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NEWS A rural road-paving project becomes an environmental disaster for JEA — with a potential price tag of $1 million. p. 8 A bill allowing zoos to breed animals on state lands has raised concerns about environmental impacts and invasive species. p. 11 BUZZ, BOUQUETS & BRICKBATS What J’ville has in common with Hanoi and Zurich. Plus a failed Northeast Florida Republican candidate aims to become a failed national Democratic candidate. p. 8 SPORTSTALK Allowing students to transfer schools for sports is the new face of “school choice.” p. 12 ON THE COVER Bite by Bite by Neighborhood: Your complete guide to dining out — from Ft. Clinch to the Matanzas Bay! p. 15 OUR PICKS Reasons to leave the house this week. p. 63 MOVIES “John Carter” tries to do everything and accomplishes nothing. p. 64

MUSIC Punk rock peeps band together for The Revival Tour. p. 69 Youth (and sleep) are no obstacles for up-andcoming Beaches native Rachael Warfield. p. 70 ARTS Grammy Award-winning vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater riffs on family, activism and plenty of soul. p. 76 The local arts community collaborates in celebrating the quiet influence of John Cage. p. 77 BACKPAGE How AP classes hurt public schools and waste millions, too. p. 90 EDITOR’S NOTE p. 4 MAIL p. 5 I ♥ TELEVISION p. 13 LIVE MUSIC LISTING p. 71 ARTS LISTING p. 78 HAPPENINGS p. 82 NEWS OF THE WEIRD p. 85 FREEWILL ASTROLOGY OLOGY p. 86 I SAW U p. 87 CLASSIFIEDS p. 88

Elizabeth Olsen stars in the innovatively creepy and atmospheric horror “Silent House.” p. 65 Cover Painting by Jim Draper (see a making of the cover video at http://bit.ly/yerGpTjim). Cover Design by John Ryan

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Prison Break

Jacksonville’s tired approach to prosecutions fails to deliver the promise of its brand

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here are certain things we know about the Duval County Jail. It is, in the words of the local sheriff, “the largest residential mental health facility” in the region. Its population is overwhelmingly poor, largely AfricanAmerican, and composed of roughly 15 percent military veterans. Though all are presumed so, some unknown number of the jail’s 4,000 inmates are also actually innocent — falsely accused, misidentified or unfortunate enough to share a name with a wanted criminal. And 90 percent of inmates are eventually released back into the community. Any one of those things might be enough to make a fair-minded person question the grim conditions inside the local jail — an overcrowded, dystopian place where suicide, rape, abuse and intimidation occur on a sliding scale from occasional to incessant. But the truth is, nobody cares about prisoners. People barely care about public school students, to be frank. But people do care — passionately — about their tax dollars, a phrase that never fails to evoke a sense of civic righteousness, even among deadbeat dads and swingers. So it’s a curious dynamic set in motion by UNF Criminology Professor Michael Hallett’s recent report on jail overcrowding, which draws a connection between a subject about which no one cares (jail overcrowding) and one that everyone does (taxes!). As Hallett points out, the city’s jail population is up — way up — despite the fact that crime is down. To be clear: Over the past five years, we’ve incarcerated more people for fewer crimes, primarily for nonviolent offenses like forgery, burglary and fraud. This local pattern of over-incarceration is unique among large Florida jurisdictions; the decline in crime around the state has been mirrored by a decline in jail populations in every other sizable municipality. Because Jacksonville is bucking that logical trend, it alone among Florida cities is failing to enjoy what Hallett dubs a “peace dividend” — the financial reward for avoiding unnecessary persecution and prison costs. The reason the city isn’t reaping the benefits of the local, state and national decline in crime, according to the report, is the “prosecutorial style” of State Attorney Angela Corey. Corey, who has recently made news in this publication for conducting searches of her employees’ emails and insulting the appearance of Folio Weekly reporters (http://bit.ly/ zhVkDP), was making news again after the release of Hallett’s report, a scathing assessment of “Jacksonville’s Punitive Civic Infrastructure” (http://bit.ly/FO5keL). Hallett blames Corey for pursuing a “tough on crime” agenda at all costs — despite the declining number of arrests, and a jail population that is “bursting at the seams.” The report also raises serious questions about whether the rising incarceration rate actually endangers and compromises community safety, since cycling large numbers of people through the criminal justice system further destabilizes families and communities, and tends to foster,

rather than diminish, criminal behavior. The report also touches on an issue that has long been of concern in both criminal justice circles and the larger community: the cozy relationship between the Public Defender and the State’s Attorney. As Folio Weekly has previously reported, Corey worked hard to get Matt Shirk elected, and had a strong hand in the organization of his office after he won (http://bit.ly/t9As4N). That relationship may have gotten chilly of late; a public records request turned up an email from Shirk accusing Corey’s sister of being “Blacksheep,” the screen identity of a particularly brutal poster in the Times-Union’s reader comments section (http://bit.ly/zhVkDP). But Corey has nonetheless worked for Shirk’s re-election, and both she and Sheriff John Rutherford hosted a December fundraiser for him at the home of Republican rainmaker Michael Hightower (http://bit.ly/wLLHnV). Hallett marvels in his report over the close alliance of these presumed adversaries. “The American criminal justice system is founded upon a structure of adversarial conflict,” he points out. “When the Sheriff and State Attorney host a political fundraiser for the incumbent candidate for Public Defender … perhaps this adversarial relationship has been compromised.” Indeed, Shirk was recently bumped by a team of high-profile defense attorneys from his role defending accused teen Cristian Fernandez, a move that spoke in part to his relative inexperience, but also to concerns about his independence from Corey and his willingness to tangle with this staunch political ally. Hallett wonders in his report whether these strange bedfellows contribute to a civic infrastructure that is overly punitive, and generally detrimental. “Is the political pressure to get tough on crime so powerful in Jacksonville that it has become the only viable ‘brand’ of Jacksonville criminal justice?” he wonders. “Even worse, is it possible that a political machine has emerged around the system with the power to sustain itself indefinitely, regardless of the costs to the community?” It’s a reasonable question, and one no longer confined to the realm of reporters and politicos. The community may not care about the people inside our criminal justice system, but they do care what they cost, and they should care whether their incarceration is necessary or remotely helpful. The city’s tough on crime brand has failed, and its most ardent pitchmen are showing their seams. It’s time to start again, brand new.  Anne Schindler themail@folioweekly.com

The University of North Florida hosts a forum on Hallett’s report and the Duval County Jail on Monday, April 2 at UNF’s University Center from 7-8:30 p.m. Participants include Angela Corey, Matt Shirk, attorney Bill Sheppard, Michael Hallett and Alton Yates.


Beyond Belief

Wow, only a couple of weeks after castigating Rick Santorum for where he chose to drink a few beers (News Buzz, Jan. 17), both cartoons in your Feb. 28 issue (“This Modern World,” “The City”) again attack the presidential candidate for his religious beliefs as it relates to the secondary issue of contraception and the primary issue of religious freedom. And the Guest Editorial “Bad Medicine” continues that attack (March 6, http://bit.ly/AbT6qN) However, what’s really laid bare here is the insidious anti-Catholicism of the cartoonists as well as the systemic bias of Folio Weekly against the Roman Catholic Church. This goes back at least 10 years, with the publication of Derf ’s cartoon (Dec. 3, 2002) that depicted a parade balloon caricature of a

globally to those most affected by catastrophes, cares for the sick and dying in hospice centers worldwide, houses and treats the elderly with respect, and cares for young mothers and mothers-to-be as well as their babies. Yes, the Church has her warts, but she is a hospital for sinners, not a hotel for saints. Catholicism is demanding in the face of serious moral issues. However, as anti-Catholicism has become the anti-Semitism of the intellectual elite, I’d like to challenge the leadership of Folio Weekly to promote religious tolerance for everyone and, once and for all, stop maligning Catholicism. Perhaps Derf can also attend the sensitivity training I suggested a decade ago? Christopher M. Shea Jacksonville via email

I’m sure I was not alone in being insulted by Tricia Booker in her article against the Catholic Church. The Bishops of the Church are not sitting around waiting to “stick it to Obama” as she claims. They are making a stand against having the morning-after pill and abortion crammed down their throats and protecting the freedom of Catholics to practice their religion according to the Constitution. There are 1 billion, 150 million members of the Catholic Church, hardly an institution lacking relevance! Our teachings and laws have been handed down through thousands of years, and martyrs have given their lives to defend them. Most of

Yes, the Church has her warts, but she is a hospital for sinners, not a hotel for saints. Catholic priest with his pants around his ankles. Since that time, I’d be interested to know how many cartoons Mr. Derf has produced and that you’ve run that mock Judaism, Islam, Buddhism and Sikhism? If there are none, then quite simply this pattern of anti-Catholicism is what we call recidivism, as you’ve seemingly taken on a mission to disparage Catholicism as it stands as a bulwark against secularism, relativism, syncretism and the hyperautonomy that have long been tearing at the fabric of our culture. As I brought to your attention in 2002, Harvard professor Arthur Schlesinger said that anti-Catholicism was “the deepest bias in the history of the American people” and was confirmed years later (1995) when the National Conference commissioned a major survey of prejudice in the U.S. and found that prejudice against Catholics was the No. 1 prejudice in the nation, trumping bias against Asian Americans, Latino Americans, African Americans, Jews and Muslims. Thus, deriding the deeply held tenets of faith of over 1 billion of the planet’s inhabitants is unconscionable. While usually extolling the twin virtues of tolerance and diversity, I see no quarter given for the Church and its faithful members. Why is that? Do you fear what you don’t understand? If so, I’d like you invite you to learn more about the Church that was founded by Jesus Christ, is the largest private institution on the planet that provides AIDS/ HIV services (in fact, more than a quarter of all services globally), treats 1 out of every 5 hospital patients in the U.S. regardless of status (faith, income, ethnicity, etc.), educates millions of students of all faiths, particularly those who are food insecure, at risk and live in underserved areas, provides disaster relief

us are supporting the Bishops and appreciate the hard stand they are having to take. Religious freedom is what the fight is about, not contraceptives. There are always going to be a few who want to make their own rules, do things the easy way and leave if they don’t like something. They are free to go! Unfortunately, Ms. Booker quit. The road is rough and narrow, but quitting is not an option for some of us. Furthermore, Sen. Rubio is not going to hell for attending a Baptist church, so I don’t think you’ll be seeing him there. Jerilyn Ann Cook Westside

The simple answer for the Catholic dynasty wanting to curb birth control among Catholics is to increase the population of their deteriorating base. Breed to succeed! Robert C. Smith

Jail Break

Many times I have been a fan of your articles and the light you shine on the troubling issues

I am sorry that the jail is overcrowded and that it costs tax dollar money to maintain those in jail. Is that a new revelation? in our great city. However, this time I have to respectfully disagree with your recent article on Jacksonville’s State Attorney Angela Corey or, as

March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 5


you state like a B movie preview, “The Punisher” (Cover Story, March 6, http://bit.ly/ypFATx). To blame our State Attorney for doing her job well and successfully putting people in jail for crimes they commit is borderline ludicrous. I am sorry that the jail is overcrowded and that it costs tax dollar money to maintain those in jail. Is that a new revelation? It is not Ms. Corey’s job to find funding for the inmates nor build a bigger jail. Her job and her office is to uphold the law and prosecute those who have been arrested for crimes if there is admissible proof. It basically boils down to one simple tenet: “Don’t do the crime if you can’t do the time.” Alan Pickert Via email

On the Hot Seat

The Secretary of the Navy, Ray Mabus, recently spoke in Jacksonville, sponsored by the local Business Council and the White House Business Council. He was asked how he assesses our vulnerability from the threat of global climate change, nationally and internationally, and how he responds to those who claim climate change is a hoax. He said he has toured Iceland and Greenland, and has been under the polar icecaps in a submarine. The evidence for and the effects of global climate change are everywhere. He said for those who claim that global climate change is a hoax, “everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but you are not entitled to your own facts.” Roughly half the world’s 7 billion people live in coastal areas and are in danger of displacement from sea level rise. The summer ice in the polar regions will be gone within 20 years, opening up new shipping routes and new areas for the Navy to patrol. Buzz Holling, an eminent ecologist who lives in British Columbia, has used the example of recent beetle outbreaks that have caused the greatest forest die-offs on record, to illustrate the dangers of climate change. He was quoted in the current issue of Orion magazine: “As we try to figure out how to come to grips with climate change, changing energy supplies, and an economy in peril, we could do worse that to take heed of Holling’s predictions: Whatever is large, global, and concentrated will not survive in the years ahead. What is small, flexible, and locally based will grow like lodgepole seedlings after a fire.” We in St. Johns County have a lot at stake. Our window of opportunity to plan for what is in store for us will not stay open forever. We should question carefully those who aspire to public office and hold them responsible for a realistic approach to global climate change and global warming.

County facility Caboodle Ranch (Buzz, March 6) is a reminder of how animals can suffer when “no-kill” policies are enforced at all costs. PETA’s undercover investigation of Caboodle Ranch revealed that cats were kept in ramshackle, moldy trailers that reeked of ammonia and their living areas were filled with waste, vomit, trash, roaches and maggots. Many cats were denied veterinary care and were left to choke on mucus and gasp for air because of rampant upper-respiratory infections. Cats’ skulls and spines were found on the property. Independent “rescues” like this one are often operated by animal hoarders — people who acquire far more animals than they can properly care for and allow them to languish in filthy conditions, often without proper food, water or veterinary care. A bill that was before the state legislature would have forced open-admission animal shelters to relinquish their animals to any so-called “rescue” operation that requests them. [If passed], the “Animal Rescue Act” (S.B. 818 and H.B. 597) would have likely resulted in more animals suffering in places like Caboodle Ranch. [Legislation like this could make] more animals become victims of hoarders posing as shelters. Yanet Pantaleon, M.D., FASCP, FCAP St. Augustine via email

I’m just thankful PETA deals with animals and not humans. For if they did, just think where we would be today. Our human rescue programs like the African Relief fund or even our local City Rescue Mission would be in trouble. As soon as one of these individuals got sick or may have not received all the medical care available to him, there would be no City Rescue Mission. PETA would close it down and have the head administrator arrested and thrown in jail, even though that administrator may have given his life savings to help the homeless. The homeless would be jailed and there would be no future beds or food for those in need. Every African relief fund would be shut down, because not every sick, abused and malnutritioned individual would make it through. Pictures would be taken and shown on a TV ad campaign of the dying women and children hoping to gain support for an organization gone astray. The head administrators would be arrested at gunpoint and jailed (yes, this is what happened to Craig

Bill Hamilton Crescent Beach

Feline Distemper

6 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012

The recent rescue of nearly 700 cats from deplorable conditions at the Madison

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus addresses the local Business Council.


Locally Owned and Independent since 1987

Grant at Caboodle Cat Ranch). But, most importantly, thousands more would die of disease and malnutrition without hope of rescue. John Morris Via email

Independent “rescues” like this one are often operated by animal hoarders — people who acquire far more animals than they can properly care for and allow them to languish in filthy conditions, often without proper food, water or veterinary care. Equal Time

I want to voice my strong support in defense of Sandra Fluke, the Georgetown University law student, against Rush Limbaugh’s despicable comments that he made about her. I want to respond to all the uproar that has been heard in this country. We women across the United States breathed a sigh of relief when the U.S. Senate recently voted down the Roy Blunt-Marco Rubio bill. This bill not only let employers deny coverage for contraception, but it also let them sidestep any medical service they found “morally objectionable.” Now Speaker of the House John Boehner is saying he will take it to the House for a vote. I want to help get out the facts on this attack on women’s health. Doctors prescribe contraception for many reasons, including preventive care. Continued use of birth control pills reduces the risk of ovarian and endometrial cancers and cysts. However, their cost often prevents women from using them, particularly women between the ages 18 and 34. It is not just birth control at stake. More than 20 million American women could lose access to mammograms, prenatal screenings, cervical cancer screenings, vaccines, domestic violence counseling and other preventive services. Now, thanks to the Affordable Health Care Act, beginning Aug. 1, the cost of preventive care will no longer be a barrier to women’s health. This health reform will ensure that contraception is covered, with no out-ofpocket cost to women. This has been a long time coming. Especially since Viagra has been covered for men by insurance companies for quite some time, without a whimper or controversy. Interesting, isn’t it?  Gina Burrell St. Augustine via email

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Folio Weekly is published every Tuesday throughout Northeast Florida. It contains opinions of contributing writers that are not necessarily the opinion of this publication. Folio Weekly welcomes both editorial and photographic contributions. Calendar information must be received three weeks in advance of event date. Copyright © Folio Publishing, Inc. 2012. All rights reserved. Advertising rates and information are available on request. An advertiser purchases right of publication only. One free copy per person. Additional copies and back issues are $1 each at the office or $4 by mail, based on availability. First Class mail subscriptions are $48 for 13 weeks, $96 for 26 weeks and $189 for 52 weeks. Please recycle Folio Weekly. Folio Weekly is printed on recycled paper using soy-based inks. 44,200 press run • Audited weekly readership 127,212

March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 7


NewsBuzz

Walter Coker

Out of His Shell Those of you with knowledge of local art may recognize this week’s cover as the work of longtime Jacksonville artist Jim Draper. The painter created the blue crab painting especially for Folio Weekly’s Bite By Bite issue. Watch Draper discuss his current projects as well as the making of the painting at http://bit.ly/ yerGpTjim. For more information on Jim Draper and to see his artwork, go to jimdraperart.com.

Storm of Ideas The 18th installment of Jacksonville’s Pecha Kucha night (Japanese for chit chat) is held on March 20 at Intuition Ale Works, 720 King St., downtown. Artists, designers and other creative folks are given the floor

Steven Johnson holds his 3-year-old daughter on one of the EZBase-paved roads on his property. (The larger rocks are poorly milled hunks of EZBase that were not suitable for paving purposes.)

to present 20 slides of their ideas, with 20 seconds allotted for each slide. The global trend has reached cities as disparate as Hanoi, Toledo, and Zurich. Presenters at the Jacksonville event include graphic designer Ian Latchmansingh, Doug Coleman, board member of Riverside Avondale Preservation Inc. and Florida Land Trust, and Michelle Barth, deputy chief of staff to Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown. Doors open at 6 p.m. and presentations begin at 7 p.m.

Winning! “Look at me! You’re looking at a victor. I beat Obama.” — Operation Rescue founder (and former South Ponte Vedra Beach resident) Randall Terry, proclaiming victory in the Oklahoma Democratic presidential primary against Pres. Obama. Terry won 18 percent of the vote, beating Obama in 14 Oklahoma counties, enough to win a delegate to the Democratic National Convention. Terry, whose previous campaigns (as a Republican) for the Florida Senate and the U.S. Congress ended in failure, is now officially running for president. Watch his unhinged rant at http://bit.ly/wxaOU3

Not Kosher “We have two congregants this year.” — Rabbi Joshua Leif, commenting on Congregation Ahavath Chesed’s representation on Folio Weekly’s annual “Water Hogs” list of the largest water users in JEA’s service area (http://bit.ly/ ziLLHQ). The rabbi made his comment after flipping through a copy of Folio Weekly’s Water Hogs issue while waiting in the green room at WJCT studios last week. 8 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

Road Trip

A rural road-paving project becomes an environmental disaster for JEA – with a potentially hefty price tag

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hen Steven Johnson accepted 16 tons of free coal ash from JEA’s coal-powered Northside Generating Station more than two years ago, the agency assured him it was as “safe as sand.” So Johnson spread the pebbly white material liberally over the dirt roads of his 30-acre Black Water Farm in Middleburg. He paved a road through wetlands, a boat ramp into Black Creek, an area near his drinking water well and roads on his neighbor’s property. He says one JEA representative was so impressed with how he applied the material, which JEA markets as EZBase, that he brought prospective clients out to Black Water Ranch to show them how Johnson was using it. But even as Johnson was spreading the stuff around his home, the federal government was considering whether to classify coal ash as a hazardous waste. Although the state of Florida has approved EZBase for a number of road-paving uses, that approval was based on strict compacting standards and application guidelines that are, in practice, not always followed. Loosely applied, the stuff leaches many of the same pollutants that make coal ash toxic, and that have prompted the state to require it be disposed of in a lined landfill. Folio Weekly previously reported about Johnson in the April 13, 2010 story “Road to Hell,” after he and a neighbor were cited by the state Department of Environmental Protection for applying the material in violation of state restrictions. The citation said the EZBase wasn’t properly compacted, meaning it could wash away and contaminate the surrounding area, and was improperly used near wetlands and in residential areas. Johnson insists that the JEA employee who offered him the EZBase rode all over his land with him and didn’t tell him anything about the restrictions. Still, DEP

cited Johnson for the violation, and said the material needed to be excavated and removed. (At the time, Johnson wouldn’t talk to the media because he was working out a settlement with DEP and JEA.) Two years later, Johnson’s property is still covered with EZBase. JEA already removed the material from Johnson’s neighbor’s property, but the agency has not yet agreed to remove the material from Johnson’s property or responded to his request that JEA compensate him for the loss of value to his property and attorney fees. A 2010 report that Johnson commissioned from Moran Environmental Recovery that he provided last week to Folio Weekly estimated the cost of removing the 12 tons of EZBase and another four tons of contaminated soil at $653,640. Replacing the soil with clean fill would bring the total cost close to $1 million. Beyond fixed costs, there are intangible ones. A 2010 real estate appraisal from Broom, Moody, Johnson and Grainger Inc. estimated that Johnson’s property was worth $470,000 before he covered it with EZBase, but that it will drop $70,000 in value — even after the EZBase is removed — because of the stigma of contamination. In its current state, the company valued the property as a liability — at a negative –$486,300. “I’m a little guy,” he says. “I ain’t no millionaire like JEA.” Johnson now feels like JEA used his farm as a toxic dump. He worries about allowing his 3-year-old daughter Kelsey to play outside. He fears she’ll ingest poisons, breathe in the EZBase dust or absorb it through her skin. Preliminary tests he had done of the property in 2010 show reason for concern. The arsenic levels in the soil samples were four times the level the state considers safe and the levels of vanadium were 75 times the state standard.

“JEA is the ones with the knowledge and the science about how to use this stuff,” he said. “I put it out here thinking I was going to improve my property. After I did my homework on it, I began to see that it’s not good, it’s not good at all.” JEA first began selling EZBase as a paving material in 2005, for $50 a truckload. Like other coal-powered electric generating stations, JEA facilities produce a sludge waste that’s a combination of fly ash and bottom ash from their silos. The ash contains heavy metals like lead, mercury, vanadium and boron, which in high concentrations can cause birth defects, lung disease, cancers, nerve disorders and other illnesses. But when the sludge hardens, it becomes like concrete. If properly compacted, JEA testing shows, the toxins are contained in the hardened material. JEA has promoted EZBase as a means of recycling, and has the strong support of the state DEP, which considers the paving material a beneficial reuse of an otherwise hazardous waste. DEP issued permits for each EZBase application. The federal Environmental Protection Agency also supports reuse, but admitted late last year that there hasn’t been enough testing done to determine the safety of coal ash byproducts. Some utilities recycle their ash into drywall or roofing shingles, bowling balls and even cosmetics. Prompted in part by the catastrophic collapse of a coal pond in Tennessee in 2008, which sent a billion gallons of coal ash sludge into Emory River, EPA has been considering for the past two years whether to classify coal ash as a hazardous waste and require that concentrations of heavy metals in it be reduced before it is dumped. (In January, the legal nonprofit Earthjustice announced it would sue EPA for delaying its decision.)


For JEA, the questions surrounding the safety of EZBase have proved costly. DEP has required the utility to remove it or cover it with a top coat at a number of locations in Northeast Florida. JEA spokesperson Gerry Boyce said there is no estimate yet of what it will cost to clear out Johnson’s EZBase, but the agency began removing the four tons of EZBase that Steven Johnson spread on neighbor James Evans’ property in December 2011. The removal cost about $20,000, and raised additional contamination concerns. Neighbors complained that the resulting dust covered everything and that trucks were leaving the property uncovered. “There were probably 20 dump trucks in and out of here every day,” says neighbor Bonnie Smith, who lives down the street from Evans and says she had two attacks of bronchitis during the process. “A white dust covered everything. There was a film on my swimming pool, every day.”

If EPA does designate coal ash a hazardous waste, utilities say the increased costs of transporting and handling the material would make recycling cost-prohibitive. They’ve lobbied heavily for states to retain regulatory control over its disposal and reuse. In October, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill that gives the states’ control over permitting and regulating products like EZBase and prevents the federal government from regulating disposal. The companion bill is in committee in the Senate. But even if EPA takes control of coal ash regulation, it will be too late to make much difference at Johnson’s Black Water Ranch. “I have an absolutely beautiful place here,” Johnson tells Folio Weekly. “It’s like a piece of heaven. It’s not some dump where it’s OK for JEA to bring their EZBase in here and poison it up.”  Susan Cooper Eastman sceastman@folioweekly.com

Restoration of the shrimp boat Apple Jack, Riberia Street, St. Augustine, February 19

Bouquets to Jacksonville’s Jason Langston for his novel and effective means of raising money for and awareness of organ donation. For the past five years, Langston has raced in the annual Gate River Run, starting at the back of the pack and collecting 10 cents in pledges for every runner he passes. Langston passed 13,670 runners out of more than 20,000 this year. He’ll add the $1,367 he raised to the donations he will collect at The Katie Ride for Life, a bike race and run that takes place on Amelia Island on April 21. That event raises money for the Katie Caples Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to educating the public about the importance of organ donation. Langston’s father received a kidney transplant in 1998. Bouquets to coxswain Susan Fraser and all the members of Jacksonville Rowing Club for representing the city with a top performance at the Sarasota Invitational Regatta on Feb. 25 and 26. The Jacksonville club won two gold medals and a bronze medal at the competition. The club’s masters team took first place among the masters teams in the 15 events they entered. Bouquets to John Fegan, Winn-Dixie’s vice president of pharmacy, and the rest of the Winn-Dixie chain, Action News and UF & Shands Jacksonville for offering the public a free home “Test for Life” kit that checks for blood in the gastrointestinal track. Winn-Dixie is giving away the EZ Detect kits from March 7 to April 7 to raise awareness — and detection of — colon cancer. Blood in the stool is a symptom of colon cancer and can also be caused by ulcers, hemorrhoids, polyps, colitis, diverticulitis and other colon diseases. March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 9


Night Sounds “The echo is amazing at 4 a.m.” — Murray Hill resident Joe Winiarz, facetiously describing the sound of CSX train horns as they travel nightly through Avondale, Murray Hill, Riverside and San Marco. Winiarz sent a March 14 email plea to City Council President Stephen Joost, asking for train “quiet zones” to be established. “These are working class neighborhoods,” he writes, “meaning folks have to sleep at night in order to function properly and productively during the day.”

All Lit Up Take down your Christmas lights already! The city of Augustine sent out a reminder to business owners and residents on March 7 explaining the city’s holiday Nights of Lights was over — on Jan. 31. “Just as we need the community to support the program by participating during the Nights of Lights, we need them to participate by turning their lights off,” wrote city public affairs director Paul Williamson in an email. “Having the city sparkle for just the 10 weeks during the Nights of Lights is what makes the Nights of Lights special,” Williamson wrote. The 19th season of Nights of Lights begins on Nov. 17, 2012.

Gestures, Simplified

10 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

Walter Coker

Cash mobs, where patrons arrive en masse to support small local businesses, are becoming de rigueur in other cities, but the first one we’ve seen planned is (spoiler alert!) scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. on March 24 at St. Augustine’s favorite art and gift shop, Simple Gestures, 4 White St. The store’s owner, Steve Marrazzo, was the subject of a Folio Weekly cover story (“Save Simple Gestures!” http://bit.ly/yYiqjn).


Where the Wild Things Were

A bill allowing zoos to breed animals on state lands has raised concerns about environmental impacts and invasive species

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n a state where debates about land use often resemble cage matches between environmentalists and big business, conservationists have a new, somewhat unexpected opponent: zoos and aquariums. Because while most of us were surfing the Internet for Wanee tickets, a bill snaked through Florida’s Legislature so quickly and quietly, even some of its supporters were surprised. House Bill 1117, dubbed the “Jurassic Park” bill by one critic, allows accredited Florida zoos and aquariums to lease state lands to research and breed hoofed animals and birds (or “selected populations of ungulates and avian species,” for those of you with degrees in animal husbandry). Though the bill met little resistance in the Legislature, some environmentalists are concerned about the risks of introducing exotic species to Florida. The state already spends millions annually fighting several invasive species like the feral pig (see Cover Story, Nov. 29, http://bit.ly/vycGQL), citrus canker and the Monk parakeet. In Okeechobee, it recently took seven months to capture 17 invasive ungulates — wild horses — that were believed to have been intentionally released by their owner. Though some would argue that wild horses are a welcome addition to the scenery, local officials were more concerned with their trampling and grazing on native vegetation on lands that had recently been restored. Representative Mark Pafford (D-West Palm Beach), one of the three members of the Legislature who voted against it, told Folio Weekly that he felt the bill should be “scrapped in its entirety,” or at least rewritten. Rep. Pafford pointed out that the bill lacks any clear environmental protection language. It does not prohibit leasing land that is preserved or threatened, or that is known to be critical breeding grounds for endangered species. Indeed, some fear the bill would make it possible for zoos and aquariums to lease land like Little Talbot Island State Park, home to the rapidly dwindling gopher tortoise. The gopher tortoise’s plight is further impacted by the invasive armadillo, believed to have become established in Florida after escaping from zoos and circuses in the early 1900s. And though the bill appoints the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to provide “technical assistance” in reviewing applications, those with authority to approve leases — the Governor and Cabinet, or the governing board of a local water management district — are to merely “consider … whether the project is consistent with the state’s goals for the lands … and will not cause harm to the land or the surrounding land.” There is no mention of endangered species (like the Anastasia Island beach mouse or the longleaf pine) or threatened ecosystems (like the sand hills in Ocala National Forest). However, funding sources are specifically detailed. There are some who believe the legislation was crafted with a specific parcel, species and zoo in mind. Dr. Larry Killmar, president of the Florida Association of Zoos and Aquariums and

vice president of Lowry Park Zoo, testified before the Legislature that somewhere “within an hour’s drive” would be ideal. Representative Shawn Harrison (R-Temple Terrace), who proposed the bill, told the Tampa Bay Times he did so because he is a “huge fan of Lowry Park Zoo” and “wanted to help them with their mission.” Killmar was quick to tell Folio Weekly that he had no immediate plans to utilize a specific parcel. He also said that his zoo would ideally seek a lease on “disturbed” land (such as that previously used for pastureland). Rep. Harrison’s office told Folio Weekly via email that while the bill “came from a conversation with Lowry Park Zoo, it was for the benefit of conserving endangered wildlife under the cooperation of all 16 AZA accredited institutions.” Rep. Harrison is a former member of the Lowry Park Zoo board. Others have taken issue with the bill’s somewhat misleading title, which begins “[a]n act

© 2012

In an ecosystem already disrupted by invasive species like feral pigs, burmese pythons and Monk parakeets, some fear the new bill will further damage Florida’s remaining wild places.

relating to conservation of wildlife.” The bill does not mention exotic species, merely stating lands will be used for “specified purposes.” According to the Florida Senate’s 2009 Manual for Drafting Legislation, the state constitution requires that bill titles give the public “fair notice” of the contents without being misleading. Legislation that fails to do so can be overturned by the courts. For many, “[a]n act relating to the conservation of wildlife,” though technically accurate, doesn’t begin to suggest the bill’s actual purpose — breeding exotic species on state-owned land. But even among the bill’s critics, most do not believe that it sounds a death knell for Florida’s endangered ecosystems or native species. A representative from the Florida State Park Service said the agency was “neutral” on the issue. Speaking on condition of anonymity, an employee of a Florida park stated they were “not worried” that their facility would become home to exotic species. Like many other state parks, they are too busy scrambling for funding and fighting actual invasives like feral pigs and the air potato to worry about giraffes or zebras. The bill was en route to Gov. Scott last week — his office would not comment on whether he intended to sign it, though Rep. Harrison said he “can’t imagine” he wouldn’t — and could take effect on July 1.  Claire Goforth themail@folioweekly.com MARCH 20-26, 2012 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 11

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Sportstalk Political Football

Allowing students to switch schools for sports is the new face of “school choice”

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hat do we remember about school? If the experience works optimally, and we’re properly socialized, we remember the fun things — homecomings, proms and sporting events. However, if students aren’t properly socialized, all bets are off. Students who don’t demonstrate sufficient “buy in” to appreciate these school spirit moments end up dropping out of school — which ends up leading to societal burdens all too often. In this sense — the sense of rewarding students for the onerous process of internalizing social norms — we see the greatest utility of high school sports and other extracurricular activities. If students are given a reason for making grades, then they will. It follows that the intrinsic value of the enterprise in itself isn’t enough, an insight which leads us to dark thoughts on the enduring value of compulsory education and so forth. As I wrote a few weeks ago, high school sports, in theory, are admirable. When the American educational system was among the world’s best, decades back, we had resources for extracurricular activities galore. These

a quarter-century ago, says the bill gives cheaters “an opportunity to cheat.” Duval Athletic Director Jon Fox, a frequent source for Frenette, says the bill will encourage “school-hopping.” It’s a source of constant bemusement to me that the movement of students is regulated to such a degree that a transfer would have punitive consequences. We live in a transitory society, where an increasing number of people are in uncertain housing situations, including families of some athletes. If a student feels his interest is served in transferring and getting a free private education at a so-called “basketball factory” like Arlington Country Day, even in the middle of a season, what’s the harm? It alleviates the school district of the burden of paying for that student’s education and it creates opportunities that the student might never have had to broaden his horizons. Does it put a public school program at a competitive disadvantage? Perhaps. But just as the student athlete does not derive financial compensation from representing his school, we should consider that there is

D.A. gets our area’s best artists, and that works out just fine, giving our Duval district a school with a national rep. Why not do the same with athletics, and maximize the true potential of student-athletes in ways that have yet to be explored?

12 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

days, we’re seeing (whether we like it or not) shifting priorities, diminished resources and austerity measures locally and globally. We will see high schools forced to streamline or, as is happening elsewhere, attempt to actively recruit tuition-paying students from overseas to fill the tuition gap. The 21st century is a different world. And maybe that’s why I see merit in reforms to the high school sports transfer process. Florida Bill 1403, which has likely been signed into law by Gov. Scott before this prints, changes the transfer process in favor of that prized commodity, the blue chip student athlete. Whereas now a transferring student has to sit out for a year before being able to play, the bill, which has passed both the House and the Senate, would allow students to play for their new school immediately. Critics of the bill abound. The TimesUnion’s Gene Frenette claims that “whenever politicians try to stick their nose into legislating athletics, it rarely passes the smell test,” adding that this bill makes him “wonder about the hidden agendas and motives of lawmakers.” I wonder about that, too. Then I look at the fully-vested parties whom Frenette cites as opposing this bill. Bishop Kenny Athletic Director Bob West, who taught me biology

no reciprocal obligation for the student to attend his current school for his entire career. There’s nothing sacrosanct about lines on a map. If a student can get a better deal, why shouldn’t he? Isn’t that an ancillary benefit of being in a “right to work” state? If Jon Fox and the gang really want to beat the private schools at their own games, maybe they could start an athletic magnet school. Why not send the best public school athletes to one facility, creating all-star teams that could compete with any squad out there? D.A. gets our area’s best artists, and that works out just fine, giving our Duval district a school with a national rep. Why not do the same with athletics, and maximize the true potential of student-athletes in ways that have yet to be explored? Of course, there are reasons an athletic magnet school would never happen. The hierarchy of such a place would be unpredictable, and it would have a domino effect on student bodies elsewhere. And though it’s easy to complain about Steve Wise, the hard fact is that there is no good reason this bill shouldn’t be law. That is, unless you believe student-athletes are indentured servants of the state.  AG Gancarski themail@folioweekly.com Twitter @AGGancarski


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I’m Gonna Wiki That I

f you’re anything like me, you no longer have time in your busy life for any donkey plop. That’s why I’m willing to share what may be the most revolutionary timesaving device humanity has ever created. It’s … “Wikipedia.” NOW BEFORE YOU GROAN AND ACCUSE ME OF BEING OLDER THAN MATLOCK, LISTEN UP, HALF-WIT. I fully realize Wikipedia’s been around for years, and is used a billion times every day by everybody. But no one has ever realized the full potential of Wikipedia … until now. Until … ME. Consider this: Every nerd in America is reading “The Hunger Games,” right? I have two responses: 1) That’s a children’s book — what is wrong with you people? And 2) I’m an adult; ergo I don’t read children’s books. HOWEVER! I do like to have sex with adults who read

fact, other than seeing Joan’s magnificent breasts — which you can also Wiki, BTW — YOU WON’T HAVE MISSED A THING. Oh! Except for maybe the amazing scene in season 3, episode 6 where an annoying Limey gets his foot run over by a lawn mower. (Wiki “foot amputation.”) I know what you’re thinking: “Oh you poor misguided Humpy! Don’t you realize that by using Wikipedia as a substitute for reading books or watching TV, you’re not actually experiencing these art forms? Wiki synopses aren’t the same as taking the journey!” Huh? What’s that? Sorry, I’m boning a hot YA geek. Tell you what: You keep talking and I’ll Wiki this convo later. 

This is exactly why I encourage you to go ahead and watch the fifth season premiere of AMC’s “Mad Men,” on Sun., March 25 at 9 p.m., even if you’ve never seen a single episode! Just take 15 minutes and WIKI THAT POOP.

9:00 FOX NEW GIRL Jess agrees to go out with a wealthy, dreamy older man. OH, POOR BABY!

children’s books — or any adult for that matter. That’s why I feign reading baby books like “The Hunger Games.” How? I WIKI THAT CRAP! So even though I haven’t read a single page, I learned enough from Wikipedia to trick some gullible nerd into the sack AND saved precious hours in the process! Example two: The TV series “Justified.” I had exactly zero interest in this when it started, and therefore skipped the first two seasons. BUT THEN! A couple of my non-dumb friends insisted it was great, so I hopped into the third season and sure enough … I LOVE IT. However! Do I love it enough to go back and watch the first two seasons? HELL TO THE UNH-UNH. Takes too much time, man. Time that could be used to bone four-eyed YA nerds. So what do I do? I WIKI THAT CRAP. And now? Not only do I know exactly what happened in the first two seasons, I saved enough time to create a Hunger Games fan site (celebrating a book I’ve never read) which has upped my YA boneage stats a whopping 37 percent! This is exactly why I encourage you to go ahead and watch the fifth season premiere of AMC’s “Mad Men,” on Sun., March 25 at 9 p.m., even if you’ve never seen a single episode! Just take 15 minutes and WIKI THAT POOP. You’ll learn everything you ever wanted to know about Don Draper, his frosty ex-wife Betty, his lispy kid Sally, his business partner Roger, his nerdy assistant (and probable YA lover) Peggy, and boobalicious office manager Joan. In

sUpport

Ask for Action

Produced by ed

Checked by

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TUESDAY, MARCH 20

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21 9:00 NBC BENT Debut! A divorcee develops a hot ‘n’ horny relationship with her contractor in this actually kind of funny new sitcom. 10:00 A&E DUCK DYNASTY Debut! A new reality show about millionaire hillbillies who own a duck calling company. OK, now I’ve seen everything.

© 2011

THURSDAY, MARCH 22 8:00 NBC COMMUNITY When Jeff starts taking anti-anxiety medicine, he goes into a narcissistic coma! 9:00 FOX TOUCH Kiefer Sutherland stars as a dad trying to reach his troubled son. (When’s he gonna start torturing somebody??)

FRIDAY, MARCH 23 9:00 FOX FRINGE A killer targets “love” which forces the team to reconsider the notion of “emotionless sex.”

SATURDAY, MARCH 24 9:00 ANI TOO CUTE! Tonight’s hard-hitting edition focuses on a problem we all want to avoid: Super fluffy puppies.

SUNDAY, MARCH 25 9:00 AMC MAD MEN Season premiere! Don is faced with a life-changing surprise. (Let me guess … lung cancer?) 11:30 TOON LOITER SQUAD Debut! Sketch comedy, pranks and general hilarity from the African-American funny guy troupe, Odd Future!

MONDAY, MARCH 26 8:00 FOX ALCATRAZ Season finale! Rebecca discovers something beneath Alcatraz, which could reveal why the show’s so boring. 10:00 NBC SMASH Derek considers stealing the musical, before remembering, “Who would ever want a Broadway musical??” Wm.™ Steven Humphrey steve@portlandmercury.com March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 13

Folio


14 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012


Eating is a great and wonderful thing, made better when someone else does the shopping, cooking and cleanup. To make things still easier, Folio Weekly offers our annual Bite by Bite by Neighborhood, a comprehensive restaurant guide that allows you to plan your dining adventures with the precision of a ninja. In addition to more than 700 restaurant listings, we’ve got features on famous gluttons, food phobias, the flavored vodka craze and 10 unbeatable meals for 10 bucks. With all that, this is one reference guide you’re going to want to bookmark on your computer (http://bit.ly/y0gnZz) and keep stuffed in the back pocket of your car’s passenger seat. So dig in, strap on the feedbag and get ready to get out there. Your next meal may be your best.

AMELIA ISLAND, FERNANDINA BEACH & YULEE 16

ORANGE PARK & MIDDLEBURG 38

ARLINGTON, FT. CAROLINE & REGENCY 19

PONTE VEDRA & NE ST. JOHNS 40

AVONDALE & ORTEGA 22

RIVERSIDE, FIVE POINTS, WESTSIDE & MURRAY HILL 41

BAYMEADOWS 23 THE BEACHES 25 DOWNTOWN JACKSONVILLE 32 FLEMING ISLAND 34 INTRACOASTAL WEST 35 JULINGTON CREEK & NW ST. JOHNS 36

Photos by Walter Coker

MANDARIN 37

ST. AUGUSTINE & ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH 46 ST. JOHNS TOWN CENTER 51 SAN JOSE & UNIVERSITY 52 SAN MARCO & SOUTHBANK 52 SOUTHSIDE 54 SPRINGFIELD & NORTHSIDE 58 March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 15


AMELIA ISLAND, FERNANDINA BEACH & YULEE

(All restaurants located in Fernandina Beach unless otherwise noted.) BARBARA JEAN’S 960030 Gateway Blvd., Amelia Island, 277-3700 See Ponte Vedra listing.

BAXTER’S RESTAURANT 4919 First Coast Hwy., Amelia Island, 277-4503 This upscale restaurant serves continental cuisine with a focus on certified Angus beef, seafood, veal and lamb. A children’s menu is available, a full bar is served, and outdoor seating is available. Open for dinner nightly.

THE BEECH STREET GRILL 801 Beech St., 277-3662 Located in a home built by Captain Bell in 1889, this restaurant is known for its extensive wine list. Beech Street has won multiple Best of Jax awards and features daily blackboard specials with a focus on regional dishes. A full bar is served. Piano music is performed Mon.-Sat. evenings and for Sun. brunch. Dress is resort-casual. Open for Sun. brunch and dinner nightly.

BRETT’S WATERWAY CAFÉ 1 S. Front St., 261-2660 Brett’s is located on the water at the foot of historic Centre Street and specializes in traditional Southern hospitality in an upscale atmosphere. The menu features daily specials, fresh Florida seafood, aged beef and a full bar. Open daily.

BRIGHT MORNINGS 105 S. Third St., 491-1771 This small café is hidden behind Amelia SanJon Gallery. With indoor and outdoor dining, the café is open for breakfast and lunch daily; closed Wed.

CAFÉ 4750 The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island, 4750 Amelia Island Parkway, 277-1100 From his Italian kitchen and wine bar, Café 4750’s Chef de Cuisine Garrett Gooch offers roasted sea bass, frutti di mare soup and clam linguini, along with fresh gelatos. Dine indoors or on the terrace. Open daily. Reservations recommended.

CAFÉ KARIBO 27 N. Third St., 277-5269 Housed in a historic building in downtown Fernandina, family-owned Café Karibo serves eclectic cuisine, including

homemade veggie burgers, fresh seafood, unique salads and made from scratch desserts. Kids menu and take-out are available, and meals are served inside or out under the oak shaded patio. The Karibrew Pub offers beer brewed on site, imports and a full bar. Open for lunch on Mon., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Live music is performed every Fri.-Sun.

CHEZ LEZAN BAKERY COMPANY 10145 Atlantic Ave., 491-4663 European-style breads and pastries, including croissants, muffins and pies are baked daily. Most breads made at Chez Lezan are made without fat or sugar. Open daily.

CRAB TRAP 31 N. Second St., 261-4749 For 30-plus years, family-owned-and operated Crab Trap has been serving fresh local seafood and steaks. Food and drink specials are featured and a full bar is served. Open nightly for dinner.

DICK’S WINGS 474313 E. S.R. 200, 310-6945 See Beaches. EIGHT SPORTS LOUNGE The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island, 4750 Amelia Island Parkway, 277-1100 This contemporary sports lounge features billiard tables and multiple flat-screen TVs along with classic sports-bar fare. Local craft brews are on tap, and an extensive wine lists is offered, along with cocktails. Open Mon.-Fri. for dinner, for lunch Sat. and Sun.

ESPAÑA RESTAURANT & TAPAS 22 S. Fourth St., 261-7700 Owners Marina and Roberto Pestana serve Old World Spanish and Portuguese cuisine, including caracoles (Andalusia-style escargot) and gambas al jerez (shrimp and garlic, sautéed with sherry and cream). Tapas includes ceviche and homemade sangria. A kids’ menu is available. Open nightly.

FALCON’S NEST 6800 First Coast Hwy., Amelia Island, 491-4242 Located at Omni Amelia Island Plantation, Falcon’s Nest offers specialty burgers, burritos, martinis, beer and wine. Airplane memorabilia decorates this island nightspot. 21 or older after 9 p.m. Happy hour is held Mon.-Fri. Open nightly.

FERNANDELI 17B S. Eighth St., 261-0008 Located in historic Fernandina Beach, FernanDeli offers deli classics with a touch of the South. Popular items include fresh corned beef and Carolina-style pulled pork. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

Big Dawg’s Sports Restaurant in the Intracoastal West neighborhood is a family-friendly sports place featuring wings, burgers, wraps and a special Puppy Chow menu for kids. 16 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012


Island Tropics Restaurant & Lounge in Springfield specializes in island dishes like fried plantain and codfish for breakfast, and curry goat or jerk chicken for dinner. FIREHOUSE SUBS 1978 S. Eighth St., 491-8095 See Mandarin. GENNARO’S RISTORANTE ITALIANO 5472 First Coast Hwy., Amelia Island, 491-1999 Gennaro’s specializes in Southern Italian cuisine, like gourmet ravioli and hand-tossed pizzas. Specialties include a shrimp feast, and the bread is baked on-site. A kids’ menu is offered; beer and wine are served. Live music is presented every weekend. Open for lunch Sat.; for dinner daily.

Chef Joe Robucci offers upscale New American fine dining with French, Creole, Asian and South of the Border influences. Seating is available in the dining room at tables around the homey fireplace, out in the large, New Orleansstyle courtyard, or upstairs on the porch with a view of the Intracoastal. Beer and an extensive wine list are served. Open nightly.

KABUKI JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR

Handcrafted sandwiches include turkey and Swiss, Lighthouse chicken salad and Bleu roast beef — all of Great Harvest’s creations are presented on made-rightthere breads, so you know it’s fresh. Open Mon.-Sat.

1147 Amelia Plaza, 277-8782 Kabuki serves certified Angus steaks and fresh seafood — all MSG-free. The Japanese dishes and items from the unlimited sushi bar can be customized to suit any taste, and the teppan art of cooking entertains as chefs prepare food in front of you. Beer and wine are served, and sushi takeout is offered. Open Tue.-Sun.

GREEN TURTLE TAVERN 14 S. Third St., 321-2324

KARIBREW BREW PUB & GRUB 27 N. Third St., Amelia Island, 277-5269

Housed in a historic shotgun shack, this local hangout has Chicago-style Vienna beef hot dogs and pub fare, cold beer and a chill atmosphere. Live music is featured weekends. Open daily.

Amelia Island’s first microbrewery, Karibrew is next door to its sister restaurant, Café Karibo. Karibrew offers a variety of beers, spirits and pub food, and Sunday brunch. Take-out is available. Open for lunch daily; for dinner Tue-Sun.

HALFTIME SPORTS BAR & GRILL 320 S. Eighth St., 321-0303

KELLEY’S COURTYARD CAFÉ 19 S. Third St., 432-8213

This new spot offers sports bar fare including onion rings, spring rolls, burgers, wraps and wings. Plenty of TVs show nearly every sport imaginable. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

In the heart of Fernandina’s historic district, Kelley’s Café serves sandwiches, wraps, soups and salads, along with fried green tomatoes. A full dinner menu is also featured. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

THE HAPPY TOMATO COURTYARD CAFÉ & BBQ 7 S. Third St., 321-0707

LUIGI’S TRATTORIA ITALIANO 31 S. Fifth St., 277-4080

This historic district restaurant serves fresh salads, deli sandwiches and barbecue — pulled pork, smoked turkey and ribs — in an easy, laid-back atmosphere. Homemade walnut chocolate chunk cookies are a specialty. Beer and wine are served, and a kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open for lunch Mon.-Sat.

The dishes are veramente, the atmosphere’s homey and the staff speaks Italian. The menu includes tortellini, lasagna and parmigiana, and owner Giovanna DeMartino Ott hails from the Napoli countryside, so you know the recipes are authentic Southern Italian. Open for dinner Mon.-Sat.

GREAT HARVEST BREAD CO. 820 Sadler Rd., 277-4747

JACK & DIANE’S 708 Centre St., 321-1444 Housed in a renovated 1887 shotgun home, this café features a menu of favorites like jambalaya, French toast and mac-n-cheese, along with an extensive vegan and vegetarian selection. Dine indoors or on a porch overlooking historic downtown Fernandina. Full bar; children’s menu; open for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

JOE’S 2ND STREET BISTRO 14 S. Second St., 321-2558

LULU’S AT THE THOMPSON HOUSE 11 S. Seventh St., 432-8394 An innovative lunch menu includes po’boys, salads and

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BITE CLUB CERTIFIED!

This restaurant hosted one of Folio Weekly’s Bite Club’s 13 free tastings. To learn more about how to join Bite Club, go to fwbiteclub.com. MARCH 20-26, 2012 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 17


seafood “little plates” served in a historic house. Dinner features fresh local seafood (Fernandina shrimp every Thur.). Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner, Tue.-Sat., brunch on Sun. Reservations recommended.

MARCHÉ BURETTE 6800 First Coast Hwy., Amelia Island, 491-4834 This old-fashioned gourmet food market and deli, in The Spa & Shops at Omni Amelia Island Plantation, offers a continental breakfast and a lunch that features wood-oven fired gourmet pizzas. A children’s menu is available. Beer and wine; open daily.

MARINA SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 101 Centre St., 261-5310 Located in a former customs house, Marina Restaurant serves local seafood, including shrimp burgers, fish sandwiches, seafood platters and oysters. And there’s steak, pasta and pork chops, along with a kids’ menu. Open daily.

MERGE RESTAURANT 510 S. Eighth St., 277-8797 Owner Adam Sears, a former sous chef at The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island, presents modern American fusion cuisine made with fresh ingredients. The seasonal menu features seafood but there are duck, chicken and beef dishes, too. Open for dinner nightly.

MONTEGO BAY COFFEE CAFÉ 463363 S.R. 200, Yulee, 225-3600 Locally owned and operated, Montego Bay serves specialty coffees, fruit smoothies and breakfast and lunch items. Dine in or hit the drive-thru. Open for breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat.

MOON RIVER PIZZA 925 S. 14th St., 321-3400 At this edgy little pizzeria, local artists’ work hangs on the walls and rock music is pumped into the dining room. Northern-style pizzas, available with more than 20 toppings, are served by the pie or the slice. A Best of Jax readers’ poll winner for Best Pizza in 2011. Open Mon.-Sat.

MURRAY’S GRILLE 463852 E. S.R. 200/A1A, Yulee, 261-2727 Situated west of Amelia Island on S.R. 200, Murray’s serves seafood, pastas and barbecue. The hand-cut steaks, grouper Elizabeth and homemade Key lime pie are among the most requested dinner items. A full bar is served. Open daily.

THE MUSTARD SEED CAFE 833 TJ Courson Rd., 277-3141 Awarded the Snail of Approval by Slow Food First Coast, this casual organic eatery and juice bar, in Nassau Health Foods, features all-natural, organic items for breakfast, as well as smoothies, veggie juices and coffees and herbal teas. Takeout is available. Open for breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat.

18 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

O’KANE’S IRISH PUB 318 Centre St., 261-1000 O’Kane’s offers a large selection of draft and imported beers. Located in the rear of a historic 19th century building, the eatery offers fish and chips, corned beef and cabbage and certified Angus beef. Open daily.

PABLO’S GRILL & CANTINA 12 N. Second St., 261-0049 Pablo’s is located in Fernandina Beach’s historic district and serves an authentic Mexican menu featuring chimichangas, fajitas and vegetarian dishes. A kids’ menu is available. Dine inside or out on the brick patio. Open daily.

PARKWAY GRILLE 5517 S. Fletcher Ave., 277-6614 Owners Mike and Bobbe Malcolm prepare breakfast and lunch daily with fresh ingredients, including a selection of Boar’s Head deli meats, in a bright and casual atmosphere.

PEPPER’S MEXICAN GRILL & CANTINA 520 Centre St., 277-2011 96096 Lofton Square Ct., Yulee, 491-6955 This casual, family-friendly restaurant features daily specials, and happy hour runs all day, every day. A full bar — featuring margaritas — is served, and a children’s menu is offered. Open daily.

*

PLAE BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 80 Amelia Village Cir., Amelia Island, 277-2132 Located in the Spa & Shops at Omni Amelia Island Plantation, this bistro style venue offers an innovative menu (with such crowd pleasers as whole fried fish and duck breast), full bar, artistic décor and live entertainment Thur.Sat. Open daily for dinner.

SALT, THE GRILL The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island, 4750 Amelia Island Parkway, 491-6746 The menu here features cuisine made with simple elements from the earth and sea served in a contemporary coastal setting. The extensive wine list boasts more than 500 wines. Cocktails are also available. Open Tue.-Sat. for dinner. Best of Jax 2011 repeat winner for Best Restaurant on Amelia Island.

SANDY BOTTOMS BEACH BAR & GRILL 2910 Atlantic Ave., 310-6904 Owner Claude Hartley offers seafood, sandwiches and pizzas. Dine indoors or out on the deck overlooking the ocean. A full bar is served. A children’s menu and take-out are available. Open daily.

SLIDERS SEASIDE GRILL 1998 S. Fletcher Ave., 277-6652 This oceanfront, Caribbean-themed restaurant serves award-winning handmade crab cakes, fresh seafood and fried pickles. Outdoor dining is featured, and children get their own beachfront playground. There’s a new open-air

A West Coast favorite that has finally arrived in Jacksonville’s Tapestry Park neighborhood, The Flame Broiler The Rice Bowl King specializes in inexpensive meals prepared without transfats, MSG, frying, or skin on meat.


A new pub on Spanish Street in St. Augustine, Barley Republic Irish Public House offers traditional burgers and sandwiches as well as Irish favorites like shepherd’s pie and bangers and mash. second floor and balcony. Live entertainment nightly. Full bar; live music Wed.-Sun. Open daily.

SONNY’S REAL PIT BAR-B-Q 2742 S. Eighth St., 261-6632 See Riverside. THE SURF 3199 S. Fletcher Ave., 261-5711 Oceanview dining is featured at The Surf, inside or out on the deck. The menu includes steaks, fresh fish and nightly specials, and there’s a Sunday lobster special. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Entertainment is held every night and weekend afternoons.

TASTY’S FRESH BURGERS & FRIES 710 Centre St., 321-0409 Located in historic downtown Fernandina Beach, Tasty’s offers a fresh alternative to fast food, using a proprietary blend of fresh meat, hand-cut fries, homemade sauces and soups and hand-spun shakes. Beer and wine are served. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

ARLINGTON, FT. CAROLINE & REGENCY ABE’S PIZZA GRILL 12192 Beach Blvd., 425-3983 The original Abe’s Pizza offers traditional Italian dishes, including lasagna, parmigiana and pizza, as well as hot and cold subs, pasta and wings. A kids’ menu, and take-out and delivery are available. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

AJ’S BAR & GRILL 10244 Atlantic Blvd., Regency, 805-9060 AJ’s menu includes burgers, salads and wings, and the grill is open daily till midnight. A full bar is served. There are video games and pool tables, Karaoke on Thur., and live music most weekends. DJ Mike is in Tue., Wed., Thur., Fri. and Sat.

TONY’S PIZZA & RESTAURANT 1425 Sadler Rd., 277-7661

BLUE BOY SANDWICH SHOP 5535 Ft. Caroline Rd., 743-3515

Tony’s serves New York-style brick oven pizza, along with dinner selections (like baked ziti and chicken broccoli alfredo). Subs, salads and wings complete the picture. Open for lunch and dinner daily; free delivery on the island.

Blue Boy has been serving up breakfast, and hot and cold sandwiches since 1972. Breads are made on site, as well as subs, camels, salads and desserts. Open Mon.-Sat. Take-out available. This location serves beer and wine.

T-RAY’S BURGER STATION 202 S. Eighth St., 261-6310

BONO’S PIT BAR-B-Q 8011 Merrill Rd., Ste. 23, Arlington, 743-3727

This hidden gem is actually located inside an old gas station, but it doesn’t escape the notice of tourists or locals. T-Ray’s won Best Burger (again!) on Amelia Island in Folio Weekly’s 2011 Best of Jax readers poll, and is famous on the island for its blue plate specials. Go for the food, stay for the gossip. Open Mon.-Sat. for breakfast and lunch.

Bono’s has slow-cooked meats and served them with tangy sauces for more than 60 years. Folio Weekly readers have repeatedly picked Bono’s as their favorite barbecue joint in our annual Best of Jax poll, with baby back ribs, barbecue salad and chicken breast sandwich among the favorites. A kids’ menu is available. Open daily.

29 SOUTH EATS 29 S. Third St., 277-7919 Located in Fernandina Beach’s historic downtown, this popular bistro’s Chef Scotty Schwartz serves traditional world cuisine with a modern twist. Open for lunch Tue.-Sat.; for dinner Mon.-Sat. and Sunday brunch.

THE VERANDAH RESTAURANT 6800 First Coast Hwy., Omni Amelia Island Plantation, 321-5050 Set among the moss-draped oaks of Racquet Park, this restaurant features an extensive menu of fresh local seafood and steaks, but the Verandah’s signature entrée is Fernandina shrimp. And many ingredients – including tomatoes, chives and lemongrass — come from the restaurant’s own herb and vegetable garden. A children’s menu is available and a full bar is served. Open nightly.

WOODY’S BAR-B-Q 474323 S.R. 200, 206-4046 See Mandarin.

CHUN KING 2771 Monument Rd., Ste. 33, Arlington, 646-1393 From sushi to soup to fried bananas, Chun King offers daily chef specials and all-you-can-eat Mongolian barbecue. A full menu, including Thai and Japanese dishes, is also served. All food is MSG-free, and take-out is available. Beer, sake and wine are served. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., for dinner Mon.-Sat.

CLIFF’S ROCKIN’ BAR-N-GRILL 3033 Monument Rd., Ste. 2, Cobblestone Plaza, 645-5162 Cliff’s features 8-ounce burgers, wings, seafood, homemade pizza and other daily specials, including the weekend handcut 12-ounce New York strip. A full bar is served, with a weekday happy hour. There’s entertainment offered every night. Take-out is available and smoking is permitted.

COTTEN’S BAR-B-QUE 2048 Rogero Rd., 743-1233 Fred Cotten Jr. has been offering his pit-cooked barbecue for more than 25 years. All the sauces are made in-house from original recipes. Cotten’s, which features moderately priced

MARCH 20-26, 2012 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 19


20 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012


items in a casual atmosphere, serves beer and wine. A kids’ selection and take-out are available. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

CRAB CREEK CAFÉ 7404 Atlantic Blvd., Arlington, 724-8050 A seafood shack with a yacht club attitude, Crab Creek Café offers oysters, gator tail, seafood and pasta in a familyfriendly atmosphere. A kids’ menu and takeout are available. Open lunch and dinner daily.

DICK’S WINGS 9119 Merrill Rd., Ste. 19, Arlington, 745-9300 See Beaches.

Family-owned-and-operated, Marti’s offers homestyle breakfast and lunch including traditional favorites like meatloaf, fried shrimp and Reubens. A kids’ menu and takeout are available. Open breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat.; Sun. breakfast only.

MATT’S ITALIAN CUISINE 2771 Monument Rd., Ste. 8, Arlington, 646-4411 The menu includes seafood, strombolis and veal, cooked-toorder. Delivery is available. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

MILLER ALE HOUSE & RAW BAR 9541 Regency Square Blvd. S., 720-0551 See Mandarin.

EAST COAST BUFFET 9569 Regency Square Blvd. N., 726-9888 This buffet restaurant serves more than 160 Chinese, Japanese, American and Italian items, as well as sushi. Dine in or take out. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner daily; open on Sun. for brunch.

FUJI SUSHI 660 Commerce Center Dr., Ste. 155, Regency, 722-9988 A respite from the busy Regency-area bustle, this casual, modern restaurant serves sushi and sashimi, tempura, soups and entrées. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

GENE’S SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 6132 Merrill Rd., Arlington, 744-2333 See Southside.

THE MUDVILLE GRILLE 1301 Monument Rd., Ste. 1, Arlington, 722-0008 See San Marco.

NERO’S CAFÉ 3607 University Blvd. N., Arlington, 743-3141 Nero’s has been serving traditional Italian-style food for 28 years. Along with nightly dinner specials, Nero’s features veal, seafood pasta dishes and New York style pizzas. Nero’s lounge features a full-service bar. Take-out is available. Open for dinner daily.

RACK ’EM UP BILLIARDS 1825 University Blvd. N., Arlington, 745-0335 See Mandarin.

GRINDER’S CAFÉ 10230 Atlantic Blvd., Arlington, 725-2712

ST. JOHNS SEAFOOD & STEAKS 7546 Beach Blvd., Regency, 721-4888

For more than 20 years, Grinder’s has been serving homestyle veggies, burgers, meatloaf, pork chops and seafood. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

These casual, family-oriented restaurants specialize in seafood and certified Angus steaks. Shrimp entrées are popular, as are the all-you-can-eat specials. Seniors and children select from special menus. Beer and wine; open for lunch and dinner daily.

THE HOT DOG SPOT & MORE 2771 Monument Rd., Ste. 32, Arlington, 646-0050 Located in Cobblestone Crossing, Hot Dog Spot serves sausages, all-beef hot dogs, and items like wings, Philly cheesesteaks and burgers, all cooked to order. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open for lunch daily.

LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT 8818 Atlantic Blvd., Arlington, 720-0106 See San Marco.

LARRY’S GIANT SUBS 7001 Merrill Rd., Arlington, 743-5664 1301 Monument Rd., Ste. 5, Arlington, 724-5802 10750 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 14, Regency, 642-6980

THE SHEIK SANDWICH DELI 9720 Atlantic Blvd., Regency, 721-2660 Family owned and operated, The Sheik has served Jacksonville for more than 40 years, serving a full breakfast — from pitas to country plates — and an extensive lunch menu. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

SWEET TOMATOES 1115 Mary Susan Dr., Regency, 722-9889 The 60-foot salad bar features four types of tossed salads, 17 freshly cut vegetables and deli items, five pasta salads and a dozen dressings, as well as soups, pizza and desserts. Takeout is available. Open daily.

See Southside.

TABOULEH MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 7645 Merrill Rd., Ste. 201, Arlington, 745-6900

MARTI’S CAFÉ 3031 Monument Rd., Arlington, 379-8363

The menu includes classic Middle Eastern and Greek favorites like kebabs, hummus, kibbeh, gyro, spinach pies,

Hot Shot Bakery & Café on Granada Street in St. Augustine serves freshly baked items, coffee and sandwiches, as well as the new local favorite, chocolate-dipped datil peppers.

Fat City

Taking a heavy-handed look at some of history’s famous gluttons

I

s gluttony a sin? Or just a sign that somebody is truly “large and in charge”? Ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus (341 BCE-270 BCE) once declared, “Eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow we die.” Yet even he could never have imagined the collection of gluttonous gourmands that would follow in his copious wake.

oysters, beef and a “few pies.” The night was shut down with a dinner of three dozen oysters, six crabs, soup, two whole ducks, six or seven lobsters, a sirloin steak, terrapins, vegetables and a palate-balancing dessert of pastries and a “two-pound” box of candy. Brady claimed he knew he had his fill only when his belly swelled to the point of touching the table.

Nicholas Wood Known as “The Great Eater of Kent,” this 17th-century British chubster made a career out of performing prodigious acts of eating at fairs and festivals. Legend has it that Wood could hork back an entire sheep (minus skin, wool and horns) in one sitting. He also once ingested a “washing-bowl of porridge,” followed by nine loaves of bread and three jugs of beer. Wood apparently would have his stomach rubbed with grease to accommodate his gargantuan intake, lest his stomach split open during his grazing. Yummers!

William Howard Taft The 27th President of the United States had a political agenda that included trust-busting, yet this Buckeye State behemoth was known privately for some gut-busting eating skills. At 6 feet, 2 inches tall and an impressive 360 pounds, Taft reportedly once got stuck in the White House bathtub. After suffering from a variety of weight-related health issues including obstructive sleep apnea and hypertension, Taft eventually changed his ways and lost 80 pounds.

Honoré de Balzac The 19th-century French novelistplaywright is known for his voluminous literary output, but his equally gargantuan gastronomic intake has put him in the heralded halls of overeating. According to one record of the author’s impressive appetites, at a lunch with his then-publisher, a Monsieur Werdet, de Balzac purportedly consumed “a hundred Ostend oysters, 12 pre-sale mutton cutlets, a duckling with turnips, a brace of roast partridges, a sole Normand, without counting hors d’oeuvres, entremets, fruits, etc. … ” And while it’s a little disturbing to think of anyone slurping back 100 raw oysters, it’s the “etc. … ” that gives us stomach cramping. The kicker is that the author of the multi-volume “The Human Comedy” had the audacity to stick M. Werdet with the check! James Buchanan Brady An American businessman, financier and philanthropist, James “Diamond Jim” Brady was known as much for amassing gigantic restaurant tabs as he was for his collection of precious jewels. One eatery owner proclaimed Brady to be among “the best 25 customers I ever had.” A typical recorded breakfast included eggs, pancakes, pork chops, fried potatoes, hominy, muffins, a beefsteak and a gallon of orange juice. Mere hours later, Brady would inhale an industrial-size lunch featuring two lobsters, deviled crabs, clams,

The Fat Boys This trio of corpulent carb cravers first rolled onto the rap scene in the early ’80s pioneering the beat box style of vocal rhyming along with their buffet-beating jams, like 1985’s “All You Can Eat” (featuring the lyrics “We’re gonna walk inside, and guess what’s up/ Put some food in my plate, and some Coke in my cup/ Give me some chicken, franks and fries/ And you can pass me a lettuce. I’m a pass it by.”) Sadly, founding member Buff Love (born Darren Robinson) died in 1995 at the age of 28 as a result of his obesity. Honorable phat rapper: Big Pun, who at the time of his death weighed 689 pounds, also died at the age of 28 in 2001 from cardiac arrest. Fat Joe, for the record, chose to lose some poundage to preserve his life. Rosalie Bradford In her lifetime, Bradford peaked out at a whopping 1,199 pounds, but through diet and exercise (and with the help of weight loss guruweird munchkin Richard Simmons), lost an amazing 917 pounds before her death at age 63 in 2006. Gluttons to watch and honorable mentions: Oprah Winfrey, Paula Deen, Luke Wilson, Cee Lo, Comic Book Guy from “The Simpsons,” Aretha Franklin and FW A&E Editor Dan Brown.  Dan Brown dbrown@folioweekly.com March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 21


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Toscana Little Italy in San Marco features Tuscan yellow walls and tile floors, and an extensive menu of traditional Italian dishes. baba ghanou and, of course, tabouleh. Beer and wine are served. Take-out is available. Open Mon.-Sat. for lunch and dinner.

is offered, a full bar is served and live music is presented Thur.-Sat. Open for lunch and dinner daily; for brunch and dinner on Sun.

T.G.I.FRIDAY’S 9400 Atlantic Blvd., Regency, 721-2200

BRICK RESTAURANT 3585 St. Johns Ave., Avondale, 387-0606

T.G.I.Friday’s offers pasta, burgers, steaks and seafood. A full bar is served and a kid-friendly menu is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

This casual eatery’s exposed-brick façade and interior are modern, but still classic Avondale. Despite the expensive fixtures, you can still grab a burger and watch a game or get the best lamb chops in town. And their veggie burger? Killer. A full bar is served. Open daily.

TONINO’S TRATTORIA 7001 Merrill Rd., Ste. 45, Arlington, 743-3848 Specializing in veal, seafood and New York-style pizza, Tonino’s serves Roman style Italian. Dine inside or out. A full bar is served — Tonino’s specializes in martinis — and a happy hour is held daily. Take-out is available. Open for dinner Tue.-Sun.

TREY’S DELI & GRILL 2044 Rogero Rd., Arlington, 744-3690 Trey is a Jacksonville native who’s been serving Northeast Florida for two decades. His menu includes deli sandwiches, along with pork, seafood and homemade soups. Prime rib specials are offered every Fri. and Sat. evening. Beer and wine are served, and a children’s menu is available. Open Mon.-Sat.

© 2011

FolioWeekly

AVONDALE & ORTEGA BISCOTTIS 3556 St. Johns Ave., Avondale, 387-2060 A microcosm of the Avondale neighborhood it calls home, Biscotti’s serves everything from innovative pizzas to a massive selection of almost-too pretty-to-eat desserts. Beer and wine are served. Open daily; for brunch Sat. and Sun.

THE BLUE FISH RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR 3551 St. Johns Ave., Avondale, 387-0700 Fresh seafood, steaks, chops and small plates are served in a casual atmosphere, along with an oyster bar. A kids’ menu

22 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

THE CASBAH CAFÉ 3628 St. Johns Ave., Avondale, 981-9966 The Casbah serves Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisine on the patio or inside the hookah lounge, where customers sit on ottomans at low tables. Wifi is available, belly dancers perform some nights, and hookah pipes are offered for smoking flavored tobacco. Live jazz is performed on select evenings. A Best of Jax 2011 winner for Best Middle Eastern Cuisine.

ESPETO BRAZILIAN STEAK HOUSE 4000 St. Johns Ave., Ste. 40, Avondale, 388-4884 Called a churrascaria (Portuguese for steakhouse), this Brazilian steakhouse features gauchos who carve the meat onto your plate from their serving tables. A full bar is served. Open for dinner Tue.-Sun.; closed Mon.

FLORIDA CREAMERY 3566 St. Johns Ave., Avondale, 619-5386 Florida Creamery offers premium ice cream, frozen yogurt, shakes, smoothies and Nathan’s hot dogs, served in Florida-centric décor. Low-fat and sugar-free choices are also offered. A kids’ selection and take-out are available. Open daily.

THE FOX RESTAURANT 3580 St. Johns Ave., Avondale, 387-2669 Owners Ian and Mary Chase offer fresh diner fare and homemade desserts. Breakfast is served all day, along with signature items such as burgers, meatloaf and fried green


tomatoes. A Jacksonville landmark for more than 50 years, The Fox is open daily.

GINJO SUSHI 3620 St. Johns Ave., Avondale, 388-5688 The owners of Sake House have opened this sushi spot in Shoppes of Avondale, serving Japanese cuisine, made-toorder with fresh ingredients. Beer and wine and take-out are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

LET THEM EAT CAKE! 3604 St. Johns Ave., Ste. 2, Avondale, 389-2122 This artisan bakery serves coffee, croissants and muffins in the early morning, then cupcakes, pastries and individual desserts throughout the day. Whole cakes are made-toorder. Open Tue.-Sat.

LILLIAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL 5393 Roosevelt Blvd., Venetia Plaza, 388-4220 This family sports bar serves wings, burgers, salads and sandwiches. The TVs air sporting events. Open for lunch and dinner daily. Happy hour is held daily.

ORSAY 3630 Park St., Avondale, 381-0909 Opened by Chew owner Jon Insetta, this French/American bistro serves steak frites, mussels and Alsatian pork chops in an elegant setting, with an emphasis on locally grown organic ingredients. Open for dinner Mon.-Sat., all day on Sun. A Best of Jax 2011 repeat winner for Best Restaurant to Impress a Date.

PINEGROVE MEAT MARKET & DELI 1511 Pine Grove Ave., Avondale, 389-8655 Pinegrove offers Cuban sandwiches and homemade chicken salad from inside the meat market, which also sells USDA choice prime aged beef cut to order. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served Mon.-Sat.

TIJUANA FLATS 5907 Roosevelt Blvd., Ste. 100, Avondale, 908-4343

up wraps, burgers and ribs. A kids’ menu and take-out are available, and a full bar is served. Sports are always on the big screen TVs. Open daily.

CAFE CONFLUENCE 8612 Baymeadows Rd., 733-7840 This European coffeehouse serves Italian specialty coffees and smoothies, along with paninis, salads and European chocolates. Beer and wine are served and outdoor dining is available. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun.

CHA-CHA’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT 9551 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 21, 737-9903 Owner Celso Alvarado and his family run this authentic Mexican restaurant. The menu includes 26 combination dinners and a wide variety of specialty dishes including chalupas and burritos. A full bar is served, and margaritas are the house specialty. Open Mon.-Sat.

THE COFFEE GRINDER 9834 Baymeadows Rd., Deerwood Village, 642-7600 Owner Slavisa Micukic runs this coffee gallery, which features the work of local artists. Seating is available indoors and out, and a full coffee/espresso menu includes several frozen mochas and frozen jet teas. Beer is served after 7 p.m. DJs spin Thur., Fri. and Sat. Open daily.

DEERWOOD DELI & DINER 9934 Old Baymeadows Rd., 641-4877 This 1950s-style diner features pink-and-chrome furnishings and photographs of the heartthrobs of yesteryear. The menu includes burgers, Reubens, shakes and Coke floats. Breakfast, a kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open daily.

EVERGREEN CAFÉ 3837 Baymeadows Rd., 636-9040 This upscale café serves savory and sweet crepes made with fresh ingredients, as well as subs, paninis and European-style cakes. Beer and wine are served and takeout is available. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

See Baymeadows.

’town 3611 St. Johns Ave., 345-2596 Owner Meghan Purcell and Executive Chef Scott Ostrander celebrate the farm-to-table concept with their Avondale restaurant, offering American fare with an emphasis on sustainability. A full bar is served. Open for dinner Mon.-Sat.; for brunch Sat. and Sun.

BAYMEADOWS AL’S PIZZA 8060 Philips Hwy., 731-4300 See Beaches. ANCIENT CITY SUBS 8060 Philips Hwy., Ste. 207, 446-9988 Locally owned-and-operated by Andy and Rhonna Rockwell, this St. Augustine-themed sandwich shop, newly relocated to Philips Highway, serves gourmet subs — toasted, pressed or cold — and salads. Ancient City offers a kids’ menu and takeout. Open Mon.-Sat.

BLACKJACK BBQ 8602 Baymeadows Rd., 730-0599 The same tasty mouthwatering barbecue dishes are available in Blackjack BBQ’s new Baymeadows location. Take-out is offered. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

BOWL OF PHO 9902 Old Baymeadows Rd., 646-4455 Traditional Vietnamese noodle soups are served alongside authentic favorites like spring rolls, shrimp wraps and egg rolls. The portions are big and the atmosphere’s easy-going. Open for lunch and dinner Wed.-Mon.

BROADWAY RISTORANTE & PIZZERIA 10920 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 3, 519-8000 This family-owned-and-operated Italian pizzeria serves calzones, stromboli and brick-oven-baked pizza, along with subs and desserts. Dine-in, take-out or have it delivered. Open daily; open late on Fri. and Sat.

BUFFALO WILD WINGS GRILL & BAR 9550 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 26, 448-1293 Along with Buffalo-style wings fixed up with 14 sauces (ranging from mild to better-be-ready blazin’), BWW serves

THE FIFTH ELEMENT 9485 Baymeadows Rd., 448-8265 A variety of authentic Indian, South Indian and Indochinese dishes form the menu, along with a large lunch buffet of lamb, goat and chicken dishes, as well as tandoori and biryani items. A kids’ menu is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

FIREHOUSE SUBS 8380 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 8, 737-3473 See Mandarin. FLAVORS ESSENCE OF INDIA 9551 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 10, 733-1525 Master chefs create contemporary and traditional dishes from all over India, including lamb, fish and prawn entrées. Clay oven kabobs and breads, vegetarian dishes and desserts are also served. A lunch buffet includes vegetarian items. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

FUJI SUSHI JAPANESE RESTAURANT 10920 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 30, 363-8888 Fuji Sushi offers fresh sushi, steak, chicken, tempura, teriyaki and seafood. Beer and wine are served. A children’s menu is available. Open daily.

GATORS DOCKSIDE 8650 Baymeadows Rd., 448-0500 See Orange Park. INDIA RESTAURANT 9802 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 8, 620-0777 India has claimed several Best of Jax awards for authentic Indian cuisine — most recently in 2011 — and serves a popular lunch buffet. Curry and vegetable dishes are offered, along with lamb, chicken, shrimp and fish tandoori. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily.

LARRY’S GIANT SUBS 8616 Baymeadows Rd., 739-2498 3928 Baymeadows Rd., 737-7740 See Southside. LEMONGRASS 9846 Old Baymeadows Rd., 645-9911 Lemongrass offers innovative Thai cuisine in a hip, metropolitan atmosphere. Chef Aphayasane’s creations include crispy whole fish with pineapple curry reduction, and customers’ favorite is “The Amazing.” An extensive beer and wine selection is served. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., for dinner Mon.-Sat.

March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 23


LOS TOROS MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5210 Baymeadows Rd., 367-8633 Los Toros serves authentic Mexican Los Toros serves authentic Mexican fare, including fajitas and a selection of vegetarian dishes. A children’s menu is available, and the full bar features margaritas. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

MANDALOUN MEDITERRANEAN LEBANESE CUISINE BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 9862 Old Baymeadows Rd., 646-1881

*

With restaurants in London, Paris, Rome and the Middle East, owner Pierre Barakat brings authentic Lebanese cuisine to Jacksonville, including charcoal-grilled lamb kebab. Belly dancing is featured every Fri. and Sat. with a full bar. Open for lunch and dinner daily (closed Mon.) and monthly dinner parties. Outdoor seating and take-out are available.

MEDITERRANIA RESTAURANT 3877 Baymeadows Rd., 731-2898 With an Old World atmosphere, this family-owned-andoperated Greek and Italian restaurant has been a local favorite for more than 26 years. Fresh seafood, veal chops and rack of lamb are among the specialties. Beer and wine are available. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., for dinner Mon.-Sat.

NATIVE SUN NATURAL FOODS MARKET & DELI 11030 Baymeadows Rd., 260-2791 See San Jose listing. Best of Jax 2011 winner for Best Organic Restaurant and Best Health Food Store.

OMAHA STEAKHOUSE BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 9300 Baymeadows Rd., 739-6633

*

With an English tavern atmosphere, this Embassy Suites Hotel’s restaurant offers center-cut beef, fresh seafood and sandwiches. The signature 16-ounce bone-in ribeye is popular, and desserts include crème brûlée. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

ORANGE TREE HOT DOGS 8380 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 4, 733-0588 Known since 1968 for their Orange Frost drink, Orange Tree serves hot dogs — topped with slaw, chili, cheese, onion sauce or sauerkraut — as well as personal pizzas.

PATTAYA THAI GRILLE 9551 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 1, 646-9506 Pattaya Thai offers extensive menu of traditional Thai, vegetarian and new-Thai, including curries, seafood, noodles and soups. A video screen displays the open kitchen, so you can watch your order being prepared. Open for lunch Tue.Fri., for dinner Tue.-Sun.

PIZZA PALACE 3928 Baymeadows Rd., 527-8649 A full bar is served at this location. See Riverside.

SMOOTHIE KING 9810 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 4, 642-1777 See Beaches. STICKY FINGERS 8129 Point Meadows Way, 493-7427 A true Memphis-style rib house, Sticky Fingers slow-smokes meats over aged hickory wood. The menu includes ribs, barbecue and rotisserie-smoked chicken. Dine indoors or out on the screened patio. Happy hour is featured weekdays. Open daily.

STONEWOOD GRILL & TAVERN 3832 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 3, 739-7206 The casual, upscale Stonewood Grill offers a flavorful dining experience with a classic American menu. The full bar offers a large wine list and a daily happy hour. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

SUSHI HOUSE 9810 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 12, 997-0966 With an assortment of specialty rolls, sushi and sashimi, this quaint restaurant offers tempura, katsu, teriyaki and hibachi entrées. Beer and wine are served. Take out and delivery are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

TIJUANA FLATS 9942 Old Baymeadows Rd., 641-1090 The fresh Tex-Mex menu features a hot bar with rotating sauces to supply any degree of heat. There’s not a microwave or freezer in sight — everything is made from fresh ingredients. Beer and wine are served. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

24 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012


TONY’S D’S NY PIZZA & RESTAURANT 8358 Point Meadows Dr., 322-7051

of Europe, the Caribbean and the Americas. A children’s menu is available, along with an extensive wine list. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

Tony’s D’s serves authentic New York pizza and pasta dishes sure to please the palates of all transplanted Yankees. Beer and wine are served. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

BAGEL WORLD 2202 S. Third St., 246-9988

VINO’S PIZZA & ITALIAN CUISINE 9910 Old Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 1, 641-7171

This cozy little place offers a breakfast special (eggs, ham and cheese) and a variety of coffees and juices. Open for breakfast and lunch daily.

Vino’s has hand-tossed New York-style, thin-crust pizzas, as well as Sicilian-style pies. Big salads, baked dishes, subs, wings and wraps round out the menu. A kids’ menu is available. Open daily.

VITO’S PIZZA & ITALIAN RESTAURANT 3825 Baymeadows Rd., 737-9236 Vito’s is family-owned and in its 26th year, serving grouper Francesco, New York and Chicago style pizzas, surf-andturf and rack of lamb. For dessert, homemade tiramisu and cannolis. A full bar is served. Open Tue.-Sun.

THE BEACHES

(All venues are in Jax Beach unless otherwise noted.) A LA CARTE 331 First Ave. N., 241-2005 Authentic New England fare like Maine lobster rolls, fried Ipswich clams, crab or clam cake sandwich, fried shrimp basket, haddock sandwich, clam chowdah, birch beer and blueberry soda. Dine inside or on the deck.

AL’S PIZZA 303 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-0002 For the 17th year in a row, Folio Weekly readers named Al’s as the source of the Best Pizza in our annual Best of Jax poll. Celebrating more than 20 years and six locations — with two more set to open this spring — Al’s offers a selection of New York-style and gourmet pizzas. Wine and beer are served, open for lunch and dinner.

ANGIE’S SUBS 1436 Beach Blvd., 246-2519 ANGIE’S GROM 204 Third Ave. S., 246-7823

BEACH DINER 501 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-6500 This locally owned diner has indoor and outdoor seating and Southern comfort menu items including fresh seafood, sandwiches and hot lunch specials. For late-sleeping beach bums, cooked-to-order breakfast is available all day. Open daily for breakfast and lunch.

BEACH HUT CAFÉ 1281 S. Third St., 249-3516 Celebrating more than 20 years in the biz, Beach Hut Café often wins the Best Breakfast category in Folio Weekly’s Best of Jax readers poll. The full breakfast menu is served all day (featuring some darn good grits), and hot plate specials are offered Mon.-Fri. Expect a wait on weekends — this place packs out. Open daily for breakfast and lunch.

BEACHSIDE SEAFOOD & MARKET 120 S. Third St., 444-8862 A full fresh seafood market, Beachside also serves a lunch and dinner menu of seafood baskets, fish tacos, daily fish specials and Philly cheesesteaks. There are tables indoors and on the open-air deck, with a great view of downtown Jax Beach. Live music is featured on weekends. Beer and wine are served, and take-out and Beaches area delivery are available. Open daily.

BILLY’S BOAT HOUSE GRILL 2321 Beach Blvd., 241-9771 Located at Beach Marine with a view of the Intracoastal Waterway, Billy’s Boat House focuses on fresh local seafood, and hand-trimmed steaks and offers a full bar. There’s trivia every Mon., and oyster and wing specials every Thur. Live entertainment is featured on Wed., Thur., Fri. and Sat. Open daily.

Home of the original baked sub, Angie’s has been serving Italian-style subs to devoted locals for more than 25 years. In addition to hot or cold subs, Angie’s offers huge salads and blue-ribbon iced tea. Beer and wine are served. A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Sub Sandwich.

BLUE WATER ISLAND GRILL 205 N. First St., 249-0083

AZURÉA 1 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-7402

BONGIORNO’S PHILLY STEAK SHOP 2294 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach, 246-3278

Located within the One Ocean Resort hotel, Azuréa offers elegant oceanfront dining with a menu influenced by flavors

Jeff and Deanna Bongiorno of South Philly have brought the Northeast to Jax — the Amoroso rolls are flown in from

This new casual spot features American fare with a Caribbean soul. A full bar is served and kids are welcome. There’s live music on the weekends, too.

A fine-dining restaurant on Atlantic Boulevard in the Intracoastal West neighborhood, Good Food Company emphasizes quality raw ingredients to create menus based on local, seasonal and organic products.

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Halftime Sports Bar & Grill on South Eighth Street in Fernandina Beach offers sportsbar fare including onion rings, spring rolls, burgers, wraps and wings. Philly and the chipped ribeye comes from South Jersey. Sandwich choices wraps, burgers and dogs. Beer and wine, and a kids’ menu are offered. Open lunch and dinner.

BOOM SHAKA LAKA’S FOOD SHACK 725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 1, Atlantic Beach, 853-5450 This new fun, casual place features a Hawaiian-themed décor and menu, with American influences. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

BONO’S PIT BAR-B-Q 1307 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 270-2666 1266 S. Third St., 249-8704 See Arlington. BREEZY COFFEE SHOP CAFE 235 Eighth Ave. S., 241-2211 This new casual coffee shop serves breakfast, lunch, baked goods and a variety of espressos and coffees, as well as vegan and gluten-free options. A kids’ selection and takeout are available. Open for breakfast and lunch daily.

BUDDHA THAI BISTRO 301 10th Ave. N., 712-4444 The proprietors of this Thai restaurant are from Thailand, and every dish is made using fresh ingredients using tried-and-true recipes. A full bar is served and take-out is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

BURRITO GALLERY EXPRESS 1333 N. Third St., 242-8226 Downtown’s Burrito Gallery’s kid sister Burrito Express in Jax Beach is mostly take-out , featuring the same great chow and fast service.

CINOTTI’S BAKERY & DELI 1523 Penman Rd., 246-1728, cinottisbakery.com Four generations of Cinotti’s have been serving the Beaches since 1964, offering cakes for all occasions, as well as pies, breads, desserts and party trays. And the deli features a variety of bagels and breads, as well as corned beef and club sandwiches.

COL. MUSTARD’S PHABULOUS PHAT BURGERS 1722 N. Third St., 247-5747 The Colonel serves some of the area’s best (and biggest) burgers, with a side of attitude. (Brace yourself, newbies.) Breakfast is also served, featuring five-egg omelets and French toast. A kids’ menu is available. Open daily.

CRAB CAKE FACTORY JAX

BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! *1396 Beach Blvd., Beach Plaza, 247-9880 Chef Kahn Vongdara presents an innovative menu of seafood dishes and seasonal favorites. A full bar is served, with a daily happy hour. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

CRUISERS GRILL 319 23rd Ave. S., Pablo Plaza, 270-0356 Locally owned and operated for more than 15 years, this casual restaurant serves half-pound burgers, fish sandwiches, big salads and award-winning cheddar fries. Cruisers is a 2011 repeat winner in the Best of Jax burger category. Beer, wine and sangria are served. Open daily.

CULHANE’S IRISH PUBLIC HOUSE BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 967 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-9595

CAMPECHE BAY CANTINA 127 N. First Ave., 249-3322

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Campeche Bay has repeatedly won Folio Weekly’s Best of Jax awards in the Best Mexican Restaurant, Best Fajitas and Best Margaritas categories. Customers favor the chili rellenos, the homemade tamales and the homemade margaritas – to say nothing of the two daily happy hours. Open for dinner nightly.

An upscale Irish pub and restaurant owned and managed by four sisters from County Limerick, Ireland, Culhane’s menu includes favorites like shepherd’s pie and corned beef, but their gastropub menu takes customers to new culinary heights. Open Tue.-Sun.; brunch is served Sat. and Sun.

CASA MARIA 2429 S. Third St., 372-9000 See Springfield. CASA MARINA INN & RESTAURANT 691 N. First St., 270-0025 The 1924 Casa Marina Restaurant is the oldest structure in Jax Beach and offers dining indoors, on the verandah or in the oceanfront courtyard. The New Beach menu features crab cakes, Mediterranean and goat cheese salad and homemade breads. Open Tue.-Fri.; for brunch on Sun. The oceanfront Penthouse Lounge offers tapas and a martini bar.

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CHICAGO PIZZA SPORTS BAR & GRILL 320 N. First St., 270-8565 See Southside.

DAVINCI’S PIZZA 469 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 241-2001 DaVinci’s customers are loyal to this family-owned-andoperated pizzeria, which uses fresh, quality ingredients for its pies. Open Tue.-Sun. for dinner.

DELICOMB DELICATESSEN & ESPRESSO BAR 1131 N. Third St., 372-4192 This family-owned-and-operated deli makes everything with natural and organic ingredients, with no hydrogenated oils or high-fructose corn syrup. Granola, tuna salad, spicy panini melts and kim chi are all on the highly varied menu. Open for breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sun.


DICK’S WINGS 2434 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach, 372-0298 311 N. Third St., 853-5004

oysters, crab and lobster. Patio seating is available, along with an all-day happy hour on Sun.; Oyster Night specials are available on Tue. and Wed.

This NASCAR-themed place serves 365 varieties of wings. The menu also features half-pound burgers, ribs and salads. Beer and wine are served. Takeout is available. Open daily.

FIVE GUYS FAMOUS BURGERS & FRIES 311 N. Third St., 694-0374 See St. Johns Town Center.

D&LP SUBS 1409 S. Third St., 247-4700

FLY’S TIE IRISH PUB 177 Sailfish Dr. E., Atlantic Beach, 246-4293

This sub place in Jax Beach offers a variety of subs, gourmet salads, wings, pizzas with all the toppings, and pasta dinners. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

If Rachael Allen and Johnny Cash had a baby and he grew up to be a chef, this would be his menu: variations on corned beef hash, black and white puddings, bangers and mash. A full bar is served and take-out is available. The kitchen is open Thur.-Sat. for dinner, for lunch Sat., Sun. for brunch.

DWIGHT’S MEDITERRANEAN STYLE BISTRO 1527 Penman Rd., 241-4496 This small, cozy bistro next to Cinotti’s Bakery specializes in hand-rolled pasta and grilled vegetables. Owner and Chef Dwight DeLude prepares meals in his exhibition kitchen and all dishes, including sea scallops and the popular crab cakes, come with pasta and veggies. With limited seating, reservations are suggested. Open for dinner Tue.-Sat.

GOURMET GROUPER 363 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 13, 372-4061

ELEVEN SOUTH 216 11th Ave. S., 241-1112

Hala specializes in authentic Middle Eastern favorites, including gyros, falafel, grape leaves and Hala’s own pita bread, made daily onsite. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

An elegant addition to the Jax Beach dining scene, Eleven South serves New American eclectic cuisine. In addition to a mesquite grill and courtyard dining, Eleven South serves a full bar and a selection of fine wines. Open for lunch Tue.Fri., for dinner nightly.

ELIZABETH’S TEA ROOM 568 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 270-1980 Elizabeth’s Tea Room is simply that: a tea room offering lunches and teas. Children’s tea parties and private teas are featured. Take-out is available. Open for lunch Tue.-Sat.

ELLEN’S KITCHEN 1824 S. Third St., Pablo Plaza, 246-1572 Serving the Beaches since 1962, this busy kitchen offers a full breakfast all day, one famous for its homemade sausage gravy and hash browns. For lunch, there’s a sandwiches, BLTs and patty melts. There’s usually a line for breakfast on weekends. Take-out is available. Open daily for breakfast and lunch.

EL POTRO 1553 N. Third St., 241-6910 See Southside. ENGINE 15 BREWING COMPANY 1500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 217, 249-2337 A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Pub/Brew Pub, this Jax Beach restaurant serves gastropub fare like soups, salads, flatbreads and specialty sandwiches, including BarBe-Cuban and beer dip. Craft beers and wine are served. A kids’ menu is available. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun.

EUROPEAN STREET CAFÉ 922 Beach Blvd., 249-3001 See San Marco. EVA’S GRILL & BAR 610 S. Third St., 372-9484 This new place serves a menu that’s a blend of Greek and Italian, with decidedly American influences. A full bar is served. Dine indoors or outside. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun.

FIONN MacCOOL’S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT 333 First St. N., 242-9499 This pub offers casual dining with an uptown Irish atmosphere, serving fish and chips, Guinness lamb stew and black-and-tan brownies. Live music is featured daily. A full bar is served. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open daily.

FIREHOUSE SUBS 1234 Beach Blvd., 339-0312 233 Third St., Neptune Beach, 249-6013

This new seafood restaurant offers gourmet dishes made with the freshest seafood available — local and regional.

HALA SANDWICH SHOP & BAKERY 1451 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 249-2212

HAPPY CUP FROZEN YOGURT 299 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 2, Atlantic Beach, 372-4059 It’s self-serve frozen yogurt at Happy Cup. Made with organic ingredients and flavored with real fruit, the yogurts can be mixed, matched and crowned with favorites from the toppings bar.

HERO’S 19TH HOLE 605 S. Penman Rd., 249-0761 Tucked inside the clubhouse at the Jax Beach Golf Course, this casual eatery has an expanded breakfast menu, as well as lunch and drink specials. Kevin Reid, the former Ritespot chef, offers familiar favorites, including burgers and hot dogs, along with those famous 12 sides and liver and onions on Thursday nights. Dollar drafts are featured and trivia is played every Wed. Open daily.

HOT DOG HUT 1439 S. Third St., 247-8886 The Hot Dog Hut serves a vast selection of dogs and sausages, and a variety of toppings, as well as hamburgers, beer-battered onion rings and seasoned French fries. Breakfast is now offered, too. Beer is served, and take-out is available. Open daily. A repeat Best of Jax 2011 winner for Best Hot Dog.

ICHIBAN JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE 675 N. Third St., 247-4688 Ichiban provides three distinct dining areas: the teppan or hibachi tables, where you can watch the chef prepare your food; the sushi bar; and Western-style seating with a menu of tempura and teriyaki dishes. Ichiban also has a fullservice bar with fine wines, including Japanese plum wine. Open for dinner daily, early-bird specials nightly.

ISLAND GIRL CIGAR BAR 108 First St., Neptune Beach, 372-0943 This smoking establishment, with a walk-in humidor, pairs appetizers with more than 25 wines and ports by the glass. Island Girl also serves 28 draft beers and bottled beer, and beer flights are featured. Live music is presented Thur.-Sat. Open daily.

JASON’S DELI 2230 S. Third St., 246-7585 Jason’s Deli serves fresh, thick deli sandwiches along with soups, salads and super spuds. The signature sandwich is a New Orleans-style muffalatta sandwich. There’s also a salad bar with more than 33 choices and free ice cream. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

See Mandarin.

FIRST WATCH 544 Marsh Landing Parkway, 834-3789 Breakfast includes all the favorites: French toast, egg dishes, pancakes, sides. Lunch offers sandwiches and salads. Kids’ selection is available. Open for breakfast and lunch daily.

THE FISH COMPANY RESTAURANT BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 12, Atlantic Beach, 246-0123

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This restaurant and oyster bar in North Beach Center serves fresh local seafood — including Mayport shrimp — and

JIMMY JOHN’S GOURMET SANDWICHES 363 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 246-2033 See Southside.

JOSEPH’S PIZZA & ITALIAN RESTAURANT 30 Ocean Blvd., Beaches Town Center, Atlantic Beach, 270-1122 For 53 years, Joseph’s has been family-owned-andoperated. In addition to hot pasta dishes, gourmet pizzas and veal entrées, Joseph’s offers an extensive beer and wine selection. Open Tue.-Sun. for lunch and dinner, open Mon. from Memorial Day to Labor Day at the beach.

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LARRY’S GIANT SUBS 701 Mayport Crossing, Ste. 26, Atlantic Beach, 246-1613 657 N. Third St., 247-9620 See Southside. LILLIE’S COFFEE BAR 200 First St., Beaches Town Center, Neptune Beach, 249-2922 Formerly Shelby’s, a Beaches landmark, Lillie’s serves locally roasted coffee and everything from eggs and bagels to flatbreads sandwiches, salads and desserts. Dine indoors or out, with patio and courtyard seating. Live jazz is featured on Sat. Open daily.

LOS TOROS MEXICAN RESTAURANT 1222 Third St. S., 246-0081 See Baymeadows. LYNCH’S IRISH PUB 514 N. First St., 249-5181 Lynch’s fresh “green” menu includes corned beef and cabbage, shepherd’s pie, and fish and chips. There’s also a full bar, and 50 imported and domestic draft beers on tap. Live entertainment is featured every evening. Open daily.

MAMBO’S CUBAN BISTRO 311 N. Third St., Ste. 103, 853-6360 Mambo’s specializes in authentic Cuban cuisine and cocktails, including ropa vieja, picadillo and lechon asada and mojitos. DJs spin Latin music every Fri. and Sat. A full bar is served. A kids’ selection and take-out are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

East meets West at Mimi’s. Every dish is infused with Asian style and ingredients, including lumpia, yaki tori and several kinds of sushi. A full bar is served and take-out is available.

MOJO KITCHEN BBQ PIT & BLUES BAR 1500 Beach Blvd., 247-6636 See San Jose listing. This Beaches location features live national and local blues acts and has a full bar. A Best of Jax 2011 winner for Best Barbecue.

MONKEY’S UNCLE TAVERN 1850 S. Third St., 246-1070 For more than 25 years, Monkey’s Uncle has served pub grub, including burgers, sandwiches, seafood and wings. Dine inside or out on the patio. A full bar is served and takeout is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily. Karaoke is held every Wed., Sat. and Sun.

M SHACK 299 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 241-2599 Brother David and Matthew Medure are flippin’ burgers at this new beaches restaurant, featuring a variety of burgers, hot dogs, fries, shakes and more familiar fare at moderate prices. Dine indoors or outside for great people-watching at Beaches Town Center (it’s in the former BookMark). Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

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MARIO’S AT THE BEACH 1830 N. Third St., 246-0005

Executive Chef Kenny Gilbert’s cuisine features local fare and innovative dishes, served in an island atmosphere. Dine inside or out on the tiki deck. A full bar is served. Open for lunch, Wed.-Sun.; for dinner nightly. Nippers is a Best of Jax 2011 winner for Best Caribbean and Best Chef.

This casual, family-friendly restaurant serves New York-style pizzas, stromboli and hot pasta dishes as well as homemade sauces, veal, shrimp and vegetarian dishes. Dine indoors or out on the patio. Open Mon.-Sat.

promise of benefit NORTH BEACH BISTRO BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 6, Atlantic Beach, 372-4105

MELLOW MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS 1018 N. Third St., Ste. 2, 241-5600 Live music is featured. See Fleming Island.

METRO DINER 1534 N. Third St., 853-6817 See San Marco. MEZZA LUNA PIZZERIA RISTORANTE 110 First St., Neptune Beach, 249-5573 This near-the-ocean eatery (in Beaches Town Center) has been around more than 20 years, serving casual bistro fare like gourmet wood-fired pizzas to nightly specials like herbcrusted mahi mahi. Dine indoors or out on the patio. A kids’ menu is available. Musical happy hour is held Tue. and Thur. Open for dinner nightly.

MIMI’S SPORTS GRILLE 1021 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 270-1030

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NIPPERS BEACH GRILLE 2309 Beach Blvd., 247-3300

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This casual neighborhood eatery serves hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood and a tapas menu. A full bar, an extensive wine list and happy hour are offered. A children’s menu is available. Live entertainment is presented Tue., Thur.-Sat. Open for lunch and dinner daily, for brunch on Sun.

OCEAN 60 RESTAURANT, WINE BAR & MARTINI ROOM 60 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 247-0060 Ocean 60 offers Continental cuisine, fresh seafood, nightly dinner specials and a seasonal menu in a formal dining room or the more casual Martini Room. Local artists are featured, along with live Latin and blues. Open for dinner Mon.-Sat.

OHANA HAWAIIAN SHAVED ICE 469 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 12, Atlantic Beach, 249-0555 The delicately shaved ice is served in 52 flavors, made without corn syrup, some without sugar. There are also crab cakes sandwiches and salads with mango salsa. Take-out is available. Open Tue.-Sun.

Fresh seafood and chowder are served surfside at Sliders Seaside Grill in Fernandina Beach, which features outdoor dining and a special beachfront playground for the kids.

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Potato Heads

How to navigate the flavored vodka boom time

I

n another sign of our complexifying times, vodka, whose virtue once was that it tasted like nothing, now tastes like everything. Stroll down any liquor store aisle and you’ll see what I mean. It’s no longer just the familiar offerings of an Absolut or a Smirnoff with flavor ranges extending no further than a pack of Starbursts; today, tastes are seemingly being programmed for tween bachelorette parties. In other words, the American horn of plenty has gotten more plenty, and now you can do shots out of it. Into this cornucopia go such new flavors as “Cake,” “Fluffed Marshmallow,” “Candy Cane” and bizarrer ones still alongside the tried and true citruses of industry stalwarts. The sudden bloom of flavored vodkas is the result of competition pressures, inspired in part by the profusion of new makers, mavericks uninhibited by stuffy qualities like brand identity. UV Vodka’s FAQ page allows, for instance, that its name “doesn’t stand for anything, but it certainly gives a nod to the brightness and intensity of the colors and flavors.” What’s happening with vodka is a spirits version of the evolutionary effect known as the Red Queen Hypothesis: Vodka makers are in an arms race, adapting new flavors to keep up with their competitors, who are adapting in response to those adaptations, creating positive feedback loop that amplifies in hyperbolic growth. And it’s limited only © 2012 by the tolerance of liquor stores, bars and — ultimately — us. The results are some extremely weird flavors, pushing the limits of all kinds of taste. Three Olives Vodka, one of the first to launch the “sport-flavoring” craze, perhaps best represents this explosion. There are the weird B-team fruits “Watermelon,” “Mango” and “Pomegranate.” There are the ones for fifth-grade happy hour: “Root Beer,” “Bubble” and “Cake.” Then there are wild cards: “Rangtang,” “Purple” (not to be confused with grape) and, most disturbingly, a flavor called simply “Dude.” Three Olives’ parent, French White Rock Distillers, launched a brand entirely dedicated to recreational tongue abuse in 2009: Pinnacle Vodka, with its 34 flavors, offers “Atomic Hots,” “Butterscotch,” “Cookie Dough” and “Gummy.” Absolut, the veteran of the flavored scene, has attempted to maintain its dignity by offering highbrow concoctions: “Ruby Red,” “Orient Apple,” “Berry Acai.” And Smirnoff, whose website has apparently given itself over entirely to depicting raves, has “Fluffed Marshmallow,” “Whipped Cream” and “Master of the Mix,” which tastes like DJ-ing. So let’s just go ahead and call this period a boom of new ideas and new flavors. As with every boom, there must come a recession. It’s impossible to maintain interest in that many flavors from drinkers or, for that matter, from suppliers. David Jabour, president of Austin, Texas-based Twin Liquors, said it’s a game of attrition. “There are hundreds upon hundreds of different variations in these

FolioWeekly

30 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

Candy cane-flavored vodka is one of a slew of tastes seemingly programmed for tween bachelorette parties.

vodkas. … What’s interesting is that only a few of them will catch on,” he said. Part of the issue is space in stores: Flavored vodkas take up about half the shelf space but account for less than 20 percent of sales. “It certainly can be a challenge from a retailer’s standpoint to figure out which one is going to be the most popular.” One of Three Olives’ new vodka flavors, “Loopy,” is supposed to taste like Froot Loops cereal, and in fact forms the basis of the hottest new drink on the beach. Nick Water, a bartender at Nippers Beach Grille in Jax Beach, says the cocktail is called a “Gatorade,”

being made are so over-the-top,” Grandinetti explains. “People usually try them once and then they’re done. It’s a novelty.” Sunset currently has 14 flavors of vodka behind the bar, including grape, citrus, raspberry and vanilla, which are top sellers. The more obscure the sauce, the tougher the sell. “We usually get a bottle or two comped from the liquor company,” he says. “But we’re not given recipes and so we have to be really creative with how we use them.” According to a recent and decidedly unscientific Facebook poll, some favorite flavor-infused vodka combinations are

Sunset Grille in St. Augustine Beach carries 14 flavors of vodkas. The more obscure the flavor, the tougher the sell. “We’re not given recipes,” says bartender Tony Grandinetti, “so we have to be really creative with how we use them.” made of Loopy vodka, water and sour mix. “It’s a Jax thing,” Water explains. “I was home in Ocala and the bartender had never heard of a Gatorade.” Three Olives isn’t messing around when it comes to marketing. When you go to the company’s website, you see an entire list of promotional events in Jacksonville showcasing new flavors at local watering holes like Latitude 30, Nighttown, Wild Wing Café and O’Brothers Irish Pub (http://bit.ly/yymZYc) Bartender Tony Grandinetti has been slinging drinks at Sunset Grille in St. Augustine Beach since 1995. He says he’s seen flavored vodka become popular over the past four years with a huge surge in the last two, but he’s doubtful it will last. “The flavors

pineapple Skky and soda on the rocks, Firefly straight up, Absolut white grape with a splash of soda, Smooth Criminal Whipped Cream with splashes of pineapple juice and Sprite, vanilla vodka and ginger ale, Three Olives cake vodka on the rocks and 888 blueberry vodka and Red Bull. But the faves may prove fleeting — at least that’s the prediction of the Sunset’s Grandinetti. “Most of the people ordering these drinks are college kids and spring breakers,” he adds. “An older guy who comes into the bar isn’t going to order a Fruit Loop martini. It’s just not going to happen.”  Brandon R. Reynolds Additional reporting by Kara Pound themail@folioweekly.com


PHILLY’S FINEST CHEESESTEAKS & PIZZA 1527 N. Third St., 241-7188 This casual restaurant serves authentic Philly cheesesteaks made with Amoroso’s bread and steaks flown in direct from Philadelphia. The Ice Bar features 55 kinds of beer, along with wine and a full bar. Open daily.

THE PIER RESTAURANT & SANDBAR 412 N. First St., 246-6454 The new oceanfront restaurant offers fresh, local fare served on two floors. Upstairs, it’s Chef’s Menu, with stuffed flounder, pork tenderloin, appetizers. Downstairs bar and patio offer casual items, daily drink specials. A children’s menu is available. A full bar is served. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Best of Jax 2011 winner for Best New Restaurant.

POE’S TAVERN 363 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 241-7637 Named in honor of Edgar Allan Poe, Poe’s Tavern is an American gastropub offering 50-plus beers with an emphasis on craft, high gravity and local and regional selections. The menu includes gourmet hamburgers, ground in-house and cooked to order, along with handcut French fries, fish tacos, entree-size salads, Edgar’s Drunken Chili and a daily fish sandwich special. A full bar is served and a kids’ selection is available. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

RAGTIME TAVERN & SEAFOOD GRILL 207 Atlantic Blvd., Beaches Town Center, Atlantic Beach, 241-7877 In business for more than 25 years, this seafood restaurant has received numerous awards in Folio Weekly’s Best of Jax readers poll, including 2011’s Best Restaurant in Jax. Menu items include blackened snapper, sesame tuna and the Ragtime shrimp. There is a full-service bar with a daily happy hour and live entertainment Wed.-Sun. Open daily.

ROYAL PALM VILLAGE WINE & TAPAS 296 Royal Palm Dr., Atlantic Beach, 372-0052 Locally owned and operated, this new spot offers more than 1,200 bottles of fine wine, 200 bottles of beer and 15 rotating microbrewed draft beers to pair with the chef’s creative tapas. Open nightly for dinner.

ROY’S HAWAIIAN FUSION CUISINE 2400 S. Third St., Ste. 101, 241-7697 High-end dining with friendly “aloha” service, Roy’s serves Hawaiian fusion with Asian aromatics using fresh local ingredients, European sauces and bold Asian spices. The full bar is open at 5 p.m. daily and a children’s menu is offered. Open nightly.

SAFE HARBOR SEAFOOD MARKET & RESTAURANT 4378 Ocean St., Mayport Village, 246-4911 There’s no doubt the seafood’s fresh — you can see the boats unloading at the dock. Whatever Safe Harbor sells in the market — shrimp, oysters, clams and scallops — they’ll cook to order. There are tables inside and out on the dock overlooking the confluence of the St. Johns River and the Atlantic Ocean. Open for lunch and early dinner Mon.-Sat.

SALA PHAD THAI 1716 N. Third St., 246-7490 This casual Thai restaurant is family-owned-and-operated and features extensive lunch and dinner menus, including spring rolls, fried squid, beef with oyster sauce and a variety of curried dishes. It’s vegan-friendly, too, offering bean curd delight, and Thai noodles and veggies. Beer and wine are served. Open daily.

SALT LIFE FOOD SHACK 1018 N. Third St., 372-4456 A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Seafood, Salt Life offers a wide array of specialty menu items, including the signature tuna poke bowl, fresh rolled sushi, Ensenada tacos and local fried shrimp, served in a contemporary open-air space. A full bar is offered. Take-out and a kids’ menu are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

SEAFOOD KITCHEN 31 Royal Palm Dr. (off Atlantic Boulevard), Atlantic Beach, 241-8470 Serving seafood in Atlantic Beach for more than 20 years, Seafood Kitchen offers reasonable meals in a no-frills atmosphere. The emphasis is on fresh local seafood prepared to order, with a wide variety of dishes available. Open daily.

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SINGLETON’S SEAFOOD SHACK 4728 Ocean St., Mayport, 246-4442

Just steps from the Mayport ferry, this ramshackle, exposed plywood haunt has been serving seafood to locals, fisherman Sales RepanddlNavy men and women since the ’60s. Customer favorites include the fried shrimp dinner and the blackened or grilled fish. Dine inside or on the enclosed porch right on the St. Johns River — literally. You can watch pelicans and otters play. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

SLIDERS SEAFOOD GRILL 218 First St., Beaches Town Center, Neptune Beach, 246-0881 Sliders offers a beach-casual atmosphere for lovers of fresh fish. Customer favorites include fish tacos and gumbo. The dessert menu features Key lime pie and homemade ice cream sandwiches. Beer and wine are served. Open nightly.

SMASHBURGER 630 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 241-2666 Do-it-yourself burgers and chicken sandwiches, hot dogs, salads, sides and fries are served at this new beach spot. Kids get their own menu. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

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SNAPPERS SEAFOOD & SPIRITS Sales Rep rl 314 N. First St., 242-2430 This casual seafood place serves fresh seafood, as well as burgers, ribeyes and po’boys. A kids’ menu is available. A full bar is served. Dine indoors or out on the deck; the people-watching is great this time of year. Open daily.

includes shrimp dinners, seven styles of hamburger and a Sunday brunch. Live music and dinner specials are featured nightly, trivia on Tues. and a late-night menu is available till 1 a.m. Thur.-Sat. Open daily.

TACOLU BAJA MEXICANA 1183 Beach Blvd., 249-8226 Fresh, Baja-style Mexican fare with a focus on fish tacos and tequila. Menu items include Bangin’ Shrimp, verde chicken tacos and fried cheese that isn’t fried. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Fri.; at 10 a.m. Sat. and Sun. for happy hour brunch.

TAMA’S SUSHI RESTAURANT 106 First St., Beaches Town Center, Neptune Beach, 241-0099 This casual beach restaurant features a full sushi bar, and tempura, teriyaki and katsu dishes. Beer, wine and sake are served. Sushi and takeout available. Open for dinner Tue.-Sun.

TWO DUDES SEAFOOD PLACE 22 Seminole Rd., Atlantic Beach, 246-2000 This place serves up-to-the-minute-fresh Mayport seafood, including shrimp, scallops, snapper and oysters done up in sandwiches or baskets, grilled, blackened or fried. The mostly-draft beers are premium and there’s a daily happy hour. Open for lunch and dinner daily; take-out is available.

THE WINE BAR 320 N. First St., 372-0211 This casual neighborhood wine bar features a wide variety of wine, beer, appetizers and cigars. Live music is presented Wed., Fri. and Sat. and board games are offered. A wine tasting is held every Thur. Open nightly.

WIPEOUTS GRILL 1585 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 247-4508

SNEAKERS SPORTS GRILLE 111 Beach Blvd., 482-1000

This casual, beachy sports place serves burgers, wings, fish tacos and plenty of cold beer — wine, too — in a relaxing atmosphere. A kids’ menu and takeout are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily; for breakfast on Sat. and Sun.

Sneaker’s offers a full bar (with more than 20 beers on tap), TV screens covering entire walls and “cheerleaders” serving the food. Happy hour is held Mon.-Fri. Open for lunch and dinner daily. Best of Jax 2011 winner for Best Sportsbar.

YOGABERRY 311 N. Third St., Ste. 104, 280-9652 544 Marsh Landing Parkway, 280-9652 See St. Johns Town Center.

STONEWOOD TAVERN & GRILL 950 Marsh Landing Pkwy., 285-2311 See Baymeadows. SUN DOG STEAK AND SEAFOOD BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 207 Atlantic Blvd., Beaches Town Center, Neptune Beach, 241-8221

*

This art-deco, family-owned restaurant has been around for 23 years and has now gone green, with biodegradable takeout containers and an onsite garden. The Dog features booth dining and a ’50s-diner-style counter, and the menu

© 2010

32 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012

DOWNTOWN JACKSONVILLE

(Jacksonville Landing venues are at 2 Independent Drive) ADAMS STREET DELI & GRILL 126 W. Adams St., 475-1400 The lunch spot serves wraps, including grilled chicken, and salads, including Greek salad. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri.

FolioWeekly

Located inside the new entertainment complex Latitude 30 on the Southside, Sunset 30 Tavern & Grill serves all the favorite sportsbar fare, including burgers, chicken, pasta and pizza.


THE ATRIUM CAFÉ 1 Independent Dr., Ste. 110, 634-1811 Located in Independent Square, Atrium Café offers hot entrées and traditional sandwiches, including a buffalo chicken sandwich. Dine outside, inside or take it to go. Open Mon.-Fri. for breakfast and lunch.

BENNY’S SANDWICH SHOP 121 W. Forsyth St. (Atlantic Place building), 634-1525 For 26 years, Benny’s — located in an old basement bank vault — has been part of the downtown breakfast and lunch scene. Everything is made from scratch. Customer favorites include the taco salad and the creamy potato soup. Open for breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri.

BENNY’S STEAK & SEAFOOD The Jacksonville Landing, Ste. 175, 301-1014 This steak-and-seafood house serves Continental cuisine with such signature dishes as the Filet Christian. Open daily. A full bar is served and a children’s menu is available.

BIG PETE’S OLD STYLE PIZZERIA 118 N. Julia St., 356-2680 Big Pete’s makes everything from scratch, including pizza, calzones, baked ziti and wraps. Big Pete’s also serves barbecue and wings. Delivery is available. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Fri.

BURRITO GALLERY & BAR 21 E. Adams St., 598-2922 A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Burrito, popular Burrito Gallery serves Southwestern cuisine with an emphasis on innovative burritos including ginger teriyaki tofu and the incomparable blackened mahi. Local art is on display, and live music or DJs are featured on the back deck during Art Walk and other special events. A full bar is offered. Open for lunch Mon., for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat.

Located in the Southside area, Greek Isles Café serves authentic Greek cuisine along with American favorites, Italian dishes and seafood items.

HOOTERS The Jacksonville Landing, Ste. 103, 356-5400

NORTHSTAR THE PIZZA BAR & SUBSTATION 119 E. Bay St., Jacksonville, 860-5451

This chain of casual restaurants are popular for their waitresses and feature wings, steamed shrimp, oysters, burgers, seafood and sandwiches. A full bar is served. All Hooters locations feature Military Appreciation all week, offering a 20 percent discount to those with military IDs.

The menu features brick-oven-baked pizzas, grinders, wings, Philly cheesesteaks, sandwiches and fries served in a laid-back setting. There’s Karaoke on Sat. A full bar and 27 beers on tap are served. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., open late Fri. and Sat.

INDOCHINE 21 E. Adams St., Ste. 200, 598-5303

OLIO MARKET 301 E. Bay St., 356-7100

Thai and Southeast Asian cuisine has arrived in the urban core. Signature dishes include chicken Satay, soft shell crab, and mango and sticky rice for dessert. A full bar is served and take-out is available. A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Thai, it’s open for lunch Mon.-Fri.; for dinner Tue.-Sat.

A new foodie favorite on the downtown dining scene, Olio serves made-from-scratch soups, salads and sandwiches, along with beer and wine. They even cure their own bacon and pickle their own pickles. Take-out is available. Open Mon.-Fri. for breakfast and lunch.

Owner/chef Sam Hamidi has been serving genuine Italian fare to Jacksonville for more than 35 years — he’s been downtown for 14 — with dishes like veal, seafood and pizza. The homemade salad dressing is a specialty. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

JAXX SPORTS BAR 225 E. Coastline Dr., 634-4044

POPPY LOVE SMOKE CIGAR BAR 112 E. Adams St., 354-8889

Located in the main lobby of Hyatt Regency Riverfront, JAXX serves appetizers, sandwiches, salads and desserts, as well as premium beer, wine and spirits. Open daily for dinner.

A cigar humidor and a wide selection of wines draw a chill downtown crowd to this urban hangout, just a few doors from Burro Bar. Open Wed.-Sun.

CHICAGO PIZZA SPORTS BAR & GRILL The Jacksonville Landing, 354-7747 See Southside.

JENKINS QUALITY BARBECUE 830 N. Pearl St., 353-6388 See Springfield.

RUSS-DOE’S SANDWICH SHOP 1745 E. Church St., 353-9065

CHOMP CHOMP 106 E. Adams St., 762-4667

JOSEPH’S PIZZA & ITALIAN RESTAURANT 7316 N. Main St., 765-0335

This new spot next to Burro Bar offers an eclectic variety at moderate prices — most items are less than $10. Dishes include panko-crusted chicken, chinois tacos, bahn mi and barbecue. Open for lunch Tue.-Sat.; for lunch and dinner Fri. and Sat. and for Artwalk.

See Beaches. This location is closed Mon.

CAFÉ NOLA AT MOCA JAX 333 N. Laura St., 366-6911 ext. 231 Located on the first floor of the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, Cafe Nola serves shrimp and grits, gourmet sandwiches, fresh fish tacos and homemade desserts. A full bar is served. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., for dinner Thur.

CASA DORA 108 E. Forsyth St., 356-8282

CITY HALL PUB 234A Randolph Blvd., 356-6750 Located in the heart of the Sports Complex, this restaurant’s casual menu features burgers, hot wings, shrimp and tilapia made to order. If lunchtime is crunch time, call in your order ahead. A full bar is served, and there’s live jazz every Fri. at noon. Music is featured weekdays, DJs spin every weekend and Wed., and big-screen TVs are all over the place. Covered patio seating is available. Open daily.

CURRENTS LOUNGE 225 E. Coastline Dr., 634-4043 Located in the main lobby of the Hyatt Regency Riverfront, Currents offers appetizers, cafe cuisine, a full bar and specialty desserts, wireless Internet access and plasma TVs. Open daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

JULIETTE’S BISTRO & THE J-BAR 245 W. Water St., 355-6664 Located inside the Omni Hotel, Juliette’s serves dinner prior to (or dessert after) a downtown show. In the morning, there’s a breakfast buffet. The full-service bar carries beers of the world, and the J-Bar serves small plates of bistroinspired cuisine. Open daily.

KOJA SUSHI The Jacksonville Landing, 350-9911 Owners John and Tony — in the sushi game for more than 10 years — offer sushi, sashimi, and Japanese, Asian and Korean cuisine. Hard-to-find items like baby octopus salad are available. A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Japanese, Koja offers indoor and outdoor dining, and a full bar is available. Open daily.

LE SHEA’S HOMESTYLE EATERY 119 W. Adams St., 354-5685

DE REAL TING CAFÉ 128 W. Adams St., 633-9738

Southern and soul food are the focus at Le Shea’s, including meat loaf, fried chicken, burgers and spaghetti — and plenty of sides. Dine-in or take-out. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., for dinner on Wed.

This Caribbean restaurant features jerk or curried chicken, conch fritters and curried goat and oxtail. A full bar is served. Open Tue.-Sun.

THE MAGNIFICAT CAFÉ 231 N. Laura St., 353-3588

FIONN MacCOOL’S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT The Jacksonville Landing, Ste. 176, 374-1547 See Beaches.

In the heart of downtown Jacksonville on Hemming Plaza, this French-style café serves French onion soup, quiche Lorraine and fresh fruit salad. Dine indoors or out on the covered patio. Take-out is available. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri.

This Talleyrand sandwich shop offers breakfast items, as well as classic American lunch fare, including PB&J, egg salad, and pimento cheese sandwiches. Dine outside at picnic tables on the decks. Open for breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri.

THE SKYLINE DINING & CONFERENCE CENTER 50 N. Laura St., Ste. 4200, 791-9533 ext. 241 Located on the 42nd floor of the Bank of America building, this cafe offers a spectacular view of Jacksonville to the busy lunch crowd downtown. A full bar is served and takeout is available. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri.

SONNY’S REAL PIT BAR-B-Q 10840 Harts Rd., 751-4225 See Riverside. TRELLISES RESTAURANT 225 E. Coastline Dr., Northbank, 634-4540 Located in Hyatt Regency Riverfront, Trellises offers American à la carte dining featuring original fresh seafood creations and regional specialties, along with a daily buffet or à la carte breakfast. A full bar is served and children’s selections are available. Open daily.

URBAN GRIND COFFEE COMPANY 50 N. Laura St., 806-5535 Located in the lobby of the Bank of America building, Urban Grind offers a variety of locally roasted whole bean brewed coffee, espresso drinks, smoothies, freshly baked pastries and bagels with homemade cream cheeses. Free WiFi for customers. Open Mon.-Fri. for breakfast.

VILLAGE BREAD CAFE The Jacksonville Landing, Ste. 175, 683-7244 See Mandarin.

March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 33


VITO’S ITALIAN CAFÉ The Jacksonville Landing, Ste. 174, 355-3002

Afraid to Eat Another Bite

Nothing can ruin your appetite like a good old-fashioned food phobia

I

n the world of dining, there’s a place where hunger meets horror headon. No, we’re not talking about the old hotwired Nacho Cheese Fountain that gurgles eternally in Folio Weekly’s shrine-like breakroom. Rather, we’re dropping a little psychological science on the culinary quandary of food phobias. A phobia (Greek for “fear”) is defined as this is a copyright proof © a persistentprotected anxiety of an object or situation that a person goes to great lengths to avoid. It’s the difference between simply disliking our advertising representative at 260-9770.yourrUn 032012 UncledAte: Ray’s pecan chutney and hatingslash-fearing it so much, you relocate to a LE AT 268-3655 war-torn Third World nation to escape it. Produced by Th ede reasons Checked Rep rl sUpport Ask for Action that by peopleSales fear foods can range from actual experiences to accumulated associations. At their most extreme, food phobias lead to what’s known as Selective Eating Disorder (SED), an intensely restrictive dietary lifestyle University College London Institute of Child Health describes as “part phobia and part addiction” (a condition not dissimilar to weather-proofing your meth lab, readjusting your “front butt” or obsessively watching Japanese house cat videos or “The Bachelor”). The most obvious behavior associated with SED is when an individual avoids eating certain foods while obsessively consuming others. And though not all food phobias lead to SED (which is a relief, because we here at Folio Weekly really, really like these damn Triscuits), experts do believe that food phobias, like any fears, can negatively affect people’s health, relationships and overall quality of life. But as with all scary things, knowing your enemy is key. Therefore, Folio Weekly has assumed the unsavory task of compiling — and fictionally augmenting — those trepidations that could potentially petrify foodies. Keep a copy of this list close by when heading out to that new Thai place that always seems to put you in spins of

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34 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

vertigo and cold sweats. And bon appetit! Acerophobia Fear of sourness Alliumphobia Fear of garlic Bacillophobia Fear of microbes Bebopophobia Fear of eating a jazz ensemble Buseyphobia Fear of eating someone else’s gigantic teeth Caponephobia Fear of choking on a gangster Coachiphobia Fear of swallowing a whistle Consecotaleophobia Fear of chopsticks Dipsophobia Fear of drinking Emetophoia Fear of vomiting Flavaflavophobia Fear of tasting a giant golden clock Frigophobia Fear of cold things Geumophobia Fear of taste Hippiphobia Fear of eating a pothead Hydrophobia Fear of water Iophobia Fear of poison Mamawiphobia Fear of eating mother-in-law’s cooking for sake of cornpone comedy skit Memeophobia Fear of your meal becoming a viral internet sensation Mittophobia Fear of choking on rhetoric Necrophobia Fear of dead things Olfactophobia Fear of smells Olgaolfactophobia Fear of smelling a Slavic woman Oprahphobia Fear of being seen by Oprah while eating Phagophobia Fear of swallowing Pnigophobia Fear of choking Ramalamadingdongaphobia Fear of tasting a doo-wop singer Rhypophobia Fear of defecation Rhypophilbinophobia Fear of defecating near Regis Philbin Thermophobia Fear of hot things Trebekophobia Fear of being seen eating on “Jeopardy!” Urophobia Fear of urine or urinating Xanthophobia Fear of the color yellow Yodelophobia Fear of choking while wearing a jaunty, feathered cap  Dan Brown dbrown@folioweekly.com

The traditional Italian and Mediterranean menu includes pasta dishes, steak and seafood entrées. Desserts, including the tiramisu and cannoli, are homemade. A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Italian, this café also features a full-service bar in the lounge, serving a daily happy hour. Open daily.

ZODIAC GRILL 120 W. Adams St., 354-8283 Zodiac serves Mediterranean cuisine and American favorites in a casual atmosphere. Zodiac Grill also offers panini and vegetarian dishes. The daily lunch buffet is a downtown favorite. A full bar is available, as are espressos and hookahs. Open for lunch and happy hour Mon.-Fri. There’s trivia on Thur., and live music on Fri. and Sat.

FLEMING ISLAND CHICAGO PIZZA & SPORTS GRILLE 406 Old Hard Rd., Ste. 106, 213-7779 See Baymeadows.

GRASSROOTS NATURAL MARKET 1915 East-West Parkway, 541-0009 See Riverside.

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS 1810 Town Center Blvd., Ste. 1, 644-7315 This island-themed restaurant offers more than 35 flavors of wings, garlic and parmesan fries, Firecracker shrimp, burgers and chicken. A full bar is served and the beverage cups are biodegradable. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

KAN-KI 2009 East-West Parkway, 269-3003 See Southside.

LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT 1571 C.R. 220, Ste. 100, 215-2223 See San Marco.

MELLOW MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 1800 Town Center Blvd., 541-1999

*

This psychedelic restaurant serves gourmet pizzas, hoagies and salads. Pies range from the Mighty Meaty to vegetarian pizzas like the Kosmic Karma. Mellow Mushroom offers 35 beers on tap and a full bar. Happy hour is held all day, every day. Live music is featured at all three locations. A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Restaurant, Bar and Pizza in OP/ Fleming Island.

MERCURY MOON GRILLE & BAR 2015 C.R. 220, 215-8999 Mercury Moon serves a variety of wings and signature sandwiches, including Philly cheesesteak, fried fish sandwich and the half-pound Moon burger. Live music is featured Mon., Wed., Fri. and Sat., and a full bar is available. Open daily.

MOJO SMOKEHOUSE 1810 Town Center Blvd., Ste. 8, 264-0636 See San Jose.

THE PITA PIT 1810 Town Center Blvd., Ste. 5, 579-4930 This upbeat restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner all day. All of the fresh ingredients are available in a pita or a salad. All-natural smoothies are also served, and free delivery is available on Fleming Island. Open daily.

TAPS BAR & GRILL 1605 C.R. 220, 278-9421 This restaurant offers more than 50 premium domestic and imported beers on tap along with a full bar. The menu features starters, burgers, sandwiches, entrees and a kids’ selection, all prepared to order with fresh ingredients. And there are lots of TVs for watching sports. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

WHITEY’S FISH CAMP 2032 C.R. 220, 269-4198 This authentic fish camp serves gator tail and fresh-water river catfish, as well as traditional meals and daily specials on the banks of Swimming Pen Creek. A repeat winner for Best Catfish in Folio Weekly’s Best of Jax readers poll, Whitey’s features a full-service bar, an outdoor Tiki bar


and live music. Come by boat, motorcycle or car. Open for breakfast on Sat. and Sun.; for lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner daily.

INTRACOASTAL WEST AL’S PIZZA 14286 Beach Blvd., Ste. 31 (at San Pablo), 223-0991 See Beaches.

AROY THAI FUSION 13475 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 40, 374-0161 This new Thai restaurant offers authentic Thai cuisine, including pad Thai, Thai fried rice and traditional curry dishes. A full bar is served, with a daily happy hour, and take-out is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

BIG DAWG’S SPORTS RESTAURANT 12630 Beach Blvd., Ste. 4, 551-3059 The family-friendly sports place features wings, burgers, wraps and specialty salads. Kids choose from their own Puppy Chow menu. Beer and wine are served, and take-out is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

BONO’S PIT BAR-B-Q 3303 San Pablo Rd. S., 223-1391 See Arlington. BRUCCI’S PIZZA, PASTA, PANINIS 13500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 36, 223-6913 See Ponte Vedra.

DICK’S WINGS 14286 Beach Blvd. (at San Pablo), 223-0115 10750 Atlantic Blvd., 619-0954 See Beaches. EL RANCHITO 14333 Beach Blvd., Ste. 22, 992-4607 This restaurant features Latin American cuisine, including dishes from Colombia, Cuba and Mexico. Beer and wine are served. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

FIREHOUSE SUBS 13245 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 9, 220-7140 See Mandarin. FIVE GUYS FAMOUS BURGERS & FRIES 3267 Hodges Blvd., Ste. 6, 992-4680 See St. Johns Town Center.

FUJI SUSHI 13740 Beach Blvd., 992-8998 At the corner of Beach and Hodges, Fuji Sushi offers dine-in and take-out Japanese fare. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

GOOD FOOD COMPANY 13475 Atlantic Blvd., 329-2407 The fine-dining restaurant and full-service catering company emphasizes using quality raw ingredients to create menus based on local, seasonal and organic products, served in an elegant atmosphere. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat.

ISTANBUL MEDITERRANEAN & ITALIAN CUISINE 13170 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 26, 220-9192 The varied menu offers European cuisine including lamb, beef and chicken dishes, as well as pizza and wraps. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

JERRY’S SPORTS GRILLE 13170 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 22, 220-6766 The menu includes hand-cut steaks, wings and hamburgers. A full breakfast is served Sat. and Sun., featuring bottomless mimosas and Bloody Marys. Trivia every Tue. Kids get their own menu. Open daily.

JIMMY JOHN’S GOURMET SANDWICHES 11702 Beach Blvd., Ste. 101, 642-8288 See Southside.

LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT 14333 Beach Blvd., Ste. 39, 992-1666 See San Marco.

MAMA MIA’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT & PIZZERIA 12220 Atlantic Blvd., 221-1122 Mama Mia’s offers casual dining, with lunchtime specials. The menu includes veal, seafood dishes, and New York-style and big-crust Sicilian-style pizzas. Delivery is available, and beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun.

© 2012 March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 35

FolioW


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With multiple locations, including this Tinseltown one, Mellow Mushroom Pizza Bakers serves gourmet pizzas ranging from the Mighty Meaty to the vegetarian Kosmic Karma, along with 35 beers on tap. MARKER 32 14549 Beach Blvd., 223-1534

SONNY’S REAL PIT BAR-B-Q 12719 Atlantic Blvd., 220-9499

Located on the Intracoastal Waterway with a panoramic view, Marker 32 serves award-winning regional New American cuisine with an emphasis on local seafood. Chef Ben Groshell’s entrées include pan seared, wild-caught salmon and beef tenderloin with scallops. Pastas and desserts are made on-premises, and the full bar features an extensive wine list. Reservations recommended. Open for dinner Mon.-Sat.

See Riverside.

© 2012

FolioWeekly

MILANO’S 12620 Beach Blvd., Ste. 21, 646-9119 This casual, family-owned restaurant and pizzeria serves homestyle Italian fare, including thin-crust New York-style pizzas, veal and baked dishes. Kids’ portions are available. A full bar is served and daily delivery service is offered. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

MOCHI FROZEN YOGURT 13546 Beach Blvd., Ste. 1A, 821-9880

SWEET CECE’S FROZEN YOGURT & TREATS 3267 Hodges Blvd., Ste. 2, 647-6890 The selection of frozen yogurt flavors and their accompanying toppings is extensive, so you can get something different every time. Open daily.

TIJUANA FLATS 13529 Beach Blvd., 223-0041 See Baymeadows.

TIME OUT SPORTS GRILL 13799 Beach Blvd., Ste. 5, 223-6999 This locally-owned-and-operated grill serves hand-tossed pizzas, wings and specialty wraps in a clean, sporty atmosphere. A full bar is available, with daily drink specials. A late-night menu is offered. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.Sun., dinner on Mon. and Sun.

See St. Johns Town Center.

MR. CHAN ASIAN CUISINE 13947 Beach Blvd., Ste. 110, 992-1388 Mr. Chan offers a variety of Pan-Asian fare, chef’s specialties including a classic spicy-cabbage kimchi, as well as traditional dishes. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

©

MVP’S SPORTS GRILLE 12777 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 5, 221-1090 2012

FolioWeekly

MVP’s offers wings, burgers and salads in a sporty atmosphere. A kids’ menu is available, and a full bar is served. Free pool and trivia are featured on Mon., Texas Hold ’Em is on Sun. and Tue., Karaoke is held every Thur., a DJ spins every Wed., Fri. and Sat. Sports are shown on 22 TVs. Open daily.

BLACKSTONE GRILLE 112 Bartram Oaks Walk, Ste. 102, 287-0766 Blackstone Grille specializes in modern American fusion cuisine, served in a trendy bistro-style setting. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Fri., dinner on Sat.

BONO’S PIT BAR-B-Q 100 Bartram Oaks Walk, Fruit Cove, 287-7710 See Arlington.

ORANGE TREE HOT DOGS 13500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 3, 223-5300

BRUCCI’S PIZZA, PASTA, PANINIS 540 S.R. 13, Ste. 10, Fruit Cove, 287-8317

See Baymeadows.

See Ponte Vedra.

PEPPER’S MEXICAN GRILL & CANTINA 13475 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 1, 221-2300

FIREHOUSE SUBS 2245 C.R. 210 W., Ste. 11, 823-9914 465 S.R. 13, Ste. 5, 287-3495 See Mandarin.

See Amelia Island.

SHANE’S RIB SHACK 13546 Beach Blvd., Ste. 1, 992-0130 Originating in Georgia, Shane’s has expanded all over the U.S., including here in J-ville. Burgers, pork, racks of ribs, chicken tenders and wings are served along with beans, fried okra, corn on the cob, collards and Brunswick stew. A kids’ selection is offered. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

36 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012

JULINGTON CREEK & NW ST. JOHNS

SMOOTHIE KING 13457 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 1, 221-1299 13770 Beach Blvd., 821-1688 See Beaches.

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS 12795 San Jose Blvd., Julington Creek, 260-8338 3055 C.R. 210, Ste. 101, St. Johns, 230-6445 See Fleming Island.

JENK’S PIZZERIA & ITALIAN CUISINE 2245 C.R. 210 W., Ste. 112, 826-1555 Family-owned-and-operated Jenk’s offers subs, New Yorkstyle pizzas, calzones and a variety of Italian dishes. Takeout and delivery are available. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.


THE NEW ORLEANS CAFÉ 12760 San Jose Blvd., 880-5155

CAFÉ DU MARCHÉ 11700 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 18, 886-6999

This Creole-style restaurant features family recipes — French bread po’boys, muffalattas and the like — served overlooking Mandarin Marina and Julington Creek. Live music is presented nightly, a full bar is served, and take-out and a kids’ menu are available. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun.

Café Du Marché offers a sophisticated menu of original recipes, including homemade breads and desserts. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open for breakfast and lunch daily.

PIZZA PALACE 116 Bartram Oaks Walk, 230-2171

See Springfield.

See Riverside. Open daily.

CHOW DOWN ALLEY 14775 Old St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 3, 880-7900

SHANNON’S IRISH PUB 111 Bartram Oaks Walk, Julington Creek, 230-9670

Family-operated Chow Down serves breakfast sandwiches, burgers, salads and specialty sandwiches. Open for breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri.

Tried-and-true dishes from the Emerald Isle — bangers and mash, corned beef and cabbage — are served alongside pork and beef entrees. A kids’ menu and take-out are available, and a full bar is served, with a daily happy hour. Live music is presented Fri. and Sat. and trivia’s on Wed. Open for lunch Wed.-Sun., for dinner nightly.

SIVADA’S CUPCAKERY 119 Bartram Oaks Walk, Ste. 105, 683-0709 See Avondale.

VINO’S PIZZA & ITALIAN CUISINE 605 S.R. 13, Ste. 103, St. Johns, 230-6966

CASA MARIA 14965 Old St. Augustine Rd., 619-8186

CLARK’S FISH CAMP 12903 Hood Landing Rd., 268-3474 Best known for its wild array of taxidermized creatures, Clark’s was the 2011 winner — again — of the Best Fish Camp category in Folio Weekly’s Best of Jax readers poll. In addition to the gator and turtle, Clark’s menu features steak, ribs and daily all-you can-eat catfish dinners. Dine indoors, outdoors, or in a glass enclosed room with a view of Julington Creek. A full bar is served. Open for dinner Mon.Fri., for lunch and dinner Sat. and Sun.

See Baymeadows.

COFFEE ROASTERS 9735 Old St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 13, 260-0810

WAKAME JAPANESE & THAI CUISINE 104 Bartram Oaks Walk, Ste. 108, 230-6688

Coffee Roasters is an independently owned coffee shop where the beans are roasted onsite. Coffee drinks, frozen lattes, baked goods and bagged coffees are also available. Open daily.

The fine dining restaurant offers authentic Japanese and Thai cuisine, including a full sushi menu, curries and pad dishes. Beer and wine are served and a kids’ selection is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

MANDARIN AL’S PIZZA 11190 San Jose Blvd., 260-4115 See Beaches.

AW SHUCKS 9743 Old St. Augustine Rd., 240-0368 This seafood place features an oyster bar, steaks, seafood, wings and pasta. Favorites are ahi tuna, shrimp & grits, oysters Rockefeller, pitas and kabobs. Sweet potato puffs are the signature side. Children’s selections are available. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

BEACH DINER 11362 San Jose Blvd., 683-0079 See Beaches.

THE BLUE CRAB CRABHOUSE 3057 Julington Creek Rd., 260-2722 Fresh Maryland-style steamed blue crabs are a big deal at this seafood restaurant, as are crab legs and steamed or fried oysters. Dining is offered on a covered deck, along with a kids’ menu, an early bird menu and daily specials. A full bar is served and there’s live music every Sun. afternoon on the deck. Open for dinner Tue.-Sat., lunch and dinner Sun.

BONO’S PIT BAR-B-Q 9820 San Jose Blvd., 268-2666 12620 Bartram Park Blvd., 652-2989 See Arlington.

BRAZILIAN JAX CAFE 9825 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 20, 880-3313 This restaurant offers a variety of authentic Brazilian dishes, including steaks, sausages, chicken, fish, burgers and hot sandwiches prepared with fresh ingredients. Every Saturday, the traditional feijoada — black beans and pork stew served with rice, collards, orange salad and toasted yucca flour with bacon — is featured. Take-out is available. Open Mon.-Sat. for breakfast, lunch buffet and dinner.

BROOKLYN PIZZA 11406 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 3, Mandarin, 288-9211 13820 St. Augustine Rd., Bartram Park, 880-0020 The owners are from Brooklyn, N.Y., so it makes sense that the Brooklyn Special Pizza is a customer favorite. The menu features calzones, white pizza and homestyle lasagna. Beer and wine are served at the Mandarin location. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

DICK’S WINGS 10391 Old St. Augustine Rd., 880-7087 See Beaches.

DON JUAN’S RESTAURANT 12373 San Jose Blvd., 268-8722 With a focus on friendly, family-oriented service, Don Juan’s has a touch of Old Mexico: patio dining. A full bar — with tequila selections — is served, and happy hour is held Mon.-Fri. A children’s menu and take-out are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

© 2011

ENZA’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 10601 San Jose Blvd., Mandarin Landing, 268-4458 This family-owned restaurant offers casual fine dining, specializing in Italian cuisine, veal and seafood dishes like seafood lasagna. In addition to a full menu and a children’s selection, Enza’s offers daily specials. A full bar is served, and take-out is available. Open for dinner Tue.-Sun.

FIREHOUSE SUBS 10131 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 8, 886-2179 4268 Oldfield Crossing Dr., 338-0142 This Jacksonville-based sub chain, founded by firefighters, serves large portions of premium meats and cheeses, steamed hot and piled on a toasted sub roll. Kids’ meals come with a free fire hat. Delivery is available. Open daily.

FIVE GUYS FAMOUS BURGERS & FRIES 10061 San Jose Blvd., 493-5414 13760 St. Augustine Rd., 402-8036 See St. Johns Town Center.

GIGI’S RESTAURANT 3130 Hartley Rd. (in the Ramada Inn), 694-4300 GiGi’s serves a prime rib and crab leg buffet on Fri. and Sat., blue-jean brunch on Sun., a daily breakfast buffet and several options for lunch and dinner buffets. The Ramada Inn is also home to The Comedy Zone featuring national comedians Tue.-Sat. A full bar is served. Open daily.

GOLDEN CHINA CHINESE RESTAURANT 11112 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 23, 260-8836 Mandarin, Szechwan and Cantonese dishes are served along with daily lunch and dinner buffets featuring 26 items on the hot bar and eight items on the cold bar. Golden China also offers beer and wine. Dine in or take out. Open daily.

GREAT WALL CHINESE RESTAURANT 12200 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 4, 262-9107 Great Wall’s menu features Szechwan, Hunan and Cantonese dishes. Dine-in or take-out is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

MARCH 20-26, 2012 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 37


HALA CAFÉ & BAKERY 9735 Old St. Augustine Rd., 288-8890

OSAKA GRILL SUSHI BUFFET 11701 San Jose Blvd., 886-7778

See Southside.

More than 150 items are offered at this Chinese and Japanese buffet, including soups, spareribs, a sushi bar, roast duck and ice cream. Children younger than 12 dine at a discount. Carry-out from the buffet is available. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

HARMONIOUS MONKS 10550 Old St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 30, 880-3040 The American-style steakhouse features a 9-ounce choice Angus center-cut filet topped with gorgonzola shiitake mushroom cream sauce, 8-ounce gourmet burgers, fall-offthe-bone ribs, wraps and sandwiches. And there’s Karaoke every Mon.-Thur., with Dennis Klee & the World’s Most Talented Waitstaff performing every Fri. & Sat. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

KAN-KI JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR 11148 San Jose Blvd., 292-2400 See Southside.

KOBE JAPANESE RESTAURANT 11362 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 8, 288-7999 This Japanese fusion-style sushi restaurant offers such dishes as oyster shooters, kobe beef shabu-shabu and Chilean sea bass, served in an eclectic atmosphere. Beer, wine and sake are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

ADVERTISING PROOF LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT 11700 San Jose Blvd., 288-0175 See San Marco.

This is a copyright proof © LARRY’S GIANTprotected SUBS

11018 Old St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 123, 262-7879 11362 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 3, 674-2945

See Southside. your advertising representative at 260-9770. RUN DATE: 032211 BLE AT 268-3655 LET’S NOSH

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MASALA INDIAN CUISINE 9825 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 6, 268-6499 This Indian restaurant, whose name means peacock, offers traditional Indian items, including tandoori specials, South Indian, Indo-Chinese and vegetarian dishes, as well as cuisine in Biryani and Thali styles. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

MILLER’S ALE HOUSE & RAW BAR 11112 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 19, 292-0003 The Ale Houses specialize in generous portions and friendly service in a nautical atmosphere. Customer favorites include fresh fish, specialty pastas, and fresh oysters and clams. There are 32 draft beer varieties, along with TVs, pool tables and video games. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

MIZU SUSHI & GRILL 14965 Old St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 124, 880-0889 Master chefs prepare fresh sushi, seafood, steak and vegetables. Indoor or outdoor dining. Open for lunch and dinner daily. Mizu is located south of the Avenues Mall at Durbin Crossing.

NATIVE SUN NATURAL FOODS MARKET 10000 San Jose Blvd., 260-6950 Fresh, organic ingredients — in vegetarian, vegan, raw food and gluten-free options, too — are used for healthy lunch and dinner items, including gourmet artisan sandwiches, seasonally inspired deli and hot bar dishes, a chopped salad bar, fresh juices and smoothies, and gluten-free baked goods. A kids’ menu, a juice, smoothie and coffee bar are offered, and all-natural and organic beers and wine are available. Indoor and outdoor seating are available. Open Mon.-Sat. Best of Jax 2011 winner for Best Organic Restaurant and Best Health Food Store.

ORANGE TREE HOT DOGS 10991 San Jose Blvd., 260-8630 See Baymeadows.

ORANGE PARK & MIDDLEBURG

RACK ’EM UP BILLIARDS 4268 Oldfield Crossing Dr., Ste. 205, 262-4030

ARON’S PIZZA 650 Park Ave., 269-1007

This cigar and hookah lounge offers 10 billiards tables in Mandarin, 16 in Arlington (plus a full kitchen), as well as shuffleboard and a variety of subs for the late-night crowd. More than 200 imported and domestic beers are featured. Open for dinner nightly.

The menu at this family-owned restaurant includes eggplant dishes and manicotti as well as New York-style pizza. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

THE RED ELEPHANT PIZZA AND GRILL 10131 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 12, 683-3773 This casual, family-friendly eatery serves pizzas, sandwiches, grill specials and pasta dishes, and kids have their own menu. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

BONO’S PIT BAR-B-Q 1765 Town Center Blvd., Eagle Harbor, 269-8870 See Arlington.

DICK’S WINGS 1540 Wells Rd., 269-2122 3540 U.S. 17 S., Green Cove Springs, 284-7772 See Beaches.

See St. Johns Town Center.

© 2011

Woody’s Bar-B-Q features barbecue plates, barbecue salads and popular pulled pork sandwiches. Along with lunch and dinner specials, there are several all-you-can-eat specials. A kids’ menu is available, and a seniors’ discount is offered at some locations. Beer and wine are served. Open daily.

(All venues are in Orange Park unless otherwise noted.)

brunch as well as a full-service deli counter featuring Vienna Beef meats. The Reuben is awesome. Real New York water bagels, bread baked on site and desserts are featured. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open daily.

MSG-free pan-Asian cuisine is prepared to order in woks using fresh ingredients. Authentic Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese and Thai dishes are served. A kids’ menu is available. Beer and wine are served. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Take-out’s available up to 15 minutes before closing.

WOODY’S BAR-B-Q 9825 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 46, 262-3955

POLLO TROPICAL 10989 San Jose, 288-5990 See St. Johns Town Center.

RENNA’S PIZZA 11111 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 12, 292-2300

MAMA FU’S ASIAN HOUSE 11105 San Jose Blvd., 260-1727

38 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

Picasso’s specializes in hand-tossed gourmet pizza along with calzones, homemade New York-style cheesecake and handmade pasta. Fresh local seafood and steaks, too. Beer and wine are served. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

10950 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 36, 683-8346

ProducedThis byauthentic jdw Jewish Checked bya full Sales db deli offers breakfast,Rep lunch and

• Open for Lunch and Dinner TuesSat. and Brunch on Sundays • New dinner menu nightly • Serving local Seafood and Fresh Fernandina Shrimp

PICASSO’S PIZZERIA 10503 San Jose Blvd., 880-0811

with more than 80 items at a full-service and self-service hot bar, salad bar, soup bar and dessert bar, as well as pizza, sushi and sandwich stations. Open daily.

ROMA’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT & PIZZERIA 14965 Old St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 101, 880-2000 Roma’s menu has more than 100 items, each made with authentic Italian spices and herbs. Specialty dishes include veal, baked seafood, and gourmet pizzas. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Beer and wine are served. Lunch buffet is offered Mon.-Fri.; lunch and dinner, daily.

FIREHOUSE SUBS 1581 C.R. 220, Ste. 115, Eagle Harbor, 215-7302 2285-B Kingsley Ave., 276-1537 36B Blanding Blvd., Orange Park, 276-0701 2640 Blanding Blvd., Ste. 210, Middleburg, 291-4411 See Mandarin.

FIVE GUYS FAMOUS BURGERS & FRIES 1910 Wells Rd., Ste. C02D-5, 637-0414 1605 C.R. 220, Ste. 130, 592-4896 9630 Apple Cross Rd., Ste. 106, 573-0900

SANTIONI’S CUCINA ITALIANA RESTAURANT 11531 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 8, 262-5190

See St. Johns Town Center.

Bruno and Silvana Santioni have been in the business of Italian dining since 1987. Their menu features rack of lamb and veal saltim bocca with homemade bread. Beer and wine are available. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri.; dinner nightly.

FRO-YOGI 9542 Argyle Forest Blvd., 573-5060

SONNY’S REAL PIT BAR-B-Q 12485 San Jose Blvd., 288-7928 See Riverside. SORRENTO ITALIAN RESTAURANT 6943 St. Augustine Rd., 636-9196 Luciano Russo and his family opened Sorrento more than 20 years ago. The extensive menu includes fish Françese and lamb Torinese, and entrées include a salad, bread and a side of spaghetti. Beer and wine are served. Open for dinner Tue.-Sun.

THAI PALACE 9965 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 35, 880-5363 This family-owned restaurant is a favorite for business meals and dates alike, featuring specialties like shrimp himapan and many curry dishes. A customer favorite is sweet Thai tea. Beer and wine are served. Dine-in or takeout. Open Mon.-Fri. for lunch, daily for dinner.

TIJUANA FLATS 13820 Old St. Augustine Rd., 262-0484 See Baymeadows. VILLAGE BREAD CAFE 10111 San Jose Blvd., 262-0740 These locally owned restaurants offer breakfast (featuring a variety of bagels and omelets), and lunch (featuring sandwiches on homestyle bread, big salads, pizzas and pastries). Open daily for breakfast and lunch, and for dinner, too, on Fri. and Sat.

This yogurt shop also offers coffees, espresso, smoothies, sandwiches and baked goods along with a variety of frozen yogurt. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

GATORS DOCKSIDE 9680 Argyle Forest Blvd., 425-6466 For more than 20 years, this sports-themed family restaurant has been serving a varied menu of grilled wings, ribs, sandwiches and salads. A full bar and take-out are available. Sports are aired on multiple TVs, and Tuesday is Kids Night. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

HJ’S BAR & GRILL 8540 Argyle Forest Blvd., Ste. 1, 317-2783 This grill serves traditional American fare: burgers, sandwiches, wraps and platters of ribs, shrimp and fish. A children’s menu is available. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

THE HILLTOP 2030 Wells Rd., 272-5959 Nestled in the woods, The Hilltop serves in formal, Southerninflected dining spaces. Specialties include New Orleans shrimp, certified Black Angus prime rib and she-crab soup. Homemade desserts are featured, along with a piano lounge (Tue.-Sat. nights), a large collection of antiques and a garden setting. The Hilltop is a frequent staging ground for weddings. A full bar is available. Open for dinner Tue.-Sat.

HOOTERS 1749 Wells Rd., 215-5858 See Downtown.

VINO’S PIZZA & ITALIAN CUISINE 4268 Oldfield Crossing Dr., 268-6660

JOEY MOZARELLAS 930 Blanding Blvd., Ste. D, 579-4748

See Baymeadows.

At this Italian restaurant, calzones, stromboli and lasagne are customer favorites, and all the pizza pies are available stuffed. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

WHOLE FOODS MARKET 10601 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 22, 288-1100 Whole Foods offers an expansive prepared-food department


LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT 2024 Kingsley Ave., 276-2776

RENNA’S PIZZA 6001 Argyle Forest Blvd., Ste. 16, 771-7677

See San Marco.

See St. Johns Town Center.

LARRY’S GIANT SUBS 700 Blanding Blvd., Ste. 15, 272-3553 1545 C.R. 220, 278-2827 1330 Blanding Blvd., Ste. 165, 276-7370 1401 S. Orange Ave., Green Cove Springs, 284-7789

THE ROADHOUSE 231 Blanding Blvd., 264-0611

See Southside.

MILLER’S ALE HOUSE & RAW BAR 1756 Wells Rd., Ste. A, 278-4600 See Mandarin.

NEW YORK BRICK OVEN PIZZA 2225-B C.R. 220, Middleburg, 278-1770 Owner Dan Dehart offers pizza by the slice, along with stromboli and homestyle baked dinners. The pizzas are hand-tossed and cooked in a brick oven. Homemade desserts are also the menu, and lunch specials are featured. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

ORANGE TREE HOT DOGS 1910 Wells Rd., O.P. Mall, Ste. H06, 269-1164 9508 Crosshill Blvd., Ste. 102, Argyle, 772-7800

The Roadhouse has been serving sandwiches, wings, burgers and quesadillas for more than 34 years. Along with six pool tables, dartboards and TVs (two are big screens), there’s live entertainment Mon.-Sat. A full bar is served featuring more than 75 imported beers. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

SANTIONI’S LA CUCINA 3535 U.S. 17, Ste. 15, Eagle Harbor, 264-1331 Owner George Trefrey is a former chef, and it shows in his innovative approach to cuisine, desserts and his extensive wine list. Live entertainment Fri. and Sat. Wine tastings are held twice a month. On the last Tuesday of each month, a free birthday dinner is served to those who celebrated during that month. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

THE SHEIK SANDWICH DELI 1994 Kingsley Ave., 276-2677 See Arlington. SONNY’S REAL PIT BAR-B-Q 1976 Kingsley Ave., 272-4606 See Riverside.

See Baymeadows.

OSAKA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE 9651 Crosshill Blvd., Ste. 102, Argyle, 317-0224 Located in Oakleaf Town Center, Osaka features a sushi bar and hibachi tables. A full bar is served. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open daily.

POMPEII COAL-FIRED PIZZA 2134 Park Ave., 264-6116 Family-owned-and-operated Pompeii is one of the few pizza places offering pizzas made in coal fired ovens. The distinctive, flavorful pies are served alongside coal-fired wings. Beer, wine, espresso and cappuccino are served. Takeout is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

SWEET TOMATOES 1625 Wells Rd., 269-6116 See Arlington. TCBY 410 Blanding Blvd., Ste. 7, 276-0955 Healthful, low-fat yogurt is offered in a variety of flavors. A kids’ selection is available. Open daily.

TEXAS ROADHOUSE 550 Blanding Blvd., 213-1000 Texas Roadhouse specializes in steaks and ribs, seafood and chops. The atmosphere’s casual and family-friendly. Daily specials are featured, and the full-service bar offers a daily happy hour, ice-cold beer and legendary margaritas. Open for dinner Mon.-Wed., for lunch and dinner Thur.-Sun.

A new spot next to Burro Bar in downtown Jacksonville, Chomp Chomp offers eclectic variety at moderate prices — most items are less than $10. March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 39


T.G.I.FRIDAY’S 1301 Wells Rd., 215-7030 See Arlington.

ELIZABETH’S CAFÉ 1500 Sawgrass Village Dr., 543-7677

THAI GARDEN 10 Blanding Blvd., Ste. B, 272-8434

Serving a full breakfast menu and lunch items, Elizabeth’s Café in Sawgrass Village specializes in scrambled eggs with Nova Scotia salmon and onions, deli-style sandwiches and espresso drinks. Outside dining is available. Open daily.

Thai Garden offers traditional Thai menu items, including pad kraw powh with roasted duck and kaeng kari (yellow curry with potatoes and a choice of meat). Fine wines, and imported and domestic beers are available. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri.; for dinner nightly.

See Mandarin.

WOODY’S BAR-B-Q 950 Blanding Blvd., Ste. 1, 272-1419

FOX’S PIZZA DEN 4360 Palm Valley Rd., 285-1292

See Mandarin.

In the heart of Palm Valley, this family-owned-and-operated restaurant serves The Wedgie, a traditional sandwich served on a pizza crust, and sandwiches, pizzas and stromboli made to order. Delivery is available. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

PONTE VEDRA & NE ST. JOHNS AL’S PIZZA 635 A1A N., 543-1494 See Beaches. AQUA GRILL 950 Sawgrass Village Dr., 285-3017 Since 1988, this American-eclectic restaurant has served fresh local seafood, aged prime steaks and vegetarian entrées. Climate-controlled lakefront patio seating is available. A kids’ menu is available, and a full bar is served. Reservations accepted. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

THE AUGUSTINE GRILLE BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 1000 PGA Tour Blvd., Sawgrass Marriott, 285-7777

*

Chef Brett Smith’s menu of global cuisine is seasonal and local, and steaks are prime. Selections include New York strip, lamb and lobster Napoleon; Hawaiian tuna is flown in twice a week. A full bar with an extensive wine list is served. A children’s selection is available. Open for dinner nightly.

©

FIREHOUSE SUBS 357 Marsh Landing Parkway, 280-9404

BARBARA JEAN’S 15 S. Roscoe Blvd., Palm Valley, 280-7522 2012

FolioWeekly

Barbara Jean’s specializes in easy Southern dining, including legendary crab cakes, seafood, meatloaf and 15 fresh vegetables. During the winter, regulars watch snowbirds pilot their boats past the restaurant on the Intracoastal Waterway. Children’s selections are available; outdoor seating, too. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner daily, Sat. and Sun. for breakfast.

BEACH DINER 880 A1A N., 273-6545 See Beaches. BOGEY GRILLE 150 Valley Cir., 285-5524

LARRY’S GIANT SUBS 830 A1A N., Ste. 6, 273-3993 See Southside. THE LOBBY BAR 1000 PGA Tour Blvd., Sawgrass Marriott, 285-7777 This spot, the hub of Sawgrass, features hand-crafted drinks, small plates, a happy hour and a view of The Players Stadium Course. Dine inside or out on the Cascades deck. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

LULU’S WATERFRONT GRILLE 301 N. Roscoe Blvd., Palm Valley, 285-0139 On the Intracoastal Waterway, LuLu’s can be reached by land or water. The menu offers fresh seafood, hand-cut steaks, burgers and specialty salads. A full bar is served, and seating is available on the screened waterfront porch. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

MULLIGAN’S PUB 45 PGA Tour Blvd., Ponte Vedra Beach, 280-1661 The new Irish pub, at the Hilton Garden Inn, offers a variety of favorites and Irish dishes. A full bar is served, including Guinness. Open for dinner daily.

NAPOLI’S PIZZA 3787 Palm Valley Rd., Ste. 104, 273-0006 Napoli’s features a variety of traditional Italian dishes including veal, pasta and traditional hand-tossed and specialty pizzas. A kids’ menu, take-out and delivery are available. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

NINETEEN AT TPC SAWGRASS 110 Championship Way, 273-3235

This family-friendly sports bar offers casual fare, including wings, quesadillas, chicken and burgers. A full bar and a kids’ menu are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

In the Tournament Players Club, Sawgrass’ clubhouse, Nineteen features more than 230 varieties of wines. The restaurant features an array of freshly prepared American and Continental cuisine, including local seafood, served in an inviting interior or al fresco on the verandah. Open daily.

BRUCCI’S PIZZA, PASTA, PANINIS 880 A1A, Ste. 8, 280-7677

PALM VALLEY FISH CAMP 229 N. Roscoe Blvd., Palm Valley, 285-3200

With three locations in Northeast Florida, Brucci’s offers authentic New York-style pizza, Italian pastas and desserts in a family atmosphere. A kids’ menu is available, and for the adults, there’s beer and wine. Happy hour is held Mon.-Fri. Open for lunch Mon.-Sat.; for dinner daily.

The Groshell family, owners of Marker 32, presents this new dining experience on the Intracoastal in Palm Valley, serving dishes made with fresh ingredients, including daily specials. Call in your order and pick it up dockside. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun.

CAFFÉ ANDIAMO 500 Sawgrass Village, 280-2299

PLAYER’S CAFÉ 262 Solana Rd., 273-5595

The Recupito family’s Caffé Andiamo offers fresh seafood, veal, steak and pizza prepared in a copper wood-burning oven, as well as daily specials. Customer favorites include fracosta loco and cappesanti di mare. Dine on the outdoor patio or inside. A full bar is served, featuring 75 wines by the glass. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

Owners Don and Terri Stanton run a family-friendly place with a golf theme and a “wall of fame.” (Ask Don how to get your portrait on the wall.) The menu includes a fresh grouper sub, Cuban sandwiches and Philly cheesesteaks. Open daily for breakfast (served all day) and lunch.

CAFÉ ON THE GREEN 1000 PGA Tour Blvd., Sawgrass Marriott, 285-7777 Café on the Green is a casual dining venue serving traditional favorites for breakfast and lunch daily.

CHINA CORAL 830 A1A N., Ste. 12, 273-8776 Located in the Tournament Plaza, China Coral serves Shanghai, Mandarin and Szechwan dishes. In addition to the menu, daily specials are offered, including the crispy fish, crispy duck and stir-fried string beans. Beer and wine are served. Open daily.

PUSSER’S BAR & GRILLE BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 816 A1A N., Ste. 100, 280-7766

*

Named for the rum, Pusser’s serves innovative Caribbean cuisine and regional favorites, like Jamaican grilled pork ribs, Trinidad smoked duck, lobster macaroni & cheese dinner. Tropical drinks, including the Pusser’s Painkiller, are popular house “remedies.” A children’s menu and take-out are available. Live entertainment is featured on the Upper Deck. Open daily.

RESTAURANT MEDURE 818 A1A N., 543-3797 Chef David Medure creates dishes with a wide range of

40 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012


Advertising proo

this is a copyright protected proo flavors from around the world. The newly renovated lounge offers small plates, creative drinks and entertainment, including happy hour twice daily. Live music is presented Mon., and Thur.-Sat. Open Mon.-Sat. for dinner.

Cajun (andouille sausage covered in jambalaya) and The Hippie (veggie dog) — and sausages, grilled chicken wraps, soups, salads, appetizers and wings. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE 814 A1A N., Ste. 103, 285-0014 See San Marco.

AL’S PIZZA promise of benefit 1620 Margaret St., Ste. 201, Riverside, 388-8384

For questions, please call your advertising representative at 260-9770. rUn dAte: 032012 FAX YOUR PROOF IF POSSIBLE AT 268-3655 sUpport

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See Beaches.

SEA PORCH BAR & GRILL 1000 PGA Tour Blvd., Sawgrass Marriott, 285-7777 This oceanfront spot offers casual cuisine along with a full bar. A kids’ menu is available. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun.

619 OCEAN VIEW 1000 PGA Tour Blvd., Sawgrass Marriott, 285-7777 619 Ocean View offers upscale dining with a Mediterranean touch, featuring fresh seafood, steaks and nightly specials. A full bar is served and a children’s menu is available. Open for dinner Wed.-Sun.

URBAN FLATS 330 A1A N., Ste. 208, 280-5515 See Southside. V. KELLY’S GASTROPUB 1000 PGA Tour Blvd., Sawgrass Marriott, 285-7777 The casual fun spot features locally sourced, farmed and fished comfort food. A full bar is served and a kids’ selection is available. Open for dinner daily.

WOK N’ ROLL 3791 Palm Valley Rd., Ste. 203, 543-7666 This spot in the valley serves authentic Chinese cuisine made with fresh ingredients. Take-out and delivery are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

WOODY’S BAR-B-Q 226 Solana Rd., Ste. 1, 280-1110 See Mandarin. ZOËS KITCHEN 240 A1A, Ste. 5, Merchant’s Plaza, 273-1100 Original recipes, with Greek and Mediterranean influences, include homemade, made-to-order sandwiches, grilled feta sandwiches and whole dinners, all available to go. Desserts include homemade ya-yas (a chocolate sheet cake), and a kids’ menu is available. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

RIVERSIDE, FIVE POINTS, WESTSIDE & MURRAY HILL ALPHADOG GRILL 2782 Park St., 374-8715 This new fun place features gourmet hot dogs — like Ragin’

BAKERY MODERNE 869 Stockton St., Ste. 6, Riverside, 389-7117 This neighborhood bakery specializes in classic pastries, artisanal breads and seasonal favorites. Everything’s made form scratch, including the popular petit fours and custom cakes. Open for breakfast and lunch daily.

BOLD BEAN COFFEE ROASTERS 869 Stockton St., Stes. 1 & 2, Riverside, 855-1181 This new spot offers artisan-crafted, small-batch roasted specialty coffees from Bold Bean’s certified organic roastery and brew bar, including honey and curry lattes, local pastries and craft beers. Beer and wine are served. Open daily.

BONO’S PIT BAR-B-Q 5229 Jammes Rd., Westside, 772-0050 705 S. Lane Ave., Westside, 783-1404

Advertising pro

See Arlington.

BUFFALO’S SOUTHWESTERN CAFÉ 6055 Youngerman Cir., Westside, 778-1101

this is a copyright protected pro

Southwestern-American cuisine is Buffalo’s niche, from wings and fajitas to sirloin steak and wraps. A full bar with a daily happy hour is offered. Dine indoors or out on the patio, where there’s a smoker-friendly patio bar. Open for lunch and dinner daily. Kids eat free on Sun.

For questions, please call your advertising representative at 260-9770. rUn dAte: 032012 FAX YOUR PROOF IF POSSIBLE AT 268-3655

promise CARMINE’S PIE HOUSE 2677 Forbes St., Riverside, 387-1400

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This brand-new Italian eatery serves pizza by the slice, gourmet pizzas and classic Italian dishes — calzone, stromboli, subs, panini — in a comfy atmosphere. Beer (craft and microbrews) and wine, take-out and delivery and a kids’ menu are available.

COOL MOOSE CAFE & BISTRO 2708 Park St., Riverside, 381-4242 Located at Park and King streets, this New England-style café offers a full breakfast menu, classic sandwiches, wraps and soups, and brunch all day Sunday. Beer and an extensive gourmet coffee menu are available. Open Tue.-Sun.

COZY TEA 1029 Park St., Five Points, 329-3964 This quaint, cozy tearoom is full of English charm. Lunch and afternoon tea features scones, soups and a variety of teas. Open Mon.-Sat.

© 2012

Nero’s Café on University Boulevard in Arlington has been serving traditional Italian-style food for 28 years, including seafood pasta dishes and New York-style pizzas.

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CRAZY EGG 954 Edgewood Ave. S., Murray Hill, 524-8711

GATORS DOCKSIDE 6677 103rd St., Westside, 777-6135

The menu offers a variety of breakfast items served till 3 p.m.; lunch includes burgers and sandwiches and dinner features steaks, prime rib, pork chops and shrimp & grits. An all-you-can-eat sideboard is featured during the week. Crazy Egg uses ingredients that are fresh, locally available and organic (when possible). Beer and wine are served. Dine in or take out. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner Wed.-Fri.; breakfast and lunch Sat.-Tue.

See Orange Park.

CROSS CREEK 850 S. Lane Ave., Westside, 783-9579 See Springfield. DICK’S WINGS 5972 San Juan Ave., Westside, 693-9258 See Beaches.

DOMO CREPES ETC. 813 Lomax St., Riverside, 619-2540 This new place is just east of the 5 Points roundabout, and offers cappuccino, crepes, soups and flatbreads, served fresh and fast. Beer and wine are served. Take-out is available. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

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EDGEWOOD BAKERY 1012 S. Edgewood Ave., Murray Hill, 389-8054

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Grassroots Markets juice bar uses certified organic fruits and vegetables. The store also offers three dozen artisanal cheeses, more than 300 craft and imported beers and 50 organic wines, and organic produce and meats, vitamins and herbs. Organic wraps, sides, sandwiches and salads are all available to go, as well as raw, vegan items. Open daily.

HOVAN MEDITERRANEAN GOURMET 2005 Park St., Ste. 1, Five Points, 381-9394 Hovan offers traditional Mediterranean cuisine, including freshly made hummus, baba ghannoush and gyros, served in a setting that attracts indie rockers and businesspeople alike. Patio dining offered. Beer and wine are served and hookahs are available. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Closed Sun.

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS 5907 Roosevelt Blvd., Ste. 700, 573-8838 See Fleming Island.

JOHNNY’S DELI 474 Riverside Ave., Riverside, 356-8055

fresh breakfast pastries, petit fours and pies. The line is long on Saturday mornings, but the wait pays off. An espresso and pastry café serves sandwiches, smoothies and soups. Open for breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat.

Johnny’s experienced staff cooks up made-to-order lunch fare, including grilled wraps, gyros and grilled chicken salad — more than 60 menu items are available for takeout only. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri.

EL MOFONGO DOMINICAN-CUBAN BAKERY

KICKBACKS GASTROPUB 910 King St., Riverside, 388-9551

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GRASSROOTS NATURAL MARKET 2007 Park St., Riverside, 384-4474

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6011 103rd St., Ste. 11, 777-4933 Mofongo is a traditional dish, and this restaurant focuses on authentic cuisine from Cuba and Dominican Republic, including breakfast items, pork and beef entrées and sandwiches made with sauces, spices and ingredients so authentic you’ll check your passport. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

This neighborhood hot spot serves breakfast, lunch and dinner 20 hours a day, with a full bar that has more than 655 bottled beers and another 84 on tap. There’s live music Thur. and Sun., and flat screen TVs dot the interior. Happy hour is held Mon.-Fri. A kids’ menu is offered and outdoor seating is available. Open daily. A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Bar Food.

EUROPEAN STREET CAFÉ 2753 Park St., Riverside, 384-9999 See San Marco.

KITCHEN KETTLE DELI 4251 Lenox Ave., Ste. 7, Westside, 387-8400

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FIREHOUSE SUBS 6331 Roosevelt Blvd., Ste. 6, Westside, 854-0057 6352 103rd St., Ste. 5, Westside, 854-0224 1855 Cassat Ave., Westside, 695-1055 6752 Normandy Blvd., Ste. 3, Westside, 338-9000 1014 Margaret St., Ste. 5, Riverside, 791-9787 See Mandarin.

FIVE GUYS FAMOUS BURGERS & FRIES 1620 Margaret St., Ste. 105, Riverside, 425-3380

Relocated and sporting Western-themed décor, Kitchen Kettle Deli is a small, family-owned business serving homemade favorites. Chef Kim Wright serves daily specials including chicken, burgers and potato salad. Take-out is available. Open Mon.-Fri. for breakfast and lunch.

LARRY’S GIANT SUBS 5733 Roosevelt Blvd., Westside, 446-9500 8102 Blanding Blvd., Westside, 779-1933 1509 Margaret St., Riverside, 674-2794 7859 Normandy Blvd., 781-7600 See Southside.

See St. Johns Town Center.

44 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

Located in historic downtown Fernandina Beach, Tasty’s Fresh Burgers & Fries offers a fresh alternative to fast food, with fresh meat burgers, hand-cut fries, and hand-spun shakes.


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Buddha Thai Bistro in Jax Beach specializes in authentic Thai cuisine made from fresh ingredients and traditional recipes. LATIN LOUNGE & RESTAURANT 5584 Timuquana Rd., 771-3838

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PERARD’S PIZZA & ITALIAN CUISINE FAX YOUR PROOF 11043 Crystal Springs Rd., Ste. 2, Westside, 378-8131

This Puerto Rican restaurant serves appetizers, salads, sandwiches and entrées so authentic, you’ll think you’re in San Juan. But it’s the Westside — increasingly the best side when it comes to traditional Latin flavors. A kids’ menu is available. Open for lunch and dinner Thur., Fri. and Sat.

Family-owned Perard’s specializes in homemade sauces, promise of benefit dough, lasagna and desserts. Traditional Italian fare includes a large selection of gourmet pizza toppings. A kids’ menu is offered, and beer and wine are served. Take-out is available. Open daily.

LITTLE JOE’S CAFÉ 245 Riverside Ave., Ste. 195, 791-3336

PERFECT RACK BILLIARDS 1186 Edgewood Ave. S., Murray Hill, 738-7645

This bright, riverview café inside the St. Joe Building serves breakfast and lunch in a casual atmosphere. Fresh soups, salads and signature salad dressings round out the New York-style deli experience. Open Mon.-Fri.

This family-friendly billiards hall offers burgers and chicken wings. Free pool is available for kids younger than 14 (with parents) on weekends. Eight O’Hausen billiards tables are featured. Beer and wine are served. Happy hour’s held Mon.Fri. Open Mon.-Sat.; lunch is served on Thur. and Fri.

MOCHI FROZEN YOGURT 1661 Riverside Ave., Ste. 128, 900-1955 See St. Johns Town Center.

MONROE’S SMOKEHOUSE BBQ 4838 Highway Ave., 389-5551 Monroe’s smoked meats include wings, pulled pork, brisket, turkey and ribs. Homestyle sides include green beans, baked beans, red cole slaw and collards. Beer and wine are served and a kids’ menu is available. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. (Check out Monroe’s on-the-go food truck on Facebook and Twitter.)

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POTTER’S HOUSE SOUL FOOD 5310 Lenox Ave., Westside, 394-0860

THE MOSSFIRE GRILL 1537 Margaret St., Riverside, 355-4434

PRIMI PIATTI 2722 Park St., Riverside, 389-5545

Just a stone’s throw from the Five Points intersection, Mossfire manages to satisfy indie kids and conservative businessfolk alike. Southwestern dishes like fresh fish tacos and chicken enchiladas are popular, and a children’s menu is available. A full bar is served, and happy hour runs Mon.Sat. in the upstairs lounge. Open for lunch and dinner daily; Sunday is happy hour all day.

This Northern Italian-style restaurant (the name means “first plate” in Italian) offers a menu made from fresh ingredients, which includes daily specials, pastas and she-crab soup. A broad wine selection and beer are served. A children’s menu is available. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri. and dinner Tue.-Sat.

O’BROTHERS IRISH PUB 1521 Margaret St., Riverside, 854-9300

This restaurant located off Blanding Boulevard offers authentic Latin cuisine served in a relaxed atmosphere. Specialties include roast pork, chuletas and pollo guisado. Beer and wine are served, and a kids’ menu is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

© 2012

PUERTO PLATA RESTAURANT 2045 Blanding Blvd., Westside, 388-5888

ST. JOHNS SEAFOOD & STEAKS 1161 S. Lane Ave., Murray Hill, 378-5050 See Arlington.

PELE’S WOOD FIRE 2665 Park St., Riverside, 955-1278 In historic Riverside, Chef Micah Windham utilizes the power of a wood-fired oven to create traditional, authentic Italian fare with a modern twist. A full bar is served and take-out is available. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

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This relaxed, family-owned restaurant serves only homestyle cuisine. Local faves include spinach pizza and chickenspinach calzones. Ravioli, lasagna and parmigiana are also offered. Dine in or take out. Beer and wine are served, and all locations offer outside dining. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

See Amelia Island.

The restaurant features traditional Irish fare like shepherd’s pie with Stilton crust, Guinness mac-n-cheese and, of course, fish-n-chips. A full bar — with plenty of beers and ales — is served. Outdoor patio dining, a kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open for lunch Tue.Sun., for dinner nightly.

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PIZZA PALACE 920 Margaret St., Five Points, 598-1212

Owned by the Potter’s House Christian Fellowship, this cafeteria style restaurant serves traditional Southern food: Fried chicken, greens, mac’n’cheese, cornbread and other regional favorites. Open Tue.-Sun.

MOON RIVER PIZZA 1176 Edgewood Ave. S., Murray Hill, 389-4442

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SAKE HOUSE 824 Lomax St., 301-1188 Located in Riverside on the corner of Lomax and Margaret streets, Sake House serves traditional Japanese cuisine and a wide variety of fresh sushi, sashimi, kiatsu, teriyaki and

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hibachi in an authentic Asian atmosphere. Beer, wine and sake are available. Open for lunch and dinner. A bonafide tatami room, with outside seating, is open.

THE SHEIK SANDWICH DELI 7361 103rd St., Westside, 778-4805 5172 Normandy Blvd., Westside, 786-7641 See Arlington.

SMOOTHIE KING 1661 Riverside Ave., Riverside, 354-5145 See Beaches.

SONNY’S REAL PIT BAR-B-Q 1923 S. Lane Ave., 786-0081 4434 Blanding Blvd., 777-0730 For more than 30 years, Sonny’s has been a Northeast Florida favorite. The beef, pork, chicken and ribs are cooked in a wood-fired pit, and sides include Vidalia onion rings, corn nuggets, potato salad, barbecue beans and coleslaw. All-you-can-eat specials daily. Take-out is available. Beer is served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

SUMO SUSHI 2726 Park St., Riverside, 388-8838

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This comfy restaurant offers a wide array of authentic Japanese dishes, from traditional to new styles of entrees and sushi rolls, including spicy sashimi salad, gyoza (pork dumplings), tobiko (flying fish roe) and Rainbow roll (tuna, salmon, yellowtail and California roll) artfully presented. wine and cold sake are served and a children’s menu 081010 RUNBeer, DATE: is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

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AUTHENTIC NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA

SUSHI CAFÉ jw2025Checked by Riverside, Sales384-2888 Rep rm Riverside Ave., Sushi Café near Five Points features a variety of sushi, including the popular Monster Roll and the Jimmy Smith Roll, along with faves like Rock-n-Roll and Dynamite Roll. Sushi Café also offers hibachi, tempura, katsu and teriyaki. Beer and wine are served. Dine indoors or on the patio. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

TASTI D-LITE 1024 Park St., 900-3040 A four-ounce serving of this creamy dairy dessert can weigh in at fewer than 70 calories. It’s offered in a gazillion flavors, served up in cones, cups, shakes and smoothies. Open daily.

TOM & BETTY’S 4409 Roosevelt Blvd., Westside, 387-3311 After 30-plus years in business, Tom & Betty’s is a Jacksonville institution. The car-themed menu features big sandwiches, burgers and homestyle favorites like pot roast. The full bar offers a daily happy hour featuring dollar drafts. Live bands perform every Fri. and Karaoke is held every Sat. Open for dinner Tue.-Sat.

TWO DOORS DOWN 436 Park St., Riverside, 598-0032

Pizza By The Slice • Whole Pizzas Calzones • Strombolis • Dinners Salads • Subs • Desserts

This restaurant is a reincarnation of Tad’s (which was located at 400 Park … um … two doors down). It’s a warm, inviting place offering traditional favorites like hotcakes, omelets, burgers, sandwiches, pork chops, liver and onions and Southern fried chicken, as well as sides and desserts. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Fri.

WASABI BUFFET 1014 Margaret St., Ste. 1, Five Points, 301-1199

Dine in or take out • lunch or dinner

288-9211 11406-3 San Jose Blvd. • At Mandarin Oaks 1 mile south of I-295

Dine in or take out • lunch or dinner

880-0020

13820 St. Augustine Rd. out At Bartram Park Have a pizza party and taste why we are Jacksonville’s favorite pizza! 46 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

More than 150 fresh items, including sushi and sashimi, are available daily on the buffet, and a dessert buffet is also served. Beer and wine are served and take-out is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

WHITEWAY DELICATESSEN 1237 King St., Riverside, 389-0355 This King Street mainstay has moved down the street a few blocks, but it’s retained its extensive sandwich selection, including some items you’d be hard-pressed to find anywhere else. Also a good spot to catch current and former politicos talking about the city’s future over tabouli or ham sandwiches. Open for breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri.

ZOËS KITCHEN 1661 Margaret St., Riverside, 355-9637 See Ponte Vedra.

Poe’s Tavern on Atlantic Boulevard in Atlantic Beach is an American gastropub offering 50-plus beers and a menu of gourmet hamburgers, fish tacos and hand-cut French fries.

ST. AUGUSTINE & ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH

(All venues are in St. Augustine unless otherwise noted.) A1A ALE WORKS 1 King St., 829-2977 This two-story brew pub, overlooking the newly restored Bridge of Lions, makes six varieties of beer and serves New World cuisine, indoors or out on the balcony. There’s a full-service bar and live entertainment Thur., Fri. and Sat. evenings. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

A1A BURRITO WORKS TACO SHOP 671 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 217-7451 114 St. George St., 823-1229 Baja-style tacos and burritos have colonized the Ancient City, much to the delight of denizens. This biz offers 100 percent vegetarian bean burritos, fish tacos and hormone-free meats, along with dynamite homemade guacamole.

© 2005 folioweekly

ACAPULCO MEXICAN RESTAURANT 12 Avenida Menendez, 808-9933 This sprawling Mexican restaurant overlooks Castillo de San Marcos and serves all of the favorites as well as weekly specials. Beer, including Mexican brands, wine and margaritas are served from the full bar. Dine in or take out. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

AMICI 1915B A1A S., St. Augustine Beach, 461-0102 This family-owned-and-operated Italian restaurant, located at the busy intersection of S.R. 312 and A1A, offers a variety of traditional pasta, veal, steak and seafood dishes. A full bar is served along with a daily happy hour, and a kids menu is available. Live jazz is presented on Thur. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

ANN O’MALLEY’S DELI & PUB 23 Orange St., 825-4040 Located across from the Old City Gates, Ann O’Malley’s serves a casual menu of soups, salads and sandwiches — favorites include the Reuben and the chicken salad — with familiar, friendly service. Dine indoors or out on the porch. Beer and wine are served, with Irish beers on tap. Open mic is every Tue. and there’s live music on weekends. Open daily.

ATHENA RESTAURANT 14 Cathedral Place, 823-9076 Located on the city’s historic downtown Plaza, Athena has an extensive menu of Greek and American dishes, including moussaka, lamb kabobs and spinach pie. Beer and wine are served. Dine inside at a booth or table, or order to go. Open daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

AUNT KATE’S 612 Euclid Ave., Vilano Beach, 829-1105 This casual spot features an expansive view of the Tolomato River and a menu with a focus on seafood, from oysters Rockefeller to maple-rubbed salmon. There’s also burgers, wraps, pasta dishes, steak, ribs and a kids’ menu. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

AVILÉS RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 32 Avenida Menendez, 829-9727 Located inside the Hilton Bayfront Hotel, Avilés offers progressive global cuisine. Popular dishes include marinated filet mignon with whipped crab potato, crispy onions and baby spinach. A children’s menu is available, a full bar is served, and complimentary valet service is featured. Open daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

BACK 40 URBAN CAFÉ 40 S. Dixie Hwy., 824-0227 Owner Jeff Sapp serves lunch and dinner items — wraps, upside-down chicken potpie, shrimp Thai bowl. Beer and wine are served. A kids’ menu and Wifi are available, and local art adorns the walls. Open Mon.-Sat.

BARLEY REPUBLIC IRISH PUBLIC HOUSE 48 Spanish St., 547-2023 This new Irish bar and pub in historic downtown St. Augustine offers traditional burgers and sandwiches as well as Irish favorites like shepherd’s pie and bangers and mash. Wine and more than 50 beers are served. Live music on weekends. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

BARNACLE BILL’S DOWNTOWN 14 Castillo Dr., 824-3663 For 30 years, this family restaurant has been serving up seafood, oysters, gator tail, steak, along with the very popular fried shrimp. Some dishes are infused with their Dat’l Do It hot sauce products. A kids’ menu and take-out are available; a full bar is served. Open for dinner nightly.

BEACHCOMBER RESTAURANT 2 A St., St. Augustine Beach, 471-3744 One of the few spots in St. Augustine where you actually eat on the beach, this casual restaurant serves a full breakfast menu (with huge pancakes) inside or out at the picnic tables. There are fresh local oysters, seafood and Beachcomber’s award winning chowder. Beer and wine are served. Open daily for lunch and dinner, for breakfast every morning except Tuesday.

BEACH GARDEN RESTAURANT 860 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 471-2555 Located inside the Holiday Inn, this tropical restaurant serves fresh seafood, steaks and sandwiches. A children’s menu is available. A full breakfast is served, and a breakfast buffet is featured during the week. Open nightly for dinner.


BENITO’S RISTORANTE ITALIANO 180 Vilano Rd., Vilano Beach, 827-1000 For more than 30 years, Benito’s been serving stone-ovenbaked pizza, pastas, seafood and other Italian favorites — heck, Benito himself grew up in Avellino, Italy. Specialty pizzas include stuffed spinach, eggplant and seafood. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun.

BISTRO DE LEON 12 Cathedral Place, 810-2100 Jean-Stephane Poinard is a fifth-generation French chef who creates dishes with fresh American produce, herbs and seafood. The bread is baked on the premises. Beer and wine are served, and a children’s menu is available. Open daily except Wed.; dinner only on Mon. and Tue.; breakfast on Sat. and Sun.

THE BLACK MOLLY BAR & GRILL 504 Geoffrey St., Cobblestone Plaza, St. Augustine Black Molly Grill serves fresh, local seafood, steaks cut from the loin, and unique pasta dishes for lunch and dinner daily, in a casual atmosphere. A kids’ menu is available. A full bar is served and happy hour never ends.

BONO’S PIT BAR-B-Q 2420 U.S. 1 S., 794-9424 See Arlington. BORRILLO’S PIZZA & SUBS 88 San Marco Ave., 829-1133 John Zappas’ New York-style restaurant serves an assortment of hot and cold subs, pasta dishes, pizzas by the pie or slice. Take-out is available, and beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

THE BRITISH PUB 213 Anastasia Blvd., 810-5111 This traditional British pub offers darts and serves ale, beer and wine, as well as traditional meat pies, Cornish pasties and sausage rolls. Varieties of authentic British food and candies are sold at the shop within. Open nightly.

THE BUNNERY BAKERY & CAFÉ 121 St. George St., 829-6166 Located in the heart of St. Augustine’s historic district, the Bunnery offers homemade cakes, cheesecakes and pastries in addition to serving up full Southern breakfasts, sandwiches, and espressos. Take-out is available. Open for breakfast and lunch daily.

CAFÉ ATLANTICO 647 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 471-7332 This white-tablecloth restaurant serves traditional and new Italian dishes in an intimate space. Master Chef Paolo Pece, from Naples, Italy, prepares risotto alla pescatora, with shrimp, scallops and seasonal shellfish served in a parmesan cheese basket. An extensive wine list and beer are offered. Open for dinner nightly.

specials. Located in the heart of the historic district, Casa Maya offers a hearty selection of dishes, both vegetarian and meat. Beer and wine are available. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner Wed.-Sun.

CELLAR 6 ART GALLERY & WINE BAR 6 Aviles St., 827-9055 A moody, inviting space, Cellar 6 serves an international array of fine wines, Wolfgang Puck coffees, handmade desserts and light bistro-style fare amid local art. Open Mon.-Sat.

CONCH HOUSE RESTAURANT 57 Comares Ave., 829-8646 This restaurant offers indoor seating as well as Tiki huts built out over Salt Run. Signature dishes include the Cracker combo platter and St. Augustine fried shrimp. The fullservice bar specializes in tropical drinks. A children’s menu is available. Live entertainment, including Reggae Sunday, is featured weekends. Open daily.

CREEKSIDE DINERY 160 Nix Boatyard Rd., 829-6113 Tucked behind a commercial stretch of U.S. 1, Creekside is an old Florida respite, featuring an outdoor deck with a fire pit. Overlooking Gonzales Creek, Creekside serves a variety of beef, chicken and seafood dishes, with an emphasis on low-country cooking. Live entertainment Wed.-Sun. and a full bar are featured. Open for dinner nightly.

CRUISERS GRILL 3 St. George St., 824-6993 See Beaches. THE BISTRO at CULINARY OUTFITTERS 9 S. Dixie Hwy., 829-2727 The Bistro is where locals lunch on crab cakes, chicken burritos, hamburgers, wraps, salads and soups, each dish made with fresh ingredients. Beer and wine are served and take-out is available. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri.

DONOVAN’S IRISH PUB 7440 U.S. 1 N., Ste. 108, Palencia, 829-0000 Donovan’s features a mix of classic Irish entrées and traditional American dinners, as well as appetizers and “pub grub.” Irish beers and whiskeys are served along with a full bar. A children’s menu is available. Six HDTVs and Wii are available. Open daily.

THE DUNES CRACKER HOUSE 641 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 461-5725 This rustic Florida-style spot is popular among college students for drinks, dinner, dancing and daily specials. Jazz is featured on Monday nights, and there’s a DJ Wed. and Fri.-Sun. Late-night dance music is featured nightly. Open for dinner nightly.

EL POTRO 226 San Marco Ave., 819-0390 See Southside. FA CAFÉ 303 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 471-2006 Short for “First Access,” this beachy café is located north of the County Pier, directly across from the first beach access to St. Augustine Beach. The tiny kitchen cranks out great daily specials — the jerk fish and mango wrap is not to be missed — and the service is super-friendly. Open Tue.-Sun. for lunch and dinner.

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FIVE GUYS FAMOUS BURGERS & FRIES 200 Cobblestone Dr., Ste. 102, 342-4194 See St. PROMISE Johns Town Center. OF

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Tucked away on historic Charlotte Street, Denoel has been around for some 40 years, serving fresh-baked baguettes, cream puffs, cheesecakes and sandwiches. Open Wed.-Sun.

FLORIDA CRACKER CAFÉ 81 St. George St., 829-0397

DICK’S WINGS 525 S.R. 16, Ste. 101, 825-4540 4010 U.S. 1 S., 547-2669 See Beaches.

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FLAVORS EATERY 125-C King St., 824-4221

DENOEL FRENCH PASTRY SHOP 212 Charlotte St., 829-3974

The lunch counter inside this health food store serves everything made-to-order using organic ingredients. Sandwiches include avocado, peanut butter with honey, falafel, hummus, tofu salad and a veggie burger. Smoothies and fresh juices are also available. Open for lunch Mon.-Sat.

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200 Cobblestone Dr., Ste. 106, 819-1808 For questions, please call your advertising representative at 260-9770. RUN DAT See Mandarin. FAX YOUR PROOF IF POSSIBLE AT 268-3655

A favorite among college students and locals, this casual restaurant serves quesadillas, pizza, smoothies, and beer and wine. Local musicians play Thur.-Sat. Indoor and outdoor seating. Open Mon.-Sat.

DIANE’S NEW DAWN MARKET 110 Anastasia Blvd., 824-1337

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Florida Cracker features a contemporary dining room and outdoor garden dining in the heart of St. Augustine’s busy St. George Street. Customer favorites include blackened scallops, crab cake-stuffed shrimp and Florida gator tail. Children’s selections are available, and beer and wine are served. Open daily.

THE FLORIDIAN 39 Cordova St., 829-0655 A restaurant that pays homage to Old Florida, The Floridian serves innovative Southern fare, made with local ingredients from area farms. Signature items include fried green tomato bruschetta, the blackened fish cornbread stack and the

CAFÉ ELEVEN 501 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 460-9311 Back under its original ownership, this former convenience store serves coffee drinks, vegetarian meals and meaty Southern comfort dishes. At night, it features some of the best bands in indie rock. Just a block from the beach, Café Eleven serves breakfast (brunch on weekends), lunch daily, and beer and wine.

CAP’S ON THE WATER 4325 Myrtle St., Vilano Beach, 824-8794 This Intracoastal restaurant is a Vilano Beach mainstay, serving cold beer, an award-winning wine list, a full bar and coastal cuisine indoors or the large, oak-shaded deck. Kids romp along the water while grownups enjoy a long meal (tapas platters, cioppino, fresh local shrimp, raw oyster bar) or a stunning sunset. Boat access is available. Open for lunch Fri.-Sun., for dinner nightly.

CARMELO’S MARKETPLACE & PIZZERIA 146 King St., 494-6658 A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Pizza in St. Aug, this pizzeria is located adjacent to a gas station, and has become a favorite destination for locals. In addition to New York-style brick-oven-baked pizza, Carmelo’s offers fresh baked sub rolls, Boars Head meats and cheeses, strombolis and Wifi. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

CASA MAYA 17 Hypolita St., 217-3039 Owner Marco Barrera serves authentic upscale Mayan cuisine that is mostly organic, including a juice bar and daily

Family-owned and family-friendly, The Red Elephant Pizza and Grill in Mandarin serves specialty pizzas, grill specials and pasta dishes in a bright, folk art-influenced environment. March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 47


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FLY BY CAFÉ 4900 U.S. 1 N., 824-3494 Located at St. Johns County airport, Fly By features signature soups, specialty burgers and chicken sandwiches. A kids’ menu, and beer and wine are available. Open daily.

FRATELLI’S ITALIAN-AMERICAN CUISINE 415 Anastasia Blvd., Anastasia Island, 819-1760 Fratelli’s, an Italian restaurant with a cozy atmosphere, offers Italian-American specialties, including meat lasagna, veal parmigiana almond-crusted salmon and chicken Verona. Beer and wine are served. Open for dinner nightly.

FUSION POINT 237 San Marco Ave., 823-1444 The theme is Japanese, but the menu is fusion — a blend of Far East favorites, vegetarian, Japanese, Vietnamese, Chinese, Korean and Thai. The menu in this indie-mod restaurant includes sushi and is constantly changing. Fusion Point serves beer and wine. Open daily.

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GAS FULL SERVICE RESTAURANT 9 Anastasia Blvd., Ste. C, Anastasia Island, 217-0326

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This low-slung building has lured regulars and locals for more than six decades. Part of Jack’s appeal is the oldfashioned pit barbecue, but the place has been updated with a Tiki bar, a large wooden deck, a new band performance space, and even a small swimming pool. Lunch and dinner are served daily. Live entertainment is featured Fri., Sat. and Sun.

KINGFISH GRILL 252 Yacht Club Dr., 824-2111 Located at the west end of the Vilano Bridge, Kingfish Grill offers casual waterside dining indoors and out on the deck. The menu features fresh daily catch, house specialties and sushi, and a kids’ menu is available. A full bar is served, and weekly live entertainment is featured. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

traditional burgers are served, along with seafood and steaks, as well as seasonal, daily specials and madefrom-scratch desserts. Beer and wine are available. A kids’ selection is available. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat.

Owner Ann Dyke and her staff serve British draught beers and cider in 20-ounce Imperial pints — as well as a full bar — in an authentic pub setting. A repeat Best of Jax winner for Best Neighborhood Bar, King’s Head serves Cornish pasties, and fish and chips. Open for lunch and dinner Wed.-Sun. A kids’ menu is available. Located north of the St. Augustine airport on U.S. 1. Look for the red double-decker bus out front.

GEORGIE’S DINER

100 Malaga Sales RepSt.,re819-9006

Georgie’s serves up homestyle fare including Greek specialties from owner George Chryssaidis, who also owns the nearby Athena Restaurant. Georgie’s is open daily. Outdoor seating available.

© 2011 FolioWeekly THE GROOVE CAFE 134 Sea Grove Main St., St. Augustine Beach, 547-2740 This new spot has a modern coastal atmosphere and an extensive menu, featuring steaks, fresh local seafood and a Sunday brunch. A full bar is served. Dine indoors or out on the tropical patio. And a kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open Tue.-Sun. for lunch and dinner.

GYPSY CAB COMPANY 828 Anastasia Blvd., Anastasia Island, 824-8244 A St. Augustine mainstay for a quarter-century, Gypsy’s menu changes daily. The signature dish is the Gypsy chicken, but the varied offering includes seafood, tofu, duck and veal dishes. The Sunday brunch draws everyone from churchgoers to bikers, and a full bar is offered. A 2011 repeat Best of Jax winner for Best Restaurant in St. Augustine.

HABANA VILLAGE CAFÉ 1 King St., 827-1700 Homestyle Cuban and American cuisine, featuring homemade sangria, authentic Cuban bread and roast pork. Habana Village is St. Augustine’s only dinner club with Latin music Thur.-Sun. A kids’ menu is available. Reservations are recommended. A full bar is served. Open daily.

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HARRY’S SEAFOOD BAR & GRILLE 46 Avenida Menendez, 824-7765 Located in a historic house with a large outside patio, this New Orleans-style eatery features fresh seafood, steaks and definitive dishes like jambalaya, etouffée and popular shrimp. The full-service bar has a daily happy hour. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

HAZEL’S HOT DOGS 2400 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd., 824-8484 Named for a Chihuahua belonging to the owners, Hazel’s offers a variety of wieners and all the embellishments from its modest digs west of downtown. Open daily.

HOT SHOT BAKERY & CAFE 8 Granada St., 824-7898 Hot Shot offers freshly baked items, coffees and handcrafted breakfast and lunch sandwiches as well as Datil B. Good hot sauces and pepper products. Open for breakfast and lunch daily.

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS 4255 S. A1A, St. Augustine Beach, 471-7120 See Fleming Island.

48 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

JACK’S BBQ 691 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 460-8100

KING’S HEAD BRITISH PUB 6460 U.S. 1 N., 823-9787

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Located at Oyster Creek Marina east of U.S. 1, Hurricane Patty’s has a large creekfront deck, lunch specials and allyou-can-eat dinners. A full bar is featured, and dock space is available for boaters. Live music is presented nightly.

The menu is ever-changing, and all items are fresh, local

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HURRICANE PATTY’S AT OYSTER CREEK 69 Lewis Blvd., 827-1822

LA COCINA INTERNATIONAL 530 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 461-8288 Located in Castillo Real Hotel, La Cocina serves global cuisine with Latin flair. Owner Juan Solano creates international specialties including paella Valenciana and nightly specials. Beer and wine are served. Open daily.

LA COCINA MEXICAN RESTAURANT 3290 U.S. 1 S., 794-1610 Sister restaurant to the La Cocina at the beach, this La Cocina offers gourmet Mexican cuisine in a fine-dining atmosphere. Beer and wine are served. Patio dining available. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

LA COLLAGE 60 Hypolita St., 829-0055 Locate in an intimate space on historic Hypolita Street, Collage offers high-end dining with a global menu. Everything is made from scratch. A specialty dessert, The Bougainvillea, commemorates the Brazilian tree. An extensive and economical wine list is offered, as is beer. Open for dinner nightly.

LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT 155 Hampton Point Dr., 230-7879 See San Marco. LARRY’S GIANT SUBS 3501-A N. Ponce de Leon Blvd., 808-0658 See Southside.

LE PAVILLON 45 San Marco Ave., 824-6202 One of the oldest restaurants in Northeast Florida, Le Pavillon is family-owned and operated. Gisele Sinatsch recommends the rack of lamb and the bouillabaisse. Norwegian salmon is popular, as are the duck and the Dover sole. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

LULI’S CUPCAKES 35 San Marco Ave., Ste. 2, 824-5280 The cupcakes, baked fresh daily, include Grandma’s Coconut, Fire Engine Red Velvet, What’s Up Doc (carrot cake) and Funky Monkey, banana and chocolate chip cake with milk chocolate frosting. Mini-cupcakes are also available. Open Mon.-Sat.

LUVBERRY CAFE 32 St. George St., 217-4206 Fresh, locally roasted Bold Bean brand coffees are served here, along with organic and fair-trade coffees and espresso, fat-free frozen yogurt, and 16 Blue Bell ice cream flavors. A kids’ selection and take out are available. Open daily.


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This is a copyright protected pro The Thirsty Iguana on Beach Boulevard on the Southside serves big margaritas, along with authentic For questions, Mexican classics like tacos, burritos, enchiladas, fajitas and quesadillas.

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MADRE’S BAJA TACOS 8 Aviles St., 823-1371

or dine outside on picnic tables. Open daily.

This restaurant, tucked away on Aviles Street in the historic district, offers classic Baja-style fish and pork tacos, as well as burritos and quesadillas. Beer and wine are served, and a kids’ menu is available. Live music is presented Thur.-Sat. Open for lunch Tue.-Sun.; for lunch and dinner Thur.-Sun.

95 CORDOVA 95 Cordova St., 810-6810

MANATEE CAFÉ 525 S.R. 16, Ste. 106, Westgate Plaza, 826-0210 Manatee Café serves organic, vegetarian meals. Owner/chef Cheryl Crosley prepares veggie omelets, tofu Reubens, miso and hummus and tabouli. The Health Food Market offers the same ingredients used in the cafe’s dishes. Open daily for breakfast and lunch.

MANGO MANGO’S BEACHSIDE BAR & GRILL 700 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 461-1077 Just steps from the A Street beach access, this Caribbean kitchen offers comfort food with a tropical twist. Specialties include coconut shrimp and fried plantains. Beer and wine are served. Outdoor seating and a kids’ menu are available. Open daily.

THE MILL TOP TAVERN & LISTENING ROOM 19 1/2 St. George St., 829-2329 A St. Augustine institution located across from the Castillo de San Marcos at the north end of St. George Street, The Mill Top’s features live music nightly. The St. Auggie Spread is the signature dish, but the menu includes homemade soups and sandwiches along with daily specials. Full bar, with service indoors or under the trees on the two-story porch. Open for lunch and dinner daily — 365 days a year.

MOJO’S TACOS 551 Anastasia Blvd., Anastasia Island, 829-1665 This family-owned spot offers double-decker style tacos, big, tasty burritos and fresh salads. Beer and wine are served and take-out is available. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

MURRAY BROS. CADDYSHACK 455 S. Legacy Trail, Ste. E106, World Golf Village, 940-3673 Decorated in a “Caddyshack” theme with actor Bill Murray’s golf and family memorabilia, this restaurant offers fresh seafood, steaks and barbecue. And keep an eye out for Bill, who’s been known to stop by for a cold one. A full bar’s served, and there’s a weekday happy hour. Open daily.

NALU’S TROPICAL TAKE-OUT 1020 Anastasia Blvd. (in Surf Station parking lot), Anastasia Island, 501-9592 Locals love this funky taco stand, which serves fresh islandstyle beef, chicken, fish and vegetarian tacos and burritos, right at the entrance to Anastasia State Park. Pick up to-go

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Located in the restored Casa Monica Hotel, this restaurant exudes elegance. The cuisine is a blend of Moroccan, Asian, Mediterranean, Caribbean and European influences. The adjacent Cobalt Lounge features a full bar and a variety of fine wines. Open daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner; Sun. brunch.

NED’S SOUTHSIDE KITCHEN 2450 U.S. 1 S., 794-2088 Opened by Gypsy Cab Co. founder Ned Pollock, this casual island-influenced restaurant features Mediterranean dishes, four kinds of tacos, and shrimp and grits, in addition to a kids’ menu and vegetarian options. Beer and wine are served, and there’s a drive-thru to pick up orders. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

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NEW YORK PIZZA COMPANY 163 Palencia Village Dr., 825-4545 All of the authentic New York-style pizzas are hand-tossed, made with their own dough and specially spiced tomato sauce, and baked in a stone oven. Other menu items include salads, cheesy calzones, pasta dishes, hot hero sandwiches and desserts.

OASIS RESTAURANT & DECK 4000 A1A and Ocean Trace Rd., St. Augustine Beach, 471-3424 Just one block from the ocean, The Oasis is a favorite among bikers and tourists. The menu includes burgers and daily specials. A kids’ menu is available. The full bar has 24 draft beers, and a happy hour Mon.-Fri. There’s live music nightly and 43 TVs for viewing sports. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

O.C. WHITE’S SEAFOOD & SPIRITS 118 Avenida Menendez, 824-0808 The spirits here aren’t just the bottled kind. O.C. White’s, built in 1791, is reputed to be haunted. Overlooking the city marina and located in a historic, two-story home, O.C. White’s serves fresh local seafood, steak and sautéed specialties. Live music is featured nightly. Outdoor dining is featured on the patio. Open daily.

OLD CITY HOUSE INN & RESTAURANT 115 Cordova St., 826-0184 Old City House Inn is St. Augustine’s only Historic Inn with a full-service restaurant and bar. A blend of Northern Mediterranean, Asian, South African and Southern influences is evident in everything from the crab and sweet corn to spring rolls. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, and Sun. brunch.

• Open for Lunch and Dinner Tues-Sat. and Brunch on Sundays • New dinner menu nightly Gourmet Cuisine in a Classic Atmosphere • Serving local Seafood and Fresh Fernadina Shrimp. She Crab Soup. Fresh Seafood. Prime Rib. Wagyu & Prime Steaks. The Music of John Michael on the Piano. Garden Weddings and Receptions. Dinner Tues-Sat *Piano Lounge Tues-Sat. Happy Hour 4:30-7PM.

272-5959 * 2030 WELLS ROAD (Two Blocks of Orange Park Mall) March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 49


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O’STEEN’S 205 Anastasia Blvd., Anastasia Island, 829-6974 Expect a wait — O’Steen’s has been packing a crowd for more than 44 years. Seafood and steak are on the menu, but the meal most everyone orders is the famous fried shrimp. At O’Steen’s, it’s no alcohol, no smoking, no reservations and no plastic — cash only. Open Tue.-Sat. for lunch and dinner.

THE OUTBACK CRABSHACK 8155 C.R. 13 N., 522-0500

• Lobster Corn Dogs with Spicy Horseradish Ketchup Spiked with Ketel One Vodka

• Sweet Tea Brined Delkat Farm Pork Chop on Macaroni Gratin with Warm Blackberry-Ginger Preserves

• Coffee and Doughnuts Glazed Doughnut Bread Pudding With Mocha Ice Cream and Butterscotch

This rustic restaurant, located on Six Mile Creek, features crabs, shrimp, gator tail, conch fritters and steaks served in a casual atmosphere. Arriving by boat or just feel like a nice after-dinner stroll? Check out the 1,500-foot floating dock. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

PANAMA HATTIE’S 361 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 471-2192 Located across A1A from the St. Johns County pier, this restaurant serves casual beach fare in a Key West-style atmosphere. Live bands are featured. Dine inside or out on the ocean-view deck upstairs. Open daily and the bar is open till 2 a.m. nightly.

ADVERTISING PROOF PIZZALLEY’S 117 St. George St., 825-2627

The downtown St. Auggie eatery offers wings, salads and,

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There’s the Garbage Can pizza: a supreme with everything. Beer and wine are served. Outdoor patio seating is available. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

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60 Charlotte St., 825-4100

restaurant to the St. George location, Produced Sister by ab Checked by Street Sales RepPizzalley’s co Chianti Room serves homemade Italian ristorante fare in a warm Tuscany setting. A full bar is available. Live music is presented Mon.-Fri. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

PLAYA CHAC MOOL 105 D St., St. Augustine Beach, 471-1131 True Yucatec cuisine, this family owned restaurant serves Mayan influenced Mexican favorites like ceviche and quesadillas, along with beer and wine, from its cozy environs near the beach. But the best part is the service, which often includes strolling guitar-playing by the owner, and (if you’re lucky) a keyboard-only version of “The Girl From Ipanema.” Covered patio seating is available.

THE PRESENT MOMENT CAFÉ © 2012 224 W. King St., 827-4499

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The Present Moment Café serves organic, vegan and vegetarian dishes, pizza, pastas, hummus and milkshakes — all prepared without meat, dairy, wheat or an oven. The most surprising thing is, you hardly notice. Organic beer and wine are available, along with take-out. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. A 2011 winner for Best Vegan/ Vegetarian Restaurant in our Best of Jax Readers’ poll.

Beer is the specialty at this German style beer house, with more than 200 varieties from around the world, with a rotating draft selection. Pair one with a hot or cold deli sandwich. Take-out orders may be phoned ahead for fast service, and beer is served to go. The kitchen’s open for lunch and late lunch during the week, till 2 a.m. Fri. and Sat.

says it all. Ultra-casual, no credit cards, no alcohol, no delivery. But there is take-out — and outside seating on tree stumps. The Beach Basket, filled with three kinds of barbecued beans, is topped with a giant pile of your choice of beef brisket, turkey or pork. Open daily “until the food runs out.”

SALT WATER COWBOYS 299 Dondanville Rd., St. Augustine Beach, 471-2332

SMOOTHIE KING 1835 U.S. 1 S., Ste. 113, 825-6770 See Beaches.

This 47-year-old restaurant, which serves tourists and locals in a turn-of-the-century fish camp surrounded by saltwater marshes, is always packed. Local seafood, ribs and chicken. Open for dinner nightly.

SONNY’S REAL PIT BAR-B-Q 1720 U.S. 1 S., 824-3220 2720 S.R. 16, 824-3315 See Riverside.

SANGRIAS TAPAS & PIANO BAR 35 Hypolita St., Ste. 201, 827-1947

SOUTH BEACH GRILL 45 Cubbedge Rd., Crescent Beach, 471-8700

The balcony of this hip, historic space overlooks busy St. George Street, making it an ideal place to while away the afternoon while sipping one of seven signature (and individually prepared) sangrias. Spanish-style tapas are also served. Live music is presented Wed.-Sun. Open daily.

Located off A1A, one block south of the S.R. 206 bridge, this two-story beachy destination offers casual oceanfront dining and fresh local seafood. Dine indoors or out on the beachfront deck. A full bar is served, and there’s a weekday happy hour. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

SANTA MARIA 135 Avenida Menendez, 829-6578

SPY SUSHI & SAKETINI LOUNGE 21 Hypolita St., 819-5637

Seafood combinations and surf-and turf are on the menu at this St. Augustine institution, which has been serving customers at the built-over-the-bayfront restaurant since 1950. A full bar is offered, along with an open-air porch, and fish feeding is encouraged. A kids’ menu is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

This sophisticated addition to the St. Augustine dining scene, started by a Flagler College grad, infuses the Ancient City with a West Coast vibe. The menu includes traditional Japanese entrées created with a European influence, sushi and a variety of saketinis, as well as 50 wines. Open for daily lunch, dinner and late night.

SCARLETT O’HARA’S 70 Hypolita St., 824-6535

STIR IT UP 18 A St., St. Augustine Beach, 461-4552

Celebrating 30-plus years in the biz, Scarlett’s is popular among college students and tourists alike. The restaurant, located in a historic 1861 house, features seafood, burgers, wings and appetizers. A full bar is served. Live music is featured nightly.

Reggae-named fresh sandwiches, wraps and smoothies are served just steps from the ocean. Try the Burrita Marley (hummus and avocado burrito) or the Pita Tosh (turkey, hummus and sprouts). A kids’ menu is offered. Open for lunch daily.

SCHMAGEL’S BAGELS 69 Hypolita St., 824-4444

SUNSET GRILLE 421 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine Beach, 471-5555

Fast and affordable breakfast and lunch in the heart of St. Augustine, all meals are prepared with Boar’s Head meats, local produce, kosher Norwegian lox and panini. Outdoor dining available. Open daily.

This Key West-style restaurant — a multiple-time winner of the Great Chowder debate — serves fresh local seafood, steaks and sandwiches inside or at open-air counters. Celebrating 20-plus years, Sunset Grille offers a full menu for kids, take-out and a new deck. A full bar is served. Open daily for lunch, dinner and late-night dining.

SEA FAIR 1 Anastasia Blvd., 824-2316 Located across the Bridge of Lions from the historic district, the Sea Fair is the oldest family-owned-and-operated restaurant in St. Augustine. Menu items include seafood, prime rib and daily specials. Dine indoors or out. A full bar is served. Open for dinner daily.

SMOKIN’ D’S BBQ 110 S.R. 206 E., 797-2050 Their motto — “We’re open if it’s smokin’” — pretty much

THE TASTING ROOM, WINE AND TAPAS 25 Cuna St., 810-2400 This upscale contemporary Spanish restaurant fuses innovative tapas with an extensive wine list. Owned by Michael Lugo, The Tasting Room is open for lunch Wed.Sun., for dinner nightly. Live music is performed nightly.

THEO’S RESTAURANT 169 King St., 824-5022

PURPLE OLIVE INTERNATIONAL BISTRO 4255 A1A S., Ste. 6, St. Augustine Beach, 461-1250 Fun and not too formal, this family-owned-and-operated restaurant’s dinner menu includes local seafood, prime cuts of beef, lamb, pork vegetarian choices, local produce, and an option to create your own plate with a selection of entrees, sauces and sides. Also featured are unique wines, a selection of nightly specials and fresh artisan breads. Open for dinner Tue.-Sat.

RAINTREE RESTAURANT 102 San Marco Ave., 824-7211 Celebrating 30 years in St. Augustine, The Raintree, located in an 1879 Victorian home, specializes in favorites like steak and seafood. A full-service bar is featured and there’s a happy hour. Reservations are accepted, and outdoor patio dining is available. Live music is performed on weekends. Open daily for dinner.

THE REEF RESTAURANT 4100 Coastal Hwy. A1A, Vilano Beach, 824-8008 At this casual oceanfront restaurant, there’s an ocean view from every table as well as outdoor dining. The menu features fresh local seafood, steak, pasta dishes and daily chef specials. A full bar is served and there’s a daily happy hour. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

RENDEZVOUS RESTAURANT 106 St. George St., 824-1090 50 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

Fionn MacCool’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, newly open at The Jacksonville Landing, offers casual dining in an uptown Irish atmosphere.


Located in the Sheraton Hotel on Deerwood Park Boulevard, the casual Bold City Grill features local microbrews on tap and a menu of fresh local seafood, Angus steaks, salads, sandwiches and burgers.

Located on the banks of San Sebastian River, Theo’s is just far enough away from the heart of downtown that it’s a popular haunt for locals and tourists alike. Favorites include seafood and Greek dishes, and the hearty breakfast is also popular. Open for breakfast and lunch daily.

T.G.I.FRIDAY’S 318 S.R. 312, 808-8443 See Arlington.

dishes made from local, seasonal ingredients. A full bar is served and the extensive, award-winning wine list has 350 Old and New World selections, and 25 wines by the glass. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., for dinner nightly.

FIREHOUSE SUBS 10261 River Marsh Dr., Ste. 131, 674-0536 See Mandarin.

WILDFLOWER CAFÉ 4320 A1A S., St. Augustine Beach, 471-2691

FIVE GUYS FAMOUS BURGERS & FRIES 4413 Town Center Parkway, Ste. 401, 996-6900

Located one block from the beach, this Provençal-style cafe’s signature dishes include the Wildflower grouper — sautéed, with blue crab meat and toasted almonds. Beer and wine are available, as is a kids’ menu. Breakfast and lunch served daily; dinner Tue.-Sat.

A Best of Jax 2011 winner for Best Burger in St. Augustine and OP/Fleming Island, Five Guys offers burgers made with fresh ground beef and finished from a wide selection of toppings, including fried onions, jalapeños or sautéed mushrooms. Fries, Kosher hot dogs and soft drinks round out the simple, basic menu. Open daily.

WOODY’S BAR-B-Q 135 Jenkins St., Ste. 106, 819-8880 See Mandarin. ZAHARIAS RESTAURANT 3945 A1A S., St. Augustine Beach, 471-4799 This family-owned restaurant has been serving Greek and Italian dishes for more than 23 years. Zaharias has a full bar and lounge and accommodates large parties. A children’s menu and an outdoor patio are available. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

ST. JOHNS TOWN CENTER BAHAMA BREEZE 10205 River Coast Dr., 646-1031 Bahama Breeze offers Caribbean-inspired cuisine and tropical drinks in an island atmosphere. Menu items include lobster quesadillas, West Indies beef patties, Creole baked goat cheese and crab claws St. Thomas. A full bar is served, and a kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open daily.

BLACKFINN AMERICAN GRILLE 4840 Big Island Dr., 345-3466 With four dining rooms, BlackFinn offers classic American fare: beef, seafood, pasta and flatbread sandwiches. Dine indoors or on the patio. A children’s menu is available and a full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

CANTINA LAREDO 10282 Bistro Dr., 997-6110 Cantina Laredo serves authentic Mexican dishes in a sophisticated atmosphere. The daily fish specials, grilled chicken and steaks are complimented by signature sauces like chipotle-wine with portobello mushrooms or sautéed artichoke hearts and roasted red bell peppers. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

THE CAPITAL GRILLE 5197 Big Island Dr., 997-9233 Located in St. Johns Town Center, The Capital Grille serves dry-aged, hand-carved steaks and fresh seafood, with a

© 2012

J ALEXANDER’S RESTAURANT 10296 Bistro Dr., 996-7147 This upscale contemporary American restaurant is known for its wood-fired cuisine. The fresh seafood is flown in daily. The steaks are hand-cut, and the produce is fresh. The fullservice bar features a wide selection of wine by the glass or bottle. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

LIBRETTO’S PIZZERIA & ITALIAN KITCHEN 4880 Big Island Dr., Ste. 1, 402-8888 Authentic NYC pizzeria brings Big Apple crust, cheese and sauce to Jax. Libretto’s serves third-generation family-style Italian classics, fresh-from-the-oven calzones, and desserts in a casual, comfy setting. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET 5205 Big Island Dr., 645-3474 The ever-changing menu (it’s printed twice daily) has more than 180 fresh items, featuring cedar-roasted Atlantic salmon, kung pao calamari and seared rare salt-and-pepper tuna. A full bar is served, and a children’s menu and take-out are available. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

MOCHI FROZEN YOGURT 4860 Big Island Dr., 807-9292 A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Yogurt Shop, Mochi offers a variety of non-fat, low-calorie, cholesterol-free frozen yogurts. The extensive selection includes tart and non-tart flavors, as well as more than 40 toppings. Open daily.

THE ORIGINAL PANCAKE HOUSE 10208 Buckhead Branch Dr., 997-6088 The recipes, unique to the Pancake House, call for only the freshest ingredients and all dishes are made to order, not fast food. The apple pancakes and Dutch babies (a pastry with butter and powdered sugar) are specialties of the Original Pancake House. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

PANERA BREAD 4720 Town Crossing Dr., 807-9103 Voted Best Soup in 2011 by our readers, Panera’s features

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POLLO TROPICAL 4863 Gate Parkway, 646-9707 This restaurant’s menu has influences from the Caribbean, Latin America and Miami, resulting in citrus-marinated, tropical spiced grilled chicken dishes served all over the world. This location also serves beer and wine and take-out is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

RENNA’S PIZZA 4624 Town Crossing Dr., Ste. 125, 565-1299 This casual New York-style pizzeria also serves calzones, antipasto, parmigiana and homemade breads. Beer and wine are served, and a kids’ menu is available. Buy by the slice — they’re humongous — or full pie. Take-out and delivery are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

SMOOTHIE KING 4624 Town Crossing Dr., Ste. 119, UNF, 996-2889

See Downtown.

JENKINS QUALITY BARBECUE 2025 Emerson St., 346-3770 See Springfield.

LEO’S PIZZA ITALIANO 5627 San Jose Blvd., Lakewood, 730-3830 The vibe at Leo’s is both Greek and Italian: Half of the restaurant features Greek décor, the other half Italian. Beer and a variety of Greek, Italian and California wines are served. Dine in or take out. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., for dinner Mon.-Sat.

MOJO BAR-B-QUE 1607 University Blvd. W., 732-7200

SNEAKERS SPORTS GRILLE 8133 Point Meadows Dr., 519-0509 See Beaches. SUITE 4880 Big Island Dr., Ste. 1, 493-9305

PEPE’S HACIENDA 3615 DuPont Ave., Ste. 900, Lakewood, 636-8131

This premium lounge and restaurant — a 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best New Club and Best Martini — offers chef-driven small plates and an extensive list of specialty cocktails, served in a comfortable, sophisticated atmosphere. A full bar is served. Open daily for happy hour, dinner and late-nite. Live entertainment nightly.

This restaurant includes an ethnic grocery store. Pepe’s offers authentic burritos, tortillas, seafood, soups and fresh-baked in-house breads. A kids’ menu is available. Open daily.

SWEET BY HOLLY 4624 Town Crossing Dr., Ste. 137, 564-2711

See Riverside.

This new specialty cupcake shop (full name: Sweet! By Good Golly Miss Holly) offers, well, cupcakes. Made fresh daily, with fresh ingredients, in a variety of sizes, the cupcakes come in 12 rotating flavors with 48 toppings. Frozen yogurt is also available. Open daily.

TIJUANA FLATS 5635 San Jose Blvd., 371-7884 See Baymeadows.

WASABI JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR 10206 River Coast Dr., 997-6528

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Wasabi serves up authentic Japanese cuisine and features teppanyaki shows. A full sushi menu is also served. Children have their own selections. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

WHISKY RIVER 4850 Big Island Dr., Ste. 3, 645-5571 Whisky River’s Southern hospitality centers on burgers, hot wings, pizzas and pulled pork, served along with a full bar and drink specials. Hell, it’s owned by Dale Earnhardt Jr. And it’s a 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Chicken Wings and Best Meal Under $10. Open daily.

© 2012

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& UNIVERSITY (LAKEWOOD)

ATHENS CAFÉ 6271 St. Augustine Rd., Ste. 7, 733-1199 From the dolmades (stuffed grape leaves) to the baby shoes (stuffed eggplant), Athens offers all the favorites. The café serves beer and wine, including Greek brands. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

CRUISERS GRILL 5613 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 1, 737-2874

SONNY’S REAL PIT BAR-B-Q 5097 University Blvd. W., 737-4906

SAN MARCO & SOUTHBANK

(All listings are in San Marco unless otherwise noted.) BASIL THAI & SUSHI 1004 Hendricks Ave., 674-0190 Basil Thai serves fresh sushi and authentic Thai cuisine, including ginger-infused salad, classic Pad Thai, all curry dishes, ebi roll, sashimi and daily specials. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., for dinner Mon.-Sat.

b.b.’s 1019 Hendricks Ave., 306-0100 There’s sophistication to spare, from the ever-changing selection of fine cheeses down to the coffee bean carefully placed in each espresso martini. A favorite lunch spot for the downtown set, b.b.’s is a 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Dessert. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

BISTRO AIX 1440 San Marco Blvd., 398-1949 Executive Chef Tom Gray serves French and Mediterranean inspired fare in an urban-chic atmosphere. The menu changes seasonally, and the wine list includes more than 250 choices. Open daily. Happy hour is held Mon.-Fri. at the Onyx Bar.

BONO’S PIT BAR-B-Q 4907 Beach Blvd., 398-4248 See Arlington.

See Beaches.

CHART HOUSE 1501 River Place Blvd., Southbank, 398-3353

DICK’S WINGS 1610 University Blvd. W., Lakewood, 448-2110 See Beaches.

Located on the Southbank of the St. Johns River since 1982, this restaurant serves fresh fish, seafood and prime rib along with a full bar. Open for dinner nightly.

GENE’S SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1571 University Blvd. W., Lakewood Plaza, 448-9888

CHECKER BBQ & SEAFOOD 3566 St. Augustine Rd., 398-9206

See Southside.

Chef Art Jennette runs the show here, serving up all manner of barbecue, seafood and down-home comfort food. Ask for the Trailer Trash Special, which features a pulled-pork sandwich, 15 of Art’s fried white shrimp, hand-cut fries and fresh fried green tomatoes. Open Mon.-Sat. for lunch, Mon.Sat. for dinner.

HEALTHY BAGEL 1500 University Blvd. W., Lakewood, 730-3322

52 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012

HOOTERS 8938 San Jose Blvd., Ste. 2, 636-9800

A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Barbecue, this funky Southern blues kitchen offers pulled pork and Carolina-style barbecue along with chicken-fried steak and Delta fried catfish. A kids’ menu and carry-out are available, along with a full bottled beer selection. Open daily.

See Beaches.

© 2011

served. A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Bagel. Open daily.

Healthy Bagel serves 20 varieties of fresh-baked bagels and 13 varieties of bagel sandwiches, including cashew chicken, cranberry turkey and Reubens. Smoothies and espresso are


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this is a copyright protected pro For questions, please call your advertising representative at 260-9770. rUn dAte: 080911 FAX YOUR PROOF IF POSSIBLE AT 268-3655 Alphadog Grill on Park Street in the Riverside/5 Points area features gourmet hot dogs and sausages, along with wraps, soups, salads and wings. CURRENTS RIVERVIEW BISTRO 841 Prudential Dr., Southbank, 306-9512 Located in the Aetna building, Currents offers Indian, Thai, Latin and European inspired dishes, as well as Southern fried chicken. Outside dining is featured, a full bar is available and the river views are terrific. Open for breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri.

EUROPEAN STREET CAFÉ 1704 San Marco Blvd., 398-9500

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The Cuban sandwiches served in this clean, bright café are the real thing: big, thick and flattened. Other favorites include traditional Cuban fare, like black beans and rice, plantains, steaks, seafood, chicken and rice, and roast pork. A full bar, Spanish wine and Cuban drink specials, including mojitos and Cuba libres, are served. Open Mon.-Sat.

FIREHOUSE SUBS 1949 San Marco Blvd., Ste. 1, 396-0001

HON KOREAN RESTAURANT 5161 Beach Blvd., Ste. 5, St. Nicholas, 396-4008

See Mandarin.

Hon serves homestyle Korean, focusing on healthy soups, casseroles, entrées and side dishes, all made with fresh meats, vegetables and seafood. The chef has more than 30 years of experience dishing out authentic Korean meals, using original methods passed down through her family. Take-out and beer and wine are available. Open for lunch and dinner Fri.-Tue.

FUJI SUSHI 1950 San Marco Blvd., 399-3305 Located on San Marco Square, Fuji Sushi is under new management with an all-new sushi menu. A kids’ menu is available, and beer, sake and wine are served. A sushi lunch is special is offered daily. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

GREEN ERTH BISTRO 1520 Hendricks Ave., 398-9156 Edgy and original, Green Erth serves Cali-inspired fare made with natural ingredients, including breakfast items, big salads, soups, paninis, sandwiches, hot dishes and desserts. Organic teas, coffees and juices are available. Open for breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat.

THE GROTTO WINE & TAPAS BAR 2012 San Marco Blvd., 398-0726 Serving a varied tapas menu of artisanal cheese plates, empanadas, bruschettas and homestyle cheesecake, this upscale wine bar features a list with more than 60 wines by the glass. Open Tue.-Sun. Wine tastings every Thur. The Grotto is a 10-time winner for Best Wine List, most recently in 2011, as well as Best Wine Store.

Sal

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HIGHTIDE BURRITO COMPANY 1538 Hendricks Ave., 683-7396

First Coast offers traditional diner fare like oversized pancakes and bacon, sandwiches, salads and burgers, including the coyote burger. A kids’ menu and take-out are offered. Open for breakfast and lunch daily.

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HAVANA-JAX CAFÉ/ CUBA LIBRE BAR BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 2578 Atlantic Blvd., St. Nicholas, 399-0609

With more than 130 imported beers, and 20 on tap, European Street knows its beers and ales — it’s a 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Beer Selection. The sandwich menu includes the classic Reuben and overstuffed sandwiches. The Listening Room features local and national Americana artists. Open daily. Outside seating is available at some locations.

FIRST COAST DELI & GRILL 6082 St. Augustine Rd., 737-7477

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Locally-owned-and-operated by Alejandro Juarez, this casual Mexican place offers homemade salsas, marinades and tortillas. Beef, pork, fish or cactus are served in burritos, tacos, salads or tortas. A kids’ menu, and beer and wine are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

© 2012

JIMMY JOHN’S GOURMET SANDWICHES 1725 Hendricks Ave., 400-7827 See Southside.

LA NOPALERA NO. 2 MEXICAN RESTAURANT 1631 Hendricks Ave., 399-1768 Don’t be alarmed to see the server’s arms filled with dinner plates — five or more at a time. The balancing act is something to behold. Tamales, fajitas and pork tacos are customer favorites. Beer, wine and margaritas are served; some locations offer a full bar. Open for lunch and dinner daily. A repeat winner for 2011 Best of Jax’s Best Margarita.

LAYLA’S OF SAN MARCO 2016 Hendricks Ave., 398-4610 Fine dining in the heart of San Marco. Traditional Middle Eastern cuisine, served inside or outside on the hookah and cigar patio. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.; dinner on Sun.

MATTHEW’S 2107 Hendricks Ave., 396-9922 This is Chef Matthew Medure’s flagship restaurant, offering fine dining in a refined, European-style atmosphere. Matthew’s specializes in artfully presented cuisine, and the

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lounge offers small plates, an extensive martini and wine list and a happy hour Mon.-Fri. Reservations are recommended. Open for dinner Mon.-Sat.

METRO DINER 3302 Hendricks Ave., 398-3701 Located in a historic 1930s-era building amid San Marco’s residential district, this upscale now has a sister location at the beach. Both serve meatloaf, chicken pot pie and homemade soups, and are open for breakfast and lunch daily. Guy Fieri filmed an episode of the Food Network’s “Diners, Drive-ins & Dives” here last year. Metro Diner is a 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Breakfast and Best Waitress, Candice Mullins.

THE MUDVILLE GRILLE 3105 Beach Blvd., St. Nicholas Plaza, 398-4326 The original St. Nicholas location is a family-oriented sports restaurant serving steaks and wings. Trivia is featured every Thur., Karaoke every Fri. and Texas Hold ’Em every Wed. There are big-screen TVs and three satellite dishes for sports fans. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

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THE OLIVE TREE 1705 Hendricks Ave., 396-2250

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this is a copyright protectedTheproof Olive Tree © serves Mediterranean homestyle healthy

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plates, including hummus, tabouleh, grape leaves, veggie kibbi, gyros, potato salad, Greek salad and more. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Fri.

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1959 San Marco Blvd., 399-8815 See Riverside.

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PLAYER’S GRILLE 4456 Hendricks Ave., 448-6670 This sports bar and grill serves burgers and wings, teriyaki stir fry and homemade soups. A full bar is available. A kids’ game room is open (TV monitored, so parents can watch), and TVs are situated in all the booths. Texas Hold ’Em is held every Wed., Sat. and Sun. Open daily and for brunch Sat. and Sun.

PULP 1962 San Marco Blvd., 396-9222 The juice bar offers fresh juices, frozen yogurt, teas, and coffees made one cup at a time, along with 30 kinds of smoothies. Some smoothies are blended with flavored soy milks and organic frozen yogurts and granola. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

© 2011

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RIVER CITY BREWING COMPANY 835 Museum Cir., Southbank, 398-2299 Situated on the Southbank Riverwalk overlooking the St. Johns River and popular with the downtown business set, River City offers fresh seafood, steaks and daily chef’s creations. Nosh in the enclosed dining room or out on the marina dining deck. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch buffet on Sun.

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE 1201 Riverplace Blvd., Crowne Plaza, Southbank, 396-6200 A consistent Best of Jax winner for Best Steaks, Ruth’s Chris serves Midwestern custom-aged U.S. prime beef, cooked in 1,800-degree broilers. Fresh seafood and live Maine lobster are also on the menu. A full bar is served with an extensive selection of wines. Reservations suggested; open nightly.

SAKE HOUSE 1478 Riverplace Blvd., Ste. 101, 306-2188 See Riverside.

SAN MARCO DELI 1965 San Marco Blvd., 399-1306 A Best of Jax winner for Best Quick Lunch, this independently owned and operated deli serves grilled fish, turkey burgers and lunch meats roasted daily in-house. Vegetarian options (including tempeh) are available. Callahead ordering and pick-up are available. Open Mon.-Sat.

SAN MARCO THEATRE 1996 San Marco Blvd., 396-4845 This historic movie house offers pizza, nachos, quesadillas, sandwiches, and beer and wine to adventurous moviegoers. The theater shows first-run films and runs a midnight movie series.

THE SANDWICH COMPANY 2011 Emerson St., 396-3666 54 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

The Sandwich Co. offers sandwiches as well as a full breakfast menu, with platters and pitas in this diner-style restaurant. Lunch features wing tenders, camel riders, steak pitas and subs. Wifi is available. Open Mon.-Sat.

THE SOUTHERN GRILL 800 Flagler Ave., Southbank, 858-9800 Popular with the business crowd, The Southern Grill offers a large menu of salads, veggie platters, sandwiches, melts and wraps. The breakfast selection includes omelets, a variety of egg combinations and sit-down favorites like pancakes. Open for breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri., breakfast only on Sat.

SQUARE ONE 1974 San Marco Blvd., 306-9004 This networking hub serves dinner in the lounge or outside on the patio. Happy hour is available at the full bar, and Square One boasts an extensive wine list. Entertainment is featured nightly. Open for dinner Mon.-Sat.

STAN’S SANDWICH & GRILL 1562 Hendricks Ave., 398-6642 Marking more than 30 years in the same location, Stan’s serves up breakfast pita sandwiches, omelets and pancakes, as well as hand-pattied burgers, dogs, subs, barbecue — and fresh cherry limeade. Take-out is available. Open Mon.-Sat.

SUSHI & SUBS 5800 Beach Blvd., St. Nicholas, 858-7032 Sushi & Subs serves, that’s right ... sushi and subs. Take-out is available. Open Mon.-Sat.

TAVERNA 1986 San Marco Blvd., 398-3005 Taverna serves European cuisine heavily influenced by the flavors of Italy and Spain. Tapas, small-plate items, Neapolitan-style wood-fired pizzas, homestyle pastas and entrées are served in a rustic yet upscale interior. Beer and wine are served and take-out is available. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch on Sat. and Sun.

TIDBITS RESTAURANT 1076 Hendricks Ave., 396-0528 For more than 25 years, Clara’s Tidbits has specialized in good food served in a friendly atmosphere, including popular lunch items like chicken salad and unique avocado sandwiches. Take-out and delivery are available. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri.

TOSCANA LITTLE ITALY 4440 Hendricks Ave., 900-1059 The 150-seat restaurant features Tuscan yellow walls, cherrywood tables and chairs, and tile floors. The extensive menu includes traditional Italian dishes. A full bar is served and take-out is available. Open Mon.-Sat. for lunch and dinner.

VINO’S PIZZA & ITALIAN CUISINE 1430 San Marco Blvd., 683-2444 See Baymeadows. This location offers a daily lunch buffet. Open daily.

WINE CELLAR 1314 Prudential Dr., Southbank, 398-8989 This Jacksonville landmark offers classic Continental and New World cuisine in an Old World setting. Dine outdoors under majestic oaks or indoors in intimate dining rooms. An extensive wine selection and a full bar are available. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., for dinner Mon.-Sat.

SOUTHSIDE ABE’S PIZZA GRILL 12192 Beach Blvd., 645-0460 Abe’s offers traditional Italian dishes, including lasagna, parmigiana and pizza, as well as hot and cold subs, pasta and wings. A kids’ menu, and take-out and delivery are available. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

ALHAMBRA THEATRE & DINING 12000 Beach Blvd., 641-1212 The nation’s longest continuously running dinner theater, the Alhambra is now renovated and features cuisine prepared by Executive Chef DeJuan Roy, who coordinates his menus


with each stage production. Reservations are suggested to guarantee seating. A full bar is served. Closed Mon.

ALL AMERICAN HOT DOG 10365 Beach Blvd., 641-5794 This family-owned casual spot has been around since 1967, offering all-beef hot dogs served in toasted buns, topped off with a variety of homestyle toppings, as well as steak pitas, burgers and subs. A kids’ menu is available. Open Mon.-Sat.

BONO’S PIT BAR-B-Q 5711 Bowden Rd., 448-5395 PROMISE OF 10065 Skinner Lake Dr. (JTB & Gate Parkway), 998-1997 See Arlington.

Apna serves Indian cuisine, specializing in haleem. A lunch buffet is featured. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

BUCA DI BEPPO 10334 Southside Blvd., 363-9090

Aromas is a sophisticated venue, with a varied tapas menu featuring appetizers and entrées like crab-stuffed shrimp and filet medallions. More than 700 premium cigars, select wines, specialty martinis, an extensive mojito menu and the Beerhouse are also offered. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

BEIGNET’S CARIBBEAN CAFÉ 4770 Barnes Rd., Ste. 1, 737-6789 A taste of the Caribbean can be found all over this restaurant, with items like jerk chicken, oxtail, goat, mahi sandwiches, and Caribbean beignets with coffee from New Orleans’ Café Du Monde. Open Mon.-Sat.

BENITO’S ITALIAN CAFÉ & PIZZERIA 9475 Philips Hwy., 268-1259 See St. Augustine.

BLUE BAMBOO 3820 Southside Blvd., 646-1478

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This popular chain restaurant gets to the heart of fresh Italian cooking with recipes like lasagna and garlic mashed potatoes. Dishes are available in three generous portion sizes (half-pound meatballs!) and served family-style in a whimsical, old-Italian setting. A full bar, take-out and a kids’ selection are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

CASTILLO DE MEXICO 12620 Beach Blvd., Ste. 19, Kernan Square, 998-7006 Castillo de Mexico offers an extensive menu served in authentic Mexican décor. There is also a weekday lunch buffet. A full bar is served. Open daily.

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CHICAGO PIZZA & SPORTS GRILL 8206 Philips Hwy., 731-9797 Chicago-style deep-dish pizzas, hot dogs and Italian beef dishes are offered by the Comastro family from Chicago, who’ve been serving up Windy City favorites for 25-plus years. They “import” ingredients all the way from exotic, faraway Illinois — talk about authentic. A full bar is served, and a kids’ menu is available. Open for lunchpromise and dinner daily. of benefit

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Located one mile north of JTB, Blue Bamboo offers Southern specialties and hip, Asian comfort food — owner and chef Dennis Chan, a fourth-generation local restaurateur, has published a cookbook titled just that. Favorites include red curry shrimp and grits, Singapore street noodles and honey-soy grilled lamb rack. A full bar — including saketinis — and an extensive wine list are served. Dine indoors or outside. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri.; for dinner Mon.-Sat.

COPELAND’S OF NEW ORLEANS 4310 Southside Blvd., 998-4414

BOLD CITY GRILL 10605 Deerwood Park Blvd., 380-8832

THE CORNER BISTRO & WINE BAR 9823 Tapestry Park Cir., Ste. 1. 619-1931

Located in the Sheraton Hotel, casual Bold City Grill features local microbrews on tap with a daily happy hour, as well as a full bar. The menu includes fresh local seafood, Angus steaks, salads, sandwiches and burgers. A kids’ menu and take-out are also offered, and there’s flatscreen TVs. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

The Corner features casual fine dining, with a menu that blends modern American favorites served with international flair. The Fresh Bar offers fine wine, cocktails and martinis. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun.

BOMBA’S 8560 Beach Blvd., 997-2291

This cozy getaway serves a full sushi bar as well as hibachi, sashimi, katsu and tempura dishes. Favorites are the Dynamite roll, Cold roll and spicy Manhattan roll. Beer, sake and wine are served. Open daily.

Meals just like your mom’s — if she cooked world-class soul food and choice Southern fare, including country-fried steak, chicken and dumplings, Delmonico steak, and homemade

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APNA RESTAURANT 10769 Beach Blvd., Ste. 14, 645-3334

AROMAS 4372 Southside Blvd., Ste. 101, 928-0515

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desserts. Open for 30 years, Bomba’s features 12 fresh sides daily, and the menu is vegan-friendly, too. There’s a happy hour, live music, free Wifi and outdoor dining. Delivery and a kids’ menu are available. Beer and wine are served. ForMon.-Sat. questions, please Open for lunch, dinner and late-night

Copeland’s 80-item New Orleans-themed, award-winning menu has a wide variety of authentic Creole, Cajun and New Orleans cuisine, including seafood, pasta and steak. Copeland’s has a full bar and a happy hour every Mon.-Sat. A children’s menu, take-out and delivery are available. Open daily.

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CRAZY SUSHI 4320 Deerwood Lake Parkway, Ste. 202, 998-9797

© 2006

Premium ice cream, frozen yogurt, smoothies and Nathan’s hot dogs are the specialty at The Florida Creamery in Avondale.

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CRUISERS GRILL 9734 Deer Lake Ct., Ste. 11, 646-2874 Best of Jax 2011 winner. See Beaches.

This new sweet spot features customized cupcakes, cakes and cake pops, in 18 flavors. Take-out is available. Open Tue.-Sun.

Wildly popular in college towns, Jimmy John’s has been serving gourmet subs and sandwiches since 1983, using fresh breads, meats and cheeses in tandem with lettuce, tomatoes and dressings to produce damn good subs. Totally Tuna, J.J.B.L.T. and Club Lulu are among the choices. Open daily.

DAVE & BUSTER’S 7025 Salisbury Rd. (I-95 & JTB), 296-1525

JOHNNY ANGELS 3546 St. Johns Bluff Rd. S., Ste. 120, 997-9850

This 40,000-square-foot restaurant/entertainment complex includes a dining room for a quiet meal away from the games. But what fun is that? D&B’s has the latest electronic interactive games and simulators as well as traditional favorites in the Million Dollar Midway. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

This diner, located near University of North Florida, serves dishes that reflect its ’50s-style décor, including Blueberry Hill pancakes, Fats Domino omelet and Elvis special combo platter, as well as burgers and shakes. Beer and wine are also available and there’s a menu just for the kiddies. Open daily.

EL POTRO 11380 Beach Blvd., 564-9977

KAN-KI 4483 Southside Blvd., 642-2626

Family-friendly and casual, El Potro cooks everything fresh and made to-order — fast, hot and simple. Daily specials and a buffet are featured at most locations. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

Kan-Ki is a Japanese steakhouse and sushi bar with teppanyaki tables, 10 sushi tables, a sushi bar and a full liquor bar. The menu includes steaks and seafood. A children’s menu is available, as well as sushi take-out. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

CUPCAKE HEAVEN 77 9475 Philips Hwy., Ste. 4, 519-7779

EUROPEAN STREET CAFÉ 5500 Beach Blvd. (between University & Emerson), 398-1717 See San Marco. FARAH’S PITA STOP CAFÉ 3980 Southside Blvd., Ste. 201, 928-4322 Farah’s specializes in Middle Eastern cuisine and caters to the lunch and dinner crowd in busy Southside. Fresh sandwiches, soups, entrées and desserts, as well as pastries and mazas (appetizers) are served. A selection of imported beers and wines is available. Open Mon.-Sat.

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KYOTO STEAK & SUSHI HOUSE 8221 Southside Blvd., Ste. 16, 645-8788 The experienced sushi chefs, trained in Japan, offer traditional Japanese style fare and a full sushi bar in a family atmosphere. A children’s menu is available. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

LA NOPALERA MEXICAN RESTAURANT 8206 Philips Hwy., Baymeadows Junction, 732-9433 See San Marco.

FIREHOUSE SUBS 8221 Southside Blvd., Ste. 4, 996-0894 4347 University Blvd. S., Ste. 1, 731-1888

LARRY’S GIANT SUBS 4479 Deerwood Lake Parkway, 425-4060 3611 St. Johns Bluff Rd. S., 641-6499

See Mandarin.

With locations throughout Northeast Florida, Larry’s Giant Subs is known for piling subs high and serving them fast for nearly 30 years. In addition to a broad selection of hot and cold subs, Larry’s features soups, salads and other items. Kids eat free on Mon. and Wed. The Southside location has an extensive beer selection, with a daily happy hour. Open daily.

FIVE GUYS FAMOUS BURGERS & FRIES 9039 Southside Blvd., 538-9100

© 2011

JIMMY JOHN’S GOURMET SANDWICHES 7159 Philips Hwy., 400-6199 9823 Tapestry Park Cir., Ste. 19, 642-8188

See St. Johns Town Center.

THE FLAME BROILER THE RICE BOWL KING 9822 Tapestry Park Cir., Ste. 103, 619-2786

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This West Coast fave is built on the concept of healthy, inexpensive fast-food prepared with no transfats, MSG, frying, or skin on meat. Fresh veggies, steamed brown or white rice along with grilled beef, chicken and Korean short ribs are featured. A kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open Mon.-Sat. for lunch and dinner.

© 2011

GREEK ISLES CAFE 7860 Gate Parkway, Ste. 116, 564-2290 Authentic Greek cuisine, homemade breads and desserts are found on the extensive menu, along with American favorites, Italian dishes and seafood items. The eggs Benedict and baklava are house specialties and there’s a menu for children. Beer and wine are served and take-out is available. Open Mon.-Sat. for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

HALA CAFÉ & BAKERY 4323 University Blvd. S., 733-5141 This Jacksonville institution — since 1975 — serves homemade pita bread, kabobs, falafel, tabouli and a daily lunch buffet. Beer and wine are available. The adjacent store carries delicacies from all over the world. Take-out is available. Open lunch and dinner, Mon.-Sat.

HOOTERS 4521 Southside Blvd., 807-9541 See Downtown.

ISLAND GIRL WINE & CIGAR BAR 7860 Gate Parkway, Ste. 115, 854-6060

LE CHAT NOIR CUPCAKE BORDELLO & BAKERY 8101 Old Kings Rd., Ste. 4, 437-4099 This French patisserie-style bakery specializes in artisan cupcakes, cakes and French macarons. Pick up your order or have it delivered. Open daily.

LECI’S ITALIAN CAFE 4076 Belfort Rd., 332-8144 Everything here is made from scratch, with authentic Italian ingredients. A kids’ menu is offered. A full bar is served and take-out is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

LIME LEAF 9822 Tapestry Park Cir., Stes. 108 & 109, 645-8568 Lime Leaf offers definitive Thai cuisine, from fresh papaya salad to pad Thai to seared ahi tuna, as well as crispy duck, all elegantly presented. Desserts include mango sweet rice. Beer and wine are served, and limited delivery is available. Open for lunch Mon.-Sat., for dinner nightly.

MAMMA LUCIA 11380 Beach Blvd., 645-0081 Located near University of North Florida and owned by real Italians, Mamma Lucia serves definitive Northern Italian cuisine, like risotto, osso buco and their specialty dessert, bomba al cioccolato, cake with ice cream and Amaretto. Their pasta and tiramisu are made fresh. Beer, wine and espresso are served and take-out is available. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun.

This smoking establishment, with a walk-in humidor, pairs appetizers with more than 25 wines and ports by the glass. A full bar is served at the Gateway location, along with more than 220 wines by the bottle; scotch flights are featured. Live music is featured Thur.-Sat. Open daily.

MATSUYA JAPANESE RESTAURANT 11380 Beach Blvd., Ste. 8, 996-0008

JASON’S DELI 4375 Southside Blvd., Ste. 15, 620-0707

MELLOW MUSHROOM PIZZA BAKERS BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 9734 Deer Lake Ct., Ste. 1, 997-1955

See Beaches.

This Japanese place offers lunch boxes and a variety of sushi dishes. Beer and wine are served. A kids’ selection and take-out are available. Open for lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun.

*

Live music is featured on the patio. See Fleming Island.

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THE MELTING POT 7860 Gate Parkway, Ste. 101, 642-4900 Participatory dining is the philosophy at The Melting Pot, with a variety of fondues — from chocolate to cheese — and entrees ranging from filet mignon to ahi tuna. A full bar is served, and a children’s menu is available. Open nightly.

MIKADO JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE 10460 Avenues Walk Blvd., 260-8860 Mikado has been serving traditional Japanese cuisine for more than 20 years. The big sushi bar seats more than 25 diners. A lunch buffet is offered Sun.-Fri. and there are 12 hibachi tables. A full bar is served and take-out is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

MIKEY’S PIZZA & ITALIAN RESTAURANT 7544 Beach Blvd., 721-7333 Family-owned for 35 years, Mikey’s serves Old New Yorkstyle thin-crust pizzas, pasta, chicken and seafood dishes. An Italian lunch buffet is offered. Take-out and delivery (within three miles) are available. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

MILLER’S ALE HOUSE & RAW BAR 9711 Deer Lake Ct., 565-2882 See Mandarin. NEW MADRID RESTAURANT 11233 Beach Blvd., 642-3741 New Madrid features urban Venezuelan cuisine from Cuba and South America. The Cuban sandwich is a big seller, along with Latin dishes like ropa vieja, picadillo, paella and arroz con pollo (chicken and rice). A kids’ menu is available. Beer, wine and homemade sangria are served. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

Taps Bar & Grill on C.R. 220 in Fleming Island offers more than 50 premium domestic and imported beers on tap, lots of TVs for watching sports and a menu featuring starters, burgers and kids’ meals. dumplings, grilled pork belly slices, chowdo soups, noodles, shredded raw beef in sesame oil and kim chi.

Take-out and a kids’ menu are available. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

THE SECRET GARDEN CAFÉ 10095 Beach Blvd., Ste. 600, 645-0859

III FORKS PRIME STEAKHOUSE 9822 Tapestry Park Circle, 928-9277

This new place serves freshly prepared Mediterranean dishes, including kabobs, wraps, pitas, specialty platters and salads in a casual atmosphere. Beer and wine are also offered. Take-out and a kids’ menu are available. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

This café serves homestyle breakfast and lunch in a gothic garden setting. Southern comfort menu items include eggs Benedict, fried green tomatoes, Alabama meatloaf and made-from-scratch desserts. Local art is displayed. Beer and wine are served. Open for breakfast daily; for lunch Tue.-Sat.; dinner is served on the first Sat. night each month.

III Forks offers a contemporary evolution of the classic steakhouse, updated and stylish with a savvy menu featuring USDA prime beef, seafood, distinctive wine and local favorites. A full bar is served and more than 1,500 wines are available. A children’s menu is available. Dine indoors or out on the patio. Open for dinner Mon.-Sat.

OTAKI JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE 7860 Gate Parkway, Stes. 119-122, 854-0485

SEVEN BRIDGES GRILLE & BREWERY 9735 Gate Parkway N., Tinseltown, 997-1999

TOMBO’S BACKPORCH BARBECUE 8929 Philips Hwy., 363-0990

Otaki features a sushi bar, hibachi grill tables and an open kitchen. A full bar is served, and a kids’ menu and take-out are also available. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., for dinner nightly.

This grill and brewery features local seafood, steaks, pizzas and award-winning freshly brewed ales and lagers. Dine indoors or outdoors. A full bar is served, and use of the pool tables is free until 4 p.m. Live entertainment is featured Fri. and Sat., weather permitting. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

Tombo’s bright yellow awning says “BBQ!” and the menu doesn’t disappoint, offering low-fat dishes, like barbecue salad, and a full breakfast menu, and the restaurant will also smoke your hogs, hams, deer and turkeys when you bring ’em in. Open for breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat.

OLIVE GRILL MEDITERRANEAN 4372 Southside Blvd., Ste. 201, 642-5444

PHILIP SUSHI 9475 Philips Hwy., Ste. 20, 519-7977 The full-service sushi restaurant serves traditional sushi, hibachi, sashimi, tempura and teriyaki dishes. Beer and wine are served and there’s a daily happy hour. Lunch specials are featured; take-out is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

PISCO’S RESTAURANT 4131 Southside Blvd., Ste. 101, 646-3888 This Peruvian restaurant offers ceviche, jalea, lomo and pollo saltado, arroz con marisco, Inca Cola and Peruvian wines. A children’s menu is available, and beer and wine are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

SAHARA CAFÉ & BAR 10771 Beach Blvd., Ste. 110, 338-9049 From tiled floors to the pillowed lounge area, the familyowned-and operated restaurant exudes Mediterranean style. Beer, wine, flavored hookahs and hot tea are offered in the lounge. Belly dancers perform every weekend. Dinner nightly.

SAKE SUSHI 8206 Philips Hwy., Ste. 31. 647-6000 The new restaurant offers sushi, hibachi, teriyaki, tempura, katsu, donburi and noodle soups. Popular rolls include Fuji Yama, Ocean Blue and Fat Boy. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

SALA THAI 10769 Beach Blvd., Ste. 10, 641-8384 Sit at a booth decorated like a thatched-roof hut and order from a varied Thai menu. House specialties change weekly. Favorites include pad Thai. For dessert, there’s mango rice or coconut ice cream. Dine in or take out. Beer and wine are served. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri.; dinner daily. SAM WON GARDENS 4345 University Blvd. N., 737-3650 This place serves mostly Korean fare, including steamed

SHIRAZ PIZZA 3980 Southside Blvd., 738-8787 This Italian restaurant just celebrated its grand opening. Shiraz offers an all-you-can-eat pizza lunch special. Beer and wine are served and take-out is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

SPECKLED HEN TAVERN & GRILLE 9475 Philips Hwy., Ste. 16, 538-0811 This stylish yet simple gastropub features Southern-style cuisine made with a modern twist: All the dishes are paired with international wines and beers, including a large selection of craft and IPA brews. A full bar is also served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

SUNSET 30 TAVERN & GRILL 10370 Philips Hwy., 365-5555 Located inside the new entertainment complex Latitude 30, Sunset 30 serves familiar sportsbar fare, including burgers, chicken, pasta and pizza. A full bar is also served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

TAVERNA YAMAS 9753 Deer Lake Ct., Tinseltown, 854-0426 This Greek restaurant serves char-broiled kabobs, seafood and traditional Greek wines and desserts. A kids’ selection and a full bar are available, and there are nightly belly dancing shows. A DJ spins every Fri. and Sat. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

T.G.I.FRIDAY’S 4409 Southside Blvd., 997-8700 See Arlington. THE THIRSTY IGUANA 7605 Beach Blvd., 647-7947 Authentic Mexican classics include tacos, burritos, enchiladas, fajitas and quesadillas. A full bar is served.

TOMMY’S BRICK OVEN PIZZA 4160 Southside Blvd., Ste. 2, 565-1999 Tommy’s creates New York-style thin crust, brick-ovencooked pizzas — gluten-free — as well as calzones, salads and sandwiches made fresh to order, using Thumann’s no-MSG meats and Grande cheeses. Beer, wine and Boylans soda are served. Curbside pick-up and take-out are offered. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

URBAN FLATS 9726 Touchton Rd., 642-1488 Urban Flats offers a casual, bistro style menu, featuring Old World flatbread paired with seasonal ingredients in wraps, flatwiches, entrées and salads. A full bar and a selection of wines by the glass or the bottle is served. A children’s menu and take-out are available. Live entertainment is featured Wed.-Sat. evenings in Ponte Vedra; Tue.-Sun. in Tinseltown. Open daily for lunch and dinner.

VILLAGE BREAD CAFE 5215 Philips Hwy., 732-2261 See Mandarin. WASABI JAPANESE BUFFET 9041 Southside Blvd., Ste. 138D, 363-9888 Included in the buffet price is all-you can-eat sushi and choice of two items from the teppanyaki grill. Customer favorites include the Jaguar, dynamite, lobster and soft-shell crab rolls. A kids’ menu is available. A full bar is served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

WILD WING CAFÉ 4555 Southside Blvd., Tinseltown, 998-9464 This hoppin’ Tinseltown spot serves 33 flavors of wings, as well as soups, sandwiches, wraps, ribs and burgers. A full bar is served. Live music is performed or a DJ spins tunes three to four nights every week. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

MARCH 20-26, 2012 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 57


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Executive Chef Kenny Gilbert (a Folio Weekly Best of Jax Best Chef of 2011), prepares innovative dishes in an island atmosphere at Nippers Beach Grille on Beach Boulevard in Jax Beach.

WOODY’S BAR-B-Q 8221 Southside Blvd., 265-0066 1638 University Blvd., 721-8836 5930 Powers Ave., 739-7427 See Mandarin.

YO SUSHI! JAPANESE RESTAURANT 4375 Southside Blvd., Ste. 4, 998-3868 Yo Sushi! strikes a balance of fun, freshness and flavor with sushi, hibachi, katsu, teriyaki and tempura cuisine. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Mexican, this familyowned-and-operated restaurant offers authentic Mexican food, including fajitas and seafood dishes, as well as a variety of hot sauces — one’s made in-house. The specialty is tacos de asada. A kids’ menu is available and a full bar is served. Open daily.

DICK’S WINGS 450077 S.R. 200, Callahan, 879-0993 12400 Yellow Bluff Rd., Ste. 101, Northside, 619-9828 See Beaches.

YUMMY SUSHI 4372 Southside Blvd., 998-8806 A Best of Jax 2011 repeat winner for Best Sushi, Yummy’s menu has everything from teriyaki, tempura and hibachistyle dinners to sushi and sashimi, as well as a variety of more than 30 specialty rolls. Lunch roll specials run Mon.-Fri. Beer, wine and sake are served. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

SPRINGFIELD & NORTHSIDE ARDEN’S KAFÉ & KATERING 8299 W. Beaver St., 781-7733 See Avondale.

BLUE BOY SANDWICH SHOP 6514 Norwood Ave., 768-9791

See Southside.

FIREHOUSE SUBS 1038 Dunn Ave., Ste. 1, 338-0098 See Mandarin.

FIVE GUYS FAMOUS BURGERS & FRIES 13249 City Square Dr., River City Marketplace, 751-9711 See St. Johns Town Center.

GREEN PAPAYA 13141 City Station Dr., 696-8886 Located in River City Marketplace, this restaurant features a Pan-Asian menu, specializing in Thai cuisine served in a contemporary atmosphere. Dine in or take out. Beer and wine are served. Dress is casual-upscale. Open daily.

See Arlington.

ISLAND TROPICS RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 2527 N. Main St., Springfield, 355-3050

BONO’S PIT BAR-B-Q 5903 Norwood Ave., 765-1817

This Caribbean restaurant is a comfy, relaxed place serving island dishes like fried plantain and codfish for breakfast, and curry goat, jerk chicken and hot wings for lunch and dinner. A variety of desserts, baked goods and tropical drinks are available. Island Tropics specializes in vegetarian meals. Beer and wine are served and take-out is available. Open daily.

See Arlington.

BOSTON’S RESTAURANT & SPORTSBAR BITE CLUB CERTIFIED! 13070 City Station Dr., 751-7499

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A full-service restaurant in River City Marketplace, Boston’s serves up a full menu of sportsbar favorites, including pizzas, pasta, wings, burgers and steak, till 2 a.m. (and there’s a lunch menu with items for less than $7). There are 30 TVs (and major sports packages) and live music every weekend. Dine inside or out on the patio. A full bar is served, and a kids’ menu and take-out are available. Open daily.

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EL POTRO 7200 Normandy Blvd., Ste. 12, 378-9822

JENKINS QUALITY BARBECUE 5945 New Kings Rd., 765-8515 For more than 53 years, Jenkins Quality Barbecue has served some of the best down-home barbecue around. Slather sauce on a whole smoky chicken or a basket of crinkle-cut French fries. All three places have a drive-thru. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

CARL’S MAIN STREET RESTAURANT 1748 N. Main St., 647-8043

LARRY’S GIANT SUBS 12001 Lem Turner Rd., 764-9999

Carl’s Main Street has been serving homestyle breakfast and lunch fare for nearly a dozen years. Takeout is available and there’s an all-you-can-eat Sunday buffet. Open Tue.-Sun.

See Southside.

CASA MARIA 12961 N. Main St., Ste. 104, 757-6411

Chef-owned-and-operated, Legends is the place where the renowned giant fried pork tenderloin originated, but there’s

LEGENDS SANDWICH SHOP 11230 New Berlin Rd., Northside, 696-6156


309-7427

plenty of regular-size dishes, too. Take out or dine in. Open Mon.-Fri. for breakfast and lunch.

See Baymeadows.

MILLHOUSE STEAKHOUSE 1341 Airport Rd., 741-8722

SWEET PETE’S 1922 Pearl St., Springfield, 509-4764

This locally-owned-and-operated steakhouse is a favorite among Northsiders, serving choice steaks from the signature broiler. The menu includes seafood, pasta dishes and Millhouse gorgonzola, plus homemade desserts. A full bar and a children’s menu are available. Live acoustic music is presented on Tue. and Fri. Open for dinner nightly.

This all-natural sweet shop offers features candy and other treats made the old-fashioned way: all natural flavors, no artificial anything. Choose from a variety of candies and natural products, including several kinds of honey.

NAGASAKI SUSHI & GRILL 12400 Yellow Bluff Rd., 751-2311

A 2011 Best of Jax winner for Best Coffeehouse, this coffeehouse offers homemade desserts and pastries, along with light lunches and ready-to-go bistro salads in a funky renovated Springfield space. Beer (featuring Bold City Brewery beers) and wine are served. Indoors and courtyard dining. Local artists’ works decorate the walls. Free Wifi. Open daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Live music is presented Wed.-Sun. and The Cellar is an adjacent wine bar.

This Japanese restaurant offers an authentic traditional menu, including a variety of teriyaki and tempura dishes, as well as hibachi, sushi and satsumi items. Bento boxes and lunch specials are also featured. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

ORANGE TREE HOT DOGS 840 Nautica Dr., River City Marketplace, Ste. 125, 714-0813 See Baymeadows.

RENNA’S PIZZA 840 Nautica Dr., Ste. 117, River City Marketplace, 714-9210 See St. Johns Town Center.

ST. JOHNS SEAFOOD & STEAKS 1403 Dunn Ave., Ste. 21, 696-1023 See Arlington.

SALSARITA’S FRESH CANTINA 840 Nautica Dr., Ste. 131, River City Marketplace, 696-4001 Located in River City Marketplace on the Northside, Salsarita’s offers cuisine with a Southwest flavor made from scratch daily and served in a family atmosphere. Deliver available. Beer and wine are served. A kids’ menu is available. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

SAVANNAH BISTRO 14670 Duval Rd., Northside, 741-4404. Low Country Southern fare, with a twist of Mediterranean and French inspiration, is offered in a relaxing atmosphere at Crowne Plaza Airport. Favorites include crab cakes, New York strip, she crab soup and mahi mahi. A kids’ menu is available. A full bar is served. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

THE SHEIK SANDWICH DELI 2708 N. Main St., 353-8181 See Arlington.

THREE LAYERS CAFE 1602 Walnut St., Springfield, 355-9791

3 LIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL 2467 Faye Rd., 647-8625 This pub serves apps, hoagies, and entrées with a decidedly British bent: bangers and mash, roast prime rib, English oxtail soup and pub fries. It’s casual and fun, too — pizza and a kids menu are also available. Beer and wine are served and the entire menu is available for take-out. Open for lunch and dinner daily.

UPTOWN MARKET 1303 Main St. N., Springfield, 355-0734 Located in the 1300 Building at the corner of Third and Main streets, Uptown Market focuses on fresh food created with the same élan that rules at Burrito Gallery. Innovative breakfast and lunch dishes — including deli selections — are served daily. Beer and wine and take-out are available.

VIVA AUTHENTIC MEXICAN RESTAURANT 2467 Faye Rd., Ste. 10, 527-1261 The chef at Viva creates dishes with a Southern Mexican influence, including fajitas, tacos, burritos, enchiladas and quesadillas made with fresh ingredients and authentic spices and served in a family-friendly atmosphere. Beer, wine and margaritas are served. A children’s menu is available.

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ZAC’S PIZZA & WINGS 12400 Yellow Bluff Rd., Ste. 106, 696-1113 Zac’s offers a variety of pizzas, from New York-style thin crust to Sicilian thick crust, made with quality ingredients and a slew of toppings. Calzones, strombolis and baked pasta dishes round out the menu. There’s also subs, wings and salads. A kids’ menu and free delivery in a four-mile radius are available. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 

STICKY FINGERS 13150 City Station Dr., River City Marketplace,

Crazy Egg in Murray Hill uses ingredients that are fresh, locally available and organic (when possible) in preparing meals that range from breakfast favorites to dinner entrees like prime rib, pork chops, chicken and shrimp & grits. March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 59

FolioW


Perfect Tens

Lunches on a Budget: 10 meals for under 10 bucks

T

he clock strikes noon and all you’ve got is a stomach noisily protesting its emptiness and a $10 bill. You ask the eternal question: Where can I get my grub on without resorting to nasty fast food? I’ve made finding such spots something of a personal hobby, and I’m grateful there are more places than ever that fit the ($10) bill. So here, in no particular order, are my Top 10 picks:

Bowl of Pho (Southside) 9902 Old Baymeadows Rd. Whether you’re pining for fried rice (less than $8.50, depending on your choice of meat) or hungry for hearty soup, there are options galore at this authentic Vietnamese spot — except on Tuesdays, when Bowl of Pho is closed. A mere $7.25 gets a large bowl of pho (Vietnamese noodle soup), which will fill you without emptying your wallet. Another option: Start with spring rolls ($3.50) served with a hoisin-peanut sauce and add a small bowl (which is actually quite large) of pho for $6.25 — homemade simmering beef broth served over rice noodles, accompanied by your choice of rare beef, beef flank, brisket, tendon, tripe or meatball, garnished with lime, jalapeño slices, Thai basil, bean sprouts, cilantro, onion, hoisin sauce or hot chili sauce. The boba teas are great, too; be sure to try the taro flavor. Uptown Market (Springfield) 1303 Main St. N. Most of the regular menu items are in the $7.95 range. Try the asiago roast beef sandwich — thin slices of roast beef piled high with tomatoes, lettuce, roasted peppers, horseradish mayo and asiago cheese on country loaf with a side of coleslaw and pickle ($7.95) or the smoked ham and brie panini with apple slices, caramelized onions and green peppers. Ask about the ever-changing daily specials. And check out the assortment of freshly baked cookies, cobblers and pies. Native Sun Natural Foods Market & Deli (Mandarin & Southside) 10000 San Jose Blvd., 11030 Baymeadows Rd. With an extensive deli case featuring a full hot bar, three daily soups, cold offerings (think pasta salad, curried pears and walnuts, lentils and greens, and wraps) and made-to-order artisan sandwiches and quesadillas, Native Sun is healthy and quick. With lunch specials

60 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

Monday through Friday, you can snag a cup of soup and half a wrap on Tuesdays for $5.99 or a grilled cheese and cup of soup on Friday for

$4.99. Try a scoop of the Stir No Fry salad from the cold bar. And don’t forget to turn around: Behind the deli cases are delectable desserts. The gluten-free oatmeal pie and whoopie pies are simply divine. Tabouleh (Arlington) 7645 Merrill Rd., Ste. 201 This tucked-away Mediterranean café boasts homemade everything; from the hummus to desserts, it’s all made in-house. The sandwich menu options include a side item of hummus, tabouleh, Mediterranean salad or, for the less adventurous, French fries, and range from $5.95 for a tuna salad pita to $7.95 for a lamb shawarma wrap. There are other traditional Greek offerings: falafel pita wrap, tabouleh rider and beef kifta wrap, all under $7. You can’t go wrong with the freshly baked spinach pies — adorable triangular turnovers brushed with olive oil and stuffed with spinach, onions, herbs and spices for $4.95 and a cup of lentil soup with pita chips ($3.95) or Turkish coffee for $2.50.

Chomp Chomp (Downtown) 103 E. Adams St. Newcomer Chomp Chomp has a handful of tables and room for a few hungry patrons at the bar, but for $7 or less, you won’t leave hungry. Everything is $6 or $7 and most items are accompanied by your choice of a spring mix salad or homemade curry-seasoned chips. Owned by the same folks as The Fox in Avondale, Chomp Chomp features a blackboard with daily specials. Try the pork bahn mi with chips or the panko-crusted chicken sandwich with marinated tomatoes and bleu cheese. Great options exist for vegetarians, as tofu can be substituted in most orders. Olio (Downtown) 301 E. Bay St. This newish restaurant is a fabulous addition to Jacksonville’s downtown. The Cobb salad with bacon, avocado, bleu cheese, onion, egg, tomato, smoked chicken and smoked ranch won’t break the bank at $8, and the $7 duck grilled cheese with duck confit, tomato, gruyere and American cheese, with a side of homemade chips or fries ($2) is a unique offering. Another favorite is the falafel wrap with pickles, crisp

© 2012

FolioWeekly

romaine and a flavorful red pepper coulis on warm naan bread ($6), which pairs nicely with a fresh homemade ginger ale ($2.50). Angie’s Subs (Jax Beach) 1436 Beach Blvd. A Jax Beach staple, Angie’s offers two sub sizes: seven-inch or 10-inch. Regulars devour the Sweet Teddy T. — roast beef, turkey, bacon, provolone and Peruvian sauce ($4.89 or $6.45) and Peruvian (ham, genoa salami, bacon, Italian sausage, provolone and Peruvian sauce), but I love the chicken salad sandwich doused with Peruvian. Tip: Ask for your sub “crunchy” — liberally packed with BBQ Fritos — it’s a fun addition. Angie’s sweet tea is a must and a refillable cup is only $1.55. Grab a bag of chips or a brownie and you’re set. Carmine’s Pie House (Riverside) 2677 Forbes St. Less than $8 will get you a Jersey Shore fried calzone complete with homemade ricotta blended with parmesan, romano and mozzarella, fresh garlic and seasonings, stuffed in pizza dough and — wait for it — deep-fried. If you’re in the mood for pizza, grab a slice or two of thin-crust, New York-style pizza for $2.27 (toppings range from .50 to .75). For an upcharge, substitute vegan cheese. Or mix it up with a house salad ($3.77) and garlic cheesy panini bread ($2.97) from the appetizer menu. India’s Restaurant (Southside) 9802 Baymeadows Rd., Ste. 8 Help yourself to multiple trips to the buffet, replete with fabulous vegetarian offerings for $6.99. Items change daily, so it’s always an adventure. Rest assured, warm naan is a staple and used to scoop up delicious morsels, and there’s also salad and dessert. M Shack (Atlantic Beach) 299 Atlantic Blvd. Homemade burgers are $3.50 (add .50 for cheese or $1 for bacon and cheese) and the veggie burger is $5.50. Try any burger “naked” by substituting a lettuce wrap for the bun. The Sunrise Burger, complete with bacon, egg, American cheese slice and Shack Sauce, is $5.50, and it pairs perfectly with a basket of warm sweet potato tots or house fries for $1.99. Or try one of the funky flavors of hand-spun milkshakes: marshmallow brûlée, bananas Foster or pecan pie. (Order the kid’s size for $2.95, the perfect lunch-sized dessert.)  Caron Streibich Host of Folio Weekly’s Bite Club Twitter @FWBiteClub

For information about how to join Bite Club, go to FWBiteClub.com


MARCH 20-26, 2012 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 61


62 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012


Reasons to leave the house this week DIRTY FUN

The fourth annual MuckRuckus MS (formerly the Mud Run) has a new name but features the same filthy fun, combining the benefits of either a 10K (or six miles) or 5K run with the challenge of navigating a series of 25 to 30 boot camp-style obstacles played out in a delightful sea of mud! It’s required to wear long pants and boots that cover the ankle, but runners (ages 12 and older) are encouraged to dress creatively. The race is held on Sat., March 24 and Sun., March 25 with the first wave of contestants hittin’ the dirt at 9 a.m. at Taye Brown Regional Park Sports Complex, 13951 Normandy Blvd., Jacksonville. A DJ, beer and food and a fire truck to hose down the runners are also featured. Register to run singly or as a team; entry fees start at $60. Proceeds benefit Multiple Sclerosis Society programs. 332-6810. muckruckusms.org/Jacksonville

PERFORMANCE

Jumpin’ Jehoshaphat! Since 1986, worldrenowned The Peking Acrobats troupe has been dazzling audiences with airborne acrobatics, gravity-defying somersaults and enough cycling skills to make this most ardent fixed-gear-biketotin’ hipster blush into his microbrew! The group has been featured on TV’s “Guinness Book Primetime” and appeared in Steven Soderbergh’s “Ocean’s Eleven.” Accompanied by the Women’s Peace Orchestra of China, which plays traditional Chinese instruments, The Peking Acrobats perform on Sat., March 24 at 7:30 p.m. at ThrasherHorne Center for the Arts, St. Johns River State College, 283 College Drive, Orange Park. Tickets range from $15-$35. 276-6750.

MUSIC ANOUSHKA SHANKAR

Sitarist-composer Anoushka Shankar carries on a family musical legacy and shares Indian classical music with the world. The daughter of legendary Indian classical musician Ravi Shankar and half-sister of Norah Jones, the 30-year-old London native has released more than a half-dozen innovative albums, twice being nominated for a Grammy. Shankar has collaborated with artists Philip Glass, Herbie Hancock, Joshua Bell, Thievery Corporation and Eric Clapton. Shankar’s latest release, the critically lauded “Traveller,” fuses Indian music with Spanish flamenco. Anoushka Shankar performs on Thur., March 22 at 8 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets are $35 and $40. 355-2787.

CHARITY CHOW DOWN CELEBRITY CHEFS

Over the last 25 years, Celebrity Chefs has raised more than $1.4 million for the Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary, which in turn distributes much-needed funds for projects such as a child development center, a social services center, an adult rehabilitation center and senior center projects. The 26th annual Celebrity Chefs Tasting Luncheon & Silent Auction features food served by more than a dozen local “celebrity chefs” including media personalities, sports figures, business leaders and even government officials (“How about some more of those French-fried taters, Mayor Alvin Brown?”), along with a silent auction offering everything from artwork and collectables to weekend getaways. The luncheon is held on Thur., March 22 from 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at Prime Osborn Center, 1000 Water St., Jacksonville. Tickets are $30. 301-4841.

MUSIC

Folks seeking a little sunshine (or maybe rain – after all, it is Florida) and seafood and quality tunes must hit the 23rd annual Great Atlantic Music Festival on Sat., March 24 from noon-8 p.m. at the oceanfront Seawalk Pavilion, Jax Beach. Seafood fixed every possible way, kids’ games, a surf contest and live music by The Druids, Split Tone, Rachael Warfield, Sol Driven Train, Simplified and Michael Burks (pictured) are featured. Check out our interview with local singer-songwriter Warfield on page 70. greatatlanticmusicfest.com

ART JOHN CAGE’S BIRTHDAY

American maverick John Cage (1912-’92) has been hailed as one of the most visionary artists of the 20th century, for his innovations in music composition, modern dance, writing and even visual art. Cage, cited as an influence by performers as varied as Frank Zappa, Brian Eno, Sonic Youth, Aphex Twin, Stereolab and Oscar-winning sound designer Gary Rydstrom, also helped popularize the music of 19th century composer Erik Satie and push artists like Robert Rauschenberg to explore the concept of “random chance.” To honor what would have been Cage’s 100th birthday, events are being held around the globe. Locally, Museum of Contemporary Art Jax, CoRk Arts District, Friday Musicale and J. Johnson Gallery host events from Sat., March 24 through Fri., March 30, featuring everything from a Cage documentary to performances by sound poet Jaap Blonk, violinist Tom Chiu and pianist Lou Goldstein. Read our story on the celebration on page 77. For a schedule, check out http://bit.ly/xTwIzh.

GLEN CAMPBELL

The self-professed Rhinestone Cowboy, Glen Campbell has enjoyed a dazzling career in music, television and film. Born into a family of sharecroppers in Delight, Ark., Campbell began his 50-year run in show biz as a session guitarist, including stints with The Champs (he played on their 1959 trash rock opus “Tequila”) and The Beach Boys. In the ’60s and ’70s, Campbell dominated the charts with hits “By the Time I Get to Phoenix,” “Wichita Lineman” and “Galveston,” hosted his own TV variety show and even starred in the original film version of “True Grit.” Campbell has released more than 70 records (a dozen of them went gold), selling some 45 million albums. Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in June last year, Campbell has been candid about his condition. His “Goodbye Tour” features three of his children joining him in his backup band. Glen Campbell performs on Sun., March 25 at 8 p.m. at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $31-$54. 355-2787. March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 63


Mars Attacks! Taylor Kitsch plays the lead role in the so-so sci-fi saga “John Carter.”

Epic, Fail

“John Carter” tries to do everything and accomplishes nothing John Carter **@@

Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd.

© 2012 FolioWeekly isney’s pre-summer offering for big-screen

D

entertainment is a bloated sci-fi period piece that freely embraces elements from “Star Wars,” “Avatar,” “Gladiator” and other mega-successful action flicks, yet lacks a coherent story of its own. Worse, the decision of the makers of “John Carter” to cram in

of “Sherlock Holmes”), along with internal disputes among the four-armed Tharks, and you have a movie going in every direction but forward. “John Carter” is director and co-writer Andrew Stanton’s first attempt at live action. He previously made the enjoyable animated hits “Wall*E” and “Finding Nemo,” among others, but with actual humans, he seems a bit overwhelmed, never finding the proper cinematic propulsion. Whereas Brad Bird seamlessly went from animation (“The Incredibles”) to live action (“Mission: Impossible — Ghost Protocol”), Stanton has

It all feels like a ripoff of other, better movies. One can imagine the producers pitching the film to financiers with a veritable laundry list of the movies it’s going to remind people of, all while telling a crazy story of its own.

64 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

everything from Edgar Rice Burroughs’ original source material was foolhardy, as it leads to a number of boring, tangential scenes that go nowhere. The first 10 minutes of the film set the tone. Within that time, we go from Mars to 1881 New York to the Old West, and none of it makes any sense. Finally, we learn that a Civil War veteran, John Carter (Taylor Kitsch), is on the run from authorities when he comes across an odd medallion and is transported to Mars, or as the Martian locals call it, Barsoom. There he meets the Na’vi, uh … I mean, Thark, a race of large green creatures with four arms who, despite their menacing looks, are quite nice once you get to know them. Little does Carter know he left one civil war for another. Battling for dominance on Mars are the Helium and Zodanga tribes, who are human. The plan is for peace to be settled through the marriage of Helium’s Princess Dejah (Lynn Collins) and Zodanga’s Sab Than (Dominic West), but (naturally) we discover that Sab has ulterior motives. Add to this plot a race of mysterious shape-shifters called the Holy Therns (one played by Mark Strong

a heavy script with too many characters, locations and visual effects to mold into fluid, let alone enjoyable, cinema. This would’ve been too much for a lot of directors, but it’s particularly so for one working with real people for the first time. That said, about three-quarters of the way through, the film finds its focus. Once Stanton figures out what we know all along — that John will have to save Dejah, fall in love, save several worlds — the movie surges to an intense, action-packed ending that has a few surprises up its sleeve. Still, it all feels like a ripoff of other, better movies. One can imagine the producers pitching the film to financiers with a veritable laundry list of the movies it’s going to remind people of, all while telling a crazy story of its own. This in itself isn’t terrible, but for all the visual flair, the colors seem oddly monotone and the 3-D doesn’t pop. In other words, “John Carter” is bad enough in that it simply reminds us how much better those earlier, action-style blockbusters were.  Dan Hudak themail@folioweekly.com


Home On the Deranged

Elizabeth Olsen stars in the innovatively creepy and atmospheric horror “Silent House” Silent House ***@

Rated R • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd.

I

n the vein of “The Ring” and “The Grudge” (both Japanese) and “Let the Right One In” (Swedish), it’s time for yet another American remake of a foreign language horror film. “Silent House,” or “La Casa Muda” in its original version, was made in 2010 by director Gustavo Hernandez with a budget of roughly $6,000 and wound up as that country’s official entry in the running for Oscar’s Best Foreign Language Film. As if that weren’t impressive enough, the movie also featured a technical tour-de-force, namely, the appearance of one sustained shot (unedited) mirroring real time in terms of the story. Once again, as were the three other remakes, the American version of “Silent House” is a worthy rendition of the original. The budget is somewhat bigger, though nowhere near the typical horror/slasher flick, and the technique remains the same, only considerably more polished. The story runs the same as the viewing time (about 85 minutes), and it seems to be filmed in one continuous shot — though, in actuality, there are several cleverly concealed cuts. This approach should not be confused with the technique of “Blair Witch,” “Cloverfield” or “Quarantine” (yet another American remake). The footage of “Silent House” doesn’t pretend to be a faux documentary; instead, the filmmakers utilize a self-conscious technique to create both suspense and surprise without resorting to familiar editing tricks and special effects. It’s also a way of trying to make the action look even more real and therefore creepier. The result is certainly not your typical horror film. There are three principal characters in the film: Sarah (Elizabeth Olsen), her father John (Adam Trese) and her Uncle Peter (Eric Sheffer Stevens). The movie opens in the early evening, as the three are in the process of packing up the family house. When Uncle Peter leaves, things start getting strange — beginning with odd noises from the upper floor. After her father goes to investigate, leaving Sarah by herself, the weirdness grows disproportionately. In short order, Sarah finds herself in a struggle for her

life with unknown malevolent forces. While utilizing many of the familiar tropes from similar horror and suspense films, “Silent House” manages to be more original than most — and not just in the technical aspects of the continuous unedited shot. The ever-present camera (focused mostly on Olsen through the whole film) turns out to be more than a gimmick. Because we are continually observing Sarah and what she sees and does, our perceptions become one with hers. But in this case, truth might not always be in the eye of the beholder, which ends up begging the question about what is real on the screen as well as in the house. In short, “Silent House” has some real surprises. The American version is written and directed by Chris Kentis and his wife Laura Lau. She also gets credit as producer and screenwriter. Their last film was 2004’s “Open Water,” the nail-biter about the scuba-diving couple accidentally abandoned in shark-infested waters. For that endeavor, Kentis took credit for writing, directing and editing, while the two of them shared honors for the cinematography. What both films have in common is an extremely unusual approach to thrills and suspense, as well as a fascination with the technical challenges of different visual perspectives. Kentis and Lau obviously relish a challenge. Some horror fans are likely to grow disenchanted with the self-reflective technical aspects of “Silent House,” preferring their frights more front and center. But after a somewhat slow start, the movie grows more and more rewarding as the plot unfurls under the open eye of the ever-present, though not necessarily always reliable, camera lens. Elizabeth Olsen, the younger sister of Kate and Ashley, follows up her acclaimed performance in last year’s “Martha Marcy May Marlene” with another solid turn in a quite different kind of film. She has clearly emerged from the shadow of the celebrity twins, and “Silent House” confirms her considerable talent and promise. As I mentioned earlier, “Silent House” is different from what you might expect in a “horror” film. And for me, at least, that’s a real plus.  Pat McLeod themail@folioweekly.com

Residential Evil! Sarah (Elizabeth Olsen) gets her scream on in the eerie scarefest “Silent House.”

March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 65


Kentucky Fried Movie: Donald Sutherland taps into the spirit of Col. Sanders in his role as Pres. Snow in the postapocalyptic sci-fi flick “The Hunger Games,” opening on March 23.

AREA THEATERS

AMELIA ISLAND Carmike Amelia Island 7, 1132 S. 14th St., 261-9867 ARLINGTON & REGENCY AMC Regency 24, 9451 Regency Square Blvd., 264-3888 BAYMEADOWS & MANDARIN Regal Avenues 20, 9525 Philips Highway, 538-3889 BEACHES Regal Beach Blvd. 18, 14051 Beach Blvd., 992-4398 FIVE POINTS 5 Points Theatre, 1028 Park St., 359-0047 NORTHSIDE Hollywood River City 14, River City Marketplace, 12884 City Center Blvd., 757-9880

FILM RATINGS **** 4'33" ***@ 420 **@@ 8:05 *@@@ 666

NOW SHOWING ACT OF VALOR **G@ Rated R • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. This action film tells the story of Bandito Platoon, an elite team of Navy SEALs sent on a global manhunt to topple a deadly terrorist plot and save a CIA operative who’s been kidnapped. Roselyn Sanchez, Nestor Serrano and actual Navy SEALs star in this patriotic thriller. THE ARTIST ***@ Rated PG-13 • Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Pot Belly’s, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd., Sun-Ray Cinema @ Five Points An Oscar favorite, “The Artist” is director Michel Hazanavicius’ expertly rendered tale of 1927 silent film star George Valentin’s (Jean Dujardin) personal and professional life, played out at the advent of “talkies.” Fate, metaphor and romance are explored with supporting efforts from Bérénice Bejo, Penelope Ann Miller, John Goodman and Missi Pyle. Shot entirely in black-and-white with no dialogue, “The Artist” reminds us why we still fall in love with stories told on the silver screen. CHRONICLE ***@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Cinemark Tinseltown This sci-fi film from writer-director Josh Trank and co-writer Max Landis follows the misadventures of a trio of teens (Dane DeHaan, Alex Russell, Michael B. Jordan) documentary-style, with “found” footage allegedly retrieved from their video cameras. After they develop telekinetic powers, the laughs die down and the body count rises when the troubled Andrew (DeHaan) decides to use his powers for darker purposes.

66 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012

THE DESCENDANTS **** Rated R • Epic Theatre St. Augustine The latest from writer-director Alexander Payne features Oscar-worthy performances from George Clooney and Shailene Woodley in the story of a reluctant patriarch and his quirky family who are troubled in paradise and find real family values in Hawaii.

ORANGE PARK AMC Orange Park 24, 1910 Wells Road, (888) AMC-4FUN Carmike Fleming Island 12, 1820 Town Center Blvd., 621-0221 SAN MARCO San Marco Theatre, 1996 San Marco Blvd., 396-4845 SOUTHSIDE Cinemark Tinseltown, 4535 Southside Blvd., 998-2122 ST. AUGUSTINE Epic Theatres, 112 Theatre Drive, 797-5757 IMAX Theater, World Golf Village, 940-IMAX Pot Belly’s, 36 Granada St., 829-3101

DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX **G@ Rated PG • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd., San Marco Theater, WGV IMAX Theater The latest animated adaptation of the work of Theodore Geisel features the voices of Zac Efron, Taylor Swift, Rob Riggle, Ed Helms and Danny DeVito. In the land of Thneedville, everything is made of plastic and teenager Audrey (Swift) wants to see a real tree. When smitten 12-year-old Ted (Efron) accepts the challenge, he encounters The Once-ler (Helms) who tells the boy the story of The Lorax (DeVito) and the fate of the trees. While “Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax” benefits from deft animation and worthy performances, its heavy-handed environmental tone seems more like a distraction, especially for younger viewers. FRIENDS WITH KIDS **@@ Rated R • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Cinemark Tinseltown, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. Producer-screenwriter-actor Jennifer Westfeldt’s directorial debut employs an ensemble cast, including Maya Rudolph, Kristen Wiig, Megan Fox, Adam Scott and “Mad Men” hunk (and Westfeldt’s longtime, real-life main squeeze) Jon Hamm. “Friends With Kids” is a rom-com that revolves around a pair of best friends who decide to have a child and still date other people — not unlike the progressively romantic lifestyles of a few of the staff here at Folio Weekly. GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE *@@@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Cinemark Tinseltown, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues Nicolas Cage continues his successful campaign of starring in a movie every two weeks in this silly sequel to the ’07 film based on the Marvel Comic. Johnny Blaze (Cage) must rescue Satan’s (Ciarán Hinds) preteen son Danny (Fergus Riordan) with the help of cycle-riding priest Moreau (Idris Elba). Throw in some tattooed monks (led by Christopher Lambert), bad acting and some over-the-top special effects, and you have a film that leaves a fiery sensation right in the ass of any discerning movie lover. GONE **G@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park A year after barely escaping the clutches of a serial killer, Jill Conway (Amanda Seyfried) discovers her sister Molly (Emily Wickersham) has been abducted by the very same guy. Time is running out and, with no leads or help from the police, Jill has no choice but to track the psycho down herself. This enjoyable take on “the hunter becomes the hunted” is the first English-speaking film from Brazilian director Heitor Dhalia.


GOOD DEEDS **G@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues The latest from Oprah-sanctioned auteur Tyler Perry is about wealthy businessman Wesley Deeds (Perry) whose priorities begin to change when he becomes involved with struggling single mother, Lindsey (Thandie Newton), who’s just been evicted. Perry’s 11th film co-stars Jamie Kennedy, Brian J. White and Rebecca Romijn. THE HUNGER GAMES Film not yet reviewed Rated PG-13 • Opens on Friday, March 23 This much-anticipated adaptation of Suzanne Collins’ immensely popular young adult novel stars Jennifer Lawrence (“Winter’s Bone”), Josh Hutcherson and Liam Hemsworth. In a post-apocalyptic world, a dystopian country called Panem (where North America once existed) holds an annual, televised event “The Hunger Games,” in which adolescents ages 12-18 are forced to fight to the death. Author Collins also produced and wrote the screenplay for the heavily hyped sci-fi action film. THE IRON LADY ***@ Rated PG-13 • Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Pot Belly’s Meryl Streep stars in the critically acclaimed historical drama about Margaret Thatcher and her journey from a grocer’s daughter to prime minister of the United Kingdom for nearly a dozen years which earned her the nickname “The Iron Lady” for her hard-line, conservative policies. Jim Broadbent co-stars. JOHN CARTER **@@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. Reviewed in this issue. JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND **@@ Rated PG • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. Josh Hutcherson, Dwayne Johnson, Luiz Guzman and Michael “I needed the money, mate” Caine star in this familygeared film about a teenager’s adventure on a remote island in the South Pacific. PROJECT X *@@@ Rated R • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. This needless teen raunchfest trades the original humor and dialogue that made “Superbad” so enjoyable and instead replaces it with a stream of unoriginal standards of the genre i.e. booze, drugs and topless women. Filmed on handycam, “Project X” features a cast of virtual unknowns and after this lame excuse for a comedy they will surely remain that way. RAMPART ***G Rated R • Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd.

Woody Harrelson stars in this powerful crime-drama about a corrupt L.A. cop who’s reckless in his personal life. Costarring Anne Heche, Cynthia Nixon, Steve Buscemi, Ned Beatty, Ice Cube and Robin Wright. SAFE HOUSE ***@ Rated R • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. Denzel Washington and Ryan Reynolds star in this enjoyable albeit predictable action flick from director Paul Greengrass (the “Bourne” films). Rookie CIA operative Matt Weston (Reynolds) has finally hit the big time after nabbing rogue agent Tobin Frost (Washington). But when killer mercenaries attack the agency’s South African “safe house,” Matt and Tobin are on the run — and the young agent learns justice and loyalty aren’t guaranteed. SILENT HOUSE ***@ Rated R • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. Reviewed in this issue. THIS MEANS WAR **@@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. This lightweight rom-com stars Chris Pine and Tom Hardy as two CIA agents locked into a heated contest over the affections of Reese Witherspoon. A superficial story and mediocre performances from the cast make “This Means War” a pointless crusade for those questing quality entertainment. A THOUSAND WORDS **@@ Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. Fast-talking literary agent Jack McCall (Eddie Murphy) wakes up one morning and discovers a beautiful magic tree in his backyard. The only problem with the new landscaping is that chatty Jack discovers that every time he says a word, a leaf dies. And when the last leaf drops (a thousand, to be exact), Jack’s a goner! Kerry Washington, Cliff Curtis and Clark Duke also star in this latest comedy from funnyman Murphy.

© 2012

FolioWeekly

21 JUMP STREET **@@ Rated R • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Carmike Amelia Island, Carmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. The popular ’80s TV show “jumps” to the big screen as this action-comedy starring It Boy hot shots Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum. After babyfaced rookie cops Schmidt (Hill) and Jenko (Tatum) join the top-secret Jump Street unit, they wind up going deep undercover as high school students. Once back in class, the bumbling pair realizes they have to bust up a dangerous drug ring and face down a few lingering anxieties from their old school days.

After the third hour of being stuck on the elevator, the cast of the rom-com “Friends With Kids” realized the continuous Muzak loop of Steppenwolf’s “Magic Carpet Ride” had, in fact, morphed from a blessing to a curse.

March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 67


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Rated PG-13 • AMC Orange Park, AMC Regency Square, Sales Rep Carmike Amelia Island,rlCarmike Fleming Island, Cinemark Tinseltown, Epic Theatre St. Augustine, Hollywood River City, Regal Avenues, Regal Beach Blvd. The rom-com genre hits bottom with this silly sentimental tripe about a woman (Rachel McAdams) who suffers amnesia after a head injury. Now her hubby (Channing Tatum) tries his damnedest to love her all over again and remind her that true love is never forgotten — unless, of course, it’s delivered through 90 minutes of gushy drivel from director Michael Sucsy. Jessica Lange and Sam Neill climb aboard for this hardly promising cinematic snooze ride. WANDERLUST *@@@ Rated R • AMC Orange Park, Cinemark Tinseltown Paul Rudd and Jennifer Aniston star in this directionless exercise in “city slicker”-style comedy as a couple of Manhattan urbanites who (ahem) wander into a hippie enclave in Georgia. Justin Theroux, Alan Alda and Malin Akerman co-star in the latest from director David Wain (“Role Models.”) WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN **@@ Rated R • Regal Beach Blvd., Sun-Ray Cinemas Tilda Swinton and John C. Reilly star in director Lynne Ramsay’s psychological thriller about the troubled relationship between mother Eva (Swinton) and her increasingly evil 15-year-old son, Kevin (Ezra Miller).

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Daniel Radcliffe makes his adult role debut as recently widowed attorney Arthur who Sales Rep rl goes to a remote British village to settle a dead woman’s account. There he encounters eccentric locals and meets a murderous spirit known as The Woman in Black. Ciarán Hinds and Misha Handley co-star in director James Watkins’ certifiably spooky picture.

OTHER FILMS SUN-RAY CINEMA “Tim and Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie,” “Albert Nobbs,” “Wanderlust” and “We Need to Talk About Kevin” are screened at Sun-Ray Cinema@5 Points, 1028 Park St., Jacksonville. The theater also screens “The Hunger Games” through March 31. Call 359-0047 for showtimes. sunraycinema.com LATITUDE 30 CINEGRILLE “Sherlock Holmes 2” and “Alvin & The Chipmunks: Chipwrecked” are currently running at Latitude 30’s new movie theater CineGrille, 10370 Philips Highway, Southside. Call for showtimes. 365-5555. BUSTER KEATON FILM GROUP “The Goat” (1921), “The Frozen North” (1922) and “The Balloonatic” (1923) are screened at 7 p.m. on March 26 at Pablo Creek branch library, 13295 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Admission is free. 314-5801. NotTheKeatonSociety.com JOHN CAGE DOCUMENTARY “The Revenge of the Dead Indians: In Memoriam of John

© 2012

68 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

Cage” is screened at 7:30 p.m. on March 26 at Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, 333 N. Laura St., downtown. 366-6911. WEEKEND NATURE MOVIES “Moth & Butterfly” screens at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. on March 24, 25 and 31 at GTM Research Reserve Environmental Education Center, 505 Guana River Road, Ponte Vedra. 823-4500. POT BELLY’S CINEMA “Albert Nobbs,” “The Artist,” “Carnage,” “The Iron Lady” and “My Week With Marilyn” are shown at Pot Belly’s, 36 Granada St., St. Augustine. 829-3101. WGHOF IMAX THEATER “Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax” is screened along with “Under the Sea,” “Forces of Nature,” “Legends of Flight 3D,” “Rescue 3D,” “The Wildest Dream: Conquest of Everest,” “Born To Be Wild 3D” and “Hubble 3D” at World Golf Hall of Fame Village, 1 World Golf Place, St. Augustine. 940-IMAX. worldgolfimax.com

NEW ON DVD & BLU-RAY THE DESCENDANTS The latest from writer-director Alexander Payne (“About Schmidt,” “Sideways”) features strong performances by George Clooney and Shailene Woodley in an engaging story about a reluctant patriarch (Clooney) and his quirky family who discover trouble in paradise and real family values in Hawaii. A critical favorite from last year, “The Descendants” snagged two Golden Globe Awards, as well as an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay. THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN Steven Spielberg’s CGI-animated adaptation of the popular Belgian comic strip speeds along with cutting-edge special effects, yet is stalled by a dull, predictable story that comes across like a weird form of self-plagiarism. Tintin (voiced by Jamie Bell) and his dog Snowy are on an action-packed adventure with Haddock (Andy Serkis) to unravel the secrets of a mysterious ship. Younger viewers will enjoy “Tintin,” but older fans of authentic action fare may feel like they’ve been transported into yet another video game disguised as a film. MY WEEK WITH MARILYN Based on an account from Colin Clark (Eddie Redmayne), a young man who worked for Sir Lawrence Olivier, this film stars Michelle Williams as the legendary Marilyn Monroe, on location shooting “The Prince and the Showgirl,” with Olivier (Kenneth Branagh). The blonde bombshell spirits Colin away on a lark, flagrantly misbehaving. Co-stars Julia Ormond, Emma Watson and Toby Jones. Williams won a Golden Globe for her portrayal of the doomed star; she was nominated for Best Actress by the Academy Awards and British Academy Film Awards. MELANCHOLIA The latest from writer-director Lars von Trier stars Kirsten Dunst, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Kiefer Sutherland. It’s the story of a contentious relationship between two sisters as Earth heads on a crash-course to collision with the rogue planet, Melancholia. While the unique narrative, Imagist sequences, somber tone and soundtrack featuring Wagner’s “Tristan und Isolde” didn’t exactly pack ’em in at the multiplex, von Trier continues his consistent and inventive work as a filmmaker. This deserves a second look on DVD. 

FolioWeekly

Royal Tux: Jonah Hill (left) and Channing Tatum are gunning for a little early-career overexposure in the cop-buddy action comedy “21 Jump Street.”


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Hot Water Music frontman Chuck Ragan (middle) is joined by upright bassist Joe Ginsberg (left) and violinist Joe Gaunt for The Revival Tour.

THE REVIVAL TOUR: CHUCK RAGAN, TOM GABEL, DAN ANDRIANO, NATHANIEL RATELIFF, CORY BRANAN Sun., March 25 at 7 p.m. Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville Tickets are $17. 398-7496

P

unk rock definitely isn’t dead. But the folktinged, Americana-rooted Revival Tour has done wonders to help the genre age gracefully, evolving and, by extension, surviving. Originally dreamed up in 2008 by Hot Water Music frontman Chuck Ragan, the collaborative, family-style Revival Tour ethos — everybody on stage playing together throughout the night, creating one part aging-punker jam session and one part old-timey hoedown — echoes Ragan’s and his thirtysomething contemporaries’ natural progression from three-chord crunch to more acoustic-based singer-songwriter fare. The Florida-raised and famously road-obsessed Ragan, joined on this upcoming Revival Tour by Oldest City inhabitants Tom Gabel of Against Me! and Dan Andriano of Alkaline Trio, along with Nathaniel Rateliff and Cory Branan, still applies the same passionate enthusiasm and everyman inclusiveness to this new, quieter iteration of his performing life. Folio Weekly chatted with Ragan about The Revival Tour’s egalitarian structure and its firm roots far in the past.

Folio Weekly: What was the original catalyst for your progression from straight-up punk to acoustic folk? Chuck Ragan: I grew up playing a lot of this music well before I was ever in Hot Water Music. And I never got out of it — when Hot

Water was going full steam, it just consumed every bit of time. When we took a hiatus, I never stopped playing or writing music. The other three dudes were doing The Draft, so it was just natural for me to continue doing what I was doing, but also put more focus on it. F.W.: How did that personal crusade turn into The Revival Tour? C.R.: One element about punk rock is that on every tour, by the end of the night, we’d all end up on stage together, so the idea was very simple: Why can’t we communicate a little more beforehand and actually play the entire tour this way? In all honesty, it’s nothing original; this style of sharing music has been around for hundreds of years. When there was a big barn-raising back in the day, there were no changeovers or headliners or breaks in between acts — it was just people working, playing music, making food and sharing it all at one time together. That was the concept for The Revival Tour, to completely revive music within each other as well as for the folks who are enjoying the show. F.W.: You’ve known Tom Gabel and Dan Adriano, both of whom live in St. Augustine, for years. How about Nathaniel Rateliff and Cory Branan — have you toured with them before? C.R.: No, and I’m excited. I’ve admired their music for a long time; they’re absolutely incredible songwriters, and I have all the respect in the world for them. We all know each other and get along great, which is the most special element of this tour. F.W.: When you started The Revival Tour in

2008, did you anticipate it being a yearly event? C.R.: That was the initial plan when my wife and I kicked it off: “Man, it would be cool if this was something that came around every year with the lineup constantly changing.” Of course, we didn’t want to come out of the gate and say, “We’re gonna do this every year!” We wanted to see if it was even something people would get into. It’s really different from any style of touring I’ve ever done in 17 years out on the road. But the first half-hour of the first show, I sat back and thought, “This is it. We need to all pitch in and keep this thing going for years so we can share this music the way it’s meant to be shared.” F.W.: So even as the tour gets bigger, will Chuck Ragan always be the main fixture? C.R.: I’m not planning on being on it all the time — in fact, I don’t want to be on it all the time. I want to see this tour thrive and feature new artists. F.W.: Seems like in 2012, the venues are bigger, as well. C.R.: Some of ’em are, but the venue size doesn’t matter to me. I’ve played massive venues where you could hear a pin drop and it felt dead — and then I’ve played places where you could barely fit 100 people in the room and everybody’s packed in shoulder to shoulder singing every word and it’s the best show of your life. We’re just looking to continue to bring a memorable showcase event to folks in an honest, grassroots fashion. For us, it’s more about the moment than what it looks like on paper.  Nick McGregor themail@folioweekly.com

MARCH 20-26, 2012 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 69


The Girl Can’t Help It

Youth (and sleep) are no obstacles for up-and-coming Beaches native Rachael Warfield GREAT ATLANTIC MUSIC FESTIVAL: THE DRUIDS, SPLIT TONE, RACHAEL WARFIELD, SOL DRIVEN TOUR, SIMPLIFIED, MICHAEL BURKS Sat., March 24 from noon-8 p.m.; Warfield is on at 3 p.m. Seawalk Pavilion, Jax Beach greatatlanticmusicfest.com

A

t 22, Jacksonville Beach native Rachael Warfield has been around nearly as long as the Great Atlantic Music Festival, which marks its 23rd year on Sat., March 24 at Seawalk Pavilion. Warfield, a local musician (rachaelwarfieldmusic.com) and full-time University of North Florida student, takes the stage at 3 p.m. for a 45-minute set. It’s be her first time playing the event, but she’s no stranger to the festival. Speaking to us on her way to the airport for a school trip to Spain, she says, “Growing up, my family would always go to the different festivals at the beach.” Warfield performs as a vocalist and pianist, solo and with her band, The Rachael Warfield Band, which for the Great Atlantic Festival includes David Lee Redding (guitar), Gene Yi (bass) and Doug Lewis (drums). The quartet will play original tunes with a few covers thrown in. Growing up in Jax Beach, Warfield knew by age three that she wanted to pursue music. “My parents have a great love and admiration for music and musicians,” she explains. “I was always singing and performing. Songs were just bursting out of me.” Since her toddler years, Warfield has performed in numerous off-Broadway productions; she had the lead in “Annie.” At 13, Warfield was admitted to Douglas Anderson School of the Arts, where she majored in vocal music and studied piano. At the age of 16, she met and began working with producer and composer Tony Coluccio, who founded Global Media Music in New York City. “Tony’s basically cultivated me and my music from the time I was 16 to 20,” Warfield says. The duo worked several songs together, including her two singles, “Take Me Away” and

70 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

“Out of My Mind.” (Her tunes can be heard for free at iheartradio.com/new2/featured/f/3549). Warfield cites influences ranging from Motown to Fiona Apple, old-school rap and Radiohead. “Marvin Gaye is my absolute idol.” Warfield says she only gets three to four hours of sleep each night. “I’m just extremely passionate and focused,” she explains. “I just enjoy my life so much.” Before enrolling at UNF as an International Business major, Warfield took a trip to New York City to chat with Coluccio about whether she should pursue her music full force or take a different path. “I decided to take the time to understand every facet of the music business,” she says. “If I know the business, no one will be able to take advantage of me.” Warfield is currently a full-time student and full-time musician — she’s performed throughout Florida including locally at Freebird Live, Jack Rabbits and CW17’s Your Jax Music Fest, as well as Miami’s Van Dyke Café and Paddy Reilly’s Music Bar in New York City. Warfield also toured with Pablo Drum in the Dominican Republic. Other bands appearing at the Great Atlantic Festival include locals The Druids, Split Tone, Sol Driven Train from Charleston, S.C., Simplified from Charlotte, N.C. and the headliner, blues guitarist-vocalist heavyweight Michael Burks. The free event features a hodgepodge of seafood vendors, a festival market place, a surf contest, and rides, games and kids’ activities. “I always had the intention of making it onto that stage,” Warfield says of the longrunning festival. It seems certain that Northeast Florida will be hearing more from this up-andcoming songstress. After Warfield graduates from UNF in December, she plans to move to either New York or Los Angeles to continue her music career. In the meantime, she’s working on a video, putting together a business plan for radio tours and preparing to head to L.A. to record her album. No wonder she doesn’t get much sleep.  Kara Pound themail@folioweekly.com

Local singer-songwriter Rachael Warfield performs at this year’s Great Atlantic Music Festival.


FreebirdLive.com 200 N. 1st St., Jax Beach, FL • 904.246.BIRD (2473)

CONCERTS THIS WEEK

CHRIS WEBBY, KIDS THESE DAYS, JAKE BISTRONG These indie rockers play at 7 p.m. on March 21 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Tickets are $15. 398-7496. WILSON PHILIPS The ’80s pop goddesses perform at 8 p.m. on March 21 at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $36-$78.50. 355-2787. SUWANNEE SPRINGFEST: YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING BAND, PETER ROWAN & TONY RICE, JUSTIN TOWNES EARLE, LARRY KEEL & NATURAL BRIDGE, JASON ISBELL & THE 400 UNIT, DONNA THE BUFFALO, RANDALL BRAMBLETT & GEOFF ACHISON, GRANDPA’S COUGH MEDICINE, WHETHERMAN The four-day festival of music and camping is held March 22-25 at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park, 3076 95th Drive, Live Oak. Tickets are $150; $125 for students and military. For a full schedule and to purchase tickets, go to suwanneespringfest.com BLACK LIPS, MEMPHIBIANS Self-professed flower punk band Black Lips performs at 8 p.m. on March 22 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Tickets are $12. 398-7496. DONNA ULISSE, THE POOR MOUNTAIN BOYS The bluegrass kicks in at 8 p.m. on March 22 at European Street CafÊ, 1704 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 399-1740. SPEEDWOLF, FORBIDDEN SIGHT, THE 2416, LIFE CHAIN Denver-based thrash heads Speedwolf play at 8 p.m. on March 22 at Burro Bar, 100 E. Adams St., Jacksonville. 353-4686. THE MIKE HENDRIX BAND This local rock group plays at 9 p.m. on March 22 at Flight 747 Lounge, 1500 Airport Road, Jacksonville. 741-4331. The group also plays at 9:30 p.m. on March 23 at Stage One Sports Bar & Dance Club, 96026 Victoria’s Place, Yulee. 583-9275. NOBFEST 2012: ALLIGATOR, THE COUGS, THE 2416, STIFF BINDLES, TEENAGE LOBOTOMY This three-day festival of indie music is held at 5 p.m. on March 23 and at 2 p.m. on March 24 and 25 at Nobby’s, 10 Anastasia Blvd., St. Augustine. Admission is $8 for March 23; $10 for March 24 and 25; three-day pass is $22. 547-2188.

THE DOYLE DUO This husband-and-wife acoustic team appears at 7 p.m. on March 23 at Three Layers CafÊ, 1602 Walnut St., Jacksonville. 355-9791. COMEBACK KID, FOUNDATION, CLOSE YOUR EYES, SUCH GOLD, LIVING WITH LIONS The heavy rock and thrash kick off at 7 p.m. on March 23 at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $13 and $15. 223-9850. SCREAMIN’ EAGLE Indie folk freak Screamin’ Eagle plays at 7:30 p.m. on March 23 at Lillie’s Coffee Bar, 200 N. First St., Neptune Beach. 249-2922. KIX BROOKS, ANDY GIBSON Brooks (of country greats Brooks & Dunn) performs at 8 p.m. on March 23 at Veterans Memorial Arena, 300 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. 630-3900. A DYING REGIME These hard-hitters play at 8 p.m. on March 23 at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $8. 246-2473. ANDY McKEE, ANTOININE DUFOUR Acoustic guitarist McKee is on at 8 p.m. on March 23 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Tickets are $15. 398-7496. LYLE LOVETT, JOHN HIATT Singer-songwriting legends Lovett and Hiatt perform at 8 p.m. on March 23 at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., St. Augustine. Tickets range from $29.50-$49.50. 209-0367. EMMA’S REVOLUTION CD Release Party The alt folk duo celebrates a new CD at 8:30 p.m. on March 23 at Unitarian Universalist Church, 7405 Arlington Expressway, Jacksonville. Advance tickets are $15; $18 at the door. 725-8133. THE LOOTERS These rockers cause a riot onstage at 9 p.m. on March 23 at Dog Star Tavern, 10 N. Second St., Fernandina Beach. 277-8010. DJ MASEO (De La Soul), $BIG BUCKS$ CREW The progressive hip hop kicks off at 9 p.m. on March 23 at Phoenix Taproom, 325 W. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Admission is $7. 799-7123. BIG ENGINE These local faves roar onstage at 9 p.m. on March 23 and

24 at Cliff’s Bar & Grill, 3033 Monument Rd., Jacksonville. 645-5162. MIKE BERNOS BAND The New Orleans-style blues rockers play at 10 p.m. on March 23 at Mojo No. 4, 3572 St. Johns Ave., Jacksonville. 381-6670. JACKSONVILLE FINE ARTS FESTIVAL: LAUREN FINCHAM, TROPIC OF CANCER, WILL PEARSALL, THE 77D’S, ERNIE AND DEBI EVANS This Avondale-based arts festival features live music starting at 10:20 a.m. on March 24 and 25 at Boone Park, 3700 St. Johns Ave., Jacksonville. shoppesofavondale.com/jacksonville_ fine_arts_festival PATTY LARKIN, MICHAEL RENO HARRELL Singer-songwriter Larkin performs at 7 p.m. on March 24 at Flagler College Auditorium, 74 King St., St. Augustine. Tickets are $25; $35 for VIP which includes CD. 794-4163. gamblerogersfest.com RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET Candy Lee is on at 10:30 a.m., Larry Mangum performs at 11:55 a.m. and Hoku-loa Polynesian Dance is featured at 2:30 p.m. on March 24 under the Fuller Warren Bridge at Riverside Avenue, downtown. 554-6865. riversideartsmarket.com ROBERT & AMY McCORMICK FUNDRAISER: BILLY BOWERS, FRANKIE PHILLIPS BAND, THAT 80s SHOW, MIKE BARBER BAND These local acts start up at noon on March 24 at River City Brewing Company, 835 Museum Circle, Jacksonville. Suggested donation is $10. Proceeds benefit the McCormick family’s medical bills due to severe burn injuries. 398-2299. GREAT ATLANTIC MUSIC FESTIVAL: THE DRUIDS, SPLIT TONE, RACHEL WARFIELD, SOL DRIVEN TOUR, SIMPLIFIED, MICHAEL BURKS The live music and seafood delights kick off at noon on March 24 at the oceanfront Seawalk Pavilion, Jax Beach. greatatlanticmusicfest.com JUST LIKE GENTLEMEN, INDIGO MR. FITCH, SILENCE THE DOUBTFUL, BEARSHARK, SERYICAL, NOBODY ON LAND The exciting local rock action kicks off at 7 p.m. on March 24 at Brewster’s Pit, 14003 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 223-9850. BRIE CECIL

FRIDAY MARCH 23

3rd STONE OSCAR MIKE

A Dying Regime /Jenni Reid SATURDAY MARCH 24

KATCHAFIRE Common Kings/N’Nova JAHMEN MONDAY MARCH 26

HOT CHELLE RAE

Cady Groves/Electric Touch THURSDAY MARCH 29

TORNADO RIDER

Catfish Alliance

FREEBIRD FRIDAY MARCH 30

FRONTIERS (Journey Tribute) SATURDAY MARCH 31

BREATHE CAROLINA

THE READY SET

ASHLAND HIGH/MATT TOKA Romance on a Rocketship THURSDAY APRIL 5

Cannibal Corpse

VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

The Best Live Music in St. Augustine!

“Join us for Blues, Rock & Funk�

March 22 Deron Baker March 23 & 24 Sentropolis

,JOH4USFFUt4U"VHVTUJOFt

VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

VVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

Exhumed/Abysamal Dawn/Arkaik SATURDAY APRIL 7

Mon-

Men’s Night Out Beer Pong 7pm $1 Draft $5 Pitchers Free Pool ALL U CAN EAT CRABLEGS

Tues-

Texas Hold ’Em STARTS AT 7 P.M.

Wed-

Bar Bingo/Karaoke ALL U CAN EAT WINGS KIDS EAT FREE FROM 5 P.M. TO 9 P.M. HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT

Thurs- DJ BG w/Cornhole Tournament 2 FOR 1 DOMESTIC DRAFTS, WELLS AND HOUSE WINE

Fri-

The Ride 9:30pm 1/2 PRICE APPS-FRI (BAR ONLY) 4-7PM DECK MUSIC 5-9 P.M.

Sat-

The Ride 9:30pm DECK MUSIC 5-9P.M.

Sun-

Rezolution 4-8pm

APPETITE

FOR DESTRUCTION (Ultimate Guns N Roses Tribute) SATURDAY APRIL 14

TIM REYNOLDS TR3 (Dave Matthews guitarist)

Sons of Bill WEDNESDAY APRIL 18

GW AR Ghoul | Kylessa

Legacy of Disorder FRIDAY APRIL 20

Early show with

THE MAINE Lydia/The Arkells WEDNESDAY APRIL 25

STEEL PULSE Innercoastal UPCOMING SHOWS 4-27: 5-2: 5-3: 5-9: 5-10: 5-20: 5-26: 7-21:

The Movement/J Boog Mickey Avalon/Andre Legacy Rusted Root Whitechapel/Miss May I Beach House Tribal Seeds One Badfish (Sublime Tribute)

March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 71

VVVVVVVVVVVVVVV


Singer-songwriter Cecil plays at 7 p.m. on March 24 at Three Layers Café, 1602 Walnut St., Jacksonville. 355-9791. THE BEAUTIFUL VIEW, GOLDEN STATE, THINK HAPPY, THOUGHTS, RAQUEL CARBERA These indie bands play at 8 p.m. on March 24 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Tickets are $8. 398-7496. BEN DeHART, KERRY GROMBACHER These singer-songwriters play at 8 p.m. on March 24 at European Street Café, 5500 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 399-1740. KATCHAFIRE, COMMON KINGS, N’NOVA, JAHMEN Tha dank reggae music kicks off at 8 p.m. on March 24 at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $15. 246-2473. DR. DAN & THE LOOTERS Dr. Dan & The Looters kick out the jams starting at 9 p.m. on March 24 at Dog Star Tavern, 10 N. Second St., Fernandina Beach. 277-8010. GRAMMERTREE CD Release Local hip-hop act Grammertree’s CD release party is held at 9 p.m. on March 24 at Phoenix Taproom, 325 W. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Admission is $5. 799-7123. TOURN Local rockers Tourn play at 9:30 p.m. on March 24 at HJ’s Bar & Grill, 8540 Argyle Blvd., Jacksonville. 317-2783. ERIC CULBERSON Georgia-bred blues head Culberson appears at 9:30 p.m. on March 24 at Mojo Kitchen, 1500 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach. Admission is $10. 247-6636. ROCCO BLU The blues artists play at 10 p.m. on March 24 at Mojo No. 4, 3572 St. Johns Ave., Jacksonville. 381-6670. THE REVIVAL TOUR: CHUCK RAGAN, DAN ANDRIANO, TOM GABEL, NATHANIEL RATELIFF, CORY BRANON The punk pals join together for a night of hardcore punk hootenanny hijinks at 8 p.m. on March 25 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Tickets are $17. 398-7496. SUPPORT THE HEART FESTIVAL: I HOPE YOU’RE A DOCTOR, REFLECTIONS IN THE ROOM, ARSUN F!ST, STILLWATER, CHOP, PATEN LOCKE This evening of music, food and art kicks off at 9:30 p.m. on March 25 at Shantytown Pub, 22 W. Sixth St., Jacksonville. Admission is $7. Proceeds benefit Girls Rock Camp Jacksonville. 798-8222. CHIEFORIA, ALLELE, SACRIFICE TO SURVIVE These area bands battle onstage (for a chance to appear at

MONDAY

Live Jazz 7-9 • TBA Big Band/Dixieland Band

MONDAY-THURSDAY Karaoke 9-1

WEDNESDAY WOW! 1/2 Price Entire Menu 5-9

FRIDAY & SATURDAY FRID

The party that made us famous — Dennis Klee and the world’sMONKS most talented waitstaff HARM (Reservations Recommended)

HARMONIOUS MONKS

880-3040 • 10550 ST. AUGUSTINE ROAD

“Home of the World’s Most Talented Wait Staff”

DOS GATOS

72 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

this year’s Welcome to Rockville Festival in April) at 7 p.m. on March 26 at Jack Rabbits, 1528 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Tickets are $8. 398-7496. GOLIATH FLORES The musician plays at 1 p.m. on March 25 at Three Layers Café, 1602 Walnut St., Jacksonville. 355-9791. JOHN EMIL Slide guitarist Emil plays at 2 p.m. on March 25 at Poe’s Tavern, 363 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach. 241-7637. BELFRY FELLOWS ROCKIN’ ACOUSTIC CIRCUS The music goes unplugged at 7 p.m. on March 25 at European Street Café, 5500 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 399-1740. GLEN CAMPBELL Country legend Campbell brings his Goodbye Tour to town at 8 p.m. on March 25 at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $31-$54. 355-2787. HOT CHELLE RAE, ELECTRIC TOUCH, ACTION ITEM Pop rockers Hot Chelle Rae play at 7 p.m. on March 26 at Freebird Live, 200 N. First St., Jax Beach. Tickets are $15. 246-2473. TWO MAN GENTLEMAN BAND This tenor guitar and upright bass duo performs at 8 p.m. on March 27 at Jack’s BBQ, 691 A1A Beach Blvd., St. Augustine. 460-8100.

UPCOMING CONCERTS

TAKE OFFENSE, XIBALA, SOUL SEARCH March 28, Phoenix Taproom TORNADO RIDER March 29, Freebird Live CARRIE NATION & THE SPEAKEASY March 29, Dog Star Tavern SAM PACETTI March 29, European Street Café San Marco FIVE BY SEVEN March 30 & 31, Cliff’s Bar & Grill BREAD & BUTTER March 30 & 31, Fionn MacCool’s Jax Beach JAKE SHIMABUKURO March 30, The Florida Theatre SAWYER FAMILY, HANK HALL MUDTOWN March 30, Phoenix Taproom BUCK WILD (Lagwagon), HURRICANE GUN, WHALEFACE, THE RESONANTS March 30, Nobby’s OUIJA BROTHERS March 30, Three Layers Cafe SUZY BOGGUSS March 30, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall LYNCH MOB March 30, Brewster’s Pit

FRONTIERS (Journey Tribute) March 30, Freebird Live 3RD STONE March 30, Dog Star Tavern WHETHERMAN, RED AFTERNOON March 31, Mojo Kitchen BREATHE CAROLINA, THE READY SET March 31, Freebird Live ALAINA COLDING March 31, Three Layers Cafe BAY STREET March 31, Mojo No. 4 DEE DEE BRIDGEWATER March 31, The Ritz Theatre & Museum ANTIQUE ANIMALS March 31, Phoenix Taproom BRENT BYRD, EMMA HILL, THE REDHEADS BRITTA-NBROOKE March 31, Riverside Arts Market CANNIBAL CORPSE, EXHUMED April 5, Freebird Live RAEKWON April 5, Brewster’s Pit GALLAGHER April 5, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall BE EASY April 6, Poe’s Tavern FRAMING HANLEY April 6, Brewster’s Pit INFINTESMAL BBQ: PERMANENT MAKEUP, STATE CHAMPION, GIGGLE GIVER, MEMPHIBIANS, I HOPE YOU’RE A DOCTOR, RAGGEDY ZEUS, POISONOUS GAS April 7, Phoenix Taproom WHETHERMAN April 7 & 21, Poe’s Tavern WHETHERMAN, MARK WILLIAMS & BLUE HORSE, JERRY MANISCALCO April 7, March 31, Riverside Arts Market CHRIS THOMAS KING, RED AFTERNOON April 7, Mojo Kitchen BREAKING THROUGH CD Release Party April 7, Brewster’s Pit THE ANATOMY OF FRANK, ANTIQUE ANIMALS, SHONI April 8, Burro Bar STATE CHAMPION, THE DEWARS April 8, Nobby’s CANDLEBOX April 10, Mavericks OVER THE RHINE, LUCY WAINWRIGHT ROCHE April 12, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall TOWER OF POWER April 12, The Florida Theatre SPRINGING THE BLUES: JOEY GILMORE BLUES BAND, ALBERT CUMMINGS, ELI COOK BAND, TRAMPLED UNDER FOOT, JOANN SHAW TAYLOR, WOODY & THE PECKERS, WILLIE GREEN BLUES PROJECT, EDDIE SHAW & THE WOLFGANG, THE LEE BOYS April 13-15, Jax Beach JOSH GRACIN April 13, Mavericks JACKSONVILLE SUPERFEST: 60 LOCAL ACTS & BANDS April 13, Aloft Tapestry Park; April 14 & 15, UNF


Spring is here and jam is in the air! The 16th annual Suwannee Springfest is four days of camping and roundthe-clock live music by the likes of progressive bluegrass band Yonder Mountain String Band (pictured), Peter Rowan and Tony Rice, Justin Townes Earle, Larry Keel & The Natural Bridge, Randall Bramblett and more on March 22-25 at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park, 3076 95th Drive, Live Oak. Tickets are $150; $125 for students and military. For a full schedule and to purchase tickets, go to suwanneespringfest.com BIG KETTLE DRUM April 13, Burro Bar MARTINA McBRIDE April 13, St. Augustine Amphitheatre TIM REYNOLDS, SONS OF BILL April 14, Freebird Live BRAIDED LIGHT DANCE PROJECT, MARTHA’S TROUBLE, SCOTT JONES DANCERS April 14, Riverside Arts Market UNDERHILL ROSE April 14, European Street CafÊ Southside DAUGHTRY April 15, T-U Center NATURAL CHILD, RIVERNECKS, THE COUGS April 15, Nobby’s VAN HALEN, KOOL & THE GANG April 16, Vets Mem. Arena GWAR, GHOUL, KYLESSA April 18, Freebird Live THE NIGHT BEATS April 18, Nobby’s

HUMAN NATURE April 20, T-U Center THE FRONTMEN April 20, Mavericks THE MAINE April 20, Freebird Live BLACK MOLLY April 20, Brewster’s Pit WANEE MUSIC FEST: ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND, FURTHUR, GOV’T MULE, TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND, JAIMOE’S JASSSZ BAND, BUDDY GUY, BRUCE HORNSBY, DEVON ALLMAN’S HONEYTRIBE April 20 & 21, Spirit of the Suwannee ROCKVILLE RUMBLE FINALS April 21, Freebird Live THE PRETTY RECKLESS, THE PARLOR MOB, THE

HOLLYWOOD KILLS April 21, Jack Rabbits SMALL HOUSES, TOBACCO PAT, AMONG GIANTS April 23, Burro Bar STEEL PULSE, INNERCOASTAL April 25, Freebird Live MARK SULTAN, WAYLON THORNTON & THE HEAVY HANDS April 25, CafÊ Eleven RODNEY ATKINS April 26, Mavericks ELVIS COSTELLO & The IMPOSTERS April 27, The Florida Theatre RISE TO AGAINST, A DAY TO REMEMBER, TITLE FIGHT April 27, St. Augustine Amphitheatre DICK DALE April 28, Jack Rabbits GREG LAKE April 29, The Florida Theatre Welcome to Rockville: KORN, SHINEDOWN, EVANESCENCE, FIVE FINGER DEATH PUNCH, P.O.D. April 29, Metro Park COUNTING CROWS May 1, The Florida Theatre THE BEACH BOYS 50th ANNIVERSARY REUNION TOUR May 2, St. Augustine Amphitheatre MICKEY AVALON, ANDRE LEGACY May 2, Freebird Live DIECAST May 3, Brewster’s Pit THE FRAY May 4, St. Augustine Amphitheatre KOTTONMOUTH KINGS, TWIZTID, BLAZE BIG B May 7, Brewster’s Pit EDDIE VEDDER, GLEN HANSARD May 8, T-U Center WHITECHAPEL, MISS MAY I May 9, Freebird Live WE OWN THE NIGHT WORLD TOUR: LADY ANTEBELLUM, DARIUS RUCKER, THOMPSON SQUARE May 10, Veterans Memorial Arena BEACH HOUSE May 10, Freebird Live CATIE CURTIS May 11, CafÊ Eleven CHUCK PROPHET & THE MISSION EXPRESS May 14, Jack Rabbits JANE’S ADDICTION May 16, The Florida Theatre UNCLE KRACKER May 19, Mavericks GRANT PEEPLES May 19, European Street CafÊ Southside TRIBAL SEEDS May 20, Freebird Live FLOGGING MOLLY May 21, Mavericks EDGAR WINTER BAND May 24, Ponte Vedra Concert Hall JACKSONVILLE JAZZ FESTIVAL: SONNY ROLLINS, CHICK COREA, STANLEY CLARKE, LENNY WHITE TRIO, PATTI AUSTIN, JACKSONVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA May 24-27, Downtown Jacksonville

MOJO

BURRO

Wednesday Will Pearsall Thursday Lyons Friday & Saturday Al Naturale Sunday Mark Williams

FIONN

Atlantic Blvd. at the Ocean "UMBOUJD#FBDIt MARCH 20-26, 2012 | FOLIO WEEKLY | 73


ONE May 26, Freebird Live DETHLEHEM May 30, Burro Bar CELERITAS, MILO June 5, Burro Bar RINGO STARR & HIS ALL STARR BAND June 29, St. Augustine Amphitheatre IAN ANDERSON (Jethro Tull) Sept. 21, St. Augustine Amphitheatre

• CLUBS • AMELIA ISLAND, FERNANDINA BEACH

BEECH STREET GRILL, 801 Beech, 277-3662 John Springer on Fri. & Sat., every other Thur. Barry Randolph every Sun. CAFE KARIBO, 27 N. Third St., 277-5269 Live music in the courtyard at 6 p.m. every Fri. & Sat., at 5 p.m. every Sun. DOG STAR TAVERN, 10 N. Second St., 277-8010 The Looters on March 23. Dr. Dan and The Looters on March 24 GENNARO’S ITALIANO SOUTH, 5472 First Coast Hwy., 491-1999 Live jazz from 7:30-9:30 p.m. every Fri. & Sat. GREEN TURTLE TAVERN, 14 S. Third St., 321-2324 Dan Voll from 7-10 p.m. every Fri. Live music every weekend O’KANE’S IRISH PUB, 318 Centre St., 261-1000 Dan Voll at 7:30 p.m. every Wed. Turner London Band at 8:30 p.m. every Thur., Fri. & Sat. THE PALACE SALOON & SHEFFIELD’S, 117 Centre St., 491-3332 BSP Unplugged every Tue. & Sun. Wes Cobb every Wed. DJ Heavy Hess, Hupp & Rob every Thur. Live music every Fri. & Sat. DJ Miguel Alvarez in Sheffield’s every Fri. DJ Heavy Hess every Sat. Cason every Mon. PLAE, 80 Amelia Circle, Amelia Island Plantation, 277-2132 Gary Ross from 7-11 p.m. every Thur.-Sat. SLIDERS SEASIDE GRILL, 1998 S. Fletcher Ave., 277-6990 Cason at 2 p.m. at the tiki bar every Sat. & Sun. THE SURF, 3199 S. Fletcher Ave., 261-5711 Live music Tue.-Sun. DJ Roc at 5 p.m. every Wed.

ARLINGTON, REGENCY

AJ’S BAR & GRILLE, 10244 Atlantic Blvd., 805-9060 DJ Sheryl every Thur., Fri. & Sat. DJ Mike every Tue. & Wed. Karaoke every Thur.

MVP’S SPORTS GRILLE, 12777 Atlantic Blvd., 221-1090 Live music at 9 p.m. every Fri. & Sat. PLUSH, RAIN, LAVA, 845 University Blvd. N., 745-1845 DJ Massive spins top 40 in Rain every Wed., DJs spin Latin every Fri. STARBUCKS, 9301 Atlantic Blvd., 724-4554 Open mic with Starbucks Trio from 8-11 p.m. every other Fri. TONINO’S TRATTORIA, 7001 Merrill Rd., 743-3848 Alaina Colding every Thur. W. Harvey Williams at 6 p.m. every Fri. Signature String Quartet every Sat. VIP LOUNGE, 7707 Arlington Expressway, 619-8198 Karaoke at 9 p.m. every Tue. Live music every Wed. & Fri. Reggae every Thur. Old school every Sat. A DJ spins every Sun.

AVONDALE, ORTEGA

BRICK RESTAURANT, 3585 St. Johns Ave., 387-0606 Duet every Wed. Goliath Flores and Sam Rodriguez every Thur. Bush Doctors every first Fri. & Sat. Live jazz every Fri. & Sat. THE CASBAH CAFE, 3628 St. Johns Ave., 981-9966 Goliath Flores every Wed. 3rd Bass every Sun. Live music every Mon. ECLIPSE, 4219 St. Johns Ave., 387-3582 DJ Keith spins for Karaoke every Tue. DJ Free spins vintage every Fri. DJs SuZiRok, LowKill & Mowgli spin for Chillwave Madness every Mon. ELEVATED AVONDALE, 3551 St. Johns Ave., 387-0700 Karaoke with Dave Thrash every Wed. DJ 151 spins hip hop, R&B, old-school every Thur. DJ Catharsis spins lounge beats every first & fourth Sat. Patrick Evan & CoAlition Industry Sun. MOJO NO. 4, 3572 St. Johns Ave., 381-6670 Mike Bernos Band at 10 p.m. on March 23. Rocco Blu at 10 p.m. on March 24 TOM & BETTY’S, 4409 Roosevelt Blvd., 387-3311 Live music every Fri. Karaoke at 8 p.m. every Sat.

BAYMEADOWS

THE COFFEE GRINDER, 9834 Old Baymeadows Rd., 642-7600 DJ Roy Luis spins new & vintage original house at 9 p.m. every Thur. GATOR’S DOCKSIDE, 8650 Baymeadows Rd., 448-0500 Comfort Zone Band at 9 p.m. every Fri. MY PLACE BAR-N-GRILL, 9550 Baymeadows Rd., 737-5299 Out of Hand every Mon. Rotating bands every other Tue. & Wed. OASIS GRILL & CHILL, 9551 Baymeadows Rd., 748-9636 DJs Stan and Mike Bend spin every Feel Good Fri.

BEACHES

(In Jax Beach unless otherwise noted) BEACHSIDE SEAFOOD, 120 S. Third St., 444-8862 Kurt Lanham sings island music every Fri.-Sun. BILLY’S BOATHOUSE, 2321 Beach Blvd., 241-9771 Tony Novelly at 5:30 p.m. on March 21. David Pooler at 5:30 p.m. on March 22. ShoNuf at 6 p.m. on March 23. Fish Out of Water at 5:30 p.m. on March 24. Kurt lanham at noon, 4Play at 4:45 p.m. on March 25 BRIX TAPHOUSE, 300 N. Second St., 241-4668 DJ IBay every Tue., Fri. & Sat. DJ Ginsu every Wed. DJ Jade every Thur. Charlie Walker every Sun. CRAB CAKE FACTORY, 1396 Beach Blvd., Beach Plaza, 247-9880 Live jazz with Pierre & Co. every Wed. CULHANE’S IRISH PUB, 967 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 249-9595 Live music every wekend DICK’S WINGS, 311 N. Third St., Ste. 107, 853-5004 Big Jeff at 8 p.m. every Thur. Live music at 9 p.m. every Sat. EL POTRO MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 1553 Third St. N., 241-6910 Wilfredo Lopez every Wed. & Sat. ENGINE 15 BREWING COMPANY, 1500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 217, 249-2337 Live music every Thur. EUROPEAN STREET CAFE, 992 Beach Blvd., 399-1740 John Thomas from 5-8 p.m. on March 25 FIONN MACCOOL’S, 333 N. First St., 242-9499 Live music every Thur.-Sat. FLY’S TIE IRISH PUB, 177 E. Sailfish Dr., Atlantic Beach, 246-4293 Nate Holley every Mon. Wes Cobb every Thur. Live music every Fri. & Sat. King Eddie reggae every Sun. FREEBIRD LIVE, 200 N. First St., 246-2473 A Dying Regime at 8 p.m. on March 23. Katchafire, Common KIngs, N’Nova and Jahmen on March 24. Hot Chelle Rae, Cady Groves, Electric Touch and Action Item on March 26 ISLAND GIRL CIGAR BAR, 108 First St., Neptune Beach, 372-0943 Aaron Sheeks on March 21. Mark O’Quinn on March 22. Tim O’Shea on March 23. Evan Paluszynski on March 24 LILLIE’S COFFEE BAR, 200 First St., Neptune Beach, 249-2922 Screamin’ Eagle at 7:30 p.m. on March 23. Live music every Fri. & Sat. LYNCH’S IRISH PUB, 514 N. First St., 249-5181 Danka on March 23 & 24. Split Tone at 10:30 p.m. every Tue. Nate Holley every Wed. Ryan Campbell every Thur. Wits End every Sun. Little Green Men every Mon. MAYPORT TAVERN, 2775 Old Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach, 270-0801 Live music at 3 p.m. every Sun. Open mic at 5 p.m. every Wed. DJ Jason hosts Karaoke at 9 p.m. every Fri. & Sat. MELLOW MUSHROOM, 1018 N. Third St., Ste. 2, 246-1500 Red Beard & Stinky E on March 21. Yamadeo on March 22. Be

74 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

Easy on March 23. Confluent on March 24 MEZZA LUNA, 110 First St., Neptune Beach, 249-5573 Neil Dixon at 6 p.m. every Tue. Gypsies Ginger at 6 p.m. every Wed. Mike Shackelford and Rick Johnson at 6 p.m. every Thur. MOJO KITCHEN, 1500 Beach Blvd., 247-6636 Eric Culberson at 9:30 p.m. on March 24. Armadillo Ball with The Whetherman on March 31 MONKEY’S UNCLE TAVERN, 1850 S. Third St., 246-1070 Wes Cobb at 10 p.m. every Tue. DJ Austin Williams spins dance & for Karaoke at 9 p.m. every Wed., Sat. & Sun. DJ Papa Sugar spins dance music at 9 p.m. every Mon., Thur. & Fri. NIPPERS BEACH GRILLE, 2309 Beach Blvd., 247-3300 Live music every weekend NORTH BEACH BISTRO, 725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 6, Atlantic Beach, 372-4105 Live music every Thur.-Sat. OCEAN 60, 60 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 247-0060 Live music every weekend THE PIER RESTAURANT, 445 Eighth Ave. N., 246-6454 Darren Corlew and Johnny Flood at 7 p.m. every Thur. DJ Infader every Fri. Nate Holley every Sat. POE’S TAVERN, 363 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 241-7637 John Emil at 2 p.m. on March 25 RAGTIME TAVERN, 207 Atlantic Blvd., Atlantic Beach, 241-7877 Will Pearsall on March 21. Lyons on March 22. Al Naturale on March 23 & 24. Mark Williams on March 25 RUSH STREET/CHICAGO PIZZA & SPORTS GRILL, 320 N. First St., 270-8565 A DJ spins at 10 p.m. every Wed., Fri. & Sat. SUN DOG, 207 Atlantic Blvd., Neptune Beach, 241-8221 Billy & Trevor on March 21. Chuck Nash on March 22. Blistur on March 23 & 24. Bread & Butter on march 25. Billy Bowers at 6 p.m. on March 27. Live music every Tue.-Sun. THE WINE BAR, 320 N. First St., 372-0211 Live music every Fri. & Sat.

RUSH STREET/CHICAGO PIZZA & SPORTS GRILL, 406 Old Hard Rd., Ste. 106, 213-7779 A DJ spins at 10 p.m. every Wed., Fri. & Sat. WHITEY’S FISH CAMP, 2032 C.R. 220, 269-4198 Karaoke on March 21. DJ BG on March 22. The Ride at 9:30 p.m. on March 23 & 24. Deck music at 5 p.m. every Fri. & Sat.

DOWNTOWN

AW SHUCKS OYSTER BAR & GRILL, 9743 Old St. Augustine Rd., 240-0368 Open mic with John O’Connor from 7-10 p.m. every Wed. Cafe Groove Duo, Jay Terry & John O’Connor, from 8-11 p.m. every Sat. Live music every Sat. CHEERS BAR & GRILL, 11475 San Jose Blvd., 262-4337 Karaoke at 9:30 p.m. every Wed. HARMONIOUS MONKS, 10550 Old St. Augustine Rd., 880-3040 Karaoke from 9 p.m.-1 p.m. Mon.-Thur. Dennis Klee & the World’s Most Talented Waitstaff every Fri. & Sat. THE NEW ORLEANS CAFE, 12760 San Jose Blvd., 8805155 Live music at 6 p.m. Tue., Wed., Fri.-Sun. Open mic with Biker Bob at 7:30 p.m. every Thur. Reggae with Les B. Fine at 1 p.m. every Sat. & Sun. Creekside Songwriters Showcase at 7 p.m. last Wed. every month RACK ’EM UP BILLIARDS, 4268 Oldfield Crossing, 262-4030 Craig Hand every Sat. Karaoke at 7 p.m. every Sun. SPECKLED HEN TAVERN & GRILLE, 9475 Philips Hwy., Ste. 16, 538-0811 Live music from 6-9 p.m. every Fri. SUNBURST STUDIOS, 12641 San Jose Blvd., 485-0946 Open mic with My Friendz Band at 8:30 p.m. every Mon. Karaoke at 8:30 p.m. with DJ Tom Turner every Tue.

BURRO BAR, 228 E. Forsyth St., 353-4692 Speedwolf, Forbidden Sight, The 2416 and Life Chain on March 22. DJ Tin Man spins reggae & dub every Tue. DJ SuZi-Rok spins every Thur. $Big Bucks DJ Crew$ every Sat. Bert No Shirt & Uncle Jesse every Sun. CITY HALL PUB, 234 Randolph Blvd., 356-6750 DJ Skillz spins Motown, hip hop & R&B every Wed. Jazz at 11 a.m., Latin music at 9 p.m. every first Fri.; Ol’ Skool every last Fri. DIVE BAR, 331 E. Bay St., 359-9090 Live music every weekend DOS GATOS, 123 E. Forsyth, 354-0666 DJ Synsonic spins every Tue. & Fri. DJ Rockin’ Bones spins every Wed. DJ Scandalous spins every Sat. DJ Randall Karaoke every Mon. FIONN MacCOOL’S, The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Dr., Ste. 176, 374-1247 Live music every weekend THE IVY ULTRA BAR, 113 E. Bay St., 356-9200 DJs 151 The Experience & C-Lo spin every Rush Hour Wed. DJ E.L. spins top 40, South Beach & dance classics every Pure Sat. THE JACKSONVILLE LANDING, 2 Independent Dr. Spanky at 8 p.m. on March 23. ShoNuf at 8 p.m. on March 24. Mr. Natural at 8 p.m. on March 30 MARK’S DOWNTOWN, 315 E. Bay St., 355-5099 DJ Vinn spins top 40 for ladies nite every Thur. Ritmo y Sabor every Fiesta Fri. BayStreet mega party with DJ Shotgun every Sat. MAVERICKS, The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Dr., 356-1110 Bobby Laredo spins every Thur. & Sat. Saddle Up every Sat. NORTHSTAR THE PIZZA BAR, 119 E. Bay St., 860-5451 Open mic night from 8:30-11:30 p.m. every Wed. THE PEARL, 1101 N. Main St., 791-4499 DJs Tom P. & Ian S. spin ’80s & indie dance every Fri. DJ Ricky spins indie rock, hip hop & electro every Sat. PHOENIX TAPROOM, 325 W. Forsyth St., 798-8222 DJ Maseo and The $BIG BUCKS$ Crew on March 23. Grammertree CD Release party on March 24 POPPY LOVE SMOKE, 112 E. Adams St., 354-1988 DJs Al Pete & Gene Dot spin for The Glossary at 10 p.m. every Sat. ZODIAC GRILL, 120 W. Adams St., 354-8283 Live music every Fri. & Sat.

INTRACOASTAL WEST

BREWSTER’S PIT, 14003 Beach Blvd., Ste. 3, 223-9850 Comeback Kid, Foundation, Close Your Eyes, Such Gold and Living With Lions on March 23. Just Like Gentlemen, Indigo Mr. Fitch, Silence The Doubtful, Bearshark, Seryical and Nobody On Land on March 24 BREWSTER’S PUB, 14003 Beach Blvd., Ste. 3, 223-9850 Open mic every Wed. Karaoke with DJ Randal & live music every Thur., Fri. & Sat. A DJ spins every Mon. BRUCCI’S PIZZA, 13500 Beach Blvd., Ste. 36, 223-6913 Mike Shackelford at 6:30 p.m. every Sat. and Mon. CLIFF’S BAR & GRILL, 3033 Monument Rd., 645-5162 Doc Mojo Band on March 21. Big Engine at 9 p.m. on March 23 & 24. Karaoke every Thur. & Sun. JERRY’S SPORTS GRILLE & STEAKHOUSE, 13170 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 22, 220-6766 Live music every Fri.

JULINGTON CREEK, NW ST. JOHNS

HAPPY OURS SPORTS GRILLE, 116 Bartram Oaks Walk, Ste. 101, 683-1964 Live music at 7:30 p.m. every Fri. SHANNON’S IRISH PUB, 111 Bartram Oaks Walk, 230-9670 Live music every Fri. & Sat.

MANDARIN

ORANGE PARK, MIDDLEBURG

CHEERS BAR & GRILL, 1580 Wells Rd., 269-4855 Karaoke at 9:30 p.m. every Wed. & Sat. CRACKERS LOUNGE, 1282 Blanding Blvd., 272-4620 Karaoke every Fri. & Sat. THE HILLTOP, 2030 Wells Rd., 272-5959 John Michael every Wed.-Sat. PARK AVENUE BILLIARDS, 714 Park Ave., 215-1557 Random Act from 7:30-11:30 p.m. every Mon. Bike Nite

FLEMING ISLAND

MELLOW MUSHROOM, 1800 Town Center Blvd., 541-1999 Wits End on March 22. State of Mind on March 23. Wes Cobb on March 24. Live music every Fri. & Sat. MERCURY MOON, 2015 C.R. 220, 215-8999 DJ Ty spins for ladies’ nite every Thur. Live music every Fri. & Sat. Buck Smith Project every Mon. Blistur unplugged every Wed.

Spun! DJ Maseo (pictured) of innovative ’80s hip-hop group De La Soul plays along with $Big Bucks$ Crew on March 23 at 9 p.m. at Phoenix Taproom, 325 W. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Admission is $7. 799-7123.


997-1955 Ryan Crary on March 21. Charlie Walker at 8 p.m. on March 22. Nate Holley on March 23 SEVEN BRIDGES GRILLE & BREWERY, 9735 Gate Pkwy. N., 997-1999 Billy Bowers at 9 p.m. on March 23. Chuck Nash every Thur. Live music at 10 p.m. every Fri. & Sat. SUITE, 4880 Big Island Dr., 493-9305 Live music from 9 p.m.-mid. every Thur. and 6-9 p.m. every Fri. & Sat. URBAN FLATS, 9726 Touchton Rd., 642-1488 Live music every Fri. & Sat. WHISKY RIVER, 4850 Big Island Drive, 645-5571 A DJ spins every Fri. & Sat. WILD WING CAFE, 4555 Southside Blvd., 998-9464 Ruckus on March 23. Cowford County Band on March 30. Live music every Fri. & Sat. Karaoke every Mon.

SAN MARCO, SOUTHBANK

Whole Lotta Indie Love! NOBFEST 2012 features three days of indie and punk rock carnage by The Cougs (pictured), Alligator, The 2416, Stiff Bundles, Teenage Lobotomy and many more starting on March 23 at 5 p.m. and on March 24 and 25 at 2 p.m. at Nobby’s, 10 Anastasia Blvd., St. Augustine. Admission is $8 for March 23; $10 for March 24 and 25; three-day pass is $22. 547-2188.

THE ROADHOUSE, 231 Blanding Blvd., 264-0611 Live music every Thur.-Sat. DJ Jason every Tue. DJ Israel every Wed. Buck Smith Project every Mon.

PALATKA

DOWNTOWN BLUES BAR & GRILLE, 714 St. Johns Ave., (386) 325-5454 Lee Kelly on March 21. David Michael Angleton on March 22. Ranger Donnie on March 23. Eric Fury on March 24. Local talent every Wed. Karaoke every Thur. Blues jam every Sun.

PONTE VEDRA

LULU’S WATERFRONT GRILLE, 301 N. Roscoe Blvd., 285-0139 Mike Shackelford & Rick Johnson from 7-10 p.m. every Fri. Tony Novelly from 6-10 p.m. every Mon. PUSSER’S CARIBBEAN GRILLE, 816 A1A N., Ste. 100, 280-7766 Braxton Adamson at 6 p.m. on March 22. Alex Seier at 8 p.m. on March 23. Billy Buchanan at 8 p.m. on March 24. Live music every Thur.-Sun. URBAN FLATS, 330 A1A N., 280-5515 Darren Corlew every Tue. Soulo & Deron Baker at 6 p.m. every Wed.

RIVERSIDE, WESTSIDE

FLA RIDERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB, 243 S. Edgewood Ave. DJ DreOne spins every Wed. for open mic nite HJ’S BAR & GRILL, 8540 Argyle Forest Blvd., 317-2783 Tourn at 9:30 p.m. on March 24. Karaoke with DJ Ron at 8:30 p.m. every Tue. & DJ Richie at every Fri. Live music every Sat. Open mic at 8 p.m. every Wed. KICKBACKS, 910 King St., 388-9551 Ray & Taylor every Thur. Robby Shenk every Sun. LOMAX LODGE, 822 Lomax St., 634-8813 DJ Dots every Tue. Milan da Tin Man every Wed. DJ Christian every Sat. DJ Spencer every Sun. DJ Luminous every Mon. THE MURRAY HILL THEATRE, 932 Edgewood Ave., 388-7807 As Hell Retreats, Convalesce, Delusions, ERRA and Words Like Vines at 7:30 p.m. on March 24 PIZZA PALACE, 920 Margaret St., 598-1212 Jennifer Chase at 6:30 p.m. every Fri. YESTERDAYS SOCIAL CLUB, 3638 Park St., 387-0502 Rotating DJs spin for Pro Bono electronic music party from 7 p.m.-2 a.m. every Sun.

ST. AUGUSTINE

A1A ALE WORKS, 1 King St., 829-2977 Deron Baker on March 22. Sentropolis on March 23 & 24. Billy Bowers on March 25 AMICI ITALIAN RESTAURANT, 1915 A1A S., 461-0102 Fermin Spanish guitar from 6-8 p.m. every Thur. ANN O’MALLEY’S, 23 Orange St., 825-4040 Open mic on March 20. Wendy Kissinger on March 21. The Wobbly Toms at 8:30 p.m. on March 23. The Grassy Noles on March 24 BARLEY REPUBLIC IRISH PUBLIC HOUSE, 48 Spanish St., 547-2023 Live music Fri. & Sat. THE BRITISH PUB, 213 Anastasia Blvd., 810-5111 Karaoke with Jimmy Jamez at 9 p.m. on March 23 CELLAR UPSTAIRS, San Sebastian Winery, 157 King St., 826-1594 Humanzee at 7 p.m. on March 23. J.R. & Barry at 2 p.m., Rick Levy & the Falling Bones at 7 p.m. on March 24. Vinny Jacobs from 2-5 p.m. on March 25 CHICAGO PIZZA & BAKERY, 107 Natures Walk Pkwy., Ste. 101, 230-9700 Greg Flowers hosts open-mic and jazz piano

from 7-10 p.m. every Tue. Live music every Fri. CRUISERS GRILL, 3 St. George St., 824-6993 Live music every Fri. & Sat. Chelsea Saddler every Sun. FLORIDA CRACKER CAFE, 81 St. George St., 829-0397 Lonesome Bert & the Skinny Lizard at 5:30 p.m. every Wed. HARRY’S, 46 Avenida Menendez, 824-7765 Billy Bowers from 6-10 p.m. on March 22 JACK’S BARBECUE, 691 A1A Beach Blvd., 460-8100 Two Man Gentleman Band at 8 p.m. on March 27. Jim Essery at 4 p.m. every Sat. Live music every Thur.-Sat. KING’S HEAD BRITISH PUB, 6460 U.S. 1, 823-9787 Mike Sweet from 6-8 p.m. every Thur. KOZMIC BLUZ PIZZA CAFE & ALE, 48 Spanish St., 825-4805 Live music every Fri., Sat. & Sun. MARDI GRAS SPORTS BAR, 123 San Marco Ave., 823-8806 Open jam nite with house band at 8 p.m. every Wed. Battle of the DJs with Josh Frazetta & Mardi Gras Mike every last Sun. MEEHAN’S IRISH PUB, 20 Avenida Menendez, 810-1923 Live music every Fri. & Sat. MI CASA CAFE, 69 St. George St., 824-9317 Chelsea Saddler from noon-4 p.m. every Mon., Tue. & Thur. Elizabeth Roth at noon every Sun. MILL TOP TAVERN & LISTENING ROOM, 19 1/2 St. George St., 829-2329 Two Thirds at 9 p.m. on March 23 & 24. Katherien Archer at 1 p.m. on March 25. Vinny Jacobs every Tue. Todd & Molly Jones every Wed. Colton McKenna at 9 p.m. every Thur. Will Pearsall at 9 p.m. every Mon. NOBBY’S, 10 Anastasia Blvd., 547-2188 Nobfest features Alligator, The Cougs, The 2416, Stiff Bindles and Teenage Loboitomy on March 23, 24 & 25 SANGRIAS WINE & TAPAS Piano Bar, 35 Hypolita St., 827-1947 Live music every Thurs.-Sun. SCARLETT O’HARA’S, 70 Hypolita St., 824-6535 Lil Blaze & DJ Alex are in for Karaoke every Mon. SIRENS, 113 Anastasia Blvd., 460-2641 Live music every Fri. DJs spin every Sat. Live music from 3-6 p.m. every Biker Sunday SPY GLOBAL CUISINE & LOUNGE, 21 Hypolita St., 819-5637 Live music every Fri.-Sun. THE TASTING ROOM, 25 Cuna St., 810-2400 Bossa nova with Monica da Silva & Chad Alger from 5-8 p.m. every Sun. TRADEWINDS, 124 Charlotte St., 829-9336 Red River Band at 9 p.m. on March 23 & 24. Mark Hart every Mon.-Wed. Open mic every Thur. Mark Hart & Jim Carrick every Fri. Elizabeth Roth at 1 p.m., Mark Hart at 5 p.m. every Sat. Keith Godwin at 1 p.m., Wade at 5 p.m. every Sun. Matanzas at 9 p.m. Sun.-Thur.

ST. JOHNS TOWN CENTER

AROMAS CIGARS & WINE BAR, 4372 Southside Blvd., Ste. 101, 928-0515 Live jazz from 8-11 p.m. every Tue. Beer house rock every Wed. Live music every Thur. Will Hurley every Fri. Bill Rice at 9 p.m. every Sat. BLACKFINN AMERICAN GRILLE, 4840 Big Island Dr., 345-3466 Live music from 2-7 p.m. every Sun. JOHNNY ANGELS, 3546 St. Johns Bluff Rd. S., Ste. 120, 997-9850 Harry & Sally from 7-9 p.m. every Wed. Karaoke from 7-10 p.m. every Sat. with Gimme the Mike DJs ISLAND GIRL CIGAR BAR, 7860 Gate Pkwy., Ste. 115, 854-6060 Jimmy Solari on March 21. Billy Buchanan on March 22. D-Lo Thompson on March 23. Matt Collins on March 24. Live music every Wed.-Sat. MELLOW MUSHROOM, 9734 Deer Lake Court, Ste. 1,

ENDO EXO, 1224 Kings Ave., 396-7733 DJ J-Money spins jazz, soul, R&B, house every Fri. DJ Manus spins top 40 & dance every Sat. Open mic with King Ron & T-Roy every Mon. EUROPEAN STREET CAFE, 1704 San Marco Blvd., 399-1740 Linda Cole & the Joshua Bowlus Trio on March 20. Donna Ulisse and The Poor Mountain Boys on March 22. Gary Starling Group on March 27. Jazz every second Tue. HAVANA-JAX CUBA LIBRE BAR LOUNGE, 2578 Atlantic Blvd., 399-0609 MVP Band from 6-9 p.m., DJs No Fame & Dr. Doom every Wed. Jazz every Thur. American Top 40 every Fri. Salsa every Sat. JACK RABBITS, 1528 Hendricks Ave., 398-7496 Chris Webby, Kids These Days and Jake Bistrong on March 21. Black Lips and Memphibians on March 22. Andy McKee and Antoinine Dufour on March 23. The Beautiful View, Golden State, Think Happy, Thoughts and Raquel Carbera on March 24. The Revival Tour: Chuck Ragan, Dan Andriano, Tom Gabel, Nathaniel Rateliff and Cory Branon on March 25. Chieforia, Allele and Sacrifice to Survive on MArch 26 MATTHEW’S, 2107 Hendricks Ave., 396-9922 Bossa nova with Monica da Silva & Chad Alger at 7 p.m. every Thur. PIZZA PALACE, 1959 San Marco Blvd., 399-8815 Jennifer Chase at 7:30 p.m. every Sat. RIVER CITY BREWING CO., 835 Museum Circle, 398-2299 Billy Bowers, Frankie Phillips Band, That 80s Show and Mike Barber Band for the McCormick fundraiser on March 24 SQUARE ONE, 1974 San Marco Blvd., 306-9004 Soul on the Square with MVP Band & Special Formula at 8 p.m.; DJ Dr. Doom at 10:30 p.m. every Mon. DJs Wes Reed & Josh Kemp spin indie dance & electro at 9 p.m. every Wed. DJs Anonymous and Mickey Shadow every Sat.

SOUTHSIDE

BOMBA’S, 8560 Beach Blvd., 997-2291 Open mic from 7-11 p.m. with Chris Hall every Tue. & every first Sun. Live music every Fri., Sat. & Sun. CORNER BISTRO & Wine Bar, 9823 Tapestry Park Cir., Ste. 1, 619-1931 Matt “Pianoman” Hall every Fri. & Sat. DAVE & BUSTER’S, 7025 Salisbury Rd. S., 296-1525 A DJ spins every Fri. EUROPEAN STREET CAFE, 5500 Beach Blvd., 399-1740 Ben DeHart and Kerry Grombacher at 8 p.m. on March 24. Belfry Fellows Rockin’ Acoustic Circus at 7 p.m. on March 25 LATITUDE 30, 10370 Philips Hwy., 365-5555 DJ Mikee on March 22. Jamaru at 8:30 p.m., DJ Chill Will at 11:30 p.m. on March 23. Boogie Freaks at 8:30 p.m., DJ Vic Jones at 11:30 p.m. on March 24

SPRINGFIELD, NORTHSIDE

BLUE DINER CAFE, 5868 Norwood Ave., 766-7774 Jazz from 7-9 p.m. every first Thur. BOOTS-N-BOTTLES, 12405 N. Main St., Ste. 7, Oceanway, 647-7798 Karaoke every Tue., Thur. & Sun. with DJ Dave. Open mic every Wed. DAMES POINT MARINA, 4518 Irving Rd., 751-3043 DJ Steve at 6 p.m. on March 22. Black Creek Rizin at 6 p.m. on March 23. Mango Fever at 4 p.m. on March 24. Mr. Natural at 4 p.m. on March 25 FLIGHT 747 LOUNGE, 1500 Airport Rd., 741-4073 The Mike Hendrix Band at 9 p.m. on March 22. Live music every Fri. & Sat. ’70s every Tue. SKYLINE SPORTSBAR, 5611 Norwood Ave., 517-6973 Bigga Rankin & Cool Running DJs every Tue. & 1st Sun. Fusion Band & DJ every Thur. DJ Scar spins every Sun. STAGE ONE DANCE CLUB, 96026 Victoria’s Place, Yulee, 583-9275 The Mike Hendrix Band at 9:30 p.m. on March 22 THREE LAYERS CAFE, 1602 Walnut St., 355-9791 The Doyle Duo at 7 p.m. on March 23. Brie Cecil at 7 p.m. on March 24. Goliath Flores at 1 p.m. on March 25 3 LIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL, 2467 Faye Rd., 647-8625 Open mic every Thur. Woodie & Wyatt C. every Fri. Live music every Sat. To get your band listed here, send all the vitals — band name, time, date, location of venue, with street address, city, admission price and contact number — to Dan Brown, 9456 Philips Hwy., Ste. 11, Jacksonville FL 32256 or email events@folioweekly.com.

March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 75


Dee Dee Bridgewater performs at The Ritz Theatre & Museum on Saturday, March 31.

DEE DEE BRIDGEWATER TO BILLIE WITH LOVE: A CELEBRATION OF LADY DAY Sat., March 31 at 8 p.m. The Ritz Theatre & Museum, 829 N. Davis St., Jacksonville Tickets are $40 632-5555

J

azz powerhouse Dee Dee Bridgewater has traveled the world over during the course of her four-decade career, and an upcoming March 31 gig at The Ritz Theatre & Museum marks Bridgewater’s first visit to Jacksonville. A Grammy and Tony Award-winner, Bridgewater visits the River City to perform “To Billie With Love: A Celebration of ‘Lady Day,’ ” a tribute to Billie Holiday. Bridgewater is not only an accomplished jazz great, she’s also the host of NPR’s awardwinning weekly syndicated show, “JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater,” and the first American to be inducted to the Haut Conseil de la Francophonie. Folio Weekly caught up with Bridgewater from her home outside Las Vegas to chat about winning Grammys, working with family and the fight against world hunger.

76 | folio weekly | March 20-26, 2012

Folio Weekly: You’ve won three Grammys, the most recent in 2011 for Best Jazz Vocal Album for “Eleanora Fagan (1915-1959): To Billie With Love From Dee Dee.” What does it feel like to win a Grammy? Dee Dee Bridgewater: It’s got to be one of the most exhilarating moments, because you have won the Grammy by a vote of people in the music industry and from all different aspects of the music industry. So to have that honor — that distinction — is very … I

can’t even describe it. For me, all three of my Grammys were like, “What? Me? What?” and I had to be pushed out of my seat. I had to be pushed out of my seat by my son for this one, because I was just sitting there. He was like, “Mom! You won!” I didn’t think I was going to hear my name, so I just kind of put myself in this zone. F.W.: Your daughter, Tulani BridgewaterKowalski, is also your manager. You haven’t killed each other yet? D.D.B.: Oh, we’ve been together now 12 years. When she suggested it — when I was looking

“[My daughter said] ‘Why don’t I be your manager?’ and I said, ‘Oh, no. No, sweetie. That would destroy our relationship.’” for a manager here in the United States — she had been in personal management and she’d worked with people like George Benson, Michael Feinstein, Peter, Paul and Mary … she said, “Why don’t I be your manager?” and I said, “Oh, no. No, sweetie. That would destroy our relationship — our mother-daughter relationship.” Because she’s a very opinionated, headstrong woman and so am I. But I love working with my daughter. She’s a very brilliant woman and extremely knowledgeable about all aspects of the music industry. F.W.: She produced your first compilation

album, 2011’s “Midnight Sun.” Tell me about that. D.D.B.: I let her run with it. I said, “You want me to do this project? I don’t know, so you got to put it together because I’m not convinced.” I told her she had to find all of the material. F.W.: How were the songs chosen? D.D.B.: I’ve always had people asking me to do more ballads. I’m just a naturally energetic person, and I thought, “A ballad album? How boring. I would have nothing to do but sit and sing.” So when I was asked to do a compilation of a mishmash of songs from throughout my career — I like having themes and this had no theme — so I decided to go with an album of ballads. F.W.: You’re a Goodwill Ambassador of the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization. How did you got involved in the fight against world hunger? D.D.B.: From my travels — especially when I was living in France — I did a lot of travels to Africa, Egypt and even some parts of Southeast Asia. I was just very humbled in these countries. More recently in China — once you leave your main cities, even if you go to the outer edges of the main cities, it’s shocking. It’s shocking that it [hunger] exists in the 21st century. In over a majority of Africa, there’s no running water. So that really struck me, and so I have always associated myself with organizations that are trying to help the poor and the hungry. So when they [the U.N.] asked me to be a Goodwill Ambassador, I was very eager to help.  Kara Pound themail@folioweekly.com


Silent Treatment The local arts community collaborates in celebrating the quiet influence of John Cage

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ots of artists are heralded for taking gambles and being imaginative risk-takers. Yet few are as trusting the realm of the random as a place of sheer possibility as John Cage. Over the course of nearly eight decades on this planet, John Cage (1912-’92) influenced creative forms as diverse as music composition, literature, visual works, performance art and even contemporary dance. And in a form of intriguing symmetry, Cage’s most famous contributions to 20th-century art were based on both chaos and contemplation. Cage was a vocal proponent of what he called “Indeterminacy,” the belief that artists can find incredible freedom by deliberately introducing elements of improvisation, uncertainty and other “happy accidents” into their work. Cage also celebrated the meditative aspects of silence and interior reflection that influenced the Minimalism movement. Cage most famously imbued these ideas into his 1952 piece 4’33”, a work that essentially instructs musicians to not play their instruments for approximately four minutes and 33 seconds. The idea behind the piece is that whatever occurs during that specific allotment of time — whether it is pure silence or the nervous coughs of the audience — is in fact the “piece.” Cage’s ideas about chaos and quiet, what defines music and art and the blurring of the line between performer and spectator dashed long-held beliefs about the roles of artist and audience. Yet the onetime student of Henry Cowell and Arnold Schoenberg intended to free rather than overthrow music. “Until I die, there will be sounds,” Cage said in 1961. “And they will continue following my death. One need not fear about the future of music.” Cage had faith in his own decades-long musical evolution, and relied on tools as varied as the I Ching, the ancient Chinese text of divination, to Hinduism and Buddhism and even the use of hallucinogenic psilocybin mushrooms to achieve his goal of “imitating nature in its manner of operation.” He worked with or influenced mid-to-late-20thcentury creative types ranging from Merce Cunningham (also Cage’s longtime partner), Robert Rauschenberg, Yoko Ono, Brian Eno and Sonic Youth. Even Paul McCartney and John Lennon admitted that Cage influenced The Beatles’ more aggressively weird cuts, like the Musique-concrète of “Revolution 9” from 1968’s “The Beatles,” commonly called the “white album.” “I can’t understand why people are frightened of new ideas,” Cage once said. “I’m frightened of the old ones.” Nearly 20 years after his death, the arts world is honoring Cage’s legacy and influence with a global celebration (johncage.org), including a diverse collection of Northeast

The artistic legacy of John Cage (1912-’92) is being honored with a weeklong festival held March 24-30.

Florida artists, galleries, museums and organizations. A series of free local events (http://bit.ly/xTwIzh) held March 24-30 includes “Circus of Happening: A ChanceDetermined Series of Arranged Convergence (for John Cage),” a series of happenings at CoRk Arts District, 2689 Rosselle St., Jacksonville, on March 24 starting at noon, a screening of the documentary, “The Revenge of the Dead Indians: In Memoriam of John

Mark Creegan calls “chance-determined methods.” Starting at noon and continuing into the evening, it features performances, films and workshops by local and regional artists including Creegan, Emerson Orsborn, Tom Baggs, Lucy Bonk, John David Erickson, Hal McGee, Tim Albro, Brian Ratigan, Scared Rabbits and Clark Lunberry. The chief organizer of much of the local Cage-related happenings is Lunberry, an

“I can’t understand why people are frightened of new ideas,” Cage once said. “I’m frightened of the old ones Cage,” on March 26 at 7:30 p.m., Museum of Contemporary Art, 333 N. Laura St., Jacksonville, a performance by sound poet Jaap Blonk on March 27 at 7 p.m., also at MOCA, a performance of Cage works by violinist Tom Chiu on March 28 at 7:30 p.m., J. Johnson Gallery, 177 Fourth Ave. N., Jax Beach and a concert of Cage’s piano pieces (including 4’33”) on March 30 at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. at Riverside’s Friday Musicale, 645 Oak St., Jacksonville, featuring pianist Louis Goldstein. MOCA director Marcelle Polednik says Cage’s greatest impact may be his explorations of silence and questions about the “temporal nature” of art that still resonate. “I think it’s the manner in which he expanded the boundaries of what is today considered a performance or musical score that continue to inspire visual and performance artists to this day.” Perhaps the most overtly “Cage-like” event is the CoRk happening, in which the day’s events will be arranged by what participant

artist-writer-performer and an associate professor in University of North Florida’s English Department. Lunberry began creating this festival last summer, arranging the Goldstein, Chiu and Blonk concerts. “The next thing I knew,” he says, “it looked like a festival was forming.” Lunberry credits UNF, MOCA, Friday Musicale, Beaches Fine Arts Series and Riverside Fine Arts Association with hosting key events while keeping the festival completely free. He’s hopeful the festival draws attention to Cage’s wide-ranging contributions and helps people break out of their daily routines. Lunberry notes, “Cage himself summed up such a message, punning upon his own name when he said, ‘Get yourself out of whatever cage you find yourself in.’ ” Lunberry believes it’s a fitting epitaph. “That seems like as good a message as any.”  Dan Brown dbrown@folioweekly.com

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PERFORMANCE STRIKING A CHORD: A MUSICAL REVIEW Local musicians and actors present this performance about homelessness at 7 p.m. on March 22 at Theatre Jacksonville, 2032 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $30. Proceeds benefit City Rescue Mission. 387-4357. crmjax.org SPUNK The 5 & Dime, A Theatre Company presents this original musical based on three short stories by Zora Neale Hurston at 8 p.m. on March 22, 23 and 24 and at 2 p.m. on March 25 at Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 1100 Stockton St., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10 in advance; $15 at the door and can be purchased at spunkjax. eventbrite.com BLAK WOMAN DYNAMIK-REBORN Jana Morea Bradley’s original stage play “Blak.Woman.Dynamik-ReBorn,” focusing on topics ranging from breast cancer to domestic violence, is staged at 7 p.m. on March 23 and 24 at Theatre Jacksonville, 2032 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $20. 382-5725. bedynamik.com PEKING ACROBATS This acclaimed acrobatic troupe performs at 7:30 p.m. on March 24 at Thrasher-Horne Center for the Arts, St. Johns River State College, 283 College Drive, Orange Park. Tickets range from $15-$35. 276-6750. CIRCUS OF HAPPENING: A CHANCEDETERMINED SERIES OF ARRANGED CONVERGENCE (FOR JOHN CAGE) This celebration of the life and art of John Cage, featuring performance, film, installations, music and roundtable discussion by John David The Art Institute hosts its Portfolio Show, featuring works by Erickson, Tim Albro, Mark Creegan, Scared graduating students (pictured, Tara Owen’s “Self Portrait”), Rabbits, Tom Baggs, Brain Ratigan, Clark in graphic and interior design, digital filmmaking and video Lunberry, Hal McGee, Jim Ivy, Loren Knack, production, design, interactive media, web design and culinary Andrew Chadwick, Dan Reaves and Emerson arts, from 5-8 p.m. on March 22 at 8775 Baypine Road, Orsborn, kicks off at noon on March 24 at CoRk Jacksonville. 486-3000. Arts District, 2689 Rosselle St., Jacksonville. http://bit.ly/xTwIzh FETTERHOFF FOR HIRE ABET presents a musical comedy about Harry Fetterhoff, a private eye working in 1940s Hollywood, at 8 p.m. on March 23 and 24 and at 2 p.m. on March 25 at STYLE & STORIES Adele Grage Cultural Center, 716 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach. Apparel and graphic designer William Catchcart is the Tickets are $20. The play is staged through April 7. 249-7177. BUG featured speaker at 7 p.m. on March 26 at Flagler College’s Players by the Sea presents Tracy Lett’s dark drama, about a Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, 48 Sevilla St., St. Augustine. cocktail waitress and her relationship with a Gulf War veteran, 826-8530. JAX JAZZ COMPETITION SEEKS PIANISTS at 8 p.m. on March 23, 24, 29, 30 and 31 at 106 N. Sixth St., The Jacksonville Jazz Piano Competition is accepting CD Jax Beach. Tickets are $20. 249-0289. ARSENIC AND OLD LACE submissions for possible inclusion in this year’s competition, Orange Park Community Theatre stages Joseph Kesselring’s to be held on May 24 at The Florida Theatre. For full details classic dark comedy, about a homicidal family, at 8 p.m. on and guidelines, visit jaxjazzfest.com ART RE-SQUARED March 23 and 24 and at 3 p.m. on March 25 at 2900 Moody Anastasia Island Branch Library seeks 100 artists for its “The Ave., Orange Park. The show runs through April 7. Tickets are Square Root of Library Art Is You!” project. Modeled after $15. 276-2599. THE BELLE OF AMHERST the Dolf James and Christina Foard “Imagination Squared” Sinda Nichols stars in William Luce’s one-woman play, about project, artists are invited to pick up a 5”x5”x1/8” canvas poet Emily Dickinson, at 7:30 p.m. on March 23 and 24 and square from the library and create a piece of art in any style at 2:30 p.m. on March 25 at Fernandina Little Theatre, 1014 with any medium. All squares must be returned by March 24. Beech St., Fernandina Beach. Tickets are $15. 206-2607. The library is at 124 Sea Grove Main St., St. Augustine Beach. JERSEY BOYS 209-3730. The Tony-winning musical, about ’60s vocal group The Four LATIN AND BALLROOM DANCING LESSONS Boleros Dance Seasons, is staged at 7:30 on March 20, 21, 22 and 27, at 8 Center features a dance class at 7 p.m. on March 21 and p.m. on March 23, at 2 and 8 p.m. on March 24 and at 1:30 every Wed. at 10131 Atlantic Blvd., Jacksonville. Class fee for and 7 p.m. on March 25 at T-U Center’s Moran Theater, 300 the seven-week course is $130. 228-9931. THEATRICAL ARTS W. Water St., Jacksonville. Tickets range from $47-$67. The Classes in theatrical performance, including song and show runs through April 1. 632-3373. HOUSE OF BLUE LEAVES dance, are held Mon.-Fri. at The Performers Academy, The Limelight Theatre presents John Guare’s dark comedy, 3674 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. Fees vary. 322-7672. about a zookeeper who dreams of making it big as a theperformersacademy.com DANCE CLASSES songwriter in 1960s Queens, at 7:30 p.m. on March 22, 23 The Dance Shack offers dance classes in several styles for all and 24 and at 2 p.m. on March 25 at 11 Old Mission Ave., St. ages and skill levels every Mon.-Fri. at 3837 Southside Blvd., Augustine. Tickets are $25; $22 for seniors; $20 military and Jacksonville. 527-8694. thedanceshack.com students. 825-1164. HELLO, DOLLY! Sally Struthers stars in the classic musical comedy, about a matchmaker in turn-of-the-century Manhattan, at 8 p.m. March 20-25 and 27, at 1:15 p.m. on March 24 and 2 p.m. on PERCUSSION AT UNF March 25 at Alhambra Theatre & Dining, 12000 Beach Blvd., Charlotte Mabrey directs UNF Percussion Ensembles at 7:30 Jacksonville. Tickets range from $42-$49. “Hello, Dolly!” is p.m. on March 20 at University of North Florida’s Robinson staged through April 8. 641-1212. JAAP BLONK Theater, 1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville. 620-2878. Sound artist Blonk performs at 7:30 p.m. on March 27 LINDA COLE WITH JOSHUA BOWLUS TRIO Jazz vocalist Cole performs along with pianist Bowlus’ combo at Museum on Contemporary Art’s MOCA Theater, 333 N. at 8 p.m. on March 20 at European Street Café, 1704 San Laura St., Jacksonville. Admission is free; seating is limited. Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10. 399-1740. 366-6911.

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TONY BENNETT Jazz vocal legend Bennett appears at 8 p.m. on March 20 at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, 1340 A1A S., St. Augustine. Tickets range from $35-$85. 209-0367. ANOUSHKA SHANKAR Sitarist-composer Shankar performs at 8 p.m. on March 22 at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets are $35 and $40. 355-2787. LES DEMERLE ORCHESTRA WITH BONNIE EISELE GALA DANCE & DINNER Drummer DeMerle leads his orchestra with vocalist Eisele at 6:30 p.m. on March 24 at Omni Hotel & Resort at Amelia Island Plantation, 6800 First Coast Hwy., Fernandina Beach. Ballroom dancing, cocktails, dinner and a silent auction are featured. Tickets are $75. Proceeds benefit the education and entertainment programs of the 2012 Amelia Island Jazz Festival. 504-4772. ameliaislandjazzfestival.com JARELL HARRIS Jazz saxophonist Harris plays at 7:30 p.m. on March 24 at Lillie’s Coffee Bar, 200 N. First St., Neptune Beach. 249-2922. EARLY MUSIC AT FRIDAY MUSICALE Ensemble 415 South plays Baroque compositions by Louis de Caix d’Hervelois, Pietro Antonio Locatelli, Bach and Telemann at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. on March 23 at Friday Musicale, 645 Oak St., Jacksonville. 355-7584. BOND & BEYOND The Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra and Tony Awardwinning vocalist Debbie Gravitte present this concert, featuring theme music from the James Bond films, at 8 p.m. on March 23 and 24 at T-U Center’s Jacoby Symphony Hall, 300 W. Water St., Jacksonville. Pre-concert music and appetizers are featured at 6:30 p.m. Tickets range from $25$70. 354-5547. An encore presentation is at 3 p.m. on March 25 at Flagler College Auditorium, 74 King St., St. Augustine. Tickets are $30; $5 for students. 797-2800. THE KENNY MACKENZIE TRIO Pianist MacKenzie performs with bassist John Pellegrino and drummer Scott Mariash at 8 p.m. on March 24 at Jazzland Café, 1324 University Blvd. N., Jacksonville. Admission is $10. 249-1009. VOICE AND PIANO Baritone Rob Tudor and pianist Michelle Huang perform at 10:45 a.m. on March 25 at Unitarian Universalist Church, 7405 Arlington Expressway, Jacksonville. 725-8133. JOHN THOMAS GROUP Pianist Thomas leads his combo at 5 p.m. on March 25 at European Street Café, 992 Beach Blvd., Jax Beach. 249-3001. BACH CANTATAS Kim Beasley sings Bach works, including Cantata No. 84 and Cantata No. 31, at 6 p.m. on March 25 at Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 1100 Stockton Street, Jacksonville. 387-5691. CLARINET RECITAL Dr. Guy Yehuda presents UNF woodwinds students at 7:30 p.m. on March 25 at University of North Florida’s Recital Hall, 1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville. 620-2878. STRING SHOWCASE CONCERT UNF strings students are featured in performance at 7:30 p.m. on March 26 at University of North Florida’s Recital Hall, 1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville. 620-2878. GARY STARLING JAZZ GROUP Guitarist Starling leads his combo at 8 p.m. on March 27 at European Street Café, 1704 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville.

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Tickets are $10. 399-1740. JAZZ IN RIVERSIDE At 7 p.m. every Thur. at Kickbacks Gastropub, 910 King St., Jacksonville. 388-9551. JAZZ AT TREE STEAKHOUSE Boril Ivanov Trio plays at 7 p.m. every Thur. and pianist David Gum plays at 7 p.m. every Fri. at Tree Steakhouse, 11362 San Jose Blvd., Jacksonville. 262-0006. JAZZ AT GENNARO’S At 7:30 p.m. every Fri. and Sat. at Gennaro’s Ristorante Italiano, 5472 First Coast Highway, Fernandina Beach. 491-1999. JAZZ IN ST. AUGUSTINE Nightly at 7 p.m. at Rhett’s Piano Bar & Brasserie, 66 Hypolita St., St. Augustine. 825-0502.

ART WALKS & FESTIVALS JAX FINE ARTS FEST The Jacksonville Fine Arts Festival features original arts and crafts, food and live music from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. on March 24 and from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on March 25 at Boone Park, 3700 St. Johns Ave., Jacksonville. shoppesofavondale.com/ jacksonville_fine_arts_festival MID-WEEK MARKET Arts & crafts, local produce and live music are featured every Wed. from 3-6 p.m. at Bull Memorial Park, corner of East Coast Drive and Seventh Street, Atlantic Beach. 247-5800. DOWNTOWN FRIDAY MARKET Arts & crafts and local produce are offered every Fri. from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive. 353-1188. RIVERSIDE ARTS MARKET RAM is held from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. every Sat. beneath the Fuller Warren Bridge on Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville and features local and regional artists, strolling performers, bands and a farmers market. Admission is free. 554-6865, 389-2449. riversideartsmarket.com

MUSEUMS AMELIA ISLAND MUSEUM OF HISTORY 233 S. Third St., Fernandina Beach, 261-7378. The exhibit “Great Women of Florida” is on display through March. CRISP-ELLERT ART MUSEUM 48 Sevilla St., St. Augustine, 826-8530. “Form and Figure,” featuring sculpture by Enzo Torcoletti and Joe Segal, is on display through April 13. A discussion by the artists is held at 7 p.m. on March 21. Apparel and graphic designer William Catchcart is the featured speaker at 7 p.m. on March 26. CUMMER MUSEUM OF ART & GARDENS 829 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, 356-6857. “Impressionism and Post Impressionism from the High Museum of Art” is on display through May 6. “Richard Chamberlin: The Year of the Sheep” runs through July 8. “Beyond Ukiyo-e: Japanese Woodblock Prints and their influence on Western Art” runs through Aug. 9. “50 Forward: New Additions to the Permanent Collection” is on display through Aug. 15. KARPELES MANUSCRIPT MUSEUM 101 W. First St., Jacksonville, 356-2992. New works in watercolor and oil by Leigh Murphy are on display through

Jazzed! The Dynamic Les DeMerle Orchestra featuring Bonnie Eisele performs on March 24 at 6:30 p.m. at Omni Amelia Island Plantation Resort, 6800 First Coast Highway, Amelia Island. This swinging event features ballroom dancing, cocktails, dinner and a silent auction. Tickets are $75. Proceeds benefit the education and entertainment programs of the 2012 Amelia Island Jazz Festival. 504-4772. ameliaislandjazzfestival.com

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80 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012


The 5 & Dime, A Theatre Company presents the original musical “Spunk,” featuring songs by George C. Wolfe and Chic Street Man, on March 22, 23 and 24 at 8 p.m. and on March 25 at 2 p.m. at Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 1100 Stockton St., Jacksonville. This local production is based on three short stories by author Zora Neale Hurston. Tickets are $10 in advance; $15 at the door and can be purchased at spunkjax.eventbrite.com April 27. “Civil War: The Beginning,” an exhibit of original letters and documents, is displayed through April 25. The permanent collection includes rare manuscripts. Open Tue.-Sat. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART JACKSONVILLE 333 N. Laura St., Jacksonville, 366-6911. “Project Atrium: Mark Licari” runs from March 24-July 8. Licari is featured in a discussion at 2 p.m. on March 24. The film “The Revenge of the Dead Indians: In Memoriam of John Cage” is screened at 7:30 p.m. on March 26. Jaap Blonk performs at 7:30 p.m. on March 27. Artist Joe Forkan’s work, “The Lebowski Cycle,” a set of 14 paintings inspired by Baroque and Neoclassical eras and “The Big Lebowski,” is on display through April 1. An exhibit of work by the winners of the Northeast Florida Scholastic Art Awards runs through March. “ReFocus: Art of the 1960s” runs through April 8. mocajacksonville.org RITZ THEATRE & MUSEUM 829 N. Davis St., Jacksonville, 632-5555. An exhibit celebrating local African-American athletes and sports figures, “More Than a Game: African-American Sports in Jacksonville, 1900-1975,” is currently on display. Admission is $8 for adults, $5 for children, students and seniors. Open Tue.-Sun.

GALLERIES ALEXANDER BREST MUSEUM & GALLERY Jacksonville University, 2800 N. University Blvd., 256-7371. “Skeleton in the Closet,” a collection of portraits by Fritz Liedtke of people struggling with anorexia and bulimia, runs through March 28. AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION ARTISTS’ GUILD & GALLERY 94 Village Circle, Fernandina Beach, 432-1750. An exhibit of Amy Schrom’s latest paintings is on display through April 7. THE ART CENTER PREMIERE GALLERY Bank of America Tower, 50 N. Laura St., Jacksonville, 355-1757. The environmentally themed exhibit “Trees” runs through April 12. BLUE DOOR ARTISTS 205 1/2 Centre St., Fernandina Beach, 557-1187. An exhibit of works by fiber artist M. Lynette Holmes is on display through March. BUTTERFIELD GARAGE ART GALLERY 137 King St., St. Augustine, 825-4577. Mary Jane Amato’s “Fiber Art” exhibit is featured through April 2. THE CULTURAL CENTER AT PONTE VEDRA BEACH 50 Executive Way, 280-0614. Photography by Clyde Butcher is displayed through April 7. DOUGLAS ANDERSON SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 2445 San Diego Road, Jacksonville, 346-5620. “Rising Stars,” featuring recent works by visual arts students, runs through April 13. WORLEY FAVER GALLERY 11A Aviles St., St. Augustine, 304-2310. “Little Gems,” featuring works by Russ Wilson, Wendy Norton and C. Ford Rile, is featured through March. FIRST STREET GALLERY 216-B First St., Neptune Beach, 241-6928. “Waves,” works

by painter Beth Haizlip and glass artist Kyle Goodwin, is on display through April 2. FLORIDA MINING GALLERY 5300 Shad Road, Jacksonville. 535-7252. “Triple Threat,” with works by Matt Hebermehl, Michael Porten and Troy Wandzel, is shown through April 27. GALLERY 725 725 Atlantic Blvd., Ste. 5, Atlantic Beach, 345-9320. “Explore the Heart,” featuring recent works by Tonsenia Yonn, Jay Shoots, Matthew Winghart, Gary Mack, Linda Olsen and Shayna Raymond, is on display through March. GALLERY 1037 Reddi-Arts, 1037 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville, 398-3161. Recent watercolors by Robert Leedy and photographs by Gary McElwee are displayed through April. GALLERY GROUP, ART INSTITUTE OF JACKSONVILLE 8775 Baypine Road, Jacksonville, 486-3000. The graduate students’ portfolio show is held from 5-8 p.m. on March 22. GALLERY L Wells Fargo Ctr., 1 Independent Dr., Jacksonville, 553-6361. “Hamish MacEwan: The Paintings 1952-2009” is on display through March 27. P.A.ST.A FINE ARTS GALLERY 214 Charlotte St., St. Augustine, 824-0251. Recent paintings by Roann Elias are shown through March. ROTUNDA GALLERY St. Johns County Admin. Bldg., 500 San Sebastian View, St. Augustine, 471-9980. “Regional Artists from the Tail End of St. Johns County,” with works by A.E. (Beanie) Backus, Joe Taylor, Charles Dickinson and Eddie White, is featured through May 6. SOUTHLIGHT GALLERY 6 E. Bay St., Jacksonville, 553-6361. Sculptor Pablo Rivera is the featured artist for March. SPACE:EIGHT GALLERY 228 W. King St., St. Augustine, 829-2838. The exhibit “Paper Chase,” by Atlanta-based arts collaborative duo TindelMichi, is on display through March 31. STUDIO 121 121 W. Forsyth St., Ste. 100, Jacksonville, 292-9303. Potter Lucky Clark is the featured artist for March. THREE LAYERS CAFÉ 1602 Walnut St., Jacksonville, 355-9791. The exhibit “Magpie: A Photographic This and That,” featuring new works by photographer Jennifer Grey, is on display through April 20. VANDROFF ART GALLERY Jewish Community Alliance, 8505 San Jose Blvd., Jacksonville, 730-2100. The photographs of Ken Hercules are displayed through March 21. WEST GALLERY CoRK Arts District, 2689 Rosselle St., Jacksonville, 707-0030. The exhibit “The Immortals,” featuring recent work by Clair Hartmann, Lee Harvey, Bruce Musser and Sharla Valeski, is displayed through March.  To list your event, send time, date, location (street address, city), admission price and contact number to print to Dan Brown, 9456 Philips Hwy., Ste. 11, Jacksonville FL 32256 or email dbrown@folioweekly.com.

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EVENTS

JAX INDIA FEST Traditional Indian folk, classical and fusion dances, cuisine, jewelry and henna tattoos, and crafts and art are featured from 1-10 p.m. on March 24 at Metropolitan Park, 1410 Gator Bowl Blvd., Jacksonville. Admission is free. 290-3378. jaxindiafest.org ST. PATRICK’S FAIR The annual fair is held March 23, 24 and 25 at 1429 Broward Rd., Jacksonville. Rides, games, food, raffles, live music and dance performances are featured. 768-6323. MOSH AFTER DARK MOSH After Dark: Trivia Night is held from 6-8 p.m. on March 22 at Museum of Science and History’s Bryan-Gooding Planetarium, 1025 Museum Circle, Jacksonville. Tickets are $10, $5 for members. 396-6674, ext. 230. themosh.org CAPTURE THE FACE OF HOMELESSNESS Local musicians and actors present a 90-minute musical revue at 7 p.m. on March 22 at Theatre Jacksonville, 2032 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. A reception is held at 5:45 p.m. at a David Yurman trunk show and raffle at Underwood Jewelers, 2044 San Marco Blvd. The revue is offered to spotlight the issue of homelessness and how the face of those impacted is rapidly changing. Tickets are $30. Proceeds benefit City Rescue Mission. 421-5149. crmjax.org FESTIVAL OF THE CHARIOTS The seventh annual Ratha Yatra parade and festival is held at noon on March 24 at Plaza de la Constitución, across from the Bridge of Lions, St. Augustine. Live music, classical dance and lots of free vegetarian food are featured. (352) 538-0292. chakra.org TRASHY FASHION SHOW To help promote “creative recycling,” Ripley’s is looking for the best outfit and artwork made out of trash, to be featured at 2 p.m. on March 24 at Ripley’s Museum, 19 San Marco Ave., St. Augustine. A trashy art show is also featured. To register, email kkiff@ripleys.com RAILROADS DAYS FESTIVAL The West Nassau Historical Society hosts the seventh annual festival from 1-8 p.m. on March 23 and from 10 a.m.-8 p.m. on March 24 at Callahan Depot, 45383 Dixie Ave., Callahan. Parades, live entertainment, antique cars and arts and crafts are featured, as well as steam engine and sawmill displays and caboose tours. Proceeds benefit the renovation of the Depot. 879-3406. wnhsfl.org WOMEN, WORDS & WISDOM The speaker series presents Charlene Taylor Hill at 6:30 p.m. on March 27 at Theatre Jacksonville, 2032 San Marco Blvd., downtown. Hill discusses how her life and work has been influenced by being in the middle of the color line. Tickets are $40; $100 for the series. Proceeds benefit Expanded Horizons, a Women’s Center of Jacksonville literacy program for women. 722-3000. womenscenterofjax.org FLAGLER FORUM The Flagler College Forum on Government and Public Policy Series continues with the editor of the AARP Bulletin Jim Toedtman at 7 p.m. on March 27 at Flagler College Auditorium, 14 Granada St., St. Augustine. Admission is free. 819-6400. flagler.edu REMEMBER THE MAPLE LEAF The sunken steamboat Maple Leaf is discussed from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. on March 22 at Mandarin Museum and Walter Jones Historical Park, 11964 Mandarin Road, Jacksonville. A tour of the historic sites with archaeologists from the Florida Public Archaeology Network is featured. 268-0784. flpublicarchaeology.org COSMIC CONCERTS Laser shows include Legends of the Night Sky: Perseus & Andromeda at 7 p.m., LaserMania at 8 p.m., Laser Spirit at 9 p.m. and Laser Jimmy Buffett’s Parrothead Party at 10 p.m. on March 23 in Bryan-Gooding Planetarium, at Museum of Science & History, 1025 Museum Circle, Jacksonville. Online tickets are $5. 396-7062. moshplanetarium.org LINCOLNVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET The weekly market, held from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. every Sun. at 399 Riberia St., St. Augustine, offers local and organic produce, baked goods, coffees, cheeses, prepared foods, crafts and jewelry at the south end of Lincolnville in Eddie Vickers Park. There’s a community garden, too. lincolnvillefarmersmarket.com

POLITICS, BUSINESS & ACTIVISM

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CHAMBER AT NOON The Ponte Vedra Chamber of Commerce gets together at 11:30 a.m. on March 21 at Sawgrass Country Club, 10034 Golf Club Drive, Ponte Vedra. Kirstin Pirris and Heather Senterfitt are the featured speakers. Admission is $25 for members, $30 for non-members. 285-2004. SEN. GEORGE MCGOVERN The St. Johns County Democratic Party holds a fundraiser at

4 p.m. on March 25 at 1178 Wood Duck Hollow, St. Johns. George McGovern is the featured speaker. Piano virtuoso Sam Clein performs. Suggested minimum donation is $45. For reservations, call 825-2336 or 287-7720. SOUTHSIDE BUSINESS MEN’S CLUB Victoria Register, of Square Foot Gardening, is the featured speaker at 11:30 a.m. on March 21 at San Jose Country Club, 7529 San Jose Blvd., Jacksonville. Admission is $20. For reservations, call 396-5559. HEALTH CARE COUNCIL The AIFBY Chamber’s new council meets at 8 a.m. on March 27 at Sutton Place Behavioral Health, 463142 S.R. 200, Yulee. The Chamber launched the council as a way to raise awareness of health care services in Nassau County as well as develop professional contacts among local health-related organizations. 261-3248. UNF SMALL BUSINESS CLASS “International Trade: The Basics” is held from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. on March 21 at the Small Business Development Center at University of North Florida, 12000 Alumni Dr., Jacksonville. The fee is $25. “How to S-T-A-R-T-U-P Your Own Business” is held from 6-9 p.m. on March 20 and April 19; fee is $40 in advance, $50 day of workshop. “Proposal and Bid Writing; Tips and Strategies” is held from 9-11:30 a.m. on March 28; fee is $40. 620-2476. sbdc.unf.edu COMMUNICATORS CONNECT INTERNSHIP FAIR The University of North Florida’s Department of Communication its second annual Communicators Connect Internship Fair from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. on March 29 at UNF’s Student Union, Building 58 W., 1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville. Registration is free; space is limited. unf.edu JACKSONVILLE JOURNEY The oversight committee of this crime-fighting initiative meets at 4 p.m. on April 19 in Eighth Floor Conference Room 851, Ed Ball Building, 214 N. Hogan St., Jacksonville. 630-7306. PEOPLE’S LAW SCHOOL Free, one-hour legal classes are presented by St. Johns Legal Aid Staff at 4 p.m. every Tue. at St. Johns Southeast Branch Library, 6670 U.S. 1 S., St. Augustine. 827-6900. LEGAL AID FREE CLINICS Jacksonville Area Legal Aid offers free clinics, with no appointment necessary, at 126 W. Adams St., Jacksonville. Topics are: Bankruptcy at 5 p.m. on the first Thur. each month; Consumer Rights at 5 p.m. on third Wed.; Emancipation at 5 p.m. on the first Wed.; Child Support Modification at 5:30 p.m. on the second Thur. of each month; Dissolution of Marriage at 5:30 p.m. on the fourth Thur. of each month; Foreclosure and Home Ownership clinic at 5 p.m. on the second Wed. of the month; Custody/Timesharing/ Paternity at 5:30 p.m. on the third Tue. of the month. Small Claims Court at 5:30 p.m. on the second Tue. of each month at Duval County Courthouse, 330 E. Bay St., Room 505, Jacksonville. In Nassau County, a Consumer Law Clinic is offered at the Nassau County Courthouse in Yulee. A sign-up is required; call (904) 356-8371, ext. 307. jaxlegalaid.org

LIBRARIES, BOOKS & WRITING

CASSANDRA KING Author King appears at 7 p.m. on March 20 at Flagler College Auditorium, 14 Granada St., St. Augustine. Admission is free. 819-6400. flagler.edu WOMEN IN LITERATURE The Jacksonville Area chapter of the National Organization for Women presents its 10th annual Women’s History event at 7 p.m. on March 26 at The BookMark, 220 First St., Neptune Beach. Rona Brinlee presents a program of books by and about women to celebrate Women’s History Month. Admission is free. 241-9026. FREE FINANCIAL SEMINARS Smart investing@your library, a series of seminars designed to help folks navigate common financial issues, is held through March 22 at libraries throughout the city. The program ends with an appearance by author Michelle Singletary at the Main Library on March 24 at noon. Seminars are free; registration is required. To register, call 630-2665 or go to jaxpubliclibrary.org WRITERS CRITIQUE GROUP This group gathers from 6-8:30 p.m. on the first Tue. of the month at Mandarin Library, 3330 Kori Road, Jacksonville. Admission is free. 428-4681. cdspublicity.com

COMEDY

AL ERNST Allstars at 8 p.m. on March 20. Al Ernst appears at 8 p.m. on March 21, 22 and 23 and at 8 and 10 p.m. on March 24 at The Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Road, Ramada Inn, Jacksonville. Tickets range from $6-$12. 292-4242. SQUARE ONE STANDUP Moses West and Herman Nazworth host standup and spoken


walter coker

The Northeast Florida Indian-American community and the culturally curious will find live music, classical dance and lots of free vegetarian food at the seventh annual Ratha Yatra parade and festival at noon on March 24 at the Plaza de la Constitución in downtown St. Augustine. (352) 538-0292. chakra.org. At Metropolitan Park, the Jax India Fest takes place from 1-10 p.m. and offers traditional Indian folk, classical and fusion dances, cuisine, jewelry and henna tattoos, and crafts and art, at 1410 Gator Bowl Blvd., Jacksonville. Admission is free. 290-3378. word at 9 p.m. every Tue. at Square One, 1974 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville. 306-9004. JACKIE KNIGHT’S COMEDY CLUB Patrick Garrity and Bob Lauver appear at 8:30 p.m. on March 23 and 24 at 3009 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd., St. Augustine. Tickets are $8 and $12. 461-8843. LATITUDE 30 COMEDY Tres Croswell is featured at 8 p.m. on March 23 and 24 at Latitude 30, 10370 Philips Highway, Southside. Tickets are $13. 365-5555. SUZANNE WESTENHOEFER Westenhoefer appears at 7:30 p.m. on March 24 at The Florida Theatre, 128 E. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Tickets are $35. Proceeds benefit Oasis, the GBLT Center of Northeast Florida. 355-5661.

UPCOMING

BEN FOLDS WITH JAX SYMPHONY April 14, T-U Center SLOW FOOD FIRST COAST TOUR DE FARM April 22 RIVER CITY CHALLENGE May 5, Downtown Jacksonville THE PLAYERS CHAMPIONSHIP May 5-13, TPC Sawgrass SLASH May 9, The Florida Theatre WILCO May 16, St. Augustine Amphitheatre K.D. LANG & THE SISS BOOM BANG May 29, The Florida Theatre THE TURTLES WITH FLO & EDDIE, THE MONKEES’ MICKY DOLENZ, GARY PUCKETT & THE UNION GAP, THE GRASS ROOTS AND THE BUCKINGHAMS June 14, The Florida Theatre

NATURE, SPORTS & OUTDOORS

KIDS’ FREE FISHING CLINIC The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission hosts a free fishing clinic for children ages 4-16 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. on March 24 at Ft. Clinch State Park Fishing Pier, 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach. Lessons on knot-tying, fishing ethics, tackle, habitat and casting are offered. A free hot dog lunch is provided. 277-7274. floridastateparks.org WETLANDS The Sea Oats Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society gets together at 7 p.m. on March 20 at City Hall, 2200 A1A S., St. Augustine Beach. Ryan Carter, president of Ecology for Natural Resource Consultants, discusses “Ecological Systems of SJC Wetlands.” 692-3927. fnps.org BULLY BASH Pro wrestlers compete at 7:30 p.m. on March 24 at The Potter’s House Christian Academy, 1150 Lane Ave. S., Jacksonville. Admission is $10 for adults, $5 for kids. Proceeds benefit programs to promote awareness of bullying. 365-1236. unitedstateswrestlingalliance.com BRAZILIAN JIU JITSU TOURNAMENT The fifth annual BJJ Open, for adults and kids, is held at 10 a.m. on March 24 at National Guard Armory, 9900 Normandy Blvd., Jacksonville. (615) 243-6233. bjjgrandprix.com SHARKS TEETH A ranger discusses the different types of shark teeth that can

be found on the area’s beaches at 2 p.m. on March 24 at the multi-use trail pavilion, south beach area on Little Talbot Island, 12157 Heckscher Drive, Jacksonville. No reservations are necessary and the program is free with regular park admission. 251-2320. floridastateparks.org PLANT CLINICS Duval County Master Gardeners host plant clinics from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on March 24 at various area locations. They will answer gardening questions and will be accepting soil samples for pH testing. For locations, call 255-7450. coj.net PING PONG TOURNAMENT A ping-pong tournament is held at 7 p.m. every Tue. at Green Room Brewing, 228 Third St. N., Jax Beach. 201-9283. BIRDS OF PREY Melanie Cain-Stage of HAWKE (Humane Association of Wildlife Care and Education), St. Augustine’s wildlife rehabilitation organization, is the featured speaker at 7 p.m. on March 26 at St. Johns River State College, C-116, 283 College Drive, Orange Park. stjohnsaudubon.com

COMMUNITY INTEREST

BLACK & WHITE GALA The Jacksonville Regional Office of Catholic Charities holds its 19th annual gala at 6:30 p.m. on March 24 at Hyatt Regency Riverfront, 225 East Coastline Drive, Jacksonville. March Madness games on the big screen, bracketology, free throws, food stations, a silent auction and live music by The Faze Band are featured. Tickets are $150. Proceeds benefit Catholic Charities programs. 354-4846 ext. 227. ccbjax.org FISH-A-THON Mayor Alvin Brown invites those ages 60 and older to the annual Fish-A-Thon in Our Park at 10 a.m. on March 23 at Kathryn Abbey Hanna Park, 500 Wonderwood Drive, Atlantic Beach. Fishing, games, lunch and an awards ceremony with trophies for most fish, largest fish, smallest fish, ugliest fish and prettiest fish are featured. 630-7392. SPANISH-AMERICAN HISTORY GALA The Legado is held from 6:30-10:30 p.m. on March 23 at St. Johns County Visitor Information center, 10 S. Castillo Drive, St. Augustine. Live music, dancing, a silent auction and a performance by Museo Interactivo of Spain are featured. Tickets are $150 for dinner and drinks. Proceeds benefit First Light Maritime Society. 997-8004. staugustinelighthouse.org WALK TO CURE DIABETES This walk begins at 9 a.m. (check-in at 8 a.m.) on March 24 at Jacksonville Fairgrounds, 510 Fairgrounds Place, Jacksonville. Live music, kids’ activities, food and games are also featured. Proceeds benefit Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation programs. 739-2101. jdrf.org ROCK N RIDE BENEFIT The 10th annual police-escorted motorcycle ride kicks off at 10:30 a.m. on March 24 at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive, downtown. Advance entry fee is $24 for drivers, $39 for drivers with a passenger. Live and silent auctions and food are featured, and Big Engine plays. Proceeds benefit the daniel Memorial. 296-1055 ext. 1003. WOMEN’S RECOGNITION The St. Johns Cultural Council presents its 2012 Recognizing Outstanding Women in the Arts Award ceremony at 5:30 p.m. on March 25 at Limelight Theatre, 11 Old Mission Ave., St. Augustine. Award-winning author and Florida native Connie

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May Fowler is the featured speaker. ROWITA recipients are Shirley Bryce, Barbara Minckley, Sister Diane Couture and Kay Burtin. Admission is free. The art exhibit, “Women of Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow,” is displayed. 808-7330. stjohnsculture.com RYDAS 4 RIGHTEOUSNESS CANCER WALK In addition to a charity walk, there’s live entertainment, guest speakers and kids’ games and activities, held from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. on March 24 at A. Philip Randolph Heritage, 1069 Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville. Proceeds benefit programs of the Colon Cancer Alliance. 674-4339. eventbrite.com SPRING 4-A-CURE 5K WALK/RUN Mason Manatee Relay for Life Team presents this charity event at 8:30 a.m. on March 24 at St. Augustine Shores Riverview Club, 790 Christina Drive., St. Augustine. Registration is $20 online, $25 day of race. Proceeds benefit American Cancer Society. racesmith.com HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION This group gets together at 6:30 p.m. on March 20 at West Regional Library, Room 105B, 1425 Chaffee Road S., Jacksonville. 778-2265. CHILDRENS’ WEEK ADVOCACY WALK Jacksonville Kid’s Coalition holds this walk at 10 a.m. on March 20 at The Jacksonville Landing, 2 Independent Drive, downtown. 350-9949. jaxkidscoalition.org UNF HEART HEALTH STUDY The School of Nursing at University of North Florida is seeking participants for a heart health study, targeting Filipino women in order to answer heart-health questions related to diabetes and cholesterol. The event is held from 7 a.m.-1 p.m. on March 24 at Holy Spirit Catholic Church’s Monsignor Heslin Hall, 11665 Fort Caroline Road, Jacksonville. For more information, call Dr. Irma Ancheta, School of Nursing, Brooks College of Health, at 383-2392. CALL FOR ARTISTS Artists are needed for Art & About, A Neighborhood Art & Music Event at Orange Park Town Hall, 2042 Park Ave., on April 14. Download artist or food vendor application at artguildoforangepark.com

KIDS

ANASTASIA BRANCH LIBRARY PROGRAMS St. Johns County Environmental Department representatives teach kids about sea turtles at 2:30 p.m. on March 21 at Anastasia Island Branch Library, 124 Sea Grove Main St., St. Augustine. Teen Lounge is held at 4 p.m. on March 22. 209-3731. VEGGIETALES LIVE! Larry the Cucumber and all his plant pals appear at 6:30 p.m. on March 23 at Evangel Temple Assembly of God, 5755 Ramona Blvd., Jacksonville. Tickets are $10 in advance, $15 at the door. 781-9393. evenagletempleag.org SPRING INTO SCIENCE CAMP This camp, for kids K-5, offers exhibits and planetarium programs from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. through March 23 at Museum of Science & History, 1025 Museum Circle, Jacksonville. Activities include Engineering with Food, Flower Power, Space Science 101, Animal Encounter, and Lego Camp: Architect Adventure. Cost is $40 per day or $180 for the entire week. MOSH members receive a discount. 396-6674 ext. 226. themosh.org TEEN “HUNGER GAMES” PROGRAM Teens 12-19 celebrate the release of the new movie

(opening on March 23) at 6 p.m. on March 20 at Southeast Branch Library, 6670 U.S. 1 S., St. Augustine. 827-6900.

CLASSES & GROUPS

INTERMEDIATE SCREENWRITING WORKSHOP Sharon Y. Cobb offers this workshop from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on March 24 at University of North Florida, University Center, 12000 Alumni Drive, Jacksonville. Admission is $89. 620-4200. learnjacksonville.com BUDDHIST CENTER Prayers for World Peace is held from 10-11:30 a.m. every Sun. at Maitreya Kadampa Buddhist Center, 85 Sailfish Dr., Atlantic Beach. Meditation for all is held at 7 p.m. every Mon. Chanted prayers and meditations are held at 7 p.m. every Wed. 222-8531. Meditation and Practical Buddhist Teaching is held at 6:30 p.m. every Mon. at Discovery Yoga, 3 Davis St., St. Augustine, 222-8531. Fee is $9 for adults, $5 for students. Meditations for Relaxation and Healing is held at 12:15 p.m. every Wed. at The Elements, 12795 San Jose Blvd., Jacksonville, 619-1587. Fee is $5. MeditationInJacksonville.org WOMEN’S SELF-DEFENSE CLASS The St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office offers this course at 6:30 p.m. on March 26 at Southeast Branch Library, 6670 U.S. 1 S., St. Augustine. To register, call 810-6694. BEREAVEMENT CLASS A grief and loss bereavement class is held from 7-8 p.m. every Thur. through April 3 at Haven Hospice, 8301 Cypress Drive, Ste. 119, Jacksonville. 733-9818. NAMI SUPPORT GROUP National Alliance on Mental Illness support group meets from 7-8:30 p.m. every first and third Thur. of the month at Ortega United Methodist Church, 4807 Roosevelt Blvd., Jacksonville. Admission is free. 389-5556. ortegaumc.org DEPRESSION BIPOLAR SUPPORT GROUP The DBSA support group meets from 5:30-7 p.m. every Wed. at River Point Behavioral Health’s Outpatient Building, 6300 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville. 343-6511 or 964-9743. Q-GROUP ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS This free, open discussion is held at 5:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri. at Quality Life Center, 11265 Alumni Way, Jacksonville. alcoholicanonymous.org DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE This support group meets from 6-7:30 p.m. every Tue. at Baptist Medical Center, 800 Prudential Drive, Jacksonville. For more information, call 616-6264 or 294-5720. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS Do you have a drug problem? Maybe they can help. 3586262, 723-5683. serenitycoastna.org, firstcoastna.org NICOTINE ANONYMOUS (NIC-A) Want to quit smoking or using other forms of nicotine? Nic-A is free, and you don’t have to quit to attend the meetings, held at 6:30 p.m. every Wed. at Trinity Lutheran Church, 1415 S. McDuff Ave., Westside. 404-6044. nicotineanonymous.org NAR-A-NON This group meets at 8 p.m. every Tue. and Thur. at 4172 Shirley Ave., Avondale. 945-7168.  To get your event included in this listing, email the time, date, location (street address, city), admission price and contact number to events@folioweekly.com or click the link in our Happenings section at folioweekly.com. Events are included on a space-available basis. “Why, yes, I do happen to know the words to ‘Little Red Caboose’ – whyever do you ask?!” The West Nassau Historical Society hosts the seventh annual Railroad Days Festival on March 23 from 1-8 p.m. and on March 24 from 10 a.m.-8 p.m. at Callahan Depot, 45383 Dixie Ave., Callahan. Parades, live entertainment, antique cars and arts and crafts are featured, as well as steam engine and sawmill displays and caboose tours. Proceeds benefit the renovation of the Depot. 879-3406. wnhsfl.org

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Riding A Man’s Phallic Aim

An annual spring fertility festival in Vietnam’s Phu Tho province is capped by a symbolic X-rated ceremony rendered G-rated by wooden stand-ins. At midnight on the 12th day of the lunar new year, a man holding a wooden phallus stands in total darkness beside a woman holding a wooden plank with a hole in it, and the act is attempted. As tradition goes, if the man succeeds at penetration, there will be good crops. After the ceremony, villagers are ordered to “go and be free,” which, according to a Thanh Nien News Service Feb. report, means uninhibited friskiness during lights-out.

Cultural Diversity

nontraditional belief that mainstream religion had become irrelevant to most folks. Tattooing is a “morally neutral” practice, Bentley said, though Brown, of course, doesn’t ink tattoos lauding drugs, gangs or the devil. In Dec., Pennsylvania judge Mark Martin dismissed harassment charges against Muslim Talaag Elbayomy, who’d snatched a “Zombie Mohammad” sign from the neck of atheist Ernie Perce at last year’s Halloween parade in Mechanicsburg. Perce was mockingly dressed as an undead person, in robes and beard. In tossing out the charge (though Elbayomy seemed to admit to assault and battery), Martin ruled Sharia law actually required Elbayomy to take the sign away from Perce. Martin later explained the technical basis for the ruling was (he-said/he-said) lack of evidence.

In the remote state of Meghalaya, India, a matrilineal system endows women with wealth and property rights and relegates men to slowmoving campaigns for equality. A men’s rights advocate, interviewed by BBC News in Jan., lamented even the language’s favoring of women, noting that “useful” nouns seem all to be female. The system, he said, breeds generations of men “who feel useless,” falling into alcoholism and drug abuse. In maternity wards, he said, the sound of cheering greets baby girls; if it’s a boy, the prevailing sentiment is “Whatever God gives us is quite all right.” The husband of one woman interviewed said, meekly, that he “likes” the current system — or at least that’s what his wife’s translation said he said. Each year, Chumbivilcas, Peru, celebrates the new year with what to us may seem “Festivus”-inspired (like the Seinfeld TV show), but is actually drawn from Incan tradition. For “Takanakuy,” with a background of singing and dancing, townsfolk with grudges from the previous 12 months (men, women, children) settle them with sometimesbloody fistfights, so they start the new year clean. Said one villager to a Reuters reporter, “Everything is solved here, and after[ward] we are all friends.” In a tradition thought to have begun in the eighth century, the village of San Bartolome de Pinares, Spain, marks each Jan. 16 with the festival of St. Anthony, with villagers riding their horses through large fires in the streets (“Las Luminarias”). As horses jump the flames, according to belief, they become purified, demons are destroyed and fertility and good health result. Apparently, no horses are harmed, and an on-the-scene priest blesses each for its courage.

John Morgan, 34, was charged in Feb. in Port St. Lucie, Fla., with embezzling over $40,000 from a trust fund that had been established for his daughter, who has special needs because of cerebral palsy. Because of the theft, she’s unable to have dental work necessitated because a care provider failed to lock her wheelchair, sending her sprawling face-first. Police officer Skeeter Manos, 34, was charged in February in Seattle with embezzling over $120,000 from a fund for the families of four colleagues who had been shot to death in the line of duty. Manos’ alleged expenditures included several trips to Las Vegas.

Latest Religious Messages

Least Competent People

Prophet Warren Jeffs, of a breakaway Mormon cult, is serving life (plus 20 years) in a Texas prison for raping two underage parishioners, but insists his power isn’t diminished. He was disciplined in Dec. for making a phone call to his congregation announcing several decrees, including barring marriages from taking place until he can return to “seal” them, and prohibiting everyone from having sex. Since Jeffs retains his “messiah” status among many church members, and life-plus-20 is a long time to wait, and since the cult is reclusive, it’s hard for outsiders to assess the sexual frustration level there.) Recovering alcoholic Ryan Brown recently moved his licensed tattoo parlor into The Bridge church in Flint Township, Mich. It’s one more indicator of Rev. Steve Bentley’s

Questionable Judgments

According to a municipal street sign in front of Lakewood Elementary School in White Lake, Mich. (filmed in Feb. by Detroit’s WJBK-TV), the speed limit drops to 25 mph on “school days only,” but just from “6:49-7:15 a.m., 7:52-8:22 a.m., 8:37-9:07 a.m., 2:03-2:33 p.m., 3:04-3:34 p.m. [and] 3:59-4:29 p.m.” Jack Taylor, 18, of Worcester, England, was given a lenient sentence in Jan. for an August burglary he admitted. He and another kid tried to steal a resident’s motorcycle but damaged it in the process. Since he was remorseful, made restitution, observed a curfew and did community service, he was released by the judge when he secured full-time employment. However, the employment, the court later learned, was as a slaughterman in Norway, where he was to take part in the culling of Alaskan baby seals.

A Special Place in Hell

LaDondrell Montgomery, 36, had been sentenced in Nov. in Houston to life in prison for armed robbery, despite his vigorous protestations of innocence. About a week later, in Dec., he was exonerated in fact. Though he’d testified at his trial, he hadn’t mentioned he had an ironclad alibi: He’d been in jail when the robbery was committed. Once jail records were reviewed, Montgomery was freed. The prosecutor hadn’t checked the records before trial, and neither had Montgomery’s attorney, but neither had Montgomery ever mentioned it. Because, he told his lawyers, he’d been in and out of jail so many times in his life, he just couldn’t recall if he’d been locked up at the time of the crime.  Chuck Shepherd WeirdNews@earthlink.net March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 85


ARIES (March 21-April 19): Not bad for a few weeks’ work or play or whatever it is you want to call this tormented, inspired outburst. Am I too forward to suggest you’ve gone a long way toward outgrowing the dark fairy tale haunting your dreams for so long? And yet all this may just be a warm-up for your next metamorphosis, when you make an audacious new commitment to becoming what you really want to be when you grow up. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): This week I’m taking a break from my usual pep talks. I think it’s for the best. If I give a kind-hearted kick in the butt, maybe it’ll encourage you to make a few course corrections, making it unnecessary for fate to get all tricky and funky on you. Here you go: 1. The last thing you need is someone to support your flaws and encourage you in your delusions. True friends offer snappy critiques and crisp advice. 2. Figure out once and for all why you keep doing a certain deed that’s beneath you, then gather the strength and get the help you need to quit. 3. It’s your duty to stop doing your duty with such a somber demeanor and heavy tread. To keep from sabotaging the good it can render, put more pleasure into it. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The German word Weltratsel can be translated as “World Riddle.” Coined by philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, it refers to questions like “What is the meaning of existence?” and “What is the nature of reality?” According to my astrological omen-reading, you’re primed to deepen your understanding of the World Riddle. For the next few weeks, you’ll have an enhanced ability to pry loose useful secrets about some big mysteries. Certain passages in the Book of Life that have always seemed like gobbledygook suddenly make sense. A bonus: Every time you decipher more of the Riddle, you’ll solve another small piece of your Personal Riddle. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” So wrote George Bernard Shaw in “Man and Superman.” From the hints I’ve gleaned, you’re in an ideal phase to be the sort of unreasonable man or woman who gets life to adapt to better serve you and your dreams. Even if it’s true that past emphasis has often been on you bending and shaping to adjust to circumstances others have wrought, the weeks ahead may be different. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In his book “Word Hero,” Jay Heinrichs offers advice on how to deliver pithy messages to really make an impact. Here’s one tip especially useful for you in the days ahead: Exaggerate precisely. Heinrichs has an example from that illustrious raconteur, American author Mark Twain. Twain did not write, “In a single day, New England’s weather changes a billion times.” Rather, it was, “In the spring I have counted 136 different kinds of weather inside of four-and-twenty hours.” Be inspired by Twain’s approach every way you can imagine. Make things bigger, wilder and more expansive everywhere you go — do it with exactitude and rigor.

86 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Liminality” refers to the betwixt and between state. It’s dawn or dusk, when it’s neither fully night nor day. It’s the prevailing mood when a transition’s imminent or a threshold beckons. During a rite of passage, liminality is the phase when the initiate has left the old way of doing things but hasn’t been fully accepted or integrated into the new way. Mystical traditions worldwide know this as a shaky but potent situation, when uncertainty and ambiguity reign even as exciting possibilities loom. You’re

now ensconced in liminality. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Argentinian writer Antonio Porchia said there were two kinds of shadows: “some hide, others reveal.” In recent weeks, you’ve been in constant contact with the hiding kind. But any moment now, you’ll be wandering away from those frustrating enigmas and into a dynamic relationship with more evocative mysteries: shadows that reveal. Be alert so you aren’t caught assuming new shadows are just like old ones. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Every winter, ant hordes overrun my house — until recently. This winter, the pests stayed away, and that’s good news. I didn’t have to fight them with poison and hand-to-hand combat. The bad news? They didn’t invade because very little rain fell, as it usually does during Northern California winters. The ants weren’t driven above ground by torrents soaking the soil. So now drought threatens the area. Water shortages may loom. I propose this scenario is a metaphor for a dilemma you may soon face, except you’ll have a choice: Would you rather deal with a lack of a fundamental resource or an influence that’s bothersome but ultimately harmless? SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’re entering one of your astrological cycle’s most buoyant phases. Your mandate: Be brash and bouncy, frothy and irrepressible. To prepare, I’ve got exclamatory declarations by poet Michael McClure. Take them as you go on catalytic adventures. They’ll help you cultivate the right mood. McClure: “Everything is natural. The light on your fingertips is starlight. Life begins with coiling — molecules and nebulae. Cruelty, selfishness, and vanity are boring. Each self is many selves. Reason is beauty. Light and darkness are arbitrary divisions. Cleanliness is as undefinable and as natural as filth. The physiological body is pure spirit. Monotony is madness. The frontier is both outside and inside. The universe is the messiah. The senses are gods and goddesses. Where the body is — there are all things.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You know those tall, starched white hats many chefs wear? Traditionally, they had 100 pleats, which denoted the number of ways a real professional could cook an egg. Wear one of those hats in the weeks ahead or whatever your specialty’s equivalent symbol is. It’s high time to express your ingenuity in dealing with what’s simple and familiar … to be inventive and versatile as you show how much you can do using just the basics. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): As I was driving my car in San Francisco late one night, I arrived at a traffic signal that confused me. The green light was radiant and steady, but so was the red light. I came to a complete stop and waited until finally, after about two minutes, the red faded. You may soon be facing a similar jumble of mixed signals. If that happens, do what I did. Don’t keep moving forward; pause and sit still until the message gets crisp and clear. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Joan Ginther has won the Texas Lottery four times, collecting more than $20 million. Is she freakishly lucky? Maybe not, according to Nathaniel Rich’s article in the August 2011 issue of Harper’s. He notes that Ginther has a Ph.D. in math from Stanford, and wonders if she’s used her substantial understanding of statistics to game the system. (More here: tinyurl.com/LuckAmuck.) Be inspired by her example. You now have exceptional power to increase your good fortune through hard work and practical ingenuity.  Rob Brezsny freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com


TOTALLY FLOORED!!! First saw you sitting on the floor in the chips aisle... then again outside... (around 8:15 am) — You were wearing a light blue polo shirt & shorts... I’m kicking myself for not getting your number... If you are reading this, what was I wearing &/or driving? When: March 11, 2012. Where: Walmart on Philips Hwy. @ 8:15am. #1299-0320

means please... When: ??? Where: Monkey’s Uncle Jax Beach. #1289-0306 PETE’S BAR You, sitting at the bar with your friends drinking whiskey. I walked in and saw you right away. We talked and you charmed me, I went to play some foosball and you left, leaving me wondering if I’ll ever see your charming self again. Let’s talk again! When: Feb. 25, 2012. Where: Pete’s Bar. #1288-0306

YOBE FROZEN YOGURT At 8pm went in looking crazy with my white polo hoodie on covering my head, pink FSCJ shorts and some flip flops. Me and my kiddie bop grabbed some frozen yogurt and I saw your handsome face, with slicked black hair, you had on shorts with a plaid blue and white button up I believe and with a friend wearing a cap. You two decided to eat outside that night. Don’t know if you noticed but I sure was looking from the corner of my eyeball lol. When: Feb. 29, 2012. Where: Orange Park Yobe Frozen Yogurt. #1298-0320

STARBUCKS DREAM GIRL You: Short reddish hair, blue bandana, red shoes, backpack. Me: Maroon zip-up, grey beanie, black hair with buzzed side. We made eye contact before you sat with your back to me. I’d like to see more of the front. Let me buy you your next coffee? When: Feb. 26, 2012. Where: Riverside Starbucks. #1287-0306

HANK WILLIAMS JR. CONCERT You were hanging out behind the guy in charge of the lights. You were also wearing a t-shirt that read Georgia across the front. I had long blonde hair and you were amused that I hunt in Georgia. I left in a hurry. Don’t let me get away, lol. When: March 3, 2012. Where: Hank Williams Jr. Concert. #1297-0320

HOPE YOU NOTICED You were in St Barts and I walked in with the girl. You didn’t look up but I could tell you were paying attention. There was more to me than meets the eye; I can’t wait to get your attention with the real me. Me: slim, Irish. You: tall, too intelligent. Care to meet by the pool? When: Feb. 20, 2012. Where: St. Bart’s. #1286-0306

MUSCULAR MOUNTAIN MAN You: tall blonde grizzly hunk that comes to the gym on his lunch break. Me: big rack with a bigger back. I’ve seen you get into a black older model F-150 with window decals on the back. Also I know we share a love for the Avett brothers. I hope that one day we can lie underneath a tree together, play guitar, sip some apple pie moonshine and listen to the birds. Will you be my Tim Tebow? When: About twice a week during lunchtime. Where: Athlete’s Choice N. Main St. #1296-0313

TATTOOED GRAPHIC DESIGNER Hey u with the giant “kitty” on your side, we have the same artist and share an interest in photography. I was sitting on the ground in the art bldg watching Ghostbusters and writing a paper, u can ask me out on a date! I think you’re hot! Hope to see u soon, maybe at the tattoo shop! When: Mondays and Wednesdays. Where: University of North Florida. #1285-0306

JOHN SMITH SEARCHING FOR POCAHONTAS Saw you just around the river bend. Watched you tattoo a stuffed giraffe and my life hasn’t been the same since. Would love to paint the colors of the wind with you. When: March 5, 2012. Where: Jerry’s Sports Grille. #1295-0313 BANGIN’ LIBRARIAN You: Blue eyes, short bangs & a green collared dress with sexy side cutouts. Me: Plaid button-up and cords. I saw you shelving DVDs. We met eyes for a few seconds and I thought to come over and ask you for a little assistance, but I was slightly intimidated. Let’s see how tough you truly are. Drinks? When: March 1, 2012. Where: Jacksonville Public Library: Willow Branch. #1294-0313 FOREVER’S MESSENGER We exchanged few words, you complimented my pants. You: adorable brunette with messenger bag. Me: blushing, excited employee in beanie wishing I had said more. I’ve seen you around and I’d like to put a name to that face. When: Feb. 25, 2012. Where: Avenues Mall. #1293-0313 TO THE MAYOR OF CAMP CRYSTAL LAKE You stole my heart from the couch.. and I have never let you out of my heart... you will always be in it no matter if your there or not... so let’s get back on that lonely couch and when we wake let go for a bike ride on the beach. When: Feb. 2011. Where: Camp Crystal Lake Herschel St. #1292-0313 SEXY TATTOOED WHISKY RIVER BARTENDER I saw you staring all night at me when I was working. We had a moment while you were DJing when I finally caught your gaze. You’re on repeat in my mind all day. Let’s make music! Where: In the bush. When: Feb. 29, 2012. Where: Whisky River/Suite. #1291-0313 RUNNING RIOT You: Pretty, petite blonde always running and laughing with your friend in Riverside. Me: Tall, tan and athletic dying to know what’s so funny. When: Jan. 26, 2012. Where: Riverside. #1290-0306 SHORT HEALTHY BRUNETTE CUTIE RE: TRIVIA All of my friends have been facebooking me and texting me funny things about your “sexy trivia man” ad, question is will you reveal yourself so I know what exactly “healthy”

WAFFLE HOUSE OFF 17 You: with your lazy eye and tangled bleached platinum hair, I was constantly wondering if you were looking at me or staring into my soul. Me: chain smoking cigarettes and watching you like a tiger hunting its prey, I will wait for you at the Waffle House. Please don’t make me eat my heart shaped pancakes alone. When: Feb. 23, 2012. Where: Waffle House. #1284-0306

Please take my case? You: Tall, dark-haired man in long coat and blue scarf. Me: Soldier with blonde hair who called you brilliant. When: Feb. 10, 2012. Where: St. Bart’s. #1282-0221 YOU HELD MY DOOR AT THE CAR Ok Joe you were a doll. Called me ma’am and I am. But still are you there? Bold City Thurs nite 9:30 pm. When: Feb. 9, 2012. Where: Bold City. #1281-0221 PUT A BIRD ON IT! Saw you on the corner of Forbes and Acosta in your faded bathrobe sitting on your porch drinking your morning brew. As soon as I got a whiff of your morning coffee breath I knew you were the one for me. If your as interested as I am, meet me at cool moose at 8 am on v-day and we’ll both have some java to go with our morning breath. When: Feb. 9, 2012. Where: Forbes & Acosta. #1280-0221 EYE CONTACT ONLY I was out with a girlfriend, wasn’t sure if you were out with yours, so I never actually spoke to you. Your dark hair, glasses and almost hidden arm tattoo caught my attention almost as much as our eye contact. As soon as I left, I regretted not saying anything. If you’re single, I’d like to actually have that conversation! When: Feb. 9, 2012. Where: Salt Life/Mellow Mushroom. #1279-0221 RAMPS ON THE STOVE TOP You the Officer that came to my parents rescue... Me the one who was in scrubs and slightly embarrassed because my father offered you “Ramps”. Ever since then you have been forever on my mind...would love to get to know you better. XOXO? When: Jan. 2011. Where: Ortega. #1278-0221 MY SUNSHINE I was driving along Atlantic Blvd, crossing at Hodges Blvd, when I saw you cruising in your V dub. Dark silk hair, hiding the fiery blonde underneath, you’re sexy dark shades resting above your little nose. It was love at first sight, but it was my first time seeing you sunshine. I’ll see you soon. When: April 11, 1984. Where: Atlantic Blvd. #1277-0214

BLACKJACKS BBQ BEAUTY You (girl) work at Blackjacks and have tattoos. I (guy) eat at Blackjacks and have tattoos... so far we’re 2 for 2. When: Feb. 14, 2012. Where: Blackjacks Baymeadows. #1283-0221

LOST GIRL? U brunette with brown eyes that shine like little stars, sitting on red couch at The Royal. Me guy dressed in black busy working and cleaning up. I really meant to catch your name? Hope I see you again one day. When: Feb. 4, 2012. Where: The Royal. #1276-0214

MYSTERIOUS COAT AND CHEEKBONES I saw U at St. Bart’s, cooking something up in the lab. Mutual friend introduced us. You told me my life story just by observing the evidence. I believe my heart was stolen.

TETHERED TO BAR NEAR BATHROOMS Me WAY too drunk, however, your beauty and energy is unforgettable. You and your dark haired gentleman friend were tethered to the bar near the bathrooms. I would love

love love to get to know you and see where it goes, if anywhere. When: Jan. 27, 2012. Where: Monkey’s Uncle Tavern – Mandarin. #1275-0214 SATURDAY AFTERNOON DELIGHT You: long curl brown hair, blue shirt, couldn’t catch your eye color thru those motorcycle goggles. Loved the cute gap between your teeth. Me: blonde blue eyed girl in red sundress. You told me how attractive you thought I was at the Daily’s on Roosevelt. Didn’t know what to say at the time but suddenly the words have come to mind. When: Jan. 28, 2012. Where: Daily’s on Roosevelt & San Juan. #1274-0214 GEORGIEGIRL1313 Met you on Plenty of Fish. We messaged back and forth and then you were gone. Hope you find this. Secret Agent Doc... Take Care Cutie... When: Feb. 1, 2012. Where: Plenty of Fish. #1273-0214 I’M IN “MISERY” WITHOUT YOU You: Adam Levine look alike, delivering my southwest salad with a little extra spice, making it a little “harder to breathe.” I was mesmerized by your doe-like eyes, I didn’t have a chance to look at your nametag. Me: strawberry blonde hair in a pink polo. next time you wanna go to panera and toss my salad? When: Feb. 2, 2012. Where: Crispers at the town center. #1272-0214 I SAW YOU WALKING DOWN THE STREET I saw you walking down the street and dang you are hot you’re so sexy you have dark black hair and very tan w/f. holla at me if you see this. When: Feb. 1, 2012. Where: Bowden Road. #1271-0214 SEXY TRIVIA MAN You: muscular blonde trivia host. Me: short healthy brunette cutie. You can guess my answer anytime. When: Jan. 24, 2012. Where: Monkey’s Uncle Beaches. #1270-0214 MY LITTLE PICTURE MAN You: young buck with buzz cut taking photos of surfers on the Jax beach pier. You winked at me while I was walking my dog on the boardwalk, then quickly got into your blue Tacoma. Next time I’ll jump in the back and we can head two blocks to Bo’s Coral Reef. When: Jan. 25, 2012. Where: Jax Beach Pier. #1269-0207 YOU WERE HOTTER THAN MY BURRITO I Saw U at the hot sauce bar and noticed you liked it spicy! You were wearing a pink hello kitty shirt and thigh high boots. I was the guy who knocked over the plastic cups. I think you should join me for spicy taco night at my place sometime. When: Jan. 27, 2012. Where: Tijuana Flats @ Bartram Park. #1268-0207

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March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 87


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ACROSS 1 Impulsive 5 Tkt. office location 8 Beset by personal demons 16 With 21 Across, what you hear at a kibbutz at the end of the day? 20 Opening 21 See 16 Across 23 Nullifiers 24 What “cycloptic” has? 25 “Mazel ___!” 26 Site of a lot of dribbling 28 Fruity quaff 29 N.J.-to-N.Y. option 31 Almost here 33 Place for hula lessons? 38 Highchair feature 40 High school class 42 Kauai keepsake 43 Literary category 44 Mil. or mus. abbr. 47 Trombone part 49 Having too many kids? 52 “___ excellent driver” (“Rain Man”) 54 Bear, in Spanish 55 Gershwin and Levin 56 Old notation for a certain chess capture 57 Dove sound 58 One with a small income? 61 Day-care charge 62 Police rank: abbr. 63 “Brothers and sisters have ___ ...” 64 Top guns 65 Par for the ___ 67 With 70 Across, heartburn? 70 See 67 Across 73 “___, won’t you?” (promo line for “The Jetsons”) 74 Adoption agcy.? 75 Foe of Dwight 77 Cartoon cat 79 Scratch 80 Wurst at their worst?

16

2

SOUTHSIDE

330 A1A NORTH 280-1202

10300 SOUTHSIDE BLVD. 394-1390

THE SHOPPES OF PONTE VEDRA

O Punnish Me (The Sequel)

1

PONTE VEDRA

3

83 It’s on the st. where you live 84 French article 85 Layer of paint 86 Coffee-to-go need 87 Gabor and Peron 88 What long concerts may do? 91 “For Me and ___” 93 Like some grins 94 Red carpet interviewees 95 Pennsylvania port city, to Amtrak 96 Subway guide 98 Ballyhoo 100 Only episode of “Leave It To Beaver” that was never aired? 103 Gab session 105 Searches (through) 109 Curry of “Today” 110 Shout that starts a game of tag 112 Stephen of “V for Vendetta” 114 Precisely 115 Blind alley 119 Result of backing into a cactus? 122 Kin of “Hallelujah!” 123 Pacing oneself between drinks? 124 Second attempts at using stickum 125 Actor McShane 126 Bireme gear 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

17

5

6

18

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H B O M B

A B U S E

MA N P E D A A C Y OV U L GU E S S E D I U S N L I E V E I W I A N T N A S A N Y T H I NGS P L A MU S H Y I ME L E F T T E NOG S I R T O L GA DOR WOWA Y S A B O U A R P R E F X E S M I C T P URCH A S E MA I N E C E N ND E E D Y MA N O I L EWE P E E K I NG A T T R I S T E S H SME A R P U 8

19

25

29

30 38 45

46

52

31

40

53

41 49

54

42

68

83 88

84

100

86

102 110 118

36

37

87

98

103

112

119

93 99

104

111

76

92

97

72

82

91 96

101 109

115 116 117

81

85

95

35

75

90

94

15

71

80

89

14

66

70

79

13

D O S E S

62

65

69

N U R S E

57

74

78

12

H A E N DD Y

51

61

73 77

11

56

64 67

T E N

P S UH B Y

43

50

60

63

A N T I

34

55

59

A H A T

S T A A L N S

28

33

48

10

L A O

T OMB S I N T O T O R EGR E T E E L A T L B I GD E L C A I R S S I B L E A RM R A B L E H A T SMY B A L T E A R I T E L I S WE R EOP L ON A E C E S S A R S KO I S A N I S L A T V S D H E A N SWE A R E L A P N Y WA S T

23 27

32

39

9

L E T

20

26

47

58

124

F T S

76 Paris suburb 77 Schoolbooks 78 Newspaper comic strip set in the Old West, “Rick ___” (1958-81) 80 You might give him the business 81 Hole number? 82 WWII turning point 83 Breathing: abbr. 84 Luxuriance 85 Capital on the Nile 89 1993 Tom Stoppard play 90 Oscar-winner McDormand 91 Speed abbr. 92 CD precursors 97 When Hamlet says “To be, or not to be” 99 Choice word 101 Beginning 102 Sot’s ailment 104 Second City co-founder Alan 106 Mortals, to Puck 107 Diplomacy 108 Wall St. buys: abbr. 111 Addams Family cousin 113 Jason’s ship 115 EMT skill 116 Moist extension 117 Track circuit 118 Actor Vigoda 120 Event at which Reba might sing: abbr. 121 Mom-and-pop helper: abbr.

Solution to Maybe Yes, Maybe No

22

24

122

S A Y H I

7

21

44

19 Ballad finale 22 Handful, maybe 27 The butler on “The Nanny” 30 Century pts. 32 The big four-oh, e.g. 34 Between halfwayshowing and full, as the moon (anagram of BUGS’ BIO) 35 Chilling 36 Whether ___ 37 “Let ___!” 39 Baseball surname 41 Social customs 44 Chevalier classic 45 ___ acids 46 Arthur of “primal scream” fame 48 Queen mother, e.g. 50 Alt. spelling 51 Additional 53 Prime-time time 55 “___ misty ...” 59 European blackbird 60 Eight, in German 61 In a melodic sense 62 Soap actress Hall 65 This, in French 66 Figurative try 68 April, May, and June, e.g. 69 Agitated 70 Predicament 71 Several Norwegian kings 72 Birth-related 74 Common contraction?

DOWN “Copy that” Trumpet great ___-mo Weight A Wynn in Vegas No later than Home, tweet home? Scarlet bird Unbar, to a bard Majestic Import-export disparity Speaker Regret Botch a catch Part of a U.S. capital Starting Movie opening? Pal-appointing, e.g.

4

AVONDALE 3617 ST. JOHNS AVE. 388-5406

AVENUES MALL

105 113

120

106 107 108 114

121

123 125

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March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 89


Advanced Disaster

How AP classes hurt public schools and waste millions, too

A

dvanced Placement. The name conjures up images of our most advanced students taking college-level classes and getting credit for them, assuming they score high enough on the exam at the end of the course. AP courses are designed to give the college-bound kids a leg up after they graduate, and it makes sense, in theory. It’s just too bad they’ve wrecked Duval County’s schools in the process. When our former Superintendent Joey Wise came in, he was a big believer in Advanced Placement classes — so big, he went to work for them after his brief term here in Jacksonville. It was under Wise that we switched from a block schedule where kids would take four 90-minute classes at a time to an A/B block schedule, where kids took eight. That’s right, friends, students here in Duval County are required to take what would be a double course load in college, where four classes is considered full-time. In fact, at most colleges, you would have to get special permission to take more than six classes in a semester, but here, it’s the norm. And the sole reason we changed our schedule was to benefit the handful of students taking Advanced Placement classes. Superintendent Wise reasoned that if kids took an AP class during the first semester, then the material wouldn’t be as fresh in their minds when they took the test at the end of the year (for some inexplicable reason, A.P. tests are given at the end of the school year, not the end of the course). Since we couldn’t have that, the schedule was changed to accommodate them, so they would still be in their AP classes when test-taking time rolled around. These students are also the group best-suited to take eight classes at a time, which means that while the schedule change was possibly beneficial to a few students, it had to be detrimental to more than a few as well. Superintendent Wise did not last, but that didn’t mean the district’s fascination with AP tests left with him. On the contrary, it exploded — but this time, for a more insidious reason. When the state does school and district grades, it looks at the number of kids taking AP classes and awards bonus points. It doesn’t matter if the kids have passed the classes or tests or not, just that they have their butts in the seats. The superintendent and his staff must have realized this, because there was a surge of students placed in Advanced Placement classes. Suddenly, kids who could barely do work at grade level were thrust into Advanced Placement classes. There was a time when students had to have permission to be in these advanced classes, but not any longer. The number of kids taking the classes expanded exponentially. And, as you can imagine, the number of kids failing Advanced Placement tests expanded exponentially as well. The worst part? This gave the district cover from some of our other problems. The superintendent and the School Board like to say

90 | FOLIO WEEKLY | MARCH 20-26, 2012

we are a “B” district on average, but the truth is, when compared to other districts throughout the state, even districts that are bigger and poorer than ours, we are doing very poorly. Our graduation rate is one of the worst in the state and so are our FCAT scores. It’s impossible to imagine Duval would be a B district unless we were getting bonus points from somewhere — and that’s where the surge of kids taking A.P. classes came in. You see, we don’t need kids to do well on the A.P. tests to get bonus points, we just need kids to take the A.P. classes — and they are now doing so in droves. If the district had to say it was a C over the last few years, I have to believe the public would have clamored for change sooner. Instead, a math teacher who reached the top of the heap, making more than a quarter-million dollars a year, hoodwinked the city. What exactly does a B mean? For Duval, it means we are the 50th-ranked district out of 67 in Florida. It’s a good thing Florida doesn’t grade on a curve. It means we have eight of the bottom 25 high schools in the state, including No. 404 out of 404. Our middle schools are in a similar predicament. It means fewer than two-thirds of our kids graduate on time (just over half of our African-American kids do) and many of those needed social promotions and grade recovery to do so. Fewer than half our kids arrive at high school reading on grade level, and if we didn’t force so many level ones and twos into Advanced Placement classes, where they have no business being, then we would be in real

the test, whether they want to or feel ready. I wonder how many of those 16,180 failed tests were just randomly filled out because the student knew they had no hope of passing it. Do other districts seem to have this problem? Not even close. Of the six districts that had more than 10,000 A.P. tests given, we had the greatest percentage of kids taking the tests and we had the worst results. The first number shown below is the percentage of 9-12th graders taking an A.P. test, and the second number is the pass rate in the other five districts. Palm Beach: 34.7 — 50.6 percent Orange: 33.2 — 42.8 percent Hillsborough: 43 — 37.6 percent Dade: 29.6 — 41.1 percent Broward: 31.1 — 48.4 percent Duval: 50.4 — 25 percent Collectively, the pass rate of the other school districts is 43 percent — some 18 percentage points higher than ours in Duval County. Other local counties: St. Johns: 39.2 — 55 percent Clay: 23.6 — 46.9 percent Nassau: 30.4 — 40.9 percent As you can see, of the big counties, only about a third of their students take A.P. tests, but here in Duval County, it’s over 50 percent. Why? Sadly, it’s because we need the bonus points. And just so you know, Hillsborough

I don’t think it would be a stretch to say we waste about a million dollars a year paying for tests that kids have no business taking. That’s 15 art teachers or a vocational electrician program that our county just throws out the window every year. trouble. By the way — our kids pass only one in four A.P. tests. That means only one in four received a grade of three, which is passing, or higher. Seventy-five percent of the tests were failed, and failed at the cost of $85 a pop. Last year, the district spent $1,375,300 on Duval’s failed tests. Let’s just round that down to an even million dollars, because some kids who have a legitimate shot at taking the tests do so and fail. But the problem is, so many students here in Duval County are taking the tests and they really have no business doing so. I don’t think it would be a stretch to say we waste about a million dollars a year paying for tests that kids have no business taking. That’s 15 art teachers or a vocational electrician program that our county just throws out the window every year. One of the reasons we do so poorly is that we require every student in an A.P. class to take

was the only other county that had more than 40 percent of its student body taking A.P. tests, and no county had more than we did. So, not only did the district change our whole schedule to just benefit a few kids, hurting many in the process, not only is the district arguably wasting about a million dollars a year, not only is the district forcing kids to take classes they shouldn’t, but worst of all, the district used Advanced Placement tests to hide our other weaknesses and pull the wool over the community’s eyes. Friends, in Duval County it hasn’t been about what’s best for the kids for years — it’s been about the board members and massaging numbers to keep their jobs.  Chris Guerrieri

Guerrieri is a special education teacher at Ed White High School in Jacksonville.

Folio Weekly welcomes Backpage Editorial submissions. Essays should be at least 1,200 words and on a topic of local interest or concern. Email your Backpage to themail@folioweekly.com or snail mail it to Anne Schindler, Editor, Folio Weekly, 9456 Philips Highway, Ste. 11, Jacksonville FL 32256. Opinions expressed on the Backpage are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the editors or management of Folio Weekly.


March 20-26, 2012 | folio weekly | 91


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