Underbelly. Photo: Elena De Soto OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW 7 p.m. May 25 at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., $29.75-$39.75, 209-0367. LUCINDA WILLIAMS, KENNETH BRIAN BAND 8 p.m. May 25 at Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 1050 A1A N., $38, 209-0399. UH HUH HER, DJ KIM ANH 8 p.m. May 26 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $17, 398-7496. JACUZZI BOYS 8 p.m. May 27 at Underbelly, 113 E. Bay St., Downtown, 353-6067. MAYDAY!, LEGIT 8 p.m. May 27 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, $8, 398-7496. STEEZ CLICK, NATHAN RYAN, PHAT J, JJ DAMON, POTENT DA ROCKSTAR, PINKYKILLA, THROWDOWN KID 5 p.m. May 28 at Aqua, 11000 Beach Blvd., Southside, $15, 997-2063.

UPCOMING CONCERTS TARRUS RILEY & THE BLACK SOIL BAND, DEAN FRASIER May 29, Freebird Live BLAIR CRIMMINS & THE HOOKERS May 29, Underbelly KEVIN GATES May 29, Aqua

LADIES WITH LYRICS: JULIE DURDEN, REBECCA ZAPEN, BRENDA DAVID May 30, Mudville Music Room MARUTA, PANSPERMIA, CUTE & CUDDLY KITTENS, LEPROSY May 30 & 31, Burro Bar BREAD & CIRCUS, DANIEL AMEDEE, BETHANY & THE TROUBADOURS, WEEKEND ATLAS, CATALYST May 30, Jack Rabbits DAVID LAREAU & THE COPPERPOTS, NEIL ALDAY & FURTHER SOUTH, SIX TIME LOSERS May 30, Underbelly GENERATOR, PRIMITIVE HARD DRIVE, PIPESTONE, A NEW DECREE May 30, Freebird Live BUFFALO BUFFALO, NOCTURNAL STATE OF MIND, SACK THE CITY, FIFIELD May 30, Murray Hill Theatre TRAVELIN’ LIGHT, DEE ABOOD May 31, Mudville Music Room CHICAGO & JACKSONVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA May 31, Metropolitan Park JESSE MONTOYA, PRETTY POLICE STATE, SPIRAL BOUND, JACOB CREEL May 31, Riverside Arts Market DISPLACE, HOLEY MISS MOLEY May 31, Underbelly U2 BY UV May 31, Freebird Live SWITCHFOOT, THOUSAND FOOT KRUTCH May 31, St. Augustine Amphitheatre

Mon-

MEN’S NIGHT OUT BEER PONG 9PM FREE POOL ALL U CAN EAT CRABLEGS

Tues-

TEXAS HOLD ’EM STARTS AT 7 P.M.

Wed-

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT t,*%4&"5'3&&'30.1. 501. t#6:8*/(4(&5 8*/(4'3&& t13*$&%"11&5*;&34  #"30/-: 1.$-04& t#"3#*/(053*7*"

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OPEN MIC NITE 9PM 13*$&%%3*/,4 1.".

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SUPER NATURAL 9:30pm 13*$&"114'3* #"30/-: 1.

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SUPER NATURAL 9:30pm %&$,.64*$1.1.

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%&$,.64*$1.1. LIVE MUSIC 4:30-8:30pm

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 39


A&E // MUSIC

THE KNIFE

PUNK NEVER DIES

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t was the summer of 1985, and I was an incoming freshman at the University of Florida. Gainesville was seriously happening at the time, with indie record stores and easyto-sneak-into nightclubs lining the streets around campus. As a 17-year-old musician and architecture major (yeah … it was a long time ago), I immersed myself in my newfound freedom and interesting musical discoveries, care of some new friends and dorm mates. A highbrow intellectual turned me on to Frank Zappa. A peace-through-vandalism buddy turned me on to black metal, speed metal and crossover punk. Suddenly I was analyzing the dense orchestral rock of Zappa while attending Celtic Frost and Agnostic Front concerts at the local VFW. (Remember when Agnostic Front was hardcore? Didn’t think so.) That year, I saw Corrosion of Conformity, Hellwitch and Death. That year, I was made painfully aware of the long-hair/skinhead rivalry that ruined too many shows. That year, I was asked to join local hardcore band Psychic Violents. That year, the Red Hot Chili Peppers smashed a wedding cake in the campus ballroom on a local cable access TV show. That year, I missed the goddamned Black Flag show. They broke up in 1986, and any hopes of catching my favorite among the era’s best bands were dashed. But my love for aggressive, bloody punk had been established — and it abides to this day. So I was delighted to receive the new compilation album North Florida Punk Rock. Released on May 9 by the folks at the Atlantic Beach record shop Young, Loud & Snotty, the album features 15 Northeast Florida punk groups on vinyl and digital download. But before we talk about the bands, let’s take a moment to appreciate the album itself, and its artwork. First off, this sucker has been pressed on purple-and-white tie-dye vinyl, and it’s a sweet piece. Also noteworthy is the cover illustration by local horror artist Stephen Bunnell, which harks back to the hand-drawn covers of ’80s punk and metal albums. A muscle-bound, green-mohawked skeleton threatens fisticuffs. He’s wearing a purple wristband. OK, not enough space here to cover all 40 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

the bands featured therein, but here are a few highlights: The package kicks off with The Reachers’ “1989,” apropos as its gang vocals reminisce about skateboarding, going to shows and ruling the neighborhood. Track 2, one of the best on the record, is a blistering tune called “Dead World” by Full On Assault. It also recalls the heyday of hardcore with an undeniable West Coast vibe. “I’m a Drunk,” by the Wastedist, is a speedy little number that might be considered a rejoinder to Black Flag’s “Drinking and Driving.” F.F.N. goes decidedly low-fi with “No Regrets & Alcohol,” another one of the record’s better cuts. It’s an angry screamer that would whip up a pretty nasty skank pit at a cul-de-sac house party, for sure. Faith City Fiasco opens the flip side with a reverb-heavy rebel yell titled “Worst Prom Ever.” Almost more metal than punk, it’s just sloppy enough to be respectable. Powerball offers a crunchy bastard of a tune with “Pull the Trigger.” Another contender for top honors, this one is nearly too musical to fit with the others on the record, as it’s heavy on intricate, well-performed riffage. Deeper into the album, Nine Tenths blasts through the very excellent, short-but-super-pissed-off “Lazy Parent,” a breakneck crossover nugget that could easily double as a D.R.I. song. If the YLS comp is a true representation of Jacksonville’s punk scene, then I’ve got to get back out there and check out some shows. Despite cheeseball attempts by some nowhuge pop bands to call themselves punk, the genre seems resilient enough to survive that nonsense. Punk — real punk — never seems to die, and the bands on this compilation are the ones keeping it alive, rude and snotty. And that’s a good thing. John E. Citrone theknife@folioweekly.com

Young, Loud & Snotty, 79 Sailfish Dr. E., Atlantic Beach North Florida Punk Rock vinyl is $15.

Digital download is $10, available through CD Baby, iTunes and Amazon.

JEREMIAH DALY, COREY KILGANNON, ALEXIS RHODE, SUMMER GOODMAN, JACOB HUDSON May 31, Murray Hill Theatre BUGZY EVANS, ENIGMA, DENNIS LEE, SKRILLA, DJ CAINE, DJ ZEUS May 31, Jack Rabbits THE CRAZY GIRLS, DANKA, PRIME TREES May 31, 1904 Music Hall MATT HIRES, THE WILD AFTER, KYLE COX June 1, Jack Rabbits MONGOLOIDS, RUDE AWAKENING, MODERN PAIN, MEAN STREAK June 2, Underbelly AMERICAN AQUARIUM, BRYCE ALASTAIR BAND June 2, Jack Rabbits FOR THE FALLEN DREAMS, OBEY THE BRAVE, I THE BREATHER, REFLECTIONS June 3, Underbelly ANDREW JACKSON JIHAD, CHEAP GIRLS, DOGBRETH June 5, Jack Rabbits SUZI TRASH June 5, Burro Bar SCUM, DMIZE, STATIK OF RX June 6, Aqua WEEZER June 6, St. Augustine Amphitheatre DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS, WATER LIARS June 6, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall GRIM ZIPPER TOUR: SCUM, DMIZE, STATIK OF RX June 6, Aqua CHRISTOPHER CROSS & JACKSONVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA June 6, Metropolitan Park KINGS OF HOLLYWOOD TOUR: APPETITE FOR DESTRUCTION (Guns N’ Roses tribute), RED & WHITE CRUE (Mötley Crüe tribute), POISON’D June 6, Freebird Live ARCHNEMESIS June 6, 1904 Music Hall SONS OF HIPPIES, BASK, APPALACHIAN DEATH TRAP June 6, Burro Bar JOSH HOWELL & FRIENDS June 6, Murray Hill Theatre RICKOLUS, LAKE DISNEY, RUFFIANS June 6, Jack Rabbits SONGWRITER’S CIRCLE ANNIVESARY: LARRY MANGUM, MIKE SHACKELFORD, JAMIE DEFRATES June 7, Mudville Music Room BOSTON June 7, St. Augustine Amphitheatre P.S. CANCER SUCKS BENEFIT: PARKRIDGE, ROSEDALE, WINTER WAVE, ATTIS ON THE PINE June 7, Jack Rabbits DENDERA, BLOODBATH, BOGGSIE BRIGADE, KING PLYWOOD June 7, Burro Bar ANIMALS AS LEADERS, CONQUERING DYSTOPIA, CHON June 8, Murray Hill Theatre GOSSAMER, FRONTIER June 9, Burro Bar PURPLE FEST: G-MAYN-FROST, ASKMEIFICARE, XXII, LEGIT, INFAMOUS June 10, Freebird Live THE PAPER JETS June 10, Jack Rabbits MY LIFE WITH THE THRILL KILL KULT, DJ TOXIC RAINBOW June 10, Underbelly ARC & STONES June 10, Burro Bar TREEHOUSE!, SUN DRIED VIBES, WHO RESCUED WHO June 11, Jack Rabbits BEARTOE, PALEFACE June 11, Underbelly THE EVERYMEN, THE VIVID, THE DULL BLADES June 11, Burro Bar ACOUSTIC ALCHEMY June 12, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall MOVE LIVE June 12, Florida Theatre SLAUGHTER DAUGHTERS June 12, Burro Bar WAR OF AGES, BEYOND THE SHORE, NEVERENDER June 12, Murray Hill Theatre FOXY SHAZAM, LARRY & HIS FLASK June 13, Freebird Live OTTMAR LIEBERT, LUNA NEGRA June 13, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall MIDNITE, 100% ST. CROIX ROOTS June 13, Jack Rabbits THE CORBITT BROTHERS, LEFTY WILLIAMS BAND, APPLEBUTTER EXPRESS June 13, Underbelly LASTWATCH, URSA MINOR, CLC June 13, Murray Hill Theatre FLORIDA COUNTRY SUPERFEST: LUKE BRYAN, JASON ALDEAN, ERIC CHURCH, MIRANDA LAMBERT, FLORIDA GEORGIA LINE, LITTLE BIG TOWN, BIG & RICH, EASTON CORBIN, COLT FORD, JOE NICHOLS June 14-15, EverBank Field AMB, PRAY, RAZORZ EDGE June 14, Aqua SHAUN PEACE BAND June 14, Jack Rabbits ROD MacDONALD June 14, Mudville Music Room COUNTING CROWS, TOAD THE WET SPROCKET June 14, St. Augustine Amphitheatre BANE, CODE ORANGE KIDS, GIVE, RHYTHYM OF FEAR June 15, Underbelly THE ROUGH & TUMBLE June 17, Burro Bar PLASTIC PLANETS June 17, Jack Rabbits TERRAVITA, J. RABBIT, COMBUSTIBLE June 18, Freebird Live GYPSY STAR, REBECCA ZAPEN June 19, Mudville Music Room GOO GOO DOLLS, DAUGHTRY, PLAIN WHITE T’s June 19, St. Augustine Amphitheatre ZOSO (Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience) June 19, Mavericks HUMMING HOUSE June 19, Jack Rabbits ANDY GRAMMER June 19, Freebird Live KID SLIM, ZERO CALORIES, CONFESSION KILLS June 20, Jack Rabbits VACATION CLUB June 20, Underbelly OKOA REFUGE BENEFIT: GREY PALUSZYNSKI, BE EASY BAND June 20, Murray Hill Theatre MERCYGIRL, WHOSOEVER SOUTH June 21, Murray Hill Theatre

ANDY KING’S SUMMER SOLSTICE SOIREE June 21, Mudville Music Room VACATION CLUB June 21, Shanghai Nobby’s PAUL McCARTNEY June 22, Veterans Memorial Arena THE CAGE ANIMALS, LAST CHANCE FOR SARAH, DIRTY AUTOMATIC June 22, Jack Rabbits BEN’S MEMORIAL BENEFIT/HOPE FOUNDATION: MR. AL PETE, DIALECTABLE, MJ BAKER, MAS APPEAL, DILLON, FF JB, CHEECH, WILL FRAZIER, JEREMY BAKER June 22, Freebird Live CRANFORD HOLLOW June 25, Jack Rabbits SUMMER HORNS: DAVE KOZ, MINDI ABAIR, GERALD ALBRIGHT, RICHARD ELLIOT June 26, Florida Theatre JIM CARRICK, MAJA GIATANA June 26, Mudville Music Room REBELUTION, IRATION, THE GREEN, STICK FIGURE, DJ MACKLE June 27, St. Augustine Amphitheatre SHOT DOWN IN FLAMES (AC/DC tribute) June 27, Freebird Live FLAGSHIP ROMANCE CD RELEASE CONCERT June 27, Mudville Music Room SEVEN HANDLE CIRCUS June 27, Jack Rabbits DAVID DONDERO June 28, Shanghai Nobby’s SOSOS June 28, Jack Rabbits THE WHOLETONES, THE WILDER SONS June 28, Freebird Live THE WOODGRAINS June 29, Jack Rabbits I AM THE WITNESS, SECRET KEEPER, AMONGST THE FORGOTTEN, I AM KING, AS ALICE SLEEPS, OUR WALKING DECEPTION July 1, Murray Hill Theatre CHRIS HENRY July 3, Mudville Music Room THE PURE ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE July 4, Freebird Live GUANTANAMO BAYWATCH, WET NURSE July 5, Underbelly SHINOBI NINJA, VIKTR July 5, Jack Rabbits BACKTRACK, HARM’S WAY, EXPIRE, TURNSTILE, SUBURBAN SCUM, DOWNPRESSER, IRON MIND, FREEDOM July 6, Underbelly ZAK WATERS July 7, Jack Rabbits LEGIT, G MAYN FROST, ASKMEIFICARE, ALCATRAZ, PINKYKILLA, SYLENT VYLENTZ July 12, Freebird Live DAVE MATTHEWS BAND July 15, Veterans Memorial Arena RAY LAMONTAGNE, JENNY LEWIS, THE BELLE BRIGADE July 15, The Florida Theatre JEREMY MESSERSMITH July 18, Jack Rabbits RITUAL UNION CD RELEASE PARTY July 18, Deep Search Records THI’SL, BRINSON, SECKOND CHAYNCE July 19, Murray Hill Theatre LAVELL CRAWFORD July 19, T-U Center GROUNDATION July 19, Freebird Live ALL NEW ATMOSPHERE July 20, Jack Rabbits AMERICAN IDOL LIVE! July 20, St. Augustine Amphitheatre OPOSSUMHOLLER, POOR RICHARDS, THE SENSES, SNAKE BLOOD REMEDY July 24, Jack Rabbits CULTURAL PROFETICA July 25, Freebird Live YING YANG TWINS July 25, Jack Rabbits EMMYLOU HARRIS July 26, T-U Center SARA BAREILLES July 26, St. Augustine Amphitheatre FALL OUT BOY, NEW POLITICS July 27, St. Augustine Amphitheatre THE SOULSHINE TOUR: MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD, SOJA, BRETT DENNEN, TREVOR HALL July 30, St. Augustine Amphitheatre GAVIN DEGRAW, MATT NATHANSON July 31, St. Augustine Amphitheatre DIRTY HEADS, PEPPER, AER Aug. 2, St. Augustine Amphitheatre MAXWELL Aug. 3, T-U Center ELLIS PAUL, DONNY BRAZILE Aug. 8, Original Café Eleven ULTIMATE ELVIS BASH Aug. 9, The Florida Theatre CROSBY, STILLS & NASH Aug. 10, St. Augustine Amphitheatre ROCK ’N’ BLUES FEST: JOHNNY WINTER BAND, EDGAR WINTER BAND, VANILLA FUDGE, PETER RIVERA (Rare Earth), KIM SIMMONDS (Savoy Brown) Aug. 14, The Florida Theatre PANIC! AT THE DISCO, WALK THE MOON, YOUNGBLOOD HAWKE Aug. 16, St. Augustine Amphitheatre THE OFFSPRING, BAD RELIGION, PENNYWISE, FEAR Aug. 19, St. Augustine Amphitheatre THE FRESH BEAT BAND Aug. 22, St. Augustine Amphitheatre BOB WEIR, RATDOG, CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD Aug. 24, St. Augustine Amphitheatre THREE DOORS DOWN ACOUSTIC Sept. 7, Florida Theatre ZZ TOP, JEFF BECK Sept. 7, St. Augustine Amphitheatre CONNECTION FESTIVAL: KERMIT RUFFINS & THE BBQ SWINGERS, LESS THAN JAKE, SURFER BLOOD, WHOLE WHEAT BREAD, TREME BRASS BAND, ORQUESTRA EL MACABEO, LA QUILOMBERA, THIS FRONTIER NEEDS HEROES, JACKIE STRANGER, WEEKEND ATLAS, NORTHE, EGO KILLER, JAH ELECT & THE I QUALITY BAND, UNIVERSAL GREEN, ORANGE AIR, ALEXIS RHODE, RYVLS, PROFESSOR KILMURE, RUFFIANS, THE GOOTCH, ASKMEIFICARE, DIRTY AUTOMATIC, WOVEN IN, GARRETT ON ACOUSTIC, TOM BENNETT BAND, MONDO MIKE & THE PO BOYS, ARTILECT, OSCAR MIKE, KANA KIEHM, PARKER URBAN BAND, KNOCK FOR SIX, NEVER ENDING STRUGGLE Sept. 12-14, Downtown Jacksonville 1964: THE TRIBUTE (Beatles tribute band) Sept. 13, The Florida Theatre SHERYL CROW Sept. 14, The Florida Theatre THE PRETTY RECKLESS, ADELITA’S WAY Sept. 18, Freebird Live KYLE KINANE Sept. 24, Jack Rabbits


A&E // MUSIC MOTLEY CRUE, ALICE COOPER Oct. 19, Veterans Memorial Arena CROWDER, ALL SONS & DAUGHTERS, CAPITAL KINGS Oct. 19, Christ’s Church, Greenland LOS LONELY BOYS Oct. 21, The Florida Theatre ANJELAH JOHNSON Oct. 24, The Florida Theatre CELTIC THUNDER Nov. 15, The Florida Theatre A PETER WHITE CHRISTMAS: PETER WHITE, RICK BRAUN, MINDI ABAIR Dec. 16, The Florida Theatre JOE BONAMASSA Dec. 17, The Florida Theatre ARLO GUTHRIE ALICE’S RESTAURANT MASSACREE Jan. 20, The Florida Theatre KATHLEEN MADIGAN Jan. 22, The Florida Theatre

CLUBS AMELIA ISLAND, FERNANDINA BEACH

DAVID’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE, 802 Ash St., 310-6049 John Springer every Tue.-Wed. Aaron Bing every Fri. & Sat. DOG STAR TAVERN, 10 N. Second St., 277-8010 Working Class Stiff at 9:30 p.m. every Tue. PALACE SALOON, 117 Centre St., 491-3332 Buck Smith every Tue. THE SURF, 3199 S. Fletcher Ave., 491-8999 DJ Roc every Wed. Honey Badgers every Sat.

ARLINGTON, REGENCY

MVP’S SPORTS GRILLE, 12777 Atlantic Blvd., 221-1090 Live music 9 p.m. every Fri. & Sat.

AVONDALE, ORTEGA

CASBAH CAFE, 3628 St. Johns Ave., 981-9966 Goliath Flores at 8 p.m. every Wed. Live jazz every Sun. Live music every Mon. ECLIPSE, 4219 St. Johns Ave., 387-3582 DJ Keith every Tue. DJ Free every Fri. DJ SuZi-Rok every Mon. MELLOW MUSHROOM, 3611 St. Johns Ave., 388-0200 Grandpa’s Cough Medicine on May 22. Live music every Sat. MOJO NO. 4, 3572 St. Johns Ave., 381-6670 Wes Cobb 10 p.m. on May 23. Live music every Fri. & Sat.

BEACHES

(All venues in Jax Beach unless otherwise noted) 200 FIRST STREET, Courtyard, Neptune Beach, 249-2922 Hot Shock at 7:30 p.m. on May 23. Dot Wilder on May 24.

Decoy on May 25 BILLY’S BOATHOUSE, 2321 Beach Blvd., 241-9771 Sho Nuff at 6 p.m. on May 23. Splinters at 5:30 p.m. on May 24. Live music every Thur., Fri. & Sun. CANTINA MAYA, 1021 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 247-3227 Live music May 23-26 CASA MARINA HOTEL, 691 First St. N., 270-0025 RadioLove at 2 p.m. on May 25 CULHANE’S IRISH PUB, 967 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-9595 Jig to a Milestone on May 23. Yankee Slickers on May 30. Irish music 6:30 p.m. every Sun. FLYING IGUANA, 207 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 853-5680 Fat cactus at 10 p.m. on May 23 & 24. Red Beard & Stinky E 10 p.m. every Thur. Darren Corlew 1:30 p.m. every Sun. FLY’S TIE IRISH PUB, 177 E. Sailfish Dr., Atlantic Beach, 246-4293 Wes Cobb every Thur. Charlie Walker every Mon. FREEBIRD LIVE, 200 N. First St., 246-2473 Leftover Salmon, Canary in the Coalmine at 8 p.m. on May 23. Palm Trees & Power Lines at 8 p.m. on May 24. Tarrus Riley & The Black Soil Band, Dean Frasier, Aima Moses, De Lions of Jah, DJ Kenny Page, Raggamuffin at 8 p.m. on May 29 ISLAND GIRL CIGAR BAR, 108 First St., Neptune Beach, 372-0943 Live music every Fri. & Sat. JAXON SOCIAL, 1161 Beach Blvd., 595-5660 The Snacks Blues Band at 9 p.m. on May 23. Live music every Sat. LANDSHARK CAFE, 1728 Third St. N., 246-6024 Lone Wolf at 8 p.m. May 23. Open mic every Wed. Matt Still every Thur. LYNCH’S IRISH PUB, 514 N. First St., 249-5181 Kickin Lassie at 10 p.m. on May 23 & 24. Barrett Jockers every Wed. Split Tone every Thur. Dirty Pete every Sun. Be Easy every Mon. Ryan Campbell every Tue. MELLOW MUSHROOM, 1018 N. Third St., 246-1500 Paul Miller on May 21. Antique Animals on May 22. T3Am on May 23. Ouija Bros. on May 24. Brock Butler on May 25 MEZZA RESTAURANT & BAR, 110 First St., Neptune Beach, 249-5573 Neil Dixon 6-8 p.m. every Tue. Gypsies Ginger 6-9 p.m. every Wed. Mike Shackelford & Steve Shanholtzer 6-8 p.m. every Thur. MOJO KITCHEN, 1500 Beach Blvd., 247-6636 Live music every Fri. NIPPERS BEACH GRILLE, 2309 Beach Blvd., 247-3300 MaryAnn Hawkins at 6 p.m. on May 21 & 26. King Eddie & Pili Pili at 6 p.m. on May 23. Split Tone on May 25. Leslie Baptiste at 6 p.m. on May 27. Live music every Wed.-Sun. NORTH BEACH BISTRO, 725 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 372-4105 Dan Evans at 7 p.m. on May 22. Richard

Smith on May 24 RAGTIME TAVERN, 207 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 241-7877 Pat Rose on May 21. Ivey West Band on May 22. Pop Muzik on May 23 & 24. River City Bluez Band at 7 p.m. on May 25 THE SHIM SHAM ROOM, 333 First St. N., 372-0781 Live music every Mon. & Thur. DJ Nick Fresh every Fri. SLIDERS SEAFOOD GRILLE, 218 First St., Neptune Beach, 246-0881 Billy Bowers at 5 p.m. on May 25 WIPEOUTS GRILL, 1589 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 247-4508 Crazy Daysies at 7:30 p.m. on May 22. Jay Acosta on May 23. Billy Bowers at 7:30 p.m. on May 29

DOWNTOWN

1904 MUSIC HALL, 19 Ocean St. N. Folio Weekly’s Deep Underground: Fractal, Audio Awakening, Jamison Williams at 7 p.m. on May 21. The Heavy Pets, Big Something, Squeedlepuss on May 23. Dewars, Four Families, This Frontier Needs Heroes, Canary in the Coalmine on May 24. Project Improv, JacksonVegas, Parker Urban Band, Mondo Mike & the Po’Boys on May 25. Live music every Thur.-Sat. & Mon. BURRO BAR, 100 E. Adams St., 353-4686 Hardside on May 21. Harakiri, Northe on May 22. Wobbly Toms, Guy & the Yehudas, Goliath Flores on May 23. Snake Blood Remedy, Cougar Barrel, Beau Crum & Weighted Hands, Christina Wagner on May 24. Willie Evans Jr., Paten Locke, Patrick Evan & Co-Alition on May 25. Live music every Wed.-Sat. DIVE BAR, 331 E. Bay St., 359-9090 The Dog Apollo, Rickolus, Civil Brute, Jeremiah Johnson on May 23. The Sh Booms, Mama Blue, Skelton Bros. on May 24. Universal Green, Whole Wheat Bread, All Night Wolves, Riverside Tuba Quartet on May 25 DOS GATOS, 123 E. Forsyth St., 354-0666 DJ NickFresh at 9 p.m. every Sat. FIONN MacCOOL’S, Jax Landing, Ste. 176, 374-1247 Spade McQuade from 5-8 p.m. on May 21. Braxton Adamson from 5-8 p.m., The Gootch at 8:30 p.m. on May 23. Spade McQuade from 5-8 p.m. on May 28 JACKSONVILLE LANDING, 2 Independent Dr., 353-1188 Clark Hill, Brett Eldredge on May 22. Just Jazz Quartet from 5-6:30 p.m., Von Barlow’s Jazz Journey, The Dream Band from 7-8:30 p.m., Jazz Jam with Lisa Kelly from 9-11 p.m. on May 23. Akia Uwanda 2:30 p.m., Unique Sound 4:30 p.m., The Noel Freidline Quintet 6:30 p.m., The Katz Downstairs 8:30 p.m., Be Easy 10 p.m. a.m. on May 24. The Gary Starling Group with Russell George at 2 p.m., Jax Jazz Collective 4 p.m., Tropic of Cancer 6-7:30 p.m. on May 25.

WEDNESDAY Pat Rose THURSDAY Ivey West Band FRIDAY & SATURDAY Love Monkey SUNDAY River City Bluez Atlantic Blvd. at the Ocean "UMBOUJD#FBDIr

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 41


A&E // MUSIC Live music every Thur.-Sat. MARK’S DOWNTOWN, 315 E. Bay St., 355-5099 DJ Roy Luis every Wed. DJ Vinn Thur. DJ 007 every Fri. Bay Street every Sat. MAVERICKS, Jax Landing, 2 Independent Dr., 356-1110 Bootsy Collins at 8 p.m. on May 25. Joe Buck, Big Tasty every Thur.-Sat. UNDERBELLY, 113 E. Bay St., 353-6067 Seahaven, Adventures, Foxing, Locals at 9 p.m. on May 22. Fusebox Funk, Herd of Watts, Groove Coalition on May 23. Moon Hooch, S.P.O.R.E., Lumagrove on May 24. Tambor, Naughty Professor, Noisebender, Joe Yorio, The Icarus Account, Hydra Melody, Joshua Wicker, Arbor Park on May 25. Jacuzzi Boys on May 27. Blair Crimmons & the Hookers on May 29 THE VOLSTEAD, 115 W. Adams St., 414-3171 Billy Buchanan, Arvid Smith on May 23. Goliath Flores on May 24. Taylor Roberts on May 25

FLEMING ISLAND

MELLOW MUSHROOM, 1800 Town Center Blvd., 541-1999 Live music every Fri. & Sat. WHITEY’S FISH CAMP, 2032 C.R. 220, 269-4198 Super Natural 9:30 p.m. on May 23 & 24. Pierce in Harmony at 5 p.m. on May 24. Open mic 9 p.m. every Thur. Deck music at 5 p.m. every Fri. & Sat., 4:30 p.m. Sun. DJ BG every Mon.

INTRACOASTAL WEST

CLIFF’S BAR & GRILL, 3033 Monument Rd., 645-5162 The Remains at 9 p.m. on May 23. White Rhino on May 24. Live music every Wed., Fri. & Sat. Open mic every Tue. SALSA’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 13500 Beach Blvd., 992-8402 Live guitar music 6-9 p.m. every Tue. & Sat.

MANDARIN, JULINGTON

GATORS DOCKSIDE, 485 S.R. 13 N., Ste. 1, 230-4353 Live music every Fri. & Sat. HARMONIOUS MONKS, 10550 Old St. Augustine, 880-3040 Back From the Brink on May 26. Open mic: Synergy 8 p.m. every Wed. World’s Most Talented Waitstaff 9 p.m. every Fri. MONKEY’S UNCLE, 10503 San Jose Blvd., 260-1349 Live music at 10 p.m. every Sat.

ORANGE PARK, MIDDLEBURG

THE HILLTOP, 2030 Wells, 272-5959 John Michael every Wed.-Sat. PREVATT’S SPORTS BAR, 2620 Blanding Blvd., 282-1564

JAX BEACH SUNDAY Spade McQuade 6-9 pm MONDAY 9pm Back from the Brink TUESDAY Kids night activities 6-8 • $5 kids meal ( under 12) Karaoke 9 pm Great Drink Specials & Late night Menu WEDNESDAY Rock Star Jam 8-12am • Ladies Night 2-4-1 THURSDAY British Invasion Music Extravaganza FRIDAY-SATURDAY “Home of the World’s Most Talented Wait Staff” Dinner & Show Music Extravaganza 9pm-Close

42 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

DJ Tammy 9 p.m. every Wed. THE ROADHOUSE, 231 Blanding Blvd., 264-0611 Cupid’s Alley 10 p.m. on May 23 & 24. DJ Big Mike 10 p.m. every Thur. Live music every Fri. & Sat.

PONTE VEDRA, PALM VALLEY

PUSSER’S GRILLE, 816 A1A N., 280-7766 Lance Neely May 21. Jason Ivey 6 p.m. May 22. Darren Corlew at 8 p.m. on May 23. Dopelimatic at 7 p.m. on May 24. Rhythm Remedy at 4 p.m. on May 25. Live music every Wed.-Sun. TABLE 1, 330 A1A N., Ste. 208, 280-5515 Jesse Cruce at 6 p.m. on May 21. Gary Starling Jazz Band on May 22. The Rubies at 7:30 p.m. on May 23. Sovereign Vine at 7:30 p.m. on May 24. Live music every Wed.-Sat.

RIVERSIDE, WESTSIDE

KICKBACKS, 910 King St., 388-9551 Ray & Taylor 8:30 p.m. every Thur. Robby Shenk every Sun. MURRAY HILL THEATRE, 932 Edgewood Ave. S., 3887807 Worth Road, Sumerlin, As We Are, Poetry & Motion, Ryvls, 3 Knights & a Rose at 7:30 p.m. on May 23. Dalton Stanley at 8 .m. on May 24. Live music every Fri. & Sat. RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET, 715 Riverside Ave., 389-2449 Brent Byrd, Savanna Leigh Bassett, Jordyn Stoddard starting at 10:30 a.m. on May 24

ST. AUGUSTINE

A1A ALEWORKS, 1 King St., 829-2977 Billy Bowers at 8 p.m. on May 22 ANN O’MALLEY’S, 23 Orange St., 825-4040 Doug MacRae at 8:30 p.m. on May 23. Slickwood 8:30 p.m. May 24. Tony Paul Neal 4 p.m. on May 25. Erich Von Otto on May 26. Open mic with Smokin Joe every Tue. CELLAR UPSTAIRS, 157 King St., 826-1594 Mojo Roux on May 23. Ralph E & the Jammers on May 24. Vinny Jacobs at 2 p.m. on May 25 THE CONCH HOUSE, 57 Comares Ave., 829-8646 418 Band & DJ Gibz from 3-7 p.m. on May 25 HARRY’S SEAFOOD, 46 Avenida Menendez, 824-7765 Billy Bowers 6 p.m. on May 21 KINGFISH GRILL, 252 Yacht Club Dr., 824-2111 Doug MacRae at 6 p.m. May 22. Michael Garrett at 7 p.m. on May 23. Jesse Evans at 7 p.m. on May 24. Dennis Fermin at 5 p.m. on May 25 MELLOW MUSHROOM, 410 Anastasia Blvd., 826-4040 Grandpa’s Cough Medicine on May 23. Ivey West Band on May 24. Live music every Fri.

MILL TOP TAVERN & LISTENING ROOM, 19-1/2 St. George St., 829-2329 Back from the Brink at 9 p.m. on May 23 & 24. Brent Byrd at 1 p.m. on May 25. Adam Lee at 9 p.m. on May 28. Aaron Esposito 9 p.m. every Thur. David Strom at 9 p.m. every Mon. Donny Brazile at 9 p.m. every Tue. SANGRIA’S, 35 Hypolita St., 827-1947 Live music at 8 p.m. every Thur. TRADEWINDS, 124 Charlotte St., 829-9336 Lisa & the Mad Hatters 9 p.m. May 23 & 24. Matanzas every Sun.Thur. Elizabeth Roth every Sat. Keith Godwin & the Rio Grande Band every Sun.

ST. JOHNS TOWN CENTER

BLACKFINN GRILLE, 4840 Big Island Dr., 345-3466 Live music 5 p.m. every Wed., 9 p.m. every Thur.-Sat. SUITE, 4880 Big Island Dr., 493-9305 Live music 9 p.m. every Fri. & Sat.

SAN MARCO, SOUTHBANK

JACK RABBITS, 1528 Hendricks Ave., 398-7496 Stages & Stereos, Darling Parade, The Orphan The Poet, Ursa Minor at 7 p.m. on May 21. Cranford Hollow on May 22. Primitive Hard Drive on May 24. Uh Huh Her on May 26. Mayday! on May 27 MUDVILLE MUSIC ROOM, 3104 Atlantic Blvd., 352-7008 Dale Crider, Del Suggs, Bob Patterson at 7:30 p.m. on May 21. Ladies with Lyrics: Julie Durden, Rebecca Zapen, Brenda David at 7:30 p.m. on May 30 THE PARLOUR, 2000 San Marco Blvd., 396-4455 Jangling Sparrows at 9 p.m. on May 22. Redneck Hummus at 9 p.m. on May 23. Snacks at 9:30 p.m. on May 24

SOUTHSIDE, BAYMEADOWS

AQUA, 11000 Beach Blvd., 997-2063 Steez Click, Nathan Ryan, Phat J, JJ Damon, Potent Da Rockstar, Pinkykilla, Throwdown Kid at 7 p.m. on May 28. Kevin Gates on May 29 ISLAND GIRL, 7860 Gate Pkwy., Ste. 115, 854-6060 Live music every Fri. & Sat. LATITUDE 30, 10370 Philips Hwy., 365-5555 VJ Didactic at 9 p.m. on May 22. Fellin vs Didactic at 9 p.m. on May 23. Live music every Thur.-Sat. MY PLACE BAR & GRILL, 9550 Baymeadows Rd., 737-5299 Aaron Sheeks on May 21. Dirty Pete on May 22. Chuck Nash Band on May 23 & 24. Fat Cactus every Mon. Chuck Nash every Tue. WILD WING CAFE, 4555 Southside Blvd., 998-9464 Chris Brinkley on May 21. Chilly Rhino on May 22 & 24. Kurt Lanham, Shotgun Redd on May 23 WORLD OF BEER, 9700 Deer Lake Ct., Ste. 1, 551-5929 Justin Lee at 8 p.m. on May 22. Mitch Kuhman Band at 9 p.m. on May 23. Stella Rising at 9 p.m. on May 24 WXYZ BAR, 4812 Deer Lake Dr. W., 998-4448 DJ Bizzi at 8 p.m. every other Fri.

SPRINGFIELD, NORTHSIDE

HWY. 17 ROADHOUSE, 850532 U.S. 17, Yulee, 225-9211 Live music every Fri. & Sat. RAZZLES SPORTS BAR, 8209 W. Beaver St., 562-8487 River City Kats at 7 p.m. on May 21 THREE LAYERS COFFEEHOUSE, 1602 Walnut St., 355-9791 Open mic at 7 p.m. on May 22. Live music every Sat.

Want to see your band’s concert dates listed here? Email all the details – date, time, venue, ticket /admission price and the band name – to djohnson@ folioweekly.com or mdryden@folioweekly.com. Deadline is 4 p.m. Friday.


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mutants in the stuff fanboy dreams are made of

I

of the master-and-pupil dynamic Logan and t’s a nasty future we open on, in this I’ve-lostcount-how-many-th X-Men flick: dark postXavier once had — way back in the first film, apocalyptic skies and ruined cities left in the 2000’s X-Men — when Logan was a huge wake of the ongoing genocide of mutants and personal mess and the grounded, patient Xavier humans by robot Sentinels. The sci-fi Judgment tamed him (a little bit, anyway). Now, in 1973, Day has come and the Terminators aren’t even younger Xavier (James McAvoy) is the personal bothering to imprison survivors in the Matrix. disaster, his work to help mutants forgotten, his There will be time travel. It’s gonna get grief over losing Raven still stinging; even his fixed. mutant power to read minds has overwhelmed I don’t know how Professor Charles Xavier him to the point where he’s taking a drug to is alive again, in his older Patrick Stewart guise. suppress it. Because the last time he fit into the narrative And then — because they need his help, at this point, he was killed, in 2006’s X-Men: too — they have to spring Magneto (Michael The Last Stand (his consciousness survived in Fassbender) from the most secure prison on another body in an after-credits scene). There’s the planet. Yes, this is a lot of fun. no attempt to explain the details, and it doesn’t Perhaps the most astonishing thing is really matter. He has a plan to stop the Sentinel that this movie is as elegant as it is. The plot war decades in the past, before it even begins. is almost ridiculously convoluted; it crams in The idea is to an absurd number use the powers of of characters and mutant Kitty Pryde traipses all over the X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST (Ellen Page) — who planet, from China ***G can send people’s to New York to Rated PG-13 • Opens May 23 consciousnesses Vietnam to Paris. back in time by a few But even when it’s days, into their own looping back on itself past bodies — to send Charles’ mind back to (and back into previous films!), it works. In 1973, when he will work to stop his old friend, retrospect, there’s surprisingly little “action,” at shape-shifter Raven (Jennifer Lawrence), from least on the scale we’re used to in comic-book killing Dr. Bolivar Trask (Peter Dinklage, flicks; what there is doesn’t look like stuff we’ve in a refreshingly “size-blind” role), who was seen 100 times. Being able to set mutants with developing the Sentinels; ironically, he got unusual powers against one another helps, no support from the U.S. government for his but director Bryan Singer knows that a little work, but his death at the hand of a mutant goes a long way, and holding off showing us convinced them his project was essential. Kitty something spectacular is more effective than says nuh-uh, a mind trip into that distant a past being pornographic about it. will kill the body it arrives in. Ah, but what It’s not astonishing, given the track record about someone who can heal from any injury? of this franchise, that this latest X-Men tale So the job gets turned over to Logan (Hugh is powerfully humanist. But this time out, it’s Jackman), as the only one who could survive not only shown in its ongoing metaphor for the “journey.” “mutation” for any sort of bigotry and irrational This is where the fun really starts. And fear of people who may be a little different. I don’t mean just because Wolverine gets to It’s also evident in its sideways scrutiny of experience his own little Life on Mars retro-fest capital-H Hope as a dialogue between the back in the land of lava lamps and waterbeds. past and the future that we shape right now. There’s also a delicious beauty in the prickly The things we do now matter, and can have Logan having to suddenly become a people an impact far beyond this particular moment. person and actively work at being ingratiating Hindsight that could be acted on through time while also telling an outrageous story about travel might be cool, but foresight works, too. traveling back in time to those whose help he MaryAnn Johanson needs. Better still: We get an exquisite reversal mail@folioweekly.com

© 2013

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 43


A&E // MOVIES

MAGIC LANTERNS

THE LAST MAN TO DIE

T

he real crime here is that practically nobody saw Mr. Nobody when it made its staggered appearance on movie screens beginning in 2009 at the Venice Film Festival. Since then, the movie has been shown in different versions at different limited runs until its home video release in early 2014. That version, the extended director’s cut, has a running time of more than two-and-a-half hours — and it’s worth every minute. Like Cloud Atlas (2012), another magnificent film too few people saw, Mr. Nobody is visually stunning, intellectually challenging and emotionally fulfilling. The nonlinear plot opens in the year 2092 as the whole world watches in awe as the last remaining mortal, 118-year-old Nemo (Jared Leto), nears death. While a jaded video journalist plies his wares to the worldwide social network, a more sympathetic interviewer plumbs Nemo’s memory for the facts of his long life. Thus begins an odyssey of memory, love and loss, fragmented along three different timelines dictated by a small boy’s impossible choice or, perhaps, something as insignificant as a falling leaf — all leading to an absolutely dazzling conclusion. When his idyllic childhood comes to an end with the separation of his parents (Natasha Little, Rhys Ifans), Nemo is forced to choose which one with whom he’d rather remain. Like Robert Frost’s “Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,” Nemo’s desperate decision either way propels him into three possible realities, each focused on a love lost and/or found. In one scenario, he finds happiness with his brunette stepsister Anna (his most fulfilling love); another pairs him with blonde Elise (a tortured but nonetheless committed marriage); and a third with Jean (a comfortable but incomplete relationship). Each of the storylines is interwoven throughout the narrative like various threads in an ornate tapestry. Time, fantasy and reality overlap, as do those playing the major characters at various ages, particularly as teens and adults — Nemo (Thomas Byrne at age 9, Toby Regbo at 15, Leto from 20-118), Anna (Juno Temple/Diane Kruger), Elise (Clare Stone/Sarah Polley) and Jean (Audrey Giacomini/Linh Dan Pham). Their names are worth noting because Mr. Nobody, despite its unusual narrative, is mostly character-driven, and the performances across the board are riveting, especially Polley’s and Leto’s. In fact, this was Leto’s last film role before his Oscarwinning turn in last year’s Dallas Buyers Club. During the interim, he took time off to devote himself to his band, Thirty Seconds to Mars. (Fittingly, one of the many alternate subplots in Mr. Nobody involves a trip to Mars.) Written and directed by Belgian filmmaker Jaco Van Dormael, the English-language Mr. Nobody was funded largely by a consortium of European producers. Though it received lavish praise at various festivals and was voted one of the best European films of the year by the American Film Institute, the movie never got wide release and, consequently, an audience. What a shame! Now you can see the lengthy film at your leisure, time and again. It’s a story that gets even better on subsequent viewings, and one of my own favorite films of the last few years. But fair warning: I also loved Cloud Atlas. Pat McLeod mail@folioweekly.com 44 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

NOBLE PURSUIT: Dido Elizabeth Belle (Gugu Mbatha-Raw), the illegitimate mixed-race daughter of a British admiral, is raised by her great-uncle Lord Lansfield (Tom Wilkinson), who moved England toward slavery’s abolishment in the 18th Century. Belle opens May 23 at Sun-Ray Cinema. Photo: Fox Searchlight Pictures

**** **@@

FILM RATINGS

MAGNETO JUGGERNAUT

***@ MYSTIQUE *@@@ TOAD

OTHER FILMS

MOONLIGHT MOVIES The 13th annual Moonlight Movies Series wraps up with Spider-Man 2 at 9 p.m. on May 23 at SeaWalk Pavilion, Jax Beach. Bring a lawn chair or blanket and a picnic; popcorn, candy and beverages are available. No alcohol, skateboards, bicycles, glass or animals (except qualified service animals). jacksonvillebeach.org SUN-RAY CINEMA Only Lovers Left Alive and Belle are screened at Sun-Ray Cinema, 1028 Park St., 5 Points, 359-0049, sunraycinema. com. TV series Cosmos is shown at 9 p.m., Mad Men at 10 p.m. every Sunday; check with the theater for updates. LATITUDE 30 MOVIES Nonstop and Mr. Peabody & Sherman are screened at Latitude 30’s CineGrille Theater, 10370 Philips Highway, Southside, 365-5555, facebook.com/latitude30. WGHF IMAX THEATER The Amazing Spider-Man 2, Island of Lemurs: Madagascar 3D, Great White Shark 3D and Born to Be Wild 3D are screened at World Golf Hall of Fame IMAX Theater, 1 World Golf Place, St. Augustine, worldgolfimax.com.

NOW SHOWING

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 **@@ Rated PG-13 This one’s gotten all kinds of fanboy guff for more than a year now, with complaints ranging from an overstuffed cast of villains (Spider-Man 3, anyone?) to the allegedly cheap, cut-sceney look of the FX to the utter unreality of casting a black actor in the role of a guy who throws thunderbolts from his body. (Don’t worry, kids: Cliven Bundy understands your concerns, even if the rest of us are more concerned that Jamie Foxx’s take on Max Dillon seems to owe a lot to Jim Carrey’s Edward Nygma in Batman Forever.) Sure, there’s a precedent for comics flicks sacrificing story to ensemble, but really – was anybody holding out for that solo Rhino flick? Maybe Marc Webb has committed a colossal blunder in rushing toward a Sinister Six movie and maybe he hasn’t – and maybe we should all just judge for ourselves. — Steve Schneider BEARS Rated G Disney takes us on a fascinating documentary voyage into the world of those cuddly, hirsute homosexuals just looking for love and acceptance in … oh, wait. It’s about actual bears. With claws and stuff. Toughing it out in Alaska. Hey, that could be interesting, too. Remember, they can see Russia! John C. Reilly narrates. — S.S. BELLE Rated PG • Opens May 23 at Sun-Ray Cinema In this reality-based indie drama, a mixed-race woman (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) of the 1700s is raised by Lord Mansfi eld

(Tom Wilkinson), her elevation to “proper society” playing an important role in the abolition of slavery in England. So maybe the Brits got offended by the Ethan Lane joke in Lincoln and decided to strike back with their own emancipation chronicle? Except that, behind the scenes, what went on appears to have been more 12 Years a Slave, with director Amma Asante failing to secure the sole screenwriting credit that ultimately went to Misan Sigay. Every one of us this side of the pond looks forward to a veddy slooooow finger-clap at the BAFTAs. — S.S. BLENDED Rated PG-13 When she appeared in the Memento-“inspired” romcom 50 First Dates, Drew Barrymore played a woman whose lack of short-term memory prevented her from remembering that she had already gone out with Adam Sandler. And in a case of life imitating art, the real Drew seems to have suffered a similar cranial trauma, since she apparently cannot remember she’s already made a movie with Adam Sandler. Three of ’em, in fact, counting this new one, in which the duo play single parents who have to get over their mutual animosity while on a shared safari vacation. Some people never learn from their mistakes, I guess – or maybe they don’t mind having those mistakes reinforced by audiences who must have ADD themselves, given how eagerly they welcome each fart joke as if it were the first one ever spoken by man. Wait a sec … what was I saying? — S.S. BRICK MANSIONS Rated PG-13 The late Paul Walker’s penultimate film takes place in “a dystopian Detroit,” which has to be the redundancy of the month. But dig this: It’s not just any old dystopian Detroit like on the news or in a Robocop movie, but a walled-off dystopian Detroit that’s a holding cell for the area’s most dangerous criminals. Helluva creative spin, right? Unless you count that the flick is a remake of the French District B13, which as The Guardian pointed out, was in turn “wantonly ripped off from John Carpenter’s Escape From New York.” But hey – at least it’s not a sequel! Costars David Belle and RZA. — S.S. CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER ***G Rated PG-13 Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), aka Captain America, hasn’t had time to cope with after-effects of one-way time travel, via cryonic sleep, from the 1940s to the 2010s, but he’s starting to face his disconnect. Costars Samuel L. Jackson and Scarlett Johansson. And Stan Lee! — Marlene Dryden DIVERGENT Rated PG-13 Beatrice Prior (Shailene Woodley) is labeled a Divergent, a group of misfits considered so dangerous that their destruction is being plotted. So she hooks up with another outcast – Four (Theo James), who’s really just one person. Costars Kate Winslet, Ashley Judd and Zoe Kravitz. — M.D. DRAFT DAY Rated PG-13 Here in J-ville, we love Draft Day – every year, there’s a chance to get some awesome players added to our already awesome Jaguars roster. (And now it could be a dream come true! Welcome to River City, Bortles, you beautiful hunk of manflesh, you.) Costars Kevin Costner,

Chadwick Boseman, Jennifer Garner, Deion Sanders, Aaron Goldhammer and Chris Berman. — M.D. FADING GIGILO Rated R Writer/director John Turturro also costars in this quirky film about Murray (Woody Allen) and Floravante (Turturro), New Yorkers who co-own a bookstore on the verge of closing. In an effort to make some fast cash to keep the store open, Murray pimps out Floravante, who does not appear to be the kind of boy toy any woman (or man) would actually fork over big bucks for – yet, to their astonishment, the money starts rolling in. Well, as Notorious B.I.G. so wisely intoned, “Mo’ money, mo’ problems.” (Biggie, who made a lot of money, is now dead.) The supporting cast, lousy with nepotism, includes Vanessa Paradis, Liev Schreiber, Sharon Keep-Your-Legs-Crossed Stone, Sofia Vergara, John’s cousin Aida Turturro, Aida’s second cousin Diego Turturro and the goddamn adorable Bob Balaban. — M.D. GOD’S NOT DEAD Rated PG Josh Wheaton (Shane Harper) is a college student having trouble in philosophy class. Professor Radisson (Kevin Sorbo) doesn’t believe there is a God, shaking Josh’s faith. Costars Dean Cain and Willie Robertson. — M.D. GODZILLA ***G Rated PG-13 The newest version updates the King of All Monsters for the 21st Century beautifully, moving in tandem with the global zeitgeist. Instead of nukes, global warming is the bugaboo behind today’s monster. Dr. Ichiro Serizawa (Ken Watanabe) works with a secret research group studying Godzilla since the 1950s, when all those Pacific nuke “tests” were actually efforts to kill the damn thing. Director Gareth Edwards hides more than he reveals, with the major monster action happening at night, enshrouded in dust, smoke and fog. Costars Bryan Cranston, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Juliette Binoche, Elizabeth Olsen and Sally Hawkins. — MaryAnn Johanson THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL **G@ Rated R Director Wes Anderson guides a great ensemble in this, The Twee-est Story Ever Told, including Edward Norton, Saoirse Ronan, Bill Murray, the goddamn adorable Bob Balaban, Adrien Brody, Willem Dafoe, Jason Schwartzman and Owen Wilson. The com-dram, about Gustave H (Ralph Fiennes), concierge of an elegant European hotel, is largely told by the 1960s version of lobby boy Zero Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham) about his time at the hotel and the madcap adventures he and Gustave had. — M.D. HEAVEN IS FOR REAL Rated PG Have you noticed that it seems to be the season of the beatific death-where-is-thy-sting story? On TV, you’ve got Resurrection, which offers the helpful reassurance that your Uncle Max who farts at Thanksgiving dinner will keep coming back even after his ticker craps out from all that breading. And in theaters, you’ve got this movie, a Greg Kinnear pay-it-upward vehicle based on the best-selling book about a kid who died for a bit and came around bearing all sorts of details about the Great Beyond. Personally, I prefer my tales of life after death to star zombies and


JACKSONVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

vampires, but I understand why there need to be other-side stories for people who will only accept immortality if it follows in the tradition of Jeebus. Still, what I wouldn’t pay to see Dead is Dead and That’s Your Lot, starring Ricky Gervais and financed by the Atheist Alliance of America. — S.S. LEGENDS OF OZ: DOROTHY’S RETURN Rated PG The Baum family’s eagerness to exploit – I mean, “further” – patriarch L. Frank’s legacy is why we have this animated musical, which premiered last year in France but is only now getting a wide release here. The use of Lea Michele’s tonsils as the voice of Dorothy is ostensibly the big draw, but the theater geeks in your social circle will be sucked in by Bernadette Peters and Megan Hilty, who played mother and daughter on the late, endearingly awful SMASH. Peters voices the character of Glinda the Good Witch … which just happens to be the same part Hilty played on Broadway in Wicked. Hey, don’t laugh! How much time do you spend memorizing RBIs? — S.S. THE LOVE PUNCH ***@ Rated PG-13 • Opens May 23 Reviewed in this issue. MILLION DOLLAR ARM Rated PG In a perfect world, Jon Hamm would be on the set of Batman vs. Superman right now, pulling on a pair of red booties and practicing his delivery of the line “I like pink very much, Lois.” (That’s the same world, of course, where Clive Owen is shooting his fifth Bond picture and the winner of The Voice gets to attach electrodes to Carson Daly’s testicles.) Instead, we have to live in reality, where we now get only a paltry seven goddamn episodes of Mad Men per year, and they’re interrupted by promos for Million Dollar Arm, a Disney family sports flick about a baseball agent who journeys to Mumbai to scout potential pitching talent. Slumdog Rookie, anyone? Oh, and Aasif Mandvi is in this, too, instead of starring in a Comedy Central series about an embattled Al-Jazeera correspondent, like he would be doing in that hypothetical nirvana I described. Meanwhile, the pitching coach who gets the boys into shape is played by Bill Paxton, who in a perfect world would … scratch that, he’d probably be doing the exact same thing. — S.S. MOMS’ NIGHT OUT Rated PG Filmmakers Jon and Andrew Erwin of the anti-abortion polemic October Baby continue to tell us what women should be up to, this time in a comedy about moms who make the mistake of having their husbands watch the kids so they can have a night out on the town. That’ll learn the selfish cunnies to stay in the kitchen! If you think the Erwins’ perspective is a bit skewed, take heart – they actually let a real live female-type-person cowrite this thing: Andrea Gyertson Nasfell, whose screenwriting oeuvre is heavily reliant on concepts of angels, missionaries and Christmas. See? Diversity out the wazoo. Costars Sarah Drew, Trace Adkins, Sean Astin, Patricia Heaton. — S.S.

NEIGHBORS **G@ Rated R New parents Mac (Seth Rogen) and Kelly (Rose Byrne) Radner have to put up with the Delta Psi fraternity buying the suburban house next door. Directed by Nicholas Stoller from a script by first-time feature writers Andrew J. Cohen and Brendan O’Brien, the comedy casts Rogen in a comfortable role as a genial pot-smoker, and Byrne in a comfortable role where she’s allowed to speak with her own Australian accent. Though they first try to play nice with the party-hearty crew led by chapter president Teddy (Zac Efron), the escalating noise levels disturbing their sleep lead them to start a conflict from which no one could escape without some sort of humiliating incident. Neighbors is built on the classic (or tired) foundation that the antagonists are more alike than they realize – clinging to their familiar sense of what makes a happy existence, digging in their heels against the perspective adjustments required for the next transitional life moment. — Scott Renshaw ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE **@@ Rated R • Opens May 23 at Sun-Ray Cinema Director-writer Jim Jarmusch’s vampire film captures the magic and melancholy that accompany the blessing – and curse – of immortality. It offers a haunting, unique addition to the genre before collapsing in the second half under its own slow pacing, two-hour runtime and near-total lack of energy and plot. Adam (Tom Hiddleston) stays secluded in a derelict Detroit mansion, composing music, bemoaning what “zombies” (humans) have done to civilization and yearning for the Renaissance – or even the ’60s. He has three acquaintances: a doctor he bribes for blood, a gopher whom he trusts to run errands, and the love of his life, Eve (Tilda Swinton), also a vampire. She lives in Morocco, and is a close friend of another eternal dweller, Christopher Marlowe (John Hurt) – yes, that Marlowe. — Cameron Meier THE OTHER WOMAN Rated PG-13 Nick Cassavettes directs Cameron Diaz as a woman who forges an unlikely alliance with her three-timing boyfriend’s wife and mistress. Silly old me was under the mistaken impression that this would be a sideways riff on The Women, but the Internet set me straight: It’s actually a grown-up version of John Tucker Must Die. Thanks, trolls! I almost said something stupid. Costars Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Leslie Mann, Kate Upton, Don Johnson (a role model for roués worldwide) and Nicki Minaj. — S.S.

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RIO 2 Rated G City parrots (Jesse Eisenberg, Anne Hathaway) are dropped deep in the Amazonian jungle. The animated kids’ feature costars Andy Garcia, Jamie Foxx and Kristin Chenoweth. X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST ***G Rated PG-13 • Opens May 23 Reviewed in this issue.

GLAM METAL GODFATHER: Billed as the first “doc opera” ever made, Super Duper Alice Cooper details the morphing of Vincent Damon Furnier into Alice Cooper. The film, screened on May 27 at Sun-Ray Cinema, includes interviews with Elton John, Iggy Pop, John Lydon (aka Johnny Rotten), Dee Snider and the Godfather of Shock Rock himself (who’s scheduled to perform at Veterans Memorial Arena on Oct. 19!). Photo: Banger Films

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SCREWBALL LOVE Pierce Brosnan and Emma Thompson are exes trying to recapture their retirement kitty. And it’s actually funny

F

46 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

© 2014

as they travel through Paris and the French or Richard (Pierce Brosnan), life Riviera, and a classic rock-infused soundtrack couldn’t be better. He’s about to begin nicely punctuates high moments, such as when a grand retirement full of travel, golf they kidnap some Texans and dress in their and relaxation, he has flings with women at likeness, snorkel, scale a rock wall and more. least 20 years his junior, and he just sold his And even better, the movie’s writer/ company for a cool $10 million. Sure, his director Joel Hopkins, striking a decidedly ex-wife, Kate (Emma Thompson), hates him more upbeat note after his dour Last Chance for his philandering, but her vitriol is a small Harvey, adds a number of stylistic flourishes price to pay for his bohemian freedom. to keep it spicy. These moments are subtle, Yep, this is the sweet life for Richard. Until but effective: Note the slow motion as Jerry (because a movie about an old dude retiring is boring) he gets to work and realizes his and Penelope arrive at the airport, and the company’s been liquidated. Everything — rack focus as Kate and Richard lie in bed from the office building to employee pensions after a gun accident. Playing with the artistic to his and Kate’s retirement funds — is medium of film — rather than simply pointing gone. The company to the camera and telling which Richard sold his jokes — keeps the THE LOVE PUNCH business decided it was a movie dynamic, and its ***@ liability rather than asset energetic cast provides Rated PG-13 • Opens May 23 and unceremoniously a more ebullient dumped the whole thing. viewing experience. Not going down without a fight, Richard The Love Punch is a rare comedy that and Kate trek from London to Paris to could’ve been made during the screwball track down Vincent (Laurent Lafitte), the era of the 1930s. There’s a simple, whimsical businessman who now threatens their very innocence about it that captures old-school existence. Upon learning Vincent purchased charm in a way that feels timeless. It’s a credit a valuable diamond and gave it to his fiancée, to all involved for being on the same page and Manon (Louise Bourgoin), Richard and executing their jobs with precision. Kate vow to steal the jewel and re-fund their What’s more, screwball comedies always retirement. For help, they call their friends carried a relevant social message, sending and neighbors Jerry (Timothy Spall) and moviegoers home with laughter and a good Penelope (Celia Imrie), who aren’t the quiet lesson. For The Love Punch, the lesson is that British couple they appear to be. it’s easy to love someone, but harder to like Whereas most mainstream comedies them as the years go on. feature immature man-boys and raunchy Any honest married couple will agree gross-out humor (ahem, Neighbors), The Love with that. Punch is smarter and more mature, but no Dan Hudak less funny. The cast looks to be having a blast mail@folioweekly.com


A&E // ARTS

PERFORMANCE

SOCIAL SECURITY An art gallery owner and her husband are visited by her mother; will she stay? Staged through June 8; dinner served for evening shows at 6 p.m.; matinees, 11 a.m. Sat. and noon Sun.; at Alhambra Theatre & Dining, 12000 Beach Blvd., Southside, $38-$55, 641-1212, alhambrajax.com. BAY AT THE MOON Ian Mairs returns to direct his play, with Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre, May 22-25 (8 p.m. Thur.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun.) at Adele Grage Cultural Center, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, $15, 249-7177, abettheatre.com. LES MISERABLES Fugitive Jean Valjean evades police while the French Revolution erupts in the classic French drama by Boublil and Schonberg, June 6-22 at Theatre Jacksonville, 2032 San Marco Blvd., $20-$25, 396-4425, theatrejax.com. OLIVER! The British musical adaption of Charles Dickens’ classic runs at 7:30 p.m. June 6-July 6 on Limelight Theatre’s Matuza Main Stage, 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine, $25, 825-1164, limelight-theatre.org. PIRATES OF PENZANCE When the hero of this comic opera was a boy, his father told his nurse to have him apprenticed as a pilot. She heard “pirate” – thus, the zany troubles begin. It’s staged at 8 p.m. June 6-29 at Orange Park Community Theatre, 2900 Moody Ave., $20, 276-2599, opct.org. SHREK THE MUSICAL A loveable ogre, a chatty donkey and a fiery princess set out on a fairy-tale adventure to save a swamp, 7:30 p.m. (weekend matinees) June 11-July 27 at Alhambra Theatre & Dining, 12000 Beach Blvd., Southside, $38-$55, 641-1212, alhambrajax.com. THE FOREIGNER Charlie is a depressed Englishman at a Southern fishing lodge in Georgia. He pretends he can’t speak English, so other lodgers speak freely in front of him. The play is staged at 8 p.m. June 12-28 at Amelia Community Theatre, 209 Cedar Street, Fernandina Beach, $10-$20, 261-6749, ameliacommunitytheatre.org.

COMEDY

HUGGY LOWDOWN & CHRIS PAUL This comedy duo, heard on the The Tom Joyner Morning Show, appears at 8 p.m. May 22-25 and 10 p.m. May 23 and 24 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, $20-$25, 292-4242, comedyzone.com. JERSEY The funnyman performs at 8 p.m. May 23 and at 7 and 9:30 p.m. May 24 at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Southside, 365-5555, latthirty.com. RICH GUZZI COMEDY SHOW Participants are invited on stage to be hypnotized in this part-comedy, part-hypnosis show at 8 p.m. May 27-31 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., Mandarin, $10-$14, 292-4242, comedyzone.com. RICH GUZZI XXXTREME SHOW This outrageous and risqué version of Rich’s comedy hypnosis show is for adults only, 10 p.m. May 30 and 31 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd., $20-$25, 292-4242, comedyzone.com. KARL ANTHONY Comedian Anthony performs at 8 p.m. May 30 and at 7 and 9:30 p.m. May 31 at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Southside, 365-5555, latthirty.com. MAD COWFORD IMPROV Weekly improv shows based on audience suggestion are held 8:15 p.m. every Fri. and Sat. at Northstar Substation, 119 E. Bay St., Downtown, $5, 233-2359, madcowford.com.

CALLS & WORKSHOPS

JACKSONVILLE’S CHILDREN’S CHORUS AUDITIONS The Jacksonville Children’s Chorus and the Young Men’s Chorus of Jacksonville audition for kids in grades 1-12 for the 2014-’15 season, May 21, 22, 28 and 29 and June 26. By appointment only, 353-1636, jaxchildrenschorus.org, youngmenschorusjax.org. IMPROVISATION FOR TEENS Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre holds an improvisation workshop for teens in grades 9-12 at 3 p.m. May 22 and 29 and June 5 at Adele Grage Cultural Center, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-7177, abettheatre.com. WATER STREET PARKING GARAGE ENHANCEMENT PROJECT The city of Jacksonville’s Art in Public Places Program seeks proposals for five sites available for artists state-wide to create 2D and 3D outdoor installations in the Water Street Parking Garage, 541 Water St. Deadline is May 26; postal submissions must be received by 5 p.m. May 27. For details, go to culturalcouncil.org/index.php/art-in-publicplaces/waterstreetgarage. BATTLE OF THE BANDS CALL Jacksonville Public Library invites local musicians, 12-18 years old, to compete in the ninth annual Battle of the Bands. The deadline is May 31. Up to eight bands are selected to compete at 1 p.m. June 21 in Downtown Main Library’s Conference Center, 303 Laura St. N., Downtown, jpl.coj.net/teens. PHANTOM AUDITIONS Orange Park Community Theatre audition roles for Yestin & Kopit’s Phantom, The Musical, 7 p.m. June 8 and 9. Production dates are Aug. 29-Sept. 21. Bring sheet music, be prepared to sing 16 bars. An accompanist is provided; no recorded music, opct.org. CREATIVE DRAMA SUMMER CAMPS Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre holds one-week and two-week age-

BEER & G STRINGS: Don’t let the name fool you. Unsurprisingly, this Amelia Island Chamber Festival concert is not raunchy. Gypsy Sparks – the trio comprising Grammynominated violinist Susie Park (pictured), pianist Elizabeth Pridgen and cellist Christopher Rex – play pieces of Sarasate, Liszt, Kodaly and Ravel on May 27 at Walker’s Landing at Omni Amelia Island Plantation Resort. The closing gala is June 1 at the Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island. Chamber Festival photo appropriate camps, for grades 1-9, starting June 9, at Grage Cultural Center, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, $160-$320, 249-7177, abettheatre.com. FISHING, SAILING, THE BEACH & THE SEA The Art Center Premier Gallery invites artists to submit work depicting the water and water sports, through July 9, at 50 N. Laura St., Downtown. The exhibit opens July 10 and continues through Sept. 2. For applications, go to tacjacksonville.org. NATURE & WILDLIFE EXHIBIT Works in any medium that celebrate the beauty of the natural world are eligible – wilderness and landscape images, birds, marine life and the diversity of creatures in the great outdoors – for the fi fth annual exhibition, held July 26-Aug. 31 at St. Augustine Art Association. Submit up to three images online by June 2; $45, 824-2310, staaa.org. ACTEEN STAGE LAB Children and teens in grades 6-12 learn street style and ambush theater at 6:30 p.m. every Wed. at Limelight Theatre, $80 per session, 825-1164, limelight-theatre.org. CALL TO ARTISTS The Art Center seeks photographers and video artists to present slide shows or videos at Art Walk at its studios. Artists must have their own projection equipment. $25 fee. For details, email reidartlaw@gmail.com. FIGURE DRAWING TAC II hosts figure-drawing sessions with a live model at 7 p.m. every Tue. (no session during the week of First Wednesday Art Walk) at TAC II, 229 N. Hogan St., Downtown, $5-$10, 355-1757, tacjacksonville.org.

CLASSICAL & JAZZ

CONCERT ON THE GREEN The 27th annual concert by the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra includes Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture and patriotic and American favorites, 8 p.m. May 25 at Magnolia Point Golf & Country Club, 3670 Clubhouse Dr., Green Cove Springs, $12-$15 or $75 for dinner package, 278-8448, concertonthegreen.com. BEER & G-STRINGS II Emotive Australian-born violinist Susie Park from the Grammy-nominated Eroica Trio leads Gypsy Sparks in pieces from Sarasate, Brahms, Liszt, Kodaly and Ravel as part of the Amelia Island Chamber Music Festival, 7 p.m. May 27 at Walker’s Landing, Omni Amelia Island Plantation, Amelia Island, $50, 277-5123, aicmf.com. KELLY/SCOTT JAZZ SEXTET Northeast Florida jazz sextet, led by vocalist Lisa Kelly and trumpet/flugelhorn player JB Scott, performs 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. May 30 at Friday Musicale, 645 Oak St., Riverside, 355-7584, fridaymusicale.com. CHICAGO The American band opens Starry Nights series with the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra at 6 p.m. May 31 at Metropolitan Park, 1410 Gator Bowl Blvd., Downtown, $84, 354-5547, jaxsymphony.org. WASTE NOT WANT NOT CONCERT Orange Park Chorale performs a benefit concert for local charity organization Waste Not Want Not at 8 p.m. May 31 at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 7190 U.S. 17, Fleming Island. THE BIG ORANGE CHORUS The popular men’s barbershop and a cappella group performs Excellence in Harmony at 3 p.m. June 1 at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts’ Terry Theater, 300 W. Water St., Downtown, 287-1896, bigorangechorus.com.

AMELIA ISLAND CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL The closing gala of the festival features violin divas with acclaimed violinists Christiana Liberis and Mary Jo Stilp and electric violinist Sarah Charness. A fundraising art show featuring work by Nadine Terk is held at 6 p.m. June 1 at the RitzCarlton, 4750 Amelia Island Parkway, Amelia Island, $40, 261-1779, aicmf.com. CHRISTOPHER CROSS Five-time Grammy-winning singersongwriter, accompanied by the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, appears at 6 p.m. June 6 at Metropolitan Park, 1410 Gator Bowl Blvd., Downtown, $84, 354-5547, jaxsymphony.org. FOUR CENTURIES OF KEYBOARD MUSIC Second in a series of performances and commentaries, pianist Rosalind J. Elson plays works of Pezold, Frescobaldi, Purcell, Haydn, Grieg and Cruse at 3 p.m. June 6 in the Choir Loft of Shepherd of the Woods Lutheran Church, 6595 Columbia Court, Jacksonville, free, 268-6701. FOUR CENTURIES OF KEYBOARD MUSIC, PART TWO In the second of a series of performances and commentaries, pianist Rosalind J. Elson plays works of Pezold, Frescobaldi, Purcell, Haydn, Grieg and Cruse, 3 p.m. June 6 at Shepherd of the Woods Lutheran Church, 7860 Southside Blvd., Southside, free, 641-8385. JAZZ IN PONTE VEDRA The Gary Starling Group (Carol Sheehan, Billy Thornton, Peter Miles) performs 7:30-10:30 p.m. every Thur. at Table 1, 330 A1A N., 280-5515. JAZZ IN RIVERSIDE Trumpeter Ray Callendar and guitarist Taylor Roberts are featured at 9:30 p.m. every Thur. at Kickbacks Gastropub, 910 King St., 388-9551. JAZZ IN MANDARIN Boril Ivanov Trio plays at 7 p.m. every Thur. and pianist David Gum plays at 7 p.m. every Fri. at Tree Steakhouse, 11362 San Jose Blvd., 262-0006. JAX BEACH JAZZ Live jazz is presented 6-9 p.m. every Fri. at Landshark Café, 1728 Third St. N., 246-6024. JAZZ IN NEPTUNE BEACH Live jazz is featured 7:30-9:30 p.m. every Sat. at Lillie’s Coffee Bar, 200 First St., 249-2922. JAZZ IN ST. AUGUSTINE The House Cats play 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m. every Sat. at Stogies Club & Listening Room, 36 Charlotte St., 826-4008. JAZZ IN ARLINGTON Jazzland Café features live music at 8 p.m. every Sat. and 6-9 p.m. every Tue. at 1324 University Blvd. N., 240-1009, jazzlandcafe.com. JAZZ IN ST. AUGUSTINE Live jazz is featured nightly at Rhett’s Piano Bar & Brasserie, 66 Hypolita St., 825-0502.

ART WALKS, FESTIVALS & MARKETS

DOWNTOWN FRIDAY MARKET Arts and crafts and local produce are offered 10 a.m.-2 p.m. May 23 and every Fri. at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Dr., Downtown, 353-1188. RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET Local and regional art, local music, food artists and a farmers market are featured, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. May 24 and every Sat. under the Fuller Warren Bridge, 715 Riverside Ave., free admission, 389-2449, riversideartsmarket.com. UPTOWN SATURDAY NIGHT The self-guided tour features

galleries, antique stores and shops open 5-9 p.m. May 31 and every last Sat. in St. Augustine’s San Marco District, 824-3152. FIRST WEDNESDAY ART WALK An art walk, featuring more than 50 galleries, museums and businesses and spanning 15 blocks, is held 5-9 p.m. June 4 and every first Wed., Downtown. downtownjacksonville.org/marketing; iloveartwalk.com. FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK The tour of Art Galleries of St. Augustine is held June 6 and every first Fri., with more than 15 galleries participating, 829-0065. JAX BEACH ART WALK More than 30 local artists display works, 5-9 p.m. June 10 and every second Tue., along First Street between Beach Boulevard and Fifth Avenue North, Jax Beach, betterjaxbeach.com/jax-beach-art-walk.html. ARTRAGEOUS ART WALK Downtown Fernandina Beach galleries are open for self-guided tours, 5:30-8:30 p.m. June 14 and every second Sat., 277-0717, ameliaisland.com. NORTH BEACHES ART WALK Galleries of Atlantic and Neptune beaches are open 5-9 p.m. June 19 and every third Thur. from Sailfish Drive in Atlantic Beach to Neptune Beach and Town Center, 249-2222, nbaw.org.

MUSEUMS

ALEXANDER BREST MUSEUM & GALLERY Jacksonville University, 2800 University Blvd. N., Arlington, 256-7371, arts.ju.edu. The permanent collection features carved ivory, Chinese porcelain, pre-Colombian artifacts and more. AMELIA ISLAND MUSEUM OF HISTORY 233 S. Third St., Fernandina Beach, 261-7378, ameliamuseum.org. The children’s exhibit Discovery Ship allows kids to pilot the ship, hoist flags and learn about the history of Fernandina Beach’s harbor. BEACHES MUSEUM & HISTORY PARK 381 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach, 241-5657, beachesmuseum.org. The exhibit Waiting for the Train: Henry Flagler & the Florida East Coast Railroad is on display through June 1. CRISP-ELLERT ART MUSEUM Flagler College, 48 Sevilla St., St. Augustine, 826-8530, flagler.edu/crispellert. Lily Kuonen’s exhibit PLAYNTINGSSGNITNALP continues through June 20. CUMMER MUSEUM OF ART & GARDENS 829 Riverside Ave., Riverside, 356-6857, cummer.org. Art collectors share the pieces that inspired their love of collecting in Collector’s Choice: Inside the Hearts and Minds of Regional Collectors, which continues through Sept. 14. FSU Professor William Walmsley displays his works through July 8. The Human Figure: Sculptures by Enzo Torcoletti is on display through September. A Commemoration of the Civil Rights Movement: Photography from the High Museum of Art is on display through Nov. 2. KARPELES MANUSCRIPT MUSEUM 101 W. First St., Springfield, 356-2992, rain.org. The permanent collection includes several rare manuscripts. Revisiting French Light, Florida Light, an exhibit held in cooperation with the Sister Cities Association and Nantes, France, features watercolors, oils and acrylics by Gordon Meggison; it’s on display through June 28. MANDARIN MUSEUM & HISTORICAL SOCIETY 11964 Mandarin Rd., 268-0784, mandarinmuseum.net. The

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 47


A&E // ARTS exhibit The Maple Leaf, First Wednesday Art Walk. which features artifacts FIRST STREET GALLERY and information from the 216-B First St., Neptune Civil War era, is on display Beach, 241-6928, through December. firststreetgalleryart.com. MUSEUM OF The 12th annual Sea CONTEMPORARY ART Turtle Show – featuring JACKSONVILLE 333 N. clay, jewelry, paintings, Laura St., Downtown, photography, metal and 366-6911, mocajacksonville. glass in a sea turtle theme – com. Shaun Thurston’s opens with a reception held Project Atrium: One Spark 7-9 p.m. May 22; it is on continues through June display through July 7. The 6. Students from MOCA’s exhibit is a fundraiser for the educational outreach Beaches Sea Turtle Patrol. program, Rainbow Artists: FLORIDA MINING Art and Autism display their GALLERY 5300 Shad Rd., work through June 1. The Southside, 425-2845, exhibit New York Times floridamininggallery.com. Magazine Photographs, Diogenes The Dog & Ryan SWING AWAY: World Golf Hall of Fame member Charlie curated by Kathy Ryan and Rummel, an exhibit of Sifford is among the golfers featured in Honoring the Lesley Martin, runs through approximately 20 pieces Legacy: A Tribute to African-Americans in Golf, which Aug. 24. Recently named from each artist, opens opened this month as a permanent exhibit at the World a fellow in the 2013-’14 with a reception held at 7 Golf Village Hall of Fame & Museum in St. Augustine. Working Artist Project at the p.m. May 22. The exhibit Photo: WGHF Museum of Contemporary continues through July 3. Art of Georgia, Scott Ingram THE GALLERY AT HOUSE exhibits a survey collection OF STEREO 8780 Perimeter of drawings and objects May 22-Aug. 24. The museum Park Ct., Ste. 100, Southside, 642-6677, houseofstereo.com. offers free admission, 6 p.m. May 22. Painting, art glass, photography, woodcrafts, pottery and MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & HISTORY 1025 Museum Circle, sculpture are featured. Southbank, 396-6674, themosh.org. Uncovering the GEORGIA NICK GALLERY 11A Aviles St., St. Augustine, Past: Archaeological Discoveries of North Florida is on 806-3348, georgianickgallery.com. The artist-owned studio display through August. French in Florida Gallery, digital displays Nick’s sea and landscape photography, along reproductions of engravings of 16th century Florida, with local works by oil painters, a mosaic artist, potter, chronicling the French attempt to establish a settlement in photographer and author. Florida and their experiences with the Timucua Indians, is on HASKELL GALLERY & DISPLAY CASES Jacksonville display through July 6. International Airport, 14201 Pecan Park Rd., Northside, VISITOR INFORMATION CENTER 10 W. Castillo Dr., St. 741-3546. Keith Doles’ Street Series and Street Corners is Augustine, 825-1000, staugustine-450.com/journey. displayed through June 29 in Haskell Gallery located before Journey: 450 years of the African-American Experience is security. Dorian Eng’s Chinese and Japanese art in the form exhibited through July 15. of threaded balls and thimbles called Temari and Yubinuki WORLD GOLF HALL OF FAME & MUSEUM Honoring the is displayed through July 7 in Connector Bridge Art display Legacy: A Tribute to African-Americans in Golf – an exhibit case before security. Marsha Glaziere’s Eclectic Coffee Spots featuring photographs, audio, video and memorabilia in Puget Sound is a collection of paintings, photographs and dating from the late 1800s to the present – is open in the impressions, displayed through July 5 in Concourse A and C permanent collection. display cases after security. HIGHWAY GALLERY floridamininggallery.com. Nine artists – Nathaniel Artkart Price, Ken Daga, Ashley C. Waldvogel, Brianna Angelakis, Christina Foard, Linda Olsen, Sara Pedigo, ABSOLUTE AMERICANA ART GALLERY 77 Bridge St., Zach Fitchner and Russell Maycumber – are featured on St. Augustine, 824-5545, absoluteamericana.com. digital billboards throughout the city in collaboration with Original Pierre Matisse prints are featured. The permanent Clear Channel through July. display features oil paintings, sculptures and prints from J. JOHNSON GALLERY 177 Fourth Ave. N., Jax Beach, international artists. Two collections of original work by 435-3200. Ex Libris – featuring works by Cara Barer, Doug John Pacovsky are on display through June 20. Exhibits are Beube, Long-Bin Chen, Brian Dettmer, Jessica Drenk, erotic in nature, and patrons must be 18 years old and older Andrew Hayes, Alexander Korzer-Robinson, Guy Laramee for entry. and Francesca Pastine – includes pieces made by carving, THE ART CENTER MAIN GALLERY 31 W. Adams St., cutting, folding and assembling books, encyclopedias and Downtown, 355-1757, tacjacksonville.org. Paintings, pastels, other bound literature journals. The exhibit is on display sketches and photography by a diverse group of member through June 13. artists are displayed. THE LOOKING LAB 107 E. Bay St., Downtown, 917-239THE ART CENTER PREMIER GALLERY 50 N. Laura St., 3772. Art in Empty Store Fronts features multimedia video Downtown, 355-1757, tacjacksonville.org. Jacksonville Life, art and sculptures by Crystal Floyd and David Montgomery. an exhibit of “things that made our city great,” continues REDDI ARTS 1037 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, 398-3161, through July 8. reddiarts.com. Works by local artists are featured, with BOLD BEAN COFFEE ROASTERS 869 Stockton St., Ste. a focus on “emerging artists for emerging collectors.” 1, Riverside, 855-1181. CoRK Arts District’s Crystal Floyd Collections change monthly. displays mixed media, terrariums and special-edition screen ROTUNDA GALLERY St. Johns County Administrative prints created with Bold Bean espresso mixed with the ink. Building, 500 San Sebastian View, St. Augustine. The BUTTERFIELD GARAGE ART GALLERY 137 King St., St. Augustine Camera Club’s third annual Juried Member St. Augustine, 825-4577, butterfieldgarage.com. The Photography Show is on display through July 24. artist-run gallery features a wide range of traditional and ST. AUGUSTINE ART ASSOCIATION 22 Marine St., contemporary works by several local artists. 824-2310, staaa.org. The Florida Artist Group (FLAG) CoRK ARTS DISTRICT 2689 Rosselle St., Riverside, presents its annual juried exhibit through May. Miniature corkartsdistrict.tumblr.com. Clay Doran releases the first Marks, with nearly 100 pieces, each no larger than 12 edition of his comic Grim Times on June 7 in CoRK East inches, is on display through June 1. Gallery. Eva, Chase, Wood? – a collaborative exhibition of SOUTHLIGHT GALLERY 201 N. Hogan St., Ste. 100, paintings and performance – features the acting of Eva Downtown, 553-6361, southlightgallery.com. Ctrl + Alt Matthews, Tony Wood’s paintings and music performed by + Image, an exhibit of select works by 24 UNF students Jennifer Chase and Lauren Fincham, 8 p.m. June 13 and enrolled in the Alternative Camera & Alternative Photographic 14 at CoRK North Gallery, 603 King St., Riverside, $10-$12, Processes course, is on display at the UNF ArtSpace. The artful.ly/store/events/2806. gallery’s May exhibit features pieces by 49 artists, including CORSE GALLERY & ATELIER 4144 Herschel St., Riverside, Jane Shirek and UNF graduate Jessie Barnes. 388-8205, corsegalleryatelier.com. Some works on SPACE:EIGHT GALLERY 228 W. King St., St. Augustine, 829-2838, spaceeight.com. Features lowbrow, pop permanent display feature those by Kevin Beilfuss, Eileen surrealism, street and underground art by nationally and Corse, Miro Sinovcic, Maggie Siner, Alice Williams and internationally acclaimed artists. Luana Luconi Winner. THE CULTURAL CENTER AT PONTE VEDRA BEACH 50 Executive Way, Ponte Vedra Beach, 280-0614. Under the For a complete list of arts events, go to folioweekly. Tall Sky, mixed-media work by Barbara Holmes-Fryfield and ceramic sculptures by Fay Samimi, opens with a reception com/calendar. To submit your arts-related event, email held 6-8 p.m. May 23; it continues through July 3. djohnson@folioweekly.com. Print deadline is 4 p.m. ECHO III 400 E. Bay St. (near Underbelly), Downtown. Monday, nine days before publication. Due to space Photographer Elena Rodriguez organizes a pop-up exhibit constraints, not all events appear in print. of local photographers’ work, 6-9 p.m. June 7. The photographs are also on display 6-10 p.m. June 4 during

GALLERIES

48 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014


DINING DIRECTORY To have your restaurant listed, contact your account manager or Sam Taylor, 904.260.9770 ext. 111 staylor@folioweekly.com DINING DIRECTORY KEY

Average Entrée Cost: $ = Less than $8 $$ = $8-$14 $$$ = $15-$22 $$$$ = $23 & up BW = Beer/Wine FB = Full Bar K = Kids’ Menu TO = Take Out B = Breakfast R = Brunch L = Lunch D = Dinner *Bite Club certified = Hosted a free Folio Weekly Bite Club tasting. Join at fwbiteclub.com. BOJ = 2013 Best of Jax winner F = FW distribution spot

AMELIA ISLAND, FERNANDINA BEACH, YULEE

29 SOUTH EATS, 29 S. Third St., 277-7919. F In historic downtown, the popular bistro’s Chef Scotty Schwartz serves traditional world cuisine with a modern twist. $$ L Tue.-Sat.; D Mon.-Sat.; R Sun. BRETT’S WATERWAY CAFÉ, 1 S. Front St., 261-2660. F Southern hospitality in an upscale waterfront spot; daily specials, fresh local seafood, aged beef. $$$ FB K L D Daily CAFÉ KARIBO, 27 N. Third St., 277-5269. F In a historic building, family-owned spot serves worldly taste fare: homemade veggie burgers, fresh seafood, made-fromscratch desserts. Dine in or on oak-shaded patio. Karibrew Pub offers beer brewed onsite. $$ FB K TO R, Sun.; L D Daily CIAO ITALIAN BISTRO, 302 Centre St., 206-4311. Owners Luke and Kim Misciasci offer fine dining: veal piccata, rigatoni Bolognese, antipasto; house specialties are chicken Ciao, homemade-style meat lasagna. $ L Fri. & Sat.; D Nightly DAVID’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE, 802 Ash St., 310-6049. In Historic District. Fresh seafood, prime aged meats, rack of lamb served in an elegant, chic spot. $$$$ FB D Nightly DICK’S WINGS & GRILL, 474313 E. S.R. 200, 491-3469. 450077 S.R. 200, Callahan, 879-0993. BOJ winner. See Northside. $ FB K TO L D Daily JACK & DIANE’S, 708 Centre St., 321-1444. F In a renovated 1887 shotgun house. Favorites: jambalaya, French toast, mac-n-cheese, vegan, vegetarian selections. Dine inside or on the porch. $$ FB K B L D Daily LULU’S AT THE THOMPSON HOUSE, 11 S. Seventh St., 432-8394. F Creative lunch: po’boys, salads, little plates served in a historic house. Dinner: fresh local seafood, Fernandina shrimp. Reservations recommended. $$$ BW K TO R Sun.; L D Tue.-Sat. MOON RIVER PIZZA, 925 S. 14th St., 321-3400. F BOJ winner. Northern-style pizzas, with more than 20 toppings, are served by the pie or the slice. $ BW TO L D Mon.-Sat. THE MUSTARD SEED CAFE, 833 TJ Courson Rd., 277-3141. Awarded Snail of Approval. Casual organic eatery and juice bar, in Nassau Health Foods. All-natural organic items, smoothies, juice, coffee, herbal tea. $$ TO B L Mon.-Sat. THE PECAN ROLL BAKERY, 122 S. Eighth St., 491-9815. Sweet and savory pastries, cookies, cakes and breads. Everything’s made from scratch. $ TO B L Wed.-Sun. PLAE, 80 Amelia Village Cir., 277-2132. Bite Club certified. Omni Amelia Island Plantation Spa & Shops. Bistro-style venue has an innovative menu: whole fried fish and duck breast. Outdoor dining. $$$ FB D Mon.-Sat. SALTY PELICAN BAR & GRILL, 12 N. Front St., 277-3811. F See ICW sunsets from second-story outdoor bar. Owners T.J. and Al offer local seafood, Mayport shrimp, fish tacos, po’boys, original broiled cheese oysters. $$ FB K L D Daily SLIDERS SEASIDE GRILL, 1998 S. Fletcher Ave., 277-6652. F BOJ. Oceanfront place serves award-winning handmade crab cakes, fresh seafood, fried pickles. Outdoor dining, open-air 2nd fl oor, balcony. $$ FB K L D Daily T-RAY’S BURGER STATION, 202 S. 8th St., 261-6310. F This spot in an old gas station offers blue plate specials, burgers, biscuits & gravy, shrimp. $ BW TO B L Mon.-Sat.

ARLINGTON, REGENCY

DICK’S WINGS & GRILL, 9119 Merrill Rd., Ste. 19 & 20, 745-9301. BOJ winner. See Northside. $ FB K TO L D Daily LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 8818 Atlantic Blvd., 720-0106. See Mandarin. $$ FB K TO L D Daily LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 1301 Monument Rd., Ste. 5, 724-5802. F See Orange Park. $ K TO B L D Daily

AVONDALE, ORTEGA

THE CASBAH CAFÉ, 3628 St. Johns Ave., 981-9966. F BOJ winner. Middle Eastern/Mediterranean fare. Patio, hookah lounge. Wi-Fi, bellydancers. $$ BW L D Daily CLAUDE’S CHOCOLATES, 3543 St. Johns Ave., 829-5790. F In Green Man Gourmet, this shop has wines, spices, fresh fruit ice pops and Belgian chocolates. See Ponte Vedra. $$ TO ESPETO BRAZILIAN STEAK HOUSE, 4000 St. Johns Ave., Ste. 40, 388-4884. F Churrascaria gauchos carve the meat onto your plate from serving tables. $$$ FB D Tue.-Sun. THE FOX RESTAURANT, 3580 St. Johns Ave., 387-2669. F Owners Ian & Mary Chase offer fresh diner fare: burgers, meatloaf, fried green tomatoes, desserts. Breakfast all day. Local landmark for 50+ years. $$ BW K L D Daily LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 4530 St. Johns Ave., 388-8828. F See Mandarin. $$ FB K TO L D Daily MELLOW MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS, 3611 St. Johns

Ave., 388-0200. F Bite Club certified. BOJ winner. See Beaches. $ BW K TO L D Daily MOJO NO. 4 URBAN BBQ & WHISKEY BAR, 3572 St. Johns Ave., 381-6670. F BOJ winner. See Beaches. $$ FB K TO L D Daily PINEGROVE MARKET & DELI, 1511 Pinegrove Ave., 389-8655. F BOJ winner. For 40+ years serving hearty fare: Cuban sandwiches, burgers, subs, wraps, homemade chicken salad, in a family spot. Onsite butcher shop cuts USDA choice prime aged beef. Craft beers. $ BW TO B L D Mon.-Sat. SIMPLY SARA’S, 2902 Corinthian Ave., Ortega, 3871000. F Down-home cooking from scratch: eggplant fries, pimento cheese, baked chicken, fruit cobblers, chicken & dumplings, desserts. BYOB. $$ K TO L D Mon.-Sat., B Sat.

BAYMEADOWS

AL’S PIZZA, 8060 Philips Hwy., Ste. 105, 731-4300. F BOJ winner. See Beaches. $ FB K TO L D Daily BROADWAY RISTORANTE & PIZZERIA, Ste. 3, 10920 Baymeadows Rd. E., 519-8000. F Family-owned-andoperated Italian pizzeria serves calzones, strombolis, wings, brick-oven-baked pizza, subs, desserts. Delivery. $$ BW K TO L D Daily INDIA’S RESTAURANT, 9802 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 8, 620-0777. F Authentic Indian cuisine, lunch buffet. Curries, vegetable dishes, lamb, chicken, shrimp, fish tandoori. $$ BW L Mon.-Sat.; D Nightly LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 8206 Philips Hwy., Baymeadows Junction, 732-9433. F See Mandarin. $$ FB K TO L D Daily LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 3928 Baymeadows Rd., 7377740. 8616 Baymeadows Rd., 739-2498. F See Orange Park. $ K TO B L D Daily PIZZA PALACE RESTAURANT & PIZZERIA, 3928 Baymeadows Rd., 527-8649. F Relaxed, family-owned place serves homestyle cuisine. Local faves include spinach pizza, chicken spinach calzones, ravioli, lasagna, parmigiana. Outside dining; HD TVs. $$ BW K TO L D Daily SNEAKERS SPORTS GRILLE, 8133 Point Meadows Dr., 519-0509. F BOJ winner. See Beaches. $ FB K L D Daily ZESTY INDIA, 8358 Point Meadows Dr., 329-3676. Chefs combine Asian methodology with European template t o create dishes like tandoori lamb chops and rosemary tikka. Vegetarian items are cooked separately in vegetable oil. $ BW TO L D Tue.-Sun.

BEACHES

(Locations are Jax Beach unless otherwise noted.)

AL’S PIZZA, 303 Atlantic Blvd., Beaches Town Ctr., Atlantic Beach, 249-0002. F BOJ winner. Celebrating more than 20 years, Al’s is a repeat Best Pizza winner in the annual BOJ readers’ poll. New York-style and gourmet pizzas. All-day happy hour Mon.-Thur. $ FB K TO L D Daily BREEZY COFFEE SHOP CAFE, 235 Eighth Ave. S., 241-2211. F Casual, family-owned shop serves fresh-baked goods, espressos, locally roasted coffees, vegan and gluten-free options. Sandwiches, local beer. $ BW K TO B R L Daily BUDDHA THAI BISTRO, 301 10th Ave. N., 712-4444. The proprietors are from Thailand; every dish is made with fresh ingredients, beautifully presented. $$ FB TO L D Daily CASA MARIA, 2429 S. Third St., 372-9000. F Familyowned-and-operated place offers authentic Mexican fare: fajitas and seafood dishes, hot sauces made in-house. The specialty is tacos de asada. $ FB K L D Daily CRUISERS GRILL, 319 23rd Ave. S., 270-0356. F BOJ winner. Locally owned and operated for 15+ years, this casual place serves half-pound burgers, fish sandwiches, award-winning cheddar fries and sangria. $ BW K L D Daily ENGINE 15 BREWING CO., 1500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 217, 249-2337. F  BOJ winner. Gastropub fare: soups, flatbreads, sandwiches, including BarBe-Cuban and beer dip. Craft beers and brew groups. $ FB K L Tue.-Sun.; D Nightly FLYING IGUANA TAQUERIA & TEQUILA BAR, 207 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 853-5680. F Fusion of Latin American and Southwestern-influenced fare: tacos, seafood, carnitas, Cubana sandwiches. 100+ tequilas. Outdoor seating. $ FB L D Daily LANDSHARK CAFE, 1728 Third St. N., 246-6024. F Locally owned & operated. Fresh, off-the-boat local seafood, fish tacos, houseground burgers, wings, handcut fries, tater tots; daily specials. $$ FB K L D Daily; R Sun. LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 1222 Third St. S., 372-4495. F See Mandarin. $$ FB TO L D Daily LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 657 N. Third St., 247-9620. F See Orange Park. $ K TO B L D Daily LILLIE’S COFFEE BAR, 200 First St., Beaches Town Ctr., Neptune Beach, 249-2922. F Locally roasted coffee, eggs, bagels, fl atbreads, sandwiches, desserts. Dine indoors or out, patio and courtyard. $$ BW TO B L D Daily MELLOW MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS, 1018 Third St. N., Ste. 2, 241-5600. F Bite Club. BOJ winner. Hoagies, salads, gourmet pizzas: Mighty Meaty, vegetarian, Kosmic Karma. 35 tap beers. Nonstop happy hour. $ BW K TO L D Daily METRO DINER, 1534 Third St. N., 853-6817. F BOJ winner. See San Marco. $$ R B L Daily MEZZA RESTAURANT & BAR, 110 First St., Beaches Town Ctr., Neptune Beach, 249-5573. F Near-the-ocean eatery, 20+ years. Casual bistro fare: gourmet wood-fired pizzas, nightly specials. Dine inside or on the patio. Valet parking. $$$ FB K D Mon.-Sat.

Chef Todd Ruiz prepares a dish of tasso snapper with preserved lemon crême, compressed cucumber and nasturtium, at Verandah at Omni Amelia Island Resort. Photo: Dennis Ho MOJO KITCHEN BBQ PIT & BLUES BAR, 1500 Beach Blvd., 247-6636. F BOJ winner. Funky Southern blues kitchen. Pulled pork, Carolina-style barbecue, Delta fried catfish, all the sides. $$ FB K TO L D Daily M SHACK, 299 Atlantic Blvd., Beaches Town Ctr., Atlantic Beach, 241-2599. F BOJ winner. David and Matthew Medure fl ippin’ burgers, hot dogs, fries, shakes, familiar fare, moderate prices. Dine inside or outside. $$ BW L D Daily POE’S TAVERN, 363 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 241-7637. F American gastropub named for the poet. 50+ beers, gourmet burgers, handcut fries, fish tacos, Edgar’s Drunken Chili, daily fish sandwich special. $$ FB K L D Daily RAGTIME TAVERN & SEAFOOD GRILL, 207 Atlantic Blvd., Beaches Town Ctr., Atlantic Beach, 241-7877. F For 30 years, popular seafood place has scored many awards in our BOJ readers poll. Blackened snapper, sesame tuna, Ragtime shrimp. Daily happy hour. $$ FB L D Daily SLIDERS SEAFOOD GRILLE & OYSTER BAR, 218 First St., Beaches Town Ctr., Neptune Beach, 246-0881. Beachcasual atmosphere. Customer faves: fish tacos, gumbo. Key lime pie, homemade ice cream sandwiches. $$ FB K L Sat. & Sun.; D Nightly SNEAKERS SPORTS GRILLE, 111 Beach Blvd., 482-1000. F BOJ winner. Full-service bar (with more than 20 beers on tap), TV screens covering entire walls and cheerleader s serving the food. Happy hour Mon.-Fri. $ FB K L D Daily

DOWNTOWN

AKEL’S DELICATESSEN, 21 W. Church St., 665-7324. F New York-style deli offers freshly made fare: subs (3 Wise Guys, Champ), burgers, gyros, breakfast bowls, ranchero wrap, vegetarian dishes. $ K TO B L Mon.-Fri. AMERICAN GRILL, Jacksonville Landing, 353-7522. Fullservice restaurant serves traditional fare: pot pies, steaks, burgers, pizza, pot roast, vegetarian dishes. $$ BW L D Daily BENNY’S STEAK & SEAFOOD, Jax Landing, Ste. 175, 301-1014. This steak-and-seafood house serves Continental cuisine with such signature dishes as the Filet Christian. $$$ FB K L D Daily CAFÉ NOLA at MOCAJax, 333 N. Laura St., 366-6911. F Shrimp & grits, gourmet sandwiches, fresh fish tacos, homemade desserts. $$ FB L Mon.-Fri.; D Thur. & ArtWalk CASA DORA, 108 E. Forsyth St., 356-8282. F Chef Sam Hamidi has been serving genuine Italian fare for 36+ years: veal, seafood, gourmet pizza. The homemade salad dressing is a specialty. $$ BW K L Mon.-Fri.; D Mon.-Sat. CASA MARIA, 12961 N. Main St., Ste. 104, 757-6411. F See Beaches. $ FB K L D Daily CHICAGO PIZZA & SPORTS GRILL, Jax Landing, 354-7747. F Chicago-style deep-dish pizzas, hot dogs, Italian beef dishes from Chicago’s Comastro family. $$ FB K TO L D Daily CHOMP CHOMP, 106 E. Adams St., 762-4667. F Eats at moderate prices – most less than $10. Chef-inspired street food: panko-crusted chicken, burgers, chinois tacos, bahn mi and barbecue. $ L Tue.-Sat.; D Fri. & Sat. CINCO DE MAYO, Jax Landing, 329-2892. Authentic yet mild dishes: fajitas, tacos, burritos, enchiladas. Din e indoors or outside. $$ FB L D Daily FIONN MacCOOL’S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT, Jax Landing, Ste. 176, 374-1547. BOJ winner. This pub offers casual dining with an uptown Irish atmosphere, serving fi sh and chips, Guinness lamb stew and black-andtan brownies. $$ FB K L D Daily HOOTERS, Jax Landing, Ste. 103, 356-5400. The chain, popular for its waitresses, features wings, steamed shrimp, oysters, burgers, seafood, sandwiches. $$ FB TO L D Daily KOJA SUSHI, Ste. 222, Jax Landing, 350-9911. F BOJ winner. Owners John and Tony, in the sushi game for 10+ years, offer sushi, sashimi, and Japanese, Asian, Korean cuisine. Hard-to-find items like baby octopus salad, too. Dine inside or out. $$ FB L Mon.-Fri.; D Nightly VILLAGE BREAD CAFE, Ste. 175, Jax Landing, 683-7244. Locally owned; bagels, omelets, sandwiches on homestyle

bread, salads, pizzas, pastries. $ TO B L Mon.-Sat. VITO’S ITALIAN CAFE, Jax Landing, Ste. 174, 355-3002. Traditional Italian and Mediterranean menu: pasta, steak and seafood entrées. Desserts, including tiramisu and cannoli, are homemade. Daily happy hour. $ FB L D Daily ZODIAC GRILL, 120 W. Adams St., 354-8283. American favorites and Mediterranean fare in a casual atmosphere; panini, vegetarian dishes. Daily lunch buffet. Espressos, hookahs. Happy hour Mon.-Fri. $ FB L Mon.-Fri

FLEMING ISLAND

GRASSROOTS NATURAL MARKET, 1915 East-West Pkwy., 541-0009. F BOJ winner. See Riverside. $ BW TO Daily LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 1571 C.R. 220, Ste. 100, 215-2223. F See Mandarin. $$ FB TO L D Daily MELLOW MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS, 1800 Town Center Blvd., 541-1999. F Bite Club certified. BOJ winner. See Beaches. $ BW K TO L D Daily MOJO SMOKEHOUSE, 1810 Town Center Blvd., Ste. 8, 264-0636. F BOJ. See Beaches. $$ FB K TO L D Daily TAPS BAR & GRILL, 1605 C.R. 220, 278-9421. F 50+ premium tap domestic, imported beers. Starters, burgers, sandwiches, entrées, made to order with fresh ingredients. Lots of TVs for watching sports. $$ FB K L D Daily WHITEY’S FISH CAMP, 2032 C.R. 220, 269-4198. F Real fish camp serves gator tail, freshwater river catfish, daily specials, traditional meals, on Swimming Pen Creek. Outdoor Tiki bar. Come by boat, motorcycle or car. $ FB K TO L Tue.-Sun.; D Nightly

INTRACOASTAL WEST

4 BONES BARBECUE, 14286 Beach Blvd., Ste. 20, 419-9855. Classic Southern barbecue: Pulled pork, brisket, chicken, turkey, ribs, chorizo served market-style by the pound. Mac ’n’ cheese, baked beans, cole slaw, green beans. Specialty sandwiches, banana pudding. $ K TO L D Tue.-Sat. AL’S PIZZA, 14286 Beach Blvd., Ste. 31, 223-0991. F BOJ winner. See Beaches. $ FB K TO L D Daily DICK’S WINGS & GRILL, 14286 Beach Blvd., 223-0115. F BOJ winner. See Northside. $ FB K TO L D Daily LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 14333 Beach Blvd., Ste. 39, 992-1666. F Tamales, fajitas and pork tacos are customer favorites. Some La Nops have a full bar. $$ FB K TO L D Daily LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 10750 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 14, 642-6980. F See Orange Park. $ K TO B L D Daily THE TENT HOOKAH LOUNGE, 12041 Beach Blvd., Ste. 4, 551-2962. Authentic fare, hookahs and flavored tobacco, specials and live belly dancing and fl oor seating, in keeping with that authenticity thing. Open late. $ BW L D Daily TIME OUT SPORTS GRILL, 13799 Beach Blvd., Ste. 5, 223-6999. F Locally-owned-and-operated grill serves hand-tossed pizzas, wings, wraps in a clean, sporty atmosphere. Daily drink specials, HD TVs, pool tables, darts, trivia. Late-night menu. $$ FB L Tue.-Sun.; D Nightly

JULINGTON CREEK

DICK’S WINGS & GRILL, 525 S.R. 16, Ste. 101, St. Johns, 825-4540. BOJ winner. See Northside. $ FB K TO L D Daily METRO DINER, 12807 San Jose Blvd., 638-6185. F BOJ winner. See San Marco. $$ R B L Daily TAPS BAR & GRILL, 2220 C.R. 210 W., Ste. 314, St. Johns, 819-1554. F See Fleming Island. $$ FB K L D Daily

MANDARIN

AL’S PIZZA, 11190 San Jose Blvd., 260-4115. F BOJ winner. See Beaches. $ FB K TO L D Daily ATHENS CAFÉ, 6271 St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 7, 733-1199. F From the dolmades (stuffed grape leaves) to the baby shoes (stuffed eggplant), Athens has all the favorites. G reek

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 49


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A LITTLE BUT OF THIS, A LITTLE BIT OF THAT The Dim Sum Room touts an abundance of flavorful Cantonese small plates THE DIM SUM ROOM, inside Watami Buffet & Lounge, 9041 Southside Blvd., thedimsumroom.com

© 2014

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50 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

I

’m about to let you in on some secrets. One: Until last week, I’d never experienced dim sum. (I know, right?) Two: Inside a restaurant, inside a strip mall, lies a special room that serves up Cantonese-style small plates — dim sum — that will rock your world. Since dim sum isn’t readily available across the area, it was exciting to order a range of dishes and embark on an exploration of these new-to-me items. Dim sum is essentially Chinese tapas, served on individual small plates or in a small steamer basket. You won’t find most of these versions on a standard Chinese menu. We started with the chicken feet ($3.75), shark’s fin dumplings ($4.25), scallop dumpling ($4.25), fried shrimp balls ($4.25), shumai ($3.75), fried taro dumpling ($3.75), steamed taro bun ($3.75) and crispy pork belly ($9.95). So, the chicken feet? Not for the faint of heart, or me — lots of small bones, odd texture (think of the fat that surrounds your rib-eye) and generally weird because they arrive looking like little feet that are waving (or high-fiving?) at you. Since they’re mostly skin, I found them to have an extremely gelatinous mouthfeel. My tablemates loved them, so © 2014 maybe it’s just not my thing. The piping-hot oversized shrimp balls had a super-crisp, crunchy exterior akin to fried noodles, which gave way to a chewy, shrimpy interior. Along with the shark’s fin dumplings, fried taro dumplings, steamed taro buns and crispy pork, I’d definitely order them again. Our plate of perfectly crispy pork belly, served with a side of hoisin sauce, was gigantic — more than enough for three to share. Our waitress also presented us with a diluted Hong Kong red vinegar, tangy and acidic, which we preferred to the sweet hoisin. The steamed taro buns were tennis-ballsized rolls of goodness of a light purple hue, and soft and fluffy in texture, imparting a subtly sweet taro flavor. The Dim Sum Room is open daily from

11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and if your guests aren’t into dim sum, they can hit up Watami’s Asian fusion buffet and full bar instead. There’s something for everyone — small plate or large. Caron Streibich biteclub@folioweekly.com facebook.com/folioweeklybitesized

NIBBLES • V Pizza is slated to open in late May at 1406 Hendricks Ave. in San Marco. • Terra Restaurant at 4260 Herschel St. in Avondale has closed. The spot is the new home of J. William Culinary, touted as “gourmet fitness meals for active people.”


GRILL ME!

DINING DIRECTORY A WEEKLY Q&A WITH PEOPLE IN THE FOOD BIZ

contemporary American cuisine – seafood, steaks, pork, burgers, salads, sides and desserts – using locally sourced ingredients when possible. $$$ FB K L Mon.-Fri.; D Nightly MSHACK, 10281 Midtown Pkwy., 642-5000. F BOJ winner. See Beaches. $$ BW L D Daily OVINTE, 10208 Buckhead Branch Dr., 900-7730. BOJ. Tapas, small plates of Spanish and Italian flavors: ceviche fresco, pappardelle bolognese. 240-bottle wine list, 75 by the glass, craft spirits. Outdoor dining. $$ FB R, Sun.; D Nightly

NAME: Jon Mykytka

RESTAURANT: Park Avenue Bistro, 3535 U.S. 17, Fleming Island BIRTHPLACE: Miami

YEARS IN THE BIZ: 14

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FAVORITE RESTAURANT (other than mine): Akashi in Miami FAVORITE COOKING STYLE: Latin, Mediterranean, Southern FAVORITE INGREDIENTS: Saffron

SAN JOSE, LAKEWOOD

IDEAL MEAL: A perfectly grilled porterhouse and a glass of red wine

CRUISERS GRILL, San Jose Blvd., Ste. 1,SUPPORT PROMISE OF5613 BENEFIT 737-2874. BOJ winner. See Beaches. $ BW K L D Daily DICK’S WINGS & GRILL, 1610 University Blvd. W., 448-2110. BOJ winner. See Northside. $ FB K TO L D Daily FUSION SUSHI, 1550 University Blvd. W., 636-8688. F Upscale sushi spot serves fresh sushi, sashimi, hibachi, teriyaki, kiatsu. $$ K L D Daily MOJO BAR-B-QUE, 1607 University Blvd. W., 732-7200. F BOJ winner. See Beaches. $$ FB K TO B L D Daily

WILL NOT CROSS MY LIPS: I’ll try anything once. INSIDER’S SECRET: Prep is everything for success. CELEB SIGHTING: None yet. CULINARY TREAT: All forms of foie gras. beers. $$ BW L Mon.-Fri.; D Mon.-Sat. DICK’S WINGS & GRILL, 10391 Old St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 1, 880-7087. F BOJ winner. See Northside. $ FB K TO L D Daily HARMONIOUS MONKS, 10550 Old St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 30, 880-3040. F American-style steakhouse features Angus steaks, gourmet burgers, ribs, wraps. $$ FB K L D Mon.-Sat. KAZU JAPANESE RESTAURANT, 9965 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 35, 683-9903. The new place has a wide variety of soups, dumplings, appetizers, salads, bento boxes, sushi, entrées, maki handrolls, sashimi. $$ FB TO L D Daily LA NOPALERA, 11700 San Jose Blvd., 288-0175. F Tamales, fajitas and pork tacos are customer favorites. Some locations offer a full bar. $$ FB K TO L D Daily LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 11365 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 3, 674-2945. F See Orange Park. $ K TO B L D Daily THE RED ELEPHANT PIZZA & GRILL, 10131 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 12, 683-3773. F This casual, family-friendly eatery serves pizzas, sandwiches, grill specials, burgers and pasta dishes. Gluten-free friendly. $ FB K L D Daily RENNA’S PIZZA, 11111 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 12, 292-2300. F Casual New York-style pizzeria. Calzones, antipasto, parmigiana, homemade breads. $$ BW K TO L D Daily

ORANGE PARK, MIDDLEBURG

ARON’S PIZZA, 650 Park Ave., 269-1007. F Familyowned restaurant has eggplant dishes, manicotti, New York-style pizzas. $$ BW K TO L D Daily DICK’S WINGS & GRILL, 1540 Wells Rd., 269-2122. BOJ winner. See Northside. $ FB K TO L D Daily THE HILLTOP, 2030 Wells Road, 272-5959. Southern-style dining. Specialties: New Orleans shrimp, certified Black Angus prime rib, she-crab soup, desserts. $$$ FB D Tue.-Sat. KRISTIN’S ON THE RIVER, 2511 Blanding Blvd., 3899455. This newly re-opened spot serves seafood and American favorites. $$ FB K TO L D Daily LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 9734 Crosshill Blvd., 908-4250. 2024 Kingsley Ave., 276-2776. F See Mandarin. $$ FB TO L D Daily LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 1330 Blanding Blvd., 276-7370. 1545 C.R. 220, 278-2827. 700 Blanding Blvd., Ste. 15, 272-3553. 1401 S. Orange Ave., Green Cove Springs, 284-7789. F All over the area, they pile ’em high and serve ’em fast. Hot/cold subs, soups, salads. $ K TO B L D Daily THE ROADHOUSE, 231 Blanding Blvd., 264-0611. F Wings, sandwiches, burgers, quesadillas; 35+ years. Pool tables, darts, foosball, TVs. 75+ imported beers. $ FB L D Daily

PONTE VEDRA, NW ST. JOHNS

AL’S PIZZA, 635 A1A N., 543-1494. F BOJ winner. See Beaches. $ FB K TO L D Daily CLAUDE’S CHOCOLATES, 145 Hilden Rd., Ste. 122, 829-5790. Hand-crafted in the onsite factory, with premium Belgian chocolate, fruits, nuts and spices. Cookies and popsicles. Claude’s will ship your order. $$ TO LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 830 A1A N., Ste. 6, 273-3993. F See Orange Park. $ K TO B L D Daily RESTAURANT MEDURE, 818 A1A N., 543-3797. Chef David Medure creates with a wide range of global flavors. The lounge offers small plates, creative drinks and entertainment, including happy hour twice daily. $$$ FB D Mon.-Sat.

RIVERSIDE, 5 POINTS, WESTSIDE

AL’S PIZZA, 1620 Margaret St., Ste. 201, 388-8384. F BOJ winner. See Beaches. $ FB K TO L D Daily BLACK SHEEP RESTAURANT, 1534 Oak St., 355-3793. BOJ winner. New American favorites with a Southern twist, made with locally sourced ingredients. Awesome rooftop bar. $$$ FB R Sat. & Sun.; L D Daily BOLD BEAN COFFEE ROASTERS, 869 Stockton St., Stes. 1-2, 855-1181. F BOJ winner. Small-batch, artisanal coffee roasting. Organic, fair trade. $ BW TO B L Daily CORNER TACO, 818 Post St., 240-0412. Made-from-scratch “semi-swanky street food,” tacos, nachos, gluten-free and vegetarian options. $ BW L D Tue.-Sun. DICK’S WINGS & GRILL, 5972 San Juan Ave., Westside, 693-9258. BOJ winner. See Northside. $ FB K TO L D Daily GRASSROOTS NATURAL MARKET, 2007 Park St., 384-4474.

F BOJ. Juice bar has certified organic fruit, vegetables. Artisanal cheese, 300+ craft/import beer, organic wines, produce, meats, wraps, raw, vegan. $ BW TO B L D Daily HAWKERS, 1001 Park St., 508-0342. The new spot is based on Asian street vendors. A collection of hawker BASIL THAI & SUSHI, 1004 Hendricks Ave., 674-0190. F recipes is served under one roof. $ BW TO L D Daily Pad Thai, curries, sushi, served in a relaxing environment. LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 1509 Margaret St., 674-2794. Dine indoors or on the patio. $$ FB L D Mon.-Sat. 7895 Normandy Blvd., 781-7600. 5733 Roosevelt Blvd., THE GROTTO WINE & TAPAS BAR, 2012 San Marco Blvd., Westside, 446-9500. 8102 Blanding Blvd., Westside, 398-0726. F Varied tapas menu of artisanal cheese 779-1933. F See Orange Park. $ K TO B L D Daily METRO DINER, 4495 Roosevelt Blvd., Ortega, 999-4600. plates, empanadas, bruschettas, homestyle cheesecake. F BOJ winner. See San Marco. $$ R B L Daily 60+ wines by the glass. $$$ BW Tue.-Sun. MOON RIVER PIZZA, 1176 Edgewood Ave. S., 389-4442. LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 1631 Hendricks F BOJ winner. See Amelia Island. $ BW TO L D Mon.-Sat. Ave., 399-1768. F See Mandarin. $$ FB K TO L D Daily THE MOSSFIRE GRILL, 1537 Margaret St., 355-4434. MATTHEW’S, 2107 Hendricks Ave., 396-9922. Matthew F Southwestern dishes like fresh fish tacos and chicken Medure’s flagship. Fine dining, European-style atmosphere. OF BENEFIT SUPPORT enchiladas are popular. Happy hour runs Mon.-Sat. in the PROMISE Artfully presented cuisine, small plates, extensive martini/ upstairs lounge, and all day Sun. $$ FB K L D Daily wine lists. Reservations. $$$$ FB D Mon.-Sat. METRO DINER, 3302 Hendricks Ave., 398-3701. F BOJ O’BROTHERS IRISH PUB, 1521 Margaret St., 854-9300. winner. Original upscale diner in a historic 1930s-era building. F Traditional Irish fare like shepherd’s pie with Stilton Meatloaf, chicken pot pie, homemade soups. $$ B R L Daily crust, Guinness mac-n-cheese and fish-n-chips. Outdoor PIZZA PALACE 1959 San Marco Blvd., 399-8815. F See patio dining is available. $$ FB K TO L D Daily SUN-RAY CINEMA, 1028 Park St., 359-0049. F Beer (Bold Baymeadows. $$ BW TO L D Daily City, Intuition Ale Works), wine, pizza, hot dogs, hummus, sandwiches, popcorn, nachos, brownies. $$ BW Daily

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ST. AUGUSTINE

AL’S PIZZA, 1 St. George St., 824-4383. F BOJ winner. See Beaches. $ FB K TO L D Daily AVILES RESTAURANT & LOUNGE, 32 Avenida Menendez, 829-2277. F Hilton Bayfront Hotel. Progressive Europeanflavored menu; made-to-order pasta night, wine dinners, chophouse nights, deluxe breakfast buffet. Sun. champagne brunch bottomless mimosas. Free valet. $$$ FB K B L D Daily CANDLELIGHT SOUTH, 1 Anastasia Blvd., 819-0588. F Brand-new on the island, the casual restaurant originally in Scarsdale, N.Y., offers fish tacos, sandwiches, wings, desserts and sangria. Daily specials. $ BW K TO L D Daily CARMELO’S MARKETPLACE & PIZZERIA, 146 King St., 494-6658. F New York-style brick-oven-baked pizza, fresh sub rolls, Boar’s Head meats, cheeses, garlic herb wings. Outdoor seating, Wi-Fi. $$ BW TO L D Daily CLAUDE’S CHOCOLATES, 6 Granada St., 829-5790. Inside The Market. Wine and chocolate pairings, soft-serve ice cream, a coffee bar, fresh fruit ice pops, cookies. $$ TO CRUISERS GRILL, 3 St. George St., 824-6993. F BOJ winner. See Beaches. $ BW K L D Daily DICK’S WINGS & GRILL, 4010 U.S. 1 S., 547-2669. BOJ winner. See Northside. $ FB K TO L D Daily THE FLORIDIAN, 39 Cordova St., 829-0655. Updated Southern fare: fresh, local ingredients from area farms. Vegetarian, gluten-free, too. Fried green tomato bruschetta, grits with shrimp, fish or tofu. $$$ BW K TO L D Wed.-Mon. GYPSY CAB COMPANY, 828 Anastasia Blvd., Anastasia Island, 824-8244. F A mainstay for a quarter-century, Gypsy’s menu changes twice daily. Signature dish is Gypsy chicken. Seafood, tofu, duck, veal. $$ FB R Sun.; L D Daily HARRY’S SEAFOOD BAR & GRILLE, 46 Avenida Menendez, 824-7765. F New Orleans-style. Cajun, Creole, Southern flavors with a modern twist: fresh seafood, steaks, pork, jambalaya, shrimp. Daily happy hour. $$ FB K TO L D Daily LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 155 Hampton Point Dr., 230-7879. F See Mandarin. $$ FB K TO L D Daily MELLOW MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS, 410 Anastasia Blvd., 826-4040. F Bite Club certified. BOJ winner. See Beaches. $ BW K TO L D Daily MOJO OLD CITY BBQ, 5 Cordova St., 342-5264. F BOJ winner. See Beaches. $$ FB K TO L D Daily PACIFIC ASIAN BISTRO, 159 Palencia Village Dr., Ste. 111, 808-1818. F BOJ winner. Chef Mas Lui creates 30+ unique sushi rolls; fresh sea scallops, Hawaiian-style poke tuna salad. $$-$$$ BW L D Daily TEMPO, 16 Cathedral Place, 547-0240. Newish fusion place specializes in healthful American fare with a Latin flair. $$ BW TO L D Tue.-Sun.

ST. JOHNS TOWN CENTER

MOXIE KITCHEN + COCKTAILS, 4972 Big Island Dr., 998-9744. Chef Tom Gray’s place features innovative

360° GRILLE, LATITUDE 30, 10370 Philips Hwy., 3655555. F Seafood, steaks, burgers, chicken, sandwiches, pizza. Dine inside, on patio. $$ FB TO L D Daily ALHAMBRA THEATRE & DINING, 12000 Beach Blvd., 641-1212. Longest-running dinner theater. Executive Chef DeJuan Roy’s menus coordinated with stage productions. Reservations suggested. $$ FB D Tue.-Sun. CASA MARIA, 14965 Old St. Augustine Rd., 619-8186. F See Beaches. $ FB K L D Daily DICK’S WINGS & GRILL, 10750 Atlantic Blvd., 619-0954. BOJ winner. See Northside. $ FB K TO L D Daily THE DIM SUM ROOM, 9041 Southside Blvd., Ste. 138D, 363-9888. Dim sum favorites: shrimp dumplings, beef tripe, sesame ball; plus traditional Hong Kong noodles and barbecue. $ FB K L D Daily. LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 3611 St. Johns Bluff S., 641-6499. 4479 Deerwood Lake Pkwy., 425-4060. F See Orange Park. BOJ winner. $ K TO BOF L D Daily PROMISE BENEFIT SUPPORT MANGIA! ITALIAN BISTRO & BAR, 3210 St. Johns Bluff Rd. S., 551-3061. F Chef/owner Tonino DiBella offers fine dining – fresh seafood, veal, steaks, New York-style pizza, desserts. Happy hour Mon.-Sat. Patio. $$$ FB K TO L D Mon.-Sat. MELLOW MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS, 9734 Deer Lake Ct., Ste. 1, 997-1955. F See Beaches. Bite Club certified. BOJ winner. $ BW K TO L D Daily SEVEN BRIDGES GRILLE & BREWERY, 9735 Gate Pkwy. N., 997-1999. F Local seafood, steaks, pizzas. Brewer Aaron Nesbit handcrafts award-winning freshly brewed ales and lagers. Inside, outdoors. $$ FB K TO L D Daily TAVERNA YAMAS, 9753 Deer Lake Court, 854-0426. F Bite Club certified. BOJ winner. Char-broiled kabobs, seafood, wines, desserts. Belly dancing. $$ FB K L D Daily WATAMI BUFFET, 9041 Southside Blvd., Ste. 138D, 363-9888. All-you can-eat sushi, plus choice of two items from teppanyaki grill. $ FB K L D Daily. WORLD OF BEER, 9700 Deer Lake Court, Ste. 1, 551-5929. F Apps and bar food: German pretzels, hummus, pickle chips, flatbreads. Craft drafts from Germany, Cali, Florida (Bold City brews), Ireland, Belgium. $$ BW L D Daily

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DICK’S WINGS & GRILL, 12400 Yellow Bluff Rd., Ste. 101, 619-9828. F BOJ winner. NASCAR-themed spot has 365 kinds of wings, half-pound burgers, ribs. $ FB K TO L D Daily HOLA MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 1001 N. Main, 356-3100. F Fresh Mexican fare: fajitas, burritos, enchiladas, daily specials. Happy hour daily; sangria. $ BW K TO L D Mon.-Sat. LARRY’S GIANT SUBS, 12001 Lem Turner, 764-9999. See Orange Park. $ K TO B L D Daily SAVANNAH BISTRO, 14670 Duval Rd., 741-4404. F Low Country Southern fare, taste of Mediterranean and French. Crowne Plaza Airport. Crab cakes, New York strip, she crab soup, mahi mahi. Rainforest Lounge. $$$ FB K B L D Daily.

MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 51

Produc


ASTROLOGY

MOON PHASES, STAGE FRIGHT & KIM JONG-IL ATTENTION, HOPEFUL ISU WRITERS: The word limit for ISU notices is now 40 words ONLY. NO ISU submissions with more than 40 words will be accepted. Please keep messages short & sweet. Count before you submit! Thanks! ROGUE MEN MUSCLE HOTTIE Young Adonis-like dude in corner of Aardwolf with friends. Tight T-shirt, dark eyes, biceps. U guys were rockin’ but I caught you lookin’. Me: Tall guy, Jags cap. Hit me up or meet at next Rogue Men. When: May 16. Where: Aardwolf/ Rogue Men. #1365-0521

YOU HELD DOOR OPEN FOR ME ... Me: Tall brunette, blue shirt. You: Brown hair, beautiful eyes, burgundy shirt/jeans, black Chevy SUV or Escalade. I think you went in Walmart after I did. I looked for you; love to meet again. When: April 21. Where: Walmart Gas Station Philips Hwy. #1353-0430

STATUESQUE BEAUTY WAITING IN MIND In pharmacy RX line. You: Tall, gorgeous dress, flats. I asked if you ever wore heels. Beautiful laugh. Me: Not as tall, looking scruffy off work; clean up well. You left, said you’d be back. Date slightly shorter? I’m your RX. When: May 14. Where: CVS Blanding Blvd. #1364-0521

ISU LOOKING AT ISU! At Mandarin Library; reading the back of Folio Weekly, laughing. Assumed it was ISU. Y ou: Cute brunette, wonderful laugh. Me: Tall muscular brunette, checking DVDs out. Love to know the person behind the laughter. Where: Mandarin Library. When: April 16. #1352-0423

HOT-N-READY BABY You: Tall, bald, sexy; getting in white Mercedes. I became enthralled when I saw your 10 pizzas. Love a man who can eat. I’ll be waiting in a leopard shirt every Wed. 8 p.m. Forget pizzas; get Hot-N-Ready with me. When: May 14. Where: Little Caesars Pizza, Southside. #1363-0521

SO WAS IT ALTERNATOR? You: Inadvertently at my moving sale, Atlantic Beach, Sunday a.m., working on buddy’s wife’s Jeep. You looked sexy under the hood working with your hands; my morning was more exciting! Bummed you never returned. Take me for a ride in your Altima before it sells? I’ll handle the heat! Where: Eakin & Sneed Law Firm, AB. When: April 13. #1351-0423

BEAUTIFUL BLONDE AT APPLEBY’S ISU with fellow workers. I was at bar watching TVs above you, with my daughter and son-in-law. Our eyes met; I felt the attraction. I want to meet the lady who made my heart jump! When: May 13. Where: Applebee’s, Old St. Augustine Rd. #1362-0521 SPACED-OUT CUT-UP SMURF SHIRT, RED CONVERSE ISU dancing your own dance, apologized for male gender, took glasses off to dance. You: Retirement home server near Sawgrass; discussed labyrinth of suffering. Told me to wait; never returned. Me: Vest, purple shirt. When: May 9. Where: The Loft, Riverside. #1361-0514

MUDVILLE GRILLE TRIVIA NIGHT You: At bar, waiting for (first?) date. My buddy and I were woefully undermanned for trivia; you jumped in to help! Me: Blue-shirted guy with onion ring fetish. I like how we connected; you were busy when your date came. Did it work out? :-) Where: Mudville Trivia. When: April 4. #1350-0423 I SAW MY FUTURE ISU hanging at a friend’s. Looking into your eyes, there was something about you; you felt it, too. You: Blue jeans, black top; I remember smile most. Your voice was a sign from heaven; my angel was there for me to love. When: 2011. Where: Captiva Bluff. #1349-0416

TATTOOS & TRUCK You: Hot, tattooed boy, black truck. Me: Red lips, silver Rodeo. Drove side-by-side, JTB to Riverside. I turned on Park, lost you. Should’ve rolled my window down when you said hi at the light. Go for a drive? When: May 6. Where: JTB to I-95N. #1360-0514

DAD NEEDS CUSTOMER SERVICE Came in with daughter; you helped her find a skirt. Help me find a way to your heart? You: Short blonde hair, folding shirts, men’s section. Me: Salt & pepper, gray in beard, love to jog, hope things work out for us ;-). When: March 28. Where: Forever 21 Avenues. #1348-0416

I BOUGHT YOU A BUD LIGHT Met at the bar, you had a nice smile. Asked if I was in military, we complained about slow service. Told you I was married. Hope you’re interested in just friends. Let me know. When: May 3. Where: Acapulco’s. #1359-0514

PUBLIX SMILE & WAVE BLONDE BEAUTY Atlantic & Hodges. You: Pretty blonde, blue eyes, blue workout clothes. Me: 6 feet tall, blue eyes, blue shirt. Eyes met on opposite lines. Almost sprained my neck. You smiled, waved, left. Should’ve run after. Don’t get chances to connect, desire I felt. Take a chance. When: April 3. Where: Publix Atlantic/ Hodges. #1347-0409

HOT BUTCH GIRL Hey, black Incahoots cut-off shirt, name R_, #27 on back. Buff arms, legs; couldn’t take my eyes off u on rowing machine! You can row my boat anytime! ;-) Sincerely, Hot brunette femme, hot pink tank top. When: May 3. Where: Riverside YMCA. #1358-0507 MEET FOR BREAKFAST AGAIN? You: Detective, JSO Organized Crime Unit, PDDS Division. Me: Work from home for IT company. We sat beside each other at breakfast. Chatted; hoped you’d ask me out; you didn’t. Single? Meet for breakfast again? Get in touch. When: May 3. Where: U.S. 17 Waffle House. #1357-0507 CUTIE WITH TEA & HOOKAH Amsterdam, Tuesday 9-11 p.m. You: Zip-up hoodie, alone. We made eye contact. Me: Black dress. I went to bathroom; my friend said you’d leave number. So excited; you left suddenly without saying anything, before I said hey. Went outside, you were gone! Meet again? :) When: March 30. Where: Amsterdam Hookah Lounge. #1356-0507 HOT BRUNETTE, COLORFUL TOP, WHITE SHORTS You: Gorgeous brunette at Salty Pelican Saturday night; with a friend. We shared a moment; we both felt it. Hope you read this, hope to hear back. You’re one in a million – beautiful green-eyed brunette. When: April 26. Where: Salty Pelican, Fernandina. #1355-0507 BEAUTIFUL POKER PLAYER @ PLAYERS ISU after poker Wednesday, with redheaded friend. Your beautiful blonde hair caught my eye. You: White top. Me: Black blue-striped golf shirt, admired you from bar. You hugged girls; want one of those hugs! When: April 23. Where: Players Grill. #1354-0430

52 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

ATLANTIC BLVD. CHOPPER HOTTIE VA TAGS You: Harley jacket, copper Chopper westbound with buddy. Blowing me kisses. Me: Pink hair, tattoos, gray Chevy Cobalt. Come see me at Regis salon, Town Center so I can catch some kisses. When: April 3. Where: Atlantic Boulevard. #1346-0409 DONOVAN’S IRISH PUB You: Alone at bar, ball cap, having dinner, talked football with others. Me: Blonde, pink shirt across bar with friend. Made eye contact; I felt attraction across the room. Wish I had your name; didn’t want to be rude to friend. Asked bartender if you’re a regular; didn’t know. Hope you see this. When: March 30. Where: Donovan’s. #1345-0409 POOL BOY & FORMER POOL GIRL We were parked next to each other. You weren’t satisfi ed with the car wash. I borrowed your vacuum. Loved your tattoo. I should have ... Haven’t/can’t stop thinking about you. When: Sunday, March 23. Where: CarBux San Jose. #1344-0402 BEAUTIFUL ASIAN AT PAPA JOHN’S ARGYLE You: Asian and beautiful, drives late model Hyundai. We made eye contact briefly. I feel like a fool for not asking for your number. Describe me and let’s start the revolution. When: March 19. Where: Papa John’s. #1343-0326 BURGER SLINGIN’ BEAUTY You: Breathtaking brunette providing burgers to all lucky to be in your presence. Me: Tall, dark-haired gentleman, catches you gazing intimately into my eyes every Tuesday. OK, yes, it’s mutual. Skip small talk and make this thing official? When: March 18. Where: MShack Atlantic Beach. #1342-0326

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I believe your persuasive powers will be stronger than usual in the weeks ahead. The words coming out of your mouth will sound especially interesting. I suspect your intelligence will get at least a temporary upgrade. The clarity of your thoughts will intensify. You’ll see truths you’ve been blind to in the past. Innovative solutions to long-running dilemmas may occur to you. The only potential snag? You may neglect to nurture your emotional riches. You could become too dry and hard. But you’ve been warned, so take steps to ensure it won’t happen. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If there was a Hall of Fame for scientists, physicist Isaac Newton (1642-1727) would’ve been the charter member. He was like Elvis Presley and Chuck Berry were to rock and roll, like Babe Ruth to baseball. The theory of gravity and the three laws of motion were his gifts to the world. He made major contributions to mathematics and optics, and was a central figure in defining modern science. There’s a legend that he invented the cat door, inspired by his pet felines. Whether or not it’s true, it’s an excellent metaphor for this horoscope. It’s a great time to apply your finest talents and highest intelligence to dream up small, mundane but practical innovations. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): During the next 12 months, you’ll have exceptional opportunities to soak up knowledge, add to your skill set and get training you need to pursue interesting kinds of success in the next six to eight years. The best way to prepare? Develop an exciting new plan for future education. To get in the mood, try this: make a list of your most promising but still unripe potentials, meditate on subjects that evoke the most curiosity, brainstorm about what experiences would give you more control over your destiny and study three people you know who’ve improved their lives taking aggressive steps to enhance their proficiency. CANCER (June 21-July 22): The moon shows us a different phase every 24 hours, which makes it seem changeable. In fact, not much actually happens on the moon. It has no atmosphere, no weather, no wind, no plant life, no seasons. There is some water, but it’s frozen. Anything like this in your life? Something that, on the surface, seems to constantly move, but whose underlying state never shifts or develops? According to my analysis, now’s an excellent time to revise how you understand this part of your world, and then update your relationship with it.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “There is always an enormous temptation in all of life,” writes Annie Dillard, “to diddle around making itsy-bitsy friends and meals and journeys for itsy-bitsy years on end … I won’t have it. The world is wider than that in all directions, more dangerous and bitter, more extravagant and bright.” Your assignment? Transcend whatever’s itsy-bitsy about your life. The alternative? Head toward the frontier and drum up experiences to thrill your heart and blow your mind. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “We are all searching for someone whose demons play well with ours,” writes novelist Heidi R. Kling. That’s good advice to keep in mind these days. Those little imps and rascals that live in you may get you in bad trouble if they’re bored. But if you arrange for them to have play dates with the imps and rascals in people you trust, they’re more likely to get you in good trouble. They may even provide bits of gritty inspiration. What’s that you say? You don’t have any demons? Not true. Everyone has them. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “When people tell you who they are, believe them,” writes blogger Maria Popova (Brainpickings.org). “Just as important, however, when people try to tell you who you are, don’t believe them.” Those suggestions are especially crucial to keep in mind these days. You’re entering a phase when your best relationships are up for review, revision and revitalization. To foster an environment in which intimacy will thrive, be extra receptive, curious, tolerant and tender. That’s all! Easy, right? A good place to start? Proceed as if your allies know who they are better than you do — even as you ask them to return the favor. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Kludge” (pronounced klooj) is slang that refers to a clumsy but effective fix for an engineering problem. It’s a cobbled-together solution that works fine, at least temporarily, even though it’s inelegant or seems farfetched. Let’s apply this concept metaphorically. You’ll be a kludge master in the next few days, skilled at making the best of mediocre situations. You may have surprising success doing things that don’t come naturally, and you find unexpected ways to correct glitches no one else has any idea about how to fix.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Have you thought of organizing a crowdfunding campaign to boost your pet project or labor of love? Get serious about it in the next four weeks. This phase of your cycle will be a favorable time to expand your audience, attract new allies and build a buzz. You have a sixth sense about how to wield personal charm to serve long-term goals. More than usual, your selfish interests dovetail with the greater good — maybe in unexpected ways.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I hesitate to compare you to your fellow Aquarian Kim Jong-il. When he was alive and ruling North Korea, he was an egomaniacal tyrant. You’re definitely not that. But there are certain descriptions of him in his official biography that remind me of the kinds of powers you may soon exhibit. He was called The Great Sun of Life and Highest Incarnation of Revolutionary Comradely Love — titles like that may suit you. It’s said he invented the hamburger. He could command rain to fall from the sky. He once shot 11 holes-in-one in a single round of golf, was a master at gliding down waterslides and never used a toilet because he produced no waste. You may be able to do comparable feats in the weeks ahead. Do it without excessive pride.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Years ago, I had a Virgo friend who was a talented singer. She had technical skill, stylistic flair and animal magnetism, worthy of being a lead vocalist in almost any great band. And yet when she dreamed of performing, she often stood in the shadows, barely visible and singing tentatively, while her back-up singers hogged the spotlight center stage. Moral of the story: Some Virgos are shy about claiming full authority. It’s not easy to shine your light and radiate power. You can learn to do so. The weeks ahead are a great time to make progress in this direction.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Even if you had a sensitive, nurturing mommy growing up, and even if she continues to play an important role in your life, now’s a good time to learn how to mother yourself better. You’re ready to know how important it is to be your own primary caregiver. I hope you’re no longer resistant to or embarrassed about the idea that part of you is still like a child who needs unconditional love 24/7. Get started! Treat yourself with the expert tenderness like a crafty maternal goddess. Rob Brezsny freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com


NEWS OF THE WEIRD PROM DRAFT

HERE, KITTY ...

A week before the National Football League held its 2014 Draft Day in May, a large contingent of junior and senior boys staged their own draft day at Corona del Mar High School in Newport Beach, California, “dividing up” the available girls to ask to the upcoming prom. As in the NFL, the drafters “scout” the draftees, and a “rule book” notes boundaries (e.g., this year, sophomore girls are eligible). The girls, of course, can decline the invitation, but the draft, as in the NFL, is designed to discourage a selected girl from being “poached” by “competing” boys. Obviously, many in the community expressed horror at the draft — the principal denounced it and urged parents to rein in their sons. One of the drafted girls, though, wrote that the whole thing was just “fun” and “is not, was never, and will never ever be used to objectify the girls.”

In April, Brazilian authorities told reporters folks in remote Ayopaya, needing to recover three motorbikes stolen by two men, tied them to a tree of woe for several days until relatives came up with compensation. The tree was a permanent host for ants that produce a venom with anti-inflammatory properties used to treat arthritis, and though relatives paid up three days later, both men needed hospitalization, one with kidney failure.

SIZE MATTERS, COMRADE

IT’S GOLDEN

The downfall of Russia-sympathizing Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych in February (which eventually provoked Vladimir Putin’s retaliation against Ukraine) accelerated when his countrymen learned of his startlingly lush lifestyle (gold toilets, a private zoo) — and caught a video glimpse of a nude portrait Yanukovych commissioned of himself by artist Olga Oleynik. Yanukovych, a not-too-buff 63-year-old, was shown reclining and with an undersized male endowment. Oleynik told Agence France-Presse news service she’d done a similar portrait of Putin — more generously endowed — but was “afraid” to show it in public or say if it was actually commissioned by Putin.

TOOTH HURTY

Skylar King, 28, filed a lawsuit in Clayton, Missouri, in April against dentist Mark Meyers (and his Same Day Dentures clinic) for a 2009 session in which Meyers somehow obtained King’s consent to extract all 32 of his teeth and provide dentures, promptly after obtaining $5,235 on King’s mother’s credit card. King, seeking treatment for an abscessed tooth, said Dr. Meyers warned he was at risk of “fatal blood poisoning” unless all the teeth were yanked. Dr. Meyers insisted King actually requested the procedure, even though X-rays revealed at least 28 of the teeth were treatable.

HARD CASH

As of late March, the Sainsbury’s supermarket in Basford, England, still had an operational ATM on an outside wall even though its screen and controls were only 15 inches off the ground, forcing customers to bend over or kneel down to get cash. A Sainsbury’s spokesman, shown a photo by a reporter of a user squatting “incredibly uncomfortabl[y]),” said no one had complained, but the store would look into moving the machine. The only explanation offered for the placement was that the store is located on a hill.

SOMETHING TO TALK ABOUT

Wellma “Tootie” Shafer, 46, was fired as a cashier at Last Chance Market in Russell, Iowa, after a customer reported her engaging in “sexual” banter at the register. Her boss, Rick Braaksma, explained, “We cannot ... talk about adult situations in front of other customers.” Shafer sought unemployment compensation; Braaksma challenged it. Among the items Last Chance sells are Wake the F- Up Coffee, The Hottest F-ing Sauce (noted, the label states, for its “ass-burning quality”), and The Hottest F-ing Nuts (all product names using the explicit “F word”), and a state administrative judge granted Shafer benefits, showing (according to an April Des Moines Register item) little sympathy for the store’s contradictory policy.

An unnamed 40-year-old man was charged in Briec, France, in May for a February incident in which his cat knocked over his statue of Buddha, demolishing it. The man apparently so reveres Buddha that, enraged, he tortured the cat by tossing it into his washing machine and setting it for a cycle at 104 degrees F.

WOE IS TREE

For this year’s annual April 25 fundraising project, the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) sold a 60-second “message,” digitally downloadable for a donation of $2.11 — but consisting only of silence (“prerecorded” silence). A veterans’ official told Australian Broadcasting Corporation News, “I was a bit dubious [but] ... I’ve seen the enthusiasm at which this is being picked up nationally.”

RESTAURANT OF CHOICE

On-the-lam parolee Mark Royal, 51, spotted in his car by sheriff ’s deputies in Sacramento, California, in March, led officers on a 35mile chase before coming to a stop in front of the Placer County Jail in Auburn and surrendering. He told the puzzled deputies only that “the food is better here” than in Sacramento’s lock-up. The deputies returned him to Sacramento anyway.

© 2014

THE NOSE KNOWS

John Novak, 48, was taken to a hospital and then arrested after a rough night in May in Buhl, Idaho, in which he threatened his sister with a rifle-bayonet and then tried a home remedy to relieve a snoring problem. With what was later measured as a 0.50 bloodalcohol level (more than six times the state’s presumed-impaired limit), he stuck two straws into his nostrils and slammed a door rapidly into his face, attempting to break the nose (and apparently succeeding, though his exact condition was not reported). He said he’d been drinking “for a week straight,” to dull the anticipated pain.

IF THE SHOE FITS

NOTW has seen the extraordinary discomfort some women embrace just to be able to wear a certain pair of designer shoes. The number and ingenuity of foot doctors serving such women has recently grown. An April New York Times report noted Beverly Hills podiatrist Ali Sadrieh offers a Perfect 10! procedure (aesthetic toe-shortening), a Model T (toelengthening) and Foot Tuck (a foot-padding for high-heel pain). New York’s Dr. Oliver Zong treats High Heel Foot (when the foot conforms to the shape of a stiletto) and Hitchhiker’s Toe (an abnormally large big toe sticking out like a thumb). Some patients get to the point right away, Sadrieh said, bringing in specific cherished shoes and asking which foot-retrofitting procedure would work (though Zong said he turned down one woman who said she’d be OK with nine toes if that’s what it took). Chuck Shepherd weirdnews@earthlink.net MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 53


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88

107

112

57 64

83

101

106

12

46

63

78

94

R E P L A M A A M P S P A L S D A B Z A N Y I N E P I P E S T E S T N C O C T O R P U R E A P T S

34

56

82

93

S O R E R

22

74

87

11

S T O P A T

40

55

77

86

10

U N H A T S

18

39

62

81 85

A M E R I C R A A N J A S L A V

M I T O S I S

50

73

76

H E X E D

33

68

72

T H A T I S

I N E N E R N O A U G OWC O T I L E N EW R O F A I L C C L D L E O A R N N E A G A Z T S L I S N S T N O A T I N G E A N U L Y S

28

45

67

71

A W A S H

27

49

61

L O C H S

17

44

54

D S O L A B Y R S E I S T D A E M N E I N E S S D T I Y N K O E S

21

31

41

A C I E D E N T H E V C O L I C O S D I E C U B P U B L O B O E S A L I N T H T S O R U U S I N R E A D G E T E S A C A KWO R G R A V B Y T E

8 16

25

36

LAST WEEK: Theme answers described famous Malcolms – Malcolm Lowry, Malcolm-Jamal Warner, Malcolm Forbes, Malcolm X, Malcolm McDowell, and TV show “Malcolm in the Middle.” The number-code hint was “anagram it.” MALCOLM anagrams into CALL MOM, an apt idea for Mother’s Day.

Solution to Go Ahead, Make Her Day

20

23

83 “At the gym I usually toss up ___ ball – it’s my specialty – just before I leave” 85 Hard to hum, maybe 86 “I like only the ___ peppers” 87 Muffin alternatives 89 Director’s first name 91 “She likes to ___ old coffee before making a new pot” 92 Not so stiff 93 ___ sheet 95 Role for Harrison 97 Contract info 99 Multitude 101 Keep from lapsing 103 Intro to physics 104 ___ the benefits 107 “Gimme ___!” 108 2014 Oscar winner Jared 110 AA program unit 113 Equinox mo. 115 Mouse’s place? 117 Erstwhile carrier

Fast-food drink Pull hard and fast Does a road job TV room Compadres “Gulliver’s Travels,” e.g. Teeny-tiny Translucent gem Go off the deep end? Grow sick of More cunning Tag amount Oregon hrs. Makes invalid Julio’s home Standoffish Back in style T-man’s first name First installment Finally Shiver’s cause Turkey’s Ataturk Deadly hisser Food container Sitar piece Crude container Been told Slumber stopper Stereo knob Nasty person Small sofa Drum site Unreliable witness Reserve officially “___ silent H in your name, right?”

E Q U A L S

15

19

51

AVONDALE 3617 ST. JOHNS AVE. 10300 SOUTHSIDE BLVD. 388-5406 394-1390 AVENUES MALL

79 “Do we want a buzzer or ___ better idea?” 81 Cousin of age 82 Barbie topper 84 Steed speed 85 Mellow yellows 88 Take care of 90 Flame flitters 93 Even now 94 French honey? 96 Other rte. 98 Doesn’t give up? 100 Gondolier’s need 101 Crowd sound 102 Less taxing 105 Peerage member 106 Wind (up) 107 Parsley cousin 109 Movie-star looks? 111 Formal requirement 112 “One more payment will make the ___” 114 Nasal partitions 116 “On your ‘Welcome’ ___ is missing” 118 Table extenders 119 Arcade pioneer 120 Volcano, at times 121 Sketched 122 Glade target 123 Exchange barbs

ACROSS Tip politely Grow tiresome Neatnik’s antithesis Dog accessory Holiday visitor Takes an oath “I ___ ... that’s the extent of my kitchen skills” Agreement of ’94 “Is a ___ way to spend an evening? Let’s kiss and make up.” “Starpeace” musician Digestion-related Firstborn PBS supporter Steaming stream Versions Periscope part Port on its own gulf Rental car option Legendary Bruin Hersey title town Bay bird Barbershop sounds ___ tank Jug band instruments Big bash Get-up-and-go Bottom line “I can sing this ___ major, but it won’t sound too good” More than vexation “Why does Ma let ___ her like that?” Nightclub requests? Intertwine Friskies eater Fall hue Bar ejectee, perhaps Fruit flaw Ex-chief justice Stone Words before “Believer” Inner tube? Take a bough? Like some gymnastics Foundry refuse “So, what do you do ___ and relaxation around here?” Poet’s meadow 1

SOUTHSIDE


SAMPLE CRAFT & IMPORT BEERS!

SUNDAY, JUNE 22 1 – 6 p.m. Riverside Arts Market 715 Riverside Ave.

FREE Admission!

$5 for Souvenir Sampling Cup & 1 Free Drink. $20 for 7 beers. $40 for unlimited sampling.

Benefiting the St. Johns Riverkeeper For more information on sponsorship opportunities please contact Ro Espinosa at 904-260-9770 ext. 129 or respinosa@folioweekly.com MAY 21-27, 2014 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | 55


56 | FOLIOWEEKLY.com | MAY 21-27, 2014

Folio Weekly 05/21/14  

Folio Weekly 05/21/14 The Ultimate Summer Guide

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