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Contents Table of

focusplantcity.com / Issue 17-10 / October 2018

LOCAL

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Plant City’s stories this month include pageant crownings, A Taste of Laura Street, 2018 Diamonds and Denim, and the release of The City Saints’ first CD. We celebrate honors bestowed to some of Plant City’s finest citizens, including the Plant City Fire Rescue and Dr. Donald Humphrey.

SPOTLIGHT

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Meet Zach Glaros, the creator of Sir Henry’s Haunted Trail on Plant City’s Frontage Road. His love for the quintessential Halloween is the creative inspiration behind his spooky seasonal attraction. Glaros has partnered with Ominous Descent to present I-4 Premier Fear Park each weekend in October.

F E AT U R E

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Dancing with the Locals, hosted by the Plant City Rotary Club, is one of fall’s most popular local events. Meet the ten couples competing for the Mirror Ball Trophy, while raising money for the community. Learn more about their journey to the dance floor.

Featured Writer

Anthony Bolesta Born in Miami, Anthony Bolesta moved with his parents to Plant City in 1993. Currently a licensed EMT and freelance writer for FOCUS, he has been working on a Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Management with plans to work in the field as he pursues a future Master’s and possibly Doctorate degree. Having worked for Focus for a little over three years, Anthony enjoys learning about his community’s history and appreciates this rare opportunity to gain knowledge he would otherwise not encounter. For someone who wants to be a lifelong learner, it’s a wonderful job.

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BUSINESS

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Master Craft Memorials has provided families with beautiful lasting memories of their loved ones for over 40 years with the belief that families help families in times of need. Master Craft Memorials credits the support of Plant City residents for their success.

DINING

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Fazoli’s owners, Terri and Livingston Chatman, brought the casual Italian on-the-go brand to Plant City in early 2018. From pizza to salad, to signature pasta, Fazoli’s has something for everyone. With generous portions, Fazoli’s is committed to offering fresh and delicious Italian fare at a great value.


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From The Publisher The last quarter of the year is always packed with fun, family activities for Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas. One thing is for certain, the Winter Strawberry Capitol community is never lacking in things to do. And it’s a wonderful thing when folks discover their passion and connect it to their work. Publisher Mike Floyd - mikef@floydpublications.com Office Manager Candy Owens - cowens@floydpublications.com Account Manager Chris Stovall - chris@floydpublications.com Account Manager Chandler Workman - chandler@floydpublications.com Managing Editor Cierra Craft - cierra@floydpublications.com Art Director Anthony Sassano - asassano@floydpublications.com

This month we’re pleased to share the community invite from Shiloh Baptist Church as they honor Pastor Joe Bowles for his 40 years of service in leading the congregation where he was baptized, ordained, and married. Talk about faithfulness! This much-admired husband, father of five, former public school teacher and current baseball coach is now ministering to the third generation in many of the families he’s served over four decades. If you’d like to celebrate with him, read the story inside and mark your calendar now for Sunday, October 21.

Distribution Tony DeVane Staff Writers Cheryl Johnston | Barbara Routen | Kelli Tharrington Sherrie Mueller | Anthony Bolesta | Cierra Craft Contributors Gil Gott | Jo-An Lusk | Nate Davis | Candy Owens Natalie Sweet | Wanda Anderson | Heather Davis | Layla Keeler Drawdy

Got a story idea? Looking to advertise in Focus? Contact us for more information. Floyd Publications, Inc. 702 W. Dr. MLK Jr. Blvd.Plant City, FL 33563 Office 813.707.8783 Fax 813.764.0990

Keep the pencil handy to add other examples of faithfulness and creativity in the October issue. These include the nighttime Halloween fun at Sir Henry’s Haunted Trail, plans to salute our Veterans, and the pottery already being shaped by Hillsborough County school students for the upcoming 8th Annual Empty Bowls Project, a major fundraiser for the United Food Bank of Plant City. In addition to passion, it takes grit and determination to accomplish longevity with your mission, be it work, hobby, or in service to others. Our town is filled with people who’ve contributed so much time, energy and money into making Plant City an amazing place to live. Please know also how much our staff and writers appreciate your faithfulness in reading, sharing stories, and advertising for the last 17 years. Building a legacy is a daily effort and it really does “take a village” to get the job done.

www.focusplantcity.com Standards of accuracy: The goal of the writers at FOCUS Magazine is to provide heart-warming stories that are accurate from the start. Being human, however, we sometimes make mistakes. Please forgive us. So if you notice anything that is incorrect, then please do not hesitate to contact the editorial department and inform it about the fact error. To do so, call (813) 707-8783 or e-mail editorial@floydpublications.com. The staff will fix the error in a timely manner. FOCUS Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Plant City businesses, restaurants and many local venues. Advertisers warrant and represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. Focus Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All letters and their contents sent to Focus Magazine become the sole property of Floyd Publications, Inc and may be reproduced thereof. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Floyd Publications, Inc. Use or duplication of material used in this publication is prohibited without approved written consent from Floyd Publications, Inc.

Warmest Regards, Mike Floyd PAGE

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Town Talk of the

Submit your good news to: editorial@floydpublications.com or call it in 813.707.8783

A groundbreaking ceremony for Fire Station #3 was held Sept. 21. The new fire station will enhance Plant City Fire Rescue’s service and response to those in need. The new fire station will serve the northern region of the city. City officials were joined by Fire Chief Burnett and members of PCFR for the ceremony.

Plant City Photo Archives & History Center hosted a joint WUSF Public Media / University of South Florida Advanced Journalism course project for the WUSF “History Matters” program. Fifteen journalism students interviewed Plant City residents including William Thomas, Jr., Jodi Stevens, and Nate Kilton. The joint project was organized by Mark Schreiner, Assistant News Director, WUSF Public Media; Gil Gott, Executive Director, Plant City Photo Archives & History Center; Stephanie Colombini, WUSF Public Media, Florida Matters Producer, Reporter; and Jeanette Abrahamsen, Visiting Instructor, University of South Florida.

K.E.Y Beauty and Esthetics is running a special for October and November only! Mention K.E.Y. Beauty and Esthetics’ FOCUS ad and receive either 10% off any beauty service with Erin or ask Kristie about Hydrofacial for $99, White Pumpkins and Clove Signature Facial for $64 or free dermaplaning with any facial. Now through Nov. 15! PAGE

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Clogging Connection recently appeared on Great Day Live by WTSP Channel 10 News. The group was featured on the news segment due to their status as a nationally-ranked clogging team. This year, Clogging Connection competed in the USA National Clogging Championships and the Dollywood Clogging Classic in Tennessee. Locals can catch Clogging Connection at several upcoming events including The Florida Opry, Hillsborough County Fair, Plant City Pig Jam and the Chilifest. Back Pocket Recording Studio in Plant City has officially opened. Located at 1514 S. Alexander Street, Suite 204 in The Oaks Plaza. As a full-service studio, Back Pocket offers recording/tracking, editing, mixing, mastering and production. The studio is equipped with state-of-the-art audio recording equipment to provide the best sound quality for projects of all sizes and genres of music.

FOUND ON FACEBOOK: HCSO Deputy Victor Vasquez was named Hispanic Deputy of the Year. Dep. Vasquez has served over 20 years as a School Resource Office. On Oct. 4, he spoke with Bay News 9 about his the honor and his job at Tomlin Middle School. Congrats, Deputy Vasquez!

Plant City’s newest dog grooming and boarding business welcomes furry friends of all breeds to Shampooches at 115 Prosser Drive. Shampooches offers boarding, teeth cleaning, grooming and baths, and free nail clippings. Plant City welcomes Shampooches and their worry-free environment for your beloved fur babies. 1916 Irish Pub is offering a special Gridiron Menu! $25 Wing Platters, $2 domestic drafts, $4 craft beers for all NFL games! Enjoy Duke’s Brunette, Bud Light, Yuengling, or Michelob ULTRA on game day. Select flatbreads, sandwiches and shareables available every Monday, Thursday and Sunday.


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LOCAL

Twenty contestants compete for the crown BY TARYN STORTER

Olivia Frazier crowns 2018 Harvest Queen, Christina Wellens

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he 2018 Hillsborough County Harvest Queen Pageant was held on Sept. 22 at 5 p.m. Twenty beautiful girls graced the stage with the hope of being selected as a 2018 Harvest Queen. Florida FFA Area V Vice President Jake Fitzpatrick and 2011 Senior Harvest Queen Morgan Boykin served as the master and mistress of ceremonies, respectively. The contestants participated in three areas of competition. In the first phase, contestants wore their pageant shirts and jeans to introduce themselves to the judges and the audience. In the second stage, the girls wore their choice of outfit for casual wear and answered a question about the county fair, as well as the world today. Finally, the contestants showcased beautiful evening gowns of all colors and graced the stage. After the preliminary competition, Next Radical Generation filled the hall with their powerful melodies.

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The group sang hits “Shake it off” by Taylor Swift, Camp Rock’s “This is Me,” and “The Greatest Show” from the film of the same name. The pageant resumed with a slideshow, commemorating the 2017 Senior Harvest Queen Olivia Frazier, and 2017 Junior Harvest Queen Taryn Storter. This emotional presentation showed events that the pair participated in, such as the County Commissioner’s meeting, Cupcakes and Queens, the Florida Strawberry Festival Grand Parade, and more. The 2017 Queens then gave their farewell addresses, thanking their families, the fair, and pageant director Mrs. Kelli Messick. In the end, Christina Wellen was selected as the Senior Harvest Queen and Bridget McLaughlin was chosen as the Junior Harvest Queen. In the Senior Division, Morgan Nolan was named the second runner-up, and Jessica Tillis was named the first runner-up. In the Junior Division, Fallon Lanteigne was chosen as

the second runner-up, and Hannah Simmons was the first runnerup. Miss Photogenic in the Senior division was Christina Wellen and Fallon Lanteigne was named Miss Photogenic in the junior division. Christina Wellen is a Junior at Seffner Christian Academy. She enjoys playing volleyball and softball. Christina is a member of the Hillsborough County Volunteer Teen Court. Upon graduation, she plans to study business and pursue a degree in law. Bridget McLaughlin is in the 8th grade at Christ the King. Her hobbies include rowing, rock climbing, and spending time with her friends. Bridget serves with the Sean Devereaux service club and plays competitive volleyball. After high school, Bridget plans to become a doctor specializing in concussion research. The pageant committee put together a beautiful night for all to enjoy. This committee consists of committee chair Kelli Messick, 2016 Harvest Queen Amber Boykin, Jennifer Boykin, 2011 Harvest Queen Morgan Boykin, Krissie Dilley, Reagan Messick, 2014 Harvest Queen Shelby St. Amant, and Whitney St. Amant. Each of these ladies put their heart into orchestrating this pageant each year.

The committee added a very special way for the girls and their families to serve the community. Those who attended the pageant were asked to donate blankets to be given to cancer patients at Moffitt Cancer Center. This was to honor the 2017 Junior Harvest Queen, Taryn Storter, as her father died from Leukemia six years ago. Over 40 blankets were collected the night of the pageant. Those who donated blankets received a free ticket to get into the Hillsborough County Fair in October. Kelli Messick believes strongly in leading these young girls in community service. When asked about the year to come, Messick said: “I have formed a special bond with the past queens and I am looking forward to getting to know our brand-new queens better. Throughout this next year, we will be together a lot. I am so excited to spend time with them and begin planning their year of reign.” Located at 215 Sydney Washer Road, enjoy the Hillsborough County Fair from Oct. 18-21 and 25-28 to see the 2018 Harvest Queens in their kingdom. There will be plenty of “Good Times and Country Rhymes” to be had by all. For more information about the fair and ticketing, visit hillsboroughcountyfair. com.

Photography by Shana Mitchell Photography

2018 Hillsborough County Fair Harvest Queen Pageant

Left to Right: 2018 Harvest Queens Senior Queen Christina Wellens and Junior Queen Bridget McLaughlin


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Movement is vitally important to overall health. Physical activity not only helps reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes and even some cancers, it also strenghthens our bones and muscles. As we age, the health of our bones and muscles--also known as our musculoskeletal system--is especially important in reducing the frequency and severity of back pain as well as preventing falls and other injuries that can lead to disability and limit our ability to engage in work and other daily activities. Back pain remains one of the most prevalent and disabling conditions worldwide. It is one of the most common reasons that patients visit their doctors, and one of the most common conditions for which doctors prescribe opioid pain medications. Since the overuse and abuse of prescription opioid painkillers in the United States remains a top public health problem, it’s essential for health care consumers and providers to understand that spinal adjustment and other conservative approaches has with documentation shown to be valuable by treating musculoskeletal conditions such as low back pain safely and effectively.

Give Us A Call! Dr. Brenda Dukes • Chiropractic Physician 752-2524 • 2401 Walden Woods Dr. • Plant City, FL 33566 www.dukeschiropractichealth.com

Dr. Dukes encourages you to write her with any questions concerning chiropractic care. PAGE

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LOCAL

Thankful for the Support of the Community Antioch Feed & Farm Supply hosts Customer Appreciation Day

BY ANTHONY BOLESTA

conversation; most in attendance were friends and neighbors, truly showing that Antioch Feed and Farm supply is something of a cultural hub for the locals. Some even played cornhole with one another and others ate lunch as the chats filled the area. Lunch was also courtesy of the folks of Antioch Feed and Farm Supply, who prepared plenty of hot dogs and chips to go around. Watson says she loves that the community feels welcomed at the store. “I love it, but I’m from Antioch; I grew up a few minutes down the road from here [Antioch Feed and Farm Supply],” said Watson. “I love

the small town feel where people in the neighborhood come and hang out in the store.” The really special thing about events like these are the little details one might miss: Seeing friends, some knowing one another for their entire lifetime. The Antioch community spent the day together, gathering to show camaraderie and appreciation for one another. The people of Antioch Feed and Farm supply and their customers have the all too rare privilege of having more than a business-only relationship. They have a community that values one another.

Crowds gathered around the storefront in anticipation for drawings and lunch service.

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ntioch Feed and Farm Supply, which is located at 12650 McIntosh Road in Thonotosassa, is described by many customers and visitors as a business with a “very knowledgeable staff who are just the friendliest people”. This appreciation goes both ways, and the folks at Antioch Feed and Farm Supply held Customer Appreciation Day on Oct. 6. The event honored customers with feed, prizes and sale items. The morning began with free coffee and donuts, as visitors strolled through the vendor booths on site. These vendors offered items such as handmade jewelry, crafts for Halloween festivities, as well as brownies. Additionally, an old fashioned pink and yellow lemonade stand was set up providing refreshments for customers. PAGE

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During lunch, Antioch staff drew names to giveaway raffle prizes. These prizes were in the form of dog products, vitamin and supplements for a healthier lifestyle, Ultra Shield fly spray as well as other pest removal products, and a water and feeder for chickens. Tonya Watson, an employee of Antioch Feed and Farm Supply, says the annual event drew more than 100 people. She says Antioch Customer Appreciation Day is important because without the support of the community, the farm store wouldn’t exist. “Without customers, you wouldn’t have a job, there wouldn’t be a store,” said Watson. “We love our customers and we have regulars we see almost everyday.” After the raffle, some customers remained and engaged in casual

Drawings were held to give attendees a chance to win great prizes as part of Customer Appreciation Day

Vendors were on site with crafts, including these Halloween decor items.


LOCAL

Shiloh Baptist Church Invites All to Honor Pastor Joe Bowles for 40 Years of Service Community Invited to Celebration BY CHERYL JOHNSTON

Pastor Joe and Susan Bowles

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hiloh Baptist Church welcomes all to its Oct. 21 celebration honoring Pastor Joe Bowles for his 40 years of service. The special service will include music, shared stories, a great message and plenty of smiles. Following the service, the fun will continue with lunch and fellowship. Michael Stevens, Student Pastor at Shiloh, cherishes the privilege he’s had over the past 12 years of “serving alongside Bro. Joe.” “I have never met a more hardworking, kind-hearted pastor who is so loved throughout our community,” said Stevens. “He has always been willing to make hospital visits and perform funerals and weddings for people who don’t attend Shiloh. One of the best lessons I have learned underneath his leadership is ‘If you are going to err, err on the side of grace.’" Music Pastor, Mark Willis, agrees. “It has been a pleasure to call Brother Joe my boss, fellow minister, and friend for the last 13 years. He truly exemplifies Christ. We hope many will join us in honoring his 40-year milestone and his heart for people here.”

“The history of my life is right here,” shared Pastor Bowles, who moved from Indiana to Plant City at age two. “I was baptized, ordained and married at Shiloh.” After his Plant City High School graduation, his education included degrees from University of South Florida and New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He taught high school and was a social worker before accepting the call to lead the church in May of 1978. He credits his “wonderful wife” Susan for her essential roles as church secretary and in ministry development while scheduling their family with five children—Brittany, Lindsay, Bailey, Kelsey, and Evan. In his spare time, he enjoys coaching baseball and the occasional round of golf. “I love my work and ministry,” Pastor Bowles explained. “Every facet is still rewarding to me and especially the many lifelong friendships made through the years. I am so thankful to be raising my own family and pastoring others through multiple generations in Plant City. This is home, for sure.” PAGE

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LOCAL

2019 Plant City High School

Calendar Girl BY SHERRIE MUELLER | PHOTOS BY JENNIFER HAMILTON

Thirty-three beautiful junior and senior girls graced the stage in the Plant City High School Auditorium on Saturday, Sept. 22, 2018, to compete for the coveted honor of being selected as a 2019 Calendar Girl. The event was sponsored by the PCHS Athletic Booster Club and Mr. Dan Coton, Treasurer, welcomed the excited crowd. Miss Kelsey Brown, 2012 Cover Girl, served as the Mistress of Ceremony. During the preliminary competition, contestants modeled an evening gown of their choice as a list of their activities and community service was read. Twenty girls were selected as semifinalists and included: Alondra Silva, Lily Batley, Madison Cruz, Ashlyn Banks, Kaily Yacinich, Elizabeth Fuqua, Aniella Hernandez, Lainee Meyer, Lizett Arriaga, Emma Miller, Carley Cotnoir, Regan Messick, Jade’a Broome, Haley Frangioni, Kayla Hernandez, Mary-Catherine Stephens, Alexandra Fryer, Kyla Varnum, Kennedy Sapp and Katherine Ruppert. Mr. Coton announced that Madison Cruz was the Top Ad Seller among the contestants and will receive a Mini Photo Shoot with photographer Deanna Hurley. Ms. Hurley is the 2019 pageant and calendar photographer. Madison sold $2,700 in total ads. All proceeds from the pageant will go to support the PCHS Athletic Department. The semifinalists were brought back to the stage individually and asked the question, “What is something you have done during your high school career that you are most proud of? All previous scores had been eliminated. Upon answering the question, the contestants walked the stage again, giving the judges one last look. While scores were being tallied the 2018 Calendar Girls were introduced. The 2018 Calendar Girls are Rachel Stevens, Charlotte Yang, Luz Maria Contreras, Reagan Tears, Anna Futch, Abigail Shane, Kennedy Cullins, Madilyn Conrad, Reagan Brown, Brenda Dixon, Dallas Baker Lillian Oliver and Cover Girl, Kendall Gaudens. Lillian Oliver, Miss December, was not at the pageant and was recognized for being in basic training to serve in the United States Air Force. A slideshow prepared by Cover Girl Kendall’s mom, Melissa Gaudens, gave highlights of the year’s activities. PAGE

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When the scores from the out of town judges were totaled, the results were given to the pageant emcee to announce the 2019 Calendar Girls. Miss Brown called out the names beginning with Miss December and continued through the months before disclosing the identity of the 2019 Cover Girl. The Plant City High School Calendar Girls are: Miss December, Emma Miller Miss November, Kyla Varnum Miss October, Kaily Yacinich Miss September, Jade’a Broome Miss August, Alondra Silva Miss July, Haley Frangioni Miss June, Mary-Catherine Stephens Miss May, Lizett Arriaga Miss April, Katherine Ruppert Miss March, Kayla Hernandez Miss February, Lily Batley Miss January, Kennedy Sapp 2019 Cover Girl, Alexandra Fryer At the conclusion of the competition, Danna Coton, Chairman of the Calendar Girl Pageant, reflected: All of the contestants were lovely, gracious and poised young ladies. It was my pleasure to work with them. Their parents should be proud and I hope it was a fun experience for all, regardless of the outcome. It takes so much courage to walk across that stage and we are very proud of them. The pageant dates back to the early 1970’s, so this is a long-standing Plant City High School tradition. Congratulations to all thirty-three beautiful young ladies who participated in the Pageant. Best wishes to the thirteen finalists who were selected to represent PCHS as 2019 Calendar Girls. These lovely ladies will have an opportunity to represent their school and our community at local events. Enjoy your year!


LOCAL

PCHS Cover Girl: Alexandra Fryer

Miss January Kennedy Sapp

Miss February Lily Batley

Miss March Kayla Hernandez

Miss April Katherine Ruppert

Miss May Lizett Arriaga

Miss June Mary-Catherine Stephens

Miss July Haley Frangioni

Miss August Alondra Silva

Miss September Jade'a Broome

Miss October Kaily Yacinich

Miss November Kyla Varnum

Miss December Emma Miller PAGE

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LOCAL

The City Saints Release Their First CD BY CHERYL JOHNSTON

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he sanctuary where City Pointe Church members worship each week was abuzz with anticipation on the night of Sept. 21 at the release party for the first CD by The City Saints. Plant City locals Cliff Brown and Edgar DeJesus describe their “Standing in the Fire” album’s title song as “The heart of worship meets mainstream dance music with heavy bass and an anthem proclaiming new life in Christ.” The band is excited to see what God will do to share the Gospel through the musical gifts He has given them. Prior to their appearance that evening, Roy Tosh, a featured artist on the title song, presented his music and rap-style worship message as well. Three other songs round out the band’s first album: Firefly, Nothing Can Stop Us Now, and Mercy Rising. Mixed, mastered and recorded at Five 5 Studios in Plant City, Brown and DeJesus served as Executive Producers. The cover also includes thanks to City Pointe Church for its sponsorship of the project. During their original song “Mercy Rising” that evening, Brown shared a portion of his testimony. He explained, “I was a heathen. Anyone who knew

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me in high school knows I ran hard…I grew up in and out of church…going to church, going to the altar, loving God and wanting to know Him more, but could never beat my sin. Every Sunday I’d go to church and just cry my eyes out. I’d ask God to forgive me. Then I would do OK for a day or two and read my Bible for a few days and go right back into sin.” He reminded the audience about Romans 5:8, saying, “God died for you, not when you cleaned up your life, but right in the middle of your mess… God doesn’t want you to play games with your salvation.” “Reach out for Him,” he added. “Give Him your sins. Tell Him, ‘I want Your life.’ [Because] There is no life outside of His.” Several video clips on the group’s Facebook page paint the vision as well. “City Saints is a project not just about us. It’s about you,” the duo encourages. “You are City Saints. Our heart, our dream, our purpose is to see lives changed by the gospel of Jesus Christ! That no matter what you have been through, or where you are... there is a God that loves you and is calling you... right now. It only takes one person to spark a revival and change a generation!”


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Kiwanis Club presents awards, installs 2018 officers BY CIERRA CRAFT

Lt. Governor-Elect Janet Daigle inducted Gil Gott as 2018 Kiwanis Club President. Gott was also awarded for Perfect Attendance, Distinguished Service and named Kiwanian of the Year at the Sept. 20 event.

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he Kiwanis Club of Plant City celebrated the achievements of its members and installed new officers on Sept. 20 at the Plant City Photo Archives. The night began with a dinner provided by the Plant City Black Heritage organization, followed by the award presentation. Moody recognized Plant City Kiwanians who have earned Legion of Honor Award, given to recognize individuals for years of membership in the Kiwanis Club. The Legion of Honor Award were presented to Mac Smith- 60 years, Dr. Scotty Huang44 years, Don Walden- 43 years, Jim McDaniel- 30 years, Anna Reitz-26 years, Ken Hawthorne-26 years, Ed Verner- 26 years, and Ken Gibbs for 21 years. Gil Gott was named Kiwanian of the Year for his dedication to the

organization. Gott, Huang, McDaniel and Moody were also recognized for Perfect Attendance at club meetings. Gott, Reitz and Moody, along with Teresa Armbruster and Heather Coats were honored with Distinguished Service Awards. The 2018-2019 Officer Installation was presented by Lieutenant Governor-Elect Janet Daigle. Daigle installed new officers with a pinning ceremony. The 2018-2019 Kiwanis Club of Plant City officer board is President Gil Gott, President-Elect Zach Hilferding, Treasurer Jim McDaniel, Secretary Keri Kozicki and Past President Sharon Moody. Congratulate these Kiwanians on their appointment to office and for a successful 2017-2018 calendar of events. PAGE

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LOCAL

Dr. Donald Humphrey Honored Lifetime Achievement Award 2018 BY CHERYL JOHNSTON

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ongratulations to Dr. Donald Humphrey! At its annual convention in July, the Florida Optometric Association presented the Plant City optometrist with its Lifetime Achievement Award. Dr. Humphrey began his 46 years of practice in Plant City when the late Dr. C. Glynn Capps offered him an associate’s position in 1972. Next came a seven-year period in private practice before he and Dr. Michael Maggard formed their EyeCare of Plant City partnership in 1990 and worked 27 years together. Dr. Humphrey and his wife Mary are now enjoying his retirement after the practice was sold in August 2017. He continues to work one day weekly at the Tampa location. Born in Wauchula, Dr. Humphrey moved to Plant City with his parents at age one. The 1964 Plant City High School graduate earned his B.A. in Zoology from the University of South Florida in 1968 before accomplishing his O.D. from the Southern College of Optometry in Memphis, Tennessee in 1972. Over the years, the communityminded Dr. Humphrey was involved in the Plant City community through leadership in organizations such as the Jaycees, East Hillsborough Historical Society, Jackson Elementary School PTA, Lions Club, Central Florida Lions Eye Bank, Arts Council, Chamber of Commerce (Director, 1986-89), American Cancer Society, USF Alumni Association- Plant City chapter, and Sons of the American

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Revolution- Maj. John DeVane Chapter, Plant City. Professionally, he served the Florida Optometric Association in numerous offices, including Chairman of the Board (1991-92). Among many other community, state, and national recognitions, Dr. Humphrey was named as Plant City’s Outstanding Citizen of the Year in 2012. In his free time, Dr. Humphrey enjoys spending time with family and traveling to the Carolinas. “Retirement is quite a bit different than being in full-time practice,” he shared, but spending time with our five grandchildren, who range in age from 4-11 years, is great fun. We also like to visit one of our favorite places, the North Carolina mountains.” Of the statewide recognition, Dr. Humphrey shared, “I was surprised and felt very honored to receive this award because there are so many deserving optometrists in our state. I also realized it’s amazing how time flies when you enjoy what you’re doing.” His future plans include continued involvement with the First United Methodist Church, the Lions Club, and the Sons of the American Revolution. “I like history and historical efforts and feel it’s important to keep our history alive,” he said. “and I will always enjoy interacting with the wonderful people of Plant City. I appreciated the loyalty my patients showed and the chance to serve three generations in some of those families.”

Dr. Donald Humphrey, recipient of the Florida Optometric Association’s 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award, retired recently after 46 years of helping folks have their best vision.

Regarding his work, he reminisced, “I always loved watching children get excited about having their vision corrected by glasses or contacts. I felt like I was helping them in their school years so they could learn more.

They made an impression on my life, too. To help people see better and have a better life made my job not seem like work. It was a joy to me. Plant City has been the perfect place to have a practice of any kind.”


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LOCAL

22nd Annual Diamonds & Denim A Night Filled with Great Food and Fun BY SHERRIE MUELLER

Margaret Stevens and Judy Martin, both retired from SFBH, share a laugh as they volunteer their time at the popular Diamonds & Denim.

Olan Stephens, Mark Yarbrough, Lori Yarbrough, Jason Conrad and Joel Connell are avid supporters of South Florida Baptist Hospital and the Diamonds & Denim event.

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he 22nd Annual Diamonds & Denim gala, sponsored by the South Florida Baptist Hospital Foundation, offered a night filled with fun and delicious food. The popular event attracted more than 600 people who enjoyed the opportunity of interacting with friends while browsing the vast silent auction display and visiting multiple food stations filled with incredible crowd favorites. Kim McElveen chaired the gala with the help of vice chairs, Marsha Passmore and Debi Peacock. The ladies were assisted by a committee of volunteers including: Carmen Brownlee, Erika Connell, Frank Cummings, Jean Ann Davenport, Kayla Drawdy, Lisa Galloway, Sylvia Knox, Sherrie Mueller, Glenda Raulerson, Bruce Rodwell, Margaret Rodwell, Rhett Rollyson, Tina Sikes, Mikie Snyder, Phil Waldron, Faye Wetherington and Lori Yarbrough. Jana Butler, the Executive Director of the South Florida Baptist Hospital Foundation, along with Lisa Gullinese, Foundation Coordinator,

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contributed to the planning efforts. Reverend Gary Shepherd, Chaplain of the hospital, offered the invocation and Rhett Rollyson, Foundation Board member, welcomed the crowd. Karen Kerr, South Florida Baptist Hospital President, thanked the large gathering for their support of the hospital. “What makes Diamonds & Denim so special is that it is a laidback casual event that is fun, not stuffy,” said Rollyson. “We raise a lot of money for a great cause and have fun doing it!” The guests are encouraged to wear jeans in keeping with the Diamonds & Denim theme. Many of the guests contributed for a chance to win a diamond ring, a Carnival cruise and the 50/50 drawing. Jeanne Knotts was the happy winner of the cruise through the new “Unlock Your Dreams” game where each participant purchased a key to attempt to unlock a cage holding the cruise tickets. Mary Bess Thompson had luck

go her way for the second time as her ticket was drawn for the Diamond ring, donated by Brown’s Jewelers. She was the recipient of a ring two years ago at the event. Lori Yarbrough, Chair of the new “Unlock Your Dreams” game, enthusiastically shared, “Diamonds and Denim is my favorite event of the year! It’s relaxed, has amazing food and is a great way to raise money for our local hospital.” All in attendance seemed to enjoy

the casual evening spent with friends and family. The committee extends a special thank you to Advanced Care Hospitalists for being the Presenting Sponsor of the 2018 Diamonds & Denim. For more information on future events hosted by the South Florida Baptist Hospital Foundation, call Jana Butler, 813-757-1277. It is exciting to imagine what will be offered at the 23rd Annual Diamonds and Denim to be held in September 2019.

2018 Diamonds & Denim Committee Front: Sherrie Mueller, Rhett Rollyson 1st row (seated): Marsha Passmore, Debi Peacock, Kim McElveen, Erika Connell, Mikie Snyder, Sylvia Knox, Kayla Drawdy 2nd row: Lisa Gullinese, Jean Ann Davenport, Faye Wetherington, Glenda Raulerson, Margaret Rodwell, Lisa Galloway Back row: Jana Butler, Frank Cummings, Phil Waldron, Tina Sikes, Carmen Brownlee, Lori Yarbrough, Bruce Rodwell


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LOCAL

Janie L. Bing owned the Seminole Restaurant, which sat at Laura and Allen streets. Mrs. Bing’s restaurant and the Bing Rooming House, owned by Mrs. Bing and her husband, E.L. Bing, anchored the historical African American business district to the area along the cross streets. Photo provided by Improvement League of Plant City

Past and present woven together at “A Taste of Laura Street” The inaugural event celebrated historical ambiance, culinary excellence BY CIERRA CRAFT

O

n Saturday, Sept. 22, the Improvement League of Plant City hosted “A Taste of Laura Street,” a cultural event highlighting the historical significance and economic development of the once bustling business district along Laura Street. During the segregation era, a physician practice, eateries, and other minority-owned businesses thrived in the former Lincoln Park neighborhood. The Bing Rooming House offered overnight accommodations for black professionals during the era of segregation. The Bing Rooming House and Ms. Bing’s Seminole Restaurant anchored the African American business district to Laura and Allen streets. These

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structures then served as beacons of hope in the face of inequality. The community came together to support the economic development and in turn, empowered the entrepreneurship along the Laura Street businesses. The opulence of these businesses proved African Americans could create a successful infrastructure in Plant City. “A Taste of Laura Street” celebrated this historic district with live music, food, and an art exhibit. Attendees were encouraged to sample the food offerings as a step into the past and vote on their favorite dishes. Pat Dexter served ribs and potato salad as part of the culinary exhibition. Pat said she and her husband, Marvin, wanted to

Pat Dexter served samples of homemade potato salad. Dexter and her husband, Marvin, entered the events culinary exhibition competition. Many attendees came back for seconds of the Dexters ribs and potato salad.


participate in “A Taste of Laura Street” because the food is a part of cultural history. “This is the history of the community, the history of this part of town,” said Pat. “It’s important our kids don’t forget.” Melanie Collins found an old recipe card of her grandparent’s peach cobbler. The recipe is popular among family and friends, so Collins brought the cobbler to “A Taste of Laura Street.” She said it was important to her to participate in this event because of the significance Laura Street has on African American history. “I wanted to raise awareness

of the community and give back,” said Collins. Attendees of the event could tour the Bing Rooming House, which now serves as a museum of African American history. The first floor contained exhibits of military service, education, music and athletics. The second floor served as an art exhibit for local artists; many pieces were availale for purchase as a fundraiser for the historic rooming house. Wellington Reyes’ piece titled “Through the Eras” featured several prominent historical figures such as President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama, political

Artist Wellington Reyes was on site providing a live painting demonstration. Reyes’ art was also on display in the art exhibit within the Bing Rooming House. Reyes said he chose to participate in the event because the historical significance of Laura Street is meaningful.

A live band provided entertainment for attendees, playing jazz and blues music.

activist and abolitionist Harriet Tubman and professional boxer Muhammed Ali. Reyes was also on site providing a live painting demonstration. William Thomas, Jr., President of the Improvement League of Plant City, says “A Taste of Laura Street” was also developed to encourage Plant City residents to bring forward photos or artifacts of Laura Street. The black and white image of Janie L. Bing’s Seminole Restaurant is the only photo from the business district known to exist. Thomas is hopeful anyone with photos will come forward. “We want citizens to dig in their cedar chests and pull out the photos of Laura Street and allow us to scan those images,” said Thomas. “The late James Washington, who deeded the structure [Bing Rooming House] to the Improvement League often spoke about the businesses that once existed on Laura Street. We

felt it was time to bring that aspect of history to the forefront.” Washington is the grandson of Ms. Bing and lived in an apartment within the rooming house prior to deeding the structure to the Improvement League of Plant City. The Improvement League of Plant City is working in collaboration with the Plant City Photo Archives to collect and preserve those memories. Members of the public who would like to bring forward photos, documents, or other artifacts from Laura Street are encouraged to contact the Plant City Photo Archives at 106 S. Evers St. “A Taste of Laura Street” guests felt the historical ambiance with live music, art, food, but most importantly, guests were immersed in a sense of community. Laura Street Business District was once a prosperous economic hub, but today its legacy serves as a reminder of yesteryear. PAGE

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LOCAL

8th Annual Empty Bowls Project Even More Excitement for 2018 BY CHERYL JOHNSTON

Local students have been busy crafting an array of beautiful pottery bowls from which guests can select a souvenir bowl with their lunch ticket purchase.

T

he 8th Annual Empty Bowls event, a fundraiser for the United Food Bank of Plant City, is planned for Nov. 10 at the area surrounding the Robert W. Willaford Railroad Museum in historic downtown Plant City. Since school started in August, local students have been busy crafting an array of beautiful pottery bowls from which guests can select a souvenir bowl with their lunch ticket purchase. Area nonprofits, from churches to civic clubs, prepare their prized soup recipes to serve the hungry crowd. Tickets are available for $5 thru Oct. 31 and will be $10 from Nov. 1 thru the event. Price includes a choice of soup, bottled water, fruit and bread, as well as a studentcrafted bowl to take home as a reminder of all the “empty bowls” every day in our own community. A cookbook featuring the homemade soup recipes from the last seven

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events is scheduled to be ready for purchase at the event. All proceeds benefit the United Food Bank to fight hunger in the Plant City area. Event chair Silvia Dodson hopes several additions to the 2018 fundraiser will engage even more participation in this great community outreach. As in years past, the committee works with local Hillsborough County schools whose teachers assist students in crafting pottery bowls that are displayed the day of the event. This year the project will involve schools in Area V, VI, and VII under the supervision of Mrs. Sharon Morris to promote this additional art opportunity for the students. Invitations have also been extended to those at the Ybor City Campus of Hillsborough Community College, as the HCC Plant City campus does not offer art classes. On Saturday, Nov. 3, the Empty Bowls Team, led by Becky

Hartmann, is hosting a professional graphic artist who has done work for Disney World and specializes in 3-D street painting. The artist will conduct a power point presentation at the Chamber of Commerce conference room for 30-35 students and adults interested in participating in this year’s sidewalk art demonstrations on Nov. 10. Following the presentation at the Chamber, the Empty Bowls Team will walk the students to the Robert W. Willaford Railroad Museum to conduct the 3-D sidewalk art demonstration by the professional graphic artist and the students. This artwork will be accomplished on the sidewalks nearest Palmer Street for more visibility in order to promote the Plant City Empty Bowls Project the following week. “We are excited about this addition to the project since we have been trying to secure a professional artist for this event since the beginning of Empty Bowls,” Dodson shared. “Offering this to the area students interested in advancing their artistic talents is important for this community service project that uses art to promote awareness

of hunger in our community and volunteer service/donations to the food bank.” In addition to patriotic entertainment by NRG (Next Radical Generation) and Band of Brothers, guests will also enjoy the MultiSchools Choir, directed by Christine Jackson, which involves students from Jackson, Knights, Lincoln, Robinson and Wilson Elementary, plus Plant City and Strawberry Crest high schools. Plan now to attend. The United Food Bank of Plant City welcomes volunteers and donations, too. Phone 813-764-0625 or visit online at ufbpc.org for details. Empty Bowls Project

Saturday, November 10 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Soup Up – 11:00 a.m. Fundraiser benefits the United Food Bank of Plant City The Robert W. Willaford Railroad Museum Palmer Street at the east end of Collins Street. Info: United Food Bank 813-764-0625; ufbpc.org Tickets $5 until Oct. 31; $10 Nov. 1st-10th

The 8th Annual Empty Bowls event, a fundraiser for the United Food Bank of Plant City, is planned for Nov. 10 at the area surrounding the Robert W. Willaford Railroad Museum in historic downtown Plant City.


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LOCAL

Help Plant City Celebrate our Veterans and Active Military BY CHERYL JOHNSTON

Residents can purchase Flag Kits for $10. The Elks Lodge is hopeful each neighborhood and business within Plant City will wave the National Flag to honor our Veterans and Active Military. Photo by Sherrie Mueller

T

hanks to the members of Elks Lodge #1727, Greater Plant City Chamber of Commerce and Plant City Main Street, the community has big plans to honor our flag and area Veterans and Active Military in October and November. The exciting news is that EVERYONE can be involved. Starting on Nov. 1, it’s hoped our town might just look like the most patriotic place in the country with every business, home and organization that loves America flying our national flag. “Besides honoring our Veterans and Active Military, we want to honor our Flag,” shared Judy Wise, the Elks Veterans Chairperson. “We want to see our main streets lined with flags flying from businesses, homes, and other organizations.” She added, “ I can close my eyes and envision Collins, Reynolds, Alexander, MLK and all the other streets lined with American Flags.”

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The organizers have prepared a flyer with sponsorship information and calendar dates to detail what’s happening when. Beginning Oct. 1, 3’ X 5’ flag kits are available for purchase at four locations for $10, along with tickets for the Veterans Day BarB-Q to salute the military. The group has purchased 3' X 5' flag kits for $10.00. Each Veteran or Active Military member is eligible for two free tickets to the BBQ scheduled at the Elks Lodge for Nov. 11 at 1:00 p.m. Others are encouraged to purchase tickets or donate to the cause. Even if they can’t attend, they can gift the meal tickets to others. From Nov. 1 through 15, flags will be flown at area businesses and residences. During this period, participating businesses are honoring Veterans and Active Military with special discounts on their products and services to all who

show their valid military ID. On Nov. 9, everyone can enjoy the free patriotic concert at 7:00 p.m. at Plant City High School. On Nov. 10, patriotic citizens of every age will gather at 10:10 a.m. at the Veterans Memorial Park in Plant City when Hopewell Funeral Home & Memorial Gardens hosts its 33rd Annual Tribute to Veterans. “For the past 32 years, Hopewell Funeral Home & Memorial Gardens has enjoyed the privilege of honoring our country’s Veterans through the music and essays of area students,” explained event coordinator Marsha Passmore. "We’re thankful for the

community’s turnout at the beautiful Veterans Memorial Park venue. Plant City truly is a great place to call home.” Sponsorships of various amounts are available and your help is needed. To learn more, contact Judy Wise at 863-370-8389. Proceeds will benefit the families of deployed military men and women. Hoping everyone will do their part, she encourages, “Just think how wonderful our beautiful little city will look when the flags are flying and the Veterans and active Military are being honored.”

"The willingness with which our young people are likely to serve in any war, no matter how justified, shall be directly proportional to how they perceive veterans of earlier wars were treated and appreciated by our nation." George Washington

Local school children perform their poetry and essays each year at the Veteran’s Memorial Park event, hosted by Hopewell Funeral Homes and Memorial Garden.


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LOCAL

Tribute Forklift Honors Firefighters BY BARBARA ROUTEN | PHOTOS BY FLORIDA FORKLIFT

Florida Forklift added gold-prism decals of a Maltese cross, firefighting symbols and the number 1 on this tribute forklift to honor local firefighters.

responders. “A tribute like this doesn’t happen very often, and the firefighters really appreciate it,” said Plant City Fire Rescue Chief David Burnett, when the shiny-red forklift was unveiled to his crew. “How can you not appreciate people who run into the face of danger?” asked Chris Morgan, Florida Forklift’s marketing director. “We respond to all hazards,” said Burnett, “medical, hurricanes, storms, vehicle fires, brush fires, people needing assistance.” Plant City has two stations. A third station, at 1710 N. Park Road, is estimated to open July 2019. The full-service Plant City Fire Rescue has 39 career personnel online, with 13 on duty daily. Two ambulances are on duty every day, each with a paramedic and an emergency medical technician, EMT. The bays also hold three engine

pumpers and one ladder truck. A new Pierce pumper will be added in November. “Our apparatus and ambulances have everything from A to Z,” the fire chief said, including oxygen masks for people and pets, and life jackets for firefighters and submerged vehicle survivors. About 90 percent of Plant City Fire Rescue calls are medicalrelated. “The firetruck may be the first to arrive on the scene, and those personnel can start treatment,” said Burnett. “When the ambulance arrives, it transports the patient.” Even when not on duty, firefighters respond if they see an accident or someone choking at a restaurant. “You do what you need to do,” said Burnett, 49, who started fighting fires with a Boy Scouts Explorer Post at age 16. He has been with Plant City Fire Rescue for 11 years.

G

ary Mansell, owner, and president of Florida Forklift wanted to honor Plant City’s firefighters, so he brought a forklift, to Fire Station 1. But it wasn’t just any forklift—it was painted fireengine red, with gold-prism decals of a Maltese cross, fire-fighting symbols and the number one. “We respect and passionately understand how fortunate we are to have the great first responders we have here,” said Mansell, “so we customized a forklift to bring attention to them.” Although the 44-year-old Florida Forklift business has offices in Tampa, Winter Haven, Orlando, Jacksonville and Fort Myers, Mansell lives in Plant City. “We have been taking from the community for a long time,” he said. “We all have, at times, used emergency services—the police, paramedics, fire rescue. Giving back is the right thing to do.” Last fall, the company hosted its first annual open-house cookout in Tampa, feeding about 100 first

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Plant City Fire Chief David Burnett sits in the driver's seat of a tribute forklift painted fire-engine red by Florida Forklift. All 13 shift members-firefighters, paramedics and emergency medical technicians-surround the shiny vehicle.


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T CI ER RA CR AF IN TE RV IE W BY

Sara Demolli S ara Demolli’s journey into the performing arts began at a young age. Influenced by her parents, Demolli is a talented dancer, singer and actress. The Blake High School sophomore has performed with several organizations in and around Tampa Bay, including Plant City Entertainment, Plant City Children’s Theatre and as a guest performer with the Arts Council of Plant City. As Demolli begins to explore college and career options, she opened up about her past and plans for the future.

Who influenced your love for the performing arts? I grew up in a family of artists. My dad painted and played music, and my mom played instruments, so I grew up with those influenced around me. Can you share a few of the organizations you have performed with? Plant City Entertainment, Plant City Children’s Theatre, Tampa Children’s Theatre, I have performed with Not Your Normal Entertainment at Disney. I was previously a Jr. Thespian and now a member of the Thespian troupe at Blake High School. I have performed with the Arts Council of Plant City, Pioneer Day at the 1914 building and the Florida Strawberry Festival. You joined dance at a young age, when did you transition into theatre and voice? I began singing lessons at 7-yearsold in December and performed six months later in “Beauty and the Beast” as the character Chip. PAGE

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What are your favorite musicals? A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, Next to Normal and Fun Home. What’s your favorite part about being on stage? The adrenaline rush. My favorite part is when the audience is laughing and feeling connected with the story. They’re feeling a part of your art. When did you decide to take the performing arts more seriously? In the 5th grade, I realized I had a knack for it and believed I would thrive in a performing arts middle school, so I started taking it seriously. I then attended Progress Village [Middle Magnet School]. At Blake High School, it’s really different than anything I’ve ever been a part of. The stakes are higher because your teacher is a casting director, so everyday is an audition. They really push you to your final goal. What are your goals for the future? My dream school is Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. They have an amazing acting and musical theatre program with intense training 7 days per week. Everyone who comes through the CMU program goes to Broadway. I am also considering other schools such as UCF and Michigan as well.

Find more People of Plant City on Facebook. Connecting the community one story at a time. facebook.com/peopleofplantcity Find more People of Plant City on Facebook. Connecting the community one story at a time. facebook.com/peopleofplantcity


RIBBONCUTTINGS

Want to become a member of the Greater Plant City Chamber of Commerce? Businesses may join the Chamber online by visiting www.plantcity.org or by calling the office at (813) 754-3707 and speaking with our Membership Director, Norm Nelson.

On Thursday, September 13th,The Greater Plant City Chamber of Commerce had the honor of hosting a ribbon cutting for Plant City's newest B&B: The Sparkman House Luxury Bed and Breakfast! The Sparkman House Luxury Bed & Breakfast is located in the Historic District of Plant City, Florida. This 1905 Queen Anne style house boasts of 12 foot ceilings, a wrap-around porch, 6 bedrooms in the main house with a separate carriage house suite, grand formal spaces, and so much more! The elegant antique dĂŠcor and grand furnishings are only a portion of the luxury that our B&B offers our guests, whether you are booking a room for a night or hosting one of your special events here.

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LOCAL

Did You Know?

"Growing Up Black in Plant City, Florida, During the Time of Segregation and Inequality" (Part 2 of 3) BY PLANT CITY PHOTO ARCHIVES

University of Tampa senior Anisa J. Brown, a Journalism major, completed 230 hours over 11 weeks as an intern at the Plant City Photo Archives & History Center in August. In addition to assisting in a few office projects, Anisa researched and completed the writing of the following monograph (published in three issues for Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3), "Growing Up Black in Plant City, Florida, During the Time of Segregation and Inequality."

Laura Street

Starting in the late 1930s, the black community came together and created its own business district on Laura Street, the east side of Plant City. The businesses on Laura Street included barbershops, salons, bars, restaurants, entertainment, gas stations, grocery stores, funeral homes, dry cleaners, and churches gave blacks the opportunity to have their very own city within Plant City. “For me, it [growing up in Plant City] was a good place,” said Vergena Jordan (nee Stallworth). “Because we had a black neighborhood, we had a black downtown, mini downtown. We felt sheltered, we had the stores, we had the movie theater, Mrs. Norris and them peanut stand, and we had the Baby Marshall’s, they had the best ice cream during the summertime. There was such a community sense, they protected us, and I remember the pride in my mom and dad.” “There were restaurants, there were barbershops, there were bars,” said Johnson. “And there was a place called Dessie Lee’s and she had the best, greasy chicken sandwiches you have ever had. She would fry that chicken and put that mayonnaise on that bread, lettuce and tomatoes. I miss that.” The black community took great pride in its neighborhood and all the accomplishments that they had achieved. Laura Street was a staple to the community until 1975, when the businesses slowly began shutting down due to desegregation in town.

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“I think the most normal thing to me is that I think blacks became more self-sufficient, unlike now,” said Bill Thomas. “Black people depended on themselves and that’s what Laura Street was.”

Segregation to Integration

“To me, Plant City was segregated to the point that my folks were afraid to allow me to go anywhere,” said Gwendolyn Thomas. “I couldn’t go anywhere unless I was with someone else and they had to know when we went and when we were coming back and the places not to go. While segregation ended in 1964, many southern cities, including Plant City, were not open to the idea of change in their city. “It was very prejudice,” said Brown. “We had to make sure we did all of our shopping and everything before dark. Even after desegregation came along there still took some time for the changes to take place.” “There was segregation and you knew that there were places you did not frequent, you didn’t go,” said Johnson. “To this very day, there is a restaurant downtown called Snellgrove’s, I still do not step foot in that restaurant. I have never been to the restaurant and I would never go to that restaurant because when I was growing up if you were black you had to go to the back door to order something. So, if I couldn’t walk through the front door, I sure wasn’t going to the back to order. And so, segregation was alive and well.”

In 1967, Plant City began integrating their schools for the first time in history. But, the idea of change did not come easy to those not knowing what to expect. “It [attending and integrated school] was very scary because you didn’t know how you would be accepted,” said Johnson. “So, it was very nerve racking because you had to put on that persona that you were not afraid and go on and do you and not worry about anybody else. And so, it was a scary and very frightening situation, but I endured and as the years went on, positive things would happen, and I was accepted more and more.” “It did not feel good attending an integrated school,” said Jordan. “Because I remember the fighting daily in the halls, the name calling, the feeling uncomfortable. You didn’t know your teachers anymore, you felt like you were kind of in a foreign land.

Laura Street, Plant City Map from 1919

Marshall High School, 5-25-61

I remember some of my classmates that I saw at Marshall I didn’t see because Plant City High was so big, it had upstairs downstairs. I got sick, literally. I remember my mother taking me to the doctor because of all the stress from being there.” “I was not able to attend an integrated school, but I was one of the first teachers to go into a white school,” said Brown. “The black principal was told that they had to select so many teachers from their school and set up our own appointments, our own interviews and hope that that principal would want us to come to integrate the school.” Because of the fear of not knowing what was going to happen next, many people went into this life changing moment blindly hoping that these changes will be for the greater good of racial equality.


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FONDNESS FRIGHT FOR

Sir Henry’s Haunted Trail and Ominous Descent create I-4 Fear Park by Cierra Craft

Those with a fondness for fright, October signifies Halloween, haunts and horror. Plant City’s I-4 Premier Fear Park is presented by Sir Henry’s Haunted Trail, in collaboration with Ominous Descent Haunted Attraction, to create a top-notch spooky outdoor experience. In 2014, Zach Glaros opened Sir Henry’s Haunted Trail, inspired by his family’s love for Halloween. He based the attraction around the legend of Sir Henry, a fictional character created by Glaros. However, he wanted to construct better sets for his haunts and sought out the advice and counsel of Ominous Descent owners Eric Dodson and Chad Ashley. Ominous Descent began constructing its attraction on Jan. 1, 2017 in Bartow. Hurricane Irma swept through Central Florida, destroying the property completely. Eight months of hard work was ruined. Glaros invited Dodson and Ashley to reconstruct their haunted attraction on the Sir Henry’s Haunted Trail property for the 2017 Halloween season. Glaros has invited Ominous Descent back for 2018 and thus, the creation of I-4 Premier Fear Park. Launched Oct. 5, I-4 Premier Fear Park includes new features and fun for those looking for a bit of a fright. Glaros and Dodson share a little back story about how their friendship formed and what visitors of I-4 Premier Fear Park can expect this Halloween season.

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FOCUS: How did Sir Henry’s Haunted Trail come to be? Glaros: I always did this at my parent’s house over in Lakeland and we would always set up Halloween displays. Pretty much go all out, we were “those people” in the neighborhood. It kept growing and growing each year; this is a pretty big passion of mine, my dad shared it as well. We always talked about doing it on a larger scale. Once I graduated college, my dad and I decided to do it on a larger scale, over at my grandfather’s property. FOCUS: Where did the name Sir Henry come from and who is he? Glaros: Sir Henry, our main character, is an ode to where it all started at. The house where I grew up was on Sir Henry’s Trail. The legend of Sir Henry is he was a famous entertainer, like a freak show, carnival kind of entertainer. On his wedding night, his bride was tragically murdered and Sir Henry disappeared after her death. It was assumed he was killed in a car crash, but no one knows for sure. A few years later, citizens in the town began seeing a phantom skeletal figure resembling the once-famous Sir Henry. As for Sir Henry’s personality, he isn’t a psychopath serial killer. He is tactical, a jokester, a trickster, he’ll be very sarcastic and playful. He wants one thing: revenge for his bride. Creating a main character for our haunted trail, for branding. I compared it to Disney: I wanted Sir Henry to be my Mickey Mouse. That was the inspiration. FOCUS: How do you use the legend of Sir Henry in the creation of the trails? Glaros: Each year, we have two trails: One trail focuses on the current Sir Henry narrative and the other focuses on ancestral portion. This year, we have “The Carving,” set in the 1700s, the ancestral lineage leading up to the present-day Sir Henry. The other trail, “Silent Walls,” focuses on the orphanage in the town, being hunted by the Boogie Man Killer. Boogie Man Killer plays a very important part into the Sir Henry story. Season by season we build upon this story. FOCUS: Eric, how did you and your business partner Chad Ashley meet? How did the idea to develop Ominous Descent come to be? Dodson: Chad and I first met while myself and my family were visiting local haunts, he owned a small haunted house in Auburndale. Chad and I officially met while we were working at another local attraction. After 3 years at the local attraction, Chad and I decided, for our own personal reasons, to leave and focus on our own goals. After about 6 months, Chad called me and asked if I would be interested in opening my own haunt, that he had a couple of investors interested in our abilities. I turned him down for a month or so, as I was focusing on my dreams. He contacted me again and asked if I would just meet with the investors and see what I thought, I agreed to meet with everyone. After the meeting I was completely sold on the idea and we both started planning, designing and looking for the perfect location in 2016. Finding the perfect location to start was in Bartow, an amazing small town that absolutely loves Halloween and opened their arms up to us. We started building Jan. 1, 2017, set to open in late September. FOCUS: What led to the collaboration of Ominous Descent and Sir Henry’s Haunted Trail? Dodson: The morning of Sept. 11, 2017 Hurricane Irma ended PAGE

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our dreams and damaging our building and the other buildings on the property. The damage was extensive and the city of Bartow deemed the buildings unsafe. Ourselves, our family and friends were completely devastated. Chad and I, along with many others spent countless hours building this dream and it was all gone. This is the moment that Zach, his wife and family helped save our dream. Giving us a opportunity to bring our vision to life once again. Giving us a space to build on his property in Plant City. We only had 9 days to pull it off and we did just that. With help from our family and friends we were able to build over 5,000 square feet of the haunt. This year, we came up with I-4 Premier Fear Park, so we could be under the same umbrella, but Zach could remain Sir Henry’s and we could maintain our brand. FOCUS: What can guests to I-4 Fear Park expect? Dodson: We’re different in a sense of our styles. We [Ominous Descent] are a little more grungy and Zach’s definitely an awesome story teller. Definitely a good fit together and giving different elements for people. Some families come out and the husband may like something a little different than the wife, but everyone has a good time. Glaros: This year, we have three haunted trails. Two, which are Sir Henry’s and one, which is Ominous. “The Carving” and “Silent Walls” are Sir Henry’s and “Twisted Souls” is Ominous. Each of those are 10-15 minute haunted walking trails. It’s outdoors, so all of our trails are natural and organic. We’ve got laser tag, new this year for us and Ominous is bringing in an escape game. We’ve got food trucks and scare actors walking around in our Common Area. FOCUS: How is your attraction different than other haunted attractions? Glaros: Sir Henry’s has a unique style, unlike anything else out there. We pride ourselves on having an intimate experience with guests… at the end of the day it’s all about having fun. That’s the most important thing to us. Dodson: Speaking from the Ominous side, we pride ourselves on an “immersive realism.” Our creative side, with our unique stories, it’s something different from other places. Our stories are a little more in depth: We take our main characters and try to portray those stories within the haunted trails, from lighting, sounds to even the music we choose. Everything is telling a story, it’s something we really pay attention too. Each element has a meaning and a purpose. FOCUS: What kind of Halloween stories inspired your unique styles and different approaches? Glaros: For me, I have always been a fan of the traditional Halloween… murder mystery and all of that stuff, so that’s the direction I take a lot of Sir Henry. In my opinion, Halloween is celebrated very differently culturally down here [Florida] than compared to the Northeast. Northeastern Halloween cultural feel is what I want guests to experience when they come to Sir Henry’s Haunted Trail. We’ve had guests from the Northeast come through in year’s past and say “this is just like when I was a kid… it has that quintessential Halloween feel.” That is what I work for in the environment. Dodson: For Ominous, I want people to feel like they’ve entered a movie. With sets, sounds and smells, I want guests to question if this is real or not- that’s my goal. With character design, set design, my goal is realism and guests questioning the realism of everything. The Common Area is designed more with what your neighbors would have out for Halloween: pumpkins, lighting, etc. It’s a homey feel. So, for trails you have entertainment, their hearts racing, their scared but the Common Area is that familiar atmosphere to relax, take photos with characters. Guests aren’t on edge the entire time; they can grab a drink, talk with friends about their experience inside the haunt and then enter the next attraction. PAGE

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Dancing Locals 2018

with the

Plant City Rotary Club’s Dancing with the Locals is a highlight of Plant City’s fall social calendar. The 2018 event is Friday, Nov. 9 at 6:00 p.m. at the Trinkle Center at Hillsborough Community College’s Plant City campus.

On average, 400 audience members purchase the $100 ticket to watch friends, colleagues and family members hit the stage and all funds raised go back to the community through the Rotary Club’s various community events. Ten couples prepare for their time in the spotlight with ten provided dance lessons and will perform routines across various dance styles. Each couple is competing for the coveted Mirror Ball Trophy. Event co-chair Jodi Stevens is consistently looking for dancers for next year’s event. Many participants are inspired to get involved by attending previous Dancing with the Locals events. For information regarding registration for next year’s event or for tickets for the 2018 event, contact Jodi at 813-716-0908. PAGE

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Ally Burt & Jose Lozoya Ally Burt is a fourth generation Plant City native and the daughter of Royce and Raquel Burt. Currently, she is a student at Florida Southern College. Ally is the 2018 Florida Strawberry Festival Queen. She says the community has shown her so much love and support during her time as the 2018 Florida Strawberry Festival Queen. Ally said she was excited to participate in Dancing With the Local because of her passion to give back to the community. Jose Loyoza is a Plant City-native and the son of Jose and Rosie Loyoza. He is the brother of Leroy, Angie, Gracie and Abby. Jose is a photographer and a medical records coordinator for Dr. Michael Salvato. Jose says he has never been the dancing type but says he is excited to give back to the community that raised him.

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Trent Lott is a 5th generation Plant City native and the eldest son of Rick and Diana Lott. He has been involved in the community since his college graduation in 2015 by starting the Plant City branch of College Hunks Hauling Junk and Moving. He is the incoming president of the young professionals' group, RISE as well as a founding member and he is very excited to see the group grow. He hopes one day RISE will become an organization of importance like the Rotary Club. He is also involved with the athletics at Plant City High school as an assistant coach for the Boys Tennis and Soccer teams. Last year, the boys' soccer team went all the way, winning Plant City High School a state championship for the first time in the school's soccer history and the 2nd State Championship overall in any team sport. Trent is involved with the United Food Bank of Plant City and loves what they do for the community. He encourages those with resources to assist the food bank in any way they can. Trent’s parents and baby sister have competed in Dancing with the Locals in the past but Trent is a tad bit more nervous than his family. For three years, Trent has been asked to participate in Dancing with the Locals. Upon hearing that the lovely Dee Dee Cardenas would dance with him, he couldn’t sign up quick enough!

Dee Dee Cardenas & Trent Lott

Dee Dee Cardenas is a Plant City- native and a graduate of Durant High School. She currently resides in Davis Island, where she attended the Paul Mitchell Beauty School Tampa. She has been a beauty professional for almost 10 years taking the bay by storm where you can see her work on a nationwide level, including billboards, TV commercials, short films, magazines, and music videos. Dee Dee served as the makeup artist for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers Cheerleaders. She is one busy bee but is involved with groups such as The Way Center and Visions of Hope. She is also involved in Shriners Hospital for Children. Dee Dee is involved with Focus 4 Beauty. Locals may know Dee Dee from her incredible work for seven wonderful years with our beloved Strawberry Queen and Strawberry Court for their events and concerts. She has helped them shine into the beautiful royalty that they are. She is also involved with and attends the Crossing Church, where she assists with their shows and is a devout follower of the Lord. She has attended Dancing with the Local in the past. She wanted to dance with a purpose and raise money for the community in the process as well as learn more about dancing in the process. Trent and Dee Dee will be performing the salsa. Trent said, “Come out and show your support for Queen Dee and the College Hunk!”

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Jerilyn Rumbarger & Brandon Snyder Brandon is a Plant City local and recently merged his company, Snyder Investments, with Allen & Company of Lakeland. Brandon is now a financial advisor with Allen and Company and is looking forward to his new business venture. He is also the Vice President of Hook A Hero, a local nonprofit that benefits first responders, as well a member of the Plant City Rotary Club. Jerilyn was raised in the small town of Brooksville, Florida. She is a 29-year-old mother to her little boy, Connor, 6 and a dog mom to Oliver, 2 and Batoka, 3. Jerilyn is a full-time manager at The Stein & Vine in Brandon, Florida and recently joined the PTA at Walden Lake Elementary. She was invited by her boyfriend, Brandon, to participate in dancing with the locals this year and is excited to experience something new and outside of her comfort zone. Brandon and Jerilyn met in January of 2018 at a charity event for Hook A Hero. After Jerilyn invited Brandon to go dive bar hopping he realized he had met his soul mate, and the two have been inseparable ever since. They both currently live in Plant City and love the idea of supporting the community and the rotary club while having some fun. PAGE

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Jessica Bullard was born and raised in Plant City, Florida, where she currently resides. She recently has accepted a new job offer as a Charter Operations Coordinator for MySky Aviation Solutions, Inc. Jessica is also a student at Hillsborough Community College. Once she completes her AA she plans to attend USF to continue pursuing her degree in Business. In her free time, she enjoys traveling anywhere and everywhere. As well as spending time with family and friends. Jessica and boyfriend Steven have three dogs Jackson, Copper, and Emmitt that keep them very busy outside of their work lives. Jessica says the dogs help keep her active and in shape while working from home.

Jessica Bullard & Steven Kirby

Steven Kirby is a front of house manager for Outback Steakhouse. Originally from Sebring, Florida, he moved to Plant City after high school to be closer to family. From playing slow pitch softball, snorkeling, or even a game of fetch in the backyard with the dogs, Steven loves staying active. Anything that can get him outdoors, he will try at least once. Sports are another thing that Steven enjoys: From watching the Chicago Cubs play on T.V. to catching a Gator game up in Gainesville or watching Tiger win the Tour Championship he enjoys it all. Being in the restaurant industry makes Steven very passionate about food. He enjoys trying new cuisine of any sort.

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Dr. Tandria Callins was born and raised in Florida and is a graduate from Plant City High School. Dr. Callins graduated from the University of South Florida with her B.S. in Communications Sciences and Disorders, M.S. in SpeechLanguage Pathology, and her Ph.D. in Special Education. She has worked in various capacities as a Speech Language Pathologist. The most notable was when she serviced the Plant City community as the Director of Rehabilitation during the time Community Care Center underwent major renovations to their rehabilitation department. Dr. Callins has served as a Regional Director of Operations for rehabilitation departments in nursing homes across Florida and Alabama for 10 years. Currently, Dr. Callins serves as the Executive Director and Principal of her own public charter school, Language & Literacy Academy for Learning, where she now serves students with varying disabilities. The Dancing with the Locals event has always been a topic of conversation in the Callins family.

Pastor & Dr. Callins

Calvin Callins Sr. was raised right here in his native town, Plant City, Florida. Calvin “Pee Wee” Callins Sr. is a 1992 Plant City High School graduate. He was a three-sport all-state athlete and currently still holds all three

assists basketball records at Plant City High School. Pastor Callins is a Beatmart/Sony Recording artist. He has four national recordings that you can purchase online or in stores today. He has also sung on more than 15 other artists’ albums. In 2009, Pastor Callins did an 11day concert tour in Europe. In 1998 Calvin Callins became the Senior Pastor of Greater New Hope Anointed Ministries, where there is a growing congregation of 700 plus members. Calvin Callins Sr. has served on the Education and Health Board of Hillsborough County and different community boards and committees. Calvin is also the Assistant Head Coach of the boys’ basketball team at Plant City High School. Dr. Callins married her high school sweetheart Pastor Calvin “Pee Wee” Callins Sr. in 1996. Their oldest daughter, Calaydria, is a Junior in college. Their oldest son, Calvin Jr., is a Senior at Plant City High School. Their youngest son, Caleb, recently featured in the FOCUS Magazine, is 3rd grader at Advantage Academy. Dr. Callins is super excited that she was able to convince her husband to participate in this year’s competition among family and friends. And yes, he did humbly submit to his wife’s “urging” to participate in this year’s DWTL competition.

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Giancarlos & Kristina Pizzini Giancarlos is a physical therapist at South Florida Baptist Hospital and Kristina is an elementary school teacher in Pasco County. Giancarlos and Kristina have been married for 8 years and have a 2-year-old little girl named Gisella. They currently reside in Land O’ Lakes in Pasco County. The Pizzinis moved to the Tampa Bay area almost three years ago from Ft. Lauderdale. Giancarlos volunteers with The Foundation at South Florida Baptist Hospital in their Children's Classic Golf Tournament. Although the Pizzinis are not Plant Citynatives, Giancarlos and Kristina love the community and family environment of Plant City. Dancing with the Locals is an amazing organization that gives so much back to the community and being a part of it is important to the Pizzinis.

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Nikki Williams is a Plant City-native and graduated from Armwood High School in 2009. After completing her education at Sanford Brown College, Nikki joined the iconic Tooth Caboose. She serves on both the pediatric and orthodontic sides of the practice and was recently named their marketing director. Nikki established the Tooth Fairy Program which is a creative and fun way to educate Hillsborough County elementary school children on the importance of dental hygiene. Yes, she is The Tooth Fairy! She has volunteered at The Florida Strawberry Festival for many years in the Media Center. She has also volunteered her time at events like Rotary’s Community Appreciation Day, Planes Trains & Automobiles, and Pig Jam. She served for several years at The Crossing Church in Brandon and now serves at Grace City Church in Lakeland. In her free time Nikki enjoys spending time out on the boat, hanging out with friends & family, and most importantly loving her fur baby Addelyn Rose. Nikki feels DWTL is a fun and entertaining way to raise funds for our community and is honored to be a part of the event.

Nikki Williams & Jake Austin

Jake Austin was raised in Lakeland and graduated from Lakeland High School in 2004. He served six years active duty in the United States Air Force and later graduated from Western Kentucky University. With experience working for both the State of Kentucky and the Bowling Green Area Chamber of Commerce, Jake returned home to Florida to continue his career in economic development. He joined the Tampa Hillsborough EDC in 2012 where he started a grassroots economic development program in Plant City. Jake now serves as the President of the Plant City EDC. He is involved with several organizations including Grace City Church, Noon Rotary, RISE Plant City, and the PCHS Business Advisory Board. Jake is the proud father of his 8-yearold daughter, Leah. In his spare time, Jake enjoys cruising the Bay, scuba diving, fishing, and traveling. While Jake was not thrilled about dancing, he felt it was time to pay his dues and support the club.

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Michael & Janet Witchoskey Janet Witchoskey is a CT Technologist at Watson Clinic, where she has worked for 32 years. Born in Tallahassee, Janet moved to Plant City in 1986. She serves in ministry with First Baptist Church of Plant City in the Choir and Worship Team. Janet is also a CrossFitter at Crossfit Plant City and a volunteer in the memory care unit at Stone Ledge Manor. Janet has enjoyed watching friends and local citizens participate in past Dancing with the Locals events. Michael Witchoskey is the assistant principal of Plant City High School and has worked in the school district for 33 years. Michael was born and raised in Plant City and says he has never lived anywhere else, except in Gainesville while attending the University of Florida. Michael is a member and deacon of First Baptist Church of Plant City. For many years, he coached local little league baseball and football. Each year, Michael volunteers at the Florida Strawberry Festival, in the information booth or with the concert events. Michael and Janet have been married for 28 years and are the parents of two sons, Stan and Steven. Stan is 24 years old and resides in California, where he works for Fox. Steven is a 19-year-old student at Western Kentucky University, where he plays football. The Witchoskeys attend every WKU football game. PAGE

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Lauriane Ciccarelli moved around a lot as a child, but her family finally settled in Tampa, where she attended Gaither High School and went on to USF to pursue a Bachelor of Science in History. She attended Stetson Law School and has been practicing law for 20 years. She currently works at the Law Firm of Troiano & Roberts, P.A. She is a member of the Lakeland Bar and Florida Bar. She is the past president and current sponsorship chair of the American Business Women Associations Downtown Lakeland Chapter and is the current president of Camp Fire Sunshine Council. She assists many nonprofits and community organizations. Lauriane is a mother to her 6-year-old son, Austin. After her pregnancy, Lauriane utilized dance to lose 96 lbs in two years’ time. Lauriane was excited to participate in Dancing With the Locals as a way to bring her love for dance and community involvement together. She is thankful to the Rotary for allowing her to participate. Lauriane says win or lose, she’s already won!

Lauriane Ciccarelli & Robert Howell

Robert Howell, except when attending college, has been a lifelong resident of Lakeland. He has been teaching math for the Polk County School Board for over twentysix years. He attended college at the University of South Florida in Tampa and earned his master’s degree from the American College of Education in Chicago. He is very proud of his daughters: Courtney, a Registered Nurse and full-time University of Central Florida student, who resides in Melbourne, Florida and Caitlin a research scientist, Doctoral Candidate, in Chicago.

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FOCUSBUSINESS

Master Craft Memorials BY CHERYL JOHNSTON

M

aster Craft Memorials has been a company on a mission for 47 years. And the inspiration for the mission to build timeless memorials that honor people’s lives comes from the kind words shared by pleased customers. Dawn Cline, owner, explained: “Just listening to the family speak of their loved one tells a story we try to put into stone. When we see that story come to life through the monument we help them create, it is very rewarding. Then when the fourth generation comes to us and says, ‘You made the monuments for our Great Grandparents, Grandparents & our parents. Now we want you to make ours,’ we feel grateful that our work has such a long-term impact.” Founded in 1971, the family owned/operated business serves the Tampa Bay and Central Florida region by employing the skill and compassion of five craftsmen.

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The Master Craft Memorials team designs and builds its handcrafted monuments at its Plant City showroom and manufacturing facility. For customer convenience, a full selection of monument types, sizes and granite color, including bronze markers and marble, is available. Families will also benefit from the design experience gathered over four decades of commemorating loved ones. “Our granite, marble and bronze are the finest money can buy,” Cline offered. “Our craftsmen, who design, letter and engrave the monuments, are true artists. They take great pride in creating beautiful and durable memorials. To ensure customer satisfaction, we provide a stencil approval with each monument order, so customers know exactly what the finished monument will look like. This also helps eliminate mistakes in spelling or wrong information.” Guests are invited to visit

the company’s design book at mcmemorials.com to see the thousands of popular designs and options available. The team can also create a custom design for your loved one. To view the choices or design your own custom monument, simply supply the username: Master Craft Memorials and then insert the Password: monuments. Master Craft Memorials takes pride in their craft and guarantee all work. Master Craft Memorials can provide a full range of cemetery services as well. These can include grave site refurbishment, engraving on site of final passing dates or other inscriptions, and cleaning. According to Cline, pre-planning is a smart move. “Because it’s a very difficult and emotional time for families at the time they experience the loss, I think it is very helpful to pre-plan your memorial. So many have said they had talked about preparing for a monument, but just never got around to it. It makes it so much easier on a surviving spouse and children if the deceased’s wishes are already known.” Cline enjoys her role in dealing with area families. She explained, “Every day we dedicate ourselves to making the most beautiful

monuments. Our family believes that caring about people and helping them with a loved one’s memorial is important. So, creating a lasting granite memorial to your complete satisfaction that honors a loved one’s life is always our goal. This is our way to honor the belief that families help families in times of need.” The company’s central location is also a plus. She praised, “The people in Plant City make this the best place for our business to be! We care about what we do and more importantly we care about the people we serve. Our goal is to create a beautiful memorial to honor the lives of their loved ones. The monuments are a celebration in stone.

Master Craft Memorials 504 South Collins Street Plant City, Fl 33563 813-754-2113   Toll-Free 888-754-2113 Cell: 727-453-9554 mcmemorials.com mcmemorials@gmail.com

Hours of Operation: Monday thru Friday, 9 am to 5 pm (ET) Saturday, 9 am to 2 pm (ET) and by appointment


JACK

GUTMAN

FOR HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY JUDGE / GROUP 8

UNMATCHED CREDENTIALS Former Senior Assistant Attorney General in Florida Successfully Prosecuted Murderers & other Violent Offenders

COMMITTED TO PUBLIC SERVICE Investigated Attorney Misconduct for the Florida Bar

ENDORSED BY

Volunteer Teen Court Judge in Hillsborough County Worked to help people with disabilities for over a dozen years

STRONG COMMUNITY ROOTS Raised in South Tampa Proud Father of Two Children

Local 2294

Married to Wife, Carlene, for Over 25 Years

www.GutmanForJudge.com POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY JACK N. GUTMAN, FOR HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY COURT JUDGE, GROUP 8. PAGE

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902 E. Reynolds St. Plant City 813.756.6999

www.dixiestation.com

Award winning Artists casper geist cliff shepard brent springer ron bell mina geist

901 E. Baker St. Plant City 813.752.6173

Service Maintenence Repairs Speed Integrity Quality PAGE

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REAL ESTATE

Waiving Escrows for a Mortgage BY NATE DAVIS, FLORIDA MORTAGE FIRM

W

hen you buy or refinance a home with a mortgage, most lenders will encourage you to escrow your tax bill and insurance premium with the mortgage payment. What’s important to know is that some escrow accounts are not required, while others are. Government loans such as VA, FHA and USDA programs require escrow accounts. On conventional loans, however, they’re optional. When I tell people that conventional loans don’t require an escrow account, they often look puzzled. Why is that?

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First, because lenders can require that your payments be escrowed, which is often what occurs when you don’t have at least a 20% down payment. Second, lenders can create an incentive for you to escrow your payment — or create a penalty not to escrow your payment. This allows lenders to cater to borrowers who demand they not escrow their payments, but an interest-rate adjustment is typically added. There are several reasons why mortgage lenders want you to escrow your payments, but the main one is to protect their investment by

ensuring taxes and insurance are budgeted for. This is neither good, nor bad, but think of it like a forced budget. It alleviates the concern of getting hit with a large tax bill and/or a large insurance bill every year. Just know that escrows can be helpful, and many people prefer them. On the flip side, the benefit to waiving escrows is that your cash needed to close on a mortgage will decrease. The reason is because whenever you’re paying escrows, the lender is required to collect all the months of taxes and insurance that will later be due. So you’re paying those costs at closing in the form of “closing costs” instead of later when the bills come due. Check out the Florida Mortgage Firm channel on YouTube and watch

“Waiving Escrow For A Mortgage” if you have any more questions about this. We explain how we let you waive escrows with a low down payment under 20%. In addition, you will not incur a fee for doing so. Or you can call my team at 813-7076200.

Florida Mortgage Firm (813-707-6200) is an Equal Housing Lender, NMLS #289323, NMLS #294701.


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A lifestyle you love, a home you love more! The Lakes and the Oaks at CountryWood have stunning new homes for sale! If golfing lakeside peaks your interest, the age-qualified community of The Lakes is for you! Interested in a family-friendly community? The Oaks all age community has it!

BEAUTIFUL NEW HOMES

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Visit us at our Open House! September 8th &The October 6th from 10am-3pm 10am-3pm

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OPPORTUNITY

CountryWood Estates, 745 Arbor Estates Way, Plant City, FL 33565 Must meet residency requirements. Specifications, options, and layout vary by model and are subject to change without notice. Additional restrictions may apply, see sales associate for details. PAGE

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REAL ESTATE The September sales are as follows:

Walden Lake Review

Address

Sales Price

Living Area

Pool

Garage

106 Capri Court North

$159,500

1542

Community

2 Car

1705 Sagebrush Road

$165,000

1971

Yes

2 Car

BY NATALIE SWEET

1901 Paddock Drive

$173,500

1948

Yes

2 Car

T

2325 Walden Place

$190,000

1780

No

2 Car

3411 Silverstone Court

$195,000

1755

No

2 Car

1905 Poplar Court

$195,000

1788

Community

2 Car

3501 Kilmer Drive

$255,000

1954

Yes

2 Car

2907 Forest Club Drive

$315,000

2623

Yes

2 Car

3305 Milton Place

$325,000

2347

Yes

3 Car

1901 N Golfview Drive

$335,000

2665

Yes

2 Car

2918 Spring Hammock Drive

$343,000

2651

Yes

3 Car

2712 Pine Club Drive

$388,750

3277

Yes

2 Car

he Walden Lake Community Association Board Meetings are the third Monday of each month at the Walden Lake Community Association office building on Griffin Boulevard in Walden Lake. The next meetings are scheduled for November 19th and December 17th at 7:00 PM. The meetings are open to all Walden Lake residents. Watch the announcement boards at all entrances for dates and times for special meetings and events. You don’t want to miss the Annual Kids ‘n Kanine Howl-O-Ween event on Saturday October 20th from 1:00 to 4:00, which will be held between the WL HOA office and the Dog Park. This is always a fun event, with lots of crafts, a photo project, games and prizes. There will be free hot dogs, hamburgers and beverages. This event is put on by our HOA Board of

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Directors and staff. You won’t want to miss it!!! During the month of September, there were 11 sales in Walden Lake and 1 sale in Walden Lake East with an average sale price of $253,313. The average days on the market were 33 days. The average price per square foot of these 14 sales is $114. There are currently 24 active listings for sale in Walden Lake and Walden Lake East with an average list price of $349,792 and an average of 89 days on the market. Four of the active listings are priced between $495,000 and $925,000. When eliminating those 4 listings, the average price drops to $296,555. There are 22 properties Pending Contract with an average list price of $258,099 and average of 32 days on the market. The market continues to remain

strong for homes that are priced well and in very good condition even with the inventory ticking up. Interest rates have been rising although still considered to be low and we expect this trend upward to continue. If you have any question about these MLS statistics, please feel free to contact me at 813-758-9586 or nsweet@ kw.com. Our HOA office on Griffin

Boulevard is a drop off center for nonperishable items to be donated to The United Food Bank. Although school is back in session, the Food Bank is always in need of donations and is preparing for the Holiday season. Feel free to contact me about this article via email me at NSweet@ KW.com or 813-758-9586.


No one sells more Real Estate than RE/MAX. Mike Griffin Broker

Realtor / Owner

Diane Griffin

Sandi Sasser-McGlathery Listing / Buying Agent

(813)976-3607

(813)504-0266

(813)719-0358

Call For Free Market Valuation of Your Home (813) 754-2012 www.RealtyProSales.com

Absolutely fall in love with this beautiful Country Style 6 Br/3 Ba home with a 4-Bay carport located on 8.66 acres of land zoned for horses w/36x36 stable complete with electric and water and a large detached workshop. Enjoy your very own pond and shooting berm on the rear of property. Interior of home has been completely updated and exterior of home has both a 55x10 screened Lanai and a 55x10 open front porch. Living area of home is 4048 sf, 6348 sf total. No HOA or Deed Restrictions. $650,000

Gorgeous WATERFRONT 4 Br/2.5 Ba Tri-level home overlooking Blue Heron Cove enjoys fishing, swimming, canoeing and paddle boarding directly out your back door. This home is 2732 sf living area & 3334 sf total; all located on a well-manicured .66 acre Lot. Upgrades include New Roof; AC system 2012, updated interior, insulated Hurricane Proof Windows 2009, New Exterior Paint, detached metal storage shed and a Lake fed Irrigation System for Yard. No HOA or deed restrictions. $329,000

Gorgeous 4/2/2 block home in a deed restricted gated community w/ private road that is move-in ready. Home includes new AC system in 2015, Cathedral Ceiling Fans, Great Room, Formal Dining Room, His/Her Walk-in Closets, Garden Tub, Walk-in Shower, large kitchen w/ stainless appliances, French Doors leading out to Screened-in Lanai, lush landscaping, irrigation, and fenced rear yard. Not located in a Flood-Zone. $259,000

Stunning 7.8 Acre Home w/ huge Workshop! This is a 4/3/3 Home includes 2 Mstr Bdrms, Open Floor Plan, updated kitchen w/ granite countertops, 30x32- 3 Car Garage, insulated and equipped w/ electric and plumbed for compressed air lines; Gated Entry, Circular Drive. 60x40 Metal Workshop. Fish out of your pond while looking for Deer, Turkey and Wild Hog! Not located in a flood zone and has NO HOA or deed restrictions. $659,000

This Bungalow style home sits on 9+ acres, gated, fenced and ready for your livestock or horses. Features include a wood-burning fireplace, wooden floors, oversize Master Bedroom and bath, high ceilings, full kitchen, metal roof and screened lanai; includes a large storage building, horse stalls and your very own pond. New A/C unit recently installed. No deed restrictions or HOA. $329,000

This beautiful 4 Br/3 Ba home sits on an oversized premium lot in the desirable section of Forest Park. Interior features include a popular 3 way split floor plan, separate living and family room, large master bathroom and the view of a large pond from the master bedroom. The 4th Bedroom comes with a built in Murphy bed and perfect for overnight visitors. Welcome Home!!! $289,000

Real Talk about

REAL ESTATE

with Sandi Sasser-McGlathery

T

he most common question I get asked as a Realtor is how’s the real estate market? I thought now is a great opportunity to talk about how homes are selling here locally. The Plant City Real Estate Market is as good as our strawberries are sweet! We have been in a growth pattern for at least the last 5 years with each year seeing prices increase and reduced days on the market. In a typical real estate market, you would see a slow down during the Fall months, but we are not in a typical market and the market is still moving and homes are still selling with consistent numbers. Important Statistics for the month of September in Plant City: 1. Active Listings for the month of September were at 390, which is the lowest amount for any month this year. Low inventory has been a problem for buyers and the pattern for 2018. 2. The Median Sales Price for the month of

September is approximately $209,000 with an average of 17 Days on the Market. 3. Homes are being sold at approximately 98% of list price. If you have been considering making a move and either buying or selling a home, please give me a call for a FREE BUYER/SELLER CONSULTATION. BUYERS: ask me how to receive a FREE APPRAISAL (approximately a $400 value). SELLERS: ask me about my OCTOBER LISTING INCENTIVE! Personally, many of you may notice the name change and I am pleased to announce my marriage to Jock McGlathery on September 1, 2018. Only the name has changed, same great agent, same great service, and same great RE/MAX office to service your Plant City real estate needs!

Sandi was born and raised in Plant City, FL and graduated from Plant City High School. She enjoys Plant City’s small-town charm and big town amenities. A licensed Realtor with over 14 years of experience in residential and commercial property sales along with an extensive background in residential and commercial leasing. Sandi presently resides in the Plant City Historical District and has the experience to help buyers find the home of their dreams and the knowledge to help sellers receive top dollar.

Sandi Sasser-McGlathery RE/MAX Real Estate Professionals 316 N. Alexander St. Plant City, FL 33563 813.719.0358 www.sandisellstampa.com

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RISING STAR PLANT CITY HIGH SCHOOL QUARTERBACK

Braxton

Plunk By Taryn Storter Braxton Plunk, a senior at Plant City High School, is the quarterback for the varsity football team. This two-year team captain is recognized for his exceptional athletic abilities, as well as his leadership on the field. “Football is my favorite sport because it takes a full team effort to succeed, counting and relying on each other to meet a common goal,” said Braxton. “Plus, I enjoy the physicality of the sport.” Braxton has had the honor of being an All-County football player and named an honorable mention on the Florida All-State team. When asked where he finds his inspiration, Braxton said, “I find my inspiration in honoring my Lord, Jesus Christ, and making my family, as well as my Raider family, proud.” As team captain, Braxton has great aspirations for the Raiders. His goal is for his team to go further than any Raider team has gone in the playoffs. At this point, Plant City High is headed towards this event, as their current record is 7-1, at the time of publication. Braxton has used his skills to give back to his community. He has been an assistant coach for various Plant City Little League baseball teams, as well as the Plant City Dolphin football team. When giving advice to younger athletes, he says athletes should have a purpose to play. Enjoy every minute and create relationships, while working hard, every chance you get. As for the future, Braxton hopes to earn a scholarship to play football for a university. He plans to earn a degree in journalism, in hopes of one day becoming a sports broadcaster. He also would like to coach football at some point in the future. PAGE

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SPORTS

Sports Team of the Month Strawberry Crest High School Swim Team losing that many swimmers in one year,” said Coach Bonanno. “Most have been with us for all four years. We will have to fill some pretty big shoes next year, especially on our boys’ team.”

BY TARYN STORTER

Roster:

SCHS Seniors (left to right): Melanie Flott, Emily Scemica, and Kaitlyn Caputo.

T

he Strawberry Crest Varsity Swim Team is an exceptional group composed of incredible swimmers. Not only do the swimmers succeed in the pool, but they also support one another in everyday life. They are truly a family. The team has had an unbelievable record for the last four years. The boys are working towards their fourth straight undefeated season, while the girls are striving for their third. Both the boys and girls have a 2-0 record for the 2018 season so far. Coach Paul Bonanno has coached the Chargers for five years. He explained that the team is close in and out of the pool. “They have created such a strong support system and not just at the pool,” said Bonanno. “It is not uncommon to see our upperclassman helping underclassman with homework or even tutoring them before and after practice. They really look out for each other and put inreal time to help each other achieve.” Bonanno said his favorite memory

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as the coach of the team, was last season when the conference win by the girls’ team. “The meet was so close that we honestly counted ourselves out,” said Bonanno. “When the scores were announced it completely took the girls by surprise. Obviously, they freaked out, but it was the genuine look of excitement mixed with shock on their faces that I'll never forget.” The Crest Swim team is 37 swimmers strong. There are four captains and six assistant captains. Melanie Flott, Emily Scimeca, Rob Haywood, and James “JP” Prescott are the captains and the backbone of the team. The assistant captains are Rebekah Clark, Alexandra Haasser, Katherine Kanyayev, Bryce McCool, Shelby Kelly, and Abdiel Rosario. These individuals have created a great environment for the entire team. This season, the swim team has 17 seniors. When these veteran swimmers graduate, Coach Bonanno knows the team will need to rebuild. “It's going to be a huge blow

Seniors • Rebekah Clark (Assistant Captain) • Layne Pullen (Diver) • Melanie Flott (Captain) • Emily Scimeca (Captain) • Ashley Piccillo • Anna Ress • Prescilla Shreive • Caitlyn Caputo • Rob Haywood (Captain) • Bryce McCool (Assistant Captain) • Drew Hayward • Shelby Kelly (Assistant Captain) • Ayden Kelly • James “JP” Prescott (Captain) • Zach Baker • Dakota Cappel • Johnny Torres

Juniors • Alexandra Haasser (Assistant Captain) • Indira Alur • Katherine Kanyayev (Assistant Captain) • Alanna Gallastegui Sophomores • Adrienne Flott (Diver) • Callie McCool • Serenity Adams (Alternate) • Alexander Lipson • Abdiel Rosario (Assistant Captain) • Braden Raburn • Carson “Will” Haywood Freshmen • Kylene Wright • Jailyn Lopez-Nevarez (Alternate) • Nadine Alur • Katherine Brock Lopez • Makaylah Kennedy • Bailey Palmer (Diver) • Adam Thrasher • Maxim Popov • David Gomez

Ayden Kelly swims freestyle at County Championships


You see them in Movies, T.V. Commercials and in Magazines!

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O’Neal & Sons Upholstery

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Before

After

Fall Market & Concert

SATURDAY, NOV. 10, FAITH LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH 3409 Paul Buchman Hwy., Plant City, FL 33565

MARKET HOURS: 12pm - 7pm FREE CONCERT 5pm on the lawn www.mylighthouse.church PAGE

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w/Christian Country artists:


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EXTRA

Wellington Reyes BY HEATHER DAVIS

T

he beauty of art is when you are free to create a true expression of yourself. For artist Wellington Reyes, this is his main focus as he creates. His art is a true reflection of who

he is. Wellington is a self-taught artist who has spent countless hours honing his craft and his “brand” until he was ready to put it forth into the public eye. The brand he works under is Afro Shades Custom Prints. The purpose of the brand is so that he is a person who not only creates art, but also is able to put out a name that reflects his look, personality, and attitude. To meet Wellington in person it is easy to see how and why his “brand” is so appealing. “People want more than just a piece of art,” said Wellington. “They also want to buy a piece of art that truly represents who I am." Wellington’s illustrated paintings and sketches are created with ink pens colored with Copic and acrylic paints. He also does portraits that have a sketched-type of feel and embodies what a person looks like. Much of his artwork is inspired by what he sees in Pop Culture, music, and books. Since creating his brand and style, Wellington has nonstop been involved in art shows. His most recent art show was a food and art event in Plant City at the historic Bing Rooming House and African American Museum called “A Taste of Laura Street.” There, he participated as an artist doing live paintings. Wellington also is an active participant with the group MAKE Plant City. He works very hard actively participating and being a part of the art scene. “The Universe brings me what I put out,” Wellington stated. His goals are to continue to participate in many more art shows as well as expanding into and branding apparel. To view the artwork of Wellington and to keep up with his many events you can look him up at Afroshades.com or follow his Instagram at Afroshadesprints.

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Dear Hillsborough County Voter, I want to be a judge in part because of the worst day in my 26 year legal career. I showed up to select a jury, the judge refused to let our expert witness testify and threatened my client with jail if she lost. My client had never been in the criminal justice system before. She is just an ordinary person like you and me. Instead of getting her day in court, she entered a plea to avoid jail. The system failed her and as an experienced attorney and a strong advocate for my client, I still could not protect her. I vowed on that day to someday become a judge so that whoever came before me would get their day in court and not be penalized. I hope I have earned your support. Please vote on or before November 6th for E. Michael Isaak for County Court Judge, Group 8. Respectfully,

Michael Isaak

FAIRNESS AND INTEGRITY IN THE COURTROOM FAMILY

Lives in Tampa with wife Betsy, daughter Sophia and son Jackson. Attends Idlewild Baptist Church.

PROFESSIONAL

26-year legal career Successful private practice for 21 years Former Assistant State Attorney Admitted to the United States Supreme Court (2003)

OVER 300+ ADDITIONAL

LEGAL, COMMUNITY AND ELECTED OFFICIAL ENDORSEMENTS including

PLANT CITY MAYOR RICK LOTT

AWARDS & COMMUNITY

State Attorney’s Long Term Service Award, 18th Circuit Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Award of Excellence (1993, 1994, 1995) St Joseph’s Hospital Foundation Board of Directors

VOTE BY NOVEMBER 6TH

The Most Experienced and Qualified Candidate in Hillsborough County Court

Mark Proctor Soil & Water Conservation

Charleene Closshey & Mayor Rick and Di Lott

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Courtney Paat and Kayla Drawdy

Political advertisement paid for by E. Michael Isaak for County Court Judge, Group 8. Political advertisment paid for by E. Michael Isaak for County Court Judge, Group 8.

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Roy Davis


EXTRA

Wanda’s

Words of Wisdom BY WANDA “LEWIS” ANDERSON

H

appy Halloween… It’s that time of year when all the kids look forward to getting loads of candy. If you plan to host a Halloween party be sure to include tonic water and a black light. Tonic water glows when a black light is near. Simply add tonic water to ice cube trays or any Halloween mold and freeze. Your guests will love it. Pumpkin Cooler, hollow out the center of the pumpkin and fill with your favorite bottled drinks and cover with ice. If you’re carving a pumpkin or cutting shapes from a gourd here’s a great tip to lengthen the shelf life: Just rub a little Vaseline on the cut edges. Need a facial? Let’s try a Pumpkin facial cream and cleanser. Pumpkin contains beta-carotene; zinc; potassium; vitamins A, C, and E; and antioxidants which are all good for your skin. You can make your own skin cream by mixing 2 tablespoons of pumpkin purée with 1/2 teaspoon of honey and 1/2

teaspoon of soy or almond milk. If you'd like, you can add a drip or two of your favorite essential oil, such as soothing lavender to the mix. Here’s a great tip for making a fall planter. Pumpkins and mums just go together. You can place a potted mum or other colorful fall plant inside a scooped out pumpkin. Add some raffia or moss, and you have a quick and easy fall decoration for your porch, patio, or deck. Whether you require a few small serving bowls or one large serving bowl I have just the tip for you. Remove the seeds and scoop out the pulp. Then fill the pumpkin shells with your favorite fall soup and serve. You can also use it as a bowl for punch or for cider, if you prefer. (Just be sure to put a bowl or liner inside to prevent contamination between the pumpkin and whatever you're serving.) I hope everyone has a safe Halloween. Until next time relax, enjoy and be thankful… PAGE

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EXTRA

SPONSORED BY

Candy’s Corner BY CANDY OWENS

H

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FUNERAL HOME • MEMORIAL GARDENS www.HopewellFuneral.com

Those AUTUMN LEAVES keep falling down, And around the corner you might just see a clown. Or perhaps a scary witch with an ugly green face, It’s a vision you might simply want to erase. Oh! Look there’s a princess wearing a crown, Followed by a fairy twirling round and around. There are pumpkins, ghosts, and so many scary sights, To help us remember that it’s HALLOWEEN night! alloween has become one of the most popular holidays in the United States over the past 125 years and is now second only to Christmas. Dressing up in costumes, decorating houses and yards with Halloween decorations and of course, the beloved ritual of trick-or-treating have made Halloween one of the most fun, looked forward to, and revered holidays by people of all ages. But where did this holiday come from and where did all these rather unusual customs get their start? Let’s take a quick look at the history of Halloween and the origin of the traditions so many people enjoy today. Like many other holidays, Halloween has evolved and changed throughout history. Over 2,000 years ago people called the Celts lived in what is now Ireland, the UK, and part of Northern France. November 1 was their New Year’s Day. They believed the night before the New Year (October 31) was a time when the living and the deceased came together. More than a thousand years ago the Christian church named November 1 All Saints Day (also called All Hallows.). This was a special holy day to honor the saints and other people who had passed away for their religion. The night before All Hallows was called Hallows Eve. Later the name was changed to Halloween. Like the Celts, the Europeans of that time also believed the spirits of the deceased would visit the earth on Halloween. So on that night people wore costumes that looked like ghosts or other creatures. They thought if they dressed like that, spirits would leave them alone. The tradition of Halloween was carried to America by the immigrating Europeans. Some traditions changed

HOPEWELL

a little, though. For example, on Halloween in Europe some people would carry lanterns made from turnips. In America, pumpkins were more common. So people began putting candles inside them and using them as lanterns. That is why you see jack-o’-lanterns today. I know there has been so much change Halloween traditions through the years, but I sure am glad that by the time I came along Halloween was celebrated just the way it should be. Let’s ask a few people from my generation their thoughts on Halloween. Connie Bonds- Personal Lines Insurance Agent said: “Oh, I just loved the Halloween Carnivals at Cork Elementary. I was a student there back in the early 1960s. It was such a happy time and I had so much fun with my friends. We all dressed up in our homemade costumes and walked around the carnival talking, laughing, playing games, eating all sorts of goodies, and just having the best time.” Jeremy Lofstrom- “Owner-inTraining” of The Whistle Stop Café said: “I was about 10 years-old and out trick-or-treating in my neighborhood when my friends and I walked toward our neighbor’s house. We spotted a man dressed up like the character Michael Myers (from the Halloween movie series) just sitting in a lounge chair in the middle of his driveway, staring straight ahead. There was no way I was going up to him to get some candy. I was scared to death.” Lori McGinnis Yarborough- life long Plant City resident, mother of two very active high school students, and community volunteer said: “I just loved the Halloween Carnivals at Bryan Elementary. I remember dressing up like a big black spider and walking across the stage on my hands during the costume contest.”

FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1971

Stewart Ross- Insurance Agent said: “SNICKER BARS!!!” I just loved to go Trick or Treating so I could get Snicker Bars.” Allen Merrill- Born and raised in Plant City, everybody’s friend loved by all, and son of the late J.D. Merrill, a former Mayor of Plant City said: “I loved to go Trick or Treating and loved the Wilson Elementary Halloween Carnivals. There was nothing like them. But, when I became a teenager, I loved to crawl up on the roof of our house and drop eggs on the unsuspecting Trick or Treaters. HAHAHA!! Julie Willis Futch- Plant City native, Little Miss Plant City of 1970, 1977 Strawberry Festival Queen Court Member, and artist said: “The Halloween Carnivals at Jackson Elementary are my favorite memories of Halloween. One year my Mother was in charge of the Haunted House. She borrowed a genuine casket from one of the funeral homes here in town and had my brother Jodi pop out of the casket as kids walked by. After the carnival was over, the funeral home was closed, so we had to load it up in the back of my parent’s station wagon and take it home with us until the funeral home reopened. I had to ride in the back of the wagon with the casket. I was scared to death even though I knew it was empty. I have not, nor will I ever forget that Haunted House and ride home with that casket for the rest of my life.” Halloween holds such wonderful memories for me. There is no way to describe the excitement I felt through the years as a child when I was dressed up in my costumes. The Halloween Carnivals at Jackson Elementary were second to none. We had costume contests, chicken and rice suppers, rummage sales, hamburger and hot dog stands, sweet shops with the best homemade cakes, pies, and candies, clown dunking booths, bean bag toss, Ring the Milk Bottles, Pick up the Ducks for a prize, going fishing for prizes with old cane poles, French fry and cotton candy booths, snow cones, popcorn, and pickles on a stick. We even had

our fathers dress up and participate in a “Miss America” contest (Now that brought the house down!!). My favorite of all were the haunted houses. Those were the thrill of a lifetime for us kids. All of that, along with the scary movies like: Dracula, The Mummy, The Wolfman, Frankenstein, Abbot and Costello Go To the Wax Museum, Vincent Price’s The Tingler, House on Haunted Hill, Night of the Living Dead, and of course, Charlie Brown’s Great Pumpkin helped set the mood. But these were not to be outdone by visions of bags full of candies from Trick or Treat night, carving pumpkins with my family, and the cool crisp air of Fall. Even the television stations ran commercials by the Kraft Company showing a mother’s hand dipping apples on a stick into a pot of hot bubbly caramel and the same hand slicing a big and rich piece of Kraft Philadelphia Cheesecake. Now how was that for setting the mood? As the seasons change and time marches on, we now find ourselves in a world where Halloween, Halloween Carnivals, and trick-or-treating are being done away with. Why? Because some people say that Halloween promotes evil. How in the name of all that is good and made with love be considered wrong? Our parents went out of their way to make the best Halloween carnivals, costume parades, dunking booths, chicken and rice suppers, popcorn and snow cone booths, and haunted houses for us. They decorated, helped us carve pumpkins, sewed costumes, took us trick-or-treating, and yes…some of our mothers even made Kraft Caramel Apples on a stick. HAHAHA!! I just know you could ask any person 40 years or older about Halloween and you would not have one person who didn’t smile, chuckle, and have happy thoughts of their childhood Halloweens. I think people need to stop and think about it and stop over thinking!! Happy Halloween and trick-or-treat!


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EXTRA

Candy’s Gettin’ Serious! BY CANDY OWENS

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ome Was Not Built In A Day! But did you know that they worked on it each and every

day? The Cave you fear to enter holds the treasures you seek. The comfort you desire is on the other side of the discomfort you avoid. Figure out what matters. Figure out what's in the way. And then figure out why you're allowing that. Be strong enough to stand alone, smart enough to know when you need help, and brave enough to ask for it. On any one day, you can change the direction of your life. On that my friends, I give you my word. When I began this journey to get

healthy I had a list a mile long of all the things that I would have to get rid of, like: my time, my precious TV time, my bread, my chocolate, my potatoes, my chips, my french fries, my cheesecake, my gravy, my donuts, my Thousand Island salad dressing, my pasta, and on and on and on. Well, you know what? I am learning the hard way that this has been a waste of my time to let those few little things control my life. In fact, those things can consume your life and they can destroy your life and they can ruin your health if you let them. Those foods are always going to be there in your life. You just have to make the choice to replace those things with exercise and healthier

foods. Your body craves healthy foods. Would you shove cheap and dirty gas into the tank of your high dollar Mercedes or would you keep it running smooth and sleek with Premium fuel? You know that your vehicle will run better and last much longer if you treat your engine with tender loving care. I have an example that I would like to share with you: Two weeks ago I went to my hair salon for my cut and color. My stylist looked at my hair and asked me what I had been doing differently? ( I was scared to death that she was going to tell me that my hair was getting thinner.) She said that she could not believe how much healthier and how much thicker my hair is getting. I

thought for a minute and then it came to me. I have lost weight, I have been exercising six days a week for several months now, and I have been able to get off of a few medications. That's it!!! I am putting better things in my fuel tank and I am treating my engine with tender loving care!!! Out of all the things that I am learning in this journey, I know one thing that is for sure about Mike Gartz.. Gartz is my Trainer, my Coach, my Confidante, and my selfless friend who is helping me find the important things that I had lost somewhere along the line, like my courage, my health, my hope, my self-confidence, and my smile. And that, boys and girls, is priceless! PAGE

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EXTRA

Leaders in Faith Pastor Mike Fredette Liberty Baptist Church Takes Feeding Folks Seriously

BY CHERYL JOHNSTON

W

hen Mike Fredette and his wife Gina moved to Florida from Massachusetts in 2009, they became involved with the homeless ministry at First Baptist Church of Dover, Meals on Wheels and two other feeding programs. Three years later, Pastor Jimmy Jones of Westside Baptist (established in 1948; re-established as Liberty Southern Baptist in 2009) invited them to visit because their children attended school together. “We expected to go once and even brought a friend, but once we saw the need and how the church was hurting, we began to volunteer,” explained the now Pastor Fredette. “There was no food program then, so we did repairs and led the youth. We just loved on the approximately 80 children coming on Sunday mornings and had them invite their friends.” “My father was in poor health, so we went to food banks during my Massachusetts childhood,” he added. “When a little boy here asked one day for something to eat, all we had for the line of 10 children was graham crackers. So we ordered pizza and took them home. Then with plastic shelving, refrigerator and freezer, we turned the former pastor’s office into a mini-pantry. We started receiving donations from other ministries, including Ministry of Hope in Lithia, which connected us with Feeding America.” He continued, “Now we’re blessed with so much food that we spend $1,600 monthly for fuel, truck lease and insurance to pick up three times weekly.” This church is serious about God’s command to “Feed My sheep.” At 6:00 a.m on Wednesday mornings, volunteers arrive at 2505

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West Granfield Avenue to unload, organize, and at the 8:00 a.m. distribution, give away 45 pallets of food (34,875 pounds) in a five-hour period to serve approximately 400 people from Mulberry, Lakeland, and eastern Hillsborough County. Among those are 45% elderly, 25% single moms, 15% disabled, and 15% struggling families/singles who can’t make ends meet. “We’re serving only 2-3% of Plant City’s homeless population,” Pastor Fredette shared. “But, in obedience, we’re doing all we can to see none go hungry. The Holy Spirit sends people in need and we’re just trying to be dependable in helping meet those needs.” Almost every volunteer was once a customer. “We’re all commissioned to make disciples, so we also have a discipleship program,” Fredette offered. “Once people in need are blessed with food, they attend church, accept the free gift of salvation, get baptized, and see their lives transformed. Then they want to serve.” “The first church in Acts- Chapter 6, had a food ministry and appointed deacons,” the determined Fredette explained of his motivation. “From Genesis when Adam and Eve ate the forbidden fruit to stories of planting seed, harvesting, gleaning, and feeding – all the way to Revelation where the locusts ate the crops – more than 1,400 biblical references involve food. We believe the biggest physical gift from God, other than His Son Jesus, is food, and that every church is commissioned to follow this early church example.” Gina Fredette also teaches children weekdays in the Liberty VPK program she directs. During the Florida Strawberry Festival, the church feeds carnival

Pastor Mike and Gina Fredette

workers as well, most of whom are poor, hungry and have few clothes. Liberty served 5,000 meals its first year, 10,000 the second, and 14,000 last year during the 10-day event. “Moving to Plant City is the best thing we’ve ever done,” Fredette said. “We pray for this God-blessed city and its untapped power. Every church can do more. I encourage everyone to view the compelling Southern Baptist Convention video on our Facebook page and organize

your church’s program to offer help in your neighborhoods.” He continued, “When we began, Liberty had eight members. I like to be a pastor people can approach, to be available for counseling, visiting and praying. Our style is very handson. Today more than 100 attend regularly. Originally they needed physical food, but now they have discovered spiritual food is even more precious.”


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EXTRA

Ethan Martin Lexi Wallace

Senior of the Month - SCHS BY HALEY GARRETT

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exi Wallace is the perfect example of an involved and intelligent student. As an honors student, she holds 5.6 grade point average and is ranked in the Top 30 of the senior class. Her peers admire her dedication to the school and her kind heart. She is involved in multiple honor societies including National Honor Society, American Sign Language Honor Society, and is a four-year member of the International Thespian Honor Society. Lexi is also a team leader in her yearbook class. In 2017, Lexi volunteered at Burnett Middle School and noticed that the deaf and hard of hearing children lacked access to books. Lexi wanted to help the children better understand the world

around them. She worked with the deaf and hard of hearing teacher and organized a book drive for the children. Lexi’s efforts resulted in the collection of over two boxes full of books for the children. Outside of school and volunteering, Lexi enjoys being active, traveling, snow skiing, horseback riding, reading and photography. She works at a tutoring center in Tampa called Mathnasium, where she tutors children. She plans is hopeful her tutoring job can fund her way through college. She plans to attend the University of South Florida and major in Mass Communications, with a concentration in Journalism. She also wants to be a photojournalist for National Geographic.

About the Writer: SCHS senior Haley Garrett serves her school on the yearbook staff and as Treasurer for the Student Council and Vice-President of the school’s choir. In her free time, the National Honor Society member and National Society of High School Scholars member enjoys singing, playing guitar and sharing her passion for music with others. Haley, who also teaches guitar, plans to attend Eckerd College in St. Petersburg to further her studies in Music Business.

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Senior of the Month DHS BY HAILEY REYES

E

than Martin, a high-performing senior at Durant High School, certainly has a love for learning, but he also has a unique passion for ice hockey. It is hard to miss the way his smile grows and how his eyes light up when he is given an opportunity to speak about his favorite sport. Martin has always had a strong interest in hockey, but due to the high costs of equipment, Martin was not able to play hockey until his junior year at Durant. Martin made the junior varsity club team at Durant in 2017 and during that season, created some of what he describes as his best memories. “Probably the most memorable experience would be hockey tryouts for the team—the intensity level in the sport is something you need to get accustomed to,” said Martin. “It was a good experience stepping up to the

challenge and making the team.” Martin surely is motivating in his own right: he has a remarkable academic record at Durant, scoring 1430 on the SAT, a 5 on the Advanced Placement (AP) English Language Exam, and a 4 on the AP Chemistry Exam. This year Martin is taking AP Calculus, AP Astronomy, and AP Physics; putting him on the course to achieve his dream, which is to attend the University of Southern California and eventually to work for either SpaceX or NASA. Martin has additionally been active in the criminal justice program for four years at Durant. Martin says he has loved learning about the American justice system, and that he is currently working on obtaining an unarmed security guard license by taking the Criminal Justice 4 class.

About the Writer: Hailey Reyes is a senior at Durant High School and is the Editor-in-Chief of Writing and Design for the PawPrint Newspaper. She has been active in many sports and clubs while at Durant, but she is most passionate about her involvement with the PawPrint. Throughout her time on PawPrint staff, she has most enjoyed writing political opinion articles and serious news pieces. When she isn't writing for the PawPrint, Hailey can be found running, creative writing, playing with her cat, or reading war satire. Hailey plans to major in journalism in college.


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SATURDAY OCTOBER 27, 2018 11 AM to 1 PM

Loetscher Auto Parts, LLC SELL YOUR USED or JUNK CAR TODAY

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3302 SYDNEY ROAD PLANT CITY, FL BRING THIS AD IN AND RECEIVE

10% OFF Expires 11/30/2018

HOSTED BY THE ARTS COUNCIL OF PLANT CITY

Plant City Chilifest Cookoff Robert W. Willaford Railroad Museum 102 North Palmer Street, Plant City, FL 33563 To enter your prize winning Chili contact: Darcy Stottlemeyer allabloom@hotmail.com 813-567-1287 Or Marsha Passmore mappmore@msn.com 813-245-2244

Arts Council of Plant City Plantcityarts.com Myers and Wright, P.A. Billy and Marsha Passmore

Dodie White

Joe and Melanie Knox PAGE

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Maggie Carlisle William and Gwendolyn Thomas

LOETSCHERAUTO.COM


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Save time. Order online.

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PLANT CITY: 238 W. Alexander St See our full menu anytime at fazolis.com PAGE

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DINING

Fazoli’s Fast. Fresh. Italian.

BY ANTHONY BOLESTA | PHOTOS BY CIERRA CRAFT 238 W. Alexander Street Open daily 11 AM to 10 PM 813-704-6749 www.fazolis.com Cash and Credit Cards Accepted

Clockwise: Chicken Carbonara $8, Ultimate Spaghetti $8, and Buffalo Chicken Mac ‘n Cheese $7

on a garlic sub roll, toasted to perfection for $7. Ultimate Sampler Fettuccine Alfredo, Penne with Meat Sauce, Spaghetti and Meatballs, Lasagna with Meat Sauce for $8.

Italian Deli Trio Salad: A bed of crisp lettuce, topped with grape tomatoes, olives, croutons, and a trio of Genoa salami, Capicola, and Ham for $7.50

T

erri and Livingston Chatman have lived in Florida all their lives and frequented Fazoli’s in the early 2000s. However, around 2007, Fazoli’s across the Sunshine State began slowly disappearing from the Florida market, and eventually was gone completely. Having prior experience in the business world as owner/operators of multiple fast food restaurants, the Chatmans sought to revive Fazoli’s presence in the state. Since Feb. 13, 2018, the Chatmans have run the only Fazoli’s currently in the state, allowing Plant City the exclusive chance to delve into what Fazoli’s is all about: “The same high-quality food minus the thirty minute wait times that you’ll see at other Italian restaurants.” The Chatmans stand by their product, guaranteeing that everything is

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cooked to order and free of artificial ingredients. “Most Fazoli’s in the past did very well in smaller markets and Plant City has been very welcoming of us, so we are very happy to be in Plant City.”, the Chatmans explained when asked about what drew them to Plant City as a location. It’s this unique fusion of the Chatmans business experience, their own personal love for Fazoli’s, and the opportunity that smaller markets provide that make the experience for customers the highest level of quality and convenience. Customer favorites include these must-try dishes: The Meatball da Vinci Which comprises of Fazoli's signature Meatballs, Pepperoni, and melted sliced Mozzarella cheese

Chicken Carbonara Spaghetti topped with creamy Alfredo sauce with hand-chopped bacon, roasted chicken, Parmesanroasted broccoli, and peas. Topped with freshly ground black pepper and Parmesan cheese for $8. Double Slice and Whole Pizza Which can be cheese or pepperoni, and for $5 and $11 respectively. Fazoli’s also offers catering for any size event and is available any day of the year, even on major holidays. Any occasion is possible with Fazoli’s catering, be it wedding receptions, rehearsal dinners, baby showers, etc. Fazoli's Catering will help make your special event an especially delicious one. As for non-catering specials, customers will be able to choose Two half portion menu items and a drink for $5. Available Monday through Friday until 4 p.m.

On Mondays, the special is a $7 Pepperoni or Cheese Whole Pizza. Tuesdays are where kids are king, with $2 Kids Meals with the purchase of any adult entrée. Kids 12 and under (Limited to 3). Wednesday allows seniors sixty-two and up to take part in the $5 Senior Deal (5 p.m. to 8 p.m.). Fast food and Italian may not seem like your usual blend of restaurant genres, but Fazoli’s has a day and time of the week for everyone to take part in the unique experience. Whether you want to dive into high-quality pasta or have a healthy salad, Fazoli’s is the place for a fast, fresh, and Italian experience! Restaurant Amenities: • Catering • Drive-thru • Take-out • Gift Cards • Email Discount Club • Vegetarian Options • Employment Opportunities • Kid's Night • Kid's Menu • Lunch Special • Handicap Accessible • Online Ordering • Loyalty App


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events can't miss

Thursday, Oct. 18 Lunch: 11AM- Noon; Shotgun Start: 12:30PM This 9-hole scramble event will benefit Hook-A-Hero, a local nonprofit dedicated to providing first responders with outdoor adventures. Breweries finest beers and cider samples available on each hole. Cost: $100 per player Info: FOCUS Magazine, (813) 707-8783

Saturday, Oct. 20 Dine Small Downtown

4-7PM A self-guided foodie experience highlighting downtown PC’s culinary talents from The Corner Store, The Strawberry Tap, and Norma's Plant City Cuban Sandwich Shop, in collaboration with Instagramers of Plant City. The Corner Store 121 Reynolds St. Info: IGersPlantCity@gmail.com

Plant City’s Chilifest Cook-Off

11AM-1PM Taste the culinary talents of Plant City at the Chilifest! A panel of judges will select a winner from the mild, spicy and novelty categories and one team will be honored with the People’s Choice Award. Sponsored by Arts Council of Plant City, Robert W. Willaford Railroad Museum 102 N. Palmer St Cost: $5 Info: Darcy Stottlemeyer, (813) 567-1287

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I-4 Premier Fear Park- Opening Weekend

Sat. Oct. 20

Night Light

Tue. Oct. 25

Bailey Elementary School PTA Fall Festival

Wed. Oct. 31

Happy Halloween!

FOCUS Magazine 1st Annual Hero Golf Tournament

Saturday, Oct. 27

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Fri. Oct. 05

7:30-10PM Each weekend in Oct., Sir Henry’s Haunted Trail & Ominous Descent welcome you to I-4 Premier Fear Park, voted a Top 10 Haunt by The Scare Factor. Explore three half-mile haunted trails, enjoy food vendors, laser tag and escape rooms. Sir Henry’s Haunted Trail 2837 S Frontage Rd Cost: $30, General Admission; $45, VIP All Access Pass; $70, Season Pass; $5, Laser Tag, $5, Escape Room Info: (863) 944-0748, www.sirhenryshauntedtrail.com

7-10PM Three Amazing Bands. One Awesome Night. Come rock in the Fall with the best home-grown Tampa Bay area Christian artists for one awesome night in Plant City. Bring your friends and family! Seating Limited. GracePoint Church 1107 Charlie Griffin Rd Cost: Free Info: Kerry Bergman, 813-759-9383

4:30-7PM Games, prizes and fun! 4 inflatable fun zones, photo opportunities, food, and games. Kona Ice will be on site with shaved Pizza, chips, and drinks will be on sale. Cost: Free entry. Armbands for $10 for first child, $5 for all others in family. Info: Bailey Elementary, (813) 707-7531

Book-A-Ween @ Bruton Memorial Library

10AM-8:45PM Stop by Bruton Memorial Library to pick up a free book on Halloween! A child must be present; costume not required. One book per child, while supplies last. 302 N. McLendon St. Cost: Free Info: Bruton Memorial Library, (813) 757-9215


Sat. Nov. 03

Sat. Nov. 10

3rd Annual Raider 5k Color Run

Check In: 7:30AM, Race: 9AM Participate in this colorful, family fun event, benefiting the PCHS Class of 2019. Runners will be doused with colored powder along the 5k route. All are welcomed to run, walk or stroll. Register online at RaiderColorRun.com. PCHS @ 1 Raider Place Cost: $35 Registration; $30 for students until November 3. $40 day of the race. Info: Lori Yarborough, (813) 478-3886.

41st Annual Pioneer Heritage Day

9AM-3PM Take a step back into history with this annual Plant City family-fun event! Enjoy food vendors, live entertainment, museum exhibits, arts and crafts, and children’s games and activities. 1914 Plant City High School Community Center 605 N. Collins St. Cost: Free to attend; food vendors will be on site. Info: The East Hillsborough Historical Society, (813) 757-9226

Veteran’s Day Memorial Event

10AM Honor fallen servicemen and women at this annual Plant City event. Sponsored by Hopewell Funeral Home and Memorial Gardens. Local students will recite essays titled “What Veteran’s Day Means to Me?” Veteran Memorial @ Courier Field 703 N Wheeler St Cost: Free Info: Marsha Passmore, (813) 245-2244

An Evening of Song with Mildred Green Humphrey & Friends

6PM Join Ms. Humphrey and Friends for an evening of music at Springhead United Methodist Church. The concert is free, but a free will offering will be taken for the church to fund a new air conditioning system. A free gift will be presented to all whom attend. Springhead United Methodist Church 2305 Sparkman Rd Cost: Free Info: Springhead United Methodist Church, (813) 752-5751

Ongoing Mondays Weekly

2nd Tuesdays Monthly

7 AM South Florida Baptist Hospital Community Rm. Info: George Banning, 813-759-1638 Square Dance Lessons 7:30 - 9 PM PC Community Chorale 7 - 9:30 PM Meets every Monday evening Cost: $35 per season Info: Mary Ella Enciso, 813-417-2808; pccchoralesecretary@gmail.com Online: www.pccchorale.org 1st & 3rd Mondays Monthly

10:30 AM @1110 N. Wheeler St. Info: Nancy Miller, 813-754-2544

Plant City Daybreak Rotary Club

Improvement League of Plant City

7 PM Historic Glover School Conference Room 5104 Horton Rd. Info: William Thomas, 813-757-6760

2nd & 4th Mondays Monthly

Plant City Commission Meeting 7:30 PM City Hall, 302 W. Reynolds St. City Clerk: 813-659-4237 (December: 2nd Monday only)

2nd Monday Monthly

Open Mic Night

8:33 PM Come show off your musical or comedic talent Krazy Kup 101 East J Arden Mays Blvd Info: 813-752-1220

3rd Monday Monthly

Family Community Advisory Council (FCAC)

5 - 6:30 PM All are welcome at The Children's Board Family Resource Center at East County monthly discussions about needed services. Children will enjoy the playgroup care & activities. 639 E. Alexander St., Plant City Info: Ladislao Sanchez 813.752.8700

1st Tuesdays Monthly

Economic Development Corp. Meeting

2 PM @PC Chamber unless announced 106 N. Evers St. Info: Jake Austin, 863-712-0655

Arts Council of Plant City

7 PM Chamber of Commerce Public Room 106 N. Evers St. Info: Dodie White, 813-752-5156

GFWC Woman’s Club of Plant City

2nd & 4th Tuesdays Monthly Integrity Business Referrals Breakfast 7:30 AM Networking and Marketplace Ministry BuddyFreddy’s Restaurant 1101 Goldfinch Dr., Plant City Info: Norm Blanton 813-326-0749

American Legion– Norman McLeod Post #26

6 PM @2207 W. Baker St. 813-752-8608 Info: Nancy Miller, 813-754-2544

4th Tuesdays Monthly Hot Coffee Topics

7:45 – 9 AM Krazy Kup 101 E J Arden Mays Blvd Info: http://www.plantcitymainstreet.org; 813-210-9926 Fees: $5 Non-member suggested contribution

Tuesdays Weekly

Plant City Lions Club

12 Noon @BuddyFreddy’s Restaurant 1101 Goldfinch Drive Info: Tony Lee, 813-752-7202

Recovery for Life

6:30 - 8PM 12-step Bible-based program to help w/ addictions Lorena Jaeb Rainbow House 504 N. Palm Dr., Plant City Info: Debbie Ray 813-763-1562

Wednesdays Weekly

Plant City Kiwanis Club

12 Noon Meetings at BuddyFreddy’s Restaurant Info: David Wolf 813-717-9300

Thursdays Weekly

Toastmasters (Chapter 4051) 7:30 - 9 AM PC Chamber Community Room 106 N. Evers St. Info: April Lubrano 813-545-1607

Entrepreneur/Small Business Consulting Services

9AM - 4PM by appointment PC Chamber, 106 N. Evers St. Info: James Chittenden, 813-204-9267 [x62017]

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SPONSORED BY

HOPEWELL FUNERAL HOME • MEMORIAL GARDENS www.HopewellFuneral.com FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1971

COME JOIN THE FOCUS COMMUNITY

“LIKE” US ON FACEBOOK FACEBOOK.COM/ THEFOCUSMAGAZINE

WORD FOR WORD Created by Calvin R. and Jackie Mathews WORD FOR WORD by Calvin R. & Jackie Mathews

ACROSS 1. Dory or dinghy 5. Steffi of tennis 9. Hamster or hound 12. Stringed instrument 16. “__ boy!” 17. Bird of prey 19. Dramatic villain 20. Common __; good judgment 21. Anagrams 24. Like clichés 25. Third set of teeth 26. Realtor’s delights 27. Dog owner 28. Omelet maker’s purchase 29. More urgent 30. Invisible emanation 31. Grand __ Dam 34. “By the Time __ to Phoenix” 35. Plays a role 36. Awful report card 39. Homonyms 43. Rain cats and dogs 44. __ de la Société; Society Islands 45. In poor health 46. Runner Sebastian 47. Antlered animal 48. Suffix for cash or cloth 49. Antonyms 54. Mean Amin 55. Slender 56. White-haired 57. Goes up 58. Neat as __ 59. “Beau __”; Gary Cooper movie 60. Dismounted 61. Rearward 64. Nostalgic song 65. Celtic language 66. Small amount 69. Rhymes 72. Pinnacle 73. Castle or Ryan 74. Certain vote 75. See 81 Down 76. Skin mark 77. Not so much 78. Synonyms 84. Cowboys’ goals, for short 85. Jack in Germany 86. Baseball’s Slaughter 87. Antenna 88. Orangey drink 89. Damages 90. Late Bombeck 91. Not dense 94. Narrow boat 95. Dancing Salome’s mom

99. 100. 102. 103. 104. 105. 106. 107. 108. 109.

Local jargon Palindromes Like a chimney flue Baltic feeder Sail extension Future atty.’s exam Crones Reasonable bedtime Dagger Endings for some biblical verbs

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Night lights Racing sleds Challenged Dog with no pedigree Old phone features Was sore Early third-century year Lubricated Wombs Great pain __ the bill; pays Signal flare Dryer and others Connect verbally Actor Jack __ “See if __!” Set in place Irving Berlin hit Toss __ Bara Rose-colored dye Went out with Insincere Celiac __; digestive ailment Long periods Feel malicious selfsatisfaction Caribbean island Lopsided Tear to bits Lock of hair “Waiting for Lefty” playwright

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S A S H

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G R A E A G L O S T U R E S G G S E E S I T E I L F E A S L I M P I N R N O U G H D E Y E L I T H A N S A N G S E C T L E Y O D T E

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FOCUS Plant City 17-10  

FOCUS Magazine Plant City Edition Issue 17-10 October 2018

FOCUS Plant City 17-10  

FOCUS Magazine Plant City Edition Issue 17-10 October 2018

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