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SUMMER 2017

The

Hometown Heroes Issue

Dedication to Local Soldiers KIA In the Line of Duty Fostering Love Where the Heart Is Chamber Ribbon Cuttings & More!


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inside this issue SUMMER 2017

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FROM THE EDITOR DEDICATION TO LOCAL SOLDIERS KIA POLL: WHO’S YOUR HERO? IN THE LINE OF DUTY FOSTERING LOVE A KING’S HEART

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EDITOR’S PICK: AFTER APRIL CALENDAR OF EVENTS WHERE THE HEART IS TEACHER FEATURE PERSONALITY PROFILE TIDBITS & TRIVIA

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IN FOCUS BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT ROSWELL CHAMBER NEWS: NEW MEMBERS RIBBON CUTTINGS Focus on Roswell is a 100% PrintReleaf™ Certified Publication Learn more at:

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FocusNM.com/PrintReleaf

ABOUT THE COVER Jeff Tutor (right) lends a helping hand to his son, Jacob, as they take a stroll through their neighborhood. Photo courtesy of Johnnie Lujan Lajuana Martinez, Publisher - Staci Guy, Associate Publisher Adrian Martinez, Director of Business Development Molly Marley, Editorial Director - Johnnie Lujan, Marketing Director Photography by Contributors & Submitted Photos Special Contributors: Rachel Corn and Jamie McKinney FOCUS ON ROSWELL IS PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY AD VENTURE MARKETING

Ad Venture Marketing, Ltd. Co. • 866.207.0821 • ad-venturemarketing.com All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission of the publisher is prohibited. Every effort was made to ensure accuracy of the information provided. The publisher assumes no responsibility or liability for errors, changes or omissions.


from the editor

“W

hen asked to think about a hero, some people might first picture Superman with the wind blowing his cape back or the iconic image of American Marines raising the flag during the battle of Iwo Jima.

Others might see their mom or a favorite celebrity. I, personally, think of a hero as somebody with qualities I want to emulate to be a better person in my community. Heroes come in all shapes and sizes. Heroes hit the streets of our city every day to protect the lives of others. Heroes enter our classrooms each morning, coffee in hand, to educate and guide our students. Heroes keep our classrooms and offices clean. Heroes scrub in during all hours of the day and night to take care of our health. MOLLY MARLEY Editorial Director

FOCUS ON ROSWELL

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It seems like in today’s world, we are, more than ever, in need of heroes. Wars are being fought all around us: in the Middle East, in the political arena and on social media, just to name a few. With a culture that seems to celebrate the victim mentality, people are beginning to shy away from entering certain careers such as law enforcement or education for fear of being persecuted over the tiniest mistake. We have become a country that is offended by absolutely everything. We should not celebrate people who just sit around and complain about the government, social injustices or whatever it is they have a bee in their bonnet about, but rather those who choose to do something to raise awareness about their issues and instill positive change. One thing I have learned from living in Roswell is that this town is full of heroes. It was hard to choose just a handful for this issue when there are so many gallant citizens whose stories could fill volumes of books. So, what separates a hero from the average person? The common thread that ties this distinguished group together is a heart of servitude. One of the most memorable moments from John F. Kennedy’s presidency was when he posed the challenge to Americans in his 1961 inaugural address, “Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for

FOCUS ON ROSWELL | SUMMER 2017

your country.” Although I regret not being able to share the account of every one of Roswell’s hometown heroes, it was a true pleasure getting a glimpse inside the lives of a selection of stand-up people who ask themselves every day what they can do for their family, friends, community and country. Like Kennedy, I also have a challenge for our Focus readers: ask yourselves what you can do for Roswell. No matter what your situation may be, take a moment to be thankful for all the blessings in your life. There is always someone out there who would give anything to have what you have or do what you do. Whether it be a grand gesture or small donation, there are numerous ways you can help someone. I encourage you to check with your neighborhood school, a local church or one of our many non-profit organizations to see how you can help meet the needs of others in Chaves County. It can be something as simple as supporting our police department or other first responders by dropping off a meal or snack at the station or even by just saying “thank you for your service” when you encounter someone in uniform. A community is made up of people from all walks of life. Imagine if everyone made serving their community a priority. Let’s start today by lending a helping hand to one another and building up our Roswell community. - Molly Marley, Editorial Director A B O U T T H E E D IT O R

Molly Marley is the editorial director of Focus on Roswell. She can be reached at molly@ad-venturemarketing.com.


WORLD WAR I PVT CECIL W. ALTER RAY A. BAKER LEWIS HATH BOZARTH PVT FLOYD L. BRADLEY PVT STANLEY J. COOK PVT CLARENCE W. DAVISSON THOMAS J. DUKE FRED GAYLE BERT GORDON J.H. HARRIS DEWEY HENDERSON LLOYD HENLEY RAY JONES PVT ACCUA E. LANG ROGER LONGBOTHAM LT WILLAM T. LUSK MATT MUSGROVE FLOYD MCDONALD OSCAR MCPHERSON 1LT A.R. SEAMAN SCOTT SHANNON PVT CLIFTON V. SMITH THOMAS D. TROWL LUTHER T. TURNER PVT FLOYD WALTERS KENNETH WATSON PVT SIDNEY WILLIAMSON PVT LESTER E. WYATT

WORLD WAR II SSG JOE ADAMS SGT DAVID L. AUTREY PBT BONNIE BARTLETT PVT JAMES F. BASS 1LT ROBERT L. BIGELOW TEC5 OCIE BLAND LTC ARDEN R. BOELLNER PVT BENNIE J. BONHAM PFC GRADY BOYD SGT JOHNNIE R. BOYKIN 1LT HOWARD T. BROWN 2LT JAMES W. BROWN, JR. TEC4 ERNESTO G. BURCIAGA SSG CHESTER A. BURNETTE CPL MORRIS D. BUSH 2LT CLEO W. BYRD SGT YSABEL A. CARMONIA, JR.

PVT JOE G. CARRILLO SSG FLOYD O. CHEEK SGT GEORGE E. CHURCHWELL SGT ULRIC C. CLARK PVT CLAYTON KERMIT LT WADE H. CORN, JR. PVT BILL D. CURTIS PFC R.J. DAVIS SSG REX A. DAVIS PVT WILLIAM M. DENNING PVT ERNEST R. DENSMEN PVT GEORGE EVERETT DIXON PVT ADAM DUTCHOVER SGT THOMAS ESSLINGER SGT AUBREY T. ELAM SSG JOHN R. FLOWERS PFC PERCY W. FOSTER PVT HOLMES C. FOWLER PVT BEN FRANKLIN, JR. PVT DAVID H. FRANKLIN “PETE” CLAYTON LEE FRANKLIN PFC WALTER A. FRYE PFC CARLOS G. GONZALES SGT JOHN E. GRANTHAM PFC VERNON J. GREER PFC ANASTACIO S. GUERREO PVT LEVI G. HAAS CPL HULCY B. HAGGERTON 1LT THOMAS M. HAGGERTON LTJG DONALD W. HAMILTON, JR. APS OVID A. HENSLEY PFC REYES HERRERA PFC CHARLES L. HICKSON PVT BILLIE B. HILL SGT WILLIAM HOOTEN CAPT F.P. HOWDEN, JR. 2LT WILLIAM L. HOWELL CPL LEROY HUDDLESTON PVT CECIL ISON SSG DILLARD JACKSON 2LT MENDEL W. JACOBSON PVT ALBERT N. JIMENEZ PVT HUGH A. JONES CAPT EMORY KEMPER 1LT DONALD R. LE PELL MSG PAUL J. LEONARD SGT AUBREY L. MADDUX PVT R.B. MARCHBANKS PVT ANOTNIO U. MATA

TEC5 WADE B. MCKNIGHT PVT THOMAS L. MCREYNOLDS 1LT EULOJIE M. MELENDEZ 2LT LIONEL MELENDEZ SGT ALBERT R. MEYER SGT CARROLL H. MILLER PVT JOSE. S. MILLER PFC LELAND E. MITCHELL MAJ BURTON C. MOSSMAN, JR. 1LT LAWRENCE W. PARCHER PVT RUDOLFO PEREZ SGT CARL A. PICKERING PFC GLEN F. PICKERING 2LT LARRY E. PINSON PFC GEORGE PRICE CPL HUBERT H. PRITCHARD SGT GEORGE W. ROBINSON CPL EDWIN L. ROBERTS PVT WOODROW W. RHODES PVT HUGH G. RICHMOND PFC WILLIAM B. RUE PVT DOUGLES SANDERS PVT ROY W. SCHMID SGT ELMO R. SCHULZ PFC BILLY J. SHELTON PFC JACK R. SHELTON SGT CHARLES H. SIMS, JR. CPL BENJAMIN F. SMITH PFC JAMES SMITH PVT ARRIE A. STEPHENS PVT EDGAR J. STEPHENS DICK STORK 2LT AUSTIN G. STRICKLAND CPL STEVEN J. SUMMERSGILL PVT HENRY A. WELCH PFC KIRK WOMAK, JR. CAPT ROBERT S. YOUNG

KOREAN WAR

VIETNAM WAR

CAPT JOHN K. ADAMS ABELARDO ARAUJO SP5 RODNEY JOE BLACK SP4 MONTY DOYAL BOYER SP4 LARRY PAUL CAMPOS PFC MELVIN CARRILLO PFC JOHN RUDOLPH CUMMINS, JR. BUL3 GEORGE ROBERT DE SHURLEY SP5 JERRY DOUGLASS DENNIS CPL JAMES LESTER FOSTER SSGT ROBERT LEE GRAHAM SPF WILLIAM COY JONES MSGT JAMES H. MACDOUGAL PFC BILLIE JAYE MARLING CLIFFORD H. RAULERSON, JR. SP4 SAMMY CHACON ROMERO PFC TRINE ROMERO, JR. PFC HECTOR MARIO SAENZ PCF CRESENCIO PAUL SANCHEZ SP4 JOSE L. SANCHEZ PFC JULIUS MITCHELL SANDERS MAJ GERALD SHIELDS SIMONS CPL ARTURO SYLVESTER SISNEROS CPL ROBERT DIXON THOMPSON, SR. PVT ROBERT DIXON THOMPSON, JR. CPL BENNIE LEE WEST SP4 LAVON STEPHEN WILSON

WAR ON TERROR SGT TOMMY GRAY SGT MOSES DANIEL ROCHA PFC RICKY SALAS, JR. SGT ANDREW PERKINS SPC BRYNN NAYLOR CPL STEVEN CHAVEZ SGT CHRISTOPHER SANDERS PO2 MENELEK M. BROWN

PFC LOUIS V. CEVEDO PVT MARTIN V. CORN 1LT STANLEY W. CROSBY SGT MARVIN L. IVIE PFC ALFRED G. LUCERO CPL MANUEL J. MARTINEZ 1LT MAQUIS H. ORACION PFC FELIPE T. SEDILLO 1LT GORDON M. STRONG

This issue of Focus on Roswell is dedicated to the Hometown Heroes who gave the ultimate sacrifice to protect the freedoms and lives of their friends and family at home. We are forever thankful for your service.


Who is your Hero? “MI SUPER HEROE ES JESUS. EL DIO SU VIDA PARA QUE TODO AQUEL QUE EN EL CREE NO SE PIERDA MAS TENGA VIDA ETERNAL. EL TAMBIEN ME A BENDICIDO CON UNA ASOMBROS FAMILIA Y TAMBIEN CON INTELIGENCIA.” -BRIDGETTE (5TH GRADE)

“MY HERO IS MY MOM. MY MOM IS MY HERO BECAUSE SHE NEVER GIVES UP AND SHE WILL ALWAYS STAY BY MY SIDE. MY MOM WILL ALWAYS BE MY HERO.” -MARCARIO (5TH GRADE)

“MI HEROE ES MI MAMA. ELLA ES MI HEROE PORQUE ME QUIERE MUCHO Y ME CUIDA. ELLA ES MUY AMOROSA CONMIGO.” -OMAR (5TH GRADE)

“MY DAD IS MY HERO BECAUSE HE SAVES LIVES EVERY DAY, SO I FEEL VERY SAFE WITH HIM. HE ALSO TEACHES ME DISCIPLINE SO WE BEHAVE WHEN WE ARE ALONE WITH OUR FRIENDS. MY FAVORITE THING TO DO WITH HIM IS TO COOK. HE LIKES WHEN WE WORK FOR STUFF SO WE CAN LEARN TO BE RESPONSIBLE. THAT IS WHY MY DAD IS MY HERO.”

-WESLEY (5TH GRADE)

“MY HEROES ARE MY PARENTS BECAUSE THEY ARE ALWAYS HELPING AND CARING FOR ME, ESPECIALLY WHEN I AM SUFFERING. THEY ARE ALWAYS LOOKING OUT FOR MY BROTHER AND ME. FLASH IS ALSO A COOL SUPERHERO. HE HELPS PEOPLE, TOO, AND IS FAST, TOO.”

-YANDEL (3RD GRADE)

“MY DAD IS MY HERO BECAUSE HE COOKS FOR US AND HE IS THE BEST AT EVERYTHING. HE IS GREAT AT BEING A FIREFIGHTER, AND HE PUTS OUT FIRES. WHEN HE COOKS FOR US, I ALWAYS EAT MORE THAN ONE BOWL.”

-EMMA (3RD GRADE)

“A HERO IS A GOOD GUY, AND A HERO HELPS PEOPLE AND GETS BAD PEOPLE AND HAS A CAPE AND CAN FLY. MY HERO IS MS. LARA BECAUSE SHE HELPS ME LEARN AND SHOWS ME HOW TO DO MATH AND READING. SHE MAKES US TORTILLAS.”

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In the

Line of Duty by Jamie McKinney

Every day they put their lives on the line, sacrifice countless hours with their families, put in overtime and are willing to go the extra mile to serve and protect the citizens of Roswell. We take for granted all the sacrifices that the men and women of the sheriff ’s department, police department, state police, fire department and first responders make every time they put on their uniforms. I would like to extend a special thanks to the wonderful and courageous heroes of Chaves County who allowed me a glimpse into their lives as first responders and shared with me why they chose careers in public service. Lieutenant Mike Herrington is an officer of the Chaves County Sheriff ’s Office (CCSO). When asked why he wanted to work in law enforcement, this is what he had to say: “When I was in high school, I had become a member of the Police Explorers, and I liked the officers and the line of work they did.” After 22 years with Roswell’s sheriff ’s department, he noted that “I like the way law enforcement agencies work together to catch predators within the community, [but I] dislike the way the courts rule when it comes to repeat offenders. I believe the sentences should be harsher.” Herrington enjoys refereeing football and teaches a class called “How to survive an active killer.” This class teaches people in schools, churches, work places—anywhere

in the community—how to prepare and what to do should an active killer enter their building. The in-depth training allows each person to better understand how to handle the situation and is very informative and beneficial for anyone. CCSO Detective Maria Wilson has been enforcing the law in Roswell for 15 years. She served as a 9-1-1 dispatcher for two years, then as a patrol officer for ten years, which brought her to her current position as a detective. Her favorite parts of being a detective are “knowing that I can help children that have been sexually and physically abused, and to be able to find justice for the victims.” She bragged, “I love what I do, and I work for a great agency.” Her one complaint about this selfless job is that the paperwork is neverending. She enjoys reading, gets few hours of sleep and puts in lots of overtime to do her job well. “There are ups and downs just like any other job. My co-workers are like my family, and I love what I do.” She explained that the state police are crucial in helping the police and sheriff ’s departments in Roswell. She noted that the state police are willing to do whatever they are asked and play an essential role in keeping the community safe. Sergeant Scott Ouillette has been with the CCSO for 17½ years. Prior to his current career in law enforcement, he served in both the United States Army and the United States Air Force, retiring from the military with 26 years of experience. His hobbies include hunting, fishing, hiking and kayaking. He admitted that he doesn’t

PHOTO: Detective Maria Wilson works to gather evidence. Photo courtesy of Jamie McKinney

SUMMER 2017 | A COMMUNITY MAGAZINE

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care for the sarcastic comments from the public, but his favorite part about working for the sheriff’s department is the company he is surrounded by. “I have a great team, they get along well together, and I enjoy working with my shift. They are like a family.”

PHOTO ABOVE LEFT: Chief Deputy M.S. Baker takes a break from his work to pose for a picture. Photo courtesy of Jamie McKinney PHOTO ABOVE MIDDLE: Deputy Pedro Silvas speaks with a civilian. Photo courtesy of Jamie McKinney PHOTO ABOVE RIGHT: Posing in their gear are members of the Roswell Fire Department: (left to right) Jerry Kermon, Mike Mathews,

Jimmy Andazola, Gary Rogers, Joe Brown, Jason Penn, John Miller. Photo courtesy of John Williams

One thing I learned about the law enforcement officers in Roswell is that they are happy to assist the public in any way they can. I recently had the privilege of accompanying Deputy Pedro Silvas on a ride-along. I experienced firsthand the typical day of someone who works in the line of duty. I observed him completing typical daily tasks such as patrolling in his district, looking for expired vehicle tags, giving warnings, issuing citations, answering calls and serving as a back-up for other officers. Silvas has been involved in law enforcement for 17 years, and when asked why he chose his career path, he shared a personal testimonial with me. PHOTO BOTTOM LEFT: Sergeant Scott Ouillette and Detective

Maria Wilson pose outside the Chaves County Sheriff’s Office. Photo courtesy of Jamie McKinney PHOTO BOTTOM RIGHT: Retired Chief Mike Mathews in the line of duty. Photo courtesy of Kim Mathews

When he was 10 years old, he was living in California with his father and step-mother (his mother having passed away five years earlier). One day a man tried to break into their house while he and his sister were home alone. He called his grandfather nearby, who told him that he would start walking there right away. With no cell phones back then, the two children had no choice but to nervously wait for their grandfather’s help. By the time their grandfather arrived, the intruder had removed a side window and was already in the house. The man grabbed Silvas and held a knife to his neck, but the ten-year-old managed to get loose. When the intruder then fled, Silvas chased him on foot. He found a police officer and told him that his house had just been broken into, but the officer would not do anything about it. Silvas recalled, “It took a tragic moment in my childhood for me to decide that I wanted to be a cop. That cop

left a huge impression on my life, and that is when I decided that I wanted to go into law enforcement one day.” Retired Chief Mike Mathews began his career as a firefighter with the Berrendo Volunteer Fire Department in 1981. In 1983 he was hired on with the Roswell Fire Department (RFD) where he worked his way up to driver, then lieutenant, assistant chief, and finally, chief in 2002 before retiring in 2005. On January 12, 2006, Mayor Bill Owen proclaimed the day as “Fire Chief Mike Mathews Day.” When asked why he became a firefighter, Mathews replied, “My Uncle Buck was a volunteer fireman and took me out on my first fire. Then I was hooked.” His favorite part about being involved in the fire department was the camaraderie, excitement and adrenaline rush. Mathews recalled how he made lifelong friendships, but he confessed that he did not like the sacrifice of time away from his family,

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PHOTO ABOVE: The Chaves County Sheriff’s Office poses for a group photo. Photo courtesy of Det. Maria Wilson PHOTO ABOVE RIGHT: Deputy Charles Drake searches for evidence inside a vehicle. Photo courtesy of Jamie McKinney

nor did he work for the money, as the pay was very low. As a retiree, Mathews spends his time hunting, golfing, working in his shop and fishing. Fire Chief Devin Graham has been a member of RFD for almost 18 years. Graham enjoys his work, and when he is not on duty, he enjoys hunting, shooting and hanging out with his beautiful wife. He grew up around a volunteer fire department and always knew that he would eventually be a firefighter himself. Graham said,

“Being mentally and physically prepared is paramount to doing this job. [With] some calls, there is no way to prepare.” It may seem to some as if sheriff’s deputies and police officers are out to get you or a firefighter dressed in all his gear is something scary. The reality is they are just doing their jobs. They are here to protect and serve you. During the seven-hour shift I spent with the sheriff’s department on my ride-along, I was welcomed with open arms and became part of their family. I am so thankful for the opportunity to walk in their

shoes for a few hours. Nothing can compare to the sacrifices they make for our safety. These men and women sacrifice personal and family time and are willing to do whatever it takes to save and protect the community. They don’t get enough credit for what they do. They see devastated families and are there to comfort the hurting. They put their lives on the line every day whether in or out of uniform because they love what they do. To the men and women who serve Roswell, WE SALUTE YOUR SACRIFICE!

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Fostering As they welcomed their two daughters, Sarah and Katie (now ages 21 and 18), the Tutors embraced the joys of parenthood and family life. Little did they know back then just how much their love could expand or how God was planning to use their lives to guide so many others. Rachel and Jeff both grew up in Roswell, initially meeting in middle school. The two reconnected in college when they shared a few classes at ENMU-Roswell and worked together in the computer lab. They married and quickly learned how to balance their careers while maintaining a household and raising their girls. Jeff began his career in public service in 1996, first as a dispatcher for the state police, then as an officer for the Roswell Police Department. He soon moved over to the Chaves County Sheriff ’s Office, where he served the citizens of Chaves County for 20 years. Rachel works as a paralegal in a local law office. Strong in their faith, the Tutors are very involved in their church community, rearing their daughters to lead godly lives and give back to their community. Their youngest, Katie, was a Rotary student of the month and a volunteer with Assisteens, while Sarah participated in two summer mission trips to Juneau, Alaska as part of a college campus ministry. After retiring from the sheriff ’s department in August 2016, Jeff began working for the Roswell Independent School District as the homeless liaison. Even with full time jobs and two grown daughters, the Tutors felt a call to open their home to other children as foster parents, a big need in Chaves County. Giving his wife credit, Jeff explained, “As far as fostering goes, Rachel is the real heart behind it. Of course, I’ve seen a lot over the years. Part of our job is taking kids into custody that have been abandoned and abused. Rachel has had a heart for fostering for years, and we talked about it a little bit when our girls were young, but we weren’t sure about incorporating foster children into the home with having younger kids in the house, too. When we finally decided to do it, the girls were a little older, and we just felt like the time was right. But I have to give Rachel the credit for the heart behind fostering.” Rachel started the fostering journey by completing the training for Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA). She was only able to work one case before her paralegal job began to pick up, and she didn’t have PHOTO ABOVE LEFT: left to right: Katie, Rachel holding their baby girl, Jeff, Kaylynn, Sarah, Jacob and Matthew know that a full house means a full heart. Photo courtesy of Johnnie Lujan PHOTO ABOVE: Back when they were a family of just four, Jeff and Rachel posed with their girls, Sarah (second from left) and Katie, who have been a tremendous help in welcoming their growing brood. Photo courtesy of the Tutor family

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FOCUS ON ROSWELL | SUMMER 2017

as much time to be as involved as she wanted. Her friend and boss, Beth Ryan, has a sister, Mindy Tanner, who had taken in three kids from the Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD), and Rachel was able to observe her positive experience as a foster parent. The Tanners were an immense support and assisted the Tutors with their own transition into foster care. Jeff admitted, “I was scared to death when we started—just the fear of the unknown.” PHOTO ABOVE: The Tutors pose for a family photo at the courthouse for the adoption of their daughter, Kaylynn: (Left to right) Sarah, Katie, Jacob, Rachel, Kaylynn and Jeff. Photo courtesy of the Tutor family

Rachel pointed out that seeing the Tanners’ kids turn out so great helped them to not fear the process. She also listens to daily radio broadcasts of Focus on the Family; the stories on that program highlight the importance of foster care. One day, it “struck her heart” that this was the time. She went home and told her husband and girls, “I think as a family we can do this.” With everyone on board, they decided to go for it. Three years ago, as their oldest daughter, Sarah, headed off to college, the Tutors welcomed their first foster child. Since then, they have now welcomed eleven children into their home to shelter and guide. Some stayed a couple of days, some a couple of weeks. According to Rachel, “You always think of them.” The Tutors told about a shopping trip to Walmart where they ran into one of the first kids who stayed with them. She was with her mom and ran over to the family to give them a hug and say hello. “It makes you feel special to know she remembered her time with us,” recalled Rachel. When they first ventured into foster care, the Tutors knew that adoption was a possibility for them and even hoped it might work out that way. They were initially thinking they would take in older children, but that all changed when they met nine-month-old Kaylynn, now three. “She stole our hearts,” they all exclaimed. The Tutors began the process to adopt Kaylynn, which usually takes about a year. They had tons of support from CYFD, other foster parents and their CASA workers. All adults in the house are required to complete training with CYFD, but teens and older children are encouraged to participate as well, and Sarah and Katie chose to do so. “CYFD wants to prepare families for everything that goes into it,” Rachel emphasized, “and make sure everybody is heard.” During this time, the Tutors were informed that Kaylynn’s biological mother was pregnant with another baby. They knew right away that the baby belonged with


L ve by Molly Marley

their family as well. Now two years old, Jacob has been with them since he was born, when he weighed under five pounds. “You can’t tell now by looking at him, but he was just a little bag of bones,” Jeff pointed out while holding the curly haired toddler. “I’ve finally got my boy!” Even now with four children, Rachel and Jeff are still finding room in their hearts and home for more. In November, they brought in Kaylynn and Jacob’s newborn half-sister and are in the process of adopting her. The new year brought another new resident when they took in sixteen-year-old Matthew (not his real name). Rachel explained that they were just going to keep him for a weekend while he was getting placed into a group home. “That really was all Jeff. After talking with him and the social worker, we just realized that he needed more of a family setting.”

“He will do better in a family setting than a group home,” Jeff agreed. “Plus, we thought if we kept him, he could stay in high school. We want to make sure he has a chance at life and is successful. That’s our goal for him, even if he’s not with us down the road. We still want to make sure he stays in school and graduates. He’s a smart kid, just grew up in a life of gangs and drugs. Once you take them out of that, you see he’s a smart kid.” “What we’re seeing with Matthew,” Rachel bragged, “is the investment CASA has put forth. Everybody is just really pulling for him to succeed. It’s not lost on him.” The Tutors hope to keep Matthew with them until he turns 18 but will probably not adopt him, acknowledging that there are many benefits provided to kids who age out of the foster system. “But if he wanted us to, we would!” Rachel quickly interjected. Also, Matthew’s father is currently working through the reunification program with CYFD, so Matthew may be reunified with his biological father.

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PHOTO ABOVE: When they can find time to get away, the Tutors enjoy visiting Port Isabel,

Texas. (Left to right) Katie, Jacob, Sarah and Kaylynn. Photo courtesy of the Tutor family

PHOTO LEFT: Matthew swings Kaylynn around while the family plays in their front yard.

Photo courtesy of Johnnie Lujan

Jeff described foster care as “basically the giving of your time and opening your home.” However, if you are not able to give that kind of commitment, there are other ways to help children in the system such as respite foster care and donations. With emotion, Jeff insisted, “One of the biggest things I’ve learned about doing it is these kids—they’re just normal kids.” “They just need some stability,” Rachel contended, “someone to care about them and invest in them a little bit.” Jeff elaborated, adding, “We keep the kids with us 24/7, and we take them with us everywhere we go. I mean, these are our kids. Not just these kids [Kaylynn, Jacob and their half-sister]. When we take someone in our home, what we want to do is just show them a normal life. That’s the whole point…to take them with you on vacations, everything.” Roswell is fortunate to have families taking care of the children in our community who are in need, but the Tutors just see it as something they were called to do. They have even inspired others to follow in their footsteps. Rachel’s sister is currently pursuing foster care as well, and Rachel credits the positive experience they have had. “These kids have just brightened everybody’s lives in our families.” Jeff affirmed, “It’s challenging at times, but it’s very rewarding.” Rachel concluded that it has been a life changing experience and encouraged others to help in any way they can. “We certainly wouldn’t have thought that at this age we’d have these little ones, that we’d be basically starting over, but it’s been so positive just watching how sweet and attentive and supportive our older girls are with these children and how their hearts have been changed as well by having them in our home. If you are feeling like you want to just try it, don’t be afraid of it. I feel like God puts it there for you, and you just need to respond. Once you do, the flood gates open. I can feel that God’s been in our life, more than I probably did my entire time with our first kids. It’s been challenging, but He has always been there to get us to the next stage.” PHOTO RIGHT: At one of the family’s favorite vacation spots, a young Sarah (left) and

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Katie pose at the lighthouse in Port Isabel, Texas with South Padre Island in the background. Photo courtesy of the Tutor family

SUMMER 2017 | A COMMUNITY MAGAZINE

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The Role of a Foster Parent

As a foster or adoptive parent with the New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD), you can help a child by providing a safe place to stay. Foster parents open their homes and their hearts to children in custody by allowing them to feel safe as they grow and learn in a family setting. Foster parents help children in their home to remain connected to their religion, culture and community. CYFD encourages foster parents to maintain lifelong connections with the children and their biological families whenever possible. CYFD’s goal is always to reunify birth parents with their children in care.

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A King’s Heart by Rachel Corn

The dictionary defines hero as “a person who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements or noble qualities.” In our great city, there have been, and will continue to be, many heroes who help to shape and give life to the ideals and values that make Roswell home for so many. No matter how far or long one may have traveled or drifted, or for those who have never left, Roswell will always be in their hearts and the place they proudly call home.

Betty King is one of those people. If you haven’t had the honor of meeting her, then you haven’t had the honor of being touched PHOTO ABOVE: Betty King (left) and her husband, John, enjoy by one of Roswell’s most selfless, giving individuals. One a night at the Spencer Theater in Ruidoso. hour with her and you will discover that an hour barely scrapes the surface of this true tale of heroism. You would also discover that King may be one of the few remaining people to have an international pen pal. Since the seventh grade, she has been writing to her pen pal, Doris, in Germany. Their friendship “started with a Red Cross box” during WWII and has flourished into a friendship that has lasted a lifetime. She has traveled to Germany with her children to visit her longtime friend, and Doris has likewise brought her family to Roswell. No matter how brief your time spent with King may be, I guarantee that you will walk away inspired, encouraged, humbled and with a slight giddy-up to your step. At least that was my experience. Born in Marshall, Texas, Betty Taylor moved to Roswell with her parents when she was just a toddler. Her father, W.C. “Bill” Taylor, was the manager of JCPenney before getting into the broadcasting business, which would later become a predominant part of her life. After graduating from Roswell High School, she ventured back to Texas to attend Texas Christian University, where she graduated in 1959 with a bachelor’s degree in education and a minor in religion. She met her husband, John King, while in Fort Worth, marrying him in 1961; they have two daughters, Karolyn and Kathryn. When she and her husband moved back to Roswell in 1963, she began serving her local community by teaching elementary social studies and geography. “If I loved it,” she realized, “then I could help them love it, too.” Teaching wasn’t just about textbooks and memorization for King; she wanted her students to love learning like she did. Even after she finished teaching, she found ways to keep in touch with some of her students, even to this day. When asked why she kept in touch with them, particularly one who spent some time in prison, she replied very matter-of-factly, “If you can cheer someone, they can cheer you.” In addition to teaching, she was active in the community. She worked alongside her husband at KBIM studios. They bought the station from her father and his partners, and through its production and her affiliation with organizations such as United Way and the local Chamber of Commerce, she helped promote the community of Roswell by getting big name speakers to come to Chaves

County. She enjoyed being a part of the broadcasting industry because of “the people you meet . . . lots of good people, people who want to make things better through service.” Motivational speakers such as Zig Ziglar, Dallas Cowboys tight end Billy Joe DuPree and Dr. Ben Carson, the neurosurgeon who became a Republican presidential candidate in 2016, all came to Roswell thanks to King’s hard work. “Dr. Carson was eager to come,” she said, “as were the PHOTO ABOVE: Betty King with President George others. When you get the trust of people, W. Bush during a trip to Washington, D.C. the trust is what builds friendships, and that builds a life of trust.” To say she has made some friendships over the years would be an understatement. In fact, upon entering or leaving her home, you are asked to sign a guest book. Her collection of guest books show years and years of guests, from numerous Dallas Cowboys players to her next door neighbor’s daughter. King was not only a teacher and an owner

PHOTO ABOVE: Betty King gifted 3,050 elementary students in the Roswell Independent School District with a copy of Gifted Hands. The front page of Betty King’s copy of Gifted Hands by Dr. Ben Carson was signed by the author himself: “To Betty and John, Keep up the great work. Many benefit from your goodwill.” PHOTO BOTTOM LEFT: Betty and John King

of KBIM, but she served as president of the New Mexico Broadcasters Association, president of our local United Way and president of the Roswell Chamber of Commerce. She also served on the board of the Carson Scholar’s Fund (Dr. Ben Carson’s scholarship committee), was a member of the board of trustees for the Spencer Theater and was a field coordinator for former U.S. Senator and Apollo 17 astronaut Dr. Harrison “Jack” Schmitt, all while being a full-time wife and mother of two. She has been the recipient of many awards in recognition of her community service, including the Outstanding Leader Award issued by the Leadership Roswell Alumni Association of the Roswell Chamber of Commerce.

SUMMER 2017 | A COMMUNITY MAGAZINE

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She remains very active within her church as well; a life of service is all she’s known. She grew up in the Disciples of Christ church, where her parents were active and involved. “Part of the way I grew up was by serving,” which is what she loves so much about Roswell. “It’s a serving town, and service makes a town.” King’s resume is just a glimpse into her heart and her home. She attributes her accomplishments to those with whom she surrounded herself, her husband and family, as well as her organizational skills, which she stresses were very important in her being able to accomplish all PHOTO ABOVE: With Dr. Ben Carson, Betty King prepares that she did, and her willingness for an event at Pearson Auditorium on the campus of New to serve. “You have to have many Mexico Military Institute. willing hearts and hands, because PHOTO BELOW: Betty King with her longtime friend and hearts and hands build things.”

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The highlight of her years in service? “I couldn’t say any one. Everything I ever did for any board or any committee I did…because I wanted to help Roswell.” Her success isn’t defined by the positions she has held or her access to all the right resources (which is undoubtedly also very helpful) or by the multiple awards she has won that hang on her walls. She has been successful because she understands the importance of giving back to her community, which is fueled by a burning desire to help make things better. “I never did anything I didn’t want or yearn to do. That comes from wanting to help your family, your community, your nation…If you’re going to work and volunteer, then love every minute of it. And I did.” So you see, a hero can come in all shapes and sizes. Some swoop in on a horse to save the lady in distress or defeat the fiery dragon; others, like King, just do what is in their hearts and never look back.

email: jhl@ad-venturemarketing.com

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Editor’s Pick: After April History is filled with incredible tales of heroism, but these stories would easily be forgotten without the often overlooked storytellers and authors who share them with the world. This April marked 10 years since Roswell residents Jolene and Frank Lilley received a phone call they will never forget. Oceans away from our relatively quiet town, Lieutenant Colonel Greg Worley was calling to inform them that their son, Staff Sergeant Scott Lilley, had been struck in the skull by shrapnel while serving with the United States Air Force in Iraq and was in critical condition. In After April, Roswell author and New Mexico Military Institute professor Eva McCollaum beautifully tells the story of how the Lilley family, with the support of their faith, family, friends in the Roswell community and the United States military, set out on the journey to recovery and brought their “Scotty” home. To read the whole story of this hometown hero, you can purchase your own copy of After April on Lulu.com or in the gift shop at the Historical Society for Southeast New Mexico.

mother of four active boys injuries were a part of life, and especially with Scotty, even before he joined the military, even as a kid. PHOTO ABOVE: The cover of Eva McCollaum’s book, After April, which is available for purchase at the Historical Society for Southeast New Mexico, features a collage of photos of U.S. Air Force Staff Sergeant Scott Lilley behind a portrait of him in uniform.

CHAPTER 4 He cried out with a loud voice, ‘Lazarus, come forth!’ --The Gospel according to John 11:43 Jolene was working on the itinerary for a trip she and Frank were planning to take with friends to Washington, D.C. the following week. Since the boys were all grown and out on their own, she could turn her considerable planning energies in various new directions. She is good with the computer, so travel was easy and so was contacting various family members. She had sent Scott some mildly scolding e-mails the day before urging him to get in touch. When she heard Frank answer the phone, she heaved a relaxed sigh. But scarcely had she leaned back into assurance when Frank began writing “head injury” on a piece of scratch paper. She went into their sparkling and perfectly decorated living room and picked up the extension. Perhaps her warm brown eyes swept over the fire place, through the front windows of the home where they had lived for the past twenty-eight years, over the polished wood of the dining table before they began to swim with a mother’s tears. Her stubborn, willful Scotty was hurt. She had learned early as the

There had been that game in Artesia when he was playing little league. He was pitching, and he collided with the third baseman while they were both trying to make a play. One of Scotty’s front teeth had broken off near the gum line. Jolene didn’t really know this from her place in the stands. She could see they were both searching for something, but Jolene knew it was best to wait until they called her in rather than being a “hover mother.” Later she discovered the manager had wanted to send Scotty to her, but he begged—begged—to finish the game. The manager consented. The team won. But, by the time she got Scotty to the dentist, the exposed nerve of that tooth was making him nauseous and dizzy with pain. That level of sheer bullheadedness could make him challenging at times. When he wasn’t fighting to stay in a game, he could be a ready helping hand, always willing to do anything Jolene asked of him, especially chores around the house. The way the elements of his personality mixed together were part of what made him Scotty, and a big part of what she loved about him.

After all, they might not need to tell everyone, but they went ahead and decided they couldn’t keep it to themselves. Jolene didn’t really think at all. She just started calling. The first family friend to arrive that morning, Teresa, brought her Bible; then the other women arrived, a core of five women, like the fingers of God, and they closed ranks around the Lilley living room and started praying, praying with all their spirits. As she looked around at them, stunned by the great wave of love washing around her, Jolene thought, They’re working as hard for Scotty right here as the doctors must be working there. One of them said, “Lord, I ask you to send the spirit of Lazarus to Scotty, just send resurrection power to him.”

After she and Frank sustained the initial shock wave of the first phone call of April 15, she wasn’t certain what they ought to do next. She wasn’t sure who to call.

PHOTO RIGHT: Scott Lilley recovers from surgery with his parents, Jolene and Frank, by his side. As McCollaum writes, “Love is a miracle we chose to share, and family is better than any hospital in the world.”

SUMMER 2017 | A COMMUNITY MAGAZINE

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That moment, that sentence, struck Jolene like a physical blow, and she had to leave the room, leave the house and stand alone in the pale green of the spring day, looking at her quiet, empty back yard. Up from her soul came the question, “Oh, God, is Scotty going to die?” Every sincere prayer of a believer is answered, every one, and sometimes the answer is yes, and sometimes the answer is no. And, sometimes, the arms of the Holy Spirit encircle the believer, preparing that soul to wait, wait until she could see her boy, to know whether his time had come. At half-hour intervals the calls from the Air Force would come, and before long Jolene knew exactly what time it was in Baghdad. They only sent flights out to Germany under the cover of darkness when they were less vulnerable to ground attacks. Jolene and Frank waited for the news that Scotty’s transport was in the air. When LTC Worley told them the Air Force would fly them to Germany after all, Jolene was surprised. She was already working on ideas for how to switch her Wednesday vacation tickets to Monday. She was deeply touched by how quickly the military made the arrangements for his family to reach Scotty. She remembered different families she had known during the Viet Nam era, and she assumed that it would be a monumental challenge to find the quickest route to Scotty in Germany. Now all the transportation would be tailored, free of charge, to their needs, and to the needs of their wounded airman. That much had improved—exponentially.

morning Jolene called many of the relatives with updates, and in her call to Matt and Danielle, his wife, in Lubbock she shared the news that Scott was in “stable but critical condition.” The Air Force had given her the number to call Scotty’s room, but Jolene wasn’t sure what good that would do. Matt made a suggestion, so Jolene decided she would call Scotty’s room in Landstuhl again. The nurse on duty, Dee, did not offer much reassurance. “I’m sorry,” she said. “We aren’t getting any response, not to our voice commands, not even to reflex tests.” Jolene thought of what Matt had suggested. “Mom,” he said. “Have her hold the phone to Scott’s ear, and you talk to him.” Dee was happy to do that, and Jolene, giving her whole being into her voice, said, “Scotty, you’re going to be okay. Mommy and Daddy are coming.” From across the world Jolene could hear the nurse say, “At ease. At ease! Mrs. Lilley, he tried to grab the phone!”

By early evening the main group of visitors and supporters had gone, and Jolene knew if she and Frank had to sit and wait until morning, she would be nearly frantic with worry. Anyway, they were sponsoring two young people for Confirmation, and they needed to go. Jolene was glad for the few hours’ distraction, the opportunity to focus on something she could do rather than something she couldn’t. Teresa came by early Monday morning because she knew Jolene would be in no condition to pack properly. After all, she and Jolene had raised their children together; they were like family. Who knew how long they would be gone? That

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PHOTOS ABOVE (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP): Scott Lilley enjoys time with his daughter,

MiKaylie. Scott Lilley visits with one of the local children in Iraq before his injury. Scott Lilley poses with his brothers at New Mexico Military Institute after giving a presentation. Pictured, left to right, are Matt Lilley, Staff Sergeant Scott Lilley, Tim Lilley and Marc Lilley.

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FOCUS ON ROSWELL | SUMMER 2017

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The Bulletin Board

2017 CARLSBAD AREA

Calendar of Events

ARTESIA AREA

TO BE INCLUDED IN THE FOCUS CALENDAR, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR ITEM TO EVENTS@FOCUSNM.COM

LEA CO. AREA

ROSWELL AREA

RUIDOSO AREA

DATE COLOR CODE INDICATES EVENT LOCATION EVERY FIRST FRIDAY OF THE MONTH

First Friday Downtown Market Downtown Roswell Every first Friday of the month 5 p.m.-8 p.m. Free Admission www.mainstreetroswell.org/ first-downtown-market/

EVERY SATURDAY JUNE 3 - AUGUST 19 Outdoor Summer Movie Spring River Park and Zoo 1306 E. College Blvd. Roswell all movies begin at dusk (approx. 8:30 p.m.) Free Admission www.mainstreetroswell.org

THURSDAYS IN JUNE

Summer Movies in the Heritage Heritage Walkway, downtown 300 block of Main Street Movies begin at sunset Free admission Free Popcorn bring a chair and a drink Contact the Ocotillo Performing Arts Center for more info

EVERY FRIDAY

Carlsbad Community Focus IHOP 2529 S. Canal St. Every Friday 7 a.m. • Speaker begins at 8 a.m.

EVERY WEDNESDAY

Stand Up Comedy Live Inn of the Mountain Gods 287 Carrizo Canyon Road Mescalero Every Wednesday 6:30 p.m. 575-464-7089

MAY 29 - JUNE 30 LCCA Summer Art Camps Center for the Arts 122 W. Broadway Hobbs 9 a.m.-4 p.m. lccanm.org

JUNE 10 - SEPTEMBER 23 2017 New Media Show/ Hobbs Outdoors Vision Fest Shipp Street Plaza 122 W. Broadway Hobbs 8 p.m. lccanm.org

HEY YOU! DO YOU SEE THIS? SO WILL YOUR CUSTOMERS! THIS SPACE IS AVAILABLE FOR ADVERTISING! CONTACT JOHNNIE TODAY FOR INFO!

JUNE 16 - 18 & JUNE 23-25

JUNE 26 - JULY 2

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast ENMU-R Performing Arts Center 64 University Blvd. Roswell 7:30 p.m. (Friday-Sunday) & 2:30 p.m. (Sunday) www.waywayoffbroadway.com

JUNE 17

Downtown Farmer’s Market Opening Day Courthouse Lawn 8 a.m.-11 p.m. Carlsbadmainstreet.org

JUNE 30 - JULY 1

Roswell Galacticon & Sci Fi Film Festival 2017 Roswell Mall 4501 N. Main St. Roswell for events and times visit roswellfilmcon.com

JULY 4

JUNE 23 - 25

Smokin’ on the Pecos State BBQ Championship Eddy County Fairgrounds Gates open Friday at 5 p.m. Gates open 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday Gates open noon-4 p.m. Sunday 575-746-2744 for more info

JUNE 24 - JULY 29

70th Anniversary UFO Festival 2017 Various Locations for schedule of events and locations visit www.ufofestivalroswell.com

2017 Downtown Concert Series Center for the Arts 122 W. Broadway Hobbs lccanm.org

July 4th Community Celebration Harry McAdams Park 5000 Jack Gomez Blvd. Hobbs 4:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.

JULY 8

Alien City Over the Line Baseball Tournament Cielo Grande Recreation Complex 1612 W. College Blvd. Roswell 8:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. www.overthelinenm.com

JULY 14 - 15

Bring Back the West Show Roswell Convention and Civic Center 912 N. Main St. Roswell 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Free Admission

Johnnie Lujan MA R KE TI N G D I R E CTOR AD VENTURE MARKETING

Call Johnnie at 575.910.8233 email: jhl@ad-venturemarketing.com


Please visit FocusNM.com for additional events and up-to-date info. JULY 15

Dawn of the Bats Carlsbad Caverns Ntl. Park Natural Entrance 5:30 a.m. nps.gov/cave

JULY 20

Carlsbad Chamber Banquet Pecos Conference Center 711 Muscatel 6 p.m.-9 p.m. 575-887-6516

JULY 21

Down Syndrome Foundation of SENM 5th Annual Educational Workshop Roswell Convention and Civic Center 912 N. Main St. Roswell 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. www.dsfsenm.org

JULY 22

AUGUST 4 - 12

JULY 28

AUGUST 18 - 19

Clay Crushers Sporting Clays Fun Shoot Eddy County Shooting Range 131 N. Firehouse Road Friday Night Game Night Two rotations available Saturday 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Registration fee includes gift, targets and lunch 575-746-2744 for more info

AUGUST 25

SEPTEMBER 23

International Day of the Cowboy Ocotillo Performing Arts Center & Bennie’s Western Wear

Movies Under the Stars - Nine Lives Del Norte Park 4314 N. Grimes Hobbs 6:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m.

AUGUST 4 - 6 & 11 - 13 “Into The Woods” ENMUR-R Performing Arts Cener 64 University Blvd. Roswell 7:30 p.m. (Friday -Sunday) & 2:30 p.m. (Sunday) www.waywayoffbroadway.com

82nd Annual Lea County Fair & PRCA Rodeo leacounty.net

Pro Rodeos Eddy County Sheriff’s Posse 1601 E. Greene Street TBD 325-668-0163 Movies Under the Stars - Sing Del Norte Park 4314 N. Grimes Hobbs 6:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m.

SEPTEMBER 15 - 16

Ruffles and Rust Expo Roswell Convention and Civic Center 912 N. Main St. Roswell 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. $5 Admission, 12 and under FREE

AUGUST 26

Red Dirt Black Gold Festival Downtown Artesia and Heritage Plaza Free Admission Entry fee to NM Beer Garden Entry fee to enter Oilfield Olympian or Oilfield Cook-off Team Visit artesiaacd.com for line up of musicians and for more info.

AUGUST 26

International Vulture Awareness Day Living Desert 1504 Miehls Drive 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. 575-887-5516

OCTOBER 14

Wolf Awareness Day Living Desert 1504 Miehls Drive 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. 575-887-5516

OCTOBER 20 - 22 & 27 - 29 “Guys and Dolls” ENMU-R Performing Arts Center 64 Univeristy Blvd. Roswell 7:30 p.m. (Friday-Sunday) & 2:30 p.m. (Sunday) www.waywayoffbroadway.com

AUGUST 29

36th Annual Heritage Dinner Roswell Convention and Civic Center 912 N. Main St. Roswell 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 575-622-8333

SEPTEMBER 9

6th Annual Roswell Elks Charity Golf Tournament NMMI Golf Course 201 W. 19th St. Roswell 7:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Ralph Brown 575-627-9255

SUMMER 2017 | A COMMUNITY MAGAZINE

19


by Molly Marley Imagine being escorted into your home by a police officer and given only ten minutes to pack a bag before you need to leave, possibly never to return. What would you put in your bag? Do you know where your birth certificate, social security card and other important documents are? Would you have time to grab that precious family heirloom or your child’s baby photos before being rushed out the door? Sadly, this is a situation many men and women in Chaves County and all over the world find themselves in every day when they make the courageous decision to leave behind their abusers. When you walk into the offices of the Roswell Refuge, as a security measure to protect the staff and clients, you must wait to be buzzed in. Upon entering, you walk down the Hall of Memories, where you come face to face with the pictures of domestic violence victims in Chaves County who were killed at the hands of their abusers. Each picture features a smiling face with a short bio about the life that was taken too soon. Turn the corner and you will see posters lining the hallway that have been put out by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, one for each year since 1996, listing the names of every victim in the United States who lost his or her life to this disgusting crime. Glancing at the considerable number of names that fill each poster, Executive Director Cindy Wilson pointed out that these posters include only the names of victims whose families were ready to share those names and stories. She was quick to admit that her work is emotionally hard, so these names keep her going. “When we [Refuge staff] get up to here and frustrated, I tell everyone, ‘Just go look,’ because this is why we’re doing it. We don’t want to add any more names.” In the United States a woman is assaulted or beaten every nine seconds. “This is a crime,” explained Wilson, who has been working at the Refuge since 2013, “that knows no boundaries and no barriers whatsoever. Not gender, not sex, not economics, not strata.” Shockingly, one in three women has been beaten or assaulted during her lifetime, including women in Chaves County. A particularly horrific case happened here in 1978 when a young social worker, Cecilia Ulibarri, was shot and killed by her estranged husband as she was leaving work one evening. Deciding that enough was enough, a coworker collaborated with prominent members of the Roswell community to take action. Members of this selfless group, who prefer to remain anonymous, pulled PHOTO ABOVE: The Forester family donates personal hygiene items to the Refuge,

putting together 40 sacks of supplies to gift clients of the shelter.

PHOTO RIGHT: Roswell Refuge Executive Director Cindy Wilson (right) and Kimberly

Byrne pose with BuzzBee at the 2017 Baby Boomer’s Business Expo.

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FOCUS ON ROSWELL | SUMMER 2017

together to buy a covered van and set up a special phone number that they advertised through agencies such as Child, Youth and Family Department (CYFD). When a victim called, somebody would take the van to pick him or her up in a public location, drive around and around to be sure they weren’t being followed, then deliver the person to the Presbyterian Church, where he or she stayed in the basement. “That was the first shelter,” Wilson recalled, and “it was open to men, women and children.” The growing need of help for victims of domestic violence led to the Roswell Refuge becoming official in 1981, thanks in large part to Karen Griffo and Karen Rogers-Melton, who used their backgrounds in finance and banking to complete all the official paperwork. As she held a scrapbook of material on the Refuge’s history, Wilson admitted that she didn’t realize at first just how many people were involved in getting the shelter up and running. “They’re my unsung heroes…and heroines. They didn’t want to be known, but without exception, when I asked them ‘Why?’ they said, ‘Because something had to be done.’ Just because it was the right thing to do.” The Refuge serves all of Chaves County, and its doors are open to anyone who is a victim. More than half of the victims served are on the run, and the Refuge has welcomed people all the way from the East Coast as well as a few people who found themselves without a home during winter storm Goliath in 2015. Clients of the Refuge and their families can stay at the shelter for up to three months, possibly four depending on the circumstances. However, Wilson noted that she doesn’t believe the victimization ever goes away. “Three months certainly isn’t enough time to change someone’s life, [and] it’s their life. They have to change it.” During their stay, clients eat communal meals and are expected to help with cooking and chores. Connected to the offices on N. Garden is the Roswell Refuge Thrift Store. Anyone staying at the shelter gets first dibs on items donated by the community and can shop free of charge for whatever they might need. The shop sends donations to its sister agencies, provides clothing and household items to families in need and is currently putting together a page on eBay where it will sell donated items that could be considered collectibles to raise extra money for the Refuge. Wilson described the shelter as “a big house that has [had] a constant, huge family in it for over 30 years and is starting to show some wear and tear.” Thrift Store profits and fundraisers held by the Refuge help with sprucing up the shelter and purchasing items the shelter’s restricted and unreliable budget does not allow for, like ingredients to make birthday cakes. Wilson said they like to go all out on holidays and make it a special time for their clients, especially the kids. She recalled one Halloween when a client


didn’t want her child out trick-or-treating, so staff and parents stood behind the doors in the Refuge. “They loved it so much, they all turned in their candy to do it again.” She praised the staff she works with, saying, “It’s a real group effort here, and one thing I want to say is that this is one of the finest [groups] I’ve ever worked with. I have never worked with such a fine, committed staff. They do the extra.” The Refuge also offers services to help victims and their families get back on their feet and allows them to continue to utilize these services once their stay has ended. “Help is the key word,” Wilson emphasized. “We don’t do it for them.” Oftentimes, a woman who has never held a job before will come into the shelter, and the staff will assist her with building a resume, writing a cover letter and filling out a job application. A California transplant, Wilson has a degree in management from Pepperdine University and uses her background in computers and the aerospace field to train clients. She has created classes for Windows, Excel, PowerPoint and other applications, then loaded them onto the computer at the shelter so someone looking to enter the workforce can learn to use those programs and better qualify themselves for employment. “I’m getting ready to add QuickBooks to the client PC so they can learn how to do general bookkeeping.” What’s the hardest part of helping someone find a job? “The client has all the decisions, all the power,” she affirmed, “and for many, it’s the first time they’ve ever been asked, ‘What do you want to do? What do you like?’” A lot of clients will get frustrated at not knowing the “correct” answer, so she has learned instead to ask them, “Ideally, if you can be anything you want to be, what would it be?” She also works with a handful of local businesses to place clients in positions for which they are qualified. “A lot of businesses in Roswell know that I’m good for computer training. I’ll teach them what they need, and if they [Refuge clients] work with me, then they can do it. They can.” One of the hardest challenges she faces when working with victims is “reassuring them they have the right to make their own choices.” The Refuge puts most of its

clients through a 15-week Survivor Empowerment Group course; after the course is completed, they can continue coming to the class and being around others if they choose. One of the first topics the class covers is “What is domestic violence?” Sometimes people don’t even recognize they are in abusive relationships because abuse is not limited to just physical abuse. Another all too common problem Wilson sees is when a client leaves the shelter and returns to his or her abuser, usually because it is all the person has ever known plus there is a lack of affordable transitional housing in Chaves County. Most abusers are ordered by the court to attend classes through the Refuge, though some seek help on their own. Wilson reported that they have had positive results with those who stick with it. It is common for abusers themselves to have been victims of molestation or abuse by the time they were five years old. When violence is all they have ever known, some offenders don’t even realize that what they are doing is wrong until they take the classes. The Refuge is not only aiding the victims but working to address the whole issue, even going into the schools to talk about bullying. When domestic violence continues over multiple generations, Wilson suggested that “if we can get to the younger generation [the children to whom she refers as ‘the silent victims’], then maybe we can head it off.” She proudly wears her Refuge identification badge as an open invitation for conversation. She is always happy to talk to those who approach her, whether the person is a victim who is seeking help or a member of the community who wants to know how one can help end domestic violence in Chaves County. The mission of the Roswell Refuge is clear: “to provide a safe environment and advocacy for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault and to educate the community about the effects of domestic and sexual assault violence on adults, children and the community at large.”

PHOTO ABOVE LEFT: Refuge board member Kelly Smith gives two thumbs up for all the toys collected by Santa’s helpers. PHOTO ABOVE MIDDLE: Images of domestic violence victims in Chaves County line the Hall of Memories. PHOTO ABOVE RIGHT: The Refuge hosted a tea party to honor its clients for Mother’s Day. PHOTO RIGHT: Lesli Carrera shows off the entrance to the Refuge Thrift Store at 1215 N. Garden.

Raise Up the Refuge

If you want to help victims of domestic violence in Roswell, monetary donations can go a long way to support the Roswell Refuge, but there are also other ways you can help the shelter.

• Donate clothing and household items to the Refuge Thrift Store.

• Businesses and families can select a room in the shelter to repair and fix up.

• Donate holiday items, such as pumpkins in the fall or ingredients for birthday cakes year round.

• Support Refuge fundraisers and bring your friends.

• Volunteer at Refuge events.

• Become a committed volunteer who trains and works side by side with Victim Advocates.

If you’re looking for more ways to Raise Up the Refuge, contact Cindy Wilson at 575-624-3222.


teacher feature

Beatriz E. Valentin ESL teacher Education: Master’s Degree in Education Curriculum and Learning from Metropolitan University, Master’s Degree in Accounting from University of Phoenix, plus more than 45 graduate credit hours from ENMUPortales in TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) and bilingual education FOCUS: How did you wind up in the Roswell school district (RISD)?

FOCUS: Please tell us about awards you have received for your work in education.

VALENTIN: I applied four years in a row to get a job in the district. I got interviews every year, but no job. In 2012, I interviewed with Rhonda Martinez at Sierra Middle School, and she gave me the opportunity to work for RISD.

VALENTIN: I was nominated for Teacher of Character in March 2017

PHOTO: As a WIDA trainer, Beatriz Valentin is an advocate for ESL students and helps other teachers in the district to better educate their bilingual students and set them up for success.

FOCUS: Tell us a little bit about your professional background and your role in educating ESL (English as a Second Language) students. VALENTIN: I graduated from the University of Puerto Rico with a bachelor’s degree in business administration/accounting. I worked for nine years as an accountant for a ready-mix company in Puerto Rico. Meanwhile during those years, I earned two master’s degrees: one in education from Metropolitan University and one in accounting. Then when I moved to Roswell, I worked three years at Roswell Job Corps as ESL instructor and one year at Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell as a math and ESL instructor. In 2012, I started working for RISD as a special education teacher. I began with a New Mexico special education teaching license and a business education endorsement. I take advantage of any opportunity to grow professionally. In these five years with RISD, I have had the opportunity to take TESOL and bilingual classes at ENMU-Portales. This year, I obtained three additional endorsements and changed my license from level 1 to level 2. I have a level 2 pre-K-12 special education license with endorsements in business education, TESOL, bilingual and modern language in Spanish.

FOCUS: What’s special about the Roswell educational system? VALENTIN: The education system in Roswell is multiculturally diverse and supportive to teachers and students. FOCUS: What do you want people to know about your department, its educators and the work they do that perhaps they might not know about or understand? VALENTIN: I am working to make Sierra Middle School a bilingual school. Also, I want people to know that they don’t need to feel ashamed to speak Spanish. They need to feel proud of their native language and work hard to be proficient in both their native language and their second language. Being a bilingual person opens doors to an excellent future. FOCUS: What is the most rewarding aspect of your job? VALENTIN: The most rewarding aspects of my job are seeing my students succeeding and seeing them proudly speaking English with confidence. FOCUS: Do you have a motto or saying that you live by? VALENTIN: The only person who can stop you from achieving your goals and dreams is yourself. Also, knowledge is power and is the only thing that anyone can’t take from you.

In June 2015, I got my WIDA trainer certification. (According to www.wida. us, the WIDA Consortium is a non-profit cooperative group whose purpose is to develop standards and assessments that meet and exceed the goals of No Child Left Behind and promote educational equity for English language learners.) Since that date, I have been working with the Public Education Department Bilingual Program offering professional development to New Mexico teachers of WIDA English language development standards. FOCUS: Tell us a little bit about you. What are your hobbies and interests? VALENTIN: I like to advocate for my ESL students because they are assets in our classroom and community. I see myself in every student I have, because eight years ago I came to the United States from Puerto Rico without knowing the English language. I understand the struggles and the excitement when you finally learn English as your second language. In my free time I walk and jog in the evenings, serve at St. John Catholic Church as a proclaimer of the word and in other church activities, read and love to learn more every day.

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FOCUS ON ROSWELL | SUMMER 2017

PHOTO: A proud mother, Beatriz Valentin (third from right) poses with her three children and daughters-in-law at their family reunion in January.


Personality Profile: by Molly Marley

Juliana Schaffer Halvorson

PHOTO: Juliana Schaffer Halvorson’s smiling face can often be seen helping with different organizations around town, especially working to build up MainStreet Roswell and bring more tourists to our community.

“Everything I do that I am successful in, I am only successful because of the team that works with me. I’ve been so lucky….The success we have is because of the team; it’s not just me.” In response to being asked why she sacrifices so much of her time and talents to serve her community, Juliana Schaffer Halvorson was quick to note that it is natural for her to do so, and attributed all her work to God, her friends and family. Sitting down at Stellar Coffee to discuss her overwhelming commitments in town, she was the epitome of humble. Halvorson grew up in an Air Force family. Living all over the world gave her the opportunity to experience different communities and gain a unique perspective on involvement. “That’s probably why I get along with people so well,” she acknowledged, noting that she was a bit of a tumbleweed growing up. She was raised with a heart to serve others and learned about community involvement through her parents’ example. Both of her parents were involved in Scouting and passed their passion for working with young people on to their daughter.

She eventually settled in Roswell in 1980. Her husband, John, grew up in town and was a member of Boy Scout Troop 2, even achieving the rank of Eagle Scout, the highest rank one can achieve in Scouting. When the young couple found out that Troop 2 needed a leader or faced losing the charter they have held since 1916, she and her husband stepped up to fill the roles of Assistant Troop Master and Troop Master, respectively. Later, after having two daughters of their own, their interest shifted to the Girl Scouts. Halvorson is still proud of all that she learned as a Scout. A self-proclaimed tomboy, she passed along her love of the outdoors and crafts to her girls. Her experience with the Boy and Girl Scouts has undoubtedly helped hone her artistic talents. She currently serves as vice president of marketing at Pioneer Bank and often lends her graphic design abilities to local non-profits. “I’m so grateful. I’d say I have the best job at the bank. They’re also very community oriented. I mean, it’s a community bank. Not just me, but a lot of the people and the officers there are all involved in organizations throughout the community….The way I look at it, I love my job, I love what I do, and not a lot of people can say that. But if God gives you a gift, you’ve got to use it for good. I try.”

Everything I do that I am successful in, I am only successful because of the team that works with me.

Halvorson began her graphic design career when she started working for KBIM-TV in the 1980s. She recalled the computer there being the size of a small room, and she taught herself how to create computer graphics with the machine using a number system. As her career developed, she continued learning more on whatever machine she had access to through her work environment. After teaching herself Photoshop, she took a graphic design class and even went on to teach a few classes. “I love

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teaching,” she pronounced, explaining that she and her family have quite a thirst for knowledge. “We always want to learn more.” This lifelong dedication to learning keeps her busy long after her workday ends and even earned her the President’s Volunteer Award. She is involved in countless groups in town, from the Walker Aviation Museum to MainStreet Roswell, recalling, “Oh, gosh, I don’t even know what else I’ve been involved in….everything! But I try to help when people need help.” She enjoys photography and arts and crafts and applies her hobbies to her volunteerism. “When I’m involved in these projects, even at work, it gives me an excuse to come up with something new. That’s why I love my job. It’s not monotonous; it’s something new all the time.” Those

who attended the UFO Festival may have seen her handiwork. She constructed a mister in the form of a large UFO that kept festival goers cool during those hot summer days. Halvorson spends the majority of her free time working with MainStreet Roswell. It is safe to say that she has used her skills for many events and had a hand in much of the positive change you see around town. When asked about her goals for continuing to improve Roswell, she paused to gaze out the window onto Main Street before saying, “I would like to see a more vibrant downtown.” She added that MainStreet’s stakeholders are also on board with this goal and have been working together to beautify the area, fill vacant spots which would include relocating the Walker Aviation Museum, and keep visitors coming back to Roswell.

PHOTO LEFT: Halvorson (top row, right) and her husband and Scoutmaster, John Halvorson, (top row, second from left) pose with the boys of Boy Scout Troop 2 at Camp Wehinahpay. PHOTO RIGHT: “I like to build things like that,” Halvorson proudley shared of the mister she created for the UFO Festival. “Every time you looked, people were under it cooling off.”


PRO TIPS FROM A POLICE POWER COUPLE!

Officers Scott Oldani and Tracy Oldani met while working for the Roswell Police Department in 2013. After they became friends, Scott asked Tracy her last name and realized he had issued her dad—his future father-in-law—a traffic citation a few years prior. Now the couple is offering up a few tips to keep your kids safe while they are home this summer.       

Teach your kids to memorize your phone number. Teach your kids to memorize their address. Keep emergency numbers written down and be sure your kids know where they are. Teach your kids your actual name (besides Mom/Dad) Teach your kids to not tell someone that they are home alone. Kids should not open the door to someone they don’t know. Establish a code word with your kids that only family members know so that they will know if they can trust an adult who needs to pick them up or come to the door.

NMMI STUDENTS: HEROES IN TRAINING

In the spirit of this “Hometown Heroes” issue, Focus on Roswell would like to recognize a select group of students who may not all be from Roswell but have called our town home for the past few years. This group of graduates from New Mexico Military Institute have all chosen to accept appointments from our distinguished United States military academies in pursuit of higher education and serving our great country.

Hazel Acosta – Kingshill, U.S. Virgin Islands – U.S. Naval Academy Lawson Barrett – Oxford, Mississippi – U.S. Air Force Academy Brandon Cordova – Apple Valley, Minnesota – U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Peter DeGroot – Roswell, New Mexico – U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Victoria Durand – Cape Coral, Florida – U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Kenneth Evans – Daniels, West Virginia – U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Taylor Fritz – Fairchild AFB, Washington – U.S. Air Force Academy Patrick Gabriel – Manhattan, Illinois – U.S. Air Force Academy Jacob Grass – Rothschild, Wisconsin – U.S. Naval Academy Nathaniel Huff – Ponca City, Oklahoma – U.S. Naval Academy Calvin Kim – Bellevue, Washington – U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Michael Matarazzo – Cedar Grove, New Jersey – U.S. Air Force Academy

Mitchell McHugh – Post Falls, Idaho – U.S. Military Academy at West Point Jonathan Nicklaus – Irvine, California – U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Aidan O’Sullivan – Wilmington, Delaware – U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Jacob Pinon – Roswell, New Mexico – U.S. Naval Academy Jake Schmidt – Ronkonkoma, New York – U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Jourdin Thompson – Brighton, Colorado – U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Cameron Thompson – Littleton, Colorado – West Point Prep [AOG] Dawson Tong – Colorado Springs, Colorado – U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Nicholas Valentine – Colorado Springs, Colorado – U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Dustin Wagner – Kernville, California – U.S. Air Force Academy James Walsh – Huntington, New York – U.S. Merchant Marine Academy

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1 | BABY BOOMER BUSINESS EXPO: The Eighth Annual Baby Boomer Business Expo was held on February 25 at the Roswell Convention Center. Approximately 1,500 people visited over 80 vendor booths at the Expo. (Left to right) Barbara Gomez, event coordinator; Staci Lehman, Roswell Honda; and Brooke Linthicum, Eastern New Mexico Medical Center 2 | BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Candace Lewis, executive director of the Roswell Chamber of Commerce, welcomes guests to February’s Business After Hours.

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3 | CLAUDIA BITRAN: Claudia Bitran, painter, filmmaker and Britney Spears impersonator from Chile, poses before speaking at the quarterly brunch for Young Professionals for the Arts Collective (YPAC). 4 | VALENTINE’S DANCE: A group of ENMU-Roswell students enjoy a Valentine’s Day celebration on campus that was coordinated by the staff in the president’s office and business office. 5 | RSO: Della Kate Graham (left) and Maryl McNally are all smiles at the Roswell Symphony Orchestra fundraiser. 6 | YPAC: Beverly Acha, current artist at the Roswell Artist-inResidence Program, chats with Mary Lou Andrews at the studio sale of Jean Nagai and Lilah Rose. 7 | ENMU-R BASKETBALL: The Back Again 4 X (pronounced Back Again for Ten) basketball team was victorious at the annual ENMU-R basketball tournament held in March. 8 | JOHN LEMAY: John Lemay speaks at the premiere of the short video An Introduction to the History of Roswell, New Mexico. The 20-minute feature was produced by the Historical Society for Southeast New Mexico with Donovan Fulkerson’s Relicwood Media over the course of a year and features a wealth of historic images plus interviews with Elvis E. Fleming, Morgan Nelson, Laurie Rufe and John Lemay on the history of Roswell with narration by David Gonzalez.

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9 | HSSNM TOURS: Area fourth graders get a dose of local history at the annual school tours hosted by the Historical Society for Southeast New Mexico, which welcomes over 1,000 children from Roswell and surrounding areas implementing local history and early 1900 living by doing hands-on activities such as churning butter, operating a cider press, taking a tour of the historical museum and even seeing a chuck wagon presentation. 10 |PANCAKE BREAKFAST: Kiwanis of Roswell held its 48th Annual Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast on March 11 at the Roswell Convention Center. Two members of the Roswell High School Key Club flip pancakes to build youth leadership programs in Roswell. 11 | THE GOOD DOCTOR: Don James (left) as the Father and Anisa Segura as the Madam perform in Roswell Community Little Theatre’s production of The Good Doctor, written by Neil Simon and directed by Jim Bignell. 12 | MIKE JOY: One of Roswell’s own cowpokes, Mike Joy, gave a presentation on the art of cowboy poetry and poetry reading at the Sunday Funday held in the Archives Building of the Historical Society.

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13 | KEY CLUB: Two dozen Key Club members representing Roswell High School, Goddard High School and Early College High School attend the 2017 Southwest District Key Club Convention in El Paso. Key Club is a student leadership community service club sponsored by the Roswell Kiwanis Club. 14 | CASA DOGS: The CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) dogs and their handlers celebrated the grand opening of the Cielo Grande Veterinary Center where they presented Dr. Nathan Wenner (far right) with an award of appreciation for donating their vet care. The CASA dogs help children cope with stressful situations and sit with them during court hearings. 15 | COFFEE WITH FIRST RESPONDERS: Homes for Heroes hosted Coffee with First Responders at Los Cerritos Restaurant on January 27. Roswell citizens were encouraged to come and visit with the city’s police officers and firefighters while sitting down for breakfast together. (Left to right) Lieutenant M. G. Herrington holding “Junior Deputy” Margot Marley; Liz Taylor, representing the Roswell Chamber of Commerce; RPD officers Mike Fry and Ryan Posey; and Jason Bethany, representing Ballard Funeral Home 16 | THAT 70’S DANCE: (from left to right) Laci Naranjo, Lauretta Archuleta, Eva Bradley, Kelly Smith and Ryann Putman get groovy at That 70’s Dance benefitting the Roswell Refuge.


business spotlight

Ed and Kathy Cook Photography & Music facebook.com/EdandKathyCookPhotography edandkathycookphotography.smugmug.com

FOCUS: Business name. COOK: Ed and Kathy Cook Photography & Music www.facebook.com/EdandKathyCookPhotography edandkathycookphotography.smugmug.com FOCUS: Name and title of person answering questions: COOK: Ed and Kathy Cook, owners FOCUS: How long have you been in business? COOK: Since 2010

FOCUS: Are there any tips you would tell customers to improve their experience when they visit your place of business or conduct business with you? COOK: Don’t expect to see just a photography studio or just a music studio. You will be surprised at what all we can do. If you need something and don’t see it, just ask. We can put our diversified talents to work for you! FOCUS: Please complete the following sentence:

COOK: Ed had a successful massage therapy business in Indiana but always wanted to pick up his real passion for art and photography. Kathy was teaching high school choir and was looking to move back west near her mom and dad and start a music studio.

COOK: When a customer walks into our business they can expect …A very warm and friendly greeting, a list of services we do, and as they gaze at our studio, they can experience a great visual of the work we have done which hangs on the walls of our art gallery. They can also take a tour of our music and recording studio. We have recorded several groups and individuals and can show examples of some great musicians in this town.”

FOCUS: What notable awards have you won?

FOCUS: Additional Comments:

COOK: Ed has won various awards in photography competitions throughout the years. He has been recognized as the best massage therapist for five years in a row in a poll conducted by the Terre Haute (Indiana) Tribune. Kathy has won many voice competitions throughout her career.

COOK: We are honored to be included in this addition of Focus on Roswell. Our work has brought us in contact with some of the best people in our community and we look forward to meeting many more!

FOCUS: What is the history or background of this business?

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chamber news MEET THE CHAMBER STAFF The voice of business in Chaves County since 1918!

CANDACE LEWIS

BEN ALEXANDER

LIZ TAYLOR

NAYELI SANCHEZ

Executive Director candace@roswellnm.org

131 WEST 2nd STREET • ROSWELL, NEW MEXICO 88201

1-877-849-7679 • 575-623-5695 WWW. RO SWE LLNM.ORG

Communications Coordinator liz@roswellnm.org

Membership Coordinator ben@roswellnm.org

Intern

Your Roswell Chamber of Commerce is here to work for you!

At the Chamber, it’s our business to help your business. We’re here to support you and your customers. And beyond your current customers, we want to help you find new customers and grow your business. We do that by helping you get the word out about your products and services. We’re also dedicated to making Roswell the very best place to live and visit. We work hard to relocate families to our beautiful city, and to increase retirement in Roswell. We are often the first stop for visitors on their way in, and as we greet each one of them with a smile, we encourage them to stop at all the wonderful local attractions. And as always, we partner with other organizations to promote community pride and spirit.

Our mission is to promote economic and social prosperity, assist in business development and tourism, and foster community spirit and pride.

WELCOME NEW CHAMBER MEMBERS! Roswell Chamber of Commerce is proud to welcome the following new members: JANUARY 2017 YUMMY BURGERS ZERO DEGREES

FEBRUARY 2017

ALPHA PLUMBING, INC. BELL GAS, INC. CIELO GRANDE VETERINARY CENTER DEANNA’S CUBBY GTO BEEF JERKY JEFF DIAMOND LAW FIRM JET AUTO GLASS L&S APPLIANCE

MARCH 2017

BRIAN MCDAID BUSINESS SOLUTIONS ENGSTROM EYE CENTER, LLC THOMPSON’S BOOT & SHOE REPAIR TKO SPORTS, LLC

APRIL 2017

ACCENT FLOWERS ALIEN ZONE ALTON’S POWER BLOCK GYM, INC. APPLE BLOSSOM FLOWER SHOP BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY (DAISY OLAGUEZ) DOWNTOWN NUTRITION

FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE OF NM, INC. GOMEZ LAW OFFICES HANK TOWNSEND CPA, LLC HARVARD PETROLEUM COMPANY INTERSTATE BATTERIES MARTIN’S JEWELRY MICHELET REALTY, LLC NEW LIFE CHURCH OF ROSWELL SUN LOAN COMPANY #034 UNITED RENTALS MERRILL LYNCH POINT S TIRE FACTORY SOUTHWEST BEARING CO. THE JEWELERS BENCH

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chamber news CO NG R ATULATIO N S TO THESE

CHAMBER BUSINESSES of the MONTH

(Pictured left to right) Assistant General Manager Erika Ocon, General Manager Rochelle Smiley and Director of Sales Samantha Gomez

Janet Libby and Dee Dyess, owners of House of Flowers.

FEBRUARY 2017

APRIL 2017

Congratulations to Fairfield Inn and Suites for being named Business of the Month for February 2017. Opened in June of 2013, the Fairfield Inn & Suites is owned and operated by Sunridge Hotel Group in Mesa, Arizona. General Manger Rochelle Smiley has been at Fairfield Inn & Suites for six years while Sales Manager Samantha Gomez has been there for two years. The facility has a total of 67 rooms and suites and provides such amenities as a hot breakfast and an outdoor heated pool and spa. They have a great staff with friendly service that makes their guests want to return.

The Roswell Chamber of Commerce is excited to announce House of Flowers, located at 405 W. Alameda, as our April Business of the Month. Owners Janet Libby and Dee Dyess walked us around their beautiful, multi-room flower and gift shop that was chock full of gifts for all occasions, including fruit and snack baskets, wedding memorabilia, stuffed animals, candles and more. House of Flowers has been in business for 17 years, but the building itself has actually been a flower shop since 1914.

FAIRFIELD INN & SUITES

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

The Roswell Chamber of Commerce, along with the Red Coats, attended the Habitat for Humanity of Roswell house presentation and ribbon cutting on February 16 for the Nunez/Gamez family. (Pictured left to right) Roswell Redcoats Ernie Orona, Gladys Ocoh, Gina Grado, Jerald Yingling and Elaine Dotts; Habitat for Humanity recipients Abrianna, Jennifer Nunez, Sierra, Anthony, Martin Gamez Jr, Martin; Roswell Redcoats Rhonda Johnson, Stacie Carroll, Lydia Lara, Danica McGonagle, Kim Vasquez and Susie Roe

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FOCUS ON ROSWELL | SUMMER 2017

HOUSE OF FLOWERS

CABLE ONE GIGAONE

Cable ONE held their ribbon cutting event and launch party on March 10 for GigaONE internet service for Roswell. This new service is super fast. Once you try it, you will be hooked! (Pictured left to right) Gladys Ocon, Lydia Lara , Gina Grado, Clarissa Gonzalez Adams, April Avitia, Clint Raby, Bianca Olvera, David Gonzolez, John Gosch, Cindy Kuntz, Sam Jimenez, Mike Lopez, Eric Garlinger, Freddy Washington, Rhonda Johnson, Kim Vasquez, Gerald Yingling, Yuki Ebara, Susie Roe


DEANNA’S CUBBY

DeAnna’s Cubby celebrated a grand reopening at their new location on March 4. They are now located at 1400 W. Second Street, Suite N in Monterrey Plaza. DeAnna’s Cubby carries a wide variety of accessories from sunglasses and shoes to handbags and hairbows. They even carry a selection of glass tobacco pipes. (Pictured left to right) Redcoats Kim Vasquez and Elaine Dotts; owner DeAnna Price, granddaughter Savannah Price and husband Jim Price; Redcoats Stacie Carrol and Sandra Stewart

ALBERTSON’S

Albertsons Market celebrated the completion of a newly remodeled store at 900 West 2nd Street in Roswell with a ribbon cutting ceremony and check presentation on April 5. Guests will benefit from enhanced and increased food service offerings, new fresh bakery items and an expanded produce section. The store has been reorganized to accommodate upgrades throughout, including a new décor package and new point-of-sale and cash register systems. To mark the occasion, the United Family made a charitable gift to Harvest Ministries of Roswell.  Albertsons Market is a grocery store that strives to be the favorite food and drug retailer in every market it serves. Stores can be found in 11 communities, including Midland and Odessa, Texas as well as Alamogordo, Albuquerque, Carlsbad, Clovis, Hobbs, Roswell, Ruidoso, Santa Fe and Taos, New Mexico. Albertsons Market is operated by the United Family, a Texas-based grocery chain that has 92 stores in Texas and New Mexico under five unique brands: United Supermarkets, Market Street, Amigos, Albertsons Market and United Express. The United Family is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Albertsons Companies. For more information, please visit www.albertsonsmarket.com.

DOWNTOWN NUTRITION

On April 22, the Roswell Chamber of Commerce and the Redcoats celebrated Downtown Nutrition’s grand opening and ribbon cutting at 113 E. Third Street. Daniel and Tammy Ramirez, Herbalife distributors, offer targeted core nutrition for men and women, health and wellness profiles and many options for nutritional meals and community fit camps. Downtown Nutrition carries healthy shake meal replacements, teas and bars at their Roswell location. (Pictured left to right) Roswell Redcoats Rhonda Johnson, Stacie Carroll, Hervey Gilliland and Kim Purcell; Herbalife Distributors Daniel, Tammy and Isaiah Ramirez; Redcoats Gladys Ocon, Gary Thrine, Sandra Stewart and Kim Vasquez

INTERIM HEALTHCARE

TKO SPORTS

On April 8, Randy Smith, the new owner of TKO Sports, celebrated a ribbon cutting event with the Roswell Redcoats and the Roswell Chamber of Commerce. Smith took over the business this year and merged with TKO Vapor. TKO Sports carries sports apparel, banners, towels, caps, throw blankets, jerseys and sunglasses. They also carry eCigs with assorted flavors. Something interesting that you may not know is that Smith has customized a program to help his customers stop smoking! Go by the Roswell Mall and check out TKO Sports. (Pictured left to right) Redcoats Kim Vasquez, Rhonda Johnson, Anjy Cooper, Susie Roe and Elaine Dotts; Andrew Smith, Randy Smith, April Smith, Ernie Montoya, Clara Smith, Andrew Romero, Brook Smith; Redcoats Lydia Lara, Gladys Ocoh and Hervey Gilland

We celebrated Interim Healthcare’s Grand Reopening and Ribbon Cutting at 500 N. Main # 902 on April 25. Interim Health Care has been part of the Roswell Community for the last eight years. Vicki Waltrop recently joined the Interim family. Interim Healthcare provides home health services to include skilled nursing, physical and occupational therapy, speech therapy and home health aides. (Redcoats) Gary Thrine, Andrea Moore, Stacie Carroll, Kim Vasquez, Rhonda Johnson, Clarissa Gonzalez Adams, Susie Roe, Gina Grado, Danica McGonagle, Hervey Gilliland and Lydia Lara. (Back row, Interim Health Care staff) Adrianna Carrillo, Twilla Rutter, Jaime Noriega, Vicki Waltrop, Doris Redding, Dr. Michael Roffers, Jennifer Bullard, Marlisa Bevers-Walls, Jim Bullard and Trevor Ivy

SUMMER 2017 | A COMMUNITY MAGAZINE

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Our new OB/GYN has same-day appointments often available. Call 575-624-4646.

At A New Era OB/GYN Specialists, we provide compassionate and comprehensive care for women. Our specialists provide pregnancy management, gynecologic services for women of all ages, plus well-woman care. Same-day appointments are often available. Call 575-624-4646 or request an appointment online at EasternNewMexicoMedicalGroup.com.

Preventive and Obstetrics Care

Well-woman visits • Breast cancer screenings • Cervical cancer screenings • Comprehensive prenatal care Vaginal/cesarean delivery • Breastfeeding support & lactation consulting Hormone replacement therapy & replacement alternatives • Abdominal & vaginal surgery

INTRODUCING Jane McMillan, M.D., FACOG OB/GYN

Michael Nowak, D.O. OB/GYN

A New Era OB/GYN Specialists 350 W. Country Club Rd., Suite 203 • Roswell, NM 88201

575-624-4646

Focus on Roswell Summer 2017  
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