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Northeast Florida’s News & Opinion Magazine • May 24-30, 2011 • Left Below • 110,860 readers every week!

Bonnie “Prince” Billy brings his confessional songwriting to a free in-store appearance. p. 41

Comedian Bill Maher revels in milking humor from America’s sacred cows. p. 48


2 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011


Inside

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Volume 25 Number 8

66

41

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MUSIC Bonnie “Prince” Billy does a free in-store in St. Augustine, Clutch brings their hard-rock sound to Freebird. p. 40

EDITOR’S NOTE p. 4 MAIL Reader feedback on Jacksonville’s own “Dr. Detox.” p. 5 NEWS Breaking promises to custodial workers is a dirty job, but the School Board may yet do it. p. 7 BUZZ, BOUQUETS & BRICKBATS Post-election wisdom from around the political spectrum. Plus an RN ditches healthcare for longer, thicker lashes. p. 8 SPORTS Tiger Woods’ golden showers, alas, have tapered off into ignominious trickles. And the sponsors mourn. p. 10 COVER STORY Dive in or rapture up: Folio Weekly’s Ultimate Summer Guide is all the seasonal direction you’ll need. p. 13 OUR PICKS Reasons to leave the house this week. p. 35

ARTS Comedian Bill Maher milks humor from America’s sacred cows. Plus Karpeles Museum exhibit explores séances, supernatural journeys and other high weirdness. p. 48 NEWS OF THE WEIRD Montana lawmakers complain tough DUI laws are “destroying a way of life.” p. 61 BACKPAGE When does legitimate protest fall within the official definitions of “threat”? Altogether too often. p. 66 I ♥ TELEVISION p. 11 HAPPENINGS p. 52 DINING p. 54 EYE p. 60 FREEWILL ASTROLOGY OGY p. 62 I SAW U p. 63 CLASSIFIEDS p. 64

MOVIES Reviews of “Priest” and “Bridesmaids.” p. 36 Cover Model: Braiden Kifer MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 3


Leading by Example A

surreal moment last week, toggling between Jacksonville election results and a Tivo-ed “American Experience” on the Freedom Riders. On one screen, shots of police dogs attacking nonviolent advocates for civil rights. On the next, the vote count gradually growing for the city’s first black mayor, and its first Democratic one in 20 years. The election of Alvin Brown was a watershed event, and a moment of which all city residents — supporters and opponents alike — can be proud. It was a close election, with a margin that Brown must remain mindful of as he moves ahead. But the race also unified the city in a way few would have expected at the outset, and may ultimately do more to break down longstanding divisions of party and race than any single event since desegregation. Much of the credit for this belongs to an unlikely bunch of people — rich, white, mostly Republican males. Led by the courageous example of former St. Joe CEO Peter Rummell, a handful of influential rainmakers stepped out of their comfort zone — away from their conservative base — and backed Alvin Brown in word, deed and cash donations. It’s hard to overstate the significance of this mass emigration, as the parade of executives — Pete Carpenter, Preston Haskell, David Hicks, Walt Bussells, Jim Rinaman, Hugh Greene — contravened party, longtime alliances, and even friendships to embrace Brown’s candidacy. Alvin Brown ran a smart campaign; a ground-hugging, amiable bid that sometimes seemed more like a prelim to his next political contest than a bare-knuckle race to the finish. But once he earned the support of this rarefied group of business leaders, something fundamental shifted. Not just in the race, but in Jacksonville’s psyche. Eight years ago, the city elected a white Republican mayor without any elective experience over a black Democratic candidate with plenty — he’d served eight years as sheriff. When Nat Glover lost the 2003 race, it was pretty clear why. Despite being a popular leader, his race and party were dealbreakers for many voters. And with a few notable exceptions (we’re looking at you, Matt Carlucci!), there weren’t any high-profile GOP defections. Speaking the morning after last week’s election, Glover suggested that the (apparent) outcome was proof of how things had changed in Jacksonville — and not just since his failed bid for mayor. Glover also lived through the grim days of the Jim Crow South, including Ax Handle Saturday, in which Glover himself was beaten by white supremacists. Surprisingly dispassionate when talking about that history, Glover nonetheless views it all of a piece: a gradual, sometimes painful evolution from a history that began with men in chains. Of course, there other factors at play in the 2003 race, including the fact that Glover faced a far less objectionable opponent, at least in the eyes of the establishment. John Peyton was the archetypal Republican golden boy, and scion of one of the city’s most powerful businessmen, whereas Mike Hogan has always struck local corporate leaders as hidebound and provincial.

4 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011

In the end, it was Hogan’s deficiencies as a candidate, as much as anything specific that Brown brought to the race, that turned key business leaders against him. Some three dozen high-profile Republicans crossed party lines, openly and with conviction, and in doing so may have forever redefined the role of party in local elections. The (D) and (R) after someone’s name will still play a role, but it will never again be the final word on a candidate’s viability. Mayor-elect Brown faces some difficult days ahead. A true City Hall rookie, he’ll need to surround himself with smart people who know the system. He must also be cautious.

The mayor’s race unified the city in a way few would have expected at the outset, and may ultimately do more to break down longstanding divisions of party and race than any single event since desegregation. On the sidelines of this election are old-school Democrats — some with very compromised reputations — already circling the Brown camp looking for ways in. Brown will also face intense pressures from the very folks whut brung him — the high-powered businessmen who can rightly claim to have delivered the race for him and who have no shortage of pet projects and special interests in need of the mayor’s “attention.” But for now, it’s possible to look at this election and simply celebrate a city that, in an era of bitter partisanship and deep racial disparities, erased those boundaries and embraced a common future.  Anne Schindler themail@folioweekly.com


Doctor Who?

Your article about Dr. Saleh (“Searching for Doctor Detox,” May 17) left me with one big question: How is he still practicing? His erratic behavior is nothing short of alarming in a mental health professional, and I was shocked to learn that he’s medical director at so many prominent facilities around Jacksonville. Thanks for a very informative piece. I hope those in a position to do something will act. Laura C. Replin Southside

The “great doctor” has officially lost his marbles. I felt like I was reading an exposé about Michael Jackson and his eccentricities, but instead I was learning some new material to hold against the fabulous magic man. I wonder if Dr. Saleh is aware that he is considered a laughing stock among his peers in

I felt like I was reading an exposé about Michael Jackson and his eccentricities, but instead I was learning some new material to hold against the fabulous magic man. Jacksonville. His former patients cringe when they hear his name and are more than happy to tell their horror stories about his psychiatric ineptitude. He is obviously very greedy, selfindulgent, dangerous, and should never be allowed to practice medicine again, anywhere. When I read that he is being held responsible for the suicide of a patient he was in charge of, I am not the least surprised. Sadly, I have a personal history with the great doctor that I will never be able to forget, no matter how hard I try.

His life reads like that of a sideshow act. While entertaining to read (like watching a reality show about the Palins), it becomes scary when you realize that this man has been responsible for human lives and is still a licensed psychiatrist. My advice for Dr. Saleh is as follows: Dive head first into magic. Move to Las Vegas, alone, and be as eccentric as you’d like. They love people like you over there. Pills, magic, money, Hummers and silk pirate shirts. You’ll fit in splendidly and will no longer be a bane on Jacksonville and the psychiatric community here. (Sounds like your family would be happy to see you go as well.) Tiffany Arnold Jacksonville via email

Does anyone seriously have faith in a psychiatrist who specializes in spray tans and caters to druggies from Las Vegas? The real-life Dr. Saleh is as bizarre as I always thought he was from his TV commercials. Randy McCutcheon Jacksonville

Wealth Over Health

The bold truth is that organized medicine, physician groups of Florida, are not serving the interest of Floridians. They are putting their own interests, greed, power and profit ahead of the well-being of the public. They disregard your health and my health. There are hundreds of thousands of Floridians who could get access to health care from optometrists, nurse practitioners, and other fully qualified health professionals, just as they do in many other states, and as the national consensus for legislation suggests we should. But physicians won’t let that happen. They block every effort to reform the law. They say that only care provided by physicians is safe, they tell the public to fear optometrists, nurse practitioners and many other health professionals. They hold disproportionate sway in the legislature. Many physicians disagree with their leadership, but stay silent, complicit in this injustice sil to us all. If Florida laws were changed, hundreds of millions ch of dollars could be saved in health care costs. Floridians h could get access to care c much more easily than they m can c now, and Floridians could lead better, healthier c lives. But physicians won’t l let l that happen, and they need to be asked, much more forcefully, why are they standing in the way? t The Institute of Medicine, Federal Trade Commission, Kaiser Foundation, Robert Woods Johnson Foundation, Florida Medical Directors Association, two Florida Senate staff reports, Cato Institute, American Association of Retired Persons, Macy Foundation, Florida Tax Watch and the MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 5


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legislature Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability (OPPAGA) have each published support for these changes. The cost of their greed is your health. And mine. Jeffrey P. Hazzard Florida Nurse Practitioner St. Petersburg

Crossing the Line

Contrary to what A.G. Gancarski writes (Sportstalk, May 10), I can’t believe that the Jaguars actually traded away the rights and possibility of selecting both Ryan Kerrigan (available at the 16th spot) and D’Quan Bowers (available at the 49th spot), both aggressive defensive ends and proven pass rushers, a definite Jaguar need, or Jimmy Smith (the new one; not the snow-nose Jags hero) as a strong cover corner — all players whose impact could come as early as this year (2011) — and instead picked Blaine Gabbert, a quarterback whose impact (if any) will not be felt for at least another year and probably two. (An opinion also expressed by one of AGG’s inside veteran contacts.) Sure, Bowers has “baggage,”

Sure, Bowers has “baggage,” but so does Ray Lewis, and a lot of NFL players actually get better in spite of (or even because of) that baggage. but so does Ray Lewis, and a lot of NFL players actually get better in spite of (or even because of) that baggage. Then, to back it up, they select an offensive lineman with the “leftover” fourth-round draft, a need that is also only contingent, this year, depending on injuries and retirement(s). I don’t believe in the principle of “draft the next quality player on the board; or, even move up to get one.” In the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s, the idea was: “Draft for need, to maintain or improve current competitiveness.” Hell, that even works for the Belichick clones in the ’90s and ’00s. It makes me wonder whether the 30-30 plan for season ticket commitment is really tied in to team ability and development … as in: “Pay us now and for 30 months, and at the end of that time, we might have a competitive product.” … Bah, humbug!  Richard C. Keene Season Ticket Holder, Section 411 Neptune Beach via email

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Folio Weekly is published every Tuesday throughout Northeast Florida. It contains opinions of contributing writers that are not necessarily the opinion of this publication. Folio Weekly welcomes both editorial and photographic contributions. Calendar information must be received three weeks in advance of event date. Copyright © Folio Publishing, Inc. 2011. All rights reserved. Advertising rates and information are available on request. An advertiser purchases right of publication only. One free copy per person. Additional copies and back issues are $1 each at the office or $4 by mail, based on availability. First Class mail subscriptions are $48 for 13 weeks, $96 for 26 weeks and $189 for 52 weeks. Please recycle Folio Weekly. Folio Weekly is printed on recycled paper using soy-based inks. 44,200 press run • Audited weekly readership 110,860


Walter Coker

Patricia Hill, who’s worked for the school system as a janitor for 26 years and is her family’s sole breadwinner, says the change would cut her annual salary by more than half, from $35,000 to $18,000.

Clean Out of Luck?

Breaking promises to custodial workers is a dirty job, but the School Board may yet do it

F

aced with the mind-boggling task of cutting $91 million from the public school budget, the Duval County School Board says everything is on the table. Last week, that included reneging on a promise made to school janitors 15 years ago when it privatized most custodial jobs. In 1996, the School Board won the support of janitors for a plan to privatize future custodial hires as long as those already on the payroll could remain public employees until they quit, retired or died. The exception made political sense, since it helped win support of the janitors’ union, but it made no business sense, according to School Board Chairman W.C. Gentry. The two-tier system means that a public employee with 20 or more years on the job might earn twice as much money as an employee of a private company doing the same work. They also answer to different bosses and have a very different benefits package. “It’s really a stupid system,” says Gentry. The arrangement has nonetheless been considered sacrosanct ever since the custodial service was privatized. But state cuts to education are forcing the School Board to re-evaluate every expense, and last week, the 196 janitorial jobs were on the chopping block. The district’s budget office told board members earlier this month that they could save $1.2 million this year and $2-$3 million next year if they privatized the jobs, and the board added the idea to a list of tentative cuts. But at a closed-door meeting last week, board members learned it wasn’t the simple solution it first appeared to be. The janitors are unionized, and any changes would have to be negotiated through union reps. Last week, the board added sports programs — cross-country, golf, lacrosse, tennis and wrestling — to a list of tentative cuts, but cutting the janitorial jobs was taken off the table. The School Board will vote on a list of cuts at its June 11 meeting and the budget must be finalized by August. Talk of privatizing the janitors will continue separately, said school spokesperson Kelly Bell, in union negotiations. “We are going to have to make some real hard calls,” says Gentry. “People are going to have to decide whether we have art and music for elementary kids or keep this bifurcated custodial system. That’s the kind of Solomonlike decisions we have to make.”

Gentry, who has spoken in favor of privatizing those 196 jobs, acknowledges the administration hasn’t provided final numbers on what it would cost to boost GCA’s contract by some 200 employees, or what it might cost to provide the displaced janitors with what he calls “a soft landing” — i.e., an opportunity for buyouts or early retirement. “I personally have a real problem with making changes that would result in some of these employees losing 25 percent of their salaries,” says Gentry. He adds that he wouldn’t be comfortable breaking the promise to janitors without offering them some consideration for their service. And he points out that with the 3 percent salary cuts and mandatory furlough days the board has required of all district employees, some of the district janitorial supervisors actually earn less than those who work for GCA (albeit with enviable public employee benefits). “If we can unify the workforce without doing harm, I would be all for it,” says Gentry. “Can we do that, and if not, how much is the harm?” Other School Board members, like Betty Burney and Martha Barrett, oppose any deal that breaks the promise. “There may be creative ways to work around that,” says Burney, “but we are also talking about the lives of people.” The issue points up the role that unions can still play in protecting jobs, even as they are weakened by legislative action around the country. In order to privatize janitorial jobs, the board would have to reach a negotiated agreement with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, Council No. 79, the union that represents them. For janitors who’ve worked for the school system for 20, 25 years or more, that union representation means a lot. They have been able to make a decent living, buy into a public pension program and afford excellent health insurance. But few would be able to find other job opportunities that could match their current salaries and benefits. Patricia Hill, who’s worked for the school system as a janitor for 26 years, says she fears she’d face defaulting on her mortage and car loans, and be unable to afford health or life insurance if she went to work for GCA. She says her salary would be cut by more than half if GCA hired her at its starting salary of $8.45 an hour, shaving her

MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 7


pay from $35,000 annually to $18,000. Like many of the remaining janitors, she is the main breadwinner in her household. Her husband Willie was disabled in a company accident and her insurance paid his medical bills and therapy. Although the School Board will continue discussion through impact bargaining with the union, custodians are pushing the board to keep its promise. “We understand the board is in a bad

position with what the governor and the Speaker of the House have done to the education budget,” says Elwood Thompson, special assistant to the state president of the AFSCME. “But what are people supposed to do? We have to come up with better ways to combat what Rick Scott and his allies have forced upon us. We shouldn’t sacrifice people.”  Susan Cooper Eastman sceastman@folioweekly.com

She Gets the Lash A job in health care would seem fairly recession-proof. But Fernandina Beach RN Jeannie Higginbotham quit her job in the operating room to open a business that sounds vaguely like an S&M parlor — Lashem-N-Leavem — where she painstakingly glues eyelash extensions onto women’s eyelids at a cost of $199 (for plain bushy, 35-39 lashes per eye) to $450 (for the bushiest, 100-120 lashes per eye). As Higginbotham says, beauty is one of the top three recession-proof industries. “By the way,” she adds, “the other two are alcohol and drugs!”

Hemming Plaza, Jacksonville, May 19

Bouquets to Republican rainmaker Peter Rummell for his willingness to cross party lines and imperil longtime political and social alliances in backing a black Democrat for Jacksonville mayor. Rummell’s public support of Alvin Brown is widely regarded as a critical juncture in Brown’s successful candidacy, an example of nonpartisan political courage that Jacksonville — and the rest of the nation — would do well to emulate. Brickbats to the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind in St. Augustine for gutting and then fencing off a historic 1924 single-family home that anchors the newly designated Nelmar Terrace National Historic District to the National Register of Historic Places. The school is remodeling the Collins House into a dormitory, but has surrounded it with a high fence and added an exterior stairwell that enlarges and intensifies the building’s footprint. City officials objected to the change, since it doesn’t adhere to local building guidelines, but say local government has no control over state-owned campus buildings. Bouquets to Friends of Jacksonville Animals President Sherri Audette and 12 other volunteers for their efforts to find homes for stray and abandoned animals at Jacksonville Animal Care & Protective Services. The number of pets euthanized in Jacksonville has dropped dramatically since 2004-’05, when more than 20,000 homeless animals were killed. Feral cat sterilization and a new animal shelter contributed to a drop of only 9,500 pets euthanized in 2009-’10, but since forming in 2008, FOJA has also contributed, for the single purpose of finding new homes for animals in the city shelter. 8 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011


NewsBuzz Election Postmortem Thoughts and insights from political players around the spectrum “Like never before the local Party came together to help lead the GOP effort for these races. I am proud of that effort.” — Duval Republican Executive Committee Chair Lenny Curry in a Friday morning email “I’ve made enough trips around the sun that I really can’t talk myself into believing somebody winning an election means the end of the world as we know it. No matter who gets elected, no matter what office, a year from now I’ll still be getting up out of the same bed, in the same place, in a sarcastic mood, and the f*cking house will still need to be vacuumed.” — Republican political consultant Jim Varian on Facebook “During [a] campaign, things get said. I am sincere in thanking Mr. Hogan and his family. This wasn’t a personal vendetta. It was a political campaign.” — Attorney and Democratic activist Jimmy Midyette on Facebook

“What a sad day for Jacksonville ... :(” — Susan Blackburn-Law on Facebook “Please consider the Duval Co. Democratic Party redeemed for the 2000 election. That is all, thank you.” — Former Democratic City Council candidate Jim Minion “These are unprecedented times facing our city and I ask all of my supporters to join me in rallying around Alvin Brown and his team as they begin the work of getting City Hall’s fiscal house in order.” — Mike Hogan, concession speech “This city is your city. This is our city. One city.” — Alvin Brown, Friday press conference Rumor Mill 2: Toney “55-45” Sleiman, Nelson “in the bag” Cuba on inaugural Jet Blue flight to Puerto Rico. — Kevin Glynn (kevpga63) on Twitter Congratulations to the new mayor of Jacksonville, Alvin Brown! — Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce (@ JaxChamber) on Twitter

Name Recognition

Hot Little Homeslice for Sale

“They look nice.” — Gov. Rick Scott, laughing off media questions about the $8,800 he spent to have his name added to 35 “Welcome to Florida” highway signs at a time of draconian budget cuts.

The Hidden Nursery at First Coast Technical College, 2980 Collins Ave., St. Augustine, is selling off this season’s crop of datil pepper plants over the next couple of weeks. The nursery is the area’s main propagator of this hot pepper. Contact agriscience instructor Eddie Lambert at 547-3441 or eddie.lambert@fctc.edu

(Almost) Perfect Pitch Jacksonville Suns pitcher Joey O’Gara struck out nine batters and held the Mobile BayBears to one unearned run on one hit in a May 12 home game that earned him the title of Southern League of Professional Baseball’s Pitcher of the Week. The Suns are the Minor League Baseball Class AA affiliate of the Florida Marlins.

MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 9


Tiger, in the Tank

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inevitable — like the fall of Mubarak or the hit on Bin Laden or Snoop Dogg recording a song with Charlie Sheen. It’s easy to talk of it as fait accompli, in retrospect. But when the walls started tumbling down Sales for RepTiger re Woods, when evidence of his serial infidelities was what all discussion centered on for days/weeks/months, no one expected him to fall off. He was the No. 1 golfer in the world, and an embodiment of the Benetton culture we all aspired to during the Greenspan era. Cablinasian was how he identified himself to the media, and at the peak of his powers, he was the hybrid — the best in the world at what he did, with a stratospheric Q-level and an unassailable reputation. We all wanted to believe in Tiger, just like we want to believe

man, you’ve got to beat the man,” Ric Flair said when he was relevant, years, decades back. These guys both lost, many times. But they keep coming back. They don’t tap out because of some shady BS injury, like Tiger Woods. Golf fans have seen him show and prove the last two years that he’s a quitter, a fraud, a chump. And, of course, he is still the face of American golf. Yeah, push Mickelson or Furyk; they’ll get over with the hardcores, but not the casual fan. Not really. Not like Tiger who, like Jordan at the top of his viability as a brand, evinced the best possible characteristics — the best performer in his field, with a great media presence. That dude is dead now. His game is dead, and so is his gimmick. It’s left to the custodians of the game to try to save his shine and swag, to guard it like it’s

Tiger Woods’ golden showers, alas, have tapered off into ignominious trickles. And the sponsors mourn.

10 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011

that every hero the media puts forth exists without flaws. The Elin situation salted his game, unmistakably. But it was here in Jacksonville that we were able to see, for the second consecutive year, signposts in the selfdestruction of Tiger Woods. 2010 saw Tiger get seven holes into a round before being carted off, selling a back injury that was convenient cover for the gaping wound that was his game that day. This year? He shot a 42 on the front nine before begging off — this time selling the knee and the Achilles that had shelved him since the Masters. Just coincidence that there’s no way in Hell that he would’ve made the cut. For the second straight year, Woods made a token appearance, only to cut and run. Maybe he doesn’t like the heat. Maybe the Saran Wrap humiture of mid-May isn’t to his liking. Or maybe it’s the other kind of heat — a whole heap of young lions who see him as the prey, bloated and worn-out and past his prime, played out like the T-Pain vocal effect, exhausted like the elastic band around the waist of a Tuesday night regular at the Golden Corral buffet. “To win, you’ve got to win Florida,” Mitt Romney once said in Dirty Duval. “To be the

Ted Williams’ brain waiting for an android host. PGA Commish Tim Finchem gave a great non-answer last Sunday when asked if Woods was strong-armed into “playing” at TPC, as a favor to either the PGA, the TPC itself, or both. “I don’t twist players’ arms and as far as Tiger being hurt, that’s a decision he has to make, and I had no information that he wasn’t ready to play golf,” Finchem said. “I don’t think anybody did. I don’t think he did.” If you say so, sir. Conspiracy theorists will disagree. U.S. golf is in a tailspin, in terms of having that iconic player who translates into enhancing revenue streams. Tiger Woods’ golden showers, alas, have tapered off into ignominious trickles. And the sponsors mourn. There will be many who frame the rise and fall of Tiger Woods as some sort of morality play, but they will be mistaken. Tiger Woods owed no one anything. He didn’t owe his wife fidelity, or the golfing world his continued viability. His rise and fall paralleled the New Economy that led us to the precipice of the Third World, so it’s perhaps fitting that his undoing is so timely. Tiger has been nothing if not a creature of his epoch, with all that that implies and represents.  AG Gancarski themail@folioweekly.com


It’s a Brand New Me! O

K, I think we can all admit that this past season of TV shows ate the hind end of a donkey. It LITERALLY was so bad, it LITERALLY asked a donkey if it could feast on its buttocks — because asking a donkey first is the polite thing to do. Don’t ask me how I know this. Anyway, the point is that when a TV season stinks, I sorta kinda stink, too. When left with nothing interesting to say, I feel backed into a corner, and in a blind panic say unseemly things about donkeys’ butts. That’s why I’m SUPER excited about the NEW Fall season of TV shows, and even more excited that you’re going to see a brand new “me.” Those overly descriptive essays in which I compare certain TV shows to the interior of a syphilitic donkey’s gastrointestinal system?

The point is that when a TV season stinks, I sorta kinda stink, too. When left with nothing interesting to say, I feel backed into a corner, and in a blind panic say unseemly things about donkeys’ butts. GONE! The brand new “me” will be pleasant, well-mannered, informative and practically devoid of any donkey-related obsessive behavior. As proof, here are a few 100 percent donkey-free descriptions of some of the brand spankin’ new shows debuting this Fall. HeeHaw! I mean … Yahoo! • “Ringer” (The CW, Tuesdays) Certainly you remember Sarah Michelle Geller, previously seen on “Buffy, the Vampire Slayer” and later, the unemployment line? Well, Sarah’s back in a new Black Swanish drama/thriller in which she takes over the identity of her bitchy dead twin sis. Has Sarah’s acting improved? NO, IT HASN’T! But that’s OK; this over-the-top soapy delight has more kick than a donkey caving in a farm boy’s skull … umm … make that “an ostrich.” They kick, right? • “Hart of Dixie” (The CW, Mondays) Speaking of out-of-work actresses, my 2005 crush of the year Rachel Bilson (formerly Summer from “The O.C.”) stars in this fish-out-of-water story about a fancy-pantsy New York doctor forced to treat hillbillies in the toothless wilds of Alabama. Expect a plethora of overdressed Southern Belles! Angry alligators! Brief love affairs with sweaty, hillbilly hunks! Unexpected compassion for her patients! And — not because I’m obsessed with them or anything, because I’m not — a donkey or two. IT’S ALABAMA. • “Charlie’s Angels” (ABC, Thursdays) A reboot of the classic sexpot ’70s cop show, this version sports three brand-new hotties (Annie Ilonzeh, Minka Kelly and Rachael Taylor) who use their wicked secret agent skillz to knock some violent, ass-beating sense into those no-good bad guys.

YOU GO, GIRLS! (Especially in those teeny bikinis. Where exactly do you hide your guns?) • “Terra Nova” (FOX, Mondays). The year? 2149! The problem? The Earth is in ruins! A brave family leaves everything behind to create a new civilization in this CG-heavy drama that combines “Land of the Lost,” “Avatar” and a heapin’ helping of “Jurassic Park,” because — that’s right! — their new home is infested with ass-chomping DINOSAURS of all shapes and species. (Maybe even donkey dinos!)

TUESDAY, MAY 24 8:00 NBC THE BIGGEST LOSER Season finale! The grand prizewinner takes home $250,000, the runners-up take home pizza rolls. 9:00 PBS FRONTLINE An examination of the Wikileaks scandal, including interviews with its leaky founder, Julian Assange.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 9:00 ABC MODERN FAMILY Season finale! Phil wants to go fishing for his b-day, the family wants to throw him a party. Hilarity and sadness ensue. 9:30 ABC COUGAR TOWN Season finale! The gang takes a trip to Hawaii and … hey! Don’t pick up that cursed Tiki idol!

THURSDAY, MAY 26 8:00 FOX SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE Season premiere! Auditions begin, featuring dancers who look like monkeys having a seizure. 8:00 DFH MY STRANGE ADDICTION A hilarious repeat featuring someone who sleeps with a blow dryer, and a woman who eats toilet paper.

FRIDAY, MAY 27 11:00 VH1 STORYTELLERS Songs and stories from your indie heartthrob and mine, Death Cab for Cutie.

SATURDAY, MAY 28 8:00 BBCA DOCTOR WHO The Doctor discovers a futuristic factory where cloned humans perform dangerous jobs — such as milking donkeys.

SUNDAY, MAY 29 9:00 TLC MY BIG FAT GYPSY WEDDING Debut! OK, so they’ve included weddings, fat people, gypsies … where are the midgets?? 10:00 AMC THE KILLING The cops decide they no longer like their current prime suspect and choose a new one. MAKE UP YOUR MIND ALREADY!

MONDAY, MAY 30 9:00 VH1 SINGLE LADIES Debut! A new “Sex and the City”esque reality show about three single ladies on the prowl! Rrrrowrrr! 10:00 BRAVO PLATINUM HIT Debut! Songwriters compete to see who can write the best tune, presided over by Jewel (ugh!) and “Idol” failure Kara DioGuardi (UGH!). 10:00 ABC EXTREME MAKEOVER: WEIGHT LOSS EDITION Debut! Again I ask you: WHERE … ARE … THE … MIDGETS??  Wm.™ Steven Humphrey steve@portlandmercury.com MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 11


12 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011


If you’re reading this, it must mean that the rumored end of the world was just idle gossip. But there’s no doubt that Florida this time of year is hotter-n-hell. Thankfully, this year’s Ultimate Summer Guide provides enough cool entertainment options to qualify as cold comfort to legions of the doomed. So grab your copy and hold it tight. Whether you plan to dive in or rapture up this summer, your fun is our soul intent. Compiled by Dan Brown events@folioweekly.com

MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 13


TUESDAY, MAY 24

Jacksonville Art & Noise Society presents THE SUBLIMINATOR at 9 p.m. at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Jacksonville. 353-4692. Museum of Contemporary Jacksonville presents the work of self-proclaimed “Man of Visions” the REVEREND HOWARD FINSTER in the exhibition STRANGER IN PARADISE through Aug. 28 at 333 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. 366-6911. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee JACKSON BROWNE performs at 8 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $41-$66. 355-2787. Local psych rock legend ROBERT LESTER FOLSOM performs at 8 p.m. at Dos Gatos, 123 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. 354-0666.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25

Alhambra Theatre & Dining presents former “Brady Bunch” star Barry Williams in the comedy THE ODD COUPLE at 8 p.m. at 12000 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $42$49. The production is staged through June 20. 641-1212. The Amelia Island Chamber Music Festival presents FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE: RETRO CONCERT I at 7:30 p.m. at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, 801 Atlantic Blvd., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $50, which includes a champagne reception after the performance. 261-1779. VOXHAUL BROADCAST plays at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $8. 398-7496. POKADOT CADAVER, NORTHE, HOLIDAZED, FINISH IT OFF, AUDZIO and CHEEZY T perform at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

THURSDAY, MAY 26

The JACKSONVILLE 48 HOUR FILM PROJECT holds a Meet & Greet, before its June 17 competition, at River City Brewing Company, 835 Museum Circle, Jacksonville. 993-7897. The Jacksonville Jazz Festival kicks off with the annual JAZZ PIANO COMPETITION at 7 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Noel Freidline emcees the concert of five finalists competing while backed by bassist Dennis Marks and Danny Gottlieb on drums. General admission is $10. 355-2787. The Alive After Five series presents GIRLZ GIRLZ GIRLZ at 5 p.m. at The Markets at St. Johns Town Center, 4850 Big Island Drive, Jacksonville. 998-7156. The annual GREATER JACKSONVILLE COIN SHOW is held from 10 a.m.-9 p.m. at Morocco Shrine Auditorium, 3800 St. Johns Bluff Road S., Jacksonville. The show is held daily through May 29. gjcc.anaclubs.org Heavy-hitters CLUTCH perform along with MAYLENE & THE SONS OF DISASTER and GROUNDSCARE at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $17. 246-2473. Star of “Last Comic Standing” JOSH BLUE performs at 8 p.m. at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Road, Jacksonville. Blue also performs at 8 and 10 p.m. on May 27 and 28 and at 8 p.m. on May 29. Tickets range from $18-$25. 292-4242. BROWN BAG SPECIAL performs at 8 p.m. at Dog Star Tavern, 10 N. Second St., Fernandina Beach. 277-8010.

FRIDAY, MAY 27

Indie rock songwriter BONNIE “PRINCE” BILLY & THE CAIRO GANG perform at 7 p.m. at Push Push Event Hall, 299 San Marco Ave., St. Augustine. 547-2341. Comedian and political gadfly BILL MAHER performs at 8 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets are $45 and $50. 355-2787.

14 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011

GENERAL TSO’S FURY, TEFLON DON, OPERATION

HENNESSEY, POOR RICHARDS and WAITING ON BRIAN play at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $8. 398-7496. The JACKSONVILLE JAZZ FESTIVAL continues with a performance by Gentlemen of the Night starring Paul Taylor, Marion Meadows and Warren Hill at 5 p.m., John Pizarrelli Quartet with the University of North Florida Jazz Ensemble I at 7 p.m. and NATALIE COLE at 9 p.m. on the Swingin’ Stage (corner of Main and Monroe streets.) The Breezin’ Stage (The Jacksonville Landing) features Navy Band Southeast’s TGIF Band at 5 p.m., Pierre & Co. at 6:30 p.m. and GLOBAL NOIZE at 8:30 p.m. The Groovin’ Stage (Hemming Plaza) presents Dayve Stewart & The Vibe at 5 p.m., Joey Calderazzo Trio featuring Orlando Le Fleming and Donald Edwards at 6:30 p.m. and REBIRTH BRASS BAND at 8:30 p.m. Gary Starling Jazz Organization performs at 6 p.m. and Ray Callendar Quintet featuring Doug Carn play at 8 p.m. at Snyder Memorial Church, at the corner of Laura and Monroe streets. Hyatt Regency Riverfront, 225 East Coastline Drive, features the ‘Round Midnight Jazz Jam hosted by The Kelly-Scott Quintet featuring Lisa Kelly, JB Scott, Per Danielsson, Dennis Marks and Clyde Connor. Hard-hitters TAPROOT perform with MANNA ZEN, BLEEDING IN STEREO, MINDSLIP and SHOTGUN HARBOUR at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. The 23rd ANNUAL PALATKA BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL kicks off with performances by Amy Dalley, Blistur and Heroine in downtown Palatka along the riverfront and down St. Johns Avenue. The festival continues on May 28 with performances by Quik Draw, Out Of Hand, Thunderfoot, Toulouse Street (Doobie Brothers tribute) and Highway To Hell (AC/DC tribute). May 29 features Bill Wharton “The Sauce Boss,” The Lee Boys, Paxton Norris and Tyler Mac, The Hendrix Experience (Jimi Hendrix tribute), Led-Hed (Led Zeppelin tribute) and Motor City Josh. The festival wraps it up on May 30 with The Red River Band and Blue Smoke. A seafood cook-off, a beauty pageant, chainsaw artist and helicopter rides are also featured. (386) 325-4406. bluecrabfestival.com Local rockers SIDEREAL, CRAZY CARLS, TASTE BUDS and MATT HENDERSON play at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $8. 246-2473. TOKYO STRING QUARTET performs at 7:30 p.m. at Amelia Plantation Chapel, 36 Bowman Road, Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $40. 261-1779. AMY HENDRICKSON & THE PRIME DIRECTIVE play at 8 p.m. at Dog Star Tavern, 10 N. Second St., Fernandina Beach. 277-8010. HED PE, MUSHROOMHEAD, STAYNE THEE ANGEL and LIVICATION play at 7 p.m. at Plush, 845 University Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $15 and $20. 734-1845. The film SPIDERMAN is screened at 9 p.m. at Sea Walk Pavilion, 11 First St. N., Jax Beach. 247-6100. GRANDPA’S COUGH MEDICINE plays at 8 p.m. at Ring of Fire Honky Tonk, 113 Anastasia Blvd., St. Augustine. 710-2115.

SATURDAY, MAY 28

The PIRATE PROM & DANCE PARTY is held from 7-11 p.m. at Dancing with Victoria’s Studio, 4420 U.S. 1, St. Augustine. Admission per couple is $20; $15 for singles. Pirate garb is optional but strongly encouraged. 710-0085. The Jacksonville Jazz Festival continues with the Jacksonville Jazz Piano Competition winner performing at noon, the McCOY TYNER TRIO with GARY BARTZ performing at 1:30 p.m., The Defenders of The Groove appearing at 3:30 p.m., Boney James at 5:30 p.m., Eddie Palmieri Salsa Orchestra with Herman Olivera at 7:30 p.m. and the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra featuring Dianne Schuur at 9:30 p.m. on the Swingin’ Stage (corner of Main and Monroe streets). The Breezin’ Stage (The Jacksonville Landing) features the first round of the Generation Next Youth Competition at 11 a.m., the finals at 2 p.m., BK Jackson at 4 p.m., Isaac Byrd Jr. & Tribe Judah at 5:30 p.m., Noel Freidline Quintet at 7:30 p.m. and SPAM ALLSTARS


at 9:30 p.m. St. Johns River City Band performs at noon, Bradford Rogers at 1:30 p.m., Raul Midón at 3:30 p.m., The Flail at 5:30 p.m., Bitches Brew Revisited with Graham Haynes, Antoine Roney, Adam Rudolph, DJ Logic, Shazad Ismaily, James Hurt, JT Lewis and Brandon Ross at 7:30 p.m. and ROY AYERS at 9:30 p.m. on the Groovin’ Stage (Hemming Plaza.) Snyder Memorial Church, the corner of Laura and Monroe streets, hosts Just Jazz Quintet at 2 p.m., The John Ricci Organ Trio at 4 p.m. and Ethan Bortnick Trio at 6 p.m. Hyatt Regency Riverfront, 225 East Coastline Drive, features the ‘Round Midnight Jazz Jam hosted by The KellyScott Quintet featuring Lisa Kelly, JB Scott, Per Danielsson, Dennis Marks and Danny Gottlieb. WestJax Ensemble performs at 10:30 a.m., Navy Band Southeast performs at 11:45 a.m. and Morton Perry Band plays at 1:30 p.m. at RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET, held under the Fuller Warren Bridge at Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville. 554-6865. Local rockers LIFT perform at 9 p.m. at My Place Bar & Grill, 9550 Baymeadows Road, Jacksonville. 737-5299. FOXY SHAZAM, SPEAKING IN CURSIVE and PETER PEPPER play at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $10. 398-7496.

FUSEBOX FUNK and NATE HOLLEY perform at 10 p.m. at Mojo Kitchen, 1500 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach. Tickets are $15; $20 for ages 18-20. 247-6636. The ST. AUGUSTINE AIR SHOW takes place at 1 p.m. today and on May 29 at the St. Augustine Airport, 4900 U.S. 1 N. Gates open each day at 9:30 a.m. Admission is $10; $5 for children. 825-0203. staugustineairshow.net Fort Clinch State Park honors WWII soldiers with a MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND event held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. on May 29 at 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach. Admission per vehicle, up to eight people, is $6; $2 for a single person. 277-7274. Burro Bar presents JAZZ FEST AFTER PARTY FREAK OUT with KEITH ANSEL at 9 p.m. at 100 E. Adams St., Jacksonville. 353-4692.

SUNDAY, MAY 29

A MEMORIAL DAY OBSERVANCE is held at 10:45 a.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church, 7405 Arlington Expressway, Jacksonville. Violinist Aron Mujumdar, harpsichordist Henson Markham, trumpeter Rob McKennon and narrator Jeremy Lucas perform works by Bach and Unger. 355-7584.

Former G-Unit rapper YOUNG BUCK performs at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $20. 223-9850.

MILK BAR REUNION 2011 is held at 8 p.m. at The Pearl, 1101 N. Main St., Jacksonville. 791-4499.

UPTOWN SATURDAY NIGHT features galleries, antique stores and shops open from 5-9 p.m. in St. Augustine’s San Marco District. 824-3152.

The VILANO BEACH SUNDAY MARKET is held every Sun. from noon-4 p.m. at Vilano Beach Town Center, 206 Vilano Road, Vilano Beach. 540-8797.

The inaugural 5K RUN/WALK and 10K LIBERTY RUN start at 8 a.m. at Vida Fitness and Omni Amelia Island Plantation, 6800 First Coast Highway, Amelia Island. Registration is $25 for adults; $15 for children 12 and younger. 277-5193. A onemile youth run is also held. active.com

LEO & THE SUN, SACK THE CITY, ALL DAY ALL NIGHT and CARRIDALE play at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $8. 398-7496.

The 2011 ED GAW OPEN WATER CHALLENGE is held at 8:30 a.m. at Main Beach, 2801 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach. Swimmer entry fee is $40. Register at active.com. Dutton Island Preserve presents the WILD WONDERS program at 11 a.m., located off Mayport Road at the end of Dutton Island Road West, Atlantic Beach. Naturalist Michael Rossi teaches families about the habitat of regional animals. The event is also held on June 4 and 11. 247-5828. The Linden String Quartet performs BRINGING HOME THE GOLD at 7:30 p.m. at Memorial United Methodist Church, 601 Centre St., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $20. 261-1779. Jam band THE FRITZ play at 8 p.m. at Dog Star Tavern, 10 N. Second St., Fernandina Beach. 277-8010.

GOLIATH FLORES performs at 1 p.m. at Three Layers Cafe, 1602 Walnut St., Jacksonville. 355-9791. TROPIC OF CANCER performs at 9 p.m. at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Jacksonville. 353-4692. The final day of the Jacksonville Jazz Festival features the Douglas Anderson School of the Arts Jazz Ensemble I at noon, Nestor Torres at 2:30 p.m., DMS with GEORGE DUKE, MARCUS MILLER and DAVID SANBORN at 4:30 p.m. and HERBIE HANCOCK at 6:30 p.m. on the Swingin’ Stage (corner of Main and Monroe streets). The Breezin’ Stage (The Jacksonville Landing) presents Tropic of Cancer at noon, JB Scott’s Swingin’ Allstars with Terry Myers at 2:30 p.m., ArtOfficial at 4:30 p.m. and Gordon Goodwin’s Big Phat Band at 6:30 p.m. Joe Baione performs at noon, The Wild Magnolias at 2:30 p.m., MAVIS STAPLES at 4:30 p.m. and Guitarzzz featuring Chuck Loeb, Chieli Minucci & Paul Jackson Jr. at 6:30 p.m. on the Groovin’ Stage (Hemming Plaza.) Snyder Memorial Church, at the corner

Drinkably smooth! Folio Weekly’s 18th annual Beer & Music Festival, featuring more than 150 beers on tap, live music and a chickenwing-eating contest, is held Friday, June 24 from 7-10 p.m. at Morocco Shrine Auditorium, 3800 St. Johns Bluff Road S., Jacksonville.

Old-fashioned boozehounds can work their way (gradually!) through the Mr. Boston De Luxe Official Bartenders Guide this summer.

Hot Wired

Fight summertime brain-drain with opportunities for adult learning

P

arents are rightly averse to allowing their offspring to settle into the sticky sloth of Florida’s humid summers. That’s why they pack up their charges and send them to Music Camp or Science Camp or Horseback Riding Camp, where they learn to lust for English riding boots. Busy minds are active minds. But grownups — the ever-striving, overworked recession-riled adults — tend to push on, intellectually unplugged. Which not only sets a poor example for the kids, but eventually proves stifling. In order to grow, the mind must be flung open and hurled toward possibility. Start with beer! The Cowford Ale Sharing Klub invites home-brewers to meetings on the second Saturday of the month with an “interklub” brewing competition, usually at the beer garden at Seven Bridges on Southside Boulevard (thecask.org). More of a traditional boozehound? Master the art of backyard entertaining by working your way (gradually!) through the Mr. Boston De Luxe Official Bartender’s Guide (Chamblin Bookmine, $5). Before you serve that tray of perfect margaritas, however, your local Home Depot (homedepot.com) will school the tool-impaired in a free two-hour class, “How to Build a Deck.” (Give Home Depot a deck pattern in any shape, any shape, and they’ll print out a set of plans with plank sizes calculated to the inch). If you aspire to cuisine beyond barbecue, check out the Chef ’s Cooking School in Ponte Vedra, which will hold a one-day class from 1-6 p.m. on June 26 on the art of making tarts. Each participant takes home a berry tart, apple tarte tatin and a wild mushroom tart with gruyere cheese baked that day. (achefscookingschool.com, 827-1350) The Amity Turkish Cultural Center (4540 Southside Blvd., Ste. 202, attcenter.org) teaches a new vocabulary of taste in monthly classes on how to prepare classic Turkish dishes. On June 18, learn to make ozbek pilavi (rice pilaf),

and on July 16, it’s a revani (semolina cake with lemon syrup, whipped cream and pistachios). To capture the flavors of summer fruits and vegetables, the First Coast Technical College’s Culinary School offers a canning class on Aug. 26 for a $36 fee (fcti.org). Done eating? Feed your brain with meditation. The Karma Thegsum Choling Buddhist temple, located at 1258 S. McDuff Ave. in Jacksonville, practices silent sitting and walking meditation every Saturday morning at 10 a.m. For a somewhat more exhilarating path toward inner peace, learn to surf. If you’re grown and never mastered the art, the St. Augustine Surf School (2 Ocean Trace Road, 206-7873) teaches two-day Wahine Weekends for women on June 11 and 12. (staugustinesurf.com) Aspiring artists can check out the Comic Book Illustration and Cartooning Workshop with Nicholas Valente on June 11 from 10 a.m.3:30 p.m. ($75, reddiarts.com), or learn “The Ancient Art of Pottery” from ceramic artist Glendia Cooper at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens (June 4 from 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m., cummer.org/education). Feeling crafty? Check out meetings of the River City Knitting Guild on the fourth Saturday each month (call Nikki Levinson-Lustgarden at 230-2873). Outdoors types can learn the art of kayak fly-fishing with Capt. John Bottko of The Salty Feather (saltyfeather.com, 645-8998) or get SCUBA certified at First Coast Divers (firstcoastdivers.com). Should there be a need to clean wounds or apply salves on the path of self-discovery, Maggie’s Herb Farm (11400 C.R. 13, St. Augustine) will be teaching how to turn medicinal herbs into ointments and tinctures in classes this summer, although the dates for June and beyond are TBD. Call 829-0722 or visit maggiesherbfarm@aol.com for more information.  Susan Cooper Eastman sceastman@folioweekly.com MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 15


Sail the seas of cheese with funk metalheads Primus (performing with The Dead Kenny G’s) on Wednesday, June 8 at The Florida Theatre.

of Laura and Monroe streets, hosts Sacred Jazz at 2:30 p.m. and VON BARLOW’S JAZZ JOURNEY at 4:30 p.m.

MONDAY, MAY 30

JOHN THOMAS GROUP performs a MEMORIAL DAY MEMORIES OF JAZZ concert at 1 p.m. at Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. PEACEMAKER, THICK AS BLOOD, MARAUDER, RHYTHM OF FEAR and WORN OUT play at 6 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. The hometown JACKSONVILLE SUNS are up against the Carolina Mudcats at 6:05 p.m. (Veterans Special), at 7:05 p.m. on May 31 (Family Feast Night), at 1:05 p.m. on June 1 (Businessperson Special), at 7:05 p.m. on June 2 (Thursday Night Throwdown), and at 7:05 p.m. on June 3 (Family Fireworks) at the Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $7.50-$22.50. 358-2846. A MEMORIAL WALL ceremony is held at 10 a.m. at the Wall, located between Veterans Memorial Arena and EverBank Field Stadium, in the Sports Complex, downtown. Speakers, a presentation of colors, a wreath presentation and musical tributes are featured. 630-3690. Hardcore favorites FACE TO FACE play with STRUNGOUT, BLITZKID and THE DARLINGS at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $20. 246-2473. Local jam band heroes CHROMA play at 8 p.m. at Dog Star Tavern, 10 N. Second St., Fernandina Beach. 277-8010. COMBICHRIST, IVARDEN SPHERE, DEADSTAR ASSEMBLY and STAR KILLER perform at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $15. 398-7496.

TUESDAY, MAY 31

Roots rockers BRAD VICKERS & HIS VESTAPOLITANS perform at 5:30 p.m. at Aloft Tapestry Park, 4812 Deer Lake Drive W., Jacksonville. 428-1281. COME WHAT MAY and SECOND THIEF play at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $8. 398-7496.

Jacksonville, spanning a 15-block radius of galleries, museums, bars and eateries. 634-0303 ext. 230. Musical comedian PAT GODWIN performs at 8 p.m. at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Road, Jacksonville. Godwin also performs nightly at 8 p.m. on June 2 and 3 and at 8 and 10 p.m. on June 4. Tickets range from $6-$12. 292-4242. TOOTS LORRAINE & THE TRAFFIC performs at 6:30 p.m. at Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant, 691 N. First St., Jax Beach. 270-0025. The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by FUNK SHUI from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 2

Violinist Jay Ungar and guitarist Molly Mason perform GRASS ROOTS SONG AND DANCE: A HOEDOWN at 7 p.m. at Amelia Island Plantation’s Walker’s Landing, 6800 First Coast Highway, Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $30. 261-1779. Folk singer and storyteller MIKE CROSS performs at 8:30 p.m. European Street Café, 1704 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $15 and $16. 399-1740. The Alive After Five series presents CLOUD 9 at 5 p.m. at The Markets at St. Johns Town Center, 4850 Big Island Drive, Jacksonville. 998-7156. Comedian FORREST SHAW appears at 7:45 p.m. at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Jacksonville. Shaw also performs on June 3 and 4. Tickets are $10 and $13. 365-5555. CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features Mid-Life Crisis at 7 p.m. under the oaks at Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The free concerts continue through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment.com/sites/concerts-plaza SLEEPLESS IN PERIL, TRANSPOSE, WITH MY BARE HANDS, CITY OF IFA, CODE OF SILENCE and CARNIVOROUS CARNIVAL play at 6 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

FRIDAY, JUNE 3

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1

FIRST WEDNESDAY ART WALK, themed “Making Music,” is a self-guided tour held from 5-9 p.m. in downtown

16 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011

Orange Park Community Theatre stages THE ART OF DINING at 8 p.m. at 2900 Moody Ave., Orange Park. Tickets are $15. The show also runs on June 4, 10, 11, 17, 18, 24 and 25. Matinees are staged at 3 p.m. on June 5, 12 and 19. 276-2599.


The Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra performs with Grammy-winning country music hitmakers Gordie Sampson, Hillary Lindsey and Brett James in the MUSIC CITY HITMAKERS concert at 8 p.m. at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts’ Moran Theater, 300 W. Water St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $22-$54. 632-3373. A KNIGHT’S TALE is screened at 9 p.m. at Sea Walk Pavilion, 11 First St. N., Jax Beach. 247-6100. The FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK self-guided tour features 25 participating galleries from 5-9 p.m. in downtown St. Augustine. 829-0065.

SUNDAY, JUNE 5

North Florida Death Metal Society presents WINTERUS at 9 p.m. at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Jacksonville. 353-4692. Violinist DAVID COUCHERON and his sister, pianist JULIE COUCHERON, perform with cellist CHRISTOPHER REX at 7:30 p.m. at Memorial United Methodist Church, 601 Centre St., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $25. 261-1779. THE DON THOMPSON CHORALE performs AN AMERICAN CHORAL BOUQUET at Resurrection Catholic Church, 3383 University Blvd. N., Jacksonville. 358-0196.

Arts and crafts and local produce are offered at DOWNTOWN FRIDAY MARKET from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive. 353-1188.

THE CAKE BOSS Buddy Valastro gives a cooking demonstration, tells stories and answers questions from the audience at 7 p.m. at the Times-Union Center of the Performing Arts, 300 W. Water St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $25.75-$45.75. 630-3900.

RIZZIN, BOO CLAN, TOO PHUCKS, MARS, PSYCHO JESUS and VANNACUTT play at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

QUASI MOJO, BIG ENGINE, BLACKFOOT, ZERO-N, DANNY DELVES AND THE DEADLY NIGHTSHADE and BLACK CREEK RIZIN play at 5 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

The SOUNDS ON CENTRE free outdoor concert features Instant Groover from 6-8 p.m. at 100 Centre St., between Second and Front, Fernandina Beach. The concerts are held on the first Friday of each month through Sept. 30.

The Church of the Good Shepherd presents its SUMMER ORGAN RECITAL SERIES with Zachary Klobnak at 6 p.m. at 1100 Stockton St., Jacksonville. 387-5691.

Local melodic punkers DANCELL perform at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $8. 246-2473. JIMMY THACKERY plays at 10 p.m. at Mojo Kitchen, 1500 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach. Tickets are $15. 247-6636.

SATURDAY, JUNE 4

Yo-Yo Champion Jack Ringca performs at 10:30 a.m., Lis and Lon Williamson are in at 11:45 a.m. and Trevis Prince performs at 2:30 p.m. at RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET, held under the Fuller Warren Bridge at Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville. 554-6865. The hometown JACKSONVILLE SUNS take on the Birmingham Barons at 6:05 p.m. (Civil War Re-enactment), at 3:05 p.m. on June 5 (Family Sunday), at 7:05 p.m. on June 6 (Belly Buster Monday), at 7:05 p.m. on June 7 (Family Feast Night), and at 1:05 p.m. on June 8 (Businessperson Special) at the Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $7.50-$22.50. 358-2846. Thrash bands WITCHAVEN, BLOODCRAFT, HALLELUJAH, VOMIKAUST and REMAINS play at 9:30 p.m. at Lomax Lodge, 822 Lomax St., Jacksonville. Admission is $5; $7 for ages 18-21. 634-8813. The 25th annual historical re-enactment of Sir Francis DRAKE’S RAID in 1586 on St. Augustine is presented throughout the city. Displays of arms, armor, crafts and depictions of Colonial lifestyles are featured, along with sacking and burning the city in the plaza. 829-9792. NONPOINT, D5, AS DAYLIGHT BURNS and COPYRITE play at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. The RITZ JAZZ N’ JAM happens on the first Sat. of every month at 7 p.m., featuring live music and the chance to jam with the house jazz band at The Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum, 829 N. Davis St., Jacksonville. Tickets are $21 in advance, $25 at the door. 632-5555. European Street Café hosts SONGWRITERS’ CIRCLE FIFTH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION at 8 p.m., featuring Larry Mangum, Mike Shackelford and Jamie Defrates, at 5500 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 399-1740. Pianist GABRIELA MONTERO performs with cellist CHRISTOPHER REX at 7:30 p.m. at Amelia Plantation Chapel, 36 Bowman Road, Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $40. 261-1779. OUT OF THE BLUE plays at 8:30 p.m. at Downtown Blues Bar & Grille, 714 St. Johns Ave., Palatka. (386) 325-5454.

MONDAY, JUNE 6

Jacksonville Ice & Sportsplex holds weekly learn-to-skate camps, as well as hockey and figure-skating camps through Aug. 12 at 3605 Philips Highway. Every Tue. through Aug., the center also presents public skate sessions from 7:30-9:30 p.m. for $5 per person. Cosmic Skating with a DJ is held from 8-10 p.m. every Sat., with $10 admission and skate rentals. 399-3223. Hey! Hey! THE MONKEES rock the stage at 8 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $45-$103.50. 355-2787.

© 2011

The Chicago Swing/New Orleans-style jazz band JB SCOTT’S SWINGIN’ ALLSTARS perform at 8 p.m. at European Street Café, 5500 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 399-1740. Congratulations! Now get a job! DUVAL COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATIONS are held today and daily through June 9 at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts, 300 W. Water St., Jacksonville. 630-3900.

TUESDAY, JUNE 7

EVOLETTE and WAITING FOR BRANTLEY perform at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. Culhane’s Irish Pub presents jazz by THE JOHN THOMAS GROUP at 7 p.m. at 967 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach. 249-9595. NASHVILLE PUSSY and KOFFIN KATS play at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $15. 398-7496. Nationally acclaimed THE RITZ CHAMBER PLAYERS perform at 2 p.m. at MOCA, 333 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. Tickets are free for members, $8 for non-members. 366-6911.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8

PRIMUS performs with THE DEAD KENNY G’s at 8 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets are $38.50 and $41. 355-2787. Eclectic combo EIGHTH BLACKBIRD performs at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 2600 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach. Tickets for the evening performance are $30. 261-1779. Comedian DOMINIQUE is featured at 8 p.m. at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Road, Jacksonville. This “Def Comedy Jam” veteran also appears at 8 p.m. on June 9-11 and at 10 p.m. on June 11. Tickets range from $15-$18. 292-4242.

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CLOUD 9 plays at 6:30 p.m. at Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant, 691 N. First St., Jax Beach. 270-0025. The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by THE BUSH DOCTORS from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 9

Comedian ANNA COLLINS performs at 7:45 p.m. at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Jacksonville. Collins also appears on June 10 and 11. Tickets are $10 and $13. 365-5555. The Alive After Five series presents VOLTAGE BROTHERS at 5 p.m. at The Markets at St. Johns Town Center, 4850 Big Island Drive, Jacksonville. 998-7156. The Main Library screens the ’50s classic SABRINA at 5:45 p.m. at 303 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. 630-2665. FALLEN TEMPLARS, BEWARE THAT NEVER ENDING, COME WHAT MAY, DREAM OF THE DAY, WATERSHIP DOWN, NEWBORN RANSOM and SIRENA play at 6 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

SATURDAY, JUNE 11

Jacksonville Centre of the Arts and The Performers Academy present their GENESIS BENEFIT AND SHOWCASE featuring a patron preview party and dinner at 6 p.m. at Jacksonville University’s Terry Concert Hall, 2800 University Blvd. N., Jacksonville. A benefit concert is held at 7:30 p.m. in JU’s Swisher Theatre. Tickets for the party are $65; $25 for the concert. 322-7672. jaxgenesis.com The BIKERS FOR LIFE Bone Marrow Drive starts at 9 a.m. at Ton Up Jacksonville, 580 College St. with the last bike in at 3 p.m. at Whitey’s Fish Camp, 2032 C.R. 220, Fleming Island. Entry fee for riders is $15; $10 for passengers; includes breakfast and lunch. The event also features drawings and live music; proceeds benefit the Be the Match Registry. 244-9819. bethematchfoundation.org/ bikersforlifejax2011 Davin McCoy performs at 11:45 a.m. and Terry Whitehead plays at 2:30 p.m. at RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET, held under the Fuller Warren Bridge at Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville. 554-6865.

Amelia Community Theatre presents THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK at 8 p.m. at 207 Cedar St., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $20; $10 for students. The play is also staged at 8 p.m. on June 10, 11, 16-18 and 23-25 and at 2 p.m. on June 19. 261-6749.

Local punk heroes YELLOWCARD play with RUNNER RUNNER at 8 p.m. at Mavericks Rock N’ Honky Tonk Concert Hall, 2 Independent Drive, Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $20. 356-1110.

MOCA presents the improvisational comedy troupe THE IMPROV EFFECT at 7 p.m. at 333 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. The troupe performs every second Thur. of each month. Tickets are $10. 366-6911.

A live international broadcast of GLOBAL DAY OF PRAYER, presented by GodTV, is held at 6 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $7.50. 630-3900.

Boaters in the JAX RIVER RALLY CHARITY POKER RUN navigate a 150-mile course on the St. Johns River. Events run through June 11 at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive, Jacksonville, and include live entertainment. 388-6637.

The Jacksonville Humane Society presents the 16th annual FLORIDA STATE FRISBEE DOG CHAMPIONSHIPS from 3-9 p.m. at Mandarin High School, 4831 Greenland Road, Jacksonville. 725-8766.

The 21st annual JACKSONVILLE FOODFIGHT is held at 6 p.m. at EverBank Field’s Touchdown Club, 1 EverBank Field Drive, Jacksonville. Fifty restaurants are participating, with proceeds benefiting Second Harvest North Florida. Advance tickets are $60; $100 VIP. 739-7074. jacksonvillefoodfight.org

VEINS OF JENNA, NORTHE, SEEKING SERENITY and SIR REAL perform at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

Vocalist Luciana Souza, guitarist Romero Lumbambo and percussionist Cyro Baptista perform FROM BACH TO BOSSA NOVA at 7 p.m. at La Tierra Prometida (formerly First Baptist Church), 416 Alachua St., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $45. 261-1779. CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features Big Pineapple at 7 p.m. under the oaks of Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The free concerts continue through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment.com/sites/ concerts-plaza Jazz musicians JOSHUA BOWLUS SEXTET performs at 8 p.m. at European Street Café, 1704 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 399-1740. BETH NEWDOME FELLOWSHIP ARTISTS perform at 1 p.m. at Savannah Grand of Amelia Island, 1900 Amelia Trace Court, Fernandina Beach. 261-1779.

FRIDAY, JUNE 10

18 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011

Theatre Jacksonville presents THE DROWSY CHAPERONE at 8 p.m. at 2032 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. The musical comedy is also staged June 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 19, 23, 24 and 25. Tickets are $25 on Fri. and Sat.; $20 for seniors, military and students on Thurs. and Sun. 396-4425.

The SECOND SATURDAY ARTRAGEOUS ART WALK is a selfguided tour featuring the galleries of downtown Fernandina Beach open from 5:30-8 p.m. 277-0717. The BEACHES FINE ARTS SERIES TRIATHLON is held at 7 a.m. at Mickler’s Landing, 1109 Ponte Vedra Blvd., Ponte Vedra Beach. bfasracing.org FIRST COAST FRIENDS OF FUNK hold a CD release party at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $8. 246-2473. Native American flutist R. Carlos Nakai performs VOICES OF THE SPIRIT at 7:30 p.m. at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 2600 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach. The event also features a collection of Zuni Indian fetish carvings. Tickets are $30. 261-1779. The exhibit SAVAGE ANCIENT SEAS opens at the Museum of Science & History, 1025 Museum Drive, Jacksonville. The collection features a wide array of prehistoric fossils of marine life. 396-6674.

SUNDAY, JUNE 12

Beth Newdome Fellowship Artists perform CZECH IT OUT! MASTERPIECES OF ANTONIN DVORAK at 7:30 p.m. at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 2600 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $15. 261-1779.

The Jacksonville Beach Summer Jazz Concert Series features LIN ROUNTREE at 5 p.m., STEVE COLE & SHILTS at 6:15 p.m. and SPYRO GYRA at 7:30 p.m. at Sea Walk Pavilion, 11 First St. N., Jax Beach. 247-6100.

FALLEN TEMPLARS, MOTOGRATER, ERODE, THRESHOLD and CARNIVOROUS CARNIVAL play at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

Violinist Rachel Barton Pine performs THE MANY MOODS OF RACHEL: BEER & G STRINGS: RETRO CONCERT II at 7 p.m. at the Palace Saloon, 117 Centre St., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $45. 261-1779.


The St. Augustine Airshow, held May 28 and 29 at Northeast Regional Airport on U.S. 1, features wing-walkers, jet aerobatics and aircraft displays.

The INTERMEZZO SUNDAY CONCERT with violinist Max Huls is held at 2:30 p.m. in the Hicks Auditorium, Main Library, 303 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. 630-2665. THE SPITS perform with openers TV Ghost and Alligator at Café Eleven, 501 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. 460-9311. Tickets are $10.

MONDAY, JUNE 13

Swedish indie rockers JUNIP perform with KATIE HELOW and ANTIQUE ANIMALS at 7 p.m. at 5 Points Theatre, 1028 Park St., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $20; $50 VIP for the after party at Underbelly, which includes drinks and midnight snacks. 354-7002, 359-0047. School’s Out! The Jacksonville Landing hosts TEACHER APPRECIATION WEEK today through June 19 at 2 Independent Drive, Jacksonville. 353-1188. The Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville presents its ARTCAMP@MOCA through Aug. 19. The nine-week-long camp provides a variety of art-making activities for kids ages 4-17. 366-6911 ext. 212. SCHOOLBOY HUMOR and HOLLANDER play at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $10. 398-7496. The “Leave ’Em Laughing Tent” screens the Laurel and Hardy films “WITH LOVE AND HISSES” (1927) and “GREAT GUNS” (1941) at 7 p.m. at Pablo Creek Branch Library, 13295 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. 314-5801.

TUESDAY, JUNE 14

The opening reception for the exhibit THE NEIGHBORHOOD AS ART: CELEBRATING THE RIVERSIDE AVONDALE AREA is held from 4-8 p.m. at The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville. The exhibit runs through July 31. 356-6857. Bossa Nova singer-songwriter MONICA DE SILVA performs at 8 p.m. at European Street Café, 1704 San Marco Blvd, Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 399-1740. Soprano Alison Buchanan, pianist Elizabeth Pridgen, clarinetist Terrence Patterson and violinist Philip Pan perform a FORT CLINCH CANDLELIGHT CONCERT at Historic Fort Clinch, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach. The group performs an encore concert at 7:30 p.m. on June 15 at the fort. Tickets for each night are $25. 261-1779. “You are getting very sleepy — and hilarious!” RICH GUZZI XXXTREME HYPNOSIS SHOW is featured at 8 p.m. at The

Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Road, Jacksonville. Tickets are $20. 292-4242. PARTY 4 THREE, SLEEP SOIL, AMP STATION, CALL IT FICTION, THE SILENT ASYLUM, LET IT HAPPEN and ULTRACOVEN play at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15

The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by THE FALLING BONES from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com DERRYCK LAWRENCE PROJECT plays at 6:30 p.m. at Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant, 691 N. First St., Jax Beach. 270-0025. The hometown JACKSONVILLE SUNS are up against the Mississippi Braves at 7:05 p.m. (Teacher Appreciation Night), at 7:05 p.m. on June 16 (Thursday Night Throwdown), at 7:05 p.m. on June 17 (Family Fireworks), at 6:05 p.m. on June 18 (Back-2-Back Cap Giveaway), and at 3:05 p.m. on June 19 (Kids Glove Giveaway) at the Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $7.50-$22.50. 358-2846. ACOUSTIC ALCHEMY performs at 7 p.m. at the Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 1050 A1A N., Ponte Vedra Beach. Advance tickets are $29.50; $35 day of show. 209-0399.

THURSDAY, JUNE 16

THE JACKSONVILLE SUNS BASEBALL CAMP is held from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. today and on June 17 for children ages 7-12 at the Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Camp fee of $85 includes a lunch on both days, a T-shirt, ball cap and ticket to a game. The camp is also held on June 29 and 30. 358-2846. SKARHEAD plays at 6 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville presents the film ALL RENDERED TRUTH at 7 p.m. at the museum’s MOCA Theater, 333 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. The film chronicles the lives of more than 20 self-taught artists of the American South. 366-6911. Comedian DEXTER ANGRY performs at 7:45 p.m. at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Jacksonville. Angry also performs on June 17 and 18. Tickets are $10 and $13. 365-5555.

MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 19


SOL DRIVEN TRAIN performs at 10 p.m. at Mojo Kitchen, 1500 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach. 247-6636.

p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets start at $33.35. 630-3900.

CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features Rob Peck & Friends at 7 p.m. under the oaks of Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The free concerts continue through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment.com/ sites/concerts-plaza

The Tony Award-winning musical CATS is staged at 8 p.m. at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts’ Moran Theater, 300 W. Water St., Jacksonville. This Broadway classic is also presented at 2 and 8 p.m. on June 18 and at 1:30 p.m. on June 19. Tickets range from $27-$62. 632-3373.

The Cathedral Basilica hosts the opening concert of the fifth annual ST. AUGUSTINE MUSIC FESTIVAL at 7:30 p.m. at 38 Cathedral Place, located in the Plaza at St. Augustine. The festival’s concerts are presented at 7:30 p.m. through June 18 and continue again at 7:30 p.m. June 23-25. Featured musicians are from Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra and Ritz Chamber Players. stauguatinemusicfestival.org The NORTH BEACHES ART WALK features the galleries of Atlantic and Neptune beaches open from 5-9 p.m. at various venues from Sailfish Drive in Atlantic Beach to Neptune Beach and Town Center. For a list of participating galleries, call 249-2222. PARK STREET performs at 8 p.m. at European Street Café, 1704 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 399-1740. Funnyman LAVELL CRAWFORD performs at 8 p.m. at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Road, Jacksonville. This “Def Comedy Jam” veteran also performs at 8 and 10 p.m. on June 17 and 18. Tickets range from $25-$30. 292-4242.

FRIDAY, JUNE 17

The Limelight Theatre presents the darkly comedic musical ASSASSINS at 7:30 p.m. at 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine. The show is also staged at 7:30 p.m. every Thur.Sat. and at 2 p.m. on Sun. through July 10. Tickets are $25; $22 for seniors; $20 for military and students. 825-1164. The JACKSONVILLE 48-HOUR FILM PROJECT kicks off at 6 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Teams are given instructions and must return with a finished film within 48 hours. 622-6800. 48hourfilm.com/jacksonville BRANDED WITH FEAR, ALL IN, MANNA ZEN and TRAVERSER perform at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. Country singer and superstar KEITH URBAN lights up the stage in his Get Closer 2011 World Tour at 7:30

CHASE COY, RIVAL SUMMER and LOVE CAN’T BE BEAT play at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $12. 398-7496. R&B fave GINUWINE performs along with TANK at 8 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $48.50-$103.50. 355-2787. Pianist Valentina Lisitsa performs HAPPY BIRTHDAY FRANZ: CELEBRATING THE 200th ANNIVERSARY OF FRANZ LISZT’S BIRTH at 7:30 p.m. at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 2600 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $30. 261-1779.

SATURDAY, JUNE 18

The BEACHES SUMMER FEST FOR MDA happens from 6-10 p.m. at the Courtyard by Marriot, 1617 First St. N., Jax Beach and features live music by FUSEBOX FUNK, HOFFMAN’S VOODOO and JAKE McCAIN as well as beer and wine tastings, food and a silent auction to benefit the Muscular Dystrophy Association. 249-9071. Cypress Hill’s SEN DOG performs with LOKEY, YOUNG FYNESSE, LIL’ FOOLISH and KEYLOW at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. MILE TRAIN and ROCCO BLU perform at 10 p.m. at Mojo Kitchen, 1500 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach. 247-6636. Morley performs at 12:30 p.m. and Laurel Lee & the Escapees perform at 2 p.m. at RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET, held under the Fuller Warren Bridge at Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville. 554-6865. The JACKSONVILLE SHARKS take on the MILWAUKEE MUSTANGS at 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $15$128. 630-3900. VIOLIST ROBERTO DIAZ AND CELLIST CHRISTOPHER REX perform at 2 p.m. at Macedonia AME Church, 202 S. Ninth St., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $15. 261-1779.

Child star turned Bieber girl turned pop queen Selena Gomez performs with her band The Scene on Sunday, July 31 at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre.

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MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 21


European Street Café presents legendary Southern rocker TOMMY TALTON at 8 p.m. at 5500 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $15. 399-1740. Local faves KYMYSTRY, ROSCOE CAIN and THE RIDE perform at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $8. 246-2473. THE FESTIVAL OF THE CHARIOT is a multicultural event featuring dancing and food, from noon-8 p.m. at Sea Walk Pavilion, 11 First St. N., Jax Beach. The event includes a procession from Eighth Avenue North to Beach Boulevard. (352) 316-4560, 247-6100. Smooth jazz saxophonist AARON BING performs at 7:30 p.m. at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts’ Terry Theater, 300 W. Water St., Jacksonville. Tickets are $30. 630-3900.

SUNDAY, JUNE 19

Guitarist Sharon Isbin performs at Amelia Island Chamber Music Festival’s RITZ GALA concert at 5:30 p.m. at The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island, 4750 Amelia Island Parkway, Amelia Island. Tickets are $40. Tickets for the Ritz Gala dinner following the performance are $90. 261-1779.

The Main Library screens the family comedy THE LOVE BUG at 5:45 p.m. at 303 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. 630-2665. Comedians STEVE LEMME and KEVIN HEFFERNAN from Broken Lizard comedy troupe perform at 8 p.m. at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Road, Jacksonville. Tickets range from $18-$25. They also appear at 8 and 10 p.m. on June 24 and 25. 292-4242. CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features Bob & Joline and The Friends of Mine Band at 7 p.m. under the oaks of Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The free concerts continue through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment. com/sites/concerts-plaza CLARA VANUM, THE GREATER RISK, SAFETY WORD ORANGE and CRIMSON CITY ROMANCE perform at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. European Street Café presents legendary soft rockers SPANKY & OUR GANG at 8 p.m. at 1704 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $15. 399-1740. MARTIN LAWRENCE brings his Doin’ Time Comedy Tour to town at 8 p.m. at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts’ Moran Theater, 300 W. Water St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $39.50-$89.50. 630-3900.

MONDAY, JUNE 20

Doing Dishes Paint Your Own Pottery Studio offers a POTTERY & GLASS FUSION CAMP for kids ages 6 and older from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at 5619 San Jose Blvd. and 3568 St. Johns Ave., both in Jacksonville. Techniques in glass and pottery-making are featured. Each class is $40. 730-3729, 388-7088. doingdishes.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 21

The audience gets to vote for the winner of the JACKSONVILLE 48-HOUR FILM PROJECT’s first group of film screenings at 6 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Submissions are also screened at 6 p.m. on June 22 and 23. Tickets are $15; $10 for students. A three-night pass is $35; $20 for students. 355-2787.

© 2011

FolioWeekly

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22

The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by THOSE GUYS from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com JOHNSTON DUO performs at 6:30 p.m. at Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant, 691 N. First St., Jax Beach. 270-0025. Alhambra Theatre & Dining stages the family classic WILLY WONKA at 8 p.m. at 12000 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $45 and $49. The show is performed through July 24. 641-1212. HIS NAME WAS IRON, DNR and ARK HARBOUR play at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

THURSDAY, JUNE 23

22 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011

FRIDAY, JUNE 24

Folio Weekly’s 18th annual BEER & MUSIC FESTIVAL is held from 7-10 p.m. at Morocco Shrine Auditorium, 3800 St. Johns Bluff Road S., Jacksonville. Sample more than 100 beers and fare from local restaurants. Live music is featured as well as a chicken-wing-eating contest. Tickets are $25 and $30 (VIP). 260-9770 ext. 110. SHAVED CHRIST performs at 8 p.m. at Budget Records, 212 San Marco Ave., St. Augustine. 806-7131. Thrasher-Horne Center for the Arts presents SOUTHERN STORIES, an evening of storytelling and music, at 7:30 p.m. at 283 College Drive, Orange Park. Tickets are $15. 276-6750. The show is also staged at 7:30 p.m. on June 25 and 26. The Florida Theatre presents The Palestine Strings and Danadeesh Dance Group performing their first U.S. dance tour in PALESTINE YOUTH CULTURAL TOUR at 8 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $28.50$103.50. 355-2787. L.A. metalheads OTEP perform with BLACK GUARD, DYSTROPHY, SISTER SIN and ONE EYED DOLL at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $12. 223-9850.

SATURDAY, JUNE 25

RUMBLE IN THE ANCIENT CITY presents an evening of AMATEUR MMA & BOXING at 6 p.m. at Ketterlinus Gymnasium, 60 Orange St., St. Augustine. Admission is $20; $10 for children. 982-0099. Registration for the first sprint of the JAX TRIATHLON series starts at 6 a.m. and the race begins at 7:30 a.m. at Main Beach Park, 99 N. Fletcher Ave., Fernandina Beach. Entry fees start at $75. (352) 637-2475.

First Coast No More Homeless Pets presents ART UNLEASHED at 7 p.m. at The River Club, 1 Independent Drive, Jacksonville. A silent auction, juried art show of animal-themed works, cocktails, gourmet food and live entertainment are featured. Proceeds benefit spay and neuter programs. Advance tickets are $50; $65 at the door. Advance VIP tickets including a 6 p.m. meet-andgreet with the artists are $60; $75 at the door. 425-0005. jaxartunleashed.com

FIRST COAST BEACH SERIES VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT is held from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. at the Jax Beach volleyball courts, located between Beach Boulevard and Fourth Avenue North. Competition continues from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. on June 26. 247-6100. fcva1.com

Comedian MIKE RIVERA appears at 7:45 p.m. at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Jacksonville. Rivera also performs on June 24 and 25. Tickets are $10 and $13. 365-5555.

CRIMSON CITY ROMANCE and LIVICATION play at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. 223-9850.

UPTOWN SATURDAY NIGHT features galleries, antique stores and shops open from 5-9 p.m. in St. Augustine’s San Marco District. 824-3152.


TUESDAY, JUNE 28

The hometown JACKSONVILLE SUNS take on the Birmingham Barons at 7:05 p.m. (Family Feast Night), at 7:05 p.m. on June 29 (Bobblehead Giveaway), at 7:05 p.m. on June 30 (Thursday Night Throwdown), at 7:05 p.m. on July 1 (Family Fireworks), at 7:05 p.m. on July 2 (Military Appreciation Night), and at 7:05 p.m. on July 3 (Fireworks Spectacular) at the Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $7.50-$22.50. 358-2846.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29

The ALEGRIA CIRQUE DU SOLEIL is staged at 7:30 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. This acclaimed troupe also performs at 7:30 p.m. on June 30, July 1 and 2, at 3:30 p.m. on July 1 and 2 and at 1 and 5 p.m. on July 3. Tickets range from $35-$99. 630-3900.

Big Momma’s Hizzouse: Martin Lawrence brings his Doin’ Time Comedy Tour to town on Thursday, June 23 at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts’ Moran Theater.

The JACKSONVILLE ROLLERGIRLS present a doubleheader with the River City Rat Pack vs. Ocala Cannibals and the First Coast Fatales vs. Palm Coast Rollerderby at 6 p.m. at Jacksonville Indoor Sports, 3605 Phillips Highway. Tickets are $10. 357-0102. jacksonvillerollergirls.com The sixth annual TEEN BATTLE OF THE BANDS kicks off at 1 p.m. at the Main Library, 303 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. 630-0673. The JACKSONVILLE SHARKS take on the TAMPA BAY STORM at 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $15$128. 630-3900. Bluegrass rockers THE MOSIER BROTHERS perform at 8 p.m. at European Street Café, 5500 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $20. 399-1740. One-man jam band ZACH DEPUTY performs “420”-friendly hits at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $15. 246-2473. Ananda Kula presents a concert by sound healers SIDDIE FRIAR and PETER LEVITOV at 6 p.m. at 4154 Herschel St., Jacksonville. Admission is a suggested donation of $10-$20. 680-7344

SUNDAY, JUNE 26

Witness the stars of the hit show “The Deadliest Catch” share drama of the high seas at THE DEADLIEST CATCH: AN EVENING WITH THE CAPTAINS at 8 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $24-$76.50. 355-2787. ACOUSTIC NIGHT at 6 p.m. at Bull Park features music by Mike Shackelford at Seventh Street and Ocean Boulevard, Atlantic Beach. Bring lawn chairs and a picnic dinner. 247-5828.

MONDAY, JUNE 27

Alhambra Theatre & Dining holds SUMMER THEATRE CAMP for children ages 9-12, daily from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. through July 8 at 12000 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. The camp fee is $495; $425 for members. 280-0614 ext. 204. BOBBY SICK, SAWCHOSISI, D-MURDER, SKUZZ, OUTBREAK, VANNA CUTT, MISS KISA, SEKTION 8, SCHIZOPHONICS and JESTA RED play at 5 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. University of North Florida offers a SUMMER ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD SCHOOL from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Fri. through July 1. The fee is $199. The camp is also held July 5-11, 11-15 and 18-22. 620-1000. ce.unf.edu/ showcalendar.awp

Southern-style comedian TIM STATUM performs at 8 p.m. at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Road, Jacksonville. Statum also appears at 8 p.m. on June 30 and July 1 and 2. Tickets range from $6-$12. 292-4242. The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by THE RESTLESS KIND from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 30

CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features The Driftwoods at 7 p.m. under the oaks of Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The free concerts continue through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment.com/sites/concerts-plaza European Street Café presents folk musician JOHN LONGBOTTOM as well as Rodger Bull and Cathy Lee at 8 p.m. at 1704 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 399-1740.

FRIDAY, JULY 1

The annual WORLD GOLF VILLAGE COMMUNITY FIREWORKS go off at dusk at WGV’s Walk of Champions, World Golf Village, St. Augustine. Bring blankets or lawn chairs. 940-4123. BEFORE THE ANCIENTS play at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. The FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK self-guided tour features 25 participating galleries from 5-9 p.m. in downtown St. Augustine. 829-0065. The SOUNDS ON CENTRE free outdoor concert features Jimmy Parrish & The Ocean Waves from 6-8 p.m. at 100 Centre St., between Second and Front, Fernandina Beach. The concerts are held on the first Fri. of each month through Sept. 30. CELLDWELLER plays at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $12. 398-7496. Guns N’ Roses tribute act APPETITE FOR DESTRUCTION appears at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $10. 246-2473.

SATURDAY, JULY 2

Country rocker COREY SMITH performs at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $22. 246-2473. YOGURT SMOOTHNESS, ALL IN, THE REAL, CAROLINE and CONNER PLEDGER play at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

SUNDAY, JULY 3

A FAREWELL TO ARMS plays at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 23


Black history tour founder Howard Lewis stands at the Mission de Nombre de Dios cross in St. Augustine, where Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles landed and where he claims U.S. black history began.

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hether you’re a native, snowbird, tourist or transplant, there’s lots to learn about Northeast Florida. And this being (strictly speaking) the South, there’s always more than one side to every story. Themed tours offer a chance to explore the area from a fresh direction, whether it’s new physical landscape or an alternate social one. From black history to ghost tours and cycling adventures, perspective is everything.

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24 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011

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us) offers a list of ride maps for the area, complete with downloadable PDF maps with directions, specific mileage and even a pit-stop planner for bathroom breaks, water and food. The 50-mile Ride Around Mandarin (RAM) looks pretty daunting, as does the Pirate Loop, a 62.5-mile course through Amelia Island Plantation, over the Nassau Sound and along the St. Johns River. But there’s a bevy of less challenging rides, too, including the monthly Low Tide Bike Ride at Anastasia State Park in St. Augustine (3.5 miles, floridastateparks.org/ anastasia) and the Jacksonville/Baldwin Rail to Trail path (14.5 miles, http://bit.ly/mNF65J).

Back in 2006, Florida native Howard Lewis realized that a big part of St. Augustine’s black history was missing from the conversation. Sure, local historians like David Nolan were giving great coverage of the Civil Rights Movement up to present day, but Lewis wanted to cover the city’s 400-year black history gap, starting in 1565 and running through the mid-1960s. In essence, Lewis wanted to educate city residents and tourists on the events that happened prior to the Civil Rights Movement. “St. Augustine Black History Tours was started in order to fill a void in the visitor experience,” Lewis says of his three-hour walking tour that starts at Fort Mose, heads to Castillo de San Marcos and takes participants into the heart of Lincolnville, a neighborhood settled in 1866 by former slaves. Over the past few years, Lewis says he’s served more visitors than residents — educating them about people like Augustine of Hippo, a famous North African philosopher and theologian who is the town’s namesake, and Jorge Biassou, one of the leaders of the Haitian slave revolt of the 1790s who left his country of servitude to become a general in St. Augustine. Tours can be scheduled via blackhistorytours2015@yahoo.com or 501-6878.

Unless you live under a rock or you’re a phasmophobist, you’ve most likely been on one of the area’s many ghost tours. St. Augustine is chock full of ’em. There’s the Ghost Train Adventures at Ripley’s Believe It or Not!, Ancient City Tours, the Ghosts & Gravestones Tour, even the GhoSt Augustine, where you get to ride around in a creepy black hearse. But there are also smaller ghost tours in Northeast Florida’s niche areas. Old Towne Carriage Company on Amelia Island offers a horse-drawn carriage in which owner and guide, Rita Jackson, recounts tales of tragic death while on the lookout for a ghostly presence (though she’s sure to make each tour age-appropriate to the children aboard). “I purposely use a small carriage that seats up to six adults,” Jackson says, “so the load is light for the horse, everyone gets lots of individual attention, the tours are tailored to each group, and I can answer everyone’s questions.” After all, many call Fernandina Beach the “City of Restless Ghosts.” (ameliacarriagetours.com)

Bicycle Tours

Walking Tours

There are plenty of Riverside hipsters heading out for microbrews on their vintage Peugeots, but there are also several alternate routes to explore in and out of the urban landscape. The North Florida Bicycle Club website (nfbc.

One of Jacksonville’s most pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods this year unveiled the city’s first self-guided podcast. The downloadable walking tour of historic Riverside is available on the Riverside/Avondale Preservation website

Ghost Tours

(riversideavondale.org). You can download it onto your phone or MP3 player and do the tour at your own pace — with a group or solo. The one-hour, two-mile tour starts at Riverside Arts Market under the Fuller Warren Bridge, taking you through haunted mansions and to the office of Leonard Skinner, the former gym teacher who gave his name to Jacksonville’s most famous band.

Farm Tours While there’s not much growing in the sweltering Florida summer, Slow Food founder Richard Villadoniga says there are plenty of opportunities to explore local agriculture. The Old Florida Antique Museum at Bulls Hit Potato Chip Factory, located in Hastings, gives a closeup look at the inner workings of Florida’s “Potato Capital” (692-2715). Villadoniga also suggests checking out the UF Agricultural Experiment Station in Hastings (research.ifas.ufl.edu) where students and professors conduct research on the science of agriculture, natural resources and human systems. (Make the drive worth your while with a stop at the County Line Produce stand, 848 S.R. 207, Hastings, 692-9400.) The Florida Agricultural Museum in Palm Coast (myagmuseum.com) offers camping, horseback riding, school activities and special events. And A Chef ’s Cooking Studio in Ponte Vedra offers cooking classes on everything from Caribbean-inspired foods to how to make the perfect fried rice (achefscookingstudio.com). Other food tours: First Coast Technical Institute’s datil pepper nursery (fcti.org, 547-3460), Intuition Ale Works beer factory tour (720 King St., Jacksonville, intuitionaleworks. com, 683-7720), the Lincolnville Community Garden (399 Riberia St., St. Augustine, citysprout.org) and Arlington Community Garden (arlingtoncommunitygarden.org). Best of all, end your day at a local farm-totable restaurant like The Floridian, Stephen’s Fine Foods, Gas, Orsay, Augustine Grille or Bistro Aix.  Kara Pound themail@folioweekly.com


MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 25


New wave ’80s faves PSYCHEDELIC FURS perform their entire “Talk Talk Talk” album as well as other hits at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $25. 246-2473.

Jarboe Park - Neptune Park June 13th-17th 9am-12 noon

4-6 year olds $140 per child

June 13th-17th 1pm-4pm

7-9 year olds $140 per child

June 13th-17th 5:30pm-7pm

3-9 year olds $95 per child

Discovery Montessori School - Jax Beach July 18th-22nd 1pm-4pm

3-6 year olds $180 per child

July 25th-29th 1pm-4pm

7-10 year olds $180 per child

Goals Indoor - Ponte Vedra Aug 15th-19th 9pm-4pm

4-9 year olds $220 per child

Aug 15th-19th 9am-12 noon

4-9 year olds $140 per child

The Florida Theatre’s Summer Movie Classics series kicks off with a screening of FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF at 2 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Admission is $7.50. A $45 movie card is available for the 10-film series. 355-2787.

MONDAY, JULY 4

A BARRY WHITE TRIBUTE is featured at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts’ Moran Theater, 300 W. Water St., Jacksonville. 630-3900. The Oldest City celebrates INDEPENDENCE DAY with a fireworks display beginning at 9:30 p.m., over the Castillo de San Marcos and Matanzas Bay, with the best vantage points located along the bay front between the Castillo and the Bridge of Lions. 825-1005. The Jacksonville Landing celebrates its ALL AMERICAN FOURTH from 2 p.m.-2 a.m. at 2 Independent Drive, Jacksonville. Live entertainment, food and drink and a fireworks display in the evening are featured. 353-1188.

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Aug 15th-19th 5:30pm-7pm

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The STARS© & STRIPES FREEDOM FESTIVAL is held from This is a copyright protected proof 10 a.m.-2 p.m. in Central Park, Fernandina Beach. This kid-friendly event features a Touch-a-Truck public safety display, pie-eating contest and other kids’ activities. The parade starts at 7 p.m. at Buccaneer Field, followed by a concert and fireworks at 9:30 p.m. 753-4467.

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held from 4-9:30 p.m. at Sea Walk Pavilion, 11 First St. N., Jax Beach. Live music and fireworks are featured. jacksonvillebeach.org

WEDNESDAY, JULY 6

TOOTS LORRAINE & THE TRAFFIC perform at 6:30 p.m. at Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant, 691 N. First St., Jax Beach. 270-0025.

© 2011

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FIRST WEDNESDAY ART WALK, themed “Art Shook Up,” is a self-guided tour held from 5-9 p.m. in downtown Jacksonville, spanning a 15-block radius of galleries, museums, bars and eateries. 634-0303 ext. 230. RABBIT performs at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $8. 398-7496. MATTHEW LUMPKIN and PATRICK JOLLE bring their Saints & Sinners Comedy Tour to town at 8 p.m. at The

Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Road, Jacksonville. The pair also performs at 8 p.m. on July 7, 8 and 9. Tickets range from $6-$12. 292-4242. The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by BREAK EVEN BAND from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com

THURSDAY, JULY 7

CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features The Falling Bones at 7 p.m. under the oaks of Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The free concerts continue through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment.com/sites/concerts-plaza

FRIDAY, JULY 8

GRANDPA’S COUGH MEDICINE performs at 9 p.m. at Fly’s Tie Irish Pub, 177 Sailfish Drive, Atlantic Beach. The band also appears at 9 p.m. on July 9. 246-4293. The three-day ST. AUGUSTINE KINGFISH CHALLENGE kicks off today at 6:30 a.m. at St. Augustine Marina, 245 Vilano Road. Final registration is held from 4-7 p.m. on July 10. Entry fee is $400; $350 before May 31. acgfa.com/ kingfishchallenge.html The JACKSONVILLE SUNS are up against the Montgomery Biscuits at 7:05 p.m. (Family Fireworks), at 6:05 p.m. on July 9 (Post-Game Concert with the George Aspinall Band), at 3:05 p.m. on July 10 (Sonny’s Family Sunday), and at 1:05 p.m. on July 11 (Camp Day No. 1) at the Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $7.50$22.50. 358-2846. DRIVEN performs at 8 p.m. at The Roadhouse, 231 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park. The band also performs at 8 p.m. on July 9. 246-0611.

SATURDAY, JULY 9

The winners of the JACKSONVILLE 48-HOUR FILM PROJECT AWARD SHOW are announced at 7 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. The winning films compete at the national level; the grand prize is a screening at Cannes Film Festival. Tickets are $10. 355-2787. The JACKSONVILLE SHARKS take a bite out of the DALLAS VIGILANTES at 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $15-$128. 630-3900.

The Florida Theatre’s Summer Movie Classics series kicks off with a screening of “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” on Sunday, July 3 at 2 p.m. at the theater, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville.

26 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011


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The final BEACHES FINE ARTS SERIES TRIATHLON is held at 7 a.m. at Mickler’s Landing, 1109 Ponte Vedra Blvd., Ponte Vedra Beach. bfasracing.org The SECOND SATURDAY ARTRAGEOUS ART WALK is a selfguided tour featuring the galleries of downtown Fernandina Beach open from 5:30-8 p.m. 277-0717. ANCIENT CITY CON IV is held today and on July 10 at Hyatt Regency Riverfront, 225 East Coastline Drive, Jacksonville. This two-day fest features workshops, games, celebrities and contests covering all things sci-fi, fantasy, anime and gaming. ancientcitycon.com

SUNDAY, JULY 10

The Florida Theatre’s Summer Movie Classics series screens TAXI DRIVER at 2 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Admission is $7.50. 355-2787.

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free concerts continue through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment.com/sites/ concerts-plaza

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Country singer JONATHAN BYRD performs at 8 p.m. with THE McMAKEN BROTHERS at European Street Café, 1704 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $15. 399-1740.

Players by the Sea presents the musical TOMMY, featuring the music of The Who, at 8 p.m. at 106 Sixth St. N., Jax Beach. The show is also staged on July 16, 21-23, 28-30 and Aug. 4-6. Tickets are $25. 249-0214.

BOZ SCAGGS and MICHAEL McDONALD perform at 6:30 p.m. at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340C A1A S., St. Augustine. Tickets are $41.50 and $76.50. 471-1965.

SUNSET RIOT and CRIMSON CITY ROMANCE perform at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

TUESDAY, JULY 12

JAX JUGGLERS Future jugglers gather from 6-7 p.m. every second Tue. and every fourth Mon. at San Marco Library’s Balis Center, 1514 LaSalle St., Jacksonville. jaxjugglers.org

WEDNESDAY, JULY 13

The inaugural HERI REGIONAL LEADERS RETREAT begins at 6 p.m. and continues through July 15 at Prime Osborn Convention Center, 1000 Water St., Jacksonville. This home school curriculum conference includes motivational speakers, networking opportunities, leadership ideas and music. Admittance is $30 for HERI members; $45 for nonmembers. 630-4000. CLOUD 9 performs at 6:30 p.m. at Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant, 691 N. First St., Jax Beach. 270-0025. The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by MID-LIFE CRISIS from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com

FRIDAY, JULY 15

SATURDAY, JULY 16

Registration for the first sprint of the JAX TRIATHLON series starts at 6 a.m. and the race begins at 7:30 a.m. at Main Beach Park, 99 N. Fletcher Ave., Fernandina Beach. Entry fees start at $75. (352) 637-2475. Blues artist CHRIS THOMAS KING performs at 10 p.m. at Mojo Kitchen, 1500 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach. 247-6636.

SUNDAY, JULY 17

The Florida Theatre’s Summer Movie Classics series screens Blake Edwards’ comedy classic THE PINK PANTHER at 2 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Admission is $7.50. 355-2787. WIZ KHALIFA, BIG SEAN and CHEVY WOODS perform at 7 p.m. at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340C A1A S., St. Augustine. Tickets are $21.50 and $31.50. 471-1965. FORGETTING FERA, FEEL LIKE LOVE and THE REAL play at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

© 2011

MONDAY, JULY 18

Registration for the 31st annual GREATER JACKSONVILLE KINGFISH TOURNAMENT is held at noon today with checkout beginning at 7:30 a.m. on July 19 at Jim King Park & Boat Ramp at Sisters Creek, 8203 Heckscher Drive. Weigh-in begins at 3 p.m. on July 22 with the awards ceremony at 6:30 p.m. on July 23. kingfishtournament.com

WEDNESDAY, JULY 20

THURSDAY, JULY 14

The star of FOX’s hit musical comedy series “Glee,” MATTHEW MORRISON, performs at 7:30 p.m. at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts’ Moran Theater, 300 W. Water St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $44-$64. 630-3900. CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features The Company at 7 p.m. under the oaks of Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The

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Comedian TOMMY DAVIDSON performs at 8 p.m. at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Road, Jacksonville. The former star of “In Living Color” also performs at 8 and 10 p.m. on July 15 and 16. Tickets are $20 and $25. 292-4242.

The JACKSONVILLE ROLLERGIRLS present the Duval Derby Dames vs. River City Rat Pack at 7 p.m. at Skate Station Mandarin, 3461 Kori Road, Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 357-0102. jacksonvillerollergirls.com

MONDAY, JULY 11

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Born to be Wild! The Jacksonville Landing presents BIKE NIGHT from 6-10 p.m. with live music by THE RIDE as well as bike washes, on-site tattooing, food and drinks and giveaways at 2 Independent Drive, Jacksonville. 353-1188.

GRANDPA’S COUGH MEDICINE performs at 9 p.m. at Nipper’s Beach Grille, 2309 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach. 246-2424.

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens features the exhibit ON THE SILK ROAD AND THE HIGH SEAS: CHINESE CERAMICS, CULTURE AND COMMERCE through Aug. 14 at 829 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville. 356-6857.

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The Main Library screens STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN at 5:45 p.m. at 303 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. 630-2665.

The Jacksonville Beach Summer Jazz Concert Series features INCENDIO at 5 p.m., TOSCHA at 6:15 p.m. and MINDI ABAIR at 7:30 p.m. at Sea Walk Pavilion, 11 First St. N., Jax Beach. 247-6100.

MINE ALL MINE play at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

sUpport

The hometown JACKSONVILLE SUNS take on the Mississippi Braves at 7:05 p.m. (Military Night), at 7:05 p.m. on July 21 (Thursday Night Throwdown), at 7:05 p.m. on July 22 (Family Fireworks), at 7:05 p.m. on July 23 (Roger Maris Plaque Giveaway), and at 3:05 p.m. on July 24 (Sonny’s Family Sundays) at the Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $7.50-$22.50. 358-2846. JOHNSTON DUO performs at 6:30 p.m. at Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant, 691 N. First St., Jax Beach. 270-0025.

MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 27


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Category 1 books to weather any storm

T

he first rule of hurricane coverage,” according to Miami journalist Carl Hiaasen, “is that every broadcast must begin with palm trees bending in the wind.” For most of the country, that remains the prevailing image of hurricanes. But for coastal residents, particularly in Southern states, the reality extends far beyond wind. There’s the packing of photographs and insurance documents, and the securing of patio furniture. Stocking up on bottled water and storing gas for the generator. Deciding whether to evacuate before it’s mandatory, or waiting until the traffic makes it impossible to go anywhere. I’m a fan of reading books appropriate for the situation at hand. When traveling, I dig into the works of local authors; when some foreign country monopolizes the news with a catastrophe or an uprising or something, I like to read fiction that paints me a picture of that place. But as summer approaches and gasoline prices soar, most of us are changing our standards for vacation travel. Like, maybe we’ll just visit the St. Augustine Alligator Farm and call it a day. Fortunately, the most fascinating stories often are in our own proverbial backyard. If you’re the type of book-a-holic who reads to escape, you might want to skip to the singles ads in the back. But if you find yourself getting a little revved up © 2011 for hurricane season, which starts in two weeks, READ ON! There’s a bevy of literature out there that will put you in the right frame of mind for panicking, making inland hotel reservations and writing GO AWAY ARLENE in day-glo paint on the plywood nailed to the side of your house. (Arlene will be the moniker of the first named storm this year.) In the way of classics, Zora Neale Hurston’s “Their Eyes Were Watching God” contains one of the most formidable hurricane scenes ever written. The scene captures the tragedy of the real-life 1928 Okeechobee hurricane, which devastated South Florida and killed thousands. In the novel, main characters Janie and Tea Cake await the storm: “They sat in company with the others in other shanties, their eyes straining against crude walls and their souls asking if He meant to measure their puny might against His. They seemed to be staring at the dark, but their © 2011

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28 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011

eyes were watching God.” Less lyrical but equally transfixing is Erik Larson’s “Isaac’s Storm: A Man, a Time and the Deadliest Storm in History,” which chronicles the hurricane that decimated Galveston in 1900, killing 8,000 and forever changing the way communities steel themselves against the rage of the sea. Larson’s nonfiction story is as compelling as any novel, including descriptions of children floating away from their parents on pieces of plywood and men helplessly swept off their roofs. The fact that the scenes were drawn from historical accounts of the storm makes them particularly gut-wrenching to read. “Last Train to Paradise,” Les Standiford’s nonfiction book about Henry Flagler’s obsession with building a railroad across the state, also metes out history in the form of a riveting story. Its climax features a battle scene pitting an enormous hurricane against a 160-ton steam engine. (Hint: Mother Nature wins.) For a more current take on nature’s fiercest storms, check out “Zeitoun” by Dave Eggers, a profile of Abdulrahman Zeitoun, who stayed in New Orleans during and after Hurricane Katrina to protect his home and business. Primarily the tale of how a family survived one of the worst natural disasters in American history, “Zeitoun” is also the story of how old-fashioned racism and modern bigotry combined with Katrina to nearly destroy a good family man. Of course, no list of hurricane literature would be complete without a mention of Carl Hiaasen’s “Stormy Weather,” a novel set in the chaotic aftermath of Hurricane Andrew. It focuses on a couple of tourists who venture into the disaster zone to view the devastation. One of them is kidnapped by Skink, the state’s former governor now living in the Florida wilds, who uses a shock collar on him to help teach him respect for nature. Also featured is Snapper, an ex-con developing a personal injury scam who’s held at gunpoint by a guy trying to collect fraudulent insurance money. I know, I know. In Florida, it barely sounds like fiction. But as hurricane season starts, let’s hope the only storms we encounter are bound in hardcover. Happy reading.  Tricia Booker themail@folioweekly.com

There’s a bevy of literature out there that will put you in the right frame of mind for panicking, making inland hotel reservations and writing GO AWAY ARLENE in day-glo paint on the plywood nailed to the side of your house.


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The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by CRABGRASS from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com

THURSDAY, JULY 21

Museum of Contemporary Jacksonville presents AN INTIMATE EVENING FOR HOWARD FINSTER at 7 p.m. at the museum’s MOCA Theater, 333 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. Beverly Finster-Guinn discusses her father’s work, followed by a screening of “The Sacred Vision of Howard Finster.” 366-6911. The opening reception for the exhibit BRIGHT IDEAS is held from 6-8 p.m. at the Women’s Center of Jacksonville, 5644 Colcord Ave., Jacksonville. The show runs through Sept. 30. 389-7749. CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features The Restless Kind at 7 p.m. under the oaks of Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The free concerts continue through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment.com/sites/ concerts-plaza “What’s up, fool?” Comedian FELIPE ESPARZA performs at 8 p.m. at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Road, Jacksonville. This winner from “Last Comic Standing” also appears at 8 p.m. on July 22 and at 8 and 10 p.m. on July 23. Tickets range from $18-$25. 292-4242. The NORTH BEACHES ART WALK features the galleries of Atlantic and Neptune beaches open from 5-9 p.m. at various venues from Sailfish Drive in Atlantic Beach to Neptune Beach and Town Center. For a list of participating galleries, call 249-2222.

FRIDAY, JULY 22

Arts & crafts and local produce are offered at the DOWNTOWN FRIDAY MARKET from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive. 353-1188. Local rockers SWEET LOW DOWN perform at 8 p.m. at The Roadhouse, 231 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park. 246-0611. The JACKSONVILLE SHARKS short-circuit the SPOKANE SHOCK at 8 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $15$128. 630-3900.

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TRIAMERA and J WILL play at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

SUNDAY, JULY 24

The Florida Theatre’s Summer Movie Classics series screens THE LAST WALTZ, Martin Scorsese’s cinematic love letter to The Band, at 2 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Admission is $7.50. 355-2787. Punkers DEAD END KIDS, UNION BOYS and NCA play at 6 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

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MONDAY, JULY 25

DISASTRO performs at 9 p.m. at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Jacksonville. 353-4692.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27

Karpeles Manuscript Museum features the exhibit SPIRITUALISM, a collection of rare manuscripts by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Harry Houdini reflecting their opposing views on spiritualism, through Aug. 27. The museum is located at 101 W. First St., Jacksonville. 356-2992.

The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by THE GRAPES OF ROTH from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com

THURSDAY, JULY 28

CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features Ancient City Slickers at 7 p.m. under the oaks of Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The free concerts continue through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment.com/sites/ concerts-plaza MARTHA’S TROUBLE performs at 8 p.m. at European Street Café, 1704 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $11. 399-1740.

MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 29


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Violinist Rachel Barton Pine, who performs everything from Bach to “classicalized” versions of Pantera and Rush, performs The Many Moods of Rachel: Beer & G Strings: Retro Concert II on Sunday, June 12 at 7 p.m. at the Palace Saloon, Fernandina Beach.

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BLISTUR performs at 8 p.m. at The Roadhouse, 231 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park. The band also plays at 8 p.m. on July 29 and 30. 246-0611.

100 MONKEYS performs at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $12. 398-7496.

The Main Library screens the classic crime drama WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION at 5:45 p.m. at 303 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. 630-2665.

SELENA GOMEZ & THE SCENE with ALLSTAR WEEKEND and CHRISTINA GRIMMIE perform at 7 p.m. at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340C A1A S., St. Augustine. Tickets are $25, $35, $45 and $75. 471-1965.

Museum of Science & History offers MUSIC UNDER THE STARS at 7 p.m. in the museum’s Bryan-Gooding Planetarium, 1025 Museum Circle, Jacksonville. Admission is $10; $5 for members. 396-6674.

FRIDAY, JULY 29

Arts & crafts and local produce are offered at the DOWNTOWN FRIDAY MARKET from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive. 353-1188. Modern rockers ALIEN ANT FARM play at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. MAD COWFORD IMPROV comedy troupe performs at 8:15 p.m. tonight and every Fri. night at Northstar Substation, 119 E. Bay St., Jacksonville. Admission is $5.860-5451.

SATURDAY, JULY 30

TYLER BRYANT performs at 7 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. UPTOWN SATURDAY NIGHT features galleries, antique stores and shops open from 5-9 p.m. in St. Augustine’s San Marco District. 824-3152.

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Folk singer ROD MacDONALD performs at 8 p.m. at European Street Café, 5500 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $11. 399-1740. FURTHUR featuring BOB WEIR and PHIL LESH plays at 6:30 p.m. at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340C A1A S., St. Augustine. Tickets are $39.50, $49.50 and $59.50. 471-1965.

SUNDAY, JULY 31

The Florida Theatre’s Summer Movie Classics series screens THE CHINA SYNDROME at 2 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Admission is $7.50. 355-2787. The JACKSONVILLE SUNS batter the Montgomery Biscuits at 6:05 p.m. (Sonny’s Family Sunday), at 7:05 p.m. on Aug. 1 (Belly Buster Monday), at 7:05 p.m. on Aug. 2 (Family Feast Night), at 7:05 p.m. on Aug. 3 (Wicked Wednesday), and at 7:05 p.m. on Aug. 4 (Thursday Night Throwdown) at the Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $7.50-$22.50. 358-2846.

30 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3

FIRST WEDNESDAY ART WALK, a culinary-themed “Now We’re Cooking!,” is a self-guided tour held from 5-9 p.m. in downtown Jacksonville, spanning a 15-block radius of galleries, museums, bars and eateries. 634-0303 ext. 230. TOOTS LORRAINE & THE TRAFFIC perform at 6:30 p.m. at Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant, 691 N. First St., Jax Beach. 270-0025. The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens offers the adult class PAINTING FUNDAMENTALS from 1:30-5 p.m. today and every Wed., through Sept. 7 at 829 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville. Class fee is $188; $168 for members. 356-6857. The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by STEAM THE BAND from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 4

The WORLD BATON TWIRLING FEDERATION INTERNATIONAL CUP is held through Aug. 7 at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Admission prices start at $27. 630-3900. CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features the Mike Hart Band at 7 p.m. under the oaks of Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The free concerts continue through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment.com/ sites/concerts-plaza ROD PICOTT and AMANDA SHIRES perform at 8 p.m. at European Street Café, 1704 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $11. 399-1740. OUT OF HAND perform at 8 p.m. at The Roadhouse, 231 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park. 246-0611.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 5

The Limelight Theatre presents the touching drama SECOND SAMUEL at 7:30 p.m. at 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine.


Tickets are $25; $22 for seniors; $20 for military and students. The show is also staged at 7:30 p.m. every Thur.Sat. and at 2 p.m. on Sun. through Aug. 28. 825-1164. The TOUR DE PAIN, featuring three different-length races in 24 hours, kicks off with a four-mile beach run at 7 p.m. leaving from the Jax Beach Lifeguard Station, 2 Oceanfront N. to 37th Avenue South and back. The race continues on Sat., Aug. 6 with a 7 a.m. 5K and a one-mile “Sizzleer” at 4:40 p.m. 731-1900. The hometown JACKSONVILLE SUNS take on the Chattanooga Lookouts at 7:05 p.m. (Family Fireworks), at 7:05 p.m. on Aug. 6 (Mike Stanton Bobblehead Giveaway), at 6:05 p.m. on Aug. 7 (Library Day), at 7:05 p.m. on Aug. 8 (Belly Buster Monday), and at 1:05 p.m. on Aug. 9 (Camp Day No. 2) at the Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $7.50-$22.50. 358-2846. Punk bands POOR RICHARDS, AMMO NATION, CAFFIENDS, FFN and STATUS FAUX play at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $8. 398-7496. The FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK self-guided tour features 25 participating galleries from 5-9 p.m. in downtown St. Augustine. 829-0065. The 2011 WRITERS CONFERENCE featuring workshops and critiques is held through Aug. 7 at University of North Florida, 12000 Alumni Drive, Jacksonville. Advance registration is $299; $349 after June 1. 620-4200. The SOUNDS ON CENTRE free outdoor concert features Touch of Gray from 6-8 p.m. at 100 Centre St., between Second and Front, Fernandina Beach. The concerts are held on the first Fri. of each month through Sept. 30. Local rockers GHOST RIDER perform at 8 p.m. at The Roadhouse, 231 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park. The band also performs at 8 p.m. on Aug. 6. 246-0611.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 6

Reggae music fills the air at the AMELIA ISLAND SUNSPLASH held from 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. at Sadler Road beach access, Fernandina Beach. The festival continues on Aug. 7 from 10:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. The two-day event features live music, vendors, surf contests, kids’ activities, food and a beach clean-up. 277-3717. sunsplashmusicfestival.com The Florida Theatre’s Summer Movie Classics series screens THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN at 7:30 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. This classic Western is also screened at 2 p.m. on Aug. 7. Admission is $7.50. 355-2787. Registration for the first sprint of the JAX TRIATHLON series starts at 6 a.m. and the race begins at 7:30 a.m. at Main

Beach Park, 99 N. Fletcher Ave., Fernandina Beach. Entry fees start at $75. (352) 637-2475. Folkie STEWART TUSSING performs at 8 p.m. at European Street Café, 5500 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $11. 399-1740.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 9

JAX JUGGLERS Future jugglers gather from 6-7 p.m. every second Tue. and every fourth Mon. at San Marco Library’s Balis Center, 1514 LaSalle St., Jacksonville. jaxjugglers.org

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10

CLOUD 9 performs at 6:30 p.m. at Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant, 691 N. First St., Jax Beach. 270-0025.

Alhambra Theatre & Dining presents the dark comedy DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS at 8 p.m. at 12000 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $42-$49. The production is staged through Sept. 18. 641-1212. The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by the NAVY PRIDE BAND from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 11

The Main Library screens the animated family favorite THE LION KING at 5:45 p.m. at 303 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. 630-2665. CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features Mystic Express at 7 p.m. under the oaks of Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The free concerts continue through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment.com/sites/concerts-plaza Singer-songwriter BETH WOOD performs at 8 p.m. at European Street Café, 1704 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $11. 399-1740.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 12

Arts & crafts and local produce are offered at the DOWNTOWN FRIDAY MARKET from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive. 353-1188. SWERVED performs at 8 p.m. at The Roadhouse, 231 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park. The band also plays at 8 p.m. on Aug. 13. 246-0611.

The Ancient City Con IV, featuring all things sci-fi, fantasy, anime and gaming, is held July 9 and 10 at Hyatt Regency Riverfront, Jacksonville.

MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 31


SATURDAY, AUGUST 13

The SECOND SATURDAY ARTRAGEOUS ART WALK is a selfguided tour featuring the galleries of downtown Fernandina Beach open from 5:30-8 p.m. 277-0717. The JACKSONVILLE ROLLERGIRLS present the River City Rat Pack vs. the Jailbreak Betties and the New Jax City Rollers vs. Capital Punishment at 6:30 p.m. at Skate Station Mandarin, 3461 Kori Road, Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 357-0102. jacksonvillerollergirls.com The Florida Theatre’s Summer Movie Classics series screens Alfred Hitchcock’s REAR WINDOW at 7:30 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. This edgy thriller, starring James Stewart and Grace Kelly, is also screened at 2 p.m. on Aug. 14. Admission is $7.50. 355-2787.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14

THRILL OF A GUN FIGHT and THE HOMEWRECKERS play at 6 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850.

MONDAY, AUGUST 15

SUICIDE SILENCE and ALL SHALL PERISH perform at 8 p.m. at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $13. 398-7496. SOCCER SHOTS Summer Camp, for children ages 3-10, is held from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Mon.-Fri. at Goals Indoor Sports, 23 Panther Lane, Ponte Vedra Beach. Fee is $95. 825-8732.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 16

The JACKSONVILLE SUNS are up against the Mobile BayBears at 7:05 p.m. (Family Feast Night), at 7:05 p.m. on Aug. 17 (Wicked Wednesday & Military Night), at 7:05 p.m. on Aug. 18 (Thursday Night Throwdown), at 7:05 p.m. on Aug. 19 (Family Fireworks), and at 7:05 p.m. on Aug. 20 (last ZOOperstars appearance) at the Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $7.50-$22.50. 358-2846.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17

DERRYCK LAWRENCE PROJECT performs at 6:30 p.m. at Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant, 691 N. First St., Jax Beach. 270-0025.

THE DEAR HUNTER performs at 6 p.m. at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by JIMMY PARRISH & THE OCEAN WAVES BAND from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 18

Museum of Contemporary Jacksonville presents FILM VISIONS OF PARADISE: THREE FILMS ABOUT AMERICAN SELF-TAUGHT ARTISTS at 7 p.m. at the museum’s MOCA Theater, 333 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. The films include “Angel That Stands By Me (Paintings by Minnie Evans),” “Possum Trot (Life and Work of Calvin Black)” and “Grandma’s Bottle Village (The Art of Tressa Prisbrey).” 366-6911. The NORTH BEACHES ART WALK features the galleries of Atlantic and Neptune beaches open from 5-9 p.m. at various venues from Sailfish Drive in Atlantic Beach to Neptune Beach and Town Center. For a list of participating galleries, call 249-2222. CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features Elizabeth & The Grapes of Roth at 7 p.m. under the oaks of Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The free concerts continue every Thurs. through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment.com/sites/concerts-plaza

32 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19

ALISON KRAUSS & UNION STATION perform with JERRY DOUGLAS at 8 p.m. at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340C A1A S., St. Augustine. Tickets are $29.50, $39.50, $49.50 and $69.50. 471-1965. The Jacksonville Humane Society’s TOAST TO THE ANIMALS benefit kicks off at 5 p.m. at the Omni Hotel Jacksonville, 245 Water St. A sampling of more than 100 varieties of wine and beer, hors d’oeuvres and desserts as well as live and silent auctions, are featured. Tickets range from $30-$65. 725-8766. jaxhumane.org Arts & crafts and local produce are offered at the DOWNTOWN FRIDAY MARKET from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive. 353-1188. The Bryan-Gooding Planetarium presents COSMIC CONCERTS at 5, 6, 7 and 8 p.m. at Museum of Science & History, 1035 Museum Circle, Jacksonville. Each concert is $5; $1 for laser glasses. 396-6674. Local rockers ROGER THAT perform at 8 p.m. at The Roadhouse, 231 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park. The band also performs on Aug. 20. 246-0611. The JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS play their first pre-season home game against the ATLANTA FALCONS at 8 p.m. at EverBank Field, 1 EverBank Field Drive, Jacksonville. 633-2000.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20

The Florida Theatre’s Summer Movie Classics series screens John Huston’s THE AFRICAN QUEEN at 7:30 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. This pioneering 1951 film, starring Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn, is also screened at 2 p.m. on Aug. 21. Admission is $7.50. 355-2787.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 21

A SUMMER BEACH RUN is held at 5 p.m. at Sea Walk Pavilion, 11 First St. N., Jax Beach. 731-1900.

St. Cyprian’s Episcopal Church holds candlelight JAZZ VESPERS at 5:30 p.m. on the third Sun. of each month at 37 Lovett St., St. Augustine. 829-8828.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 23

MATISYAHU and TREVOR HALL perform at 7:30 p.m. at the Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 1050 A1A N., Ponte Vedra Beach. Advance tickets are $27.50; $30 day of show. 209-0399.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24

JOHNSTON DUO performs at 6:30 p.m. at Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant, 691 N. First St., Jax Beach. 270-0025.

The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by SMOKIN MIRRORS from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 25

CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA features Triple Rock Blues Band at 7 p.m. under the oaks of Plaza de la Constitución, located between Cathedral Place and King Street, St. Augustine. The free concerts continue through Sept 5. Bring lounge chairs. Alcohol is prohibited. staugustinegovernment.com/sites/ concerts-plaza BLISTUR performs at 8 p.m. at The Roadhouse, 231 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park. 246-0611. The Main Library screens the Fondafest ON GOLDEN POND at 5:45 p.m. at 303 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. 630-2665.


Taking its name for the Spanish word for “joy,” Alegria Cirque du Soleil performs its arena acrobatic show June 29-July 3 at Veterans Memorial Arena.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 26

The SECOND ANNUAL GREAT SOUTHERN TAILGATE COOKOFF takes place today and on Aug. 27 and features barbecue teams from across the country competing for cash, prizes and bragging rights at Main Beach Park, 99 N. Fletcher Ave., Fernandina Beach. gstailgatecookoff.com OUT OF HAND performs at 8 p.m. at The Roadhouse, 231 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park. The band also plays at 8 p.m. on Aug. 27. 246-0611. Arts & crafts and local produce are offered at the DOWNTOWN FRIDAY MARKET from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive. 353-1188. The Comedy Zone presents funny bros SHAWN & MARLON WAYANS at 8 and 10 p.m. at 3130 Hartley Road, Jacksonville. These creators of the “Scary Movie” films also perform at 8 and 10 p.m. on Aug. 27 and at 8 p.m. on Aug. 28. Tickets are $40 and $45. 292-4242.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 27

UPTOWN SATURDAY NIGHT features galleries, antique stores and shops open from 5-9 p.m. in St. Augustine’s San Marco District. 824-3152. The Florida Theatre’s Summer Movie Classics series screens the beloved romantic comedy SABRINA at 7:30 p.m. at 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. This 1954 film, starring Audrey Hepburn, Humphrey Bogart and William Holden, is also screened at 2 p.m. on Aug. 28. Admission is $7.50. 355-2787. FORT MOSE HISTORIC STATE PARK offers a ranger-led guided tour at 11 a.m. at 15 Fort Mose Trail, St. Augustine. 823-2232.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 28

ACOUSTIC NIGHT at Bull Park features music by Mike Shackelford and others at Seventh Street and Ocean Boulevard, Atlantic Beach. 247-5828.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 31

The Music by the Sea free concert series continues with music by TRIPLE ROCK BLUES BAND from 7-9 p.m. at St. Augustine Beach Pier & Pavilion, 350 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. Each week, an area restaurant offers meals for less than $10. The series continues each Wed. through Sept. 28. 471-1686. staugbchcivicassoc.com 

MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 33


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34 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011


Reasons to leave the house this week INDIE ROCK BONNIE “PRINCE” BILLY & THE CAIRO GANG

Since the early ’90s, indie singer-songwriter Will Oldham has chosen to perform under a variety of aliases, but there’s no disguising how his darkly confessional songs have influenced the current crop of indie artists. His most recent endeavor with cohorts Emmet Kelly and Angel Olsen is Bonnie “Prince” Billy & The Cairo Gang, and they perform at a free in-store appearance for Budget Records on Friday, May 27 at 7 p.m. at Push Push Event Hall, 299 San Marco Ave., St. Augustine. The event is all ages, no alcohol. 547-2341.

MUSIC JACKSONVILLE JAZZ FEST

FESTIVAL PALATKA BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL

For nearly two decades, the Jacksonville Jazz Festival has been bringing legendary icons and up-andcoming musical hotshots to Northeast Florida, and this year’s lineup honors that tradition. The fest is held May 26-29 at various venues in downtown Jacksonville and features artists like Herbie Hancock, McCoy Tyner, Natalie Cole, Global Noize, Mavis Staples, Rebirth Brass Band, the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra featuring Dianne Schuur and the John Pizarrelli Quartet with the UNF Jazz Ensemble I, as well as local players ranging from Von Barlow’s Jazz Journey to Tropic of Cancer. The festival kicks off with the Jacksonville Jazz Piano Competition at 7 p.m. on May 26 at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. The annual competition features five finalists dueling it out for a cash prize and a chance to perform at the festival. 355-2787. For a full list of scheduled performers, check out jaxjazzfest.com. 630-2489.

The 23rd annual Blue Crab Festival is held May 26-30 in downtown Palatka and offers a weekend of delectable crustaceans along with arts and crafts, helicopter rides, a beauty pageant, a charity duck race, a chainsaw artist and live music by the likes of Amy Dalley, Bill “The Sauce Boss” Wharton, Blistur, The Red River Band and others. (386) 325-4406. bluecrabfestival.com

PUNKS (RE)UNITE! FACE TO FACE

When punk rock bands reunite, is it a matter of hypocrisy, rock and roll irony, humility or all of the above? Whatever the answer, SoCal punks Face To Face deserve a free pass. After calling it quits in ’04 over (what else?) “musical differences,” the slam pit faves wound up working with acts ranging from Me First & the Gimme Gimmes to The Offspring. But even in the fickle world of punk rock, absence makes the tattooed heart grow fonder, as the reformed band is currently touring in support of its latest release, “Laugh Now … Laugh Later.” They perform along with Strung Out, Blitzkid and The Darlings on Monday, May 30 at 8 p.m. at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $20. 246-2473.

FRIDAY, MAY 27

FOOD

BITE CLUB

Folio Weekly’s Bite Club offers free tastings at Northeast Florida’s most innovative resta -urants. Events are open to registered Bite Club members (selected for each event by answering essential foodie trivia) and are hosted by food blogger Caron Streibich. The next tasting is held on Friday, May 27 at Uptown Market, 1303 N. Main St., Jacksonville. To sign up for future tastings, or just to learn what Bite Club is all about, check out fwbiteclub.com. 280-7766.

BILL MAHER

Whether you sing his praises or damn him to blazes, you gotta give comedian Bill Maher props for weathering pop culture trends. The Emmy award-winning host of HBO’s “Real Time with Bill Maher” has parlayed his gift of gab and cutting satire into a successful career that has virtually reinvented the talk show format, and annoyed conservative zealots and godless heathens in equal measure. He performs on May 27 at 8 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets are $48 and $50. 355-2787. MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 35


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Your body is a wasteland: Paul Bettany gets in shape with the “20 Minute Post-Apocalyptic Workout” in the futuristic vampire flick, “Priest.”

Tooth or Dare

Paul Bettany and Maggie Q save the vampire flick “Priest” from genre overload Priest **G@Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd.

S

©

andwiched with an opening date between “Thor” and “Pirates of the Caribbean,” the new film “Priest” incorporates elements of just about every genre imaginable in a desperate attempt to hook potential viewers. The movie has vampires, renegade warrior-priests, revved-up cycles, guns, blades and gore. The setting is like a postapocalyptic Western where folks outside the Blade-Runner-inspired urban world ride horses 2011 and homestead farms. Naturally, it’s also in 3-D. Like the underwhelming “Dylan Dog” of three weeks earlier, “Priest” is based on a series of graphic novels with an international origin, in this case Korean instead of Italian — a curious-enough pedigree given the likes of the X-Men, Captain America and Green Lantern who (like Thor) will each be representing the good ol’ USA comic book heroes later this summer. No spandex or superpowers for Priest, though. He dresses like a monk and kills like Clint Eastwood of the spaghetti Westerns, except that his weapons of choice include all kinds of neat knives, swords and sharpened crosses. Like steely-eyed Clint, the Priest is also another Man With No Name. © 2011The film stars Paul Bettany as the brownrobed antihero, reteaming the actor with director Scott Stewart of last year’s “Legion,” a dopey flick in which Bettany played a pistolpacking Archangel Michael in opposition to the forces of the Apocalypse. At the outset, “Priest” might seem to be more of the same, and the basic premise (as well as much of the plot) is undeniably silly, just short in fact of the utter stupidity of “Legion.” Nonetheless, the new film manages to rise above the nonsense, due in large part to its likable cast and the oddball but appealing mix of genres. “Priest” opens with an animated prologue, which sets the historical background for the conflict. The history of the world, it turns out, is marked by the battle between humans and vampires. The latter were getting the upper hand when the Church rolled out its secret weapon, a select cadre of priests trained to kill the bloodsuckers with ruthless efficiency and martial skills beyond the powers and

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36 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011

abilities of normal men and women. Having all but eliminated the vampire threat, the priests were then disbanded, and assimilated into the everyday workforce, lest they remind the general populace of the horrors they had destroyed. That’s all fine and good, according to the titular head of the Church, Monsignor Orelas (Christopher Plummer). The surviving priests are merely relics of an unpleasant past. But when the vampire menace resurfaces, one priest (Bettany) goes rogue, defying the commands of his superiors to rescue his niece who has been taken hostage by the bloodsuckers. The Church sends a posse, headed by a priestess (the marvelous Maggie Q) in pursuit, but pretty soon we discover where her real loyalties lie. Together with the tough young Sheriff Hicks (Cam Gigandet), the two priests move to confront resurgent vampires and their mysterious leader Black Hat (Karl Urban), a being with bloody vengeance in his heart and undreamed power in his control. His headquarters are in an ironclad train racing toward the city like an unchecked Trojan horse of doom. Not to be confused with the romantic and/ or sinister creatures of “Dracula,” “True Blood” or “Twilight,” the vampires in “Priest” are blind, slavering beasts in the mold of the computer game “Doom,” themselves appropriately enough computer-generated like most of the background and action in the film. In this regard, “Priest” bears more than a passing resemblance to “Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow” (2004). While the earlier film’s novelty (for the time) was its digitally enhanced background, what saved it was the appealing cast of Jude Law, Angelina Jolie and Gwyneth Paltrow. In much the same way, Paul Bettany and Maggie Q rise above the predictability of the computer monsters and the silliness of “Priest,” mostly on the sheer power of their physical presence. To a lesser degree, the same is true of Karl Urban’s villainous performance. Next to them, the blustery Cam Gigandet comes across like a misplaced surfer dude. Whether or not “Priest,” like the “Resident Evil” flicks, will spawn its intended franchise, Paul Bettany and Maggie Q are fun to watch as we bide our time waiting for more traditional superheroes to take a bite out of the summer box office.  Pat McLeod themail@folioweekly.com


Vow of Stupidity

“Bridesmaids” is a shotgun wedding of raunchy jokes and feeble sentiment Bridesmaids

*G@@ Rated R • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd.

P

rogress! Hollywood has recognized women’s comedic value! If you’ve had it up to here with movies about disgusting, crude dudes and it’s extra funny cuz they’re fat, behold: “Bridesmaids” features not one but two overweight women who’ll gross you out with their flab, sexual desires, farts, inability to recognize others’ personal space and more revolting things that are doubly hilarious coming from fatties! But wait! There’s more! Let there be projectile vomiting as an expression of emotional upset! Let there be explosive diarrhea! Let there be outrageous public intoxication, sexual degradation and physical humiliations! Because, apparently, that’s the only way comedies can depict the inner turmoil of friendships changing, jealous feelings and other terrible secret things we all experience yet find it tough to talk about. “Bridesmaids” is happy to be graphic about stuff that doesn’t matter — except it makes us go “Ewwww!” — and demur about stuff it should be graphic about. Like how much fun Kristen Wiig’s Annie has with her “bed buddy,” Jon Hamm’s Ted, an assh*le who treats her terribly (in cleverly satirical and genuinely humorous ways because they’re slightly exaggerated). While the film’s quite content to offer unfettered looks at women in pain — vomiting their guts out, smashed out of their skulls and embarrassing themselves with intoxicated public antics — it can’t give us an unvarnished look at female sexual pleasure. The best thing I can say about “Bridesmaids” is that it does take a few baby steps in some good directions, but distractedly wanders off course too often to be satisfying. The distractions are infuriating, because the kernels of a truly smart, truly honest, truly brilliant movie are here, but they’re lost in what’s now a standard Hollywood humiliation comedy. Annie’s best friend, Lillian (Maya Rudolph),

is getting married and Annie’s maid of honor, but now she has to contend with pathetic Helen (Rose Byrne), who’s trying to grab her best-friend status, and Megan (Melissa McCarthy), sister-in-law-to-be, who’s fat and therefore amusing when she farts or expresses sexual interest in a man, and other assorted “characters.” I use characters in the pejorative sense: two bridesmaids disappear halfway through the film, proving they were merely a setup for an unfunny punch line, rather than real characters in the story. Much of the rest of the film, as Annie copes with all the nonsense that goes along with planning a big wedding, feels like overlong “SNL” sketches haphazardly thrown together (the script is by Wiig and fellow Groundlings comic Annie Mumolo, first-timers both). There’s no way in hell a movie like this should be longer than two hours, and it’s painfully clear where time is wasted. There are some lovely bits that are almost profoundly honest and funny: Opening scenes establishing Annie’s and Lillian’s friendship are sharply realized, capturing women’s relationships perfectly. Equally sweet is Annie’s nascent romance with nice cop Nathan (Chris O’Dowd), thrown in her path as a romantic foil. There’s even a sly “Brady Bunch” joke so precisely apropos, it’s sheer genius. I imagine the smart, witty, grownup stuff originally in the movie was vetoed after some studio exec pointed out that every instance of unwanted bodily fluids shown in current comedies adds $10 million to the box office. The modern gross-out comedy is practically defined by being 90 minutes of mortification, inviting us to laugh at the protagonists, followed by a finale that suddenly turns sentimental and wants us to feel sympathy toward those we’ve been watching get pummeled. But that disconnect and the wild shifts in tone have never felt more bizarre than they do in “Bridesmaids,” because they’ve never felt more calculated. And the piling on of the raunch tarnishes the good stuff so badly, it’s hard to be sympathetic to any of it.  Mary Ann Johanson themail@folioweekly.com

Chick Flick for Sickos: Maya Rudolph (far right), Kristen Wiig (center) and the rest of the cast prepare for their next matrimonially driven flatulence joke in the crude comedy “Bridesmaids.”

MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 37


Priced to move: Will Ferrell stars in the quirky drama “Everything Must Go,” a film based on Raymond Carver’s short story “Why Don’t You Dance?”

AREA THEATERS

AMELIA ISLAND Carmike Amelia Island 7, 1132 S. 14th St., 261-9867 ARLINGTON & REGENCY AMC Regency 24, 9451 Regency Square Blvd., 264-3888 BAYMEADOWS & MANDARIN Regal Avenues 20, 9525 Philips Highway, 538-3889 BEACHES Regal Beach Blvd. 18, 14051 Beach Blvd., 992-4398 FIVE POINTS 5 Points Theatre, 1028 Park St., 359-0047 NORTHSIDE Hollywood River City 14, River City Marketplace, 12884 City Center Blvd., 757-9880

FILM RATINGS **** ***@ **@@ *@@@

MEXICAN RADIO UNDERGROUND RADIO HAM RADIO TALK RADIO

NOW SHOWING AFRICAN CATS **@@ Rated G • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Cinemark Tinseltown Samuel L. Jackson narrates this documentary exploring the lives of a pride of lions during a two-year period in the Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya. BRIDESMAIDS *G@@ Rated R • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. Reviewed in this issue. EVERYTHING MUST GO **@@ Rated R • Cinemark Tinseltown, Regal Beach Blvd. Based on a short story by Raymond Carver, Will Ferrell and Laura Dern star in this film about an alcoholic who tries to hit the “restart” button on his life. FAST FIVE *G@@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square,

38 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011

ORANGE PARK AMC Orange Park 24, 1910 Wells Road, (888) AMC-4FUN Carmike Fleming Island 12, 1820 Town Center Blvd., 621-0221 SAN MARCO San Marco Theatre, 1996 San Marco Blvd., 396-4845 SOUTHSIDE Cinemark Tinseltown, 4535 Southside Blvd., 998-2122 ST. AUGUSTINE Epic Theatres, 112 Theatre Drive, 797-5757 IMAX Theater, World Golf Village, 940-IMAX Pot Belly’s, 36 Granada St., 829-3101

Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. Vin Diesel, Paul Walker and Dwayne Johnson star in the latest installment of the popular car-driven series that spins out into predictable action-flick fare. HANNA **** Rated PG-13 • AMC Regency Square A captivating and innovative thriller about a young girl (an impressive Saoirse Ronan) trained to be a lethal assassin by her special agent father (Eric Bana). HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS. EVIL **@@ Rated PG • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Cinemark Tinseltown, Regal Avenues Hayden Panettiere, Amy Poehler, Bill Hader and Glenn Close lend their voices to the latest installment of this humorous, animated 21st Century update on Little Red Riding Hood. INSIDIOUS **@@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Regal Avenues Patrick Wilson and Rose Byrne star in this supernatural thriller that gives big chills up to the halfway point, when “Saw” filmmakers James Wan and Leigh Wannell submit to fear and fall back on tried-and-true (and tired) formulaic scares. JANE EYRE **@@ Rated PG-13 • 5 Points Theatre Director Cary Fukunaga’s staid take on Charlotte Brönte’s gothic love story stars Mia Waskikowska and Michael Fassbender.


JUMPING THE BROOM **@@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. Paula Patton, Laz Alonso (“Avatar”) and Angela Bassett star in this rom-com about a young corporate lawyer whose upper-class family questions her choice of a bluecollar fiancé. MADEA’S BIG HAPPY FAMILY **@@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. Loretta Devine, Shad “Bow Wow” Moss and Cassi Davis star in this latest ensemble-driven family comedy/drama from Tyler Perry. PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES **@@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. This latest (and rumored to be last) in the popular swashbuckling series has Capt. Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) joining forces with Blackbeard (Ian McShane) and daughter Angelica (Penelope Cruz) to find the legendary Fountain of Youth. Also starring: Geoffrey Rush and the Rogue King himself, Keith Richards! PRIEST **G@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. Reviewed in this issue. PROM **@@ Rated PG • Regal Avenues This teen comedy is about kids (Aimee Teegarden, Siu Yin Chang and Thomas McDowell) navigating the biggest social event of the year, Prom Night.

City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd., San Marco Theatre Kenneth Branagh’s winning adaptation of Norse mythology by way of Marvel Comics is a thunderous affair, featuring Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman, Anthony Hopkins and Tom Hiddleston. WATER FOR ELEPHANTS **@@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. This adaptation of Sara Gruen’s novel stars Robert Pattinson and Reese Witherspoon as a couple who find romance and danger in a traveling circus.

OTHER FILMS AIRPLANE! We have clearance, Clarence. Movies at Main presents the spoof that begat all other spoofs at 5:45 p.m. on May 26 at Main Library’s Hicks Auditorium, 303 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. Admission is free. 630-2366. MOONLIGHT MOVIES The city of Jacksonville Beach continues its Moonlight Movies Series with “Spider-Man,” screened at 9 p.m. on May 27 at Sea Walk Pavilion, located on First Street at the ocean in Jax Beach. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. Admission is free. 247-6100 ext. 3. TOY STORY This animated classic is shown at 10:15 a.m. on May 27 at Anastasia Branch Library, 6670 U.S. 1 S., St. Augustine. Kids may bring sippy cups and stuffed toys or blankies. 209-3730. THE THINGS THAT MAKE FOR PEACE Memorial Presbyterian Church concludes its May film festival with “Soldier of Conscience” at 7:30 p.m. on May 28 at its Fellowship Hall, 32 Sevilla St., St. Augustine. A discussion follows each film. 829-6451.

POT BELLY’S CINEMA “Just Go With It,” “Of Gods and Men,” “Limitless” and “The Lincoln Lawyer” are shown at Pot Belly’s, 36 Granada St., St. Augustine. 829-3101. 5 POINTS THEATRE “Jane Eyre” screens at 4 and 9:15 p.m. on May 24, at 4:45, 7 and 9:15 p.m. on May 25 and at 4 p.m. on May 26 at 5 Points Theatre, 1028 Park St., Jacksonville. 359-0047. WGHOF IMAX THEATER ”Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides 3D” is screened along with “Born To Be Wild 3D,” “The Ultimate Wave Tahiti 3D” (featuring Kelly Slater), “Hubble 3D” and “Under The Sea 3D,” at World Golf Hall of Fame Village, 1 World Golf Place, Exit 323 off I-95, St. Augustine. 940-IMAX. worldgolfimax.com

NEW ON DVD & BLU-RAY THE MECHANIC Let the Charles Bronson revival start here! Jason Statham and Ben Foster star in this needless but watchable remake of the 1972 Bronson classic about a hired assassin who “fixes” people. Get it? THE RITE Good versus evil in this supernatural horror flick starring Anthony Hopkins and Colin O’Donoghue as two priests who have one helluva time battling demonic possession. THE ROOMMATE The rent’s too damn high! Leighton Meister stars as a psychotic college freshman with a lethal fixation on her new roommate. It was enjoyable the first time around, when it was called “Single White Female.” BUDRUS Julia Bacha’s engaging documentary chronicles a group of Israeli and Palestinian citizens as they contend with a barrier erected in the remote village of Budrus. 

RAMMBOCK: BERLIN UNDEAD ***G Rated R • AMC Orange Park A feel-good zombie movie? Sure. In German with English subtitles. RIO **@@ Rated G • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. This birdbrained animated flick coasts along on the star power of its cast (featuring the voices of Jesse Eisenberg and Anne Hathaway), but its unoriginal story keeps it caged in clichéd family fare. SOMETHING BORROWED *@@@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. Discerning moviegoers won’t feel like losing 90 minutes of their lived to this silly, banal rom-com starring Ginnifer Goodwin, Kate Hudson and Josh Krazinski (“The Office”). SOUL SURFER **@@ Rated PG • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. True-life story of surfer girl Bethany Hamilton (AnnaSophia Robb) and her fight for survival after a vicious shark attack off the coast of the Hawaiian island of Kauai. SOURCE CODE **@@ Rated PG-13 • Regal Avenues Jake Gyllenhaal and Michelle Monaghan star in an overwrought sci-fi flick about time travel and amnesia, programmed to be forgotten immediately after viewing. THOR ***@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River

“Now, the Southwestern African red-billed Witoto finch!” And on the third day, prisoners Johnny Depp and Kevin R. McNally realize that playing “Birdcalls of the World” is no way to serve hard time in the swashbuckling action romp, “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides.”

MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 39


Top Gear: The Western Maryland-based heavy rockers Clutch.

CLUTCH with MAYLENE & THE SONS OF DISASTER and GROUNDSCORE Thursday, May 26 at 7 p.m. Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach Tickets are $17 246-2473

M

aryland hard-rock quartet Clutch harkens to a simpler time in American music, when riffs were heavy, speakers were loud and image was the last thing bands thought about “managing.” Over the course of 21 years, nine full-lengths, five live releases, three EPs and two rarity compilations, Clutch has explored every corner of heavy metal, blues, punk, prog, funk and stoner rock — all while maintaining the same four-man lineup, the same home base and the same regular-guy persona the band started with in 1990. Folio Weekly recently chatted with lead singer Neil Fallon about cutting out the middleman, tried-and-true methods of success and not selling out. Folio Weekly: I really liked a quote in Clutch’s bio: “If you’re not learning, then you’re retiring.” How have you kept things fresh? Neil Fallon: It’s all about listening to music. It’s fairly easy to do. And I’m not just talking about rock ‘n’ roll, either. There’s always plenty of room for improvement. And it’s not digging ditches, you know? Music’s actually a lot of fun.

40 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011

F.W.: Having been signed to a variety of labels, how satisfying was it to release your latest album (“Strange Cousins From The West”) on the band’s own Weathermaker Music imprint?

N.F.: It was great. You hear a lot about how difficult it is to sell music these days. But for bands like us that have a very dedicated niche audience, it’s much easier to cut out the middleman and sell directly to the fan. It’s a more honest approach; we’re not kidding ourselves thinking that we’re going to press a million of the next record. We know that’s not going to happen. That’s not why we’re in this

“To make a living in the creative arts, sometimes you have to make a buck. I don’t think there’s any shame in that.” — we’re in this because we like making music, and if we can have a more honest business approach, it works out better for everybody. F.W.: Is your live performance more important than the recorded output? N.F.: Ultimately, the live performance is what it’s all about. Even vinyl records are a new invention; live music’s been around for tens of thousands of years, and I think the transience of it, the experience of seeing something that will never happen again, is what makes it so thrilling. I’d much rather be known as a great live band than a great band on record. F.W.: Nearly every one of Clutch’s nine albums has been recorded at home in Maryland. How

tied are you guys to the Old Line State? N.F.: We all still live in Maryland — well, [guitarist] Tim [Sult] lives in West Virginia, but not too far over the border. We all went to high school together, and we were lucky because there was a great music scene in D.C., a good one in Baltimore, and if you really wanted to, you could drive four hours north to New York. At the same time, it wasn’t so inundated that you got cross-contaminated like in major cities, where you can get lost in the shuffle much easier. I saw some great shows growing up: Fugazi, Bad Brains, countless hardcore and punk rock shows. Tim and [drummer] Jean-Paul [Gaster] were definitely more inclined to go to metal shows, and they saw some great ones, too. We were very lucky to have the old 9:30 Club in D.C. F.W.: Licensing your music to video games, TV shows and movies surely helped you survive. Has there ever been debate about whether that constitutes selling out? N.F.: There are plenty of things we’ve turned down that no one knows about. But to make a living in the creative arts, sometimes you have to make a buck. I don’t think there’s any shame in that. The selling-out argument usually comes from people who are not making a living in the creative arts; they’re working a 9-5 and they can sit on a pedestal and say, “Well, if I were you, I wouldn’t have done that.” But you can’t really say that when you’re looking at paying a bill. You can’t say to your landlord, “I just wrote this awesome riff yesterday. Will that suffice?”  Nick McGregor themail@folioweekly.com


Spiral Stares: Will Oldham is Bonnie “Prince” Billy, performing with The Cairo Gang at a free St. Augustine gig.

The Billy Club

Singer-songwriter Will Oldham brings his confessional style to a free in-store appearance BONNIE “PRINCE” BILLY & THE CAIRO GANG Friday, May 27 at 7 p.m. Budget Records “In-Store” at Push Push Event Hall, 299 San Marco Ave., St. Augustine 547-2341

W

hat elevates a musician from being merely successful to undeniably iconic? A prolific body of work released under a dizzying array of nom de guerre? A thriving cinematic career? A flattering New Yorker profile (http://nyr.kr/fyv)? An unflinching dedication to noble goals? If so, Louisville, Ky., native Will Oldham is a bona fide American icon. Over the last 18 years, he has released 20 fulllengths and scads of singles full of haunting Appalachian folk and alt-country under a half-dozen names, ranging from Palace Brothers and Palace Songs to Bonnie “Prince” Billy, Bonnie Billy and The Continental OP. Since 1987, he’s appeared in 15 movies and TV shows — everything from indie favorites like “Matewan” to mainstream hits like “Jackass 3D.” But as Oldham recently told Folio Weekly, he’s always trying to remove as many commercial trappings as possible from his music. Hence, Bonnie “Prince” Billy & The Cairo Gang’s upcoming Free Florida tour, which places the trio of Oldham, Emmett Kelly and Angel Olsen performing for free at seven record stores across the Sunshine State.

Folio Weekly: Did [record label] Drag City talk you into this Free Florida in-store performance thing? Will Oldham: No, it was my idea. [Laughs.] These shows don’t make as much sense financially, but it’s nice to stretch out and feel the vibe of most folks in the room. Nobody’s got anything on the line except for their time. F.W.: Yet you put a lot on the line with one of your recent releases, the “Island Brothers” 10-inch, which raised money for earthquake relief in Haiti. W.O.: Emmett Kelly of The Cairo Gang and I were going out on the road, and we wanted to add some songs, so we were thinking how or why should we release them? Around that time, I became acquainted with EDGE OUTREACH, which is based in Louisville and

has a presence in Haiti providing manageable water purification systems. The earthquake of course made that a far more urgent need, so it became a very nice way to not pretend to be anything but somewhat selfish. I put a high value on community — it helps me feel sane and strong and connected — and to be able to draw a direct line from the music that we make to this organization based in Louisville down to Haiti was great.

© 2011

F.W.: Why the pseudonyms? W.O.: I came to music thinking about acting, without knowing what it was to be a recording artist. I liked the idea of separating things by the group of songs or by the effort, rather than by those that make the effort. To do that, you change the names to reflect the different people who are involved. F.W.: Do you have any memories from your past trips to Florida? W.O.: This will be a significant trip, because I’ve never successfully gotten a show south of Tampa. I remember once playing in Orlando, and a guy took the Greyhound from Miami to see the show. He said late one night, his father had called him and told him he was seeing something on television that he thought his son would like, and it turned out that it was a music video for [my] song “Horses.” He did like it, and it got him excited, so through his father, through this video, he was down in Miami and made this connection: “I wanna go see more of this music.” It was tremendously exciting, and illustrates a lot of the reasons for getting involved with this kind of work at all. F.W.: Is a free in-store your idea of a perfect show? W.O.: It’s nice to do this every once in a while, because we get to just play music, and people get to [just] hear music. Ideally, it’s the maximum sort of intangible exchange, which is what we like to think music is about anyway — people playing and singing, which travels through the air, through the sensory receptors, into the brains and hearts of other people. That’s what we get to do on this trip, so yeah, I can’t wait.  Nick McGregor themail@folioweekly.com MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 41


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CONCERTS THIS WEEK

JACKSON BROWNE Legendary songwriter Browne performs at 8 p.m. on May 24 at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $41-$66. 355-2787. VAMPIRATES Fiendish punks Vampirates perform at 8 p.m. on May 24 at Shantytown Pub, 22 W. Sixth St., Jacksonville. Admission is $3. 798-8222. ROBERT LESTER FOLSOM This local psych legend performs at 8 p.m. at May 24 at Dos Gatos, 123 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. 354-0666. DERRYCK LAWRENCE PROJECT These funky local rockers perform at 6:30 p.m. on May 25 at Casa Marina Hotel & Restaurant, 691 N. First St., Jax Beach. 270-0025. POKADOT CADAVER, NORTHE, HOLIDAZED, FINISH IT OFF, AUDZIO, CHEEZY T The local punk and modern rock bands play at 7 p.m. on May 25 at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. GIRLZ GIRLZ GIRLZ The Alive After Five series presents these ’80s-style rockers at 5 p.m. on May 26 at The Markets at St. Johns Town Center, 4850 Big Island Drive, Jacksonville. 998-7156. NATE HOLLEY Local fave Holley performs at 7 p.m. on May 26 at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Jacksonville. 365-5555. ONE NIGHT STAND Ironically, these local rockers play nightly at 8 p.m. on May 26, 27 and 28 at Cliff’s Bar & Grill, 3033 Monument Road, Ste. 2, Jacksonville. 645-5162. CLUTCH, MAYLENE & THE SONS OF DISASTER, GROUNDSCARE The heavy rock kicks off at 8 p.m. on May 26 at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $17. 246-2473. BLISTUR These area rockers perform at 8 p.m. on May 26 at The Roadhouse, 231 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park. 246-0611. BROWN BAG SPECIAL These jam band faves perform at 8 p.m. on May 26 at Dog Star Tavern, 10 N. Second St., Fernandina Beach. 277-8010. ARIANA HALL, DEL SUGGS, LARRY MANGUM These folk acts perform at 8 p.m. on May 26 at European Street CafÊ, 1704 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $11. 399-1740. PALATKA BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL with AMY DALLEY,

BLISTUR, QUIK DRAW, BILL WHARTON “THE SAUCE BOSSâ€? THE LEE BOYS, OUT OF HAND, THUNDERFOOT This three-day festival of food, arts and live music showcases bands May 27-30 in downtown Palatka along the riverfront and St. Johns Avenue. (386) 325-4406. For a full list of performers and showtimes, visit bluecrabfestival.com BONNIE “PRINCEâ€? BILLY & THE CAIRO GANG These indie rock faves perform at 7 p.m. on May 27 at Push Push Event Hall, 299 San Marco Ave., St. Augustine. 547-2341. THE BENN This eclectic acoustic act performs at 7 p.m. on May 27 at Three Layers Cafe, 1602 Walnut St., Jacksonville. 355-9791. HED PE, MUSHROOMHEAD, STAYNE THEE ANGEL, LIVICATION This night of aggro metal kicks off at 7 p.m. on May 27 at Plush, 845 University Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $15 and $20. 734-1845. TAPROOT, MANNA ZEN, BLEEDING THE STEREO, MINDSLIP, SHOTGUN HARBOUR Heavy rockers Taproot storm the stage at 7 p.m. on May 27 at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. THE MOSQUITOS These rockers buzz onstage at 8 p.m. on May 27 at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Jacksonville. 365-5555. SPANKY THE BAND These local rockers slap out some jams at 8 p.m. on May 27 at Wild Wing CafĂŠ, 4555 Southside Blvd., Jacksonville. 998-9464. AMY HENDRICKSON & THE PRIME DIRECTIVE The local faves play at 8 p.m. on May 27 at Dog Star Tavern, 10 N. Second St., Fernandina Beach. 277-8010. WEST END MEMORIAL TRIBUTE TO ARMED FORCES Downtown Blues Bar & Grille present live music in honor of our armed forces nightly at 8 p.m. on May 27-30 at 714 St. Johns Ave., Palatka. (386) 325-5454. SWERVED These local rockers careen onto stage at 8 p.m. on May 27 and 28 at The Roadhouse, 231 Blanding Blvd., Orange Park. 246-0611. SIDEREAL, CRAZY CARLS, TASTE BUDS, MATT HENDERSON The local rockers play at 8 p.m. on May 27 at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $8. 246-2473. GENERAL TSO’S FURY, TEFLON DON, OPERATION HENNESSEY, POOR RICHARDS, WAITING ON BRIAN Punk and ska kick off at 8 p.m. May 27 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $8. 398-7496.

RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET WestJax Ensemble performs at 10:30 a.m., Navy Band Southeast at 11:45 a.m. and Morton Perry Band at 1:30 p.m. on May 28 at Riverside Arts Market, under the Fuller Warren Bridge at Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville. 554-6865. YOUNG BUCK The former G-Unit rapper performs at 7 p.m. on May 28 at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $20. 223-9850. LAUREN FINCHAM This popular area songwriter takes the stage at 7 p.m. on May 28 at Three Layers Cafe, 1602 Walnut St., Jacksonville. 355-9791. THE FRITZ These jam band faves play at 8 p.m. on May 28 at Dog Star Tavern, 10 N. Second St., Fernandina Beach. 277-8010. FOXY SHAZAM, PETER PEPPER, SPEAKING IN CURSIVE Cincinnati hard-rockers Foxy Shazam perform at 8 p.m. on May 28 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $10. 398-7496. SUGARBEAR This sweet area act performs at 8 p.m. on May 28 at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Jacksonville. 365-5555. LIFT These local rockers play at 9 p.m. on May 28 at My Place Bar & Grill, 9550 Baymeadows, Jacksonville. 737-5299. JAZZ FEST After-Party FREAK OUT with KEITH ANSEL Burro Bar hosts this post-Jazz Fest chillax and/or freak out session at 9 p.m. on May 28 at 100 E. Adams St., Jacksonville. 353-4692. FUSEBOX FUNK, NATE HOLLEY This night of local funky flavors kicks off at 10:15 p.m. on May 28 at Mojo Kitchen, 1500 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach. Tickets are $15; $20 for ages 18-20. 247-6636. GOLIATH FLORES The multi-instrumentalist plays at 1 p.m. on May 29 at Three Layers Cafe, 1602 Walnut St., Jacksonville. 355-9791. TITLE FIGHT, TOUCHE AMORE, MENZINGERS, DEAD END PATH, SWEAR JAR This night of HC and thrash kicks off at 7 p.m. on May 29 at Unit 6, 1890 Wambolt St., Jacksonville. Admission is $12. unit6.tumblr.com MILK BAR REUNION 2011 Gray-haired New Wavers and middle-aged GenX types get sloppy and nostalgic at 8 p.m. on May 29 at The Pearl, 1101 N. Main St., Jacksonville. Admission is $10. 791-4499. LEO & THE SUN, SACK THE CITY, ALL DAY ALL NIGHT, CARRIDALE Indie hijinks kick off at 8 p.m. on May 29 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are

VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

May 26 Deron Baker May 27 & 28 The Mix

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“Join us for Blues, Rock & Funk�

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Maylene & the SonS of DiSaSter GrounDScare FRIDAY MAY 27

SIDEREAL/CRAZY CARLS Taste Buds/Matt Henderson SATURDAY MAY 28

Quasi Mojo and guests SUNDAY MAY 29

Mishka/anuhea Bubbly Joe/Whetherman MONDAY MAY 30

FACE TO FACE STRUNG OUT Blitzkid / the darlings FRIDAY JUNE 3

TEN WEST (featuring Niki Dawson of NBC’s The Voice)

DANCELL/ONE LESS ATLANTIC Ark HArbor/NortHe SATURDAY JUNE 4

Wasted talent/Prideless FRIDAY JUNE 10

Blue Dogs SATURDAY JUNE 11

First Coast Friends of Funk - CD Release Party -

VVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

The Best Live Music in St. Augustine!

FreebirdLive.com 200 N. 1st St., Jax Beach, FL • 904.246.BIRD (2473) THURSDAY MAY 26

FRIDAY JUNE 17

Mon-

TuesWedThursFri-

SatSun-

OPEN MEMORIA L DAY!

Mens Night Out Beer Pong 9pm $1 Draft $5 Pitchers Free Pool ALL U CAN EAT CRABLEGS Texas Hold ’Em STARTS AT 7 P.M.

All U Can Eat Wings KIDS EAT FREE FROM 5 P.M. TO 9 P.M. HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT Country Night w/ Supernatural BASS TOURNAMENT 4-8P.M. Full Blown Monkey 1/2 PRICE APPS-FRI (BAR ONLY) 4-7PM ACOUSTIC AFTERNOONS 5-9 P.M. Full Blown Monkey ACOUSTIC AFTERNOONS 5-9 P.M. Rezolution REGGAE SUNDAYS 5PM-9PM

Skinny Records Showcase SATURDAY JUNE 18

Beach Blast with

KYMYSTRY

Rosco cain/a1a noRth SATURDAY JUNE 25

ZACH DEPUTY & gUEsTs FRIDAY JULY 1

APPETITE FOR DESTRUCTION (Guns N Roses tribute)

HoRNit SATURDAY JULY 2

COREY SMITH Matt Still SUNDAY JULY 3

Alternative Legends

PSYCHEDELIC FURS (2 sets with Talk Talk Talk and all the hits) UPCOMING SHOWS 7-9:   U2 by UV (U2 tribute) 7-16:  Bobby Lee Rodgers 7-22:  We the Kings/Summer Set/ Hot Chaelle Rae 7-23:  Tribal Seeds/Seedless 7-29:  Frontiers (Journey Tribute) 7-30:  Donavon Frankenreiter 8-1:   10 Years 9-17:  Reverend Horton Heat/ Supersuckers

MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 43

VVVVVVVVVVVVVVV


$8. 398-7496. TROPIC OF CANCER These popular local instrumentalists perform at 9 p.m. on May 29 at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Jacksonville. 353-4692. COOKOUT & BLOCK PARTY with WILLIE EVANS JR., TOUGH JUNKIE, ARSUN F!ST, MAS APPEAL, LMG, D.A.R.R.Y.L., THE I GIVE New clothing boutique Icon kicks it off in style with a barbecue and live music from noon-6 p.m. and a Lyricist Hour at 7 p.m. on May 29 at 108 E. Adams St. The boutique also hosts music at 4 p.m. next door at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Jacksonville. 683-8914. PEACEMAKER, THICK AS BLOOD, MARAUDER, RHYTHM OF FEAR, WORN OUT These heavy hitters play at 6 p.m. on May 30 at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. FACE TO FACE, STRUNGOUT, BLITZKID, THE DARLINGS Hardcore heroes Face to Face play at 8 p.m. on May 30 at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $20. 246-2473. CHROMA Jams of many colors are produced starting at 8 p.m. on May 30 at Dog Star Tavern, 10 N. Second St., Fernandina Beach. 277-8010. COMBICHRIST, IVARDEN SPHERE, DEADSTAR ASSEMBLY, STAR KILLER This night of non-mellow music begins promptly at 8 p.m. on May 30 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $15. 398-7496. BRAD VICKERS & HIS VESTAPOLITANS The rootsy rockers perform at 5:30 p.m. on May 31 at Aloft Tapestry Park, 4812 Deer Lake Drive W., Jacksonville. 428-1281. COME WHAT MAY, SECOND THIEF These indie acts play at 8 p.m. on May 31 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $8. 398-7496.

VAINS OF JENNA June 11, Brewster’s Pit JUNIP, KATIE HELOW, ANTIQUE ANIMALS June 13, 5 Points Theatre ACOUSTIC ALCHEMY June 15, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall SOL DRIVEN TRAIN June 16, Mojo Kitchen KEITH URBAN June 17, Veterans Memorial Arena KYMYSTRY, ROSCO CAINE June 18, Freebird Live MILE TRAIN, ROCCO BLU June 18, Mojo Kitchen OTEP, BLACK GUARD, SISTER SIN, DYSTROPHY, ONE-EYED DOLL June 24, Brewster’s Pit YELLOWCARD, RUNNER RUNNER June 25, Mavericks Rock N’ Honky Tonk Concert Hall ZACH DEPUTY June 25, Freebird Live APPETITE FOR DESTRUCTION (Guns N Roses tribute) July 1, Freebird Live COREY SMITH July 2, Freebird Live PSYCHEDELIC FURS July 3, Freebird Live CHRIS THOMAS KING July 16, Mojo Kitchen WIZ KHALIFA July 17, St. Augustine Amphitheatre TOBY KEITH, AARON LEWIS July 21, St. Augustine Amphitheatre WE THE KINGS, SUMMER SET July 22, Freebird Live TRIBAL SEEDS, SEEDLESS July 23, Freebird Live FURTHUR featuring BOB WEIR & PHIL LESH July 30, St. Augustine Amphitheatre DONAVON FRANKENREITER July 30, Freebird Live SELENA GOMEZ & THE SCENE, ALLSTAR WEEKEND July 31, St. Augustine Amphitheatre ALISON KRAUSS & UNION STATION, JERRY DOUGLASS Aug. 19, St. Augustine Amphitheatre SLIGHTLY STOOPID, REBELUTION, SHWAYZE, CISCO ADLER Aug. 21, St. Augustine Amphitheatre MATISYAHU Aug. 23, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall DELBERT McCLINTON Sept. 10, The Florida Theatre TAYLOR SWIFT Nov. 11, Veterans Memorial Arena

on May 27 & 29. Early McCall on May 28. Live music in the courtyard at 6 p.m. every Fri. & Sat., at 5 p.m. every Sun. DOG STAR TAVERN, 10 N. Second St., 277-8010 Brown Bag Special on May 26. Amy Hendrickson & The Prime Directive on May 27. The Fritz on May 28. Chroma on May 29 GENNARO’S ITALIANO SOUTH, 5472 First Coast Hwy., 4911999 Live jazz from 7:30-9:30 p.m. every Fri. & Sat. GREEN TURTLE TAVERN, 14 S. Third St., 321-2324 Dan Voll from 7-10 p.m. every Fri. Live music every weekend INDIGO ALLEY, 316 Centre St., 261-7222 Dan Voll & the Alley Cats at 8 p.m. every Sat. Frankie’s Jazz Jam at 7:30 p.m. every Tue. Open mic at 7 p.m. every Thur. Live music every Fri. & Sat. O’KANE’S IRISH PUB, 318 Centre St., 261-1000 Dan Voll from 7:30-11:30 p.m. every Wed. The Turner London Band at 8:30 p.m. every Thur., Fri. & Sat. THE PALACE SALOON & SHEFFIELD’S, 117 Centre St., 491-3332 BSP Unplugged every Tue. Wes Cobb every Wed. DJ Heavy Hess in Sheffield’s, Hupp & Rob in Palace every Thur. Live music every Fri. & Sat. DJ Miguel Alvarez in Sheffield’s every Fri. DJ Heavy Hess in Sheffield’s every Sat. BSP Unplugged every Sun. Cason every Mon. All shows at 9:30 p.m. PLAE, 80 Amelia Circle, Amelia Island Plantation, 277-2132 Gary Ross from 7-11 p.m. every Thur.-Sat. SEABREEZE SPORTS BAR, 2707 Sadler Rd., 277-2300 Karaoke with Daddy’O every Wed. DJ Roc at 9 p.m. every Fri., 10 p.m.-2 a.m. every Sat. SLIDER’S SEASIDE GRILL, 1998 S. Fletcher Ave., 277-6990 Cason at 2 p.m. at the tiki bar every Sat. & Sun. THE SURF, 3199 S. Fletcher Ave., 261-5711 Richard Smith on May 24. Stevie Fingers on May 26. Richard Stratton on May 27 & 29. Gary Stewart on May 28. Andy Haney on May 30. Early McCall on May 31. DJ Roc at 5 p.m. every Wed.

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REGENCY ForUPCOMING questions, please call your advertising representative at 260-9770. rUnARLINGTON, dAte: 052411 CONCERTS AJ’S BAR & GRILLE, 10244 Atlantic Blvd., 805-9060 TEN WEST, DANCELL,PROOF ONE LESS ATLANTIC June 3, DJ Sheryl every Thur., Fri. & Sat. DJ Mike every Tue. & Wed. FAX YOUR IF POSSIBLE AT 268-3655

Freebird Live Karaoke every Thur. MUSIC promise CITY HIT-MAKERS June 3, T-U Center’s Moran sUpport 9119 Merrill Ste. 5, Rep 551-7076 ProducedMEEHAN’S by jw TAVERN, Checked by Rd., Sales rl of benefit Ask for Action Theater Karaoke every Wed. Live music every Fri. AMELIA ISLAND, FERNANDINA BEACH MVP’S SPORTS GRILLE, 12777 Atlantic Blvd., 221-1090 JIMMY THACKERY June 3, Mojo Kitchen BEECH STREET GRILL, 801 Beech St., 277-3662 John WITCHAVEN, BLOODCRAFT, HALLELUJAH, VOMIKAUST, Live music at 9 p.m. every Fri. & Sat. Springer every Fri. & Sat., every other Thur. Barry Randolph REMAINS June 4, Lomax Lodge PLUSH, RAIN, LEOPARD LOUNGE, 845 University Blvd. N., every Sun. NONPOINT June 4, Brewster’s Pit 745-1845 Mushroomhead, Stayne Thee Angel, Livication and CAFE KARIBO, 27 N. Third St., 277-5269 Hoffman’s Bicycle THE BLUE DOGS June 10, Freebird Live Hed Pe on May 27. DJ Massive spins top 40 in Rain every Wed.,

• CLUBS •

DJs spin Latin every Fri.; house & techno in Z-Bar every Fri. TONINO’S TRATTORIA & MARTINI BAR, 7001 Merrill Rd., Ste. 45, 743-3848 Harry & Sally from 6:30-9 p.m. every Wed. Alaina Colding every Thur. W. Harvey Williams at 6 p.m. every Fri. Signature String Quartet every Sat.

AVONDALE, ORTEGA

BRICK RESTAURANT, 3585 St. Johns Ave., 387-0606 Duet every Wed. Goliath Flores and Sam Rodriguez every Thur. Bush Doctors every 1st Fri. & Sat. Live jazz every Fri. & Sat. THE CASBAH CAFE, 3628 St. Johns Ave., 981-9966 Goliath Flores every Wed. 3rd Bass every Sun. Live music every Mon. ECLIPSE, 4219 St. Johns Ave., 387-3582 DJ Keith spins for Karaoke every Tue. DJ Free spins vintage every Fri. DJ Dave Berg spins every Sat. DJ Alex Pagan spins every Sun. ELEVATED AVONDALE, 3551 St. Johns Ave., 387-0700 Karaoke with Dave Thrash every Wed. DJ 151 spins hip hop, R&B, funk, soul & old-school every Thur. Live music every weekend. DJ Catharsis spins lounge beats every 1st & 4th Sat. Patrick Evan & Co-Alition every Industry Sun. MOJO NO. 4, 3572 St. Johns Ave., 381-6670 Live music every Fri. & Sat. TOM & BETTY’S, 4409 Roosevelt Blvd., 387-3311 Live music every Fri. Karaoke at 8 p.m. every Sat.

BAYMEADOWS

THE COFFEE GRINDER, 9834 Old Baymeadows Rd., 642-7600 DJs Albert Atkins and Roy Luis spin new & vintage original house every Thur., Fri. & Sat. MY PLACE BAR-N-GRILL, 9550 Baymeadows Rd., 737-5299 Lift at 9 p.m. on May 28. Out of Hand every Mon. Rotating bands every other Tue. & Wed. OASIS GRILL & CHILL, 9551 Baymeadows Rd., 748-9636 DJs Stan and Mike Bend spin every Feel Good Fri. TERA NOVA, 8206 Philips Hwy., 733-8085 DJ Jose de la Soul spins salsa & freestyle every Latin Thur. DJs spin hip hop every Fri. DJs Leland & Marc-E-Marc spin top 40 & house every Sat. DJ Leland McWilliams spins for South Beach Friday every 2nd Fri. Reggae Fanatic is held every 3rd Fri. TONY D’S NEW YORK PIZZA & RESTAURANT, 8358 Point Meadows Dr., 322-7051 Live music from 6-9 p.m. every Fri.

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Cincinnati neo-glam rockers Foxy Shazam perform along with Peter Pepper and Speaking in Cursive at 8 p.m. on May 28 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. The band has drawn comparisons to Queen, Meat Loaf and The Darkness on the strength of their live shows. Advance tickets are $10. 398-7496.

BEACHES

(In Jax Beach unless otherwise noted) THE ATLANTIC, 333 N. First St., 249-3338 The Infader spins every Wed. DJ Wes Reed spins every Thur. DJ Jade spins old wave & â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s retro, SilverStar spins hip hop every Fri. DJ Wes Reed spins â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s, old school, remixes & mashups, Capone spins top 40 & dance faves every Sat. BEACHSIDE SEAFOOD, 120 S. Third St., 444-8862 Kurt Lanham sings classical island music every Fri.-Sun. BILLYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BOATHOUSE, 2321 Beach Blvd., 241-9771 Mr. Sunshine at 5:30 p.m. on May 25. Kurt Lanham at 5:30 p.m. on May 26. 4Play at 6 p.m. on May 27. John Waters at 5:30 p.m. on May 28. Incognito at noon, Grandpaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cough Medicine at 4:30 p.m. on May 29. John Waters & Bush Doctors on May 30

THE BRASSERIE, 1312 Beach Blvd., 249-5800 Live music every Wed. & Thur. BRIX TAPHOUSE, 300 N. Second St., 241-4668 DJ Anonymous every Mon., Tue. & Thur. Live music every Wed. DJ IBay every Fri. & Sat. Charlie Walker every Sun. CARIBBEE KEY, 100 N. First St., Neptune Beach, 270-8940 Live music every Thur.-Sun. CASA MARINA, 691 First St. N., 270-0025 Derryck Lawrence Project on May 25. Toots Lorraine & the Traffic on June 1 COPPER TOP, 1712 Beach Blvd., 249-4776 Rick Arcusa Trio on May 26. Mike Shackelford on May 27. Biker Bob on May 28. Pili Pili on May 29. Karaoke with Billy McMahan from 7-10 p.m. every Tue.

THE COURTYARD, 200 First St., Neptune Beach, 249-2922 Local singer-songwriter Don Miniard at 7 p.m. on May 27. Live music every Fri. CULHANEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S IRISH PUB, 967 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-9595 Boogie Freaks at 9 p.m. on May 27. Not Unheard at 6:30 p.m., Jax Pipes & Drums at 7:30, Karaoke at 10 p.m. on May 28. Live music every weekend DICKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WINGS & GRILL, 311 Third St. N., 853-5004 Wits End on May 27. Milos on May 28. Chillakaya on May 29. Open mic every Thur. Live music every Fri. & Sat. Reggae every Sun. Karaoke every Mon. ENGINE 15 BREWING COMPANY, 1500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 217, 249-2337 Live music every Thur. EUROPEAN STREET, 992 Beach Blvd., 249-3001 Evanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Acoustic Trio at 5 p.m. on May 29 FIONN MACCOOLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S IRISH PUB, 333 First St. N., 242-9499 Live music every Tue.-Sun. FLYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TIE IRISH PUB, 177 E. Sailfish Dr., Atlantic Beach, 246-4293 Nate Holley every Mon. Wes Cobb every Thur. Live music every Fri. & Sat. King Eddie reggae every Sun. FREEBIRD LIVE, 200 N. First St., 246-2473 Clutch, Maylene & The Sons of Disaster and Groundscare on May 26. Sidereal, Crazy Carls, Taste Buds and Matt Henderson on May 27. Mishka, Anuhea and Bubbly Joe on May 29. Face To Face, Strung Out, Blitzkid and The Darlings on May 30 ISLAND GIRL CIGAR BAR, 108 First St., Neptune Beach, 372-0943 Live music at 9:30 p.m. every Fri. & Sat. LYNCHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S IRISH PUB, 514 N. First St., 249-5181 Split Tone at 10:30 p.m. every Tue. Nate Holley Band every Wed. Ryan Campbell every Thur. Video DJ & Karaoke every Sun. Little Green Men every Mon. MAYPORT TAVERN, 2775 Old Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach, 270-0801 Live music at 3 p.m. every Sun. Open mic at 5 p.m. every Wed. DJ Jason hosts Karaoke at 9 p.m. every Fri. & Sat. MELLOW MUSHROOM, 1018 N. Third St., Ste. 2, 246-1500 Bread & Butter on May 25. DJ EJ on May 26. Three the Band on May 28. The Fritz on May 31. Wits End on June 1. Live music every Fri. & Sat. MEZZA LUNA, 110 First St., Neptune Beach, 249-5573 Neil Dixon at 6 p.m. every Tue. Mike Shackelford and Rick Johnson at 6 p.m. every Thur. MIMIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SPORTS GRILLE, 1021 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 270-1030 DJ Dennis Hubbell spins & hosts Karaoke at 8 p.m. every Thur. & Fri. MOJO KITCHEN, 1500 Beach Blvd., 247-6636 Fusebox Funk

ADVERTISING PROOF

TUE 5/24 Team Trivia This is a copyright protected proof Š WED 5/25 Buck Smith THURS 5/26 Samat&260-9770. Trey For questions, please call your advertising representative RUN DATE: 052411 FRI 5/27 & SAT 5/28 Cloud 9 FAX YOUR PROOF IF POSSIBLE AT 268-3655 SUN 5/29 Wes Cobb MON 5/30 Richard Smith PROMISE OF BENEFIT RL SUPPORT ASK FOR ACTION Produced by _JW_ Checked by ____ Sales Rep ____

Wednesday Billy Bowers Thursday Midlife Crisis Friday & Saturday Al Naturale Sunday Exit Atlantic Blvd. at the Ocean "UMBOUJD#FBDIt MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 45


& Nate Holley on May 28. Jimmy Thackery on June 3 MONKEY’S UNCLE TAVERN, 1850 S. Third St., 246-1070 Wes Cobb at 10 p.m. every Tue. DJ Papa Sugar spins dance music at 9 p.m. every Mon., Thur. & Fri. DJ Austin Williams spins dance & for Karaoke every Wed., Sat. & Sun. NORTH BEACH BISTRO, 725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 6, Atlantic Beach, 372-4105 Live music every Thur.-Sat. OCEAN 60, 60 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 247-0060 Rocco Blu on May 27. 5x7 Band on May 28 PACO’S MEXICAN GRILL, 333 N. First St., 208-5097 Live music at 9 p.m. every Thur. RAGTIME TAVERN, 207 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 241-7877 Billy Bowers on May 25. Midlife Crisis on May 26. Al Naturale on May 27 & 28. Exit on May 29. Live music every Wed.-Sun. RITZ LOUNGE, 139 Third Ave. N., 246-2255 DJ Jenn Azana every Wed.-Sat. DJ Ibay every Sun. RUSH STREET/CHICAGO PIZZA & SPORTS GRILL, 320 N. First St., 270-8565 A DJ spins at 10 p.m. every Wed., Fri. & Sat. SUN DOG, 207 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 241-8221 Buck Smith on May 25. Sam & Trey on May 26. Cloud 9 at 9:30 p.m. on May 27 & 28. Wes Cobb on May 29. Richard Smith on May 30. Live music every Wed.-Sun. THE WINE BAR, 320 N. First St., 372-0211 Live music every Fri. & Sat.

DOWNTOWN

every Mon. Live music every Tues. DE REAL TING CAFE, 128 W. Adams St., 633-9738 DJs Mix Master Prince, Pete, Stylish, Big Bodie play reggae, calypso, R&B, hip hop and top 40 every Fri. & Sat. DIVE BAR, 331 E. Bay St., 359-9090 The Turbo A.C.s and The Arkhams at 9 p.m. on June 2. DJ NickFresh spins every Tue. Indie Lounge. DJ SuZi-Rok spins every Thur. DJ Trim spins top 40, dance & rock every Fri. DJ Shanghai spins top 40, dance & rock every Sat. DOS GATOS, 123 E. Forsyth, 354-0666 Robert Lester Folsom on May 24. DJ Synsonic spins every Tue. & Fri. DJ Rockin’ Bones spins rock, rockabilly & roots every Wed. DJ Scandalous spins every Sat. DJ Randall spins Karaoke every Mon. THE JACKSONVILLE LANDING, 2 Independent Dr., 353-1188 The Jacksonville Jazz Festival runs May 27-29 THE IVY ULTRA BAR, 113 E. Bay St., 356-9200 DJs 151 The Experience & C-Lo spin every Rush Hour Wed. DJ E.L. spins top 40, South Beach & dance classics every Pure Sat. MARK’S DOWNTOWN, 315 E. Bay St., 355-5099 DJ Massive spins top 40 & dance every Velvet Fri. DJ Shotgun spins top 40 & dance every BayStreet Sat. MAVERICKS ROCK N’HONKY TONK, The Jacksonville Landing, 356-1110 Bobby Laredo spins every Thur. & Sat. Saddle Up every Sat. THE PEARL, 1101 N. Main St., 791-4499 DJs Tom P. & Ian S. spin ’80s & indie dance every Fri. DJ Ricky spins indie rock, hip hop & electro every Sat. POPPY LOVE SMOKE, 112 E. Adams St., 354-1988 Lil John Lumpkin, Stefano DiBella & Lawrence Buckner every Wed. & Fri. ZODIAC GRILL, 120 W. Adams St., 354-8283 Eric Carter and DJ Al Pete every Fri.

INTRACOASTAL WEST

BREWSTER’S PIT, 14003 Beach Blvd., Ste. 3, 223-9850 Pokadot Cadaver, Northe, Holidazed, Finish It Off, Audzio and Cheezy T on May 26. Taproot, Manna Zen, Bleeding the Stereo, Mindslip and Shotgun Harbor on May 27. Young Buck on May 28. Peacemaker, Thick as Blood, Marauder, Rhythm of Fear and Worn Out on May 30 BREWSTER’S PUB, 14003 Beach Blvd., Ste. 3, 223-9850 Throwback Tue. ’70s, ’80s & top 40. Open mic with CBH every Wed. Karaoke with DJ Randal & live music every Thur., Fri. & Sat. A DJ spins every Mon. BRUCCI’S PIZZA, 13500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 36, 223-6913 Mike Shackelford at 6:30 p.m. every Sat. Brucci’s Live open mic with Mike Shackelford at 6:30 p.m. every Mon. CLIFF’S BAR & GRILL, 3033 Monument Rd., 645-5162 One Night Stand at 8 p.m. on May 26, 27 & 28. Karaoke every Tue. DJ Kevin for ladies nite every Wed. Karaoke with DJ Jack at 9 p.m. every Sun. Live music every Thur., Fri. & Sat. JERRY’S SPORTS GRILLE & STEAKHOUSE, 13170 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 22, 220-6766 Boogie Freaks at 7:30 p.m. on May 26 & 28. Rick Arcusa at 8:30 p.m. on May 27. The Karaoke Dude at 8 p.m. every Mon. Live music outside for Bike Night every Thur. Live music every Fri. & Sat. YOUR PLACE BAR & GRILL, 13245 Atlantic Blvd., 221-9994 Brian Ripper on May 24

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BURRO BAGS, 228 E. Forsyth St., 353-4692 The Subliminator JULINGTON CREEK, NW ST. JOHNS COUNTY on May 24. Keith Ansel on May 28. Tropic of Cancer on May HAPPY OURS SPORTS GRILLE, 116 Bartram Oaks Walk, 29. DJ Tin Man spins reggae and dub every Tue. Devin Balara, Ste. 101, 683-1964 Live music at 7:30 p.m. every Fri. Jack Diablo & Carrie Location every Thur. Live music every Fri. FLEMING ISLAND SHANNON’S IRISH PUB, 111 Bartram Oaks Walk, $Big Bucks DJ Crew$ every Sat. Country Sunday with Bert No MELLOW MUSHROOM, 1800 Town Center Blvd., 541-1999 230-9670 Live music every Fri. & Sat. Shirt & Uncle Jesse every Sun. DJ Chef Rocc spins hip hop, Live music every Fri. & Sat. indie & soul every Buttery Ass Sun. MERCURY MOON, 2015 C.R. 220, 215-8999 DJ Ty spins for CAFE 331, 331 W. Forsyth St., 354-1999 Acoustic open MANDARIN ladies’ nite every Thur. Live music every Fri. & Sat. Buck Smith mic 9 p.m.-2 a.m. every Tue. Live music at 9 p.m. every Wed. AW SHUCKS OYSTER BAR & GRILL, 9743 Old St. Project every Mon. Blistur unplugged every Wed. & Fri. Factory Jax’s goth-industrial 9 p.m.-2 a.m. every Sat. by ab Rd., Checked by mic Sales promise ofa.m.benefit sUpportRUSH STREET/CHICAGO Ask for Augustine 240-0368 Open with John Rep O’Connordl PIZZA Action & SPORTS GRILL,Produced 406 Old Underground 9 p.m.-2 every Mon. from 7-10 p.m. every Wed. Cafe Groove Duo, Jay Terry and Hard Rd., Ste. 106, 213-7779 A DJ spins at 10 p.m. every CITY HALL PUB, 234 Randolph Blvd., 356-6750 DJ Skillz John O’Connor, from 8-11 p.m. every Sat. Live music from 9 Wed., Fri. & Sat. spins Motown, old school, hip hop & R&B every Wed. Live p.m.-mid. every Sat. WHITEY’S FISH CAMP, 2032 C.R. 220, 269-4198 Country music every Thur. Smooth Jazz Lunch at 11 a.m., Latin music BLUE CRAB CRABHOUSE, 3057 Julington Creek Rd., Night with Supernatural at 8 p.m. on May 26. Full Blown at 9 p.m. every first Fri.; Ol’ Skool every last Fri. A DJ spins 260-2722 Live music on the deck every Sun. afternoon Monkey at 9:30 p.m. on May 27 & 28. Rezolution on the deck classic R&B, hip hop & dance every Saturdaze. Live reggae & CHEERS BAR & GRILL, 11475 San Jose Blvd., 262-4337 at 5 p.m. on May 29. DJ BG every Mon. DJs spin island music every Sun. Joel Crutchfield for open mic Karaoke at 9:30 p.m. every Wed. THE NEW ORLEANS CAFE, 12760 San Jose Blvd., 880-5155 Jazz on the Deck 7-10 p.m. with Sleepy’s Connection every Tue. Open mic with Biker Bob at 7:30 p.m. every Thur. Les B. Fine at 1 p.m. every Reggae Sun. Creekside Songwriters Showcase at 7 p.m. on the last Wed. each month RACK ’EM UP BILLIARDS, 4268 Oldfield Crossing, 262-4030 Craig Hand every Sat. Karaoke at 7 p.m. every Sun. SPECKLED HEN TAVERN & GRILLE, 9475 Philips Hwy., Ste. 16, 538-0811 Live music from 6-9 p.m. every Fri. THE TREE STEAKHOUSE, 11362 San Jose Blvd., 262-0006 The Boril Ivanov Biva Jazz Band from 7-9 p.m. every Thur. David Gum at the piano bar from 7-10 p.m. every Fri.

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ORANGE PARK, MIDDLEBURG

CHEERS BAR & GRILL, 1580 Wells Rd., 269-4855 Karaoke at 9:30 p.m. every Wed. & Sat. CRACKERS LOUNGE, 1282 Blanding Blvd., 272-4620 Karaoke every Fri. & Sat. THE HILLTOP, 2030 Wells Rd., 272-5959 John Michael every Wed.-Sat. THE ROADHOUSE, 231 Blanding Blvd., 264-0611 Blistur on May 26. Swerved at 8 p.m. on May 27 & 28. Buck Smith Project every Mon. DJ Waldo every Tue. DJ Papa Sugar every Wed. SENOR WINGS, 700 Blanding Blvd., 375-0746 DJ Andy spins for Karaoke every Wed. DJ Tammy spins for Karaoke every Fri. Live music every Sat.

PALATKA

DOWNTOWN BLUES BAR & GRILLE, 714 St. Johns Ave., (386) 325-5454 West End Memorial Armed Forces Tribute at 8 p.m. on May 27-30

PONTE VEDRA

AQUA GRILL, 950 Sawgrass Village Dr., 285-3017 Brian Green on May 29 NINETEEN AT SAWGRASS, 110 Championship Way, 273-3235 Time2Swing at 6 p.m. every Jazz Thur. Strings of Fire from 6-9 p.m. every Sat. PUSSER’S CARIBBEAN GRILLE, 816 A1A N., Ste. 100, 280-7766 Live music May 27-29 URBAN FLATS, 330 A1A N., 280-5515 High Tides of Jazz at 7:30 p.m. on May 26. The Fritz at 7:30 p.m. on May 27. Darren Corlew Band on May 28. Darren Corlew every Tue. Soulo & Deron Baker at 6 p.m. every Wed.

RIVERSIDE, WESTSIDE

FATKATS NIGHT CLUB, 1187 S. Edgewood Ave., 994-5201

46 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011


Let’s be blunt. Rapper Young Buck performs at 7 p.m. on May 28 at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Along with 50 Cent, the Atlanta native was a onetime member of NYC hip-hop group G-Unit. Tickets are $20. 223-9850.

Waylay plays every Thur. Live music & DJ Lavo spinning hip hop, rock, reggae, punk; Caden spins house, techno, breaks, drum & bass at 9 p.m. every Flashback Fri. HJ’S BAR & GRILL, 8540 Argyle Forest Blvd., 317-2783 Karaoke with DJ Ron at 8:30 p.m. every Tue. & DJ Richie at every Fri. Live music every Sat. Open mic at 8 p.m. every Wed. KICKBACKS, 910 King St., 388-9551 Dave Massey every Tue. Ray & Taylor every Thur. Robby Shenk every Sun. THE LOFT, 925 King St., 476-7283 DJs Wes Reed & Josh K every Thur. LOMAX LODGE, 822 Lomax St., 634-8813 DJ Dots every Tue. Milan da Tin Man every Wed. DJ Christian every Sat. DJ Spencer every Sun. DJ Luminous every Mon. METRO, 2929 Plum St., 388-8719 DJ Chadpole every Fri. & Sat. Karaoke with KJ Rob every Sun., Mon. & Tue. MONROE’S SMOKEHOUSE BBQ, 4838 Highway Ave., 389-5551 Bluegrass Nite every Fri. THE MURRAY HILL THEATRE, 932 Edgewood Ave., 388-7807 Corey Kilgannon, Lights of Evening, The Perfect Measure and Saving Daisy on May 27. Rejoice the Awakening, Set Apart, Thirtyseven and In Betrayal on May 28 WALKERS, 2692 Post St., 894-7465 Jax Arts Collaborative every Tue. Patrick & Burt every Wed. DJ Jeremiah every Thur. Acoustic every Thur.-Sat. Dr. Bill & His Solo Practice of Music at 5 p.m. every Fri.

ST. AUGUSTINE

A1A ALE WORKS, 1 King St., 829-2977 Deron Baker on May 26. The Mix on May 27 & 28 AMICI ITALIAN RESTAURANT, 1915 A1A S., 461-0102 Fermin Spanish guitar from 6-8 p.m. every Thur. ANN O’MALLEY’S, 23 Orange St., 825-4040 Open mic with Smokin Joe from 7-10 p.m. on May 24. Patrick Sullivan at 6:30 p.m. on May 25. Wobbly Toms at 8:30 p.m. on May 27. Irish By Marriage at 1 p.m., Colton McKenna at 8:30 p.m. on May 28. Karaoke at 8 p.m. on May 29. Live music every Fri. & Sat. THE BRITISH PUB, 213 Anastasia Blvd., 810-5111 Karaoke with Jimmy Jamez at 9 p.m. on May 27 & 28. Jukebox nite on May 29. Open mic night with Christi Harris at 8:30 p.m. on May 30 CAFE ALCAZAR, 25 Granada St., 825-9948 Live music daily CELLAR UPSTAIRS, San Sebastian Winery, 157 King St., 826-1594 Sentropolis on May 27. Domenic Patruno at 2 p.m., Ain’t Too Proud 2 Beg at 7 p.m. on May 28. Vinny Jacobs at 2 p.m. on May 29 CHICAGO PIZZA & BAKERY, 107 Natures Walk Pkwy., Ste. 101, 230-9700 Greg Flowers hosts open-mic and jazz piano from 7-10 p.m. every Tue. Live music every Fri. CONCH HOUSE LOUNGE, 57 Comares Ave., 829-8646 418 Band from 3-7 p.m. on May 29. Brad Newman every Thur. Live music at 3 p.m. every Sat. CREEKSIDE DINERY, 160 Nix Boatyard Rd., 829-6113 Live music on deck Wed.-Sun. CRUISERS GRILL, 3 St. George St., 824-6993 Live music every Fri. & Sat. Chelsea Saddler every Sun. FLORIDA CRACKER CAFE, 81 St. George St., 829-0397 Lonesome Bert & the Skinny Lizard at 5:30 p.m. every Wed. THE FLORIDIAN, 39 Cordova St., 829-0655 Live music every Fri. & Sat.

HARRY’S SEAFOOD BAR & GRILLE, 46 Avenida Menendez, 824-7765 Stu Weaver every Mon. JACK’S BARBECUE, 691 A1A Beach Blvd., 460-8100 Jim Essery at 4 p.m. every Sat. Live music every Thur.-Sat. JOHNNY’S, 3009 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd., 829-8333 Montage features electro, dance & indie every Mon. KINGFISH GRILL, 252 Yacht Club Drive, 824-2111 Chubby McG at 6 p.m. on May 25. Dewey & Rita at 6 p.m. on May 26. Menage at 7 p.m. on May 27. Ivey Bros. at 7 p.m. on May 28. Big Pineapple at 6 p.m. on May 29. Colton McKenna at 1 p.m. on May 30 KING’S HEAD BRITISH PUB, 6460 U.S. 1, 823-9787 Mike Sweet from 6-8 p.m. every Thur. KOZMIC BLUZ PIZZA CAFE & ALE, 48 Spanish St., 825-4805 Live music every Fri., Sat. & Sun. LOCAL HEROES CAFE, 11 Spanish St., 825-0060 Glam punk rock dance party Radio Hot Elf with DJ Dylan Nirvana from 9 p.m.-2 a.m. every Fri. MARDI GRAS, 123 San Marco Ave., 540-2824 Battle of the DJs with Josh Frazetta & Mardi Gras Mike every last Sun. MEEHAN’S IRISH PUB, 20 Avenida Menendez, 810-1923 Live music every Fri. & Sat. MI CASA CAFE, 69 St. George St., 824-9317 Chelsea Saddler noon-4 p.m. every Mon., Tue. & Thur. Amy Hendrickson every Sun. & Wed. MILL TOP TAVERN & LISTENING ROOM, 19 1/2 St. George St., 829-2329 True Blue at 9 p.m. on May 27 & 28. Anthony Disica at 1 p.m. on May 29. Vinny Jacobs every Tue. Todd & Molly Jones every Wed. Colton McKenna at 9 p.m. every Thur. Will Pearsall at 9 p.m. every Mon. THE OASIS, 4000 A1A & Ocean Trace Rd., 471-3424 Pam Affronti at 5:30 p.m. on May 27. Tony Novelly at 5:30 p.m. on May 28. John Emil at 4 p.m. on May 29 PUSH PUSH SALON, 299 San Marco Ave., 547-2341 Bonnie Prince Billy & the Cairo Gang at 7 p.m. on May 27 THE REEF, 4100 Coastal Hwy., Vilano Beach, 824-8008 Richard Kuncicky from 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. every Sun. RHETT’S PIANO BAR & BRASSERIE, 66 Hypolita St., 825-0502 Live jazz at 7 p.m. every night SANGRIAS PIANO BAR, 35 Hypolita St., 827-1947 Soul Searchers every Wed. Jim Asalta every Thur. Jazz every Fri. The Housecats every Sat. Sunny & the Flashbacks every Sun. SCARLETT O’HARA’S, 70 Hypolita St., 824-6535 Lil Blaze & DJ Alex hosts Karaoke every Mon. THE TASTING ROOM, 25 Cuna St., 810-2400 Bossa nova with Monica da Silva & Chad Alger from 5-8 p.m. every Sun. ZHANRAS, 108 Anastasia Blvd., 823-3367 Deron Baker & Soulo every Tue. DJ Cep spins ’80s & disco every Sun. Vinny Jacobs open mic every Mon.

ST. JOHNS TOWN CENTER, TINSELTOWN

AROMAS CIGARS & WINE BAR, 4372 Southside Blvd., Ste. 201, 928-0515 W. Harvey Williams every Tue. DJ Royal every Wed. & Thur. DJ Benz every Fri. DJ T-Rav every Sat. THE GRAPE, 10281 Midtown Pkwy., 642-7111 Live music every Fri. & Sat. John Earle every Mon. DJ Mikeology every Thur. ISLAND GIRL Wine & Cigar Bar, 7860 Gate Pkwy., Ste. 115, 854-6060 Jazz every Wed. Live music every Thur., Fri.

& Sat. MELLOW MUSHROOM, 9734 Deer Lake Court, Ste. 1, 997-1955 Jay Ivey on May 25. Charlie Walker on May 26. Nate Holley on May 27. Bread & Butter on May 28. Open mic nite every Tue. SEVEN BRIDGES GRILLE & BREWERY, 9735 Gate Parkway N., 997-1999 Chuck Nash every Thur. Live music at 10 p.m. every Fri. & Sat. SUITE, 4880 Big Island Dr., 493-9305 Latin Wave at 7:30 p.m. on May 24. Cloud 9 at 8 p.m. on May 25. Frontline at 9 p.m. on May 26; 7:30 p.m. on May 27. Latraia Savage & the Allstars at 7:30 p.m. on May 28 URBAN FLATS, 9726 Touchton Rd., 642-1488 Live music every Fri. & Sat. WHISKY RIVER, 4850 Big Island Drive, 645-5571 Alive After Five with Girlz Girlz Girlz on May 26. Down Theory every Mon. A DJ spins every Fri. & Sat. WILD WING CAFE, 4555 Southside Blvd., 998-9464 Ruckus on May 26. Spanky the Band on May 27. Live music every Fri. & Sat. Karaoke every Mon.

SAN MARCO, SOUTHBANK

ENDO EXO, 1224 Kings Ave., 396-7733 Paten Locke spins classic boombox, hip hop & tru school every Thur. DJ J-Money spins jazz, soul, R&B, house every Fri. DJ Manus spins top 40 & dance every Sat. Reggae every Sun. Open mic with King Ron & T-Roy every Mon. EUROPEAN STREET CAFE, 1704 San Marco Blvd., 399-1740 Ariana Hall, Del Suggs and Larry Mangum at 8 p.m. on May 26. Jazz every 2nd Tue. HAVANA-JAX CUBA LIBRE BAR LOUNGE, 2578 Atlantic Blvd., 399-0609 MVP Band from 6-9 p.m., DJs No Fame & Dr. Doom every Wed. Jazz every Thur. DJ Omar spins dance every Fri. DJs Harry, Rico & Nestor spin salsa every Sat. JACK RABBITS, 1528 Hendricks Ave., 398-7496 General Tso’s Fury, Teflon Don, Operation Hennessey, Poor Richards and Waiting on Brian at 8 p.m. on May 27. Foxy Shazam, Peter Pepper and Speaking in Cursive on May 28. Leo & the Sun, Sack the City, All Day All Night and Carridale on May 29. Combichrist, Ivarden Sphere, Deadstar Assembly and StarKiller on May 30. Don’t Ever Say Never, Second Thief, Come What May, A Jasey Project and Avirence on May 31 MATTHEW’S, 2107 Hendricks Ave., 396-9922 Bossa nova with Monica da Silva & Chad Alger at 7 p.m. every Thur. SQUARE ONE, 1974 San Marco Blvd., 306-9004 Sidewalk 65 at 9 p.m. on May 28. Soul on the Square & Band of Destiny at 8 p.m. every Mon. John Earle Band every Tue. DJs Wes Reed & Matt Caulder spin indie dance & electro every Wed. Split Tone & DJ Comic every Thur.

SOUTHSIDE

BOMBA’S, 8560 Beach Blvd., 997-2291 Open mic from 7-11 p.m. with Chris Hall every Tue. & every first Sun. Live music at 8 p.m. every Fri., at 6 p.m. every Sat. & at 5 p.m. every Sun. CORNER BISTRO & Wine Bar, 9823 Tapestry Park Cir., Ste. 1, 619-1931 Matt “Pianoman” Hall at 8 p.m. every Fri. & Sat. EUROPEAN STREET CAFE, 5500 Beach Blvd., 398-1717 JB Scott Allstars on June 6 LATITUDE 30, 10370 Philips Hwy., 365-5555 Nate Holley on May 26. The Mosquitos on May 27. Sugar Bear on May 28. Open mic every Wed. Whyte Python every Flashback Fri. Live music every Thur., Fri. & Sat.

SPRINGFIELD, NORTHSIDE

BOOTS-N-BOTTLES, 12405 N. Main St., Ste. 7, Oceanway, 647-7798 Open mic every Wed. Karaoke at 8 p.m. every Thur. A DJ spins every Fri. & Sat. Live music every weekend DAMES POINT MARINA, 4518 Irving Rd., 751-3043 Live music every Fri. & Sat. FLIGHT 747 LOUNGE, 1500 Airport Rd., 741-4073 Big Engine every Thur. Live music every Fri. & Sat. ’70s every Tue. SHANTYTOWN PUB, 22 W. Sixth St., 798-8222 Vampirates at 10:30 p.m. on May 24 SKYLINE SPORTSBAR & LOUNGE, 5611 Norwood Ave., 517-6973 Bigga Rankin & Cool Running DJs every Tue. & 1st Sun. Fusion Band & DJ every Thur. DJ Scar spins every Sun. THREE LAYERS CAFE, 1602 Walnut St., 355-9791 Open mic with Al Poindexter at 7 p.m. on May 26. The Benn at 7 p.m. on May 27. Lauren Fincham at 7 p.m. on May 28. Goliath Flores at 1 p.m. on May 29 3 LIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL, 2467 Faye Rd., 647-8625 Open mic at 8 p.m. every Thur. Woodie & Wyatt C. every Fri. Live music at 8 p.m. every Sat.  To be included in the live music listing, send all the vitals — time, date, location with street address, city, admission price and contact number — to Dan Brown, 9456 Philips Hwy., Ste. 11, Jacksonville FL 32256 or email events@folioweekly.com

MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 47


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An ounce of freedom: Comedian Bill Maher wonders if our very future hangs in the balance!

Rebel Without a Pause

Comedian Bill Maher delights in milking humor from America’s sacred cows BILL MAHER Friday, May 27 at 8 p.m. The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville Tickets are $45 and $50 355-2787

A

political commentator, stand-up comedian, film producer, actor and author, Bill Maher is one of the most abhorred and adored icons in American pop culture. Known by right-wingers as a professional agitator and by left-wingers simply as a god, Maher advocates for the legalization of marijuana and same-sex marriage, criticizes religions and pharmaceutical companies, and his bold stance hasn’t endeared him to the rich and powerful. Between his two shows — the defunct “Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher” on Comedy Central and “Real Time with Bill Maher” (now in its ninth season) on HBO — Maher has been nominated for 26 Emmy awards, yet hasn’t won once. He claims this is because he’s an atheist. Of course, he’s also never been married. Go figure. Maher recently spoke with Folio Weekly about Bobbitt backlash, Florida’s national rep and comedy as jazz improv.

Folio Weekly: You’ve been to Northeast Florida a few times. How would you describe crowds here? Bill Maher: Well, I love playing places where people don’t expect me to go. They’re always the most fun because they probably have more people in town who don’t think like me and so I hope it’s a treat for the people who do. So I always have fun in Jacksonville. 48 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011

F.W.: Florida makes headlines with missing

toddlers, pill mills and foreclosures. How can we get some street cred? B.M.: (Laughs.) Street cred? Maybe dispute another national election? I don’t know, I mean Florida is one of those few destinations — like my state of California — that most of the rest of the country kind of wishes they were living in because it’s sunny and it just has that feel of a place like, “Gosh, when I get rid

“Donald Trump is a preposterous, ridiculous figure who has all of the moral compass of an opportunistic infection.” of this dumb job, I’m gonna go to Florida.” So I think that’s more important than the day-to-day politics. F.W.: When you appeared on “The Late Show with David Letterman,” you compared Donald Trump running for president to John Wayne Bobbitt’s severed penis being the Ambassador to France. Has there been much backlash? B.M.: (Laughs.) You know, I’ve seen it all over the Internet and I was amused that it hit such a nerve. Of course, you have to kind of hear the whole thing to have it make sense. What I was trying to say was, why are we listening to this curiosity from the ’80s — hence the analogy to Mr. Bobbitt’s severed penis. But I think people are coming around to the idea — even Republicans — that

Donald Trump is a preposterous, ridiculous figure who has really no place in the national debate and has all of the moral compass of an opportunistic infection. F.W.: How much of your stand-up is improv and how much is rehearsed? B.M.: That’s a good question. It’s always good to have a very strong outline. What I do not like to do — and I never do it to my audience — is waste their time. They’re paying their hard-earned money and they should see an amazing show. And I don’t care who you are, you cannot ad lib an amazing show, so I know where I’m going from the first minute to the next 90 minutes to two hours. I know the ride I’m gonna take them on and all of the subjects I’m gonna cover. Within that, you can riff like in a song — you can go off and do a little jazz riff in the middle of the song. F.W.: Who is the most intelligent celebrity you’ve ever interviewed? B.M.: Oh, I never answer those kinds of questions. I want them to come back to my show. F.W.: I read that your childhood crush was Barbara Eden from “I Dream of Jeannie.” If Jeannie granted you one wish, what would it be? B.M.: To go back in time. F.W.: No, you could have anything — world peace, legalization of marijuana? B.M.: F*ck it. I’m going to be selfish. I want my youth back.  Kara Pound themail@folioweekly.com


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Whack Magic

The exhibit “Spiritualism” explores séances, supernatural journeys and other high weirdness SPIRITUALISM — ORIGINAL LETTERS OF SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE AND HARRY HOUDINI Karpeles Manuscript Library, 101 W. First St., Jacksonville The exhibit is on display through Aug. 31 Open Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., 356-2992

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ne of the greatest discoveries of the late 19th century was new lines of communication, as the likes of Thomas Edison, Guglielmo Marconi and Nikola Tesla mapped out a latticework of radio waves. But while these quantum leaps were occurring in the broadcast ether, other pioneers were tapping into more esoteric frequencies. Though now usually equated with ghost stories and hoaxes, the belief system known as Spiritualism crackled across America and Western Europe like a rogue transmission. Séances, clairvoyance, table-tapping and automatic writing originally began as serious explorations into the occult. MacGregor Mathers, Madame Blavatsky and Aleister Crowley are but a few of those who sought communion with unseen forces through arcane means. By 1897, Spiritualism had upwards of eight million followers, mostly upper and middle class people weary of the confines of orthodox JudeoChristianity. The movement was as progressive as it was diligent, supporting political causes like abolition of slavery and women’s suffrage, and many key mediums were women. Most famously, Mary Todd Lincoln held séances in the White House in an attempt to contact her dead son. At her side in the darkened circle was her husband, Pres. Abraham Lincoln. The current display at Karpeles Manuscript Museum in Springfield attempts to shine a light on this curious time in Western history. What makes the 20 exhibits of “Spiritualism” interesting is that they chronicle the contrasting spiritual explorations of two of the more popular figures of the day: author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the legendary illusionist Harry Houdini. While best known as the creator of the crafty detective Sherlock Holmes, Doyle (1859-1930) was also an unabashed spiritualist who went as far as opening his own London bookstore, stocked with books and papers devoted to his pursuits. Magician and escape artist Harry Houdini (1874-1926) was as intent on freeing himself from chains as he

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was exposing supernatural fraud. Doyle and Houdini were friends as well as contemporaries, and “Spiritualism” illustrates the fervor of turn-of-the-century seekers through the pair’s opposing views. The Scottish physician and writer Doyle invested his time and income into his research, and in 1925 opened his Psychic Bookshop and Library a stone’s throw from London’s Westminster Abbey. One manuscript (exhibit R2) is a hand-scribbled list of expenses for the shop, showing Doyle kicking in 100 shillings to keep the enterprise in the black. An 1897 contract (exhibit C4D) shows Houdini’s handwritten appeal for work for him and his wife, featuring the blunt promise that “I don’t drink, smoke or chew … if you can’t offer us a salary, let me know what you will do for us.” Before his death, the skeptical Houdini vowed to contact the living from beyond the grave, a gesture unmet to this day. But Doyle’s surrender to the other side was resolute. A spirit known only as “Phineas,” which appeared to Doyle’s wife on Dec. 10, 1922 while she was in a trance, reappeared over several years during séances. A document titled “The Danish Incident” (exhibit R7) tells the story of how the novelist planned a tour of Scandinavia. Phineas urgently begged him not to, warning “[…] If you could see what lies before you, you would shrink back in terror.” Doyle ignored the spirit’s plea. While there, the 71-year-old suffered a heart attack from which he never fully recovered. Four months after his passing, his wife again entered a trance, this time to contact her late husband. Exhibit L3 is an eerie collection of graphite scribbles on blue paper with the words “Beloved” repeated along with the assurance of her husband’s presence appearing from beyond the grave. The collection also covers Doyle’s fascination with faeries (or “Dwellers on the Border” as he calls them in exhibit C1D), Houdini’s perpetual financial woes, and a photo of what appears to be an “etheric body” in mid-flight during an actual séance. One of Doyle’s notes from a séance held on Nov. 6, 1919 (exhibit R5) also documents the unwanted appearance of a classic demonic force: an “American heckler.” 

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PERFORMANCE AMELIA EARHART Stephen Pigman directs this kid-geared production about the legendary aviatrix at 7:30 p.m. on May 24 and 25 at the Limelight Theatre, 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine. Tickets are $10; $5 for children. 825-1164. MURDER MYSTERY DINNER An interactive “Whodunit?” and dinner is staged at 2:30 p.m. on May 24-31 and at 5:30 p.m. on May 25-29 at Historic St. Augustine Wine Cellar, 119 St. George St. Tickets are $43.15; $35.15 for children. 671-2508. THE DAY THEY SHOT JOHN LENNON A Classic Theatre presents James McLure’s story, about people brought together to mourn the late Beatle’s death, at 7:30 p.m. on May 26, 27 and 28 at Flagler College’s Gamache-Koger Theatre, 50 Sevilla St., St. Augustine. Tickets are $20; $18 for seniors, $10 for students. 829-5807. DIVIDING THE ESTATE Players by the Sea presents Horton Foote’s story of a dysfunctional Texas oil clan at 8 p.m. on May 26, 27 and 28 at 106 Sixth St. N., Jax Beach. Tickets are $20; $17 for students, seniors and military. 249-0289. BOOKSTORE ABET presents this musical comedy at 8 p.m. on May 27 and 28 and at 2 p.m. on May 29 at Adele Grage Cultural Center, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach. Tickets are $20. 249-7177. THE ODD COUPLE Alhambra Theatre & Dining presents former “Brady Bunch” star Barry Williams in Neil Simon’s raucous 260-9770. comedy rUnabout dAte: 051711 incompatible roommates at 8 p.m. on May 25-29 and 31, at 1:15 p.m. on May 28 and at 2 p.m. on May 29 at 12000 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets range 641-1212. Produced byfrom ab$42-$49. Checked by Sales Rep dl

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RONAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC OPEN JAM Musicians hold a jam session at 11 a.m. on May 28 at Ronan School of Music, 763 Geraldine Drive, Jacksonville. 647-7957. FILM PROJECT MEET & GREET The Jacksonville 48 Hour Film Project holds a meet & greet, before its June 17 competition, at River City Brewing Company, 835 Museum Circle, Jacksonville. 993-7897. DANCE INSTRUCTION Braided Light Dance Project offers adult intermediate ballet classes from 6:15-7:45 p.m. every Wed. and from 1-2:30 p.m. every Sat. at Barbara Thompson School of Dance, 8595 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Each class is $10. 997-0002. INDIE FILM OPEN CASTING CALL Director Frank B. Goodin II seeks male and female actors of all ethnicities (ages 18-23) for his latest film, “Miracle Seven,” at auditions held on May 24 and 26. For an appointment, call 416-5438. atiyagoodin@gmail.com DASOTA SEEKS ACTORS FOR STUDENT FILM The Douglas Anderson School of the Arts Cinematic Arts Department seeks two female actors for lead roles in an upcoming student film production. The characters are a 23-year-old “Joan Jett”-type rocker and a 19-year-old country girl. Musical skills a plus. 346-5620, ext. 154; 742-4908. JAX ART UNLEASHED First Coast No More Homeless Pets accepts works in a variety of media for its June 23 Jax Art Unleashed fundraiser and juried art show. Deadline is May 30. Artwork may be dropped off or mailed to 6817 Norwood Ave., Jacksonville FL 32208. 520-7900. jaxartunleashed.com

CLASSICAL & JAZZ FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE: RETRO CONCERT I The Amelia Island Chamber Music Festival presents cellists Zuill Bailey and Christopher Rex, violist Sabina Thatcher, violinist Amy Schwartz Moretti, bassist Kurt Muroki and pianist Orli Shaham joined by Linden String Quartet at 7:30 p.m. on May 25 at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, 801 Atlantic Blvd., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $50 and include a champagne reception afterwards. 261-1779. JAZZ PIANO COMPETITION The Jacksonville Jazz Festival gets underway as Noel Freidline emcees this competition of five finalists at 7 p.m. on May 26 at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. General admission is $10. 355-2787. LET FREEDOM RING Fawzi Haimor conducts the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra in this patriotic concert in honor of Memorial Day

50 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011

One Hot Dish: The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens presents “On the Silk Road and the High Seas: Chinese Ceramics, Culture and Commerce” through Aug. 14 and “The Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain” through Dec. 31. “Silk Road” features more than 70 pieces that exemplify the history of ceramic arts, and “The Wark Collection” is considered one of the greatest accumulations of ceramics created in the 18th-century castle town of Meissen, Germany. The museum is located at 829 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville. Admission is $10; $6 for seniors, military and students. 356-6857.

at 8 p.m. on May 26 at First Baptist Church, 1600 S. Eighth St., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $15. 354-5547. BRASS COMMUNITY CONCERT The Beaches Barbershop Choir and the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra conducted by Fawzi Haimor perform at 6:30 p.m. on May 27 at TPC Sawgrass clubhouse, 110 Championship Way, Ponte Vedra Beach. Bring lawn chairs and a picnic. brassonline.org NOTES & STROKES Southlight Gallery features live jazz “jam sessions” with musicians and artist demonstrations from 5-8 p.m. on May 27, from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5 p.m. on May 28 and from noon-2 p.m. on May 29 at 100 N. Laura St., Jacksonville, 553-6361. For a full listing of scheduled performers and artists visit southlightgallery.com HERITAGE SINGERS OF JACKSONVILLE This local chorale group performs at 7 p.m. on May 27 at Faith Community Church, 3450 C.R. 210 W., St. Johns. 287-3223. TOKYO STRING QUARTET The AICMF presents this acclaimed combo at 7:30 p.m. on May 27 at Amelia Plantation Chapel, 36 Bowman Road, Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $40. 261-1779. JACKSONVILLE JAZZ FESTIVAL SWINGIN’ STAGE Artists scheduled to perform on May 27 are Gentlemen of the Night with Paul Taylor, Marion Meadows and Warren Hill at 5 p.m., John Pizarrelli Quartet with University of North Florida Jazz Ensemble I at 7 p.m. and Natalie Cole at 9 p.m. On May 28, it’s the Jazz Piano Competition winner performing at noon, the McCoy Tyner Trio with Gary Bartz at 1:30 p.m., The Defenders of The Groove appearing at 3:30 p.m., Boney James at 5:30 p.m., Eddie Palmieri Salsa Orchestra with Herman Olivera at 7:30 p.m. and the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra featuring Dianne Schuur at 9:30 p.m. On May 29, it’s the Douglas Anderson School of the Arts Jazz Ensemble I at noon, Nestor Torres at 2:30 p.m., DMS with George Duke, Marcus Miller and David Sanborn performs at 4:30 p.m. and Herbie Hancock at 6:30 p.m. Located at the corner of Main and Monroe streets, Jacksonville. 630-3690. JACKSONVILLE JAZZ FESTIVAL BREEZIN’ STAGE Artists scheduled to perform on May 27 are Navy Band Southeast’s TGIF Band at 5 p.m., Pierre & Co. at 6:30 p.m. and Global Noize at 8:30 p.m. On May 28, it’s the first round of the Generation Next Youth Competition at 11 a.m., finals at 2 p.m., B.K. Jackson at 4 p.m., Isaac Byrd Jr. & Tribe Judah at 5:30 p.m., Noel Freidline Quintet at 7:30 p.m. and Spam Allstars at 9:30 p.m. On May 29, it’s Tropic of Cancer at noon, JB Scott’s Swingin’ Allstars with Terry Myers at 2:30 p.m., ArtOfficial at 4:30 p.m. and

Gordon Goodwin’s Big Phat Band at 6:30 p.m. Located at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive, downtown. 630-3690. JACKSONVILLE JAZZ FESTIVAL GROOVIN’ STAGE Artists scheduled to perform on May 27 are Dayve Stewart & The Vibe at 5 p.m., Joey Calderazzo Trio with Orlando Le Fleming at 6:30 p.m. and Rebirth Brass Band at 8:30 p.m. On May 28, it’s the St. Johns River City Band at noon, Bradford Rogers at 1:30 p.m., Raul Midón at 3:30 p.m., The Flail at 5:30 p.m., Bitches Brew Revisited with Graham Haynes, Antoine Roney, Adam Rudolph, DJ Logic, Shazad Ismaily, James Hurt, JT Lewis and Brandon Ross at 7:30 p.m. and Roy Ayers at 9:30 p.m. On May 29, it’s Joe Baione at noon, The Wild Magnolias at 2:30 p.m., Mavis Staples at 4:30 p.m. and Guitarzzz with Chuck Loeb, Chieli Minucci and Paul Jackson Jr. at 6:30 p.m. Located at Hemming Plaza, 117 W. Duval St., Jacksonville. 630-3690. JACKSONVILLE JAZZ FESTIVAL OLD CHURCH STAGE Artists scheduled to perform on May 27 are Gary Starling Jazz Organization at 6 p.m. and Ray Callendar Quintet with Doug Carn at 8 p.m. On May 28, it’s Bill Hart Quartet at noon, Just Jazz Quintet at 2 p.m., The John Ricci Organ Trio at 4 p.m. and Ethan Bortnick Trio at 6 p.m. On May 29, it’s Sacred Jazz at 2:30 p.m. and Von Barlow’s Jazz Journey at 4:30 p.m. Located at Snyder Memorial Church, 226 N. Laura St., Jacksonville. 630-3690. ’ROUND MIDNIGHT JAZZ JAM The Jacksonville Jazz Festival presents this late-night jam session hosted by The Kelly/Scott Quintet from 10 p.m.-2 a.m. on May 27 and 28 at Hyatt Regency Riverfront, 225 East Coastline Drive, Jacksonville. 630-3690, 588-1234. BRINGING HOME THE GOLD The AICMF presents the Linden String Quartet at 7:30 p.m. on May 28 at Memorial United Methodist Church, 601 Centre St., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $20. 261-1779. MEMORIAL DAY OBSERVANCE Violinist Aron Mujumdar, harpsichordist Henson Markham, trumpeter Rob McKennon and narrator Jeremy Lucas perform works by Bach and Unger at 10:45 a.m. on May 29 at Unitarian Universalist Church, 7405 Arlington Expressway, Jacksonville. 355-7584. FESTIVAL OF ANGLICAN HYMNODY Dr. Marilyn Keiser conducts the Chancel Choir of the Church of the Good Shepherd at 6 p.m. on May 29 at 1100 Stockton St., Jacksonville. 387-5691. CONCERT ON THE GREEN The Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra performs at 8 p.m. on May 29 at Spring Park, 229 Walnut St., Green Cove Springs. Advance tickets are $10; $8 for students. Tickets at the gate are $12; $10 for students. concertonthegreen.com


ART WALKS & FESTIVALS UPTOWN SATURDAY NIGHT This event features galleries, antique stores and shops open from 5-9 p.m. on May 28 in St. Augustine’s San Marco District. 824-3152. DOWNTOWN FRIDAY MARKET Arts & crafts and local produce are offered every Fri. from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive. 353-1188. RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET The Arts Market is held from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. every Sat. beneath the Fuller Warren Bridge on Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville and features local and regional artists, strolling performers, bands and a farmers market. Admission is free. 554-6865, 389-2449. riversideartsmarket.com

MUSEUMS BEACHES MUSEUM & HISTORY CENTER 413 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach, 241-5657. “Acrylics and Old Photos” by Diana Patterson is on display June 1-Aug. 2. CUMMER MUSEUM OF ART & GARDENS 829 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, 356-6857. The Up & Cummers present “What is Art? Art is Healing” at 6:30 p.m. on May 24. Admission is $25; $15 for members. The exhibit, Ralph H. & Constance I. Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain, is on display through Aug. 14. The restored Tudor Room gallery is open through Dec. 31. CRISP-ELLERT ART MUSEUM 48 Sevilla St., St. Augustine, 826-8530. Andy Warhol’s 1967 film, “I, a Man,” is screened at 7 p.m. on May 26. KARPELES MANUSCRIPT MUSEUM 101 W. First St., Jacksonville, 356-2992. The show “Spiritualism,” featuring manuscripts of Harry Houdini and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, is on display through Aug. 27. Overstreet Ducasse’s “Mixed Media” is on display through July 28. The permanent collection features a variety of rare manuscripts. Open Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART JACKSONVILLE 333 N. Laura St., Jacksonville, 366-6911. Christina West’s exhibit, “What a Doll: The Human Object as Toy,” runs through Aug. 28. “Stranger in Paradise: The Works of Reverend Howard Finster” runs through Aug. 28. Family Fun Free Day is held from noon-4 p.m. every Sun. Open Tue.-Sun. mocajacksonville.org RITZ THEATRE & MUSEUM 829 N. Davis St., Jacksonville, 632-5555. “Lift Ev’ry Voice in LaVilla,” an exhibit of African-American history in Jacksonville, is on permanent display. Admission is $6 for adults, $3 for children, students and seniors. Open Tue.-Sun. ST. AUGUSTINE PIRATE AND TREASURE MUSEUM 12 S. Castillo Drive, St. Augustine. (877) 467-5863. This museum houses one of the largest collections of authentic pirate-related artifacts in the world, including the 17th century treasure chest of Captain Thomas Tew.

GALLERIES ANCHOR BOUTIQUE 210 St. George Street, C2, St. Augustine, 808-7078. Nick Commoditie is the featured artist through May. THE ART CENTER COOPERATIVE GALLERY 31 W. Adams St., Jacksonville, 355-1757. Susanne Schenke is the featured artist for May. BUTTERFIELD GARAGE ART GALLERY/BUTTERFIELD GARAGE TOO 137/137-C King St., St. Augustine, 825-4577, 829-0078. Glass sculptor James Stanford’s display, “Cave Paintings of the 21st Century,” runs through June 1. FIRST STREET GALLERY 216-B First St., Neptune Beach, 241-6928. The ninth anniversary of the show “Turtle Art” features local, regional and national artistic renderings, in various media, of endangered sea turtles. It runs May 25-June 27. The opening reception is held from 7-9 p.m. on May 27. HASKELL GALLERY Jax International Airport, 14201 Pecan Park Road, 741-3546. A collection of art kites by Melanie Walker and George Peters of Airworks Studios is on display through June. Commissioned work by the pair is shown in JIA’s Connector hallway. INDIGO ALLEY WINE BAR 316 Centre St., Fernandina Beach, 261-7222. Painter Paul Maley is the featured artist through June. JAXPORT GALLERY 2831 Talleyrand Ave., Jacksonville, 357-3052. The latest works by photographer Kirk Chamberlain and painter Anthony Whiting are on display through May. NULLSPACE 108 E. Adams St., Jacksonville, 716-4202. “Sequence Variations — New Work by Mark Estlund” is on display through June 3. P.A.ST.A FINE ARTS GALLERY 214 Charlotte St., St. Augustine, 824-0251. Watercolorist promise of benefit Carolyn Hayes Kelso is the featured artist through June. SALTWATER GALLERY 81 King St., St. Augustine, 669-5099. Designer Jason Fort’s exhibit, “Deviations — A Focus on Chaos,” runs through May. SOUTHLIGHT GALLERY 100 N. Laura St., Jacksonville, 553-6361. The gallery’s “Notes & Strokes” series features live jazz and artist demonstrations nightly from May 27-29. SOUTH GALLERY FSCJ’s South Campus, 11901 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville, 646-2023. “Ann Holloway Williams: A Celebration of Joy & Color, 1926-2010,” is on display through June 23. WATERWHEEL ART GALLERY 5047 First Coast Highway, Fernandina Beach, 261-2535. Watercolorist Sue Farrior Harden’s works are displayed through May. W.B. TATTER STUDIO GALLERY 76 A San Marco Ave., St. Augustine, 823-9263. Works by Val Lucas are featured through May. 

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For a complete list of galleries, log on to folioweekly.com. To list your event, send time, date, location (street address, city), admission price and contact number to print to Dan Brown, 9456 Philips Hwy., Ste. 11, Jacksonville FL 32256 or email dbrown@folioweekly.com. JPEGs must be at least 3”x5”, 300 dpi to be considered for publication.

All Dolled Up: Christina West’s exhibit, “What a Doll: The Human Object as Toy,” is on display through Aug. 28 at Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, 333 N. Laura St. The Atlanta-based West sculpts human figures at three-quarter scale, and playfully places them in deliberately awkward and even childish positions. 366-6911.

MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 51

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“Arggh matey! The parrot is my date!” The inaugural Pirate Prom & Dance Party is held on May 28 from 7-11 p.m. at Dancing with Victoria’s Studio, 4420 U.S. 1 S., St. Augustine. While pirate attire isn’t mandatory, it is strongly encouraged. Tickets are $15. 710-0085.

EVENTS

ROCK ON THE RIVER II Bands scheduled to perform at this free show starting at 1 p.m. on May 30 at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive, downtown, include Sick Puppies, Panic! at the Disco, The Airborne Toxic Event, Awolnation, Hugo and Manna Zen. VIP tickets are $50. 353-1188. jacksonvillelanding.com BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL The 23rd annual Blue Crab Festival is held May 27, 28, 29 and 30 in downtown Palatka along the riverfront and St. Johns Avenue. A lumberjack show, a seafood cook-off, a duck race, camel rides, helicopter rides, a pageant and carnival rides are featured. Bands slated to perform include Bill Wharton, The Lee Boys, Highway to Hell, Motor by City Josh, Sales RepBand and Bluesmoke. (386) 325-4406. Red River bluecrabfestival.com MEMORIAL DAY RIVERFEST The 23rd annual event is held May 28, 29 and 30 at Thrasher Horne Conference Center, 283 College Drive, Orange Park, and Spring Park on Magnolia Avenue, Green Cove Springs. A health and fitness expo, arts festival, Concert on the Green with Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, fireworks, arts and crafts, kids’ activities and a memorial service honoring veterans are featured. memorialdayriverfest.com CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA St. Augustine Jazz Society performs at 1 p.m. on May 30 at Plaza de la Constitucion in downtown St. Augustine. Bring a chair or blanket. Concerts continue at 7 p.m. every Thur. through Labor Day. 824-1004. PIRATE PROM & DANCE PARTY The inaugural Pirate Prom & Dance Party is held from 7-11 p.m. on May 28 at Dancing with Victoria’s Studio, 4420 U.S. 1 S., St. Augustine. Pirate attire is encouraged. Tickets are $15. 710-0085. FREE FAMILY CONCERTS The Amelia Island Chamber Music Festival offers free family-friendly concerts, including “Soar with eighth blackbird,” featuring the innovative sextet by that name, held at 11 a.m. on June 8 at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 2600 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach. Beth Newdome Fellowship Artists perform at 1 p.m. on June 9 at Savannah Grand of Amelia Island, 1900 Amelia Trace Court, Fernandina Beach. No ticket is required for these concerts. 261-1779. aicmf.com RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET WestJax Ensemble, Navy Band Southeast and Morton Perry Band perform on May 28 at Riverside Arts Market, held under the Fuller Warren Bridge on Riverside Avenue, downtown. The Arts Market features local and regional artists, a water taxi and a farmers market from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. every Sat. Admission is free. 554-6865, 389-2449. riversideartsmarket.com MOSH AFTER DARK Dr. Mike Reynolds discusses “Speaking of Meteorites” at 6 p.m. on May 26 at Museum of Science & History, 1025 Museum Circle, Jacksonville. Admission is $5; free for MOSH members, students and teachers with an ID. For reservations, call 396-6674, ext. 230. FAMILY AFFAIR MEMORIAL DAY CELEBRATION The inaugural celebration is held from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. on May 30 at The Bridge of Northeast Florida, 1824 Pearl St., Jacksonville. Food, an essay contest, bounce houses, live music, prizes and games are featured. Author Toya Carter is on hand to sign copies of her book, “Priceless Inspirations.” Bring lawn chair or blankets. 419-8336. MEMORIAL DAY AT FT. CLINCH A Memorial Day program is held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on May 28 and from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. on May 29, in honor of those who served in World War II, at Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach. Explore military displays, view memorabilia and learn about the uniforms, weapons, vehicles and lifestyle of those who were part of the war during the 1940s. Admission to the park is $6 per vehicle up to eight people in one car and $2 per person. Kids younger than 6 are admitted free. 277-7274. floridastateparks.org WOMEN’S LUNCHEON The Athena Cafe Luncheon presents Sally Nielsen, discussing “Life Writing for the Sake of Sanity,” from noon-1 p.m. on May 26 at FSCJ’s administrative offices, Boardroom 405, 501 W. State St., Jacksonville. Brownbaggers

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are welcome; an optional catered lunch is $10. For reservations, call 256-6987.

POLITICS & ACTIVISM

JAX RULES SUBCOMMITTEE MEETING Councilmember Art Shad, chair of the Rules Subcommittee on Ethics Bills, meets with Vice-Chair Richard Clark and Councilmembers Denise Lee, Stephen Joost, Bill Bishop, John Crescimbeni and Clay Yarborough, at 9:30 a.m. on May 25 in City Council Chambers, City Hall, 117 W. Duval St., Jacksonville. The bills up for discussion are 2011-167 ORD-MC, 2011-197 ORD-MC and 2011-232 ORD-MC. 630-1404. ROBERT’S RULES OF ORDER The ins and outs of public deliberation are presented at a free meeting on Robert’s Rules of Order from 6-9 p.m. on May 26 at Ed Ball Building, Training Room 110, at 214 N. Hogan St., downtown. The event is free, but seating is limited. To reserve a space, call 255-8261. JACKSONVILLE JOURNEY The oversight committee of this crime-fighting initiative meets at 4 p.m. on June 16 in Eighth Floor Conference Room 851, Ball Building, 214 N. Hogan St., Jacksonville. 630-1273.

COMMUNITY INTEREST

ONEJAX HUMANITARIAN AWARDS Delores Weaver, Martha Barrett, Nat Glover and Mark M. Green are honored at 6 p.m. on May 26 at the OneJax Humanitarian Awards dinner, held at Hyatt Regency Riverfront, 225 E. Coastline Drive, Jacksonville. The annual dinner honors those who have demonstrated an unwavering commitment to strengthening relationships in Jacksonville. Tickets are $200. For reservations, call 354-1529. OPERATION LIFESAVER OPEN HOUSE Florida Operation Lifesaver, a nonprofit offering education programs to prevent collisions, injuries and fatalities on and around railroad tracks and highway-rail grade crossings, holds an Open House from 3-6 p.m. on May 25 at Florida DOT Urban Office, Training Bldg., 2198 Edison Ave., Jacksonville. oli.org BLOOD DRIVE The Blood Alliance Bloodmobile is parked from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. on May 26 at Southeast Branch Library, 6670 U.S. 1 S., St. Augustine. To make an appointment, call 827-6900. RELAY FOR LIFE POKER RUN This ride starts at 11 a.m. on May 28 at S&L Classics, 10590 U.S. 1 N., Ponte Vedra. The fee is $20 per poker hand. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society, Relay for Life of Ponte Vedra Beach. 217-7075. ARTHRITIS BENEFIT A five-course wine dinner, A Night in Barcelona, is held from 6-9 p.m. on May 24 at Ocean 60, 60 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach. Tickets are $100; proceeds benefit the Arthritis Foundation. 247-0060. foodiesusa.com JTA’S SUMMER YOUTH PASS A JTA Summer Youth Pass is the ticket to unlimited rides on the bus and Skyway and free admission to Jacksonville Suns’ home games. Purchase a Summer Youth Pass for $30 for June and receive July for free; add August for $15 more. You must purchase your Summer Youth Pass by June 30, and it’s only for those 18 years and younger. 630-3100. jtafla.com

BOOKS & WRITING

BOOK CLUBS Maeve Binchy’s “Minding Frankie” is discussed at 3 p.m. on May 24 at Ponte Vedra Branch Library, 101 Library Blvd., Ponte Vedra, 827-6950. Beth Hoffman’s “Saving CeeCee Honeycutt” is discussed at 6:45 p.m. on May 26 at Southeast Branch Library, 6670 U.S. 1 S., St. Augustine, 827-6900. BINGO FOR BOOKS This adults-only event is held at 2 p.m. on May 28 at Anastasia Island Branch Library, 124 Sea Grove Main Street, St. Augustine Beach. Win some great books. 209-3730. ROMANCE AUTHORS Ancient City Romance Authors present Elizabeth Sinclair, discussing “Dos and Don’ts of Writing a Series,” at 12:30 p.m. on May 28 at Southeast Regional Library, 10599 Deerwood Park Blvd., Jacksonville. acrarwa.org KAREN WHITE Author White presents her novel, “Beach


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this is a copyright protected pro For questions, please call your advertising representative at 260-9770. rUn dAte: 052411 FAX YOUR PROOF IF POSSIBLE AT 268-3655 Trees,” at 3 p.m. on May 31 at The BookMark, 220 First St., Neptune Beach. 241-9026.

KIDS

RACE FOR KIDS 5K/1 MILE FUN RUN The run/walk starts at 7:30 a.m. on May 28 at 245 Little River Road, Nocatee, Ponte Vedra. A continental breakfast, games, raffles, prizes and a celebration follow. Registration for the 5K is $30, $10 for the 1-mile fun run. Proceeds benefit Young Life programs. ylraceforkids.com REAL-LIFE SUPERHEROES Kids meet real-life SJC firefighters, police officers and lifeguards and find out what it takes to be a local superhero at 3 p.m. on May 25 at Ponte Vedra Library, 101 Library Blvd., Ponte Vedra. 827-6950. sjcpls.org JAX ZOO Jacksonville Zoo & Gardens is the new home for rescued penguins, which are housed in the Tuxedo Coast exhibit. The Zoo features more than 1,800 rare and exotic animals and over 1,000 unique plant species. Preservation of sustainable biodiversity is a key mission of the nonprofit organization, an accredited member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums. It is open from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. 757-4463. jacksonvillezoo.org AMELIA ARTS ACADEMY Amelia Arts offers camps and summer workshops for kids 4-11 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. weekdays, June 20-Aug. 12 at 516 S. 10th St., Fernandina Beach. Activities include painting, storytelling, band, clay working, global art and music. 277-1225. ameliaartsacademy.org ICE SKATING CAMPS & CLASSES Jacksonville Ice & Sportsplex, 3605 Philips Highway, Southside, offers Hockey Camp for ages 6-14, Summer Learn to Skate Camp for kids ages 6-14, and Figure Skating Academy Level for ages 8-16. Public sessions are half-price while students are enrolled in Learn to Skate & Learn to Play classes. 399-3223. jaxiceandsportsplex.com

COMEDY

JOSH BLUE The Comedy Zone features All Stars on May 24 and 25. Comedian Josh Blue, “Last Comic Standing” star, appears at 8 p.m. on May 26 and 29, and at 8 and 10 p.m. on May 27 and 28 at 3130 Hartley Road, Ramada Inn, Jacksonville. Tickets range from $18-$25. 292-4242. JACKIE KNIGHT’S COMEDY CLUB Robert Holloway and Shannon Hall appear on May 27 and 28 at the Comedy Club, 3009 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd., St. Augustine. Tickets are $12. 461-8843. LATITUDE 30 COMEDY Comedy Central’s Ken Miller appears, along with Juanita Lolita, on May 26, 27 and 28 at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Southside. Tickets are $10 and $13. 365-5555.

UPCOMING

BUDDY VALASTRO “THE CAKE BOSS” June 5, T-U Center BIKERS FOR LIFE BENEFIT RIDE June 11, Fleming Island MARTIN LAWRENCE June 23, T-U Center FOLIO WEEKLY’S BEER FEST June 24, Morocco Shrine Auditorium

JACKSONVILLE FOODFIGHT June 9, EverBank Field KEITH URBAN June 17, Veterans Memorial Arena CATS June 17-19, Times-Union Center 48 HOUR FILM PROJECT June 17-21, The Florida Theatre ALEGRIA CIRQUE DU SOLEIL June 29, Veterans Memorial Arena

JAGUARS vs. FALCONS Aug. 19, EverBank Field

NATURE, SPORTS & OUTDOORS

EARTH WORKS SPRING SEMINARS Edible landscaping is discussed at 10 a.m. on May 28 at Earth Works Garden Center, 12501 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. 996-0712. NESTING BIRD STEWARDS NEEDED The nesting season for shorebirds and seabirds along St. Johns County coastline is here; volunteer stewards are needed at several locations. Training in bird identification, nesting cycles and stewardship is held at 6 p.m. on May 25 at Summer Haven least tern colony, A1A south of St. Augustine. For directions and reservations, call 813-5115. audubon.org JACKSONVILLE SUNS The hometown Suns — 2010 Southern League Champs — kick off a homestand against the Carolina Mudcats at 6:05 p.m. on May 30 at the Baseball Grounds, 301 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Games continue at 7:05 p.m. on May 31 and June 2 and 3, and at 1:05 p.m. on June 1. General admission is $12.50. 358-2846. jaxsuns.com PRO SOCCER JAX DESTROYERS Brand-new pro soccer team, the FC Web.com Jax Destroyers, takes on the Bradenton Academics at 4 p.m. on June 5 at Jacksonville University’s soccer stadium, 2800 University Blvd. N., Jacksonville. At press time, at least 14 players with local connections have been signed. Tickets are $5 and $8. jaxdestroyers.com

promise of benefit

FALLEN HEROES MEMORIAL 5K The 5K is held at 8 a.m. and the fun run’s at 9 a.m. on May 28 at EverBank Field, by the memorial Wall, downtown. Entry fee is $25, $30 day of race. Runners get a T-shirt. A celebration with awards and live music follows the race. milestoneraceauthority.com LOW TIDE BIKE RIDE The ride is held at 11 a.m. on May 28 at Anastasia State Park, 1340A A1A S., St. Augustine. The ride is free with paid park admission. 461-2035. floridastateparks.org TALBOT ISLANDS CRITTERS A ranger discusses common species that inhabit the natural communities of Northeast Florida’s undeveloped barrier islands at 2 p.m. on May 28 at Pavilion One, Little Talbot Island State Park, 12157 Heckscher Drive, Jacksonville. The program is free with regular park admission. 251-2320. floridastateparks.org ROWING FOR FITNESS Row for fitness and fun with the Bulldog Rowing Club. Adult and youth learn to row classes are offered monthly. Experienced rowers also welcome. 256-5082. bollescrew.org

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BUSINESS

SOUTHSIDE BUSINESS MEN’S CLUB Rene Carter, Family Abbey Carpet & Floor, is the featured speaker at noon on May 25 at San Jose Country Club, 7529 San Jose Blvd., Jacksonville. Admission is $20. For reservations, call 396-5559. CHAMBER AFTER HOURS Ponte Vedra Chamber of Commerce meets at 5:30 p.m. on May 25 at Ponte Vedra Wellness Center, 100 Corridor Road, Ste. 220, Ponte Vedra. Admission is free for members and first-time guests. 285-2004.

CLASSES & GROUPS

WOMEN’S SELF-DEFENSE CLASS Betty Griffin House offers a free women’s self-defense class at 9 a.m. on May 27 at Lion’s Den Karate, 138 N. One Drive, Ste. A, St. Augustine. For reservations, call 826-1904. THE LEARNING COMMUNITY A Coping with Loss workshop is held at 5 p.m. on May 25 at 626 S. Eighth St., Fernandina Beach. Introduction to Paying Small Business Taxes class is held at 5:30 p.m. on May 27. The Ultimate Disaster Preparedness class is held at 6 p.m. on June 1. 430-0120. tlcnf.com FREEDOM FROM ADDICTION Buddhist teacher John Jones offers these classes at 7 p.m. on June 2 and 16 at Maitreya Kadampa Buddhist Center, 85 Sailfish Drive, Atlantic Beach. 222-8531. MeditationInJacksonville.org COMMUNITY HOSPICE SUPPORT GROUPS Bereavement Support is held every Tue., from 6:30-8 p.m., May 24-July 12 at Neviaser Educational Institute of Community Hospice, 4266 Sunbeam Road, Jacksonville; and every Wed., from 6:30-8 p.m., May 25-July 13 at Acosta-Rua Center for Caring of Community Hospice, 5450 Ramona Blvd., Jacksonville. Support group participants must meet with a Community Hospice bereavement counselor before joining a group. To learn whether a Community Hospice therapeutic support group might be right for you, call Roxanne C. Miller, LCSW, manager of bereavement and community grief, at 407-6330. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY RE-STORE The new store is located at 2745 Industry Center Road, Ste. 8, St. Augustine, just off S.R. 16, west of Four Mile Road. The store is packed with great bargains such as furniture, building materials, appliances and all kinds of household items. Proceeds benefit the building of decent, affordable homes for families in need in St. Johns County. Open from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. every Thur., Fri. and Sat. 829-6916. HUMANE SOCIETY VOLUNTEERS The St. Augustine Humane Society recruits and trains volunteers 17 or older for a variety of services including spay shuttle operations, fundraising and building renovations. The necessary forms are found at staughumane.org. 827-8817. YOGA AT THE GRANARY A yoga class is held at 10:30 a.m. every Thur. at The Granary, 1738 Kingsley Ave., Orange Park. Classes are $12 each. 264-5443. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS Do you have a drug problem? Maybe they can help. 358-6262, 723-5683. serenitycoastna. org, firstcoastna.org NAR-A-NON This group meets at 8 p.m. every Tue. and Thur. at 4172 Shirley Ave., Avondale. 945-7168. BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU Classes are open to men, women and children, beginning, intermediate and advanced, from 7-9 p.m. every Mon.-Thur., and from 10 a.m.-noon every Sat. at East Coast Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 7035 Philips Highway, Ste. 7, Jacksonville. The first lesson is free. 554-7800. SCRABBLE CLUB This Jacksonville group gathers at 1 p.m. every Wed. at Golden Corral, 11470 San Jose Blvd., and every Thur. at Barnes & Noble, 11112 San Jose Blvd. For times, email curtlee59@aol.com. All levels are welcome. 733-1565. JAX JUGGLERS Future jugglers gather outside at local parks in the summertime; check the website for details. Admission is free. jaxjugglers.org  Events are listed on a space-available basis. To list an event, send time, date, location (street address, city), admission price and contact number for publication to events@folioweekly.com or click the link in our Happenings section at folioweekly.com.

© 2011

MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 53


DINING GUIDE KEY

Average Entrée Cost: $ = Less than $8 $$ = $8-$14 $$$ = $15-$22 $$$$ = $23 & up BW = Beer, Wine FB = Full Bar CM = Children’s Menu TO = Take Out B = Breakfast L = Lunch D = Dinner F = Folio Weekly distribution point Send changes to mdryden@folioweekly.com

(In Fernandina Beach unless otherwise noted.) THE BEECH STREET GRILL Fine dining is offered in a casual atmosphere. The menu includes fresh local seafood, steaks and pasta dishes created with a variety of ethnic influences. Award-winning wine list. FB. L, Wed.-Fri.; D, nightly; Sun. brunch. 801 Beech St. 277-3662. $$$ BEEF O’BRADY’S FAMILY SPORTS PUB F Signature wings, burgers and sandwiches. BW. TO. L & D, daily. 1916 S. 14th St. 261-0555. (For more locations, visit beefobradys.com) $$ BRETT’S WATERWAY CAFÉ F At the foot of Centre Street, the upscale restaurant overlooks the Harbor Marina. The menu includes daily specials, fresh Florida seafood and an extensive wine list. FB. L & D, daily. 1 S. Front St. 261-2660. $$$ BRIGHT MORNINGS The small café offers freshly baked goods. B & L daily. 105 S. Third St. 491-1771. $$ CAFÉ 4750 An Italian kitchen and wine bar. Chef de Cuisine Garrett Gooch offers roasted sea bass, frutti di mare soup, clam linguini, panatela bruschetta and fresh gelatos. Dine indoors or on the terrace. FB. B, L & D, daily. 4750 Amelia Island Pkwy., The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island. 277-1100. $$$ CAFÉ KARIBO F Eclectic cuisine, served under the oaks in historic Fernandina, features sandwiches and chef’s specials. Alfresco dining. FB. L & D, Tue.-Sat.; L, Sun. & Mon. 27 N. Third St. 277-5269. $$ CHEZ LEZAN BAKERY F European-style breads, pastries, croissants, muffins and pies baked daily. 1014 Atlantic Ave. 491-4663. $ EIGHT Contemporary sports lounge offers burgers, sandwiches, wings and nachos. FB. D, Mon.-Fri.; L & D, Fri. & Sat. The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island, 4750 Amelia Island Pkwy., Amelia Island. 277-1100. $$ ESPAÑA RESTAURANT & TAPAS Traditional Spanish and Portuguese dishes, tapas and paella served in a cozy atmosphere. BW, CM. D nightly. 22 S. Fourth St. 261-7700. $$$ FERNANDELI F Classics with a Southern touch, like a onethird-pound devil dog, Reubens and pulled pork. Sandwiches and wraps built to order from fresh cold cuts, tuna, egg and turkey salads. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 17B S. Eighth St. 261-0008. $ GENERAL STORE F This new store has a little bit of everything. Breakfast includes hot rope sausage, lunch features the Redneck Reuben. Deli meats, cheeses, chicken, fish, pizzas and pasta, too. BW. B, L & D, daily. 520 Centre St. 310-6080. $ GENNARO’S RISTORANTE ITALIANO F Southern Italian cuisine: pasta, gourmet ravioli, hand-tossed pizzas. Specialties are margharita pizza and shrimp feast. Bread is baked on-site. CM, BW. L & D, daily. 5 S. Second St., 2619400. 5472 First Coast Highway, Amelia Island, 491-1999. $$ HAPPY TOMATO COURTYARD CAFE & BBQ Pulled pork sandwich, chicken salad and walnut chocolate chunk cookie, served in a laid-back atmosphere. BW. CM. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 7 S. Third St. 321-0707. $$ JACK & DIANE’S F Casual cafe offers steak & eggs, pancakes, Cajun scampi, etouffée, curry pizza, vegan black bean cakes, shrimp & grits, hand-carved steaks. FB. B, L & D, daily. 708 Centre St. 321-1444. $$ JOE’S 2ND STREET BISTRO Elegant island atmosphere. NY strip steak with sauces, Maine crab cakes, seafood fricassee and roast chicken penne pasta. BW. CM. D, nightly. 14 S. Second St. 321-2558. $$$ KABUKI JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR F Teppanyaki masters create your meal; plus a 37-item sushi bar. BW. D, Tue.-Sun. Amelia Plaza. 277-8782. $$ KELLEY’S COURTYARD CAFE F She crab soup, salads, fried green tomatoes, sandwiches and wraps are served indoors or out on the patio. Vegetarian dishes are also offered. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 19 S. Third St. 432-8213. $ LULU’S AT THE THOMPSON HOUSE F An innovative lunch menu includes po’boys, salads and seafood “little plates” served in a historic house. Dinner features fresh local seafood (Fernandina shrimp every Thur.); nightly specials. BW. L & D, Tue.-Sat., brunch on Sun. Reservations recommended. 11 S. Seventh St. 432-8394. $$ MONTEGO BAY COFFEE CAFE Locally owned and operated, serving specialty coffees and fruit smoothies. Dine in or hit the drive-thru. B & L, Mon.-Sat. 463363 S.R. 200, Yulee. 225-3600. $ MOON RIVER PIZZA F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Northernstyle pizza by the pie or the slice. Choose from more than 20 toppings. Owner-selected wines and a large beer selection. BW. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 925 S. 14th St. 321-3400. $ THE MUSTARD SEED CAFE Organic eatery and juice bar. Extensive, eclectic menu featuring vegetarian and vegan items. Daily specials: local seafood, free-range chicken and

54 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011

Dustin Hegedus

AMELIA ISLAND, FERNANDINA BEACH, YULEE

Espeto Brazilian Steak House offers an authentic Brazilian dining experience, complete with gauchos and a river view on St. Johns Avenue in Avondale.

fresh organic produce. Wraps, sandwiches, soups. CM. B & L, Mon.-Sat. 833 T.J. Courson Rd. 277-3141. $$ O’KANE’S IRISH PUB F Rustic, genuine Irish pub up front, eatery in back, featuring daily specials, fish-n-chips, and soups served in a sourdough bread bowl. FB. L & D, Mon.Sun. 318 Centre St. 261-1000. $$ PEPPER’S MEXICAN GRILL & CANTINA F The family restaurant offers authentic Mexican cuisine. BW, CM. L & D, daily. 520 Centre St. 272-2011. $$ PICANTE GRILL ROTISSERIE BAR Picante offers flavors of Peru and Latin America, served in a contemporary atmosphere. The menu includes authentic Peruvian cebiche and homestyle empanadas. BW, CM, TO. B, L & D daily. 464073 S.R. 200, Ste. 2, Yulee. 310-9222. $$ PLAE In Spa & Shops at Omni Amelia Island Plantation, the cozy venue offers an innovative and PLAEful dining experience. D, nightly. 277-2132. $$$ SALT, THE GRILL Best of Jax 2010 winner. Elegant dining featuring local seafood and produce, served in a contemporary coastal setting. FB. D, Tue.-Sat. 4750 Amelia Island Pkwy., The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island. 491-6746. $$$$ SANDOLLAR RESTAURANT & MARINA F Dine inside or on the deck. Snow crab legs, fresh fish, shellfish dishes. FB. L & D, daily. 9716 Heckscher Dr., Ft. George Island. 251-2449. $$ SLIDERS SEASIDE GRILL F Oceanfront dining; local seafood, shrimp, crab cakes, outdoor beachfront tiki & raw bar, covered deck and kids’ playground. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 1998 S. Fletcher Ave. 277-6652. $$ THE SURF F Dine inside or on large oceanview deck. Steaks, fresh fish, shrimp and nightly specials. Late-night menu. FB. L & D, daily. 3199 S. Fletcher Ave. 261-5711. $$ T-RAY’S BURGER STATION F A favorite local spot; Best of Jax 2010 winner. Grilled or blackened fish sandwiches, homemade burgers. BW, TO. B & L, Mon.-Sat. 202 S. Eighth St. 261-6310. $ 29 SOUTH EATS F Part of historic Fernandina Beach’s downtown scene. Award-winning Chef Scotty serves traditional world cuisine with a modern twist. L, Tue.-Sat.; D, Mon.-Sat.; Sun. brunch. 29 S. Third St. 277-7919. $$

ARLINGTON, REGENCY

EAST COAST BUFFET F A 160+ item Chinese, Japanese, American and Italian buffet. Dine in, take out. FB. L & D, Mon.Sat.; Sun. brunch. 9569 Regency Sq. Blvd. N. 726-9888. $$ GENE’S SEAFOOD F Serving fresh Mayport shrimp, fish, oysters, scallops, gator tail, steaks and combos. L & D, daily. 6132 Merrill Rd. 744-2333. $$ KABUTO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE & SUSHI BAR F This restaurant offers steak & shrimp, filet mignon & lobster, shrimp & scallops, a sushi bar, teppanyaki grill and traditional Japanese cuisine. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 10055 Atlantic Blvd. 724-8883. $$$ LA NOPALERA Best of Jax 2010 winner. See Intracoastal. 8818 Atlantic Blvd. 720-0106. MEEHAN’S TAVERN F This Irish pub and restaurant serves beef and Guinness stew, Philly cheesesteak sandwiches, traditional lamb stew and jalapeño poppers, made fresh onsite, in a comfy atmosphere. Wifi, HDTVs, non-smoking. BW. L & D, Wed.-Sun. 9119 Merrill Rd., Ste. 5. 551-7076. $$ NERO’S CAFE F Nero’s serves traditional Italian fare, including seafood, veal, beef, chicken and pasta dishes.

Weekly specials are lasagna, 2-for-1 pizza and AYCE spaghetti. CM, FB. L, Sun.; D, daily. 3607 University Blvd. N. 743-3141. $$ ORANGE TREE HOT DOGS F Hot dogs with slaw, chili cheese, sauerkraut; small pizzas. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 9501 Arlington Expwy., Regency Sq. 721-3595. (orangetreehotdogs.com) $ PITA EXPRESS Philly, chicken fajita, falafel, chicken Caesar salad and eggplant parmigiana pitas, plus omelets and pancakes. CM. B, L & D, daily. 2754 Trollie Lane. 674-2637. $ REGENCY ALE HOUSE & RAW BAR Generous portions and friendly service in a nautical atmosphere. Fresh fish, specialty pastas, fresh oysters and clams. BW. L & D, daily. 9541 Regency Square Blvd. S. 720-0551. $$ TREY’S DELI & GRILL F Fresh food served in a relaxed atmosphere. Burgers, Trey’s Reuben, deli sandwiches, pork, steaks, seafood, pies. Prime rib specials every Fri. night. CM, BW. L & D, Mon.-Fri. 2044 Rogero Rd. 744-3690. $$ UNIVERSITY DINER F The popular diner serves familiar breakfast fare and lunch items like meatloaf, burgers, sandwiches: wraps, BLTs, clubs, melts. Daily specials. BW. B & L, Sat. & Sun.; B, L & D, Mon.-Fri. 5959 Merrill Rd. 762-3433. $

AVONDALE, ORTEGA

BISCOTTIS F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Mozzarella bruschetta, Avondale pizza, sandwiches, espresso, cappuccino. Revolving daily specials. B, Tue.-Sun.; L & D, daily. 3556 St. Johns Ave. 387-2060. $$$ THE BLUE FISH RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR Fresh seafood, steaks and more are served in a casual atmosphere. Halfportions are available. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 3551 St. Johns Ave., Shoppes of Avondale. 387-0700. $$$ BRICK RESTAURANT F Creative all-American fare like tuna tartare, seaweed salad and Kobe burger. Outside dining. FB. L & D, daily. 3585 St. Johns Ave. 387-0606. $$$ THE CASBAH F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Middle Eastern cuisine is served in a friendly atmosphere. BW. L & D, daily. 3628 St. Johns Ave. 981-9966. $$ ESPETO BRAZILIAN STEAK HOUSE F Gauchos carve the meat onto your plate from serving tables. FB. D, Tue.-Sun., closed Mon. 4000 St. Johns Ave., Ste. 40. 388-4884. $$$ THE FOX RESTAURANT F Best of Jax 2010 winner. The Fox has been a Jacksonville landmark for 50-plus years. Owners Ian & Mary Chase serve classic diner-style fare, homemade desserts. B & L daily. 3580 St. Johns Ave. 387-2669. $ ORSAY Best of Jax 2010 winner. The French/American bistro focuses on craftsmanship and service. FB. D, Tues.-Sat. 3630 Park St. 381-0909. $$$ RUAN THAI F The elegant Avondale restaurant offers authentic Thai cuisine, including curries and pad dishes. CM, FB. L & D, Tue.-Sun. 3951 St. Johns Ave. 384-6665. $$$ TOM & BETTY’S F A Jacksonville tradition for more than 30 years, Tom & Betty’s serves hefty sandwiches with classic car themes, along with homemade-style dishes. CM, FB. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 4409 Roosevelt Blvd. 387-3311. $$ ’town F Owner Meghan Purcell and Executive Chef Scott Ostrander bring farm-to-table to Northeast Florida, offering American fare with an emphasis on sustainability. FB. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 3611 St. Johns Ave. 345-2596. $$

BAYMEADOWS

AL’S PIZZA F Best of Jax 2010 winner. See Beaches. 8060

Philips Hwy. 731-4300. $ BROADWAY RISTORANTE & PIZZERIA F Family-ownedand-operated New York-style pizzeria serves hand-tossed, brick-oven-baked pizza, and traditional Italian dinners, wings, subs. Dine-in or delivered. CM, BW. L & D, daily. 10920 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 3. 519-8000. $$ CAFE CONFLUENCE F This European coffeehouse serves Italian specialty coffees and smoothies, along with paninis, salads and European chocolates. Outdoor dining. BW. L & D, Tue.-Sun. 8612 Baymeadows Rd. 733-7840. $ CHA-CHA’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT F Owner Celso Alvarado offers authentic Mexican fare with 26 combo dinners and specialty dishes including chalupas, enchiladas and burritos. FB. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 9551 Baymeadows Rd. 737-9903. $$ CHICAGO PIZZA & SPORTS GRILLE F Chicago-style deepdish pizzas, hot dogs, Italian beef dishes from the Comastro family, serving authentic Windy City favorites for 25+ years. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 8206 Philips Hwy. 731-9797. $$ DEERWOOD DELI & DINER F The ’50s-style diner serves malts, shakes, Reubens, Cubans, burgers, and traditional breakfast items. CM. B & L, daily. 9934 Old Baymeadows Rd. 641-4877. $$ THE FIFTH ELEMENT F The first four elements are earth, water, air and fire — but here they prepare authentic Indian, South Indian and Indochinese dishes with artistic flair. Lunch buffet includes lamb, goat, chicken, tandoori and biryani items. CM. L & D, daily. 9485 Baymeadows Rd. 448-8265. $$ GATOR’S DOCKSIDE F See Orange Park. 8650 Baymeadows Rd. 448-0500. $$ INDIA RESTAURANT F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Extensive menu of entrées, clay-oven grilled Tandoori specialties and chicken tandoor, fish, seafood and korma. L, Mon.-Sat., D, daily. 9802 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 8. 620-0777. $$ LARRY’S GIANT SUBS F With locations all over Northeast Florida, Larry’s piles subs up with fresh fixins and serves ’em fast. Some Larry’s Subs offer B & W and/or serve breakfast. CM. L & D, daily. 3928 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 9 (Goodby’s Creek), 737-7740; 8616 Baymeadows Rd. 739-2498. larryssubs.com $ LEMONGRASS F Upscale Thai cuisine in a metropolitan atmosphere. Chef Aphayasane’s innovative creations include roast duckling and fried snapper. BW. R. L, Mon.-Fri.; D, Mon.Sat. 9846 Old Baymeadows Rd. 645-9911. $$ MANDALOUN MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE F This Lebanese restaurant offers authentic Mediterranean cuisine: lahm meshwe, kafta khoshkhas and baked filet of red snapper. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 9862 Old Baymeadows Rd. 646-1881. $$ MAYURI INDIAN CUISINE F Traditional Indian items include tandoori specials, South Indian, Indo-Chinese, vegetarian, biryani and thali style dishes. BW. L & D. 9551 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 10. 448-5999. $$ NATIVE SUN NATURAL FOODS MARKET F Best of Jax 2010 winner. The organic supermarket offers a full deli and a hot bar with fresh soups, quesadillas, rotisserie chicken and vegan sushi, as well as a fresh juice and smoothie bar. 11030 Baymeadows Rd. 260-2791. $ OMAHA STEAKHOUSE Center-cut beef, fresh seafood and sandwiches served in an English tavern atmosphere. The signature dish is a 16-ounce bone-in ribeye. Desserts include crème brûlée. FB. L & D, daily. 9300 Baymeadows Rd., Embassy Suites Hotel. 739-6633. $$ PATTAYA THAI GRILLE F Serving traditional Thai and


Voted a Top 5 Restaurant in Orange Park. Fresh Ingredients Quality Presentation • Traditional Thai Food vegetarian items and a 40-plus item vegetarian menu in a contemporary atmosphere. B/W. L & D, Tue.-Sun. 9551 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 1. 646-9506. $$ PIZZA PALACE F See San Marco. 3928 Baymeadows Rd. 527-8649. $$ STICKY FINGERS F Memphis-style rib house specializes in barbecue ribs served several ways. FB. L & D, daily. 8129 Point Meadows Way. 493-7427. $$

BEACHES

(In Jax Beach unless otherwise noted.) A LA CARTE Authentic New England fare like Maine lobster rolls, fried Ipswich clams, crab or clam cake sandwich, fried shrimp basket, haddock sandwich, clam chowdah, birch beer and blueberry soda. Dine inside or on the deck. TO. L, Fri.-Tue. 331 First Ave. N. 241-2005. $$ AL’S PIZZA F Serving hand-tossed gourmet pizzas, calzones and Italian entrees for more than 21 years. Voted Best Pizza by Folio Weekly readers from 1996-2010. BW. L & D, daily. 303 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach. 249-0002. $ ANGIE’S SUBS F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Subs are madeto-order fresh. Serious casual. Wicked good iced tea. 1436 Beach Blvd. 246-2519. $ ATOMIC FLYING FISH SEAFOOD TACO GRILL Beach-casual with Cali-style fish, steak, blackened gator tacos and sides. L & D, daily. 309 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach. 372-0882. $$ BEACH BUDS CHICKEN F This cozy, family-owned place serves marinated fried or baked chicken: family meals (kids like Peruvian nuggets), giant tenders, in box lunches and as Mini-Me sandwiches, along with gizzards, livers, 15 sides and fried or blackened shrimp, fish, conch fritters, deviled crabs. TO. L & D, daily. 1289 Penman Road. 247-2828. $ BEACHSIDE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT & MARKET F The full fresh seafood market serves seafood baskets, fish tacos, oyster baskets and Philly cheesesteaks. Dine indoors or outside. Beach delivery. CM, BW. L & D, daily. 120 S. Third St. 444-8862. $$ BONGIORNO’S PHILLY STEAK SHOP F South Philly’s Bongiorno family imports Amoroso rolls for Real Deal cheesesteak, Original Gobbler, clubs, wraps, burgers and dogs. BW, CM. L & D, daily. 2294 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach. 246-3278. $$ BONO’S PIT BAR-B-Q F Baby back ribs, fried corn, sweet potatoes. BW. L & D, daily. 1307 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach. 270-2666. 1266 S. Third St. 249-8704. bonosbarbq.com $ THE BRASSERIE & BAR French/European-style bistro and bar offers coq au vin, French onion soup, fritto misto, Moroccan-style lamb shank. FB. D, Tue.-Sun. 1312 Beach Blvd. 249-5800. $$$ BUDDHA’S BELLY F Authentic Thai dishes made with fresh ingredients using tried-and-true recipes. FB, TO. L & D, daily. 301 10th Ave. N. 712-4444. $$ CAMPECHE BAY CANTINA F Homemade-style Mexican items are fajitas, enchiladas and fried ice cream, plus margaritas. FB. D, nightly. 127 First Ave. N. 249-3322. $$ CARIBBEE KEY F Best of Jax 2010 winner. AmerCaribbean cuisine includes seafood, steaks and sandwiches. Open-air deck bar upstairs; outdoor dining downstairs. FB. L & D, daily. 100 N. First St., Neptune Beach. 270-8940. $$ CASA MARIA See Springfield. 2429 S. Third St. 372-9000. CHICAGO PIZZA & SPORTS GRILLE F See Baymeadows. 320 N. First St. 270-8565. $$ COPPER TOP SOUTHERN AMERICAN CUISINE F The menu features favorites from The Homestead, like fried chicken, homemade-style biscuits and cornbread, served in a family atmosphere inside a cozy log cabin. CM, FB. Sun. brunch; D, daily. 1712 Beach Blvd. 249-4776. $$ CRAB CAKE FACTORY JAX F Chef Kahn Vongdara presents an innovative menu of seafood dishes and seasonal favorites. FB. L & D daily. The Factory’s Ashley Hayek is a 2010 Best of Jax winner for Best Bartender. 1396 Beach Blvd., Beach Plaza. 247-9880. $$ CRUISERS GRILL F Best of Jax 2010 winner, serving burgers, sandwiches, nachos, tacos, quesadillas and cheese fries. 319 23rd Ave. S. 270-0356. $ CULHANE’S IRISH PUB Four Culhane sisters own and operate the authentic Irish pub, featuring Guy Fieri’s (“Diners, DriveIns & Dives”) fave items — Guinness stew, lamb sliders and fish pie. L, Fri.-Sun.; D, Tue.-Sun.; weekend brunch. FB, CM. 967 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach. 249-9595. $$ DICK’S WINGS F This NASCAR-themed place serves 365 varieties of wings. The menu also features half-pound burgers, ribs and salads. BW, TO. L & D daily. 2010 Best of Jax winner for Best Chicken Wings. 2434 Mayport Road, Atlantic Beach, 372-0298. 311 N. Third St., 853-5004. $ DWIGHT’S The Mediterranean-style bistro features fresh local seafood, filet mignon, mixed grill and an extensive wine list. D, Tue.-Sat. 1527 Penman Rd. 241-4496. $$$$ ENGINE 15 BREWING COMPANY F This new Jax Beach restaurant serves gastropub fare like soups, salads, flatbreads and specialty sandwiches, including BarBe-Cuban and beer dip. Daily specials, too. CM, BW. L & D, Tue.-Sun. 1500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 217. 249-2337. $ EUROPEAN STREET F See San Marco. 992 Beach Blvd. 249-3001. $ FIONN MACCOOL’S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT Casual dining with uptown Irish flair, including fish and chips,

Guinness beef stew and black-and-tan brownies. FB, CM. L & D, daily. 333 N. First St. 242-9499. $$ THE FISH COMPANY F Fresh, local seafood is served, including Mayport shrimp, fish baskets, grilled tuna and an oyster bar. L & D, daily. CM, FB. 725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 12, Atlantic Beach. 246-0123. $$ HALA SANDWICH SHOP & BAKERY Authentic Middle Eastern favorites include gyros, shwarma, pita bread, made fresh daily. BW. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 1451 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune PROMISE OF BENEFIT Beach. 249-2212. $$ HOT DOG HUT F Best of Jax 2010 winner. All-beef hot dogs, sausages, hamburgers, crab cakes, beer-battered onion rings and French fries. B. L, daily. 1439 Third St. S. 247-8886. $ ICHIBAN F Three dining areas: teppan or hibachi tables (watch a chef prepare your food), a sushi bar and Westernstyle seating offering tempura and teriyaki. FB, Japanese plum wine. L & D, daily. 675 N. Third St. 247-4688. $$ LYNCH’S IRISH PUB Best of Jax 2010 winner. The full-service restaurant offers corned beef and cabbage, Shepherd’s pie and fish-n-chips. 30+ beers on tap. FB. L, Sat. & Sun., D, daily. 514 N. First St. 249-5181. $$ MEZZA LUNA RISTORANTE F A Beaches tradition for 20+ years. Favorites are Szechuan ahi tuna, lasagna Bolognese and wood-fired pizza. Inside or patio. Extensive wine list. CM, FB. D, Mon.-Sat. 110 First St., Neptune Beach. 249-5573. $$$ MIMI’S SPORTS GRILLE East meets West: Every dish is infused with Asian style and ingredients, including lumpia, yaki tori and several kinds of sushi. FB. L & D daily. 1021 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach. 270-1030. $$ MOJO KITCHEN BBQ PIT & BLUES BAR F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Traditional slow-cooked Southern barbecue served in a blues bar atmosphere. Favorites are pulled pork, Texas brisket and slow-cooked ribs. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 1500 Beach Blvd. 247-6636. $$ MONKEY’S UNCLE TAVERN F For 25 years, Monkey’s has served pub grub, burgers, sandwiches, seafood and wings. Dine inside or out on the patio. FB. L & D, daily. 1850 S. Third St. 246-1070. $ NORTH BEACH BISTRO Casual dining with an elegant touch, like slow-cooked veal osso buco; calypso crusted mahi mahi with spiced plantain chips. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 6, Atlantic Beach. 372-4105. $$$ OCEAN 60 Best of Jax 2010 winner. A prix fixe menu is offered. Continental cuisine, with fresh seafood, nightly specials and a changing seasonal menu. Dine in a formal dining room or casual Martini Room. D, Mon.-Sat. 60 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach. 247-0060. $$$ PACO’S MEXICAN GRILL Serving Baja-style Mexican cuisine, featuring carne asada, tacos, burritos, fish tacos and shrimp burritos. CM, FB. B, L & D, daily. 333 First St. N. 208-5097. $ PARSONS SEAFOOD RESTAURANT F The family-style restaurant has an outdoor patio and an extensive menu, including the mariner’s platter and the Original Dreamboat. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 904 Sixth Ave. S. 249-0608. $$ PHILLY’S FINEST F Authentic Philly-style cheesesteaks are made with imported Amorosa rolls. Hoagies, wings and pizza ... cold beer, too. FB. L & D, daily. 1527 N. Third St. 241-7188. $$ RAGTIME TAVERN SEAFOOD GRILL F The Beaches landmark serves grilled seafood with a Cajun/Creole accent. Hand-crafted cold beer. FB. L & D, daily. 207 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach. 241-7877. $$ SALT LIFE FOOD SHACK An array of specialty menu items, including signature tuna poke bowl, fresh rolled sushi, Ensenada tacos and local fried shrimp, in a casual, trendy open-air space. FB, TO, CM. L & D, daily. 1018 Third St. N. 372-4456. $$ SNEAKERS SPORTS GRILLE F Best of Jax 2010 winner. 111 Beach Blvd. 482-1000. $$ SUN DOG STEAK & SEAFOOD F Eclectic American fare, art deco décor with an authentic diner feel. FB. L & D, daily; Sun. brunch. 207 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach. 241-8221. $$ TACOLU BAJA MEXICANA F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Fresh, Baja-style Mexican fare, with a focus on fish tacos and tequila, as well as fried cheese, bangin’ shrimp and verde chicken tacos. L & D, Tue.-Sun. 1183 Beach Blvd. 249-8226. $$ THAI ROOM RESTAURANT F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Dine in an intimate setting as Chef Thepsouvanh prepares Thai cuisine like crispy duck or pan-seared Chilean sea bass. BW. L, Mon.-Fri. D, Mon.-Sat. 1286 S. Third St. 249-8444. $$$ TWO DUDES SEAFOOD PLACE F Brand new, serving up-tothe-minute-fresh Mayport seafood, including shrimp, scallops, snapper and oysters in sandwiches or baskets, grilled, blackened or fried. The Dudes’ salad and a Caesar salad are also available. B, TO. L & D daily. 22 Seminole Rd., Atlantic Beach. 246-2000. $ THE WINE BAR The casual neighborhood place has a tapas-style menu, fire-baked flatbreads and a wine selection. Tue.-Sun. 320 N. First St. 372-0211. $$

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DOWNTOWN

(The Jacksonville Landing venues are at 2 Independent Drive) ADAMS STREET DELI & GRILL The lunch spot serves wraps, including grilled chicken, and salads, including Greek salad. L, Mon.-Fri. 126 W. Adams St. 475-1400. $$ BURRITO GALLERY & BAR F Best of Jax 2010 winner.

MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 55

Folio


GRILL ME!

A WEEKLY Q&A WITH PEOPLE IN THE RESTAURANT BIZ

NAME: Pete Silvano RESTAURANT: Blu Tavern, 1635 Wells Road, Orange Park BIRTHPLACE: Springfield, Mass. YEARS IN THE BUSINESS: 25 FAVORITE RESTAURANT (other than my own): Michael’s at The Citadel, Scottsdale, Ariz. FAVORITE COOKING STYLE: Fusion, Indian, Asian and Latin FAVORITE INGREDIENTS: Garlic, fresh herbs, truffle oil, sherry vinegar and olive oil. IDEAL MEAL: Grilled ribeye, fresh arugula salad with sherry vinegar and truffle oil, zucchini and a 22-ounce glass of cold Stella Artois. WOULDN’T EAT IF YOU PAID ME: I’ll try anything. MOST MEMORABLE RESTAURANT EXPERIENCE: Cooking for 400 with only two people. INSIDER’S SECRET: Fat plus seasoning plus acid equals good food. CELEBRITY SIGHTING: None yet, but they’re coming! CULINARY GUILTY PLEASURE: Pork fat

Southwest cuisine, traditional American salads. Burritos and more burritos. Onsite art gallery. FB. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 21 E. Adams St. 598-2922. $ CAFÉ NOLA AT MOCA JAX On the first floor of Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, Cafe Nola serves shrimp and grits, gourmet sandwiches, fresh fish tacos, homemade desserts. FB. L, Mon.-Fri.; D, Thur. 333 N. Laura St. 366-6911 ext. 231. $4 CHICAGO PIZZA & SPORTS GRILLE F See Baymeadows. The Jacksonville Landing. 354-7747. $$$ CITY HALL PUB On the Trolley route. A sports bar vibe: 16 big-screen HDTVs. Angus burgers, dogs, sandwiches & sides, AYCE wings buffet, soup-n-salad. FB. Free downtown area lunch delivery. L & D, daily. 234 Randolph Blvd. 356-6750. $$ DE REAL TING CAFE F The popular restaurant offers a Caribbean lunch buffet Tue.-Fri. FB. L & D, Tue.-Sun. 128 W. Adams St. 633-9738. $ INDOCHINE Serving Thai and Southeast Asian cuisine in the core of downtown. Signature dishes include favorites like chicken Satay, soft shell crab, and mango and sticky rice for dessert. BW, FB, TO. L, Mon.-Fri., D, Tue.-Sat. 21 E. Adams St. 598-5303. $$ JENKINS QUALITY BARBECUE Family-owned-and-operated. Jenkins offers beef, pork, chicken, homemade desserts. L & D, daily. 830 N. Pearl St. 353-6388. $ JULIETTE’S & J-BAR Serving dinner before (or dessert after) a show. Breakfast buffet. J-Bar serves bistro-inspired small plates. FB. Daily. Omni Hotel, 245 W. Water St. 355-6664. $$$ KOJA SUSHI F Sushi, Japanese, Asian and Korean cuisine. Indoor and outdoor dining and bar. FB. L & D, daily. The Jacksonville Landing. 350-9911. $$ THE SKYLINE DINING & CONFERENCE CENTER Weekday lunch includes salad bar, hot meals and a carving station. L, Mon.-Fri.; L, Sun. upon request. FB. 50 N. Laura St., Ste. 3550. 791-9797. $$ ZODIAC GRILL F Serving Mediterranean cuisine and American favorites, with a popular lunch buffet. BW. B & L, daily. 120 W. Adams St. 354-8283. $

FLEMING ISLAND

CHICAGO PIZZA & SPORTS GRILLE F See Baymeadows. 406 Old Hard Road, Ste. 106. 213-7779. $$ GRASSROOTS NATURAL MARKET F See Riverside. B, L & D, Mon.-Sat.; L, Sun. 1915 East West Pkwy., 541-0009. $ HONEY B’S CAFE Breakfast includes omelets, pancakes, French toast. Lunch offers entrée salads, quiches and buildyour-own burgers. Peanut butter pie is a customer favorite. Tea parties are held every Sat. B & L, daily. 3535 U.S. 17, Ste. 8. 264-7325. $$ LA NOPALERA F Best of Jax 2010 winner. See Intracoastal. 1571 C.R. 220, Ste. 100. 215-2223. $ MERCURY MOON F Appetizers, sandwiches, desserts. Daily specials. TO, FB. L & D, daily. 2015 C.R. 220. 215-8999. $$ MOJO SMOKEHOUSE F Best of Jax 2010 winner. FB. L & D, daily. 1810 Town Ctr. Blvd. 264-0636. $$ WHITEY’S FISH CAMP F The renowned seafood place, family-owned since 1963, specializes in AYCE freshwater catfish. Also steaks, pastas. Outdoor waterfront dining. Come by car, boat or bike. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 2032 C.R. 220. 269-4198. $

56 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011

INTRACOASTAL

AL’S PIZZA F Best of Jax 2010 winner. See Beaches. 14286 Beach Blvd. (at San Pablo Rd.) 223-0991. $ BRUCCI’S PIZZA, PASTA, PANINIS F Brucci’s offers authentic New York-style pizza, Italian pastas and desserts in a family atmosphere. CM, BW. L & D, daily. 13500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 36. 223-6913. $ CLIFF’S ROCKIN’ BAR-N-GRILL F Cliff’s features 8-ounce burgers, wings, steak, seafood, homemade pizza and daily specials. FB. L & D, daily. Smoking permitted. 3033 Monument Rd., Ste. 2, Cobblestone Plaza. 645-5162. $$ ISTANBUL MEDITERRANEAN & ITALIAN CUISINE F A varied menu offers European cuisine including lamb, beef and chicken dishes, as well as pizza and wraps. BW. L & D, daily. 13170 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 26. 220-9192. $$ JERRY’S SPORTS GRILLE & STEAKHOUSE F The menu includes wings, hamburgers, Ahi tuna and handcut steaks. CM, FB. Daily. 13170 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 22. 220-6766. $ LA NOPALERA F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Family-ownedand-operated, serving authentic Mexican cuisine, like tamales, fajitas, pork tacos, in a casual family atmosphere. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 14333 Beach Blvd. 992-1666. $ MILANO’S RESTAURANT & PIZZERIA Homemade Italian cuisine, breads, pizzas, calzones and specialty dishes. BW, CM. L & D, daily. 12620 Beach Blvd., Ste. 4. 646-9119. $$ TIME OUT SPORTS GRILL F Wings, gourmet pizza, fresh seafood and specialty wraps. FB. D, Mon.-Fri.; L & D, Sat. & Sun. 13799 Beach Blvd., Ste. 5. 223-6999. $$ TKO’S THAI HUT F The menu offers Thai fusion, curry dishes, chef’s specials, steaks, healthy options and sushi. Hookahs are available. Dine inside or on the covered patio. FB. L & D, daily. 13500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 46. 647-7546. $$ ZAITOON MEDITERRANEAN GRILL Traditional Mediterranean family recipes are blended to create Spanish, French, Italian and Middle Eastern inspired dishes. L & D, Tue.-Sun. 13475 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 40, Harbour Village. 221-7066. $$

JULINGTON, NW ST. JOHNS

BLACKSTONE GRILLE The menu blends flavors from a variety of cultures and influences for modern American fusion cuisine, served in a bistro-style setting. FB. L & D, Mon.-Fri., D, Sat.; Sun. brunch. 112 Bartram Oaks Walk, Ste. 102. 287-0766. $$$ BRUCCI’S PIZZA F See Intracoastal. 540 S.R. 13, Ste. 10, Fruit Cove. 287-8317. $$ CHICAGO PIZZA BAKERY & PUB F Transforms from family restaurant to pub serving Chicago-style deep dish pizza. CM, FB. D, Tue.-Fri., L & D, Sat. & Sun. 107 Nature Walk Pkwy., Ste. 101, 230-9700. $$ HAPPY OURS SPORTS GRILLE F Wings, big salads, burgers, wraps and sandwiches. Sports events on HDTVs. CM, FB. 116 Bartram Oaks Walk, Ste. 101. 683-1964. $ PIZZA PALACE F See San Marco. 116 Bartram Oaks Walk. 230-2171. $

MANDARIN

AL’S PIZZA Best of Jax 2010 winner. See Beaches. 11190 San Jose Blvd. 260-4115. $ AW SHUCKS F This seafood place features an oyster bar, steaks, seafood, wings and pasta. Favorites are ahi tuna, shrimp & grits, oysters Rockefeller, pitas and kabobs. Sweet

potato puffs are the signature side. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 9743 Old St. Augustine Rd. 240-0368. $$ THE BLUE CRAB CRABHOUSE F A Maryland-style crabhouse featuring fresh blue crabs, garlic crabs, and king, snow and Dungeness crab legs. FB, CM. D, Tue.-Sat.; L & D, Sun. 3057 Julington Creek Rd. 260-2722. $$ BROOKLYN PIZZA F The traditional pizzeria serves New York-style pizza, specialty pies, and subs, strombolis and calzones. BW. L & D, daily. 11406 San Jose Blvd. 288-9211. 13820 St. Augustine Rd. 880-0020. $ CASA MARIA F See Springfield. L & D, daily. 14965 Old St. Augustine Rd. 619-8186. $$ CLARK’S FISH CAMP F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Clark’s has steak, ribs, AYCE catfish dinners, 3-pound prime rib. Dine in, out or in a creek-view glass-enclosed room. FB. D, Mon.-Fri.; L & D, Sat. & Sun. 12903 Hood Landing Rd. 268-3474. $$ DON JUAN’S RESTAURANT F Authentic Mexican dishes prepared daily from scratch, served in a casual atmosphere. FB, CM. L & D, daily. 12373 San Jose Blvd. 268-8722. $$ GIGI’S RESTAURANT Breakfast buffet daily, lunch buffet weekdays. The Comedy Zone (Best of Jax 2010 winner) has an appetizer menu. FB. B, L & D, daily. I-295 & San Jose Blvd. (Ramada Inn). 268-8080. $$ (Fri. & Sat. buffet, $$$) HALA CAFE & BAKERY F See Southside. 9735 Old St. Augustine Rd. 288-8890. $$ KOBE JAPANESE RESTAURANT The fusion-style sushi restaurant offers oyster shooters, kobe beef shabu-shabu, Chilean sea bass and filet mignon. BW & sake. L & D, daily. 11362 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 8. 288-7999. $$ LET’S NOSH F The authentic Jewish deli offers a full breakfast, lunch, brunch and full-service deli counter. Real New York water bagels, bread baked on site and desserts. CM. B & L, daily. 9850 San Jose Blvd. 683-8346. $ MAMA FU’S ASIAN HOUSE MSG-free pan-Asian cuisine prepared to order in woks using fresh ingredients. Authentic Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese and Thai dishes. BW, CM. L & D, daily. 11105 San Jose Blvd. 260-1727. $$ MANDARIN ALE HOUSE A laid-back atmosphere with 30-plus beers on tap. FB. L & D, daily. 11112 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 19. 292-0003. $$ METRO DINER F See San Marco. 12807 San Jose Blvd. 638-6185. $$ NATIVE SUN NATURAL FOODS MARKET F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Organic supermarket with full deli and salad bar serving wraps, quesadillas, chopped salads, vegetarian dishes. Fresh juice and smoothie bar. Indoor and outdoor seating. Mon.-Sat. 10000 San Jose Blvd. 260-6950. $ PICASSO’S PIZZERIA F Picasso’s specializes in handtossed gourmet pizza, calzones, homemade New York-style cheesecake and handmade pasta. Fresh local seafood and steaks. BW, CM, TO. L & D daily. 10503 San Jose Blvd. 880-0811. $$ WHOLE FOODS MARKET F 100+ prepared items at a fullservice and self-service hot bar, soup bar, dessert bar. Madeto-order Italian specialties from a brick oven pizza hearth. L & D, daily. 10601 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 22. 288-1100. $$

calzones and Italian entrees. Voted Best Pizza in Jax by Folio Weekly readers from 1996-2010. BW. L & D, daily. 635 A1A. 543-1494. $ AQUA GRILL Upscale cuisine offers fresh seafood, Angus steaks, Maine lobster and vegetarian dishes. Outdoor patio seating. FB. L, Mon.-Sat.; D, nightly. 950 Sawgrass Village Dr. 285-3017. $$$ BRUCCI’S PIZZA F Authentic New York-style pizza, Italian pastas, paninis, desserts. Family atmosphere. CM. L & D, daily. 880 A1A, Ste. 8. 280-7677. $$ CAFFE ANDIAMO Traditional Italian cuisine features fresh seafood, veal, homemade pastas and wood-fired pizza prepared in a copper clad oven. An extensive wine list is offered in a cosmopolitan atmosphere. Dine indoors or Out on the terrace. L & D, daily. 500 Sawgrass Village. 280-2299. $$$ KARMA This homey place offers favorites from here and abroad, including burgers, wings, pastas, salads and apps, prepared with fresh, local ingredients. Outdoor dining is available. Brunch menu on Sat. & Sun. CM, FB. L, Sat. & Sun.; D, daily. 822 A1A N., Ste. 105. 834-3942. $$ LULU’S WATERFRONT GRILLE F On the Intracoastal Waterway, LuLu’s can be reached by car or by boat. Seafood, steaks and pasta dishes with a sophisticated flair. FB. L & D, daily; Sun. brunch. 301 N. Roscoe Blvd. 285-0139. $$ NINETEEN AT TPC SAWGRASS In Sawgrass’ Tournament Players Club, Nineteen features more than 230 wines and freshly prepared American and Continental cuisine, including local seafood, served inside or al fresco on the verandah. L & D, daily. 110 Championship Way. 273-3235. $$$ PUSSER’S BAR & GRILLE F Freshly prepared Caribbean cuisine, including red snapper Ponte Vedra Jamaican grilled pork ribs and barbecued salmon tower. Tropical rum drinks feature Pusser’s Painkiller. FB. L & D, daily. 816 A1A N., Ste. 100. 280-7766. L, $$; D, $$ RESTAURANT MEDURE Chef Matthew Medure offers his eclectic cuisine featuring local and imported seafood with Southern and Asian influences. F/B. D, Mon.-Sat. 818 A1A N. 543-3797. $$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE Best of Jax 2010 winner. See San Marco. 8141 A1A. 285-0014. $$$$ SIMPLE FAIRE F Breakfast and lunch favorites, featuring Boar’s Head meats and cheeses served on fresh bread. Daily specials. B & L, Mon.-Fri. 3020 Hartley Rd. 683-2542. $$ 619 OCEAN VIEW Dining with a Mediterranean touch, featuring fresh seafood, steaks and nightly specials. FB, CM. D, Wed.-Sun. 619 Ponte Vedra Blvd., Cabana Beach Club. 285-6198. $$$ URBAN FLATS Ancient world-style flatbread is paired with fresh regional and seasonal ingredients in wraps, flatwiches and entrées, served in a casual, urban atmosphere. An international wine list is offered. FB. L & D, daily. 330 A1A N. 280-5515. $$

ORANGE PARK

AJ’S ON PARK STREET AJ’s is a casual barbecue spot serving smoked St. Louis-style ribs, pulled pork, smoked brisket, seafood and dishes made with a Latin touch. L & D, Mon.-Fri. 630 Park St. 598-0188. $$ AL’S PIZZA F Best of Jax 2010 winner. See Beaches. 1620 Margaret St. 388-8384. $ BAKERY MODERNE F The neighborhood bakery offers classic pastries, artisanal breads, seasonal favorites, all made from scratch, including popular petit fours and custom cakes. B & L, daily. 869 Stockton St., Ste. 6, Riverside. 389-7117. $ CARMINE’S PIE HOUSE The brand-new Italian eatery serves pizza by the slice, gourmet pizzas, appetizers, classic Italian dishes — calzone, stromboli, subs, panini — wings, and microbrews in a casual atmosphere. BW, CM, TO, delivery. 2677 Forbes St. 387-1400. $$ COOL MOOSE F Classic sandwiches, eclectic wraps and desserts. An extensive gourmet coffee menu with Green Mountain coffees and frozen coffee drinks. B & L, daily. Brunch, Sun. 2708 Park St. 381-4242. $ CROSS CREEK See Springfield. 850 S. Lane Ave. 783-9579. $$ EUROPEAN STREET CAFÉ F See San Marco. 2753 Park St. 384-9999. $ GATOR’S DOCKSIDE F See Orange Park. 6677 103rd St., Westside, 777-6135. $$ GRASSROOTS NATURAL MARKET F A deli, organic and natural grocery, and juice & smoothie bar offers teas, coffees, gourmet cheeses; natural, organic and raw items. Grab-andgo sandwiches, salads and sides. Craft beers, organic wines. B, L & D, Mon.-Sat.; L, Sun. 2007 Park St. 384-4474. $ HJ’S BAR & GRILL Traditional American fare: burgers, sandwiches, wraps and platters of ribs, shrimp and fish. CM, FB. L & D, Sat. & Sun., D, Mon.-Fri. 8540 Argyle Forest Blvd., Ste. 1. 317-2783. $$ HOVAN MEDITERRANEAN GOURMET F Dine inside or on the patio. Mediterranean entrées include lamb, and beef gyros. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 2005-1 Park St. 381-9394. $ JACKSONS GRILL The locally owned spot’s original menu has fried pickle chips, Rockin’ Ranch burgers, gumbo, sandwiches. BW, TO. B, L & D, daily. 1522 King St. 384-8984. $$ JOHNNY’S DELI & GRILL F A Riverside tradition, serving

ARON’S PIZZA F This family-owned restaurant offers eggplant dishes, manicotti and New York-style pizza. BW, CM, TO. L & D daily. 650 Park Ave. 269-1007. $$ BLU TAVERN F This restaurant has an upscale feel with a casual atmosphere. Favorites include bread pudding and Orange Park salad. Blu also serves pasta dishes, burgers, seafood, pork, beef and steaks. CM, FB. L & D, daily; B, Sat. & Sun. only. 1635 Wells Rd. 644-7731. $$ GATOR’S DOCKSIDE F For 18-plus years, the sports-themed family restaurant has served wings, ribs, entrees, sandwiches. FB. L & D, daily. 9680 Argyle Forest Blvd. 425-6466. $$ THE HILLTOP CLUB She-crab soup, scallops, prime beef, wagyu beef, chicken Florentine and stuffed grouper. Chef Nick’s salmon is a favorite. FB. D, Tue.-Sat. 2030 Wells Rd. 272-5959. $$ JOEY MOZARELLAS This Italian restaurant’s specialty is a 24-slice pizza: 18”x26” of fresh ingredients and sauces made daily. CM, TO. L & D, daily. 930 Blanding Blvd. 579-4748. $$ PASTA MARKET & CLAM BAR F This family-owned-andoperated restaurant offers gourmet pizzas, veal, chicken and mussels, shrimp and grouper dishes and (of course) pastas: spaghetti, fettucine, lasagna, ziti, calzones, linguini, tortolini and ravioli, all made with fresh ingredients, homemade-style. Daily specials. CM, BW, sangria. 1930 Kingsley Ave. 276-9551. D, nightly. $$ POMPEII COAL-FIRED PIZZA F Pizzas are baked in coal-fired ovens. Popular pizzas include Health Choice and Mozzarella. Coal-fired sandwiches and wings, too. BW. L & D, daily. 2134 Park Ave. 264-6116. $$ THE ROADHOUSE F Burgers, wings, deli sandwiches and popular lunches are served. FB. L & D, daily. 231 Blanding Blvd. 264-0611. $ THAI GARDEN F Traditional Thai cuisine made with fresh ingredients, served in a relaxed atmosphere. Curry dishes and specialty selections with authentic Thai flavors. BW. L, Mon.Fri.; D, nightly. 10 Blanding Blvd., Ste. A. 272-8434. $$

PONTE VEDRA, NE ST. JOHNS

AL’S PIZZA F Homemade breads, pizza, white pizza,

RIVERSIDE, 5 POINTS, WESTSIDE


60+ fresh deli and grill items, including hot sandwiches. L, Mon.-Fri. 474 Riverside Ave. 356-8055. $ MONROE’S SMOKEHOUSE BBQ Smoked meats include wings, pulled pork, brisket, turkey and ribs. Homemade-style sides include green beans, baked beans, red cole slaw, collards. BW, CM. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 4838 Highway Ave., 389-5551. $$ MOON RIVER PIZZA F Best of Jax 2010 winner. See Amelia Island. 1176 Edgewood Ave. S. 389-4442. $ MOSSFIRE GRILL F Southwestern menu with ahi tuna tacos, goat cheese enchiladas and gouda quesadillas. Dine inside or on the patio. FB. L & D, daily. 1537 Margaret St. 355-4434. $$ O’BROTHERS IRISH PUB F Innovative Irish fare and traditional faves are offered, like lambburger with Stilton crust, Guinness mac & cheese, Shepherd’s pie and fish-nchips — plus 18 beers on tap. L, daily except Mon.; D, daily. CM, FB. 1521 Margaret St. 854-9300. $$ PERARD’S PIZZA & ITALIAN CUISINE F Traditional Italian fare is prepared with fresh sauces and dough made from scratch daily, along with a large selection of gourmet pizza toppings. CM, BW. L & D, daily. 11043 Crystal Springs Rd., Ste. 2. 378-8131. $ PERFECT RACK BILLIARDS F Upscale billiards hall has burgers, steak, deli sandwiches, wings. Family-friendly, non-smoking. BW, CM. L & D, daily. 1186 Edgewood Ave. S., Murray Hill. 738-7645. $ PIZZA PALACE ON THE PARK F See San Marco. Outdoor seating. 920 Margaret St., 5 Points. 598-1212. $$ SAKE HOUSE F Japanese grill and sushi bar features sushi, sashimi, katsu, tempura, hibachi and specialty rolls. CM, BW, sake. L & D, daily. 824 Lomax St. 301-1188. $$ SUMO SUSHI F Authentic Japanese fare, traditional to entrees and sushi rolls, spicy sashimi salad, gyoza (pork dumpling), tobiko (flying fish roe), Rainbow roll (tuna, salmon, yellowtail, Calif. roll). BW, CM. L & D, daily. 2726 Park St. 388-8838. $$ TWO DOORS DOWN F Former Tad’s owner offers traditional faves: hotcakes, omelets, burgers, pork chops, liver & onions, fried chicken, sides and desserts. CM, TO. B & L, Mon.-Fri. 436 Park St. 598-0032. $ WALKERS This nightspot has a tapas menu plus a wide variety of wines, served in a rustic, intimate atmosphere. BW. Tue.-Sat. 2692 Post St. 894-7465. $ WASABI JAPANESE BUFFET F AYCE buffet. Sushi bar, sashimi, hibachi, teriyaki, tempura, steak, seafood. BW. L & D, daily. 1014 Margaret St., Ste. 1, 5 Points. 301-1199. $$

ST. AUGUSTINE

© 2011

FolioWeekly

Walter Coker

A1A ALE WORKS F The city’s only brew pub taps seven hand-crafted ales and lagers. A1A specializes in innovative New World cuisine. FB. L & D, daily. 1 King St. 829-2977. $$ AMICI ITALIAN RESTAURANT F A family-owned-andoperated Italian restaurant offers traditional pasta, veal, steak and seafood dishes. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 1915B A1A S., St. Augustine Beach. 461-0102. $$

ANN O’MALLEY’S F Fresh handmade sandwiches, soups, salads and perfectly poured Guinness. Favorites include Reubens and chicken salad. CM, BW, Irish beers on tap. L & D, daily. 23 Orange St. 825-4040. $$ BARNACLE BILL’S BEACHSIDE, BARNACLE BILL’S DOWNTOWN F For 30 years, these family restaurants have served seafood, oysters, gator tail, steak, and popular fried shrimp. FB, CM, TO. Downtown location, L & D daily; beach location, D nightly. 451 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 471-2434. 14 Castillo Drive, 824-3663. $$ BEACH STREET PIZZA New York and Chicago style pizzas, calzones and homemade pasta dishes, all made from fresh ingredients., served in a beach-theme atmosphere. CM. L & D, Tue.-Sun. 4171 A1A S. 461-0910. $$ THE BISTRO AT CULINARY OUTFITTERS Locals lunch on crab cakes, chicken burritos, hamburgers, wraps and soups, made with fresh ingredients. BW, TO. L, Mon.-Fri. 9 S. Dixie Hwy. 829-2727. $ THE BLACK MOLLY BAR & GRILL Brand-new Black Molly Grill serves fresh, local seafood, steaks and pasta dishes in a casual atmosphere. FB, CM. L & D daily. 504 Geoffrey St., Cobblestone Plaza. 547-2723. $$ BORRILLO’S PIZZA & SUBS F Specialty pizzas are Borrillo’s Supreme (extra cheese, pepperoni, sausage), white and vegetarian pizzas. Subs and pasta dinners. L & D, daily. 88 San Marco Ave. 829-1133. $ CAFÉ ATLANTICO Traditional and new Italian dishes served in an intimate space. Master Chef Paolo Pece prepares risotto alla pescatora, with shrimp, scallops and seasonal shellfish, in a parmesan cheese basket. BW. D, nightly. 647 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach. 471-7332. $$$ CAFÉ ELEVEN F Eclectic cuisine like feta spinach egg croissant, apple turkey sandwich, pear-berry salad. Daily chef creations. BW. B, L & D, daily. 501 A1A Beach Blvd. 460-9311. B, $; L & D, $$ CAP’S ON THE WATER F This Vilano Beach mainstay offers coastal cuisine — tapas platters, cioppino, fresh local shrimp, raw oyster bar — indoors or on an oak-shaded deck. Boat access. FB. L, Fri.-Sun., D, nightly. 4325 Myrtle St., Vilano Beach. 824-8794. $$ CARMELO’S PIZZERIA F Authentic New York style brickoven-baked pizza, fresh baked sub rolls, Boars Head meats and cheeses, fresh salads, calzones, strombolis and sliced pizza specials. BW. L & D, daily. 146 King St. 494-6658. $$ CELLAR 6 ART GALLERY & WINE BAR Wolfgang Puck coffees, handmade desserts and light bistro-style fare amid local art. BW. Mon.-Sat. 6 Aviles St. 827-9055. $$ CREEKSIDE DINERY Creekside serves beef, chicken and seafood, with an emphasis on low-country cooking. Outdoor deck with a fire pit. FB. D, nightly. 160 Nix Boatyard Rd. 829-6113. $$ THE FLORIDIAN The downtown restaurant serves innovative Southern fare, made with local farmers’ local food. Signature items: fried green tomato bruschetta, ’N’grits with shrimp, fish or tofu. L & D, Wed.-Mon. 39 Cordova St. 829-0655. $$ GYPSY CAB COMPANY F Best of Jax 2010 winner.

Thai fusion, curry, chef specials, sushi and even hookahs round out the menu at TKO’s Thai Hut, on Beach Boulevard in the Intracoastal West area.

MAY 24-30, 2011 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 57


© 2011

58 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011

FolioWeekly

International menu features large portions, reasonable prices. FB. L & D, daily. 828 Anastasia Blvd. 824-8244. $$ HARRY’S SEAFOOD BAR & GRILLE F In a historic, two-story house, the New Orleans-style eatery has fresh seafood, steaks, jambalaya, etouffée and shrimp. FB. L & D, daily. 46 Avenida Menendez. 824-7765. $$ KINGFISH GRILL At Vilano Bridge’s west end, Kingfish Grill offers casual waterside dining indoors and on the deck, featuring fresh daily catch, house specialties and sushi. FB, CM. L & D, daily. 252 Yacht Club Drive. 824-2111. $$ KINGS HEAD BRITISH PUB F Authentic Brit pub serves fish & chips, Cornish pastie and steak & kidney pie. Tap beers are Guinness, Newcastle and Bass. BW. L & D, Wed.-Sun. 6460 U.S. 1 (4 miles N. of St. Augustine Airport.) 823-9787. $$ THE MANATEE CAFÉ F Serving healthful cuisine using organically grown fruits, vegetables, grains and legumes. B & L, daily. 525 S.R. 16, Ste. 106, Westgate Plaza. 826-0210. $ MANGO MANGO’S BEACHSIDE BAR & GRILL F Caribbean kitchen has comfort food with a tropical twist: coconut shrimp and fried plantains. BW, CM. Outdoor dining. 700 A1A Beach Blvd., (A Street access) St. Augustine Beach. 461-1077. $$ MILL TOP TAVERN F A St. Auggie institution housed in an 1884 building, serving nachos, soups, sandwiches and daily specials. Dine inside or on open-air decks. At the big mill wheel. FB. L & D, daily. 19 1/2 St. George St. 829-2329. $$ OASIS RESTAURANT & DECK F Just a block from the ocean, with a tropical atmosphere and open-air deck. Steamed oysters, crab legs, burgers. CM, FB. B, L & D, daily. 4000 A1A & Ocean Trace Rd., St. Augustine Beach. 471-3424. $ PURPLE OLIVE INTERNATIONAL BISTRO F Family-ownedand-operated, offering specials, fresh artisan breads. Soups, salad dressings and desserts made from scratch. BW. D, Tue.-Sat. 4255 A1A S., Ste. 6, St. Augustine Beach. 461-1250. $$ RAINTREE The restaurant, in a Victorian home, offers a menu with contemporary and traditional international influences. Extensive wine list. FB. D, daily. 102 San Marco Ave. 824-7211. $$$ THE REEF RESTAURANT Casual oceanfront restaurant has an ocean view from every table. Fresh local seafood, steak, pasta dishes and daily chef specials. Outdoor dining. FB, CM, TO. L & D daily. 4100 Coastal Hwy. A1A, Vilano Beach. 824-8008. $$ SCARLETT O’HARA’S Best of Jax 2010 winner. Serving Southern fare, barbecue and seafood. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 70 Hypolita St. 824-6535. $$ SOUTH BEACH GRILL Located off A1A, south of the S.R. 206 bridge, this two-story beachy destination offers casual oceanfront dining and fresh local seafood. Dine indoors or out on a beachfront deck. FB. B, L & D daily. 45 Cubbedge Road, Crescent Beach. 471-8700. $ SUNSET GRILLE Casual Key West style and a seafood-heavy menu — it’s a consistent Great Chowder Debate winner. Specialties include baby back ribs, lobster ravioli, coconut shrimp and datil pepper wings with bleu cheese dressing. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 421 A1A Beach Blvd. 471-5555. $$$ ZHANRAS F Art-themed tapas-style place has small plate items in a casual, contemporary space. Entrée portions available. CM, FB. D, daily; Sun. brunch. 108 Anastasia Blvd. 823-3367. $$

and vegetarian choices make up specialty pizzas, hoagies and calzones. FB. L & D, daily. 9734 Deer Lake Court (at Tinseltown). 997-1955. $ mellowmushroom.com MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET F Featuring seafood, an everchanging menu of more than 180 items includes cedar-roasted Atlantic salmon and seared salt-and-pepper tuna. FB, CM. L & D, daily. 5205 Big Island Dr., St. Johns Town Ctr. 645-3474. $$$ THE ORIGINAL PANCAKE HOUSE The recipes, unique to the Pancake House, call for only the freshest ingredients. CM. B, L & D, daily. 10208 Buckhead Branch Dr. 997-6088. $$ OTAKI JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE F Family-owned steakhouse has an open sushi bar, hibachi grill tables and an open kitchen. Dine indoor or out. FB, CM, TO. L, Mon.-Fri.; D, nightly. 7860 Gate Parkway, Stes. 119-122. 854-0485. $$$ POMPEII COAL-FIRED PIZZA F See Orange Park. 7860 Gate Parkway. 253-3314. $$ RENNA’S PIZZA F Renna’s serves up New York-style pizza, calzones, subs and lasagna made from authentic Italian recipes. Delivery, CM, BW. 4624 Town Crossing Dr., Ste. 125, St. Johns Town Center. 565-1299. rennaspizza.com $$ SEVEN BRIDGES GRILLE & BREWERY F Innovative menu of fresh local grilled seafood, sesame tuna, grouper Oscar, chicken, steak and pizza. Microbrewed ales and lagers. FB. L & D, daily. 9735 Gate Pkwy. N. 997-1999. $$ SOUTHSIDE ALE HOUSE F Steaks, fresh seafood, sandwiches and desserts. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 9711 Deer Lake Court. 565-2882. $$ STEAMERS CAFE F Steamers’ menu has all-natural and organic items, including wraps, sandwiches, subs, soups, steamer bowls, smoothies and fresh juices. Daily lunch specials. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 4320 Deerwood Lake Parkway, Ste. 106. 646-4527. $ SUITE The St. Johns Town Center premium lounge and restaurant offers chef-driven small plates and an extensive list of specialty cocktails, served in a sophisticated atmosphere. FB. D & late-nite, nightly. 4880 Big Island Dr., Ste. 1. 493-9305. $$ TAVERNA YAMAS This Greek restaurant serves char-broiled kabobs, seafood and traditional Greek wines and desserts. FB. L & D daily. 9753 Deer Lake Court. 854-0426. $$ URBAN FLATS F See Ponte Vedra. CM. FB. L & D, daily. 9726 Touchton Road. 642-1488. $$ WASABI JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Authentic Japanese cuisine, teppanyaki shows and a full sushi menu. CM. L & D, daily. 10206 River Coast Dr. 997-6528. $$ WHISKY RIVER F Best of Jax 2010 winner. At St. Johns Town Center’s Plaza, Whisky River features wings, pizza, wraps, sandwiches and burgers served in a lively car racingthemed atmosphere (Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s the owner). FB. CM. L & D, daily. 4850 Big Island Drive. 645-5571. $$ WILD WING CAFÉ F Serving up 33 flavors of wings, as well as soups, sandwiches, wraps, ribs, platters and burgers. FB. 4555 Southside Blvd. 998-WING (9464). $$ YUMMY SUSHI F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Teriyaki, tempura, hibachi-style dinners, sushi & sashimi. Sushi lunch roll special. BW, sake. L & D, daily. 4372 Southside Blvd. 998-8806. $$

ST. JOHNS TOWN CENTER, TINSELTOWN

ATHENS CAFÉ F Serving authentic Greek cuisine: lamb, seafood, veal and pasta dishes. BW. L & D, daily. 6271 St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 7. 733-1199. $$ CRUISERS GRILL F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Burgers, sandwiches, nachos, quesadillas and cheese fries. 5613 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 1. 737-2874. $ DICK’S WINGS F Best of Jax 2010 winner. NASCAR-themed family style sports place serves wings, buffalo tenders, burgers and chicken sandwiches. CM. BW. L & D, daily. 1610 University Blvd. W. 448-2110. dickswingsandgrill.com $ MOJO BAR-B-QUE F Best of Jax 2010 winner. The Southern Blues kitchen serves pulled pork, brisket and North Carolinastyle barbecue. TO, BW. L & D, daily. 1607 University Blvd. W. 732-7200. $$

© 2011

FolioWeekly

BLACKFINN AMERICAN GRILLE With four dining rooms, BlackFinn offers classic American fare: beef, seafood, pasta, chicken and flatbread sandwiches. Dine indoors or on the patio. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 4840 Big Island Dr. 345-3466. $$ FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES Best of Jax 2010 winner. 13249 City Square Dr. 751-9711. 9039 Southside Blvd., 538-9100. 4413 Town Center Pkwy., Ste. 401. 996-6900. fiveguys.com $ THE FLAME BROILER Serving food with no transfat, MSG, frying, or skin on meat. Fresh veggies, steamed brown or white rice along with grilled beef, chicken and Korean short ribs are featured. CM, TO. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 9822 Tapestry Park Circle, Ste. 103. 619-2786. $ THE GRAPE BISTRO & WINE BAR F More than 145 wines, along with a tapas menu of gourmet fare to pair with the wine list. A wide selection of beer is also served. L & D, daily. 10281 Midtown Parkway, Ste. 119. 642-7111. $$ ISLAND GIRL WINE & CIGAR BAR F Upscale tropical vibe. Walk-in humidor, pairing apps and desserts with 25 wines, ports by the glass. 220+ wines by the bottle; draft, bottled beer. L & D, daily. 7860 Gate Pkwy., Ste. 115. 854-6060. $$ JOHNNY ANGELS F The menu reflects its ’50s-style décor, including Blueberry Hill pancakes, Fats Domino omelet, Elvis special combo platter. Shakes, malts. B, L & D, daily. 3546 St. Johns Bluff Rd. S., Ste. 120. 997-9850. $ LIBRETTO’S PIZZERIA & ITALIAN KITCHEN F Authentic NYC pizzeria serves Big Apple crust, cheese and sauce, along with third-generation family-style Italian classics, fresh-fromthe-oven calzones, and desserts in a casual, comfy setting. L & D, daily. 4880 Big Island Dr., Ste. 1. 402-8888. $$ LIME LEAF F Authentic Thai cuisine: fresh papaya salad, pad Thai, mango sweet rice. BW. L, Mon.-Fri.; D, Mon.-Sat. 9822 Tapestry Park Cir., Stes. 108 & 109. 645-8568. $$ MELLOW MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Tossed spring water dough, lean meats, veggies

SAN JOSE

SAN MARCO, SOUTHBANK

BASIL THAI & SUSHI F Offering Thai cuisine, including pad Thai and curry dishes, and sushi in a relaxing atmosphere. L & D, Mon.-Sat. BW. 1004 Hendricks Ave. 674-0190. $$ b.b.’s F A bistro menu is served in an upscale atmosphere, featuring almond-crusted calamari, tuna tartare and wild mushroom pizza. FB. L & D, Mon.-Fri.; brunch & D, Sat. 1019 Hendricks Ave. 306-0100. $$$ BISTRO AIX F Best of Jax 2010 winner. French, Mediterranean-inspired fare, award-winning wines, woodfired pizzas, house-made pastas, steaks, seafood. Indoor, outdoor dining. FB. L, Mon.-Fri.; D, nightly. 1440 San Marco Blvd. 398-1949. $$$ CHECKER BBQ & SEAFOOD F Chef Art Jennette serves barbecue, seafood and comfort food, including pulled-pork, fried white shrimp and fried green tomatoes. L & D, Mon.-Sat. 3566 St. Augustine Rd. 398-9206. $ EUROPEAN STREET F Big sandwiches, soups, desserts and more than 100 bottled and on-tap beers. BW. L & D, daily. 1704 San Marco Blvd. 398-9500. $ THE GROTTO F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Wine by the glass. Tapas-style menu offers a cheese plate, empanadas


ADVERTISING SPE

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bruschetta, chocolate fondue. BW. 2012 San Marco Blvd. 398-0726. $$ HAVANA-JAX CAFÉ/CUBA LIBRE BAR LOUNGE F Authentic Latin American fine dining: picadillo, ropa vieja, churrasco tenderloin steak, Cuban sandwiches. L & D, Mon.-Sat. CM, FB. 2578 Atlantic Blvd. 399-0609. $ KIRIN SUSHI F On San Marco Square. All-new sushi menu. Dine under neon in a cool atmosphere. CM, BW. L & D, daily. 1950 San Marco Blvd., Ste. 1. 399-3305. $$. LAYLA’S OF SAN MARCO Fine dining in the heart of San Marco. Traditional Middle Eastern cuisine, served inside or outside on the hookah and cigar patio. BW. L & D, Mon.-Sat.; D, Sun. 2016 Hendricks Ave. 398-4610. $$ MATTHEW’S Chef’s tasting menu or seasonal à la carte menu featuring an eclectic mix of Mediterranean ingredients. Dress is business casual, jackets optional. FB. D, Mon.-Sat. 2107 Hendricks Ave. 396-9922. $$$$ METRO DINER F Best of Jax 2010 winner. Historic 1930s diner offers award-winning breakfast and lunch. Fresh seafood and Southern cooking. Bring your own wine. B & L, daily. 3302 Hendricks Ave. 398-3701. $$ PIZZA PALACE F It’s all homemade from Mama’s awardwinning recipes: spinach pizza and chicken-spinach calzones. BW. L & D, daily. 1959 San Marco Blvd. 399-8815. $$ PULP F The juice bar offers fresh juices, froyo (frozen yogurt), teas, coffees made one cup at a time, along with 30 kinds of smoothies. B, L & D, daily. 1962 San Marco Blvd. 396-9222. $ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE A Best of Jax 2010 winner. Midwestern prime beef, fresh seafood in an upscale atmosphere. FB. D, daily. 1201 Riverplace Blvd. 396-6200. $$$$ SAKE HOUSE See Riverside. 1478 Riverplace Blvd. 306-2188. $$ SAN MARCO DELI F The independently owned & operated classic diner serves grilled fish, turkey burgers and lunch meats roasted daily in-house. Vegetarian options, including tempeh, too. Mon.-Sat. 1965 San Marco Blvd. 399-1306. $ TAVERNA Tapas, small-plate items, Neapolitan-style wood-fired pizzas and entrées are served in a rustic yet upscale interior. BW, TO. L & D, Tue.-Sat. 1986 San Marco Blvd. 398-3005. $$$

SOUTHSIDE

BISTRO 41° F Casual dining features fresh, homemade breakfast and lunch dishes in a relaxing atmosphere. TO. B & L, Mon.-Fri. 3563 Philips Hwy., Ste. 104. 446-9738. $ BLUE BAMBOO Contemporary Asian-inspired cuisine includes rice-flour calamari, seared Ahi tuna, pad Thai. Street eats: barbecue duck, wonton crisps. BW. L, Mon.-Fri.; D, Mon.-Sat. 3820 Southside Blvd. 646-1478. $$ BOMBA’S SOUTHERN HOME COOKING F The neighborhood comfort spot offers Southern homestyle fare, featuring fresh veggies. Outside dining is available. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 8560 Beach Blvd. 997-2291. $$ BUCA DI BEPPO Italian dishes served family-style in an eclectic, vintage setting. Half-pound meatballs are a specialty. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 10334 Southside Blvd. 363-9090. $$$ CITY BUFFET CHINESE RESTAURANT F City Buffet offers an extensive selection of Chinese fare, including beef, fish, crabs, chicken, pork, desserts, ice cream, at its all-you-can-eat buffet. BW, CM. L & D, daily. 5601 Beach Blvd. 345-3507. $ CORNER BISTRO & WINE BAR F Casual fine dining. The menu blends modern American favorites served with international flair. The Fresh Bar offers fine wine, cocktails, martinis. FB. L & D, Tue.-Sun. 9823 Tapestry Park Circle, Ste. 1. 619-1931. $$$

For questions, please call your advertising representative at 260-9770. RUN DATE: 040511 AT 268-3655

EL POTRO F Family-friendly, casual, Potro cooks it fresh, IF POSSIBLE FAX ElYOUR PROOF made-to-order — fast, hot, simple. Daily specials and buffet at most locations. BW. L & D, daily. 5871 University Blvd. W., 7330844. 11380 Beach Blvd., 564-9977. elpotrorestaurant.com $ PROMISE OF BENEFIT EUROPEAN STREET F See San Marco. 5500 Beach Blvd. 398-1717. $ HALA CAFE & BAKERY F A local institution since 1975 serves house-baked pita bread, kabobs, falafel and daily lunch buffet. Best of Jax 2010 winner. TO, BW. L & D, Mon.Sat. 4323 University Blvd. S. 733-5141. $$ LA NOPALERA F Best of Jax 2010 winner. See Intracoastal. 8206 Philips Hwy. 732-9433. $ SPECKLED HEN TAVERN & GRILLE F This stylish yet simple gastropub features Southern-style cuisine made with a modern twist: Dishes are paired with international wines and beers, including a large selection of craft and IPA brews. FB. L & D, daily. 9475 Philips Hwy., Ste. 16. 538-0811. $$ SUNSET 30 TAVERN & GRILL F Located inside the new entertainment complex Latitude 30, Sunset 30 serves familiar favorites, including seafood, steaks, sandwiches, burgers, chicken, pasta and pizza. Dine inside or on the patio. FB. L & D, daily. 10370 Philips Hwy. 365-5555. $$ TOMMY’S BRICK OVEN PIZZA F Premium New York-style pizza from a brick-oven — the area’s original gluten-free pizzeria. Plus calzones, soups and salads; Thumann’s no-MSG meats, Grande cheeses and Boylan soda. BW. L & D, Mon.Sat. 4160 Southside Blvd., Ste. 2. 565-1999. $$ WASABI JAPANESE BUFFET F Best of Jax 2010 winner. AYCE sushi and two teppanyaki grill items are included in buffet price. FB. L & D, daily. 9041 Southside Blvd., Ste. 138C. 363-9888. $$

SPRINGFIELD, NORTHSIDE

BOSTON’S RESTAURANT & SPORTSBAR F A full menu of sportsbar faves; pizzas till 2 a.m. Dine inside or on the patio. FB, TO. L & D, daily. 13070 City Station Dr., River City Marketplace. 751-7499. $$ CASA MARIA F The family-owned restaurant serves promise of benefit sUpport authentic Mexican fare, including fajitas and seafood. The specialty is tacos de azada. CM, FB. L & D, daily. 12961 N. Main St., Ste. 104. 757-6411. $$ JOSEPH’S PIZZA & ITALIAN RESTAURANT F Gourmet pizzas, pastas. Authentic Italian entrees like eggplant parmigiana, shrimp scampi. BW. L & D, daily. 7316 N. Main St. 765-0335. $$ MILLHOUSE STEAKHOUSE F A locally-owned-and-operated steakhouse with choice steaks from the signature broiler, and seafood, pasta, Millhouse gorgonzola, homemade desserts. CM, FB. D, nightly. 1341 Airport Rd. 741-8722. $$ SALSARITA’S FRESH CANTINA F Southwest cuisine made from scratch, served in a family atmosphere. CM, BW. L & D, daily. 840 Nautica Dr., Ste. 131, River City Marketplace. 696-4001. $ THREE LAYERS CAFE F Lunch, bagels, desserts, and the adjacent Cellar serves fine wines. Inside and courtyard dining. BW. B, L & D, daily. 1602 Walnut St., Springfield. 355-9791. $ 3 LIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL F This modern restaurant’s menu features popular favorites: salads, sandwiches and pizza, as well as fine European cuisine. Nightly specials. 2467 Faye Rd., Northside. 647-8625. $$ UPTOWN MARKET F Located in the 1300 Building at the corner of Third & Main, Uptown serves fresh fare made with the same élan that rules Burrito Gallery. Innovative breakfast, lunch and deli selections. BW, TO. 1303 Main St. N. 355-0734. $$ 

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WINE LISTINGS ANJO LIQUORS 5-8 p.m. every Thur. 9928 Old Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 1, 646-2656 AROMAS CIGAR & WINE BAR Best of Jax 2010 winner. Call for schedule. 4372 Southside Blvd., 928-0515 BLUE BAMBOO 5:30-7:30 p.m., every first Thur. 3820 Southside Blvd., 646-1478 CIRCLE JAPAN “Sake 101” 5-8 p.m. every Fri. 12192 Beach Blvd., Ste. 1, Southside, 710-5193 THE GIFTED CORK Tastings daily. 64 Hypolita St., St. Augustine, 810-1083 THE GRAPE 5-7:30 p.m. every Wed.; 1-4 p.m. every Sat. 10281 Midtown Pkwy., Ste. 119, SJTC, 642-7111 THE GROTTO 6-8 p.m. every Thur. 2012 San Marco Blvd., 398-0726 MONKEY’S UNCLE LIQUORS 5-8 p.m. every Fri. 1850 S. Third St., Jax Beach, 246-1070 NORTH BEACH BISTRO 6-8 p.m. every Tue. 725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 6, Atlantic Beach, 372-4105 OCEAN 60 6-8 p.m every Mon. 60 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 247-0060 PASTA MARKET & CLAM BAR 4-6 p.m. every Tue. 1930 Kingsley Ave., Orange Park, 276-9551 PUSSERS CARIBBEAN GRILL 6 p.m., every second Fri. 816 A1A N., Ste. 100, Ponte Vedra Beach, 280-7766

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RIVERSIDE LIQUORS 5-8 p.m. every Fri. 1035 Park St., Five Points, 356-4517 THE GIFTED CORK Call for details. 64 Hypolita St., St. Augustine, 810-1083 THE TASTING ROOM 6-8 p.m. every first Tue. 25 Cuna St., St. Augustine, 810-2400 TASTE OF WINE Daily. 363 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 9, Atlantic Beach, 246-5080 TOTAL WINE & MORE Noon-6 p.m. every Fri. & Sat. 4413 Town Center Pkwy., Ste. 300, 998-1740 URBAN FLATS 5-8 p.m. every Wed. 330 A1A N., Ponte Vedra Beach, 280-5515 WHOLE FOODS MARKET 6 p.m. every Thur. 10601 San Jose Blvd., Mandarin, 288-1100 THE WINE BAR 6-8 p.m. every Thur. 320 First St. N., Jax Beach, 372-0211 WINE WAREHOUSE 4-7 p.m. every Fri. 665 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 246-6450 4434 Hendricks Ave., San Marco, 448-6782 1188 Edgewood Ave. S., Riverside, 389-9997 4085 A1A S., St. Augustine Beach, 471-9900 ZAITOON MEDITERRANEAN GRILL 6-8 p.m., every first & third Wed. 13475 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 40, Intracoastal W., 221-7066 

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1. Diane Pierce, Cathy and Jay Rogers 2. Lynn and Mallory Layton 3. “30A Style” author Lynn Nesmith and artist Jim Draper 4. Lon Walton, Barbara Goodrich and Glenn Layton 5. Terry Walton and Sam Patrick 6. Mary Lyn and T.F. Jenkins 7. Bill Leuthold and Stephanie Jarvis 8. Pierce residence in Paradise Key South Beach

60 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011

he new community of Paradise Key South Beach celebrated an evening of art and architecture with artist Jim Draper and an exhibition of his nature-inspired paintings. Former Southern Living architecture editor Lynn Nesmith signed copies of her book, “30A Style,” which highlights homes of the historic communities and New Urbanist towns of Scenic Highway 30A along the Gulf of Mexico — the kind that inspired Paradise Key in Jax Beach’s South Beach area. The event drew guests from all walks of life — designers, architects, Jaguar executives, even a green developer from Perth, Australia, traveling around Florida for inspiration. As the evening progressed, attendees lingered on the front and side porches with mojitos and margaritas as the sun set behind a stand of native live oaks and palmettos. 

For more photos from this and other events, check out the Street Team link at folioweekly.com.

Photos by Walter Coker


Down By Law

Tonya McDowell, 33, an off-and-on homeless person in Bridgeport, Conn., was arrested in April by police in nearby Norwalk, charged with felony theft of $15,686 worth of “services” from the city. McDowell’s crime? Enrolling her 6-year-old son in Norwalk’s Brookside Elementary School when she really “resided” (as much as a sporadically homeless person can “reside”) in Bridgeport. She has “resided” in a Norwalk shelter, but was crashing at a friend’s place in Bridgeport when she registered her son. The head of Norwalk’s Board of Education acknowledged that dismissal is the usual penalty for registering an unqualified student.

The Continuing Crisis

In March, jurors in New Orleans convicted Isaiah Doyle of a 2005 murder and were listening to evidence in the penalty phase of the trial when Doyle decided to take the witness stand (as defendants sometimes do in a desperate attempt to avoid the death penalty). However, Doyle said to the jurors, “If I had an AK-47, I’d kill every last one of y’all with no remorse.” (The jury recommended the needle.) The Montana House of Representatives passed a tough drunk-driving bill in March to combat the state’s high DUI rate, but it came over the objection of Rep. Alan Hale (and later, Sen. Jonathan Windy Boy). Hale, who owns a bar in Basin, Mont., complained tough DUI laws “are destroying small businesses” and “destroying a way of life that has been in Montana for years and years.” Until 2005, drinking while driving was common and legal outside of towns as long as the driver wasn’t drunk. Furthermore, Hale said, people need to drive home after they drink. “[T]hey are not going to hitchhike.” Sen. Windy Boy said such laws put the legislature on “the path of criminalizing everyone in Montana.” Conventional academic wisdom is that the death penalty is not an effective deterrent to homicide, but according to accused murderer Dmitry Smirnov, it deterred him from killing Ms. Jitka Vesel in Oak Brook, Ill. — until March, that is, when Illinois’ death penalty was repealed. Prosecutors said Smirnov, from Surrey, British Columbia, told them he decided to come to Illinois and kill Vesel (in cold blood, over an online relationship gone bad) only after learning through Internet research the state no longer had capital punishment. A Scranton, Pa., police officers’ union filed a state unfair labor practice complaint in April against Chief Dan Duffy because he arrested a man caught violating a warrant and possessing marijuana. The union contract says only union members can “apprehend and arrest” lawbreakers, and since Duffy’s “management,” he should’ve had an officer make the arrest.

Cavalcade of Rednecks

Shelly Waddell, 36, was cited by police in February in Waterville, Maine, after “a couple of ” drivers reported seeing two children riding on the roof of the van she was driving early one morning. Waddell told police she was delivering newspapers to customers, but denied the kids were on the roof.

Bright Ideas

Artist Louis “Shovelhead” Garrett is a quilter in the eastern Missouri town of Louisiana,

whose specialty is sewing quilts of women’s panties, according to a Hannibal Courier-Post item. After showing his latest quilt at a women’s luncheon in Hannibal in March, he described his high standards: “No polyester. I don’t want those cheap, dollar-store, not-sexy, farm-girl panties. I want classy — silk or nylon.”

Oops!

Arifinito (he uses one name), a member of the Indonesian parliament, resigned in April after a news photographer in the gallery zoomed in on the tablet computer he was watching, catching him surfing Internet porno sites. Arifinito’s conservative Islamic Prosperous Justice Party campaigned for a tough anti-pornography bill in 2008. Wheeee! In March, in Pierce County, Wash., a sewer worker, 37, came loose from a safety line and slid about 3,000 feet through a 6-foot-diameter sewer pipe at Chambers Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. He “could have drowned,” according to one rescuer, but he was taken to a hospital with “minor injuries.” Gilbert, Ariz., firefighters rescued Eugene Gimzelberg, 32, in March after he’d climbed down a 40-foot sewer hole naked. Gimzelberg said he’d smoked PCP and marijuana and eaten hallucinogenic mushrooms. He was hospitalized in critical condition.

Chutzpah!

Jacob Barnett, 12, an Asperger’s-syndromefueled math genius who maxed out on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children and is enrolled at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, told an Indianapolis Star reporter in March his next project is proving the Big Bang theory wrong. But if not the Big Bang, asked the reporter, how do we exist? Said Jacob, “I’m still working on it.” “I have an idea, but … I’m still working out the details.” Hint: Jacob’s major point of skepticism is that the Big Bang doesn’t account neatly for carbon. Said his biological mother, Kristine Barnett, 36: “I flunked math. I know this did not come from me.” Adam Yarbrough, 22, ticketed by a female police officer in Indianapolis in March after he was spotted swerving in and out of traffic on the Interstate, allegedly compounded the problem first by offering the cop “five dollars” to “get rid of this ticket” and then by “[H] ow about I give you a kiss?” Felony bribery charges were filed. Bonus fact: Yarbrough was riding a moped.

Least Competent Criminals

Marissa Mark, 28, indicted in March in Allentown, Pa., for hiring a hit man in 2006 via the then-active website HitManForHire.com, agreeing to pay $37,000 to have a California woman killed. Prosecutors haven’t revealed the motive. Mark allegedly made traceable payments through PayPal (which in recent years has refused to process transactions involving online gambling or WikiLeaks document dumps, but did handle payments in ’06 for HitManForHire.com, run by an Egyptian immigrant, who told the Las Vegas Sun in ’08 he’d never contract for murder but sought to make money double-crossing clients and alerting (for a fee) intended victims.  Chuck Shepherd WeirdNews@earthlink.net

MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 61


FreeWill Astrology ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Weaseling out of things is important to learn,” said cartoon anti-hero Homer Simpson. “It’s what separates us from the animals — except the weasel.” I usually don’t share that sentiment. My standard advice is to face up to challenging situations and take responsibility for the part you played in creating them. But I’m going to rebel against my custom this week and endorse Homer’s approach. You may be on the verge of getting sucked into a mess you had no role in creating. Either that, or you’ll be asked to carry out a mission irrelevant to your long-term goals. Either way, you have cosmic permission to weasel out. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I’m going to bring up a sore subject only because I think you’re finally ready to make it much less of a sore subject. The truth as I see it is that a part of you got petrified way back when. A formerly fluid, flexible part of your psyche got turned into stone, metaphorically speaking, losing usefulness and creating distortions throughout the rest of you. Now, after all this time, you’ve circled back to a phase when you have the power to at least partially un-petrify this lost function. To get started, turn your attention to it in a way that you feel like laughing and crying at the same time. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Poet Gerard Manley Hopkins coined the verb “to selve,” what a person does in the process of creating his or her distinctive presence in the world. Writing this column is an ongoing opportunity for me to selve, for example, because each time I conjure a new horoscope, I exercise the idiosyncratic combination © 2011 of skills, attitudes, training and knowledge that‘s special to me. According to my omen-reading, you’re in a phase when you have a sacred duty to selve with extra intensity and alacrity. Be ruthless in seeking out experiences that give you a chance to tap into, cultivate and express your most unique qualities.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the longest love letter in history was written by an Indian man, Harish Kondakkuli. The gushing 143-page message took him more than three months to finish. Oddly, it was addressed to an imaginary woman, since there was no one in his life he was in love with. Consider the possibility of exceeding his achievement in the weeks ahead. You’re at the peak of your ability to express wickedly delicious passions and profoundly tender intentions. There may even be a real person, not an imaginary one, who deserves your extravagant outflow. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Postsecret.com is a website where folks can anonymously reveal deep, dark feelings. I found one entry I think would be perfect for you to use as your own in the weeks ahead. “I don’t want to cover up my scar,” it read. “It’s a good conversation starter and it makes me look bad-ass. But thank you anyway!” To further inspire what I hope is your fearless effort to claim the power inherent in your wounds, I offer this spur from musician and author Henry Rollins: “Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue. Realize the strength, move on.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In her irreverent platinum-selling song “Monster,” Sagittarian rapper Nicki Minaj offers a poetic sequence never before heard in the history of the planet: “Pull up in the monster … with a bad b-tch that came from Sri Lanka / yeah I’m in that Tonka, color of Willy Wonka.” I hope you’ll soon come up with an equally revolutionary innovation in your chosen field. All the cosmic forces are conspiring in the weeks ahead to help you do the equivalent of rhyming “Tonka” and “Sri Lanka” with “Willy Wonka.” Cooperate! (The NSFW video is at http://bit.ly/MinajMonster.)

FolioWeekly

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here comes your ninth loss of innocence. Or is it your 10th? As you’ll soon prove, again, you manage to make every time feel like the first time. When the moment arrives and the sweet purity ebbs away, the twinge shuddering through you has the same primal intensity you’ve experienced. But here’s the redemption: Like most of the previous transitions, this one leads to a surprising blessing you couldn’t have gotten any other way. When your innocence is reborn — as it will be, sooner or later — it’ll be wiser and wilder than ever. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): There’s a small chance that this scenario will come to pass: You’ll be invited to become part of a situation that promises to give special privileges or inside information, but after you join you’ll find your participation requires you to compromise your principles. But there’s a far greater chance — more than 80 percent — that this scenario takes place: You’ll be invited to join fortunes to a group, circle, tribe or situation that won’t ask you to dilute your integrity or betray your values. It’s likely to activate a dormant part of your potential. The moral of the story? Be very discerning.

62 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MAY 24-30, 2011

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Right now you have more power than you realize — more power to understand confusing situations, to influence those you’ve assumed are resistant to change, and more power to overcome apparent disadvantages. The only factor that may prevent you from accomplishing more than what you thought possible is a lack of confidence. I’m not urging you to cultivate a foolishly arrogant faith in your ego; I’m clueing you that there are hidden forces at work that you can call on for help: wisdom that’s been dormant, love that’s been neglected and allies who’ve been mum.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Time is the enemy of romantic love, said Andrew Marvell in his 17th-century poem, “To His Coy Mistress.” Medieval author Andreas Capellanus had a different idea, identifying marriage as the enemy of romantic love. In Richard Wagner’s opera “Tristan and Isolde,” Tristan rails against the daylight, calling it the enemy of romantic love. And in their book “Immediacy and Reflection in Kierkegaard’s Thought,” the editors theorize that “capitalism, which makes a fetish out of sex … is the enemy of romantic love.” While all those statements may be true, they’re only mildly relevant for you right now. The most dangerous enemy of romantic love — or any other kind of love, for that matter — is this: not listening well. Overcome that enemy. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In an age when bee populations have dropped dramatically, some gardeners have found they need to pollinate their tomato plants manually. One woman I know tickles each swollen bulb of seeds with a toothbrush. Another uses a camel’s-hair brush. Metaphorically speaking, I suspect you’ll have to try something similar in the weeks ahead: Make an intervention to facilitate a fertilizing process that doesn’t seem to be happening naturally. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the week ahead, your psyche may sometimes have an odd tingling sensation resembling what happens when you hit your funny bone. Is it painful? Is it pleasurable? Maybe some of both, with the net effect being a command to wake up and play harder, love stronger and notice more beauty. If you respond to that mandate with even a modicum of passion, I suspect you’ll get a surprising reward: At least one of the secret laws of your nature reveals itself, rising up clear and raw in a sweet waking vision.  Rob Brezsny freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com


HOTTIE SIGNING AUTOGRAPHS You, hottie with tattoos, signing autographs for underage fan-girls. Me, more than a fan-girl, wanting more than an autograph, but unable to do anything but stare at your hotness. I will do anything to prove I am your No. 1 fan-girl. When: May 6, 2011. Where: Mayport Base. #1022-0524 PERFECTLY ROUND SHAVED HEAD Beside each other at Winn Dixie on Sunday evening. I noticed your perfectly round shaved head, nice eyes and a tat on your left arm. You waited to leave in your silver X-Terra until I was leaving ... should’ve said something. When: April 10, 2011. Where: Winn Dixie, Old St. Augustine. #1021-0524 REMEMBER MY UNIQUE NAME? You: Cute manager at the new Mojo’s in Avondale with the beard and Castro cap. Me: Dark red hair, Smiths T-shirt. You came by our table to check on our food and we had a lengthy talk about our distaste for tequila and the Killers. Said you got off too late to hang out that night. When do you get off early? When: May 7, 2011. Where: New Mojo’s. #1120-0517 MOTHER’S DAY POPS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA You, a beautiful blonde with a green backpack beach chair. Your attire consisted of an eye-catching black-and-white striped dress with an aesthetically pleasing smile! The orchestra was excellent but ended too quickly. Wish we could have been together longer. Cheerio. When: May 8, 2011. Where: Jacksonville Beach Pavilion Lawn. #1119-0517 MARCH OF DIMES WALK Me: Standing at the Publix tent in my tan hat. You: wearing a red shirt walking for Wells Fargo, you walked up to me and said “Hello” like you knew me. Wish I would have talked to you more! Would like to get to know you! When: May 7, 2011. Where: March of Dimes Walk. #1118-0517 OOPS You: Ritz bartender off work. Me: black curls, green eyes, soft lips. We started making out (for some reason), I paused long enough to ask if u had a gf (OOPS), u said no and we kept going at it. Somehow I have pics of the hot makeout session thanks to my roommate. Good times, I want more! When: April 17, 2011. Where: Ritz. #1117-0510 CUTE GUY ON THE PHONE I first saw you walking around the library, you were wearing a blue shirt, you had a blonde shaved head, Khaki shorts, Then as I was leaving you were on the phone outside, we made eye contact and shared a smile. When: May 4, 2011. Where: Jacksonville Public Library. #1116-0510 WHICH END WAS UP? Your laughter, a melody at my manchild ways. Me, a blubbering idiot for a simple jappy Jew. Let’s sit together forever and watch the world go by. Took loosing each other, too find each other again. Forever after starts now.... When: March 25, 2011. Where: Everywhere. #1115-0503

GIGGLING GATOR & GYM You: tall, blonde, wearing a Simpsons/FamilyGuy? shirt. Me: oversized yellow shirt. We met once before at a scummy bar, but my wing(wo)man flailed on me & you forgot my name. The second incident was the gym, but I choked. You offered me a place to crash initially, maybe I’ll take you up on that next time? When: April 20, 2011. Where: The Giggling Gator/ Gym. #1111-0503 HOTTIE IN THE GARDEN You, lounging on your foldout in the middle of your Forbes Street yard. I stopped back by in my jeep and you were diggin in the dirt. I think you said your name, but all I can remember is beautiful. When: April 1, 2011. Where: Riverside. #1110-0426 STRAWBERRY MOJITO After we harassed the waiter for strawberry mojitos, it sounded pretty tasty, so you ordered one. Care for another? When: April 19, 2011. Where: Mossfire. #1109-0426 SHARKFEST 2011 You: Red shirt, jeans. Me: Black button-down and dark hair. We made eye contact a few times. Loved your tongue technique with those jello shots. Maybe we can have a little more oral … conversation! When: April 16, 2011. Where: Sharkfest 2011. #1108-0426 MY CHOCOLATE DESIRE You: black workout suit. Me: black/white striped tank. You had me speechless when you walked over to me and placed your arm around me. So much so... I have no idea what you said to me. LOL Let’s try this again? Ms. Intrigued. When: April 15, 2011. Where: Folio Weekly’s Margarita Fest. #1107-0426 ONLY THERE FOR ORIENTATION… I passed you in the main hallway. You had a perfect smile and perfect eyes. We locked eyes up until we passed. And I ran into you a few more times. I had a black polo, short black hair, glasses. You did something to me. When: April 14, 2011. Where: My Workplace in Orange Park. #1106-0426 BEAUTY AND THE BANK You looked a bit flustered at the ATM. Your beautiful curly locks, mesmerizing emerald eyes, and even your faint, perfectly placed freckles made my heart beat frantically. I hope whoever put that ring on hand fills you with the magnitude of joy you filled me with in those brief seconds of bliss! When: March 22, 2011. Where: Chase Bank ATM. #1105-0426 I SAID HI You were passing me at the register that evening, with a

white shirt, and your beautiful eyes reached mine and I said hi. Wish I could have said more. But the smile you gave me with those eyes sold me. Wish I could see you again. When: April 11, 2011. Where: Kangaroo on Southside near Avenues Mall. #1104-0419 NAVY OFFICER BEACH BEAUTY Sorry I thought you worked at Walmart, but my point was I wanted to ask you out. I could use a little Naval discipline. When: April 10, 2011. Where: Jax Beach. #1103-0419 HANDSOME AT LOFT THURSDAY You: Handsome, tall, wearing a black DC shirt outside The Loft on Thursday. Wanted to talk to you, will I get the chance? When: April 7, 2011. Where: The Loft. #1102-0419 I THOUGHT YOU WERE DEAD I saw you under the pier, lying stiff as a board and it looked like you weren’t breathing. I poked you and you jumped up at me like a crazy person, but that’s the fastest my heart has ever beat. I hope you read this and remember me, maybe we can talk someday. When: April 5, 2011. Where: Under the pier. #1101-0412 WHITE FEDORA, TOP AND PANTS Hat with black band set off your olive skin, your toes were the only other color besides your beautiful eyes. Got you dancing, dreaming, my Queen, I’ve found her! Hoping he’s just a date? A beautiful smile and the face of an angel. Meet me: grey shirt, black hair, for more good music, dancing, smiles, Baymeadows’ My Place, Fridays. When: Sunday after Blues Fest. Where: Atlantic after Blues Fest. #1100-0412 UNDERWATER BANANA HAMMOCK I was taking a dive in the deep end, and swam past the most beautiful humpback whale. You may not be a whale, but I think you know what I want to do to your back. It’s true what they say, “Abyss” was the greatest movie of the ‘80s. Let’s make bubbles. When: March 30, 2011. Where: Underwater. #1099-0412 HEY, I SAW U! I saw you strutting your stuff at some wings n a boat place. Think you’re a fly chick. I know where to find you. Wanna play? When: March 29, 2011. Where: Buffalo Wild Wings. #1098-0405 SOUTHSIDE FENDER BENDER Oops! Sorry about that. You: tall, hot, unshaven, driving a truck. Me: flustered blonde on my way to work. Even though there was no damage, wish we would have exchanged info. When: Feb. 2011. Where: Southside Blvd. #1097-0405

INTRIGUED AT BONEFISH We talked briefly at BoneFish. You are a PT. We never got a chance to finish our conversation. You definitely piqued my interest. Would love to chat more and see where it goes if you are up for it. When: March 24, 2011. Where: BoneFish Jax Beach. #1096-0405 DID YOU NEED TO SEE YOUR CHIROPRACTOR? We were both looking at DVDs in the library. Hope you did not have to see your chiropractor! When: March 36, 2011. Where: Library. #1095-0405 ST. PATRICK’S AROUND MIDNIGHT You: blond, young, attractive, next to me at the bar. Neither of us said a word. You kept caressing my arm. I should have said hello, or at least bought you a drink. When: March 17, 2011. Where: Lynch’s Irish Pub. #1094-0405 WHAT DOES MP MEAN? You have an Irish name but don’t look Irish. You asked about my goofy foot tattoos. Then you left. Sad face. See you next time, maybe. When: March 17, 2011. Where: BCB. #1093-0329 I’LL LET YOU DO DINNER HUMOR We sat across the same table at a networking meeting. You, tall dark & handsome. Me, trying to catch your attention. I tried to make you laugh and in your deadpan ways you told me you’ll do the humor. I know I’ll win you over. Care to share business cards? When: Feb. 28, 2011. Where: San Jose Country Club. #1091-0322 EXCITEDLY SEEKING HOT FILIPINO You were a hot enthusiastic Filipino; a total flirt. It was Feb. 9. I think you understand why I can’t say exactly how we met, but I was the super sexy redhead w/ the great personality. We talked about Hawaii and your hand. I want to know if you were serious about us going out! When: Feb. 9, 2011. Where: Cambridge Medical Institute. #1090-0322 HOTTIE ON HARLEY You were checking out my pollen-covered black car and flirting? with me and my grandson in his car seat of course. You: man. Me: woman. When: Feb. 24, 2011. Where: Southside Blvd. #1089-0322 KIDS TEMP, STARBUCKS RIVERSIDE I was at Starbucks Riverside with my mom. We laughed about the barista’s lack of concern for publicly preserving your tough, manly image. No need to be shy about your preference for lukewarm coffee. I have a feeling that preference doesn’t translate into the other facets of your life. p.s. Cute Ray Bans. When: Feb. 25, 2011. Where: Starbucks Riverside. #1080-0308

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MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 63


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THE SHOPPES OF PONTE VEDRA

Products I’d Like To See ACROSS 1 On ___ (fleeing) 7 Preexisting condition? 11 It gets hammered 16 Doesn’t know one ___ 18 Building blocks of a sort 20 He directed Eastwood in the 1960s 21 Anti-crop pest product? 24 “Got it,” to a gob 25 “The Pilot’s Wife” author Shreve 26 Silo filler 27 After the bell 29 Knight stick 31 Anti-amphibian product? 34 Anti-faucet leak product? 42 Emulate Tommy Moe 43 ___-Foy, Quebec 44 Drillmasters? 45 Long or now preceder 46 That cad 48 Stuff in a cell 50 Simple to use, as a product 52 Anti-dysentery product? 57 Cribbage need 58 Propulsion poles 60 NYC gambling sign 61 Was in theaters 62 Evita’s guy 64 Followed 66 Path to a pew 68 Money spent 69 Swarm 72 Anti-grape stain product? 74 Worthless stuff 75 Admits frankly 76 Finland, to the Finns 77 Main dish 79 Alliance formed under HST 1

2

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 5

124 Down’s “Rocky” Court figs. Pitching stats ___ choy Anti-insect product? Not well-known Morse word Carrier to Oslo Landing info Angler, at times Military drama that spun off “NCIS” Parisian pronoun Anti-“pests in general” product? Anti-dandruff product? Blithe DEA agent’s find Manhattan Project VIP Nick’s wife and others Kick-off prop Anti-fungus product (with an Elton John jingle)? Cell phone company Debussy contemporary Chance for many to sleep in Impede, variantly Former Dodge model French Revolution figure DOWN Deuce topper Green target UK record label Red river? Mideast gulf Henner of “Taxi” ET on TV Mr. Prokofiev Mr. Stravinsky “Brave New World” drug Saloon selection Pahrump’s state: abbr. Kin of “presto” Arkin-Falk comedy, “The ___” Rice vampire Rx watchdog Change genetically “M*A*S*H” co-star 6

16

7 17

21

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Solution to “Flip Sides” P A N G

I M T P I OMM ROE S T OR S T A N URN S E A CH ZWE I G NO V E R GEOD T R I N I R EG A I T H I N MA T T H E I S A Y P A C E S T A R 9

S T I R

11

52

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S I F T S

E T T A

OW K E I L E L

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28

48

49 55

56

62

63

68 74

82

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90 95

103 108

110

47

67

89

102

T Y P E

43

54

66

94 101

S L A T E

33

61

81

93

32

77

88

14

A R E

20

73

80

13

42

53

76

100

41

60 65

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12

A L T AM I R R E A SON E KOU T O FM S A DO D E R R E HOR T S A L AGR E E N I GS SM I F E S T Y N A D EME SO RU T H B L E SOU R E NO UN U F OS L E N OWS D A OU A V E R S OR T BOA T S H CUR S E I P R E S S N A L ON G

27

46

59

64

87

S K I R A C K

31 40

51

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R Y E

A L O R E A K T A K I C S L AO MA NN L ONGS B I RD AME G B B A S A YOU V EM I N AM M I S E R A MA C S R I S K I GH S I H A T E Y S T H A S MA R T L I T T L E A R S EM I S T S

10

30

39

58

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I B E T

19

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57

D O G E

26

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78 Teacher of a sort 80 “___ old for this!” 82 Either founder of Apple 84 Joke target 85 Circular snack 86 Actress Deborah 88 Toy with a string 89 Meal starter? 90 Canned heat? 92 Spy org. 96 Quiver filler 98 Oliver Stone epic 99 Puts straight 100 Palooka 102 Up in the air 104 One of Martin Sheen’s sons 105 Innumerable 107 Lovably odd 108 Service charges 112 He threw seven no-hitters 113 Apportion (out) 115 Clue-sniffing dog 116 Avoid 117 Hubbub 118 Verve 119 Joseph of ice cream fame 121 Lower the beam 122 Tampa has one 123 Author Deighton 124 Actor known for wearing gold

23

25

44

98

22 Supreme Court first name until 2006 23 Chimp in space 28 Word after naked or private 30 Words to live by 32 Ohio city 33 Chow down uptown 34 Former surgeongeneral 35 Baseball team 36 Fashion first name 37 Some mil. trials 38 Solvent compounds 39 Draft ratings 40 Irrationally afraid 41 Girl in the house 47 Emil’s “Blue Angel” co-star 49 Renounce 51 Wilhelm I’s realm 53 Toscanini, e.g. 54 Toscanini, e.g. 55 Self starter? 56 Hangs loose 59 Elvis-suit features 63 PINs, e.g. 64 Depp-Landau film 65 Twosome 67 “___ loves me ...” 68 Black Sea port dweller 69 Role for Harrison 70 Track, often 71 Rooter opening 73 Parenthesis alternative

18

29

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8

AVONDALE 3617 ST. JOHNS AVE. 388-5406

22

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AVENUES MALL

84 91

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MAY 24-30, 2011 | folio weekly | 65


Enemy of the State

When does legitimate protest fall within the official definitions of “threat”? Altogether too often.

O

n March 1, 2011, after a long, dreary winter, my twentysomething daughter and a girlfriend were heading to a local tanning salon less than a mile from their house. On the way, they noticed they were following a Maryland Transportation Authority vehicle equipped with rear-mounted cameras and other equipment. They joked that they should say nice things about the police in case they were being recorded. Upon arriving at the salon, they were surprised to find they were blocked in by the same vehicle. The officer stated he ran her tags and found her registration was suspended (not true) and the car insurance had lapsed (also not true). When she tried to check her tags, he blocked her movement and confiscated her tags, issued her two citations amounting to around $400 and told her to get the car towed. In the meantime, another officer arrived, unidentified, in an official car while the first officer, having now run her license, noted a DUI over two years old which had long been resolved and subsequently proceeded to not only search both women’s purses, but tore the car apart. A few days later, documentation in hand, my daughter attempted to retrieve her tags from the department of motor vehicles, only to be told they had been destroyed. The DMV has no idea why. Best case scenario? A glitchy database and an overzealous or bored employee. Whether this was an illegal stop remains to be determined. That this was an illegal search is clear.

We want access to the video and audio of the stop and all written documentation. Without a lawyer and a subpoena, this will not be available to use until after the case is adjudicated in June, at which point this evidence is likely to go the way of the tags. Case closed? We’ll see. Why tell this little story about my daughter? Whatever your political affiliation, it’s hard to explain the use of such elaborate and expensive “homeland security” equipment, paid for by taxpayers, to pursue two local women who were not breaking any laws. A little history here: Way back in October 2003, after 9/11 made everyone realize that rescue operations needed to be on the same page, not to mention the same kind of radios, Pres. Bush issued HSPD 5 and HSPD 8. (Homeland Security Presidential Directives). HSPD 5 told jurisdictions to get their act together on incident reporting by “establishing a single, comprehensive national incident management system.” HSPD 8 required “a national domestic allhazards preparedness goal, with established mechanisms for improved delivery of Federal preparedness assistance to State and local governments.” St. Johns County stepped up early to comply. Here are some of the resources St. Johns County can bring to bear during any “disaster”: A brand new Emergency Operations Center on S.R. 16, five stationary cameras around town with zoom and infrared capabilities (with more planned), access to aircraft from

the coordination between law enforcement agencies in the event of an “attack,” a natural disaster and “civil unrest.” These centers have armed security guards authorized to shoot to kill in the event of an emergency. (Ours is conveniently located in Jacksonville.) Then there’s Infragard, a creepy corporate/ security coalition that demands the anonymity of an AA meeting. From its Jacksonville website which is updated as of this writing: “InfraGard is a Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) program that is dedicated to promoting information sharing between the public and private sectors regarding critical infrastructure protection issues. The goal of InfraGard is to enable the flow of information so that the owners and operators of infrastructure assets can better protect themselves and so that the United States government can better discharge its law enforcement and national security responsibilities.” I don’t think their main focus is merely making sure citizens have access to drinking water or shelter in case of a hurricane. However, not just anyone can join and once you’re in, you can’t really talk about anything to anybody and you have to agree to some “procedures” when discussing what Infragard really does: “Independent of the type of presentation (interview, brief or published documentation), the InfraGard leadership and the local FBI representative should be made aware of the upcoming presentation. The InfraGard member and the FBI representation should agree on the theme of the presentation. The identity of InfraGard members should be protected at all

Ideologically based violence, in turn, is defined as “the use, planned use or threatened use of force or violence” to promote political, religious or social beliefs. Force and violence are conveniently not defined. other regions and one county helicopter with live video feed capability, a SWAT team and SWAT vehicles, a HazMat team and vehicle, a bomb robot, a certified bomb team and bomb truck, a mobile media communications center, a Command Task Force Unit, an underwater rescue vessel and diving teams, and a Mutual Aid Agreement with other areas if things get really crazy, which brings me to several other levels of “support.” From their website: “Joint Terrorism Task Forces (JTTFs) are small cells of highly trained, local investigators, analysts, linguists and SWAT experts from dozens of U.S. law enforcement and intelligence agencies. It is a multi-agency effort led by the Justice Department and FBI designed to combine the resources of federal, state and local law enforcement.” Local “task force fusion centers” have been set up all over the nation to provide

times. Names of individual members or their employers should not be disclosed without the permission of the individual and the employer.” What do you call this unholy and secretive alliance of corporate/government/local law enforcement? I call it alarming. But there’s more. Local law enforcement agencies have been receiving military equipment courtesy of the Department of Homeland Security for years. We’re talking semi-automatic weapons, helicopters, tanks, combat gear. Some municipalities are now dressing their forces in black, resembling SWAT commandos instead of your friendly local peace officers. Finally, let’s not forget HR 1955, passed in an overwhelming 400-to-6 vote by the House of Representatives in 2007 in “Patriot Act” haste: The Homegrown Violent Radicalization Terrorism Act, which thankfully died in the Senate, twice. HR 1955 defines “homegrown terrorism”

and “violent radicalization” nebulously; the former is merely “the use, planned use or threatened use of force or violence by a group or individual born, raised or based and operating primarily within the United States or any possession of the United States to intimidate or coerce the United States government, the civilian population of the United States, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives,” while the latter means “the process of adopting or promoting an extremist belief system for the purpose of facilitating ideologically based violence to advance political, religious or social change.” “Ideologically based violence,” in turn, is defined as “the use, planned use or threatened use of force or violence by a group or individual to promote the group or individual’s political, religious or social beliefs.” Force and violence are conveniently not defined. Sounds fair enough, until you start crunching the language and come to the realization that practically anyone protesting anything, on any given day, could fit the description. And it’s vague on purpose. We still have in place the National Security Letters, which enable the FBI access to private citizens’ library records, telecommunications and personal residences and businesses. We still have the telecommunications industry’s monitoring our calls and location, without a warrant. And now the Judiciary Committee in Congress is set to pass the renewal of the mostly still-unread and misunderstood Patriot Act, which keeps most of these ridiculous spying-on-Americans tactics in place. As the economy worsens, particularly here in Florida with draconian cuts to crucial social services just so corporations can receive tax breaks, people will become angry, desperate and start to resist. But once you learn about the force that can be brought to bear against peaceful protestors, you’re bound to be as intimidated as my daughter was. On her small case, we have decided to fight back. We want answers. We have decided some things are worth standing up for, like protections against unreasonable search and seizure — what used to be called the Fourth Amendment. The First Amendment guarantees us the right of peaceful assembly, among other things. Can we defend our Constitution by standing our ground? Will we be intimidated or will we fight? Knowledge is power, and now you have some knowledge. That means you have the power and that means you have to fight. This issue is beyond politics. This issue is at the very core of what we used to call “freedom” in America. We cannot remain silent. We cannot give up. The fight will call for courage and sacrifice, in big ways and small. Can we do it? Mary Lawrence

Mary Lawrence is co-founder of PUSH (People United to Stop Homelessness). She lives in St. Augustine.

Folio Weekly welcomes Backpage Editorial submissions. Essays should be at least 1,200 words and on a topic of local interest or concern. Email your Backpage to themail@folioweekly.com or snail mail it to Anne Schindler, Editor, Folio Weekly, 9456 Philips Highway, Ste. 11, Jacksonville FL 32256. Opinions expressed on the Backpage are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the editors or management of Folio Weekly. 66 | folio weekly | MAY 24-30, 2011


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