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JURY MEMBERS 2014

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GRAND PRIX

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COPING WITH COPING WITH FREEZING CONDITIONS FREEZING CONDITIONS USING INFORMATION DESIGN TO HELP USINGREFUGEES INFORMATION DESIGN TOHOMES HELP WINTERISE THEIR REFUGEES WINTERISE THEIR HOMES

photo by CARE

photo by CARE

Winter in Syria and the surrounding region is cold and harsh. In Jordan, more than half a million refugees Syria have sought shelter Winter in Syria andfrom the surrounding region is to fleemore their homes. Most coldafter and being harsh.forced In Jordan, than half a of themrefugees are staying in run-down with million from Syria haveapartments sought shelter a few In the winter, afternothing being but forced toold fleemattresses. their homes. Most of CARE has helped families to cope during the them are staying in run-down apartments with freezing temperatures, distributing cash to buy nothing but a few old mattresses. In the winter, heaters blankets and fuel refills to refugees.

CARE has helped families to cope during the Emantemperatures, Ismail freezing distributing cash to buy Program Director heaters blankets and fuel refills to refugees. photo by CARE

photo by CARE

Introducing CARE

photo by CARE

photo by CARE

CARE International is a global As a non-religious and non-political confederation of 14 member organisations confederation, CARE delivers humanitarian Introducing CARE working together to end poverty. They and development assistance to anyone in fight poverty injustice in more than As a non-religious need regardless race, gender, ethnicity, CARE International is aand global andofnon-political 80 countries aroundorganisations the world to help the age, religion, view or sexual confederation of 14 member confederation, CAREpolitical delivers humanitarian world’s to poorest people find routes out ofand development orientation. assistance to anyone in working together end poverty. They poverty. CARE also emergency need regardless of race, gender, ethnicity, fight poverty and injustice in delivers more than aidaround to survivors of wartoand natural In 2015political CARE celebrate years practical 80 countries the world help the age, religion, view or70sexual disasters. They are often first on the scene, and hands-on experience; their programmes world’s poorest people find routes out of orientation. helping people to rebuild their lives in tackle the deep-seated root causes of poverty. CARE also delivers emergency the aftermath. poverty, not just the consequences.

aid to survivors of war and natural disasters. They are often first on the scene, helping people to rebuild their lives in the aftermath.

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In 2015 CARE celebrate 70 years practical and hands-on experience; their programmes tackle the deep-seated root causes of poverty, not just the consequences.

CARE Jordan

Eman Ismail Program Director CARE Jordan


Category Project

Social Affairs CARE refugee leaflet by TDL London

What was the challenge?

What was our solution?

CARE international asked for our help during the crisis in Syria when millions of people were fleeing the country. They urgently needed a leaflet to help refugees prepare for the colder months by ‘winterising’ their accommodation within neighbouring countries. We only had five days to design the document for immediate use within the refugee communities.

Project progress blogs were posted each day on Behance, enabling CARE to view progress both in their UK and Syrian bases. This also enabled them to invite feedback from a wider stakeholder group.

carbon monoxide build up. A life size measurement rule was used to highlight how wide the ventilation gap should be, this enabled the leaflet to act as a physical tool as well as for information sharing.

Symbols As the final product was going to educate the user and act as a series of calls to action for varied levels of literacy, we used symbols to represent certain elements and actions; this enabled us to minimalise text. Feedback was sought on the perception of these symbols throughout the design stage.

Line art We used simple line art and clear messaging to ensure the leaflet was suitable for all literacy levels. Different line weights were used to define objects, with circles used to ‘zoom in’ on elements defining ‘good’ and ‘bad’ more clearly, and arrows and colour depicting heat.

The brief was to design a leaflet suitable for varied levels of literacy, and clearly explained how to keep warm. The leaflet would be handed out with ‘non food items’, i.e. the equipment needed to help winterise accommodation. The design needed to highlight the benefits of winterising over just ‘buying another heater’. The constraints for the project were: •

Two sided for cheap on-site printing.

Designed in English and Arabic.

The leaflet had to be clear and easy to understand with a heavy focus on visuals not just text.

The leaflet had to explain the priorities of keeping warm as stated by ‘Global Shelter Cluster’ best practice.

Call to action The use of illustrated people ‘performing’ the actions helps the user to understand the ‘how’ rather than just the final outcome. The illustrations also give ‘good and bad’ situations for easy comparison. The use of 3D illustrations helped to add depth to the heat and ventilation impacting actions.

photo by CARE

Life size measurement rule One of the main challenges was to portray the requirement to prevent heat loss, but still retain good ventilation to reduce

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SPECIAL RECOGNITION

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Contact: name: Victoria Tomlinson company/organisation: TDL-London

Life-size dimensions were shown on the space dedicated to carbon monoxide poisoning.

e-mail: victoria@tdl-london.com website: www.tdl-london.com

Circles were used to ‘zoom in’ on elements defining ‘good’ and ‘bad’ more clearly.

Working up the translated version required flipped designs (for reading right to left) and a specialist Arabic typeface.

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Category:

Healthcare

Project:

Ärzte ohne Grenzen

What was the challenge? Doctors Without Borders is a Nobel Peace Prize winning emergency medical organisa­ tion that operates in conflict zones around the world. Since 2000, Moniteurs has been responsible for the corporate design of the German branch. 2014 has seen the organ­ isation sharpen its image: clear, indepen­ dent, professional – these are the essential attributes. What was the solution? Moniteurs’ task is to reflect these at­ tributes in print. The corporate design is kept open in order to be able to speak specifcally to the different target groups. The colour red and the concise typography, developed for Doctors Without Borders by Moniteurs – a “rough” headline cut, based on the font Fago – have become important distinguishing features for the organisation. What was the effect? The design uses colours, typography and images in a way that creates a “reading atmosphere”, which makes it easy for the reader to enter the material. The goal of the design is to have lots of information that is interesting and easy to discover. For this, data graphics were also developed.

Contact: Moniteurs Communication design info@moniteurs.de www.moniteurs.de

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Category: Wayshowing Project:

Oxford Brookes University

What was the challenge? Oxford Brookes University had commissioned a new building for the campus. They wanted it to be a modern icon in the heart of the campus: The new John Henry Brookes Building. As with the architecture the information graphics had to literally sign a new attitude to branding a built environment within their organisation. We had to design the scheme off plan working closely with the architects. What was the solution? The architects design used a varied palette of materials and colours. We took the key brand device (the notch) from the guidelines and developed it to define the detail of the information graphics. The arrow becomes quite a participant in the signs and the icons we designed to reflect the thin weight of Helvetica that we have chosen. We have separated the icons and the type for quick reference, recognising that in a University you have a mix of students who visit everyday to new visitors who only visit once. We worked with the background colours in each instance introducing signs with depth to create some visual contrast within the space. What was the effect? Having designed the solution off plan we are pleased to know that the students and staff have responded very positively. It is a complex building and the new look and feel has been sited to extend throughout the university. The building opened in May 2014 and has won several architectural and design awards.

Contact: name: Lucy Holmes company/organisation: Holmes Wood e-mail: lucy@holmes-wood.com website: www.holmes-wood.com 1 : Oxford Brookes University

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© Holmes Wood 2014

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Category:

xx

Project:

NYU Langone Medical Center Wayfinding & Communications System

What was the challenge? NYU Langone Medical Center is considered one of the nation’s premier centers for excellence in clinical care, biomedical research and medical education. However, they are not immune to the changing and competitive healthcare market. Major gifts led to the renaming and re-branding of the institution and its several facilities. In 2008, the Medical Center’s Real Estate Development and Facilities Department (RED&F) embarked on an ambitious Campus Transformation Initiative to reshape the Medical Center. The initiative is comprised of new construction, renovations and expansions to reorganize and optimize resources across all NYU Langone facilities. The institution is committed to being a “world-class, patient-centered integrated academic medical center.” This vision statement formed the framework for the Wayfinding and Communications System. An extension of this vision is a visitor wayfinding and communications experience that serves a diverse community yet is as straightforward, logical and clear as possible. What was the solution? A key goal of the system was to create an environment in which users can be given simple, clear directions to a medical center destination, no matter their primary language. To meet this goal we established a consistent

Contact: name: Jennette Cheung company/organisation: Two Twelve e-mail: jcheung@twotwelve.com website: www.twotwelve.com

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naming convention to be employed across all wayfinding touchpoints and an intuitive circulation strategy to aid in navigation but creating a reliable understanding of the facility. This became the functional framework for the system and detailed how to address user wayfinding requirements by determining how and where information and directions are needed. In order to be successful, the circulation strategy needed to consider both current and future conditions as determined by the Campus Transformation Initiative. The circulation strategy developed for the main campus consists of three color-coded pathways that lead to key landmarks - the public elevators. This simplification makes navigation more efficient and simplifies the decisions users have to make on their journey. The pathways also function as information highways containing the touchpoints that aid in a user’s journey. We used a simple five-step process to guide users to their destinations and to establish understandable and memorable directions. (1. Building 2. Entrance 3. Pathway 4. Elevator 5. Destination). All destinations are color-coded to their corresponding pathway and assists in self-navigation, particularly for those users with limited English and reading proficiency. What was the effect? For NYU’s patients and visitors, the difficulty in finding one’s way around this complex environment was further compounded by intimidating medical terms, inconsistent signage, varying directions, and elevated stress levels. Iterative consensus building and applications of user testing and

research served as foundations for a responsive wayfinding system, one where the network of information is interconnected, logical, suits the users’ needs, and can be embraced by the Medical Center. The consistent design aesthetic and wayfinding vocabulary serves as the backbone of this system, manifesting in each of the touchpoints, from static signage to maps and digital tools. The overall user experience The overall user experience is thus transformed to one that is supportive, seamless, and stress-free. The solution has simplified navigation and made each touchpoint an opportunity for the Medical Center to express their brand and reinforce their mission. We have not just created tools or a wayfinding system of signage and digital interactions, but a branded experience focused on patient-centered care. For NYU Langone Medical Center, we exceeded expectations by designing an experience that: -maintains visual continuity -provides accessible information that can be understood by a diverse community -seamlessly integrates digital and static tools in the physical environment -embraces user testing research to meet the needs of a diverse community, from training staff with consistent directions to incorporating user feedback on interactivity -grows with the expansion of the Medical Center by being flexible and easy to maintain.


Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Brisbane Multilingual Pedestrian Signage

What was the challenge? One of the strategies from the Australian city of Brisbane’s Economic Development Plan, is to establish stronger links with the Asia Pacific economy. Part of this strategy is to provide multilingual communication to international visitors, including signage and digital guides. Based on the target audience of short stay international tourists and long stay international students, messages in Korean, Japanese, Traditional Chinese and Arabic are to be included in the signage. The messaging should be inclusive of a variety of languages, however, English should be treated as the dominant language. What was the solution? Multilingual signage in the city centre was developed to support international visitors and reinforce Brisbane’s credentials as a global city. Thirty three new multilingual directional signs, were installed within the city centre, replacing English only signs. An inherent problem with multilingual signage is ensuring that all of the messages are discernible and legible. This was addressed in two ways. First, a sign panel features a single message repeated in multiple languages. A busy location with several messages becomes more visible to the user by dedicating one message per panel. Second, a clear hierarchy is denoted between English and the other four languages. English is still the dominant language spoken.

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Contact: Contact: name: Laura Beattie name: Laura Beattie company/organisation: Dotdash company/organisation: Dotdash e-mail: laura@dotdash.com.au e-mail: laura@dotdash.com.au website: www.dotdash.com.au website: www.dotdash.com.au


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This is achieved by the ordered layout of messages, selection and balancing of typeface weights and the shape of the sign panels. Using a kit of parts approach, the strength of the design relies upon a simple panel and post components that can be configured in a multitude of ways to suit a specific location. A post can support several panels of communication for a complex location or a single panel for a location that requires only one message. A busy location with several messages becomes more visible to the user by dedicating one message per panel. The Kit of Parts approach to the design integrates signage elements made of recyclable stainless steel and aluminium with existing structural components. The modularity of the panels advocates for ease of rotation, and anticipates the inevitability of future change. The design is predicated on a principle of energy conservation. In this case, human energy. The intention is to help more people move around Brisbane city efficiently and effectively thus achieving more with less. What was the effect? Throughout Brisbane’s city centre these highly recognizable signs stand out from their environment, punctuating a pedestrians journey with brightly coloured panels displaying clear and concise information. They provide an inclusive, clearly identifiable wayfinding strategy, for visitors of many nationalities trying to navigate a new urban environment.

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Gebrüder Weiss, Signage

What was the challenge? We got the pleasant task to develop a wayfinding system for the headquarter of Gebrüder Weiss, a logistics company located in Lauterach/Austria. Our work was about understanding what people in the company are doing, the things which influence and determine their way of thinking and their behavior. Move­ ment is a main concept of Gebrüder Weiss – not only the goods, but also the people and the company itself are in a constant movement. What was the solution? Set in motion, the embleme – the orange square – becomes a blurred shape and finally a point. Based on the point as a highly moveable form, we derive starting points, arrival point, viewpoints and points of intersection. The idea is about connecting points and rising up lines inbetween them, which are forming active networks that reflect the world of Gebrüder Weiss. Furthermore, the point provides the fundament for creating a specific typo­ graphy and pictograms for the wayfinding system. The design of ground markings and direction signs are also following the same concept.

What was the effect? The infographic on the glass fronts connects via virtual lines the employees from the headoffice in Lauterach with customers and staff members all over the world. These connections illustrate the different altitudes of the sun and therefore the clock time at the respective locations. This could animate people to develop an awareness for their collegues far away. One takes the first coffee in the morning, while another enjoys allready his well­ earned closing time drink. »Village squares« are created to offer open encounters and exchange zones to everybody. These spaces should help to escape from the daily routine and to find a relaxing moment. To make also the workaday life of the drivers visible in the headquarter, road markings from different countries bring this reality back to the world of management. Walking across the 70 meters long tunnel from the old to the new office building, you pass several locations along a virtual 47th degree of latitude. This walk »around the world« is ment to overcome barries and distances. All intentions of this project are aiming to bring toghether and to feel the world of Gebrüder Weiss.

Contact: Name: Sigi Ramoser, Martin Platzgummer, Stefan Amann Company: Sägenvier Designkommunikation ramoser@saegenvier.at www.saegenvier.at/neues

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Category: Wayshowing Project:

University of Greenwich

What was the challenge? The University of Greenwich: Library and Academic Building is a new Library and School of Architecture. Working with the architects, Heneghan Peng we responded to their solution: ‘the urban grain (striation) is drawn across the site, its dimensions related to natural light penetration, air movement and scale. The grain of narrow and wide bands structure the site, narrow bands containing courtyards, wide bands provide the teaching and learning spaces’. What was the solution? Working with the concept of voids and the clear grid structure that runs throughout the building we created our own sub-grid and designed a play on positive and negative spaces. The colour palette in the building is white and grey. We took inspiration from Le Corbusier’s tonal colours and created these 3D forms. Every sign is unique and the shape responds to the exact location within the space. What was the effect? The feedback is good. There is a feeling that the building, its function and the information graphics work as one.

Contact: name: Lucy Holmes company/organisation: Holmes Wood e-mail: lucy@holmes-wood.com website: www.holmes-wood.com 1 : University of Greenwich

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© Holmes Wood 2014

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Category: Wayshowing Project:

Imperial War Museum

What was the challenge? The Imperial War Museum (IWM London) reopened its doors to the public after a period of extensive redevelopment and transformation. The timing is auspicious: 2014 is the centenary of the start of the First World War. We delivered an integrated wayfinding solution for the revamped Museum. We worked collaboratively with the multi-disciplinary team to ensure the end-user needs were at the heart of the solution. What was the solution? The design translates the brand concept of ‘Forces of War’ into a 3D display effect by offsetting panels and using opposing margins for the information graphics. Panels are split to reveal a flash of colour to establish a hierarchy of information. The design is modular and flexible to allow the Museum to update content easily when required as well as to promote current and upcoming exhibitions. We had extensive consultation to establish the masterplan and design criteria, a comprehensive wayfinding strategy and review of nomenclature, as well as the design of all components of the internal and external scheme. In addition to the wayfinding components this also included the design of banners, donation boxes, a donor board and a hand-held printed guide. We also upgraded the Museum’s existing set of pictograms for use on the scheme. What was the effect? The Museum is enjoying a very busy time, welcoming visitors into the transformed spaces. It is early days but the feedback we’ve received has been very positive, in capturing the brand within the built environment and guiding people around a new building.

Contact: name: Lucy Holmes company/organisation: Holmes Wood e-mail: lucy@holmes-wood.com website: www.holmes-wood.com 1 : Imperial War Museum

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© Holmes Wood 2014

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Legible Leeds The first realisation of the project was the development of the Leeds Walk It printed map. At a glance it gave people an understanding of the structure of the city, and on more detailed inspection revealed the retail offer in each centre. The mapping highlighted the permeability of the shopping hubs, allowing people to plan journeys using connections through each shopping mall and arcade. Ahead of the on-street implementation, and alongside the publication of the printed map, temporary signs replaced the outdated city centre map signs at arrival points around the centre. This dibond overcladding allowed the new maps to be present on-street a year ahead of the development of the bespoke system.

What was the challenge? With over 1,000 shops and restaurants, Leeds city centre is one of the largest retail centres in the UK. Its shopping experience is unique; it is the only city that offers both top ten premium, and value retail centre markets. Along with its shear size, this dichotomy has made it difficult for visitors to understand what the city has to offer, leading to polarised views of the Leeds shopping experience. With proposals for two new major shopping centres – Trinity Leeds and Eastgate Quarters – adding 25% more shops and restaurants, the council’s City Centre Management team recognised the urgency to consolidate the visitor experience prior to its expansion.

Contact: name: Ben Acornley company/organisation: Applied Wayfinding e-mail: info@appliedwayfinding.com website: appliedwayfinding.com

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What was the solution? Applied’s wayfinding strategy identified a fragmented centre – 13 disparate retail clusters, in addition to cultural, civic and financial destinations, all served by disconnected arrival points. The strategy centred on a simple approach: ‘knowledge of one centre equals knowledge of all’. This approach established that each retail cluster would act as a gateway for the entire city, providing integrated information that described the city offer and allowed visitors to plan their current and future visits. The wayfinding strategy formed the building blocks for the design of a new wayfinding system featuring a combination of on-street sign and print applications.

The implementation of the permanent system was then strategically phased, so that installations could be made as and when funding allowed. The pedestrian signs were developed to a unique design, with a curved edge along one side giving the signs a distinctive appearance, and solar cell-powered backlit panels illuminating the maps at night. What was the effect? The on-street pedestrian signage system, with its integrated multi-modal information and supporting print applications have raised the profile of Leeds as one of the country’s premier retail destinations. The bespoke signs give the City of Leeds an unmistakable character. The wayfinding system has been well received and continues to expand, with Applied having overseen all consequent sign installation phases to date.


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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

University of British Columbia Campus Wayfinding

What was the challenge? The University of British Columbia is a ‘tier one’ research university with an enviable global reputation in academic achievement and research. A major aspect of UBC’s approach is ensuring that the wider community has access to performances, exhibitions and events linked to faculty programmes. The 1,000-acre campus features a mixture of museums, arts and research venues make UBC very much the cultural heart of Vancouver, but this was not widely recognised by the public. In 2010, UBC asked Applied to review wayfinding for the attractions and also review the thinking towards attraction promotion to address perceived problems. User research, analysis of user requirements and expectations of the cultural attractions revealed a deeper disconnect in the eyes of the public about the accessibility and extent of this large campus. As a result of this the cultural attractions were not fulfilling their potential as campus revenue earners. Following on from these findings, Applied began work on a wayfinding strategy to better highlight the walkability of the UBC Vancouver campus, and promote the cultural attractions.

Contact: name: Ben Acornley company/organisation: Applied Wayfinding e-mail: info@appliedwayfinding.com website: appliedwayfinding.com

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What was the solution? Applied proposed a strategy that took a more basic approach, proposing objectives to use wayfinding information to help cement a clearer image of a multi-faceted UBC as a ‘destination’, rather than a disparate collection of attractions related to a tier one University. Working closely with University departments and feeding in public opinion and holistic thinking, Applied developed a strategic plan that encouraged awareness, identity and navigation for the campus and its attractions. This plan proposed a multiplatform mapping solution that could unify the image of the campus, increase spatial understanding, allow the flexibility for planned development and include technological innovation.

The strategic project united public affairs, campus planning, attractions and technical teams at UBC around a common purpose and led to an executive decision for development of the wayfinding scheme, commissioning Applied as its designers. Development began in 2012, with the implementation completed ready for the start of the new academic year in 2013. The new system features mapping and wayfinding information at arrival points, fingerposts, monolith signs at strategic locations throughout the campus, and detailed lecterns in local residential and athletic campus areas. Applied produced a design and sign specification that was entirely fabricated in Delta, British Columbia by Knight Group. To deliver the three mapping scales required for the various sign applications, Applied worked closely with the UBC GIS and planning teams, producing a custom system that would allow UBC to produce highquality artworks themselves in-house.


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What was the effect? UBC’s new wayfinding system has been a great success, making not only the cultural attractions, but all academic, athletic, and residential buildings easy to find. Applied’s detailed and human-scale mapping designs allow visitors, students, and staff alike to orientate themselves and plan their journeys to and round campus easily.

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The design aesthetic of the system, with its high-spec product design, clear typography, and custom iconography, complements and expands upon the university’s identity standards, reinforcing UBC’s tier one status. Applied have documented all of this into a set of design guideline manuals, which ensure that UBC will be able to maintain their high standards for years to come.

With the success of the pedestrian wayfinding system, Applied were subsequently asked to develop design standards for building entrance signs, a parking wayfinding strategy, campus road sign design standards, and a wayfinding system for UBC’s Okanagan campus, which modified the Vancouver standards to suit the particular characteristics of the campus.

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Category: Category:

Wayshowing Wayshowing

Project: Project:

“flying “flyingkite” kite”Signage SignageDesign Designfor forTaiwan TaiwanHakka HakkaCultural CulturalCenter Center

What was thethe challenge? What was challenge? Taiwan Hakka Cultural Center is estabTaiwan Hakka Cultural Center is established as as a specialist institution to to promote lished a specialist institution promote thethe long-term conservation andand developlong-term conservation development of of Hakka culture. ment Hakka culture. TheThe Hakka population in Taiwan numbers Hakka population in Taiwan numbers around 4 million people, which means around 4 million people, which means around 20% of of thethe total population. around 20% total population. This center is divided intointo two, thethe exhibiThis center is divided two, exhibitiontion part andand thethe research part, andand thethe part research part, former oneone covered with oneone roof which is is former covered with roof which open to to thethe public consists of of permanent open public consists permanent exhibition room, four special exhibition exhibition room, four special exhibition rooms, theater andand lecture rooms. rooms, theater lecture rooms. OurOur points of of signage design was to to propoints signage design was provide a guidance signage easy to to understand vide a guidance signage easy understand forfor great many visitors andand also to to make great many visitors also make them feelfeel familiar with thethe signage itself. them familiar with signage itself. What was thethe solution? What was solution? This building is characterized by by exhibition This building is characterized exhibition space in the large atrium space, likelike a box, space in the large atrium space, a box, andand many diagonal columns. many diagonal columns. WeWe thought that standard wall hanged thought that standard wall hanged type or or straight stand type signage areare notnot type straight stand type signage suitable forfor such a bold space, so so tried to to suitable such a bold space, tried guide people by by unique floating signage. guide people unique floating signage. WeWe used “kite” which areare very familiar to to used “kite” which very familiar Hakka people as as a design motif of of floating Hakka people a design motif floating signage andand selected their traditional redred signage selected their traditional color to to stand out.out. color stand What was thethe effect? What was effect? TheThe signage with flying kitekite shape which signage with flying shape which areare floating independently from wall andand floating independently from wall columns cancan bebe recognized clearly andand eascolumns recognized clearly easily ily from everywhere. And also thethe vivid redred from everywhere. And also vivid color stand outout in the colorless space with color stand in the colorless space with glass andand metal materials. AsAs a result, they glass metal materials. a result, they function as as a visual accent in the space. function a visual accent in the space.

Contact: Contact: name: KeiKei Miyazaki name: Miyazaki company/organisation: KMD Inc.Inc. company/organisation: KMD e-mail: info@km-d.jp e-mail: info@km-d.jp website: www.km-d.jp/ website: www.km-d.jp/

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Category: Category: Project: Project:

wayshowing wayshowing MED-El MED-El

What was thethe challenge? What was challenge? OnOn thethe oneone hand ourour aimaim was to to create anan hand was create aesthetic orientationsystem that represents aesthetic orientationsystem that represents thethe architecture as as well as as thethe corporate architecture well corporate design of of MED-EL, anan world leading comdesign MED-EL, world leading company of of hearing aidaid devices andand hearing pany hearing devices hearing implants. OnOn thethe other hand thethe orientaimplants. other hand orientationsystem also hashas to to cover thethe highest tionsystem also cover highest safety andand security standards. safety security standards. What was thethe solution? What was solution? TheThe design vocabulary of of thethe building`s sur-surdesign vocabulary building`s face was taken andand translated to to thethe door face was taken translated door signs. Next to to administration also reasesigns. Next administration also reasearch labs areare located at at thethe headquarter`s arch labs located headquarter`s building. TheThe white color, material andand thethe building. white color, material clean character of of thethe signs emphasize thethe clean character signs emphasize feeling of of thethe laboratories andand encourage feeling laboratories encourage work, thethe redred color functions as as a signal work, color functions a signal andand highlighting color. While designing thethe highlighting color. While designing signs, great value was setset to to thethe details, signs, great value was details, also anan important part of of thethe overall design also important part overall design of of MED-EL. To To represent thethe organic design MED-EL. represent organic design of of thethe hearing aidaid devices thethe edges areare hearing devices edges rounded. TheThe triangle form functions as as rounded. triangle form functions anan index of of orientation. AsAs anan example thethe index orientation. example leading edges of of thethe triangle door signs areare leading edges triangle door signs pointing at at thethe door handles andand giving a a pointing door handles giving hinthint to to gogo further. further. What was thethe effect? What was effect? Through thethe new orientationsystem, a a Through new orientationsystem, combination of of thethe corporate design andand combination corporate design architecture, thethe headquarter of of MED-EL architecture, headquarter MED-EL is forming both inside andand outside a hole is forming both inside outside a hole aesthetic unit. aesthetic unit.

Contact: Contact: name: Christian Lunger, Markus Scheiber name: Christian Lunger, Markus Scheiber company/organisation: motasdesign company/organisation: motasdesign e-mail: office@motasdesign.com e-mail: office@motasdesign.com website: www. motasdesign.com website: www. motasdesign.com

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Kresge Art Center

What was the challenge? The Kresge Art Center, on Michigan State University’s campus, was built in 1958 and houses the Department of Art, Art History, and Design. Over the past 55 years signage had been installed intermittently and inconsistently, as additions were built and interior configurations altered. Disoriented students and visitors often relied on asking staff or passersby for directions. Of special concern was awkward placement of room numbers on the face of doors hidden within alcoves, disregard of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements, no indication of the annex building, no maps, and incorrect room identification. What was the solution? Being an educational institution, budget was limited, but the creative opportunities and student energy was high. I taught a wayfinding course in which we developed initial concepts for interior signage. The mockups—produced with petroleum-based vinyl and plexiglass—enabled valuable critical review. Continued design and research led to producing the actual system with environmental consideration towards materials and processes. Sustainable materials were used, and the production sequence was local and efficient. What was the effect? The wayfinding system seamlessly integrates information for users. Sign proportions relate to architectural elements and unique spaces. The color palette— based on exterior chromatic panels— indicates the four levels of the building. Maps and directional signage display updated information, and highlight key public use rooms. With the aid of the wayfinding system (in compliance with ADA), visitors now understand the building upon their first visit, while sensing the creative disciplines that reside in it.

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Contact: name: Kelly Salchow MacArthur organisation: Michigan State University e-mail: salchow@msu.edu website: elevatedesign.org


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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Otto-Wagner-Hospital Vienna/Austria

What was the challenge? The historic hospital campus with its many buildings (“Pavillions”) was designed in the early 1900s by the Viennese Architect Otto Wagner. The whole complex is partly still in use as a hospital but also in its entirety under heritage conservation order. Wayshowing consisted of a collection of signs that were installed over the years of varying quality and partly outdated content. Visitiors and – more significantly – ambulance-drivers frequently got lost, a very unsatisfactory and sometimes life-threatening situation. The new outdoor signage system for pedestriand and drivers needed to blend in with the architectural setting, there were budget constraints as well as a very tight deadline. The daytime and nighttime emergency admission switched between two buildings thus requiring a digital solution that switched direction according to time of day.

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What was the solution? The dark green and light brown coloring blends in with the historic background while still providing good visibility. Also the typographie has softer, “Jugendstil” connotations while delivering the clear readability required. Very pragmatically the choice of frames took up a style already in evidence with existing structures that were not to be replaced. What was the effect? Explicitly positive reactions from management and staff, who had participated in the design process. It was particularly gratifying that there was no negative feedback at all, which really surprised the management (the Viennese don’t usually like change). Ambulance-drivers also seem to find their way now, so who knows how many lives have already been saved through good information design.

Contact: Josef Sögner Sögner.Orientierungsmanagement office@orientierungsmanagement.com Veronika Egger is-design veronika@egger.pro


BRONZE

GOal!

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Category: Category:

Wayshowing Wayshowing

Project: Project:

Deutsche DeutscheGesetzliche GesetzlicheUnfallversicherung Unfallversicherung– –DGUV DGUV

What was thethe challenge? What was challenge? TheThe new headquarter of of thethe DGUV new headquarter DGUV (Deutsche Gesetzliche Unfallversicherung) (Deutsche Gesetzliche Unfallversicherung) designed by by Grüntuch & Ernst architects, designed Grüntuch & Ernst architects, located in the center of of Berlin. Moniteurs located in the center Berlin. Moniteurs designed thethe building orientation signage designed building orientation signage forfor itsits conference rooms, recep tiontion area, conference rooms, recep area, offofcefce spaces andand thethe under ground carcar park. spaces under ground park. What was thethe solution? What was solution? Moniteurs very frstfrst signage system in in Moniteurs very signage system glass. Especially developed forfor thethe DGUV, glass. Especially developed DGUV, highly related to to thethe corporate identity. highly related corporate identity. TheThe holding gesture of of thethe logo sensitive holding gesture logo sensitive transferred to to thethe concept forfor thethe signage. transferred concept signage. Round­shaped, high­quality glass with Round­shaped, high­quality glass with a blue edge transform thethe logo intointo thethe a blue edge transform logo space. General maps, direction signs, door­ space. General maps, direction signs, door­ plates, Pictograms areare individual developed plates, Pictograms individual developed forfor thethe DGUV. DGUV. What was thethe effect? What was effect? TheThe signage system, with thethe focus onon signage system, with focus barrier­free design, structures thethe 10,000 barrier­free design, structures 10,000 sqm multi­leveled building, certif eded with sqm multi­leveled building, certif with gold by by thethe German Sustainable Building gold German Sustainable Building Council. Council.

Contact: Contact: Moniteurs Communication design Moniteurs Communication design info@moniteurs.de info@moniteurs.de www.moniteurs.de www.moniteurs.de

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Category:

Wayshowing

Project:

Town and District Courthouse & Prison, Eisenstadt/Austria

What was the challenge? The court and prison of the federal capital Eisenstadt underwent major reconstruction as well as significant extention (new building). Modern legal processes should be reflected in the architecture with new entrances, totally new room configurations (hearing rooms, service center etc.). A suitable wayfinding solution had to be developed based on “design for all”-principles. What was the solution? It was agreed with the architect, that wayshowing and information should be provided using existing surfaces rather than

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adding new layers of material. Large glass surfaces posed a triple challenge: maintain the light and transparency of the building, provide privacy and ensure safety of use with glass markings that are visible for visitors with a visual impairment. Tactile lettering is in evidence on all door plates and some handrail information. What was the effect? Wayshowing information is as close as possible on existing materials as possible (walls, glass) and thus “part of the building”. It looks genuine “built in” but clearly visible. It blends in the architecture, nevertheless is highly supportive.

Contact: Josef Sögner Sögner.Orientierungsmanagement office@orientierungsmanagement.com Veronika Egger is-design veronika@egger.pro


BRONZE

GOal!

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Category: Category:

Universal UniversalDesign Design

Project: Project:

Vienna ViennaUniversity UniversityofofEconomics Economicsand andBusiness Business

What was thethe challenge? What was challenge? TheThe challenge was thethe self-set standard challenge was self-set standard of of being anan international best-practice being international best-practice leader in Inclusive Design by by providing leader in Inclusive Design providing a visual andand informative bracket forfor thethe a visual informative bracket largest newly built business school campus largest newly built business school campus in Europe. TheThe orientation system should in Europe. orientation system should guide 25,000 students through cutting-edge guide 25,000 students through cutting-edge architecture setset within thethe extensive park architecture within extensive park landscape of of thethe Vienna Prater. landscape Vienna Prater. What was thethe solution? What was solution? TheThe challenge to to equally provide informachallenge equally provide informationtion forfor allall people was metmet with anan intelpeople was with intelligent combination of of analog andand digital, ligent combination analog digital, of of tactile andand acoustic media that engage tactile acoustic media that engage allall senses. senses. What was thethe effect? What was effect? AnAn extensive inclusive orientation system. extensive inclusive orientation system. TheThe open-source font Titillium hashas a strong open-source font Titillium a strong character. TheThe accompanying pictogram character. accompanying pictogram family refers to to thethe business context. family refers business context. ByBy folding thethe signs, 2 levels allow to to folding signs, 2 levels allow transport information in both, German transport information in both, German andand English. Blind andand partially sighted English. Blind partially sighted people were given additional guidance. people were given additional guidance. Tactile Braille, raised tactile letters, tactile Tactile Braille, raised tactile letters, tactile paving + guidance lines andand tactile maps paving + guidance lines tactile maps offer information. AllAll applications follow offer information. applications follow thethe two-sense principle by by alternatively two-sense principle alternatively addressing at at least twotwo senses to to thethe oneone addressing least senses missing. Digital door terminals allow to to missing. Digital door terminals allow contact staff members, digital door displays contact staff members, digital door displays show current andand upcoming lectures. AllAll show current upcoming lectures. information is not visual only, butbut acoustic information is not visual only, acoustic too.too. InfoInfo terminals areare bilingual, with audio terminals bilingual, with audio mode, a strong reading contrast andand cancan bebe mode, a strong reading contrast rolled-under. rolled-under.

Contact: Contact: name: Erwin K. K. Bauer name: Erwin Bauer company: buero bauer company: buero bauer e-mail: office@buerobauer.com e-mail: office@buerobauer.com website: buerobauer.com website: buerobauer.com

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GOLD

ALCLLUSIVE IN

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Category: Emergency Category: Emergency/ Safety / Safety Project: Escort Project: Escort: Safety : SafetyWayfinding WayfindingSignage SignageDesign Design What was thethe challenge? What was challenge? “Escort: Safety Wayfinding Signage “Escort: Safety Wayfinding Signage Design” is aispartial result from thethe Design” a partial result from Shelters andand Materials Management Shelters Materials Management Project, World Design Capital Taipei 2016: Project, World Design Capital Taipei 2016: Adaptive CityCity effort. It isIt an opportunity Adaptive effort. is an opportunity butbut also a challenge to to make a wayfinding also a challenge make a wayfinding signage system results in ainpopulation’s signage system results a population’s heightened understanding andand awareness heightened understanding awareness of of emergency andand safety information. emergency safety information. What was thethe solution? What was solution? TheThe work “Escort: Safety Wayfinding work “Escort: Safety Wayfinding Signage Design” focuses onon twotwo signage Signage Design” focuses signage system phases; thethe Normative andand thethe system phases; Normative Featured phases. TheThe Normative phase Featured phases. Normative phase features existing national public signs, features existing national public signs, while thethe Featured phase, anan extension of of while Featured phase, extension thethe Normative, presents anan independent Normative, presents independent Wayfinding Signage system. Visitors Wayfinding Signage system. Visitors attending thisthis exhibition areare invited to to attending exhibition invited view andand to to become acquainted through view become acquainted through simulation activity with thisthis user-friendly simulation activity with user-friendly community-based emergency andand safety community-based emergency safety Wayfinding Signage Design system. Wayfinding Signage Design system. What was thethe effect? What was effect? TheThe wide public distribution of of aesthetic wide public distribution aesthetic andand functional design visuals inform andand functional design visuals inform train people to to immediately recognize train people immediately recognize signage information andand assist them to to signage information assist them respond to to different emergency situations respond different emergency situations with reduced confusion, anxiety andand stress. with reduced confusion, anxiety stress. TheThe work “Escort: Safety Wayfinding work “Escort: Safety Wayfinding Signage Design” focuses onon thethe creation Signage Design” focuses creation of of a concise, uniform andand aesthetically a concise, uniform aesthetically pleasing andand informative visual signage pleasing informative visual signage design system. design system.

Contact: Contact: name: Tingyi S. S. LinLin name: Tingyi company/organisation: VIDVID Lab, Taiwan Tech company/organisation: Lab, Taiwan Tech e-mail: tingyi.desk@gmail.com e-mail: tingyi.desk@gmail.com website: http://tingyilin.wordpress.com/ website: http://tingyilin.wordpress.com/

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Category: Category:

Corporate CorporateDesign Designand andCommunications Communications

Project: Project:

ICCT ICCTPublications Publications

What was thethe challenge? What was challenge? TheThe ICCT Publications contain a lot of of data, ICCT Publications contain a lot data, standard diagrams andand dense facts andand standard diagrams dense facts figures. TheThe challenge was to to impart knowfigures. challenge was impart knowledge about thethe complex subject matter by by ledge about complex subject matter means of of information graphics, to to structure means information graphics, structure thethe publication clearly andand to to visually guide publication clearly visually guide thethe reader through thethe publication. reader through publication. What was thethe solution? What was solution? In the Pocketbook 2012 andand 2013 fivefive In the Pocketbook 2012 2013 illustrative andand informative double-sided illustrative informative double-sided visualizations structure thethe publication, visualizations structure publication, create different possible entries forfor a viewer create different possible entries a viewer andand liven upup thethe dense content. OnOn thethe liven dense content. respective covers of of thethe different publication respective covers different publication illustrative elements of of visualization from illustrative elements visualization from thethe inner part areare shown andand introduce thethe inner part shown introduce subject in ainplayful manner. subject a playful manner. TheThe consistent useuse of of color andand graphical consistent color graphical elements throughout thethe whole publications elements throughout whole publications andand in different medias (print andand digital) in different medias (print digital) help thethe viewer to to findfind hishis way though thethe help viewer way though immense mass of of information immense mass information (up(up to to 100100 standard diagrams) andand data. standard diagrams) data.

What was thethe effect? What was effect? A series of of different publications in differA series different publications in differentent medias that communicate facts of of a a medias that communicate facts complex subject matter in ainclear, demoncomplex subject matter a clear, demonstrative andand reader-friendly way. strative reader-friendly way.

Contact: Contact: Barbara Hahn / Christine Zimmermann Barbara Hahn / Christine Zimmermann Hahn undund Zimmermann Hahn Zimmermann mail@von-b-und-c.net mail@von-b-und-c.net www.von-b-und-c.net www.von-b-und-c.net

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GOLD

B2C C2B

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Category: Category:

Corporate CorporateDesign Designand andCommunication Communication

Project: Project:

Schreinerei SchreinereiFreudig Freudig»Book »BookofofCraft« Craft«

What was thethe challenge? What was challenge? Founded in 1917, thethe carpenter’s workFounded in 1917, carpenter’s workshop called Schreinerei Freudig hashas been shop called Schreinerei Freudig been passed onon from oneone generation to to thethe next. passed from generation next. To To impart thethe values – dedicated to to thethe impart values – dedicated long familiy tradition of of carpentry – a–new long familiy tradition carpentry a new corporate design was to to create. Values likelike corporate design was create. Values handcraft, tradition, sustainability, quality, handcraft, tradition, sustainability, quality, family, teamwork, etc... to to mention some family, teamwork, etc... mention some of of them, should bebe reflected/transported by by them, should reflected/transported thethe logo, thethe applications andand haptics. logo, applications haptics. What was thethe solution? What was solution? Part of of thethe new corporate design is aissmall Part new corporate design a small butbut lovely brochure titled »Book of of Craft«. lovely brochure titled »Book Craft«. It combines allall themes thethe company stands It combines themes company stands for.for. TheThe curved »F«»F« monogram, gently curved monogram, gently embossed onon thethe cover, is aisdiscreet haptic embossed cover, a discreet haptic experience. Working day-to-day with a a experience. Working day-to-day with natural material such as as wood, both natural material such wood, both craftsmanship andand haptics play a major rolerole craftsmanship haptics play a major forfor thethe company andand areare therefore reflected company therefore reflected in the brochure’s manufacture andand content. in the brochure’s manufacture content. What was thethe effect? What was effect? With itsits new corporate design andand thethe With new corporate design »Book of of Craft« thethe traditional carpenter’s »Book Craft« traditional carpenter’s workshop represents notnot only itsits craftsworkshop represents only craftsmanship butbut also itsits self-concept. NotNot manship also self-concept. knowing if there willwill even bebe a demand forfor knowing if there even a demand it, it, there areare only fewfew copies of of thethe brochure there only copies brochure left. It won several international design left. It won several international design awards in 2014. awards in 2014.

Contact: Contact: Andreas Koop Andreas Koop designgruppe koop designgruppe koop info@designgruppe-koop.de info@designgruppe-koop.de www.designgruppe-koop.de www.designgruppe-koop.de

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Category: Category:

Products Productsand andServices Services

Project: Project:

Modern ModernMailboxes Mailboxes

What was thethe challenge? What was challenge? Existing mailboxes areare broadly generic andand Existing mailboxes broadly generic mediocre in design. They areare produced as as mediocre in design. They produced utilitarian objects without open exploration utilitarian objects without open exploration towards aesthetic or or creative opportunity. towards aesthetic creative opportunity. Frustration with thisthis product incited anan Frustration with product incited interdisciplinary approach towards interdisciplinary approach towards emphasizing thethe relationships between emphasizing relationships between typography, object andand architecture. typography, object architecture. Research identified fivefive noteworthy Research identified noteworthy mid-Century modern architects (George mid-Century modern architects (George Brigham, Robert Metcalf, David Osler, Brigham, Robert Metcalf, David Osler, Alden B Dow, andand Tivador Balogh) who Alden B Dow, Tivador Balogh) who each designed serveral homes in Michigan. each designed serveral homes in Michigan. What was thethe solution? What was solution? Mailboxes were developed to to relate to— Mailboxes were developed relate to— butbut notnot imitate—the architecture they areare imitate—the architecture they paired with, andand informed by by universal paired with, informed universal design principles. Special consideration design principles. Special consideration was given to to designing hinges, flags andand was given designing hinges, flags mounting methods that would relate to to mounting methods that would relate thethe specific mailbox, while being durable specific mailbox, while being durable through time andand weather. TheThe typography through time weather. typography onon each boxbox was considered in tandem each was considered in tandem with thethe dimensional design. Collaboration with dimensional design. Collaboration between designer, homeowner, between designer, homeowner, architectural organization, fabricators andand architectural organization, fabricators vendors resulted in six unique mailboxes vendors resulted in six unique mailboxes that challenge thethe traditional object. that challenge traditional object. What was thethe effect? What was effect? Final fabrication utilizes stainless steel, Final fabrication utilizes stainless steel, aluminum, copper, powder coating, acrylic, aluminum, copper, powder coating, acrylic, andand reflective vinyl. Influenced by by thethe reflective vinyl. Influenced exceptional spatial interactions between exceptional spatial interactions between thethe homeowners andand their cherished homeowners their cherished homes, each mailbox aspires to to create anan homes, each mailbox aspires create unexpected user experience onon a smaller unexpected user experience a smaller scale, which is worthy of of thethe architectural scale, which is worthy architectural quality. This project demonstrates creative quality. This project demonstrates creative opportunity across disciplines, towards opportunity across disciplines, towards options that question generic assumptions, options that question generic assumptions, andand that reveal solutions complementary to to that reveal solutions complementary thethe environment they become a part of.of. environment they become a part

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Contact: Contact: name: Kelly Salchow MacArthur name: Kelly Salchow MacArthur organisation: Michigan State University organisation: Michigan State University e-mail: salchow@msu.edu e-mail: salchow@msu.edu website: elevatedesign.org website: elevatedesign.org


EDITOR`S CHOICE & BRONZE LIK

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Category:

Didactics

Project:

Design from farm to fork: aware food, sustainable development

What was the challenge? This work aims to enhance, to raise awareness and to provide a useful tool for the knowledge and the promotion of agro-food chain of Veneto, a district that is very rich in variety and leader in this production in Italy. The basic question was: how can design help to enhance the fruit and vegetable products of the territory and help operators of the whole production chain that carries products of the earth up to our tables? Inside the Bachelor’s degree in Industrial Design and Multimedia of the IUAV University of Venice, the agro-food sector has been the focus of various educational activities. From a direct comparison with farmers, local producers, representatives of the consortium of typical products protection, were born many innovative ideas around some fruits and vegetables typical of the Veneto territory, in particular 16 products (violet artichoke of St. Erasmo, pepper of Zero Branco, Lamon bean, Marostica cherry and walnut of Feltre, just to name a few). What was the solution? With the contribution of farmers of the more authentic agriculture of the territory and of Coldiretti (Italian Organization of Farmers), the laboratory for Communication Design 2 - conducted by Gianluigi Pescolderung with Elisa Pasqual and Giorgio Cedolin - worked on an infographic project for the promotion and knowledge of local products.

Contact: name: Gianluigi Pescolderung / Laura Badalucco organisation: Iuav University of Venice e-mail: laurabada@iuav.it website: www.iuav.it

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The direct contact between farmers and students was very important and allowed a construction shared and participated of the contents. A unique blend of history, tools, skills, methods, ingredients, returned through

accurate processes of storytelling and visualization. A system of information panels, simple and cheap, is intended to transmit “at a glance“ all the knowledge necessary to an aware consumption “ from farm to fork “.


GOLD GOT IT.

What was the effect? The result was a system of information and awareness on the quality of fruit and vegetables typical of the Veneto that was presented in Treviso in October 2013 in a major exhibition (along with other student’s design projects from IUAV ). It was an event focusing on the themes of food supply in view of Expo 2015 and sponsored by the University IUAV of Venice with the Chamber of Commerce of Treviso, Coldiretti, Unindustria Treviso and others. The exhibition, entitled “ Design from farm to fork “ was then brought in Venice and in other venetian cities to promote culture and quality of local products and to stimulate even the youngest (the same students for first) to a deeper understanding of the wealth of their territory. Here there are some of the student’s projects: . Marostica cherry, design Chiara Tonon, Giordana Lazzarato, Marianna Saccardo; . Violet artichoke of St. Erasmo, design Guido Dal Prà, Alberto Reginato, Caterina Zoppini; . Lamon bean, design Michele Bruttomesso, Otto Climan, Giordano Zennaro; . Red beet of Chioggia, design Giulia Modolo, Elisa Porcu, Vita Tae Zorat.

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Category:

Editorial

Project:

Vermessungen

What was the challenge? „Vermessungen“ visualizes data regarding the Austrian county of the Tyrol. By visually translating statistical data it seeks public awareness for a broad set of problems around an area which traditionally identifies itself with tourism, mountains and skiing. The enormous ammount of data made the choice of material difficult. The main challenge – certainly for the designers – lay in the transformation of statistics into understandable, yet appealing graphics . What was the solution? The choice of material as well as the visual strategies were discussed between the editor, the writer and the designer on an equal basis. Seeking for diversification, methods of story-telling were implied: An example is the corelation of the annual production of artificial snow for skiing and the motorway between Innsbruck and Rome which could be covered in snow by 1,52 metres using the equal amount of water. What was the effect? The book was published in late 2014. After one month we observe high public interest manifesting in newspaper/TV-coverage and high selling figures. Hence, the project has been a success so far. Our near-future-hope is to add to a shift of awareness in an area which is highly industrialized, struck by environmental polution, high costs of living and many more challenges. A contrast to clichees around a romantic life in the Alps.

Contact: Christian Mariacher Atelier Christian Mariacher info@ateliermariacher.at www.ateliermariacher.at

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Category: Category:

Future FutureConcepts Concepts

Project: Project:

Visual VisualInformation InformationConcept Conceptfor forDornbirn Dornbirn(AT) (AT)

What was thethe challenge? What was challenge? TheThe natural history museum »inatura« is an natural history museum »inatura« is an attractor to to more than 150.000 visitors each attractor more than 150.000 visitors each year. TheThe distance from thethe historical buildyear. distance from historical buildinging to to thethe centre of of Dornbirn is less than centre Dornbirn is less than 500500 meters. ButBut when walking it feels likelike meters. when walking it feels a long distance, since thethe path leads youyou a long distance, since path leads through living areas andand a school district. through living areas a school district. TheThe citycity of of Dornbirn hashas tried to to setset differDornbirn tried differentent approaches with signs andand footsteps approaches with signs footsteps onon thethe ground, butbut allall of of them failed. TheThe ground, them failed. basic need to to getget somewhere is he firstfirst basic need somewhere is he trigger to to watch outout forfor help or or signs. And trigger watch help signs. And if you want to to getget somewhere youyou need thethe if you want somewhere need information that there is something worth information that there is something worth thethe effort. So:So: How would it be possible to to effort. How would it be possible attract visitors from thethe centre to to search attract visitors from centre search thethe »inatura« andand vice versa? »inatura« vice versa?

beetle is pointing towards thethe »inatura«, beetle is pointing towards »inatura«, hishis current home. current home. They both areare made of of polished bronze, They both made polished bronze, leaning towards each other. OnOn thethe way leaning towards each other. way between thethe twotwo sculptures those wonderbetween sculptures those wonderfulful red-white striped platforms willwill show red-white striped platforms show thethe way. They areare stuck in the facades of of way. They stuck in the facades houses, seem to to rollroll around a street corner, houses, seem around a street corner, serve children as as a stage andand many more. serve children a stage many more. These objects areare anan invitation to to play andand These objects invitation play bebe used, they cancan also carry information used, they also carry information about thethe upcoming exhibitions of of thethe about upcoming exhibitions »inatura« andand thethe »Kunstraum Dornbirn«, »inatura« »Kunstraum Dornbirn«, or or concerts, events andand other things hapconcerts, events other things happening at at thethe marketplace. pening marketplace. Meanwhile a social sculpture willwill bebe Meanwhile a social sculpture initiated: oneone platform is carrying a radio initiated: platform is carrying a radio play, filled with changing contents, likelike play, filled with changing contents, thethe famous andand funny stories about Bruno famous funny stories about Bruno What was thethe solution? Walter, a riddlehunt forfor children, inhabitWhat was solution? Walter, a riddlehunt children, inhabitIn earlier days thethe centre used to to bebe thethe ansans of of Dornbirn telling stories andand so so on... In earlier days centre used Dornbirn telling stories on... traffic junction number 1 in1 the region of of Different events involving thethe population of of traffic junction number in the region Different events involving population Vorarlberg. 2525 years agoago thethe junction was likelike moving along thethe straight lineline Vorarlberg. years junction was Dornbirn, Dornbirn, moving along straight turned intointo a pedestrian zone, butbut until between A and B, B, crossing fences, entering turned a pedestrian zone, until between A and crossing fences, entering then thethe famous policeman Bruno Walter through windows andand garages, then famous policeman Bruno Walter houses houses through windows garages, conducted thethe traffic, placed in the middle thethe important goal is to establish conducted traffic, placed in the middle etc... etc... important goal is to establish of of thethe junction, standing onon a small platthose twotwo very close places intointo thethe junction, standing a small platthose very close places form. HeHe was well known andand beloved as as a a awareness of of inhabitants. Only then cancan form. was well known beloved awareness inhabitants. Only then policeman andand a human being. HeHe delivers succeed to to spread thethe facts, so so visitors policeman a human being. delivers wewe succeed spread facts, visitors thethe most positive memories youyou could think outside willwill bebe encouraged to to move most positive memories could think from from outside encouraged move of,of, hehe was a warmhearted man andand fullfull of of from oneone to to another. was a warmhearted man from another. humour. WeWe reinstalled hishis person in his oldold humour. reinstalled person in his duty as as a signpost. HeHe is supposed to to enter duty a signpost. is supposed enter hishis oldold platform, butbut in 6inmeters height, platform, 6 meters height, andand notnot at at hishis original position, butbut onon thethe original position, grounds of of thethe »inatura«, pointing towards grounds »inatura«, pointing towards thethe marketplace. marketplace. OnOn thethe former position in the marketplace former position in the marketplace wewe willwill findfind thethe same platform, butbut from same platform, from there, in 6inmeters height, a giant, golden there, 6 meters height, a giant, golden

Contact: Contact: Andreas Koop Andreas Koop designgruppe koop designgruppe koop info@designgruppe-koop.de info@designgruppe-koop.de www.designgruppe-koop.de www.designgruppe-koop.de

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What was thethe effect? What was effect? WeWe allall areare looking forward to to thethe realisalooking forward realisationtion of of thisthis project, which was thethe winner project, which was winner of of thethe international competition »Vlow! international competition »Vlow! Award«, where wewe presented it to anan interAward«, where presented it to international juryjury of of experts andand thethe persons in in national experts persons charge of of Dornbirn. This concept is touchcharge Dornbirn. This concept is touchinging forfor so so many, because of of it’sit’s lightheartet, many, because lightheartet, playful approach, andand of of it’sit’s deep connecplayful approach, deep connectiontion to to thethe realreal history at at thethe same time –– history same time it brings back some very positive memories it brings back some very positive memories from former times andand shows, how they from former times shows, how they cancan findfind a modern andand innovative new duty a modern innovative new duty in the now andand here. Another important in the now here. Another important issue: thethe concept is easy to to move, since issue: concept is easy move, since thethe citycity plans thethe reorganisation of of thethe plans reorganisation structure of of urban development. structure urban development. More: http://vimeo.com/109119749 More: http://vimeo.com/109119749 Team: Daniela Egger (author), Daniel Team: Daniela Egger (author), Daniel Nikolaus Kocher undund Gottfried Bechtold Nikolaus Kocher Gottfried Bechtold (artists), Mark Riklin (sociologist), Büro (artists), Mark Riklin (sociologist), Büro Super BFG undund designgruppe koop/Andreas Super BFG designgruppe koop/Andreas Koop (designer) Koop (designer)


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http://vimeo.com/109119749 http://vimeo.com/109119749

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Category: Category:

Sustainability Sustainability

Project: Project:

PEACOX PEACOX

What was thethe challenge? What was challenge? Ecological issues in traffic become more Ecological issues in traffic become more andand more pressing as as personal transportamore pressing personal transportationtion is one of of thethe greatest contributors of of is one greatest contributors COCO Means to to support people Means support people 2 emissions. 2 emissions. reducing their ecological impact areare reducing their ecological impact urgently needed. People love to to useuse apps. urgently needed. People love apps. ButBut how to to design a route planning appapp forfor how design a route planning users who want to to useuse it frequently improvusers who want it frequently improvinging their ecological footprint? their ecological footprint? What was thethe solution? What was solution? PEACOX enables users to to become aware PEACOX enables users become aware of of more environment-friendly mobility more environment-friendly mobility options. It does so so by by providing realreal time options. It does providing time information through innovative components information through innovative components that areare playful, visually andand aesthetically that playful, visually aesthetically pleasing. It goes beyond justjust displaying COCO pleasing. It goes beyond displaying 2 2 information, with thethe shape-changing tree information, with shape-changing tree as as a central feedback element, challenges a central feedback element, challenges andand badges as as additional motivational badges additional motivational aspects andand route suggestions based onon aspects route suggestions based COCO emissions. emissions. 2 2 What was thethe effect? What was effect? A study with testtest users in Vienna andand A study with users in Vienna Dublin examined if and how thethe PEACOX Dublin examined if and how PEACOX appapp would influence thethe testtest users’ mobility would influence users’ mobility behaviour. First results were published in in behaviour. First results were published October 2014. They show that thethe aims of of October 2014. They show that aims thethe research project were achieved. TheThe research project were achieved. innovative features of of thethe PEACOX appapp in-ininnovative features PEACOX fluenced thethe testtest users’ mobility behaviour fluenced users’ mobility behaviour positively. positively. Users stated that PEACOX increased their Users stated that PEACOX increased their awareness in regards to to COCO awareness in regards 2 pollution. 2 pollution. They chose more eco-friendly means of of They chose more eco-friendly means transport thanks to to PEACOX. transport thanks PEACOX.

Contact: Contact: Michael Kieslinger Michael Kieslinger Fluidtime Data Services GmbH Fluidtime Data Services GmbH michael.kieslinger@fluidtime.com michael.kieslinger@fluidtime.com http://www.fluidtime.com http://www.fluidtime.com

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Motivation right onon your start screen Motivation right your start screen A little tree onon thethe PEACOX appapp start screen gets more andand more green leafs if the A little tree PEACOX start screen gets more more green leafs if the user chooses eco-friendly options forfor hishis or or herher trips. user chooses eco-friendly options trips.

Rewards to to motivate further Rewards motivate further Challenges areare another option to to influence user behaviour. TheThe PEACOX operators Challenges another option influence user behaviour. PEACOX operators could propose forfor example to to useuse thethe bike twice a week in the following month. could propose example bike twice a week in the following month.If the If the user meets thethe target, hehe gets bonus points andand specific badges (e.g. EcoEco Guru). user meets target, gets bonus points specific badges (e.g. Guru).


GOLD

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Progress tracking Progress tracking PEACOX offers daily, weekly or or monthly sta-staPEACOX offers daily, weekly monthly tistics of of thethe user´s mobility behaviour. These tistics user´s mobility behaviour. These features visualize thethe ecoeco friendliness of of thethe features visualize friendliness user´s mobility onon his/her mobile phone. Ad-Aduser´s mobility his/her mobile phone. ditionally, PEACOX offers a leaderboard, where ditionally, PEACOX offers a leaderboard, where thethe users cancan compare their own mobility users compare their own mobility behaviour to to thethe performance of of other PEACOX behaviour performance other PEACOX users. This also motivates travellers to to save users. This also motivates travellers save COCO emissions by using eco-friendly modes of of emissions by using eco-friendly modes 2 2 transport. transport.

Route planning thethe ecological way Route planning ecological way TheThe PEACOX appapp offers a cross-modal route PEACOX offers a cross-modal route planner, that comes with a new feature: planner, that comes with a new feature: it shows thethe COCO of of every route it shows every route 2 emissions 2 emissions option. SoSo thethe user becomes aware of of thethe option. user becomes aware consequences his/her travel choices. HeHe consequencesof of his/her travel choices. or or sheshe directly sees how much COCO could bebe directly sees how much could 2 2 saved by by choosing anan eco-friendly means of of saved choosing eco-friendly means transport. This kind of of ecological feedback transport. This kind ecological feedback is calculated by by using emission models. is calculated using emission models. PEACOX also recommends routes to to thethe PEACOX also recommends routes user. Especially in an urban environment it it user. Especially in an urban environment often makes sense to to useuse thethe bike or or public often makes sense bike public transportation instead of of a car. TheThe time forfor transportation instead a car. time thethe triptrip remains almost thethe same, butbut using remains almost same, using a car multiplies COCO a car multiplies 2 emissions. 2 emissions.

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Category:

Student Work

Project:

Interactive Visualisation of Metadata

What was the challenge? Concerning the data retention in Germany and the global surveillance disclosures published with the help of Edward Snowden in 2013, the term metadata was used to appease concerned users. Metadata does not include the content of communication (e.g. the text on a letter) but contains the information “who communicates at what time, where and with whom” (e.g. the letter’s envelope). The privacy and safety of users was declared safe and protected by government and intelligence agencies because no actual content is retained. This argumentation did soothe many people because metadata is a very abstract construct. But the truth is that metadata can, in fact, reveal most accurate and private details of a persons life and behaviour. This has been proven by several analyses of retained data. Many people feel safe while using social networks (e.g. Facebook) because they choose not to reveal any personal data such as their home address or telephone number directly, but simply using social networks generates huge amounts of metadata. It can be automatically analysed and will present detailed behaviour of the user - something most people are not aware of. The challenge therefore was to let everyone experience the extent of this surveillance by themselves - using their own data. What was the solution? The challenge was solved by our interactive visualisation called “Datenschnorchel” (English: “data snorkel”). It is an illustration of the user’s analyzed metadata. The name

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comes from the German expression “Daten abschnorcheln”, used for the interception of data. People using the visualisation shall learn what metadata can reveal about them using data from their own social network accounts. Those networks are used to provide the following data types for the visualisation: Who? When? Where? With whom? How long? Analysing this data, some facts about the user can be assumed: Residence If a user posts something from a certain location between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m, the location might be his residence.

The generated information can be clustered into two different visualisation types: Location-based information, which is shown on a map and contact-based information, which will be presented as a list. The map, being the most important view, is shown in a circle. It gives the user the impression of “looking through a keyhole”, as if he is spying on himself. Icons of the respective facts (residence, work, ...) are placed on the map. Additional information explaining how the Datenschnorchel generated this information is revealed if the icon is clicked. Locations which are not shown in the current map frame are displayed at the border of the circle, providing a compasslike navigational help.

Work Posts from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. might refer to the users workplace or school/university. Leisure activities Location entries from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m might refer to leisure activities (such as sport, meeting friends, etc.) Relationships The amount of communication between the user and other users can give us an overview about important and less important contacts.

The user can switch between the map view and a contacts view, which is also presented in the circle.


Category:

Student

Project:

Indeland: Energy Infographics

What was the challenge? “Indeland” is an association of various cities and villages located in a region in Germany with one of the largest lignite surface mines in the world. The region provides energy for itself and a large part of Germany with the mined lignite, while alternative energies from the same region are unable to provide energy for a fraction of the people living there. The lignite-fired plant produces more than 18 000 times the amount of energy than alternative energy producers like wind power plants or solar plants in the same region while using much less space. When comparing produced energy and emissions of the lignite-fired power plant with renewable energy, most people can’t imagine how much of a difference exists in the amount of produced energy and on the other hand how much emission the power plant really produces. People want to change to green energies but most of the time don’t realize that it is not that easy to replace a big lignite-fired power plant with renewable energies. The challenge was to create awareness about the situation and the dimensions of several energy sources and to allow an opinion to form about future perspectives and possibilities. What was the solution? What was the solution? The solution was a room installation consisting of two main graphics focusing on those dimension differences. The first infographic (a 5m long installation) uses the size of the installation and a quantity of little squares to visualize differences of produced energy. It shows a timeline of population development, energy

Contact: name: Mark-Jan Bludau company/organisation: FH Aachen e-mail: markjan.bludau@gmail.com website: http://be.net/markjanbludau

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demand, and energy generation of various energy sources and future predictions/ perspectives. One square represents 0,001 tWh of produced energy. The second graphic tries to make the abstract volume of produced CO2 by the lignite-fired power plant more accessible by comparing it to the annual emissions of all licensed cars of several big German cities combined. What was the effect? The information is easier to grasp for the viewer and also has more of an emotional effect. The viewer needs to step closer to be able to see the small amount of energy produced by renewable energies and in this way the installation leaves the viewer with a bigger impact when he sees the immense mass of produced energy by the power plant in comparison. On the other hand, the second graphic of the installation shows that the price for this amount of energy is very high, by demonstrating that in one year the power plant produces as much CO2 as all of the licensed cars in Berlin, Hamburg, Munich, Cologne, Frankfurt, Stuttgart, Bremen, Düsseldorf, Duisburg, Leipzig, Essen, Bonn, Dortmund, Wuppertal, Nuremberg, Bochum, Wiesbaden, Hannover and Aachen together.


Category:

Student Work

Project:

Amsterdam tram network map

What was the challenge? The Amsterdam tram network is a vast transport system with a complicated track layout and entangled stop arrangements. Due to this complexity, the representation of the system on a map is challenging. Since decades, changes in orientation criteria and style have been very common in the tram map. In the last four years, there have been three different maps (not counting updates). It seems it is hard to find a graphical representation of the network that satisfies both users and designers. The goal of the project was to find an adequate graphical representation of the system, and arrange user-centred design issues to enhance comprehension and legibility. Special attention at how information for wheelchair users is shown would also be a priority. All these had to fit in a foldable pocket size map. What was the solution? One of the main efforts was to bring the new network map closer to Amsterdam’s characteristic geographical layout to improve orientation of users within the city. However, there had to a balance between a clear layout, and a geographically accurate map. To do so, a survey was carried out were participants were timed while describing the tram routes they would choose from two predetermined parts of the city. Among four different maps, the dodecalinear angle layout (0º, 30º, 60º and 90º) was selected. To avoid excessive distortion of the city when transferring the information to the new map, tram stops in the city centre were not placed more than 1,5 cms from its place in the geographical map.

Contact: name: Joan Zalacain company/organisation: student e-mail: j@zlk.cat website: www.zlk.cat

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To incerease legibility the layout also had to be able to accomodate horizontal text to label the tram stops. The actual map shows many stop labels at 45º, and past maps even featured labels at 90º. The task is harder than in a metro network, which runs underground not following a city’s streets and has greater distances between stops. The map was designed with the idea that wheelchair access is a priority. It reverses the current trend by showing the symbol for a barrier free stop as the standard one. Stops with no disabled access are marked with an alternate symbol. The argument behind this is that accessible stops are no longer an added value they should a standard.

What was the effect? The combination of both a clear layout and geographical accuracy, yields a map similar to the shape of the city while still remaining easy to understand. The accuracy helps users to keep track of the route, as they travel overground and are more aware of the geographical changes of the city. The stop labels set horizontally are easier to read, and remain at 7pt size in pocket map size. Redesigning the map with the symbol for a barrier free stop as the standard might seem as a small change in the map, but it is a strong stance. Despite the complexity of the network the goals were achieved, delivering a map which is user friendly and takes wheel chair users into account.


IIIDaward book 2014  

Award winning submissions in Information Design from 4 continents

IIIDaward book 2014  

Award winning submissions in Information Design from 4 continents

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