Page 1


FISH


Trust your car insurance with a company named for those it serves. We’ve been taking care of auto owners since 1916. Why trust your insurance with anyone else?

Poppell Insurance, Inc.

503 W. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Blvd. Plant City, FL • 813-752-4155 www.poppellinsurance.com


Plant City’s Hometown Plumber You Can Depend On

FREDDIE MULLIS PLUMBING, INC. (Not F.C. Mullis Plumbing)

Repipe Experts Family Owned & Operated Since 1984

WE GUARANTEE ALL OUR WORK Lic. # RF0066444

BONDED & INSURED Lifetime Plant City Resident

Fast Service

-Leaks Repaired

-Toilets

-Sewer Lines

-Faucets

-Drain Cleaning

-Disposals

-Water Heaters

813-754-0317 www.freddiemullisplumbing.com

Only Plumber Recommended By The


Contents Table of

focusplantcity.com / Issue 16-05 / May 2017

HIGHLIGHTS

36 In this our annual medical issue, we’re pleased to showcase the South Florida Baptist Hospital expansion of its Steve and Krista Howard Heart and Vascular Center. This second state-of-the-art, 768-square-foot cardiac catheterization lab has created the capability for more cardiac services and for lifesaving treatment of ST elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. PAGE

8

16

LOCAL

46

BUSINESS

72

DINING

Among our stories this month are the Future Fair effort to help graduating seniors connect with local employers, the Pregnancy Care Center’s 25th Anniversary Open House, Relay for Life and the upcoming Camp Invention for kids who love science. You can also learn more about the Elks Club and its outreach efforts, along with a story about becoming an EMT.

Our medical issue also features profiles on care providers such as Duke’s Chiropractic, Family Medical Specialists of Florida, Now Care Walk In Clinic, Tooth Caboose, and Watson Clinic, to name a few. Learn more about the professional services conveniently located right here in Plant City.

In honor of Cinco de Mayo, we’re featuring Taco Rey Mexican Grill this month. The winner of our 2017 Readers’ Choice Award for Best Mexican definitely deserves a salute for its tasty food, excellent service, and affordable prices.


PAGE

9


From The Publisher Publisher Mike Floyd mike@floydpublications.com Office Manager Candy Owens cowens@floydpublications.com Managing Editor Cheryl Johnston cjohnston@floydpublications.com Art Director Anthony Sassano asassano@floydpublications.com Distribution Tony DeVane Staff Writers Cheryl Johnston | Barbara Routen | Kelli Tharrington Contributors Gil Gott | Jo-An Lusk | Nate Davis | Candy Owens Natalie Sweet | Mike Goodwine | Wanda Anderson | Katie Loudermilk Anthony Bolesta | Jennifer Jordan | Heather Dykstra | Sherrie Mueller Heather Davis

Got a story idea? Looking to advertise in Focus? Contact us for more information. Floyd Publications, Inc. 702 W. Dr. MLK Jr. Blvd.Plant City, FL 33563 Office 813.707.8783 Fax 813.764.0990 www.focusplantcity.com Standards of accuracy: The goal of the writers at FOCUS Magazine is to provide heart-warming stories that are accurate from the start. Being human, however, we sometimes make mistakes. Please forgive us. So if you notice anything that is incorrect, then please do not hesitate to contact the editorial department and inform it about the fact error. To do so, call (813) 707-8783 or e-mail editorial@floydpublications.com. The staff will fix the error in a timely manner.

M

ay is the month of Mother’s Day and Memorial Day—when we remember our moms and those who served unto death in the military to protect our country. Thinking about these two holidays, I realized what they both have in common is sacrifice. Mothers pretty much lay down their own lives for their children and soldiers have been willing to lay down theirs since even before America was established as a nation. Being a publisher, I’m always on the lookout for fresh story ideas and new ways to present interesting pages for our Focus readers. When I came across this quote by Mitch Albom in his book For One More Day, it struck a chord with me. He wrote, “Behind all your stories is always your mother’s story. Because hers is where yours begin.” And isn’t that the truth. No wonder we all want to honor ours—and not just on Mother’s Day, but every day. How can we ever repay our Moms for their unconditional love? Honestly, we can’t. But what we might try to do is capture her stories through audio, video, or the written word so our children will know their beginnings, too. We’ve all heard the regrets of those who wished they had done that before it was too late. Perhaps this little reminder will encourage you to give it a try. We can ask the same question about repaying our military men and women down through the years, too. The least we can do is to remember the price many have paid and teach our children to do the same, like our mothers did. Hopefully, in the remembering, their stories will live on. If you have one or a few you’d like to share, we’d love to learn more. Here’s hoping your family will make some beautiful memories in May.

FOCUS Magazine is published monthly and is available through local Plant City businesses, restaurants and many local venues. Advertisers warrant and represent the descriptions of their products advertised are true in all respects. Focus Magazine assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. All letters and their contents sent to Focus Magazine become the sole property of Floyd Publications, Inc and may be reproduced thereof. All views expressed in all articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Floyd Publications, Inc. Use or duplication of material used in this publication is prohibited without approved written consent from Floyd Publications, Inc.

Warmest Regards, Mike Floyd PAGE

10


PAGE

11


PAGE

12


PAGE

13


Town Talk of the

Submit your good news to: editorial@floydpublications.com or call it in 813.707.8783

Fifth Gear Band’s bassist, Marc Rodriguez (center), a.k.a “Marc Rod,” an IT technician for Hillsborough County, recently received the coveted 2017 Jerry Spinelli Scholarship Award from the Highlights Foundation for his middle-grade adventure novel,“Tiara Wars: Book 1,” which features the Bruton Memorial Library on the cover. Rodriguez writes under the pseudonym name Rod Martinez (Visit rodmartinez.us online for details).

OK, longtime locals. Raise your hand if you’ve ever enjoyed Bertha Raburn’s Red Velvet or Italian Cream cakes during her employment with the Johnson family-owned BuddyFreddy’s Restaurant when it was located near the Strawberry Festival grounds. Now, offer a high-five to the fantastic cook who just turned 90 on April 28. PAGE

14

Teaching kids to give back to the community is an important job--one that Cork Elementary guidance counselor Tim Godshall takes seriously. In the contest for Area 6 Schools, Cork won first place for elementary and second place overall for collecting 9,300 pounds of non-perishable food donations to the United Food Bank. Students loved that Mr. G had to spend the day on the school’s roof, armed with a megaphone, to heckle anyone within earshot. It’s widely known he would do anything to help children succeed. “We are doing more here than passing tests,” he said. “We want to send out kids who become adults that care about their community.” Many of Plant City’s faithful gathered for the noontime National Day of Prayer 2017 gathering in the auditorium at City Hall - the evening service was held at Life Family Church.

Found on Facebook: Congratulations to Charlie Harris, General Manager of the Holiday Inn Express in Plant City, who just received his trophy for the 2016 Intercontinental Hotels Group “Torchbearer Award.”


PAGE

15


LOCAL

10th Annual Blueberry Festival Keel & Curley Winery Hosts U-Picking Family Fun BY BARBARA ROUTEN

appearance at the festival. The band formed about a year ago and consists of Ron Brutscher on lead vocals and rhythm guitar, Mike Grubb on lead guitar and vocals, Chuck Vaccarello on drums and vocals and Marc Rodriquez, a.k.a. Marc Rod, on bass and vocals. “Of all the venues we’ve played, this is our favorite, and the Blueberry Festival is the most fun event we’ve ever played,” said Grubb. “The reason people like us,” said

Brutscher, “is that we play what our audiences heard and grew up with. Nothing obscure. We want them singing and dancing with us. We’re learning more 80s and 90s music, so we can get the 30- and 40-year-old crowd more involved, too.” Attendees and participants hope that the festival will continue for years to come. For information about Keel & Curley’s upcoming events, visit keelandcurleywinery.com.

Keel & Curley Winery’s Blueberry Festival featured food and craft vendors in the parking lot and throughout the grounds.

T

he tenth-annual Blueberry Festival attracted hundreds of people during two weekends in April. More than 100 vendors of food, drinks and crafts sold their wares on the Keel & Curley Winery grounds. A special strawberry-shortcake wine was available for a limited time, and the blueberry wines, for which the vintner is best known, flowed steadily. Some festival attendees, such as Melissa Gray, previously had come to Keel & Curley only on weekday evenings for the food, ambiance and music on the venue’s covered, outdoor deck. “It’s nice to see what the place is like in the daytime,” said Gray, a Lakeland resident who works in Plant City. “The festival is a more community-friendly, family-oriented event.” With her were her parents, Bill and Sharon Gray, her sister Tiffany Oden, and friends Cathy Jean Baptiste and Camilla Gittens. They enjoyed watching the kids play in the children’s activities area and checking out the booths of local businesses and other sellers.

PAGE

16

Vendors participated from across the Tampa Bay area. Melissa Luria of Tampa, owner of Blessings of Home, brought her homemade jams— typical ones such as blueberry and strawberry and unique, tasty concoctions such as carrot cake jam and apple pie jam. Bruce and Andrea McWilliams, a married couple from St. Petersburg who own Brea’s Coffee, a mobile specialty coffee, tea and frappe bar, sold beverages. Sandy Williams, owner and inventor of Ring-A-Ma-Jiggy, demonstrated her decorative hair ties that double as attractive finger rings until needed for the hair. Jorge Salmeron, Durant High School migrant advocate and coowner of Blue Gold Growers with his wife, Alicia Salmeron, sold fruit trees and sweet, juicy Florida peaches. Contact him at bgg1983@hotmail. com or (813) 748-5817 for Blue Gold Growers’ u-pick hours through May. Scheduled entertainment at the Blueberry Festival included classic rock covers by the Fifth Gear Band (tinyurl.com/fifthgearband). They have performed several times at the winery, but this was their first

Sandy Williams, owner and inventor of Ring-A-Ma-Jiggy, talks about her decorative yet practical hair tie that can be worn on a finger as a ring until needed for the hair.

The Blueberry Festival’s children’s area included a giant-ball track, a bucking shark, inflatables, a petting zoo and pony rides.


You see them in Movies, T.V. Commercials and in Magazines!

Loetscher Auto Parts, LLC SELL YOUR USED or JUNK CAR TODAY

TAMMY HANSON Appearing in New TNT TV Series This Summer. Shell Aviation Lubricants Promotional Event & Air Show. CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT TODAY!

DAK MURPHY Heartland Living Magazine Bridal Fashion Shoot Featured Model.

SARAH SCHERMERHORN Heartland Living Magazine Bridal Fashion Shoot Featured Model.

They’re the JESS ANDERSON MODELS!

All ages & types needed • No experience necessary • Free training

SOUTH FLORIDA AVENUE, SUITE 115 • LAKELAND, FL 33813 863-688-9939 1037Established For 36 Years LIC#1290000013

813.752.3770 3302 SYDNEY ROAD PLANT CITY, FL BRING THIS AD IN AND RECEIVE

10% OFF Expires 6/30/2017

LOETSCHERAUTO.COM

BRIAN LE Publix Training Film and Print Ad Principal Role.

AMANDA LEVASSEUR Shell Aviation Lubricants Promotional Event & Air Show Principal Role.

MASON HILL Heartland Living Magazine Bridal Fashion Shoot Featured Model.

www.jessandersontalentandmodelagency.com Jess Anderson index pg JUNE17.indd 1

4/26/2017 6:33:27 AM

PAGE

17


LOCAL

Camp Invention Register now for STEM Fun with Director Paul Coletti

BY CHERYL JOHNSTON | PHOTOS BY PAUL COLETTI

Camp Invention campers and leaders working on their I Can Invent Design Maker Studio Projects.

T

he amazing “hands on, minds on” Camp Invention is back. Now in its fourth Plant City summer, the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) camp incorporates all subjects as campers learn without even realizing they are learning. Tied in with the National Inventors’ Hall of Fame, Camp Invention has been promoting STEM instruction since the ‘80s. Themed LAUNCH this year, the weeklong camp convenes from June 5-9 in the Grimes Family Agricultural Center at the Strawberry Festival Grounds. From 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m, students will rotate through four learning modules. Paul Coletti, a Plant City resident for nine years and fourth grade teacher of math and science at Walden Lake Elementary, also directs the Gainesville camp, now in its 16th year. “This fun, active and educational week is all about forward thinking,” he said. “Our goal

PAGE

18

in Plant City is 90 campers, with a maximum of 110. I’m so excited Camp Invention is growing its roots.” Registration for Kindergarten through 6th graders costs $235, with a limited number of scholarships available. Students in grades 7 and 8 can be involved for $135 as Leaders in Training. High school and college students can interview with Coletti to be on staff. All teachers are certified. Coletti appreciates the “fantastic local support and encouragement.” He explained, “I know parents want their campers to be safe, engaged, and to have fun. This camp is all about that. Our student to staff ratio can’t be beat. Last year we had 4 staff for every child.” “It meshes with Hillsborough County Standards for instruction perfectly,” he added. “Camp Invention is one summer week during which your child’s creativity, innovation, and problem-solving skills are challenged and developed in fun and exciting ways. Our top

priority is to inspire future innovators and build their confidence in the natural ability to dream and create.” Modules for 2017 include: 1) Duct Tape Billionaire™ Risk-taking, duct-taping dynamos can choose to invent from scratch or select a basic design to make their own. They’ll explore patents, hear how to launch a business, and present their products to mock investors. 2) Mission: Space Makers™ - Mission Control sends teams opportunities to locate and prepare a new planet for human habitation. They’ll design inventions that transform the atmosphere, terrain and ecosystem of an exoplanet. They’ll set up a Space Lab to hatch eggs and grow crystal trees, take on the jobs of tomorrow and explore beyond our galaxy. 3) Have A Blast™ - Your child will fling, fly and float through high-energy air battles while using physics to boost their advantage. Children engineer a variety of

working tools, including “snowball” throwers and a giant air cannon. Everyone builds their own high-tech Bubble Blaster with flashing lights to take home. 4) Operation Keep Out™ - A young inventor’s dream come true, children create the ultimate Spy Gadget Alarm Box to secure treasures. The electrical engineering super spies must decode an invisible ink note, dismantle worn out electronics and then wire their own unique Alarm Box. At Camp Invention, children use creativity, imagination, and inventive thinking skills to solve problems within each environment, building on the previous day’s knowledge. Using upcycled household materials, they are challenged by the teamwork and hands-on fun. For more information or to register your student, please visit campinvention.org to search for the Plant City camp or call Paul Coletti at 813-951-6266.

Camp Invention Campers trying to solve problems in their Epic Eco-Park.


PAGE

19


LOCAL

Law Enforcement Dinner BY TARYN STORTER

Trooper Alain Hernandez-Ginarte, the Florida Highway Patrol Officer of the Year.

T

he East Hillsborough County Law Enforcement Banquet is a major highlight of the year in Plant City. The evening of May 9, 2017 marked the 55th year of this amazing event organized to show our community’s appreciation for our local law enforcement officers. Four individuals are awarded annually as “Officer of the Year” in their respective divisions: Florida Highway Patrol, Hillsborough County Sherriff’s Department, Plant City Police Department, and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The Florida Highway Patrol awarded Trooper Alain HernandezGinarte this extraordinary honor. In 2016, Trooper Hernandez-Ginarte made 180 impaired driver and 15 drug arrests. He also issued 990 other arrest citations and 326

PAGE

20

afloat. In late 2016, Officer Patterson passed away due to a bicycle accident. His legacy will live on through those he impacted in our community. Finally, from the Plant City Police Department, Master Sergeant Dale Peterson was recognized for his service as the one responsible for the special events our local police force covers, including the Florida Strawberry Festival. He works with the FSF Board of Directors as well

as Festival security personnel to ensure that visitors have a safe and enjoyable time. The 55th Annual East Hillsborough County Law Enforcement Banquet was an evening to remember. Once again, this wonderful recognition dinner brought our community together to show appreciation and respect for the men and women who serve locally. Thankfully, the tradition will continue!

Deputy Lowe received the award from the Hillsborough County Sherriff’s Office for Deputy Kevin Smetana, who was absent due to participation in a charity bike ride.

warnings. Through his diligence, he has saved the state of Florida millions of dollars in damages. The Hillsborough County Sherriff’s Office recognized Deputy Kevin Smetana, a key department member since 2010. In October of 2016, he found a suspect from a vague vehicle description in a parking lot and prevented him from escaping. Deputy Kevin Smetana is helping to keep our county safe. From the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Officer Greg Patterson was awarded “Officer of the Year” posthumously. Officer Patterson saved three individuals involved in a Jet Ski accident in Tampa Bay. He jumped into the water, fought against a strong current, and kept the victims Officer Greg Patterson’s daughter, Kaitlyn, received the Officer of the Year from the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission award in memory of her father.


Ornamentals: Nursery Pots Soil Mediums Herbicides Fungicides

Nursery Blend Fertilizers Greenhouse Poly

Agriculture: Fertilizer Crop Protection

Grass Seed Food Plot Seeds

COUPON Free Qt of Weed Killer with a $50.00 purchase

813-752-8342

103 S. Alexander St. Plant City, FL, 33563 Hours of operation: Monday- Friday 7:30am - 5:00 pm

PAGE

21


LOCAL

Little Miss Plant City

BY TARYN STORTER

The 2017 Little Miss Plant City Queen and Court- Queen J-Zell Arazelly Gilbertsen, First Maid Annistyn Faith Griffin, and court members Kacie LeaAnn Harrell, Brooke Sidnei Browning, and Addison Love Griffin.

T

here are many great traditions in the Plant City Community, one of which is the Little Miss Plant City Pageant. For 49 years, five 8-to-10-year-old girls from our city are selected to be ambassadors for the GFWC Jr. Women’s Club and the community of Plant City. These girls represent our town in activities such as Relay for Life, the Strawberry Festival, and the various parades at Christmas and during the Florida Strawberry Festival. The theme of the 2017 pageant was “Be our Guest,” taken from Beauty and the Beast. The stage was enchanted, adorned with roses, greenery, and even Lumiere and Cogsworth made an appearance. The Mistresses of Ceremony were Kellie Hinson Morrow, 2001

PAGE

22

Strawberry Festival Queen, and Kathy Pagliero, a 1999 Strawberry Festival Queen’s Court Member. During conversations with the 2016 Little Miss Plant City Court, the young ladies expressed their sadness about the year ending. Last year’s court included Queen Carlie Elizabeth Braglin, First Maid Gracie Ashlyn Garner, Court Members Kenley Gail Connell, Sarah Grace Sparkman, and Abigail Lee Mullis. Their favorite memories of the year included making lots of friends, riding in parades, posing for too many pictures, and as Kenley Gail Connell exclaimed, “trips to Fred’s Market.” The pageant program consists of the interview, introduction, pageant walk, and for the Top Ten, an

onstage question. Contestants are judged on personality, poise, dress and stage presence. Throughout the competition, the girls have the chance to get to know each other. The night of the pageant, they vote for one girl who was extremely kind and went above and beyond to encourage and support other contestants. This year’s Miss Congeniality is Addison Love Griffin. Also, the girls were asked to obtain sponsorships for the pageant. With $775 in sponsors, Madelynn Marie Hardwick earned the award for most money raised. From among the 46 contestants, the Top Ten finalists were: Bella Grace Bikowski, Madelynn Marie Hardwick, J’Zell Arazelly Gilbertsen,

Annistyn Faith Griffin, Jillian Rayne Starford, Brooke Sidnei Browning, Lily Ann Nance, Addison Love Griffin, Kacie Lynn Culbreth, and Hayven LeaAnn Harrell. After an onstage, rehearsed question, “What does beauty mean to you?” the judges selected the 2017 Little Miss Plant City Court. Brooke Sidnei Browning, Addison Love Griffin, and Kacie LeaAnn Harrell were chosen as court members, Annistyn Faith Griffin was named the First Maid, and J-Zell Arazelly Gilbertsen was crowned 2017 Little Miss Plant City Queen. Congratulations to our newest hometown royalty!

J-Zell Arazelly Gilbertsen’s reaction is priceless when her name was announced as the 2017 Little Miss Plant City Queen.

Three of the Top 5, Annistyn Faith Griffin, Kacie LeaAnn Harrell, and Brooke Sidnei Browning share a tearful hug shortly after they were announced as a part of the court.


LOCAL

Elks Club Cares for Kids BY KELLI THARRINGTON | PHOTOS BY LARRY THARRINGTON

The Elks Club of Plant City donated $2,691.26 to clear the lunch debt of students at area schools. Marty Carroll, the Exhalted Ruler of the Plant City Elks hopes he project will become an annual event. He said, “Helping kids and helping the community is what the Elks are all about.”

H

elping children and Veterans is a priority for the Plant City Elks Lodge. So when Virginia Tharrington, a member of Ladies of the Elks, heard about a need in local schools to pay lunch account deficits, she knew just the place to go. After gathering the information needed Mrs.Tharrington then approached the Elks Club with her findings that 15 out of 17 Plant City Schools carried a lunch debt. “For many children, the only decent meal they will have is that meal at school,” said Tharrington. “We wanted to be sure nothing would stop them from getting it.” But it isn’t just about meeting the physical need that was important to the Ladies of the Elks.It’s also the emotional stigma that follows an inability to pay. When students have accrued five lunch charges and have not paid the debt, they must select an alternative lunch consisting of a cheese sandwich, fruit, and milk. “Schools are aware of those children in need and we do our best not to put any extra stress on them,” said Alicia Wilkerson, Principal at

J.S. Robinson Elementary School in Plant City. She added that the alternative lunch program is district policy. The charges follow the student throughout their school career and if the bill is not paid by the time they graduate, they will not receive a diploma. With that in mind, the Elks Club of Plant City rallied around the idea to pay off all student lunch debt for all Plant City schools. “It’s great! Just another way our community reaches out to help their own,” said Jennifer West, Principal of Lincoln Elementary in Plant City. Sharon Morris, Area 6 Superintendent showed her appreciation at the fish fry dinner hosted by the Elks Club on May 3 to present the checks to the school representatives. “We could not be more excited about this partnership. This is another way to help students be successful.” In total, $2,691.26 was donated to the schools. Marty Carroll, the Exhalted Ruler of the Plant City Elks hopes that the project will be an annual event.”Helping kids and helping the community is what the Elks are all about.” PAGE

23


LOCAL

Pregnancy Care Center 25th Anniversary Walk for Life and Open House BY KELLI THARRINGTON

The morning began with prayer and encouragement by Pastor Greg Davis before the crowd started its walk.

The Pregnancy Care Center’s annual Walk for Life received fundraising help from 184 walkers who registered this year.

S

ince 1992 the Pregnancy Care Center of Plant City has been providing pregnancy and parental counseling and so much more in the 25 years that it has served residents of the eastern Hillsborough County communities. On April 29, 2017, the Center celebrated its 25-year milestone with a public open house to showcase the new facility. More than 100 supporters attended the celebration. The new construction cost of $138,000 was offset by fundraising efforts and a donation of $40,000 from local businesses. From the Center’s annual Walk for Life event on April 8, another $23,693 was raised toward their goal. The morning of the open house also included a Chamber of Commerce ribbon cutting. Darlene Davis, the PCC Executive Director cut the red ribbon to welcome the community inside to see the renovations. “We are excited to welcome you and to thank you for all of your efforts,” she said. Stepping in through the front

PAGE

24

door, clients are welcomed in to the reception area. Once their needs are established they will move on to other areas in the center. The rooms are decorated to feel homelike and inviting. “We want every client and visitor to feel comfortable here. We are here to help them and don’t want them to feel intimidated,” said Beth Odom, the Center’s Client Services Director. The tour continued into the medical services area, the rooms in which women can receive sonograms and private consultations with a nurse. The Center’s nurse, Shannon Simmons, shared, “I’m able to meet with them privately and give them the attention they need.” Simmons was especially happy with the new sonogram equipment to provide quality care for her clients. The Pregnancy Care Center serves the community’s men as well. The “Man Cave” addition provides space for the men who visit or are waiting for their partners. “It’s stressful for the men, said Charles Van Oosten, a board member for the

The fully stocked Baby Boutique in the Pregnancy Care Center of Plant City allows clients and new mothers the ability to shop with their “Earn While You Learn” baby bucks.

Pregnancy Care Center of Plant City. This area gives them a place to read and talk about the issues they are facing.” This area gives them a place to read and talk about the issues they are facing.” One of the most beneficial participation programs for clients is “Earn While You Learn.” This is a part of the program in which the clients earn everything they need such as diapers, clothing and formula for their children by showing

up for counseling and other services that we offer here,” explained Darlene Davis. “All items are new and clients use the points they earn to do the shopping themselves in the center store.” Celebrating 25 years in service to the community is an important accomplishment. Pastor Greg Davis, the children’s pastor at the Plant City Church of God and board member said it best, “We are here to increase God’s kingdom one baby at a time.”


brokepoorfl.com PAGE

25


LOCAL

Future Fair Hundreds of Area Graduating Seniors Explore Career Opportunities BY KELLI THARRINGTON | PHOTOS BY KYLE HAMILTON

in depth interviews. “What I have seen today is a lot of growth. For some this process is natural, but for some it is a learning process. It takes confidence and a leap of faith,” said Rick Lott, Mayor of Plant City. “Today is about building confidence.” Plant City High School senior Jake Dippold found the experience valuable. “It has opened my eyes to the companies here. I found out about an ironworks program that looks really interesting.” Dippold’s interest is mechanics and the ironworks program would offer him expanded knowledge of the trade. Another PCHS senior, Carlos Campbell, currently employed at Moe’s in Plant City, said the fair was a real eye opener. “It’s great to know that going to college is not

necessary to be successful.” Aaron Ngtang is one who is unsure of what he wants to do after graduation from PCHS. “Now I know what is available here. The Future Fair was worthwhile,” he said. Helping the youth of the community realize their worth is what Yvonne Fry of Fryed Egg Productions is passionate about. But, she says it couldn’t happen without community involvement. “I am amazed every time you ask the Plant City community for help. They always show up in a very big way,” Fry said. Over 40 businesses donated their time and experience for the event. “It’s about improvement and empowerment and the experience today hopefully provided that for them.”

Attentive students receive answers to their questions about career opportunities.

A

t the Future Fair more than 500 Plant City area high school students learned their future is looking very bright. Held at the John R. Trinkle Center on April 18, 2017 at the Plant City Hillsborough Community College campus, students were able to meet leaders and learn of the opportunities in their own backyard. Susan Sullivan, Principal of Plant City High School, was thrilled to offer this opportunity to her students. “We are trying to make that connection between school and career.” The goal was to focus on those students who are on the fence about college or don’t know what to do after graduation. “It’s important that students know they can be successful even if going to college is PAGE

26

not the path for them,” said Sullivan. Jake Austin, President of the Plant City Economic Development Corporation, was happy to share the opportunities available in Plant City. “The reality is that not everyone can afford college and most end up with a lot of debt and no job to pay for that debt. These students are providing our community with a quality workforce. It’s an opportunity for employers as well as future employees.” For some students, the fair was the first time they had ever been involved in the interview process. The idea of hosting the fair just before graduation was to give students time to interview with multiple companies in one day and make connections for future, more

Employers were eager to help students know about careers right here in our community.

Star Distribution is serious about hiring locals.


LOCAL

Area Churches Sponsor Community Easter Egg Hunt BY KATIE LOUDERMILK

E

aster egg hunts are a classic tradition for most. Typically, parents bring their children with Easter baskets to collect as many eggs as they can. However, the Easter egg hunt presented by a group of Plant City area churches on April 15, 2017 was more unique. The event at the Plant City Stadium included live worship presentations by recording rap artist, Mynista, and the group, 7th Surrender. Mayor Lott’s welcome, interpreted into Spanish as well, emphasized the importance of community and praised the involvement of numerous local churches. Pastor Jack Myers of Life Family Church followed by sharing the Gospel message of Jesus Christ with an attentive audience. And then, the hunt began. Kids from ages 2 to 12 waited eagerly to hunt for their Easter eggs filled with candy. Eggs were spread across the grassy portions

of the stadium’s playing field, which was divided for age groups. A few Golden eggs stood out from the others and the children finding those received prizes from the churches involved. This Easter Egg was not just an event for the little ones; adults were included with raffle tickets for special prizes such as flat screen televisions and gift cards to local restaurants. “I came to this event for my kids’ enjoyment,” explained Shelly Blake. “But I got excited when I heard they had things for parents, too! Everyone was happy.” Life Family Church organized this event to share Christ’s love and bring the community together. The turnout was notable and children and parents alike enjoyed themselves. And for those who took their first step into the Christian faith, water baptism by a minister was also offered. PAGE

27


LOCAL

Relay for Life Plant City “Apps” Make for Successful Fundraising BY JENNIFER JORDAN

Words with Friends attracted players and raised additional monies for the cause. Again, the Princess Makeovers were popular with the little girls. This effort is in honor of Megan Carpenter, a local student who passed away from cancer over 10 years ago. Greg Taylor, his siblings and other family members have made an annual tradition of attending Plant City’s Relay event together in honor of Gloria Jean Vega, the mother who died from cancer in September of 2009. Taylor’s book, Gloria’s

Song, records his caregiving efforts during the last year of her life and is available on Amazon.com. Knights Elementary was this year’s Sapphire sponsor for raising over $18,000 using their given app of Candy Crush to “crush” cancer. Loretta Cummings, a Knights Elementary educator and team captain this year, shared, “I’ve been going to Relay for Life for years, but this is my first as team captain. We are so proud of our students for all the money they raised, and we’re proud to be here at Relay for Life.”

Honorary survivor Jodi Stevens (4th adult from left) celebrating her victory against cancer with her family and friends.

H

undreds of friends, families, teachers, and students participated in Relay for Life— Plant City, an annual fundraiser to benefit the American Cancer Society. Held at Plant City High School on April 21-22, 2017, many came together in the hopes of raising awareness and money for the fight against cancer. Thus far, the efforts of 62 teams from Hillsborough County’s Area VI Schools and local individuals, businesses and organizations have raised more than $100,000 of Plant City’s $260,000 goal. Sponsorships and donations are still needed as the fundraising efforts continue. After a chorus of elementary school students sang the National Anthem, cancer survivors took their victory lap while everyone applauded their win against cancer. Baycare employee Jodi Stevens served as 2017 Honorary Survivor

PAGE

28

for Plant City’s event. “It’s quite an honor, but it was definitely never on my bucket list to be the honorary survivor,” she offered. “No one wants cancer, that’s for sure. It was an interesting adventure, but now I’m glad to say the cancer is behind me.” As the cheers on the sidelines continued, a lap for the caregivers of those fighting cancer demonstrated how much their dedication and love is appreciated and needed. When the different schools and area teams began their laps, it kicked off the start of an all-night walk that is the foundation of the event. Since “cancer never sleeps,” team members took turns in walking throughout the night. Tents set up by the Area VI schools in Hillsborough County promoted the theme of “apps,” such as those found on a cell phone. Apps such as Twitter, Pinterest, and

The 2017 Florida Strawberry Festival Queen and Court start the Survivors’ Lap around the track.

Cancer survivors make their walk around the track to honor their victory against cancer.


DAD, IT’S TIME TO RELAX! HAPPY FATHER’S DAY! Full grooming and boarding services available for dogs and cats by our groomer, Terri Pardo

We offer pet boarding in a state of the art facility with television for the pets to watch. We are located on 5 acres of land.

Call For Pricing on Boarding Or Grooming.

UNCLE G’S BED & BISCUIT 1821 Stephens Ln, Dover, FL 33527 Phone: (813) 689-6725 unclegsbedandbiscuit.com

PAGE

29


LOCAL

Sheryll Broadnax Transitions

Transitions are Inevitable - Transformations are Possible

BY CHERYL JOHNSTON

W

hen Sheryll Broadnax lost her husband Roosevelt to sudden death in July of 2013, her world stopped spinning for a time. After 29 years of marriage, they were still very much in love as sweethearts, best friends, and soul mates. Now, after almost four years without her strong and confident husband, the owner of De Javu Upscale Boutique has decided it’s time to transition into the next chapter of her life. Sheryll has already been notifying her faithful customers that the formal wear boutique at 104 West Reynolds Street will hold its final sale from June 1-24, 2017. Since 1999, she has worked to build customers for life and hopes to express her gratitude in a special way for their loyalty. “This business has never been about the dresses I’ve helped so many girls and women with for their special occasions,” she offered. “It’s about the beauty of their individuality and about my relationship to them in service to the community.” “My customers are my friends, and I’ve served some into the third generation now,” she said. “I will always be grateful for the conversations, tears and laughter we’ve shared—for the sorrows and the joys we’ve discussed together— for those ‘that’s not a dress issue’ chats that went beyond business.” But now, Sheryll Broadnax, the fashion merchandising graduate, is embarking on the next phase of adventure. “First, I will focus more on my family. I need some “mommy time” with my 13-year-old daughter, Sade, and for my son, Roosevelt,

PAGE

30

Jr. and daughter-in-law Teresa and grandchildren—Gabby, Victoria and Ayden. Sade is athletic, a basketball player as I was, and in coaching her school’s team, I will be there more often for her. I’m creating a window to invest in my daughter’s dreams. The former model and Art Institute graduate is also completing another degree as a Health and Wellness Coach. She’s been walking and running again for mental clarity, focus and to build stamina, too— and even completing races like the Gasparilla 5K. “Physical fitness and mental well-being are passions for me. Being whole and healthy in body, mind and spirit brings balance and joy to life. I call this Temple Care,” she explained. ‘Transforming the U in Fabulous’ will be a key thought as she shapes her new destiny. “I feel like it’s time to cap my 29year ‘heart and life symphony’ with Roosevelt. He will always live on in our children. But sometimes things beyond our control force us to revert to the other songs playing in our background. After time and lots of talks with God, I feel I’m ready.” Sheryll wishes everyone could have experienced the love story she and her “Boo” enjoyed. The two met in church and knew each other through high school after her family moved here from the Bahamas in 1973. But she had no idea until he left Florida A & M University early to return to Plant City and prepare for a marriage proposal, that he had been in love with her all those years. She explained that her husband, a semi-pro football player and Plant City Trojans coach, “had loved me so purely and completely,” adding, “Roosevelt and I dedicated our

Sheryll Broadnax is so very, very grateful for the support of her Plant City community and faithful customers.

lives to God together, and our son Roosevelt, Jr. cut his teeth on the Bible. He’s now the lead pastor at Greater New Mt. Zion Church and our Sade sings and worships through dance there. They will carry on their father’s legacy.” Until Sheryll reveals specific details of her new venture, she

wants to be available to help others as she was helped by members of the PCHS Class of ’80 following her husband’s funeral. She was created to share her faith, encourage others, and build relationships. To communicate, e-mail her at sheryllybroadnax@gmail.com or phone 813-719-9066.


LOCAL

Statue Challenge BY KELLI THARRINGTON | PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHELLY DRUMMOND

1st place for “most realistic” was the children, Lilly and Will, taken at the Library by Melissa Hart.

T

he Arts Council of Plant City is a small but mighty club with a goal to support the arts in the community for all ages. In February, ACPC unveiled the J. Seward Johnson sculptures that will be on display until June 1st. To engage the community before the collection moves on to the next city, the group held a “statue challenge” contest in which contestants staged a photo with the sculpture of their choice. “We just wanted to make sure everyone had a chance to see how amazing these works of art really are,” said ACPC board member Shelly Drummond. The top three winners were awarded gift baskets filled with goodies from local businesses. These are: 1st place “Most Realistic”: Melissa Hart - photo of children (Lilly and Will), at Bruton Memorial Library 2nd place “Most Active”: Kerry Bergman - photo of teens at the golf sculpture 3rd place “Best Representing Plant City: Cassandra Banning photo of Bonnie at Bruton Memorial Library (The registered therapy dog is a library reading buddy on

Wednesday evenings and is active at South Florida Baptist Hospital.) The contest was a fun way to involve the community, but the arts council does so much more. They provide scholarships to Plant City High School students and host the popular annual Reflections contest which honors various art mediums for participating students. They also provide art lessons for MacDonald Training Center clients. The Center focuses on empowering people with disabilities to lead the lives they choose. Some of their work was displayed recently in the Five by Five exhibit at the Tampa Museum of Art. Art should be accessible to everyone,” said club president Marsha Passmore. The group’s mission is to promote the arts and create programs in which artists can participate and thrive. “We are always looking for members and connections to help promote art in the community.” To assist in any of the arts council programs or to become a member, contact Dodie White at 813-9270595 or at dodiewhite@msn.com.

PAGE

31


LOCAL

Striving to be an EMT BY ANTHONY BOLESTA

Daniel Armstong, 30, takes the leadership position in this scenario as Instructor Tim O’Connor observes the mock drill.

H

illsborough Community College offers a wide variety of training across its multicampus institution. However, the EMT program is one of the few that focus on a future in public service. This course of study allows many aspiring students a foot in the door and a step onto the path of various fields of advanced medicine, such as Paramedic and Physician’s Assistant. Many use these career steps as a precursor to becoming firefighters, a position that requires certificates from both the Fire academy and the EMT program. EMT training is a one-semester program designed to prepare students to provide basic life support techniques and skills, such as those used by members of an ambulance crew or those in a hospital setting. This course requires participants to constantly be a student, willing and eager to gain new knowledge as both techniques and technology are invented and developed. In a forever changing field like medicine, one can never be too good for further education. The EMT course is approximately 16 weeks, about the length of a typical college course semester. It’s divided into both lecture and practical learning days. On Mondays

PAGE

32

through Thursdays, for almost three hours daily, class members learn to treat someone in trauma and medical scenarios. The practical training includes how to give medications, treat an injury, assess a patient and their vital signs, properly transport a patient and so much more. Lieutenant Jeff Johnson of the Tampa Fire Department, a lecture instructor at the Plant City Campus, wanted to make things clear on what this program means for the community. He encouraged, “Train to be at your best when others are at their worst and have a positive effect on the world around you.” The EMT course at HCC certifies approximately 40-60 students in the 2-3 classes offered on campus. Each must pass the state test given at the end of the term. Offering extensive knowledge and hands-on, quickresponse skills to help someone in need, the program will enable those who see it through to be true lifesavers. All that’s required is a person’s desire, determination and dedication to answer the call. Note: Our writer, Anthony Bolesta, is currently in the EMT program, with certification expected in May 2017. We look forward to hearing more about his future on this lifesaving career path. Feel free to encourage him on our Focus Magazine page on Facebook.

Instructor Richard Fischer showing Max Vierra, 18, how to place a Bag Valve Mask on a patient who cannot breathe adequately on their own.

EMT students (L-R) Max Vierra (18), Alex Huff (20), Daniel Armstrong (30) and Emily Simpson (19) demonstrate proper spinal Immobilization on a backboard.


PAGE

33


MI LK KATI E LO UD ER IN TE RV IE WS BY

Focus: You’ve won blue ribbons for your cakes at the Florida Strawberry Festival. How did you become such a great cook? I didn’t know how to cook when we married, but I learned by watching Leon. I kept trying to improve and got plenty of practice as our family grew to six kids. Focus: Tell us about getting your driver’s license at age 54 and going to work for BuddyFreddy’s. “Getting that license and taking the job as a BuddyFreddy’s cook were the best things I ever did for myself. It opened a whole new world for me with adults. At the restaurant, I made pies and cakes like the Red Velvet and Italian Cream, plus cornbread, biscuits, dumplings and then the salads before I retired in 1991. Focus: Any advice regarding how to have a 50-year+ long marriage? “Be good and kind to each other.” Focus: How have things changed since you were a child? “Now we have lights, electric appliances, telephones and bathrooms. We no longer have to use the cowbell to sound an alarm.”

BERTHA REE JORDAN RABURN S

urrounded by more than 200 wellwishers, Bertha Raburn celebrated her 90th birthday on April 29, 2017 at a party focused on family, friends and faith. Included among the attendees were four of the Johnson family, Bertha’s former employers: Evelyn, Buddy, Fred and Tammy. Regarding her long life, one thing those folks will attest to: “But godliness with contentment is great gain.” This beloved mother of six: sons Bobby, Tommy, and Frank and daughters Brenda [Hunter], Cathy [Jackson] and Cheryl [Dorrell] has never suffered a long illness, surgery, or even a broken bone.

PAGE

34

She now claims 13 grandchildren and 18 “great-grands” (with two more due soon). Her happy childhood as number seven of twelve children born to Stanley and Margaret Kidd Jordan in Opp, Alabama included a move to Jay, Florida when she was four and another to Plant City in 1947. She married Leon Raburn on Christmas Eve that year after his first flirtation—a note on chewing gum wrapper—in June. Before his death at age 69, they celebrated almost 50 years of marriage.

Focus: Describe your childhood entertainment. “We swam, skipped rope, and played Hide & Seek or Red Rover. We also cared for our dogs, horses, and livestock. My family farmed cotton, peanuts, and vegetables, but I didn’t like picking cotton. At least In the fields we girls could wear pants instead of skirts or dresses. I always loved school, too, especially math.” Focus: Church has always been an important aspect of family life, right? Yes, mother always took us. And I met Leon at the First Assembly of God on Strickland Street. His father was a preacher, so the children all played music and sang in church. As an adult he didn’t attend much, but he made sure the children and I got there.”

Focus: Describe a typical week now. “It’s much quieter because I can’t do quite as much. I crochet and cook a little for our Magnolia Hill potlucks. I read my Bible every morning and Psalm 23 every day. I like biographies, too. Focus: You called life “a gift from God.” What advice for a blessed life can you offer. “Be happy and love each other. Have faith in God and do right. We should make the best of it, no matter what.”

Find more People of Plant City on Facebook. Connecting the community one story at a time. facebook.com/peopleofplantcity Find more People of Plant City on Facebook. Connecting the community one story at a time. facebook.com/peopleofplantcity


OUR PROFITS ARE YOUR PAYDAY When you do business with Farm Credit, you are a member of a cooperative. When we do well, you do well. And we’ve been doing well for over 100 years. LOANS FOR: • • • •

Operating expenses Farm land Lots and homes Recreational property

• • • •

Refinancing Buildings Fences Equipment

Loans for land, homes & living. 866 . 245 . 3637 farmcreditcfl.com

PAGE

35


LOCAL

Did You Know?

Be a History Detective! Join the Junior Archivists Club at the Plant City Photo Archives & History Center BY PLANT CITY PHOTO ARCHIVES

W

hy study Plant City? Because discovering Plant City’s past is enlightening and empowering. It fosters an understanding and appreciation of the richness and the fullness of Plant City’s history and its community. To help the youth of Plant City gain an appreciation for the history of their community, the Photo Archives is starting a Jr. Archivists Club, where students can become History Detectives! Many Americans across this vast country can trace their roots back to Plant City. With thousands of people settling here or passing through, Plant City’s history is tied to the history of much of America. The citizens of this area have played a role in America’s history from the Ante-Bellum period (before 1865), through the massive railroad development, through World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the dramatic population growth years, and much more.

PAGE

36

Junior Archivists will learn how to examine documents and photographs for information about the people, places, and time periods of Plant City’s past. By examining prints and photographs, students can gain knowledge of Plant City’s geography, history, architecture, fashion, transportation, economy, infrastructure, and civic life. When these budding archivists study primary sources such as original maps, manuscripts, newspaper articles, and photographs, the history of Plant City comes alive! Structured along the lines developed by the Brooklyn Public Library, the Jr. Archivists program centers around the Jr. Archivists Club concept where students will learn together, examine, and discuss. The focus is on observation and inferences. The students will learn the difference between primary and secondary sources. They will

examine and analyze the sources to determine what evidence is available and factual based on observation and inferences. They learn to find the answers to Who? What? Where? When? and Why? The students will practice with these sources and analyze them for facts, then learn how to organize the resulting factual material. Much like the many Jr. Historian Clubs throughout the country, the Jr. Archivists Club will gather data and work on projects as teams or individually, with the guidance of the Photo Archives’ archivists and historians. The Plant City Photo Archives contains over 100,000 photographs, newspaper and magazine articles, and documents, along with numerous family and organization papers and miscellaneous stuff. The Jr. Archivists will avail themselves to the numerous materials and proceed through structured procedures of data collection, examination, and

analysis. This program is totally new and will be an exciting fresh activity providing a learning environment with a fun-filled history detective atmosphere. To help establish this program, the Photo Archives has received grants from Unity in the Community and the Plant City Rotary Club. For more information on the Jr. Archivists program, call 813.754.1578 or email gil@ plantcityphotoarchives.org. The Photo Archives is an awardwinning institution founded in 2000 and is an active member of the American Association for State and Local History as well as the Society of Florida Archivists. The Photo Archives is located at 106 South Evers Street, in downtown Plant City. The hours are Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. For information on the Brooklyn Public Library program go to www. bklynlibrary.org/connections.


RIBBONCUTTINGS

“The Plant City Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting for Captain Ship Fish Market on Thursday, April 27th. The family owned business located at 3418 West Baker Street in Plant City, FL. The idea to open The Captain Ship Seafood Market came in response to Plant City’s need for fresh seafood. The family is committed to supporting the community by hiring locally and primarily working with local distributors to provide our neighbors with the freshest seafood possible. They ask that you will continue to partner with them to make this place a real asset to Plant City and surrounding communities.”

“The Plant City Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting for the Pregnancy Care Center of Plant City on Saturday, April 29th to celebrate their “25th Anniversary of Saving Live”s and to showcase the renovation to their building. The Pregnancy Care Center’s goal is to “Share God’s compassion and provision to those facing an unexpected pregnancy and to uphold the sanctity of human life.” The Plant City Chamber of Commerce held a Ribbon Cutting for Universal Insurance on Thursday, May 4, 2017. Conveniently located near Walden Lake, Universal Insurance of Plant City Inc. has served the community since 2012 as a non-standard, all-lines insurance agency, offering policies from an array of well known carriers. Their professional, bilingual staff has more than 40 years of experience in the industry and is committed to making residents and business owners in Plant City their top priority. Universal Insurance is driven to provide genuine, trustworthy service and to develop a personal connection with everyone who steps through their door. They care about our community and believe they can serve it well by providing superior service and peace of mind by educating customers on policies that best fit their needs. Stop by at 1501 S. Alexander Street, Suite #101, or visit inivinspc.com to see how they can serve you. The Plant City Chamber of Commerce held a Ribbon Cutting for Save the Moment on Tuesday, May 2, 2017. Save the Moment, a nationally recognized name in the awards industry, has been in business for 23 years and recently relocated from Sebring to Plant City. Save the Moment combines art with technology to create unique and memorable items. Their in-house production facility includes the latest sublimation, engraving and laser techniques which allows for a quick turnaround time. Their skilled team focuses on attention to detail, adhering to high quality control standards and exceeding customer expectations. If you are looking for customized plaques, trophies, crystals, mugs, metals or awards for your business, organization or sports team, Save the Moment is the best choice in the industry. Stop by their showroom across from the Strawberry Festival grounds or visit savethemoment.com to learn more.” PAGE

37


PAGE

38


SOUTH FLORIDA BAPTIST HOSPITAL

EXPANDS HEART CARE

STEMI CARE NOW AVAILABLE IN PLANT CITY BY CHERYL JOHNSTON

outh Florida Baptist Hospital (SFBH) has some great news for Plant City area residents. With the recent $2.1 million expansion of its Steve and Krista Howard Heart and Vascular Center, the hospital’s experienced cardiac and interventional team can now treat all your heart care needs. Tharen Leesch, manager of Interventional Services at SFBH, is excited to report the enlarged Center, including a second state-of-the-art, 768-squarefoot cardiac catheterization lab, allows treatment for ST elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI). “This is great news for the families in our community,” he said. “Plant City has a lot of heart disease and prior to opening this newest lab, heart attack patients were transported to Lakeland, Brandon or Tampa.” Leesch continued, “Now they can receive life-saving treatment right here.” During an Open House for the cath lab on February 28, 2017, the hospital staff welcomed public tours. Guests learned SFBH has been performing exceptional heart care for many years, including cardiac catheterization and stent placement since 2010 and interventional procedures since 2011. But now, with the STEMI program, EMS, physicians and patients have a new and nearby choice for multiple cardiac services. Patients can now receive high-quality care for STEMI and cardiogenic shock, including diagnostic catheterizations, stent placement and myocardial infarction critical care.

S

A Life-Saving Addition

One of the deadliest types of heart attacks, STEMI occurs with complete blockage of blood supply to the heart. The best treatment method, a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), must see the artery opened within 90 minutes of first receiving care from emergency medical personnel. Since time affects muscle loss, cardiogenic shock complicates a STEMI because the heart can’t pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs. Obviously, getting specialized heart care quickly at the closest hospital is critical. PAGE

39


South Florida Baptist Hospital’s specially trained team is on hand, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to treat STEMI patients. Along with a state-ofthe-art ICU for post-myocardial infarction care, there is also a streamlined process for EMS and private vehicle arrival. The expanded Center features specialized recovery rooms, top-notch cardiovascular technology, and dedicated waiting areas for family and friends. Expert physicians and highly trained technologists also provide an array of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the treatment of vascular disease, such as peripheral artery disease.

review and board certification in interventional cardiology (need five years of experience post-training with more than 1,000 adult cardiology procedures or 375 pediatric procedures performed). Passionate about his career, Dr. Khadim is “pleased that South Florida Baptist Hospital is now a premier destination for patients who want and need superior cardiovascular and interventional radiology procedures.” He continued, “Plant City residents no longer need leave their community for the finest health care.” “In addition,” he shared, “our future is bright as even more services are on the hospital’s horizon.”

Dr. Ghazanfar Khadim, MD, FAAC, FSCAI

Tharen Leesch

Dr. Ghazanfar Khadim, MD, FAAC, FSCAI is an interventional cardiologist and Medical Director of South Florida Baptist Hospital’s new cath lab. He has served with SFBH for almost eight years now. After becoming an Internal Medicine physician and working seven years in that field, Dr. Khadim realized several things that prompted his refocus into cardiovascular care. He explained: “Cardiovascular disease is the biggest killer of mankind. Specializing in this field has allowed me to impact the health of more people. Since most of the research funding is directed to treating heart disease, it’s exciting to use the latest technologies and therapies to best take care of patients. It’s also very gratifying work to help someone with crushing chest discomfort and to save the lives of patients on the verge of death.” Patients can have confidence in Dr. Khadim’s ability. A mark of excellence, his prestigious FSCAI designation (Fellow of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions) required a credentials PAGE

40

Tharen Leesch has a passion for his career in cardiology that now spans 24 years, including six with the U.S. Army’s 730th Medical Clearing Company. The program at SFBH is the fourth he has helped to establish or expand. “I enjoy my work and appreciate the progress in technology and equipment I’ve seen during that time,” Leesch explained. “The good Lord said somewhere in the Bible that those who help others would be blessed and I believe that’s true.” “The human body is dynamic,” he said, “and we are learning more and more every day as to how its systems work, repair themselves, and can be healed with medical assistance. Cardiology is challenging work, but also very rewarding because we can help people live longer or have a better quality of life through improved health.” “I’d like the people of Plant City to have confidence in our cardiac intervention and care program, enough that SFBH becomes their first choice for screenings and procedures.”


Technologically Advanced Equipment

Although many of the same functions can be performed in the original lab, it was designed initially for interventional radiology procedures. An updated control room accommodates both labs with patient monitoring and health data recording devices. Equipment now includes a blockage detecting machine that captures 15 X-ray images per second from the bottom up. Another addition is an automated injection machine with detection system that prevents an injection taking place if any air is detected in the syringe. The SFBH Heart and Vascular Center now serves patients with the following:

Cardiac Diagnostic Tests

• Ankle-Brachial Index- helps indicate a narrowing of arteries in your legs • Cardiac CT Angiogram and Coronary Angiogram- uses special dye and x-rays to see blood flow through the heart • Cardiac Nuclear Imaging stress test- accurately detects coronary artery disease • Nuclear MUGA (Multiple Gated Acquisition) Scan- produces computergenerated movie images of your beating heart • Nuclear stress test- shows how well blood flows into the heart.

Cardiac Imaging Services

• Angioplasty and Stenting- addresses a blocked artery and keeps it open with a stent • Catheter Angiography- evaluates blood vessels using a dye • Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA)- doctors can see buildup on artery walls • Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filter Placement- filters blood clots from traveling to the heart • MR Angiography- noninvasive MRI exam of blood vessels • Myocardial Perfusion- reveals blood flow to the heart, known as a nuclear stress test • PET/CT scans- show detailed images of structures in your body • Ultrasound for Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD)- examines circulation in the arteries

Stenting, and Atherectomy to address any blocked arteries outside the heart. • Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (PPMs and ICDs): These devices pace a slow heart so it beats at a normal rate. ICDs quickly send an electrical shock to the heart to change an abnormally fast rhythm back to a normal rhythm. • Pericardiocentesis procedure removes fluid from the sac surrounding the heart. Dr. Khadim emphasizes the need for early assessment. “People frequently come too late for assessments because they have only vague symptoms or none at all. This means we begin attacking these processes at a much later time. It’s wise to learn what conditions may impact your body. Women, for example, can reduce their risk for heart issues by 50% with a risk factor modification. We recommend these for women over 20 years of age because plaque buildup begins early.” To discover your risk for heart disease, inquire about the hospital’s screening packages. The American Heart Association’s website is also a source for information on heart health, diseases and treatment.

Cardiac Rehabilitation

Through medically supervised fitness programs, the hospital’s highly skilled, professional staff helps people with cardiac or pulmonary disease look and feel better. Participants receive education on their disease and work with staff members to identify individual risk factors. A three-phase program provides step-by-step care that parallels the patients’ recovery from illness. Advanced telemetry monitors individuals during exercise, which alerts the staff to changes in their well-being and prints out periodic reports so physicians can also monitor progress. For more information about SFBH cardiology services or a physician referral, please call 1-800-BayCare.

Interventional Cardiology

Interventional cardiologists at SFBH work with an experienced staff of nurses and technicians to perform diagnostic catheterizations. The procedure involves insertion through the wrist or groin artery with catheters, which is then guided to the patient’s heart where the chamber’s blood pressure can be measured and images taken to discover any blockage. Results help physicians determine if the patient has heart disease. Other services include: • Diagnostic Cardiac Catheterization via the Radial Artery in the wrist or the Femoral Artery in the Groin: This includes Coronary and/or Bypass graft Angiograms which use a special dye and x-rays to see how blood flows through the heart’s arteries. • Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI - Stent) uses a drug-eluting stent to help prevent an artery from closing. Types of PCI include: Angioplasty and Stenting to address a blocked artery or bypass grafts in the heart. • Peripheral Vascular Intervention (PVI): Types include: Angioplasty,

Heart and Vascular Center | South Florida Baptist Hospital 301 N. Alexander St. | Plant City, FL 33563 Hours: 7:30am-5pm, Monday-Friday

About South Florida Baptist Hospital Since 1953, South Florida Baptist Hospital has served Plant City and surrounding areas as a not- for-profit community hospital. The progressive, 147-bed acute care facility offers a full range of diagnostic, rehabilitative, surgical, therapeutic and women’s services, including obstetrics. South Florida Baptist Hospital is part of the BayCare Health System, a family of health care providers consisting of the 14 leading not-for-profit hospitals in the Tampa Bay region. About BayCare Health System BayCare is a leading not-for-profit health care system that connects individuals and families to a wide range of services at 14 hospitals and hundreds of other convenient locations throughout the Tampa Bay and Central Florida regions. Inpatient and outpatient services include acute care, primary care, imaging, laboratory, behavioral health, home care, and wellness. Our mission is to improve the health of all we serve through community-owned, health care services that set the standard for high-quality, compassionate care. PAGE

41


FOCUS On Medical

(This is a paid advertisement)

Dukes Chiropractic Health Clinic, P.A.

IMPORTANT HEALTH INFORMATION

D

iscovered in 1895, the healing art, science, and philosophy of chiropractic is the most widely used natural health profession in the world. The effective, safe, and drug-free treatment continues to increase in popularity because it respects your body’s natural healing and recuperative abilities. Dukes Chiropractic Health Clinic, P.A. was established in 1985 with a motto “To Love, To Serve, and To Give Out of Abundance.” As an Oral Roberts University and Life University graduate, it means so much to Dr. Brenda Dukes that people are healthy—mentally, physically, and spiritually. A special promise was given when the office was dedicated—“to always treat the person, not pocketbooks. God would take care.” That was and is now paramount. Dr. Dukes explained, “With so many changes in healthcare, along with the true calling and dedication of the healthcare provider, our office has a true commitment.” Dr. Dukes and her staff are thankful to be part of the area’s medical community. But it’s also wonderful Dr. Dukes knows they have helped to save lives and given many a better quality of life. She said, “We are so thankful many are seeing the documented studies that support and validate chiropractic care.” “Chiropractic is the removal of nerve interference,” explained Dr. Dukes. “Chiropractors study the nervous system, which includes the central, autonomic, and peripheral. Subluxations, the misalignments of vertebrae, cause nerve impairment, which impacts every area of health.”

PAGE

42

She continued, “Remember, people take care of cardiac, respiratory, and muscular systems, but we must not leave out the nervous system. Care, as stated, is valuable for most everyone—young, older—for stress relief, pregnancy, and so many other conditions. Dr. Dukes looks for the underlying causes of disease, discomfort, and pain, as opposed to just treating symptoms. Many seemingly unrelated symptoms often arise from spinal imbalances. The practice is dedicated to determining the root of the pain and creating a personalized course of treatment initially and for wellness. Services Dr. Dukes is so blessed to have Brenda Chandler, LMT#MA19549, Sarah Dahl, and Nicole VanVickle as a part of the team. The clinic offers some wonderful programs to include: Spinal adjustments, ultrasound and electro muscle stimulation, massage therapy (MM#74100), VibraWav® (whole body vibration), traction, custom orthotics (postural balance), nutritional counseling (some highly recommended products for even cardiovascular), patient education, and Digital Pulse Analysis (DPA) to assess arterial vessel conditions. Community Service Dr. Dukes has been since day one involved in the community as a Chamber of Commerce member, Leadership program graduate (1987), supporter of youth at the Florida Strawberry Festival Steer and Swine Shows and through scholarships, and past chairman of the Junior

Dr. Brenda K. Dukes

Royalty Pageant (1986-1990). She has also helped to sponsor Diamonds & Denim fundraisers for the South Florida Baptist Hospital Foundation and supported the East Hillsborough County Law Enforcement Awards Banquet. Additionally, Dr. Dukes is available for health presentations to business, civic clubs, churches and various groups, etc. Professional Affiliations and Contributions Dr. Dukes has a strong Christian faith to be active for the Lord and in her profession. She holds memberships in many local, state and national professional organizations. In addition to radio presentations, she has written columns about spinal health for Focus Magazine (17 years) and Plant City Courier (20 years). Education Dr. Dukes graduated from Plant City High School (1976), Oral Roberts University (1981), and Life University as a Doctorate of Chiropractic (1984). She became a Diplomate of Neurology (DACAN) in 1992. Presently, she continues her studies on auto-immune conditions. Dr. Dukes is pleased to have studied with the world-renowned Dr.

Larry Webster to learn the “Webster technique,” which is helpful for turning breech babies. She treasures one of his few research notebooks he had signed and given to her. Clinic Appreciation Dinner Dr. Dukes hosted a special banquet at the Trinkle Center for the 30th anniversary of the practice “to give back and express our thanks. But mostly,” she added, “it was a tribute to the Lord, to celebrate His goodness, and for the wonderful people and community we love and appreciate.” Affordable Healthcare In closing, Dr. Dukes wants to express “the value our care has given through the years.” She encouraged, “Do not feel or think you can’t afford care—rather, think ‘I can’t afford NOT to have care.’” Please call the office soon to receive the many benefits and value that chiropractic care offers.

Dukes Chiropractic Health Clinic, P.A. 2401 Walden Woods Drive Plant City, FL 33566 813-752-2524 dukeschiropractichealth.com


FOCUS On Medical

(This is a paid advertisement)

“Service to the community has always been important to him and helping to care for its citizens is his way of giving back.”

Family Medical Specialists of Florida, PLC Dr. Michael Paul Gimness, MD

Q

uality healthcare for the entire family is right here in Plant City. Dr. Michael Paul Gimness of Family Medical Specialists of Florida is accepting new patients of all ages. Dr. Gimness hails from a long line of physicians. His great-grandfather was a physician and teacher at New York Medical College, his great uncles were physicians in Ohio, his grandfather was chief of

anesthesia at his hospital in Seattle, his grandmother was a nurse and his father is an optometrist. “It’s in my blood,” Dr Gimness said. Service to the community has always been important to him and helping to care for its citizens is his way of giving back. Dr. Gimness opened his practice in Plant City in 2007 but has been practicing medicine for 17 years.

A native of a small town of 1500 in Washington state, Dr. Gimness enjoys the hometown atmosphere of Plant City. Dr. Gimness attended medical school at St. George’s University. He then found himself doing clerkships in New York and New Jersey and finally residencies in Augusta, Georgia and Jacksonville, Florida. Coming from a larger practice, Dr. Gimness really wants to focus on the one-on-one care a small practice can provide. “I have control over my own time. The relationships I have with my patients are important to me.” It’s those relationships that have helped him get through some really tough times. Last year his wife, Dr. Solange Pendas, passed away suddenly from a spontaneous brain hemorrhage. She was groundbreaking in bringing care for breast cancer patients to Central Florida at the Lakeland Regional Cancer Center. “My patients mean the world to me. They have really helped me through a rough time.” After the loss of his wife, Dr. Gimness began to feel the pressures of being a single, working parent and added another physician to his practice. Dr. Sony Sam has been seeing patients since September of 2016. Dr. Gimness truly sees his patients as a part of an extended family. That is what drew him into

family medicine. “You spend a lot of time with your family physician,” he explained. He really enjoys getting to know the entire family. With that in mind, Dr. Gimness wants to place the focus of his practice on preventative care and incorporating healthy lifestyle practices as early as possible. “Healthier citizens make a more productive society,” said Gimness. The mission for him and his practice is to promote the health of the community and make certain there is a place for patients of all ages to receive quality, caring, attentive, and preventative healthcare. It looks like the line of physicians will continue. Dr. Gimness’ son, Nathan, 17, is deciding on the possibility of becoming an exotic animal veterinarian or continuing in the steps of his mother. Dr. Gimness also has a sister who is a doctor and another sister who is in dental school. “Caring for others is the legacy of my family -- we have always felt it is important to help heal those in need.”

Family Medical Specialist of Florida Dr. Paul Gimness 1703 Thonotosassa Road Plant City, FL 813-567-5679 www.fmsflorida.com PAGE

43


FOCUS On Medical

(This is a paid advertisement)

Two New Dental Specialists Treating Tooth Caboose Families D r. Daniel V. Ruffolo, DDS, MSD and Tanya Bejarano, DDS are two recent additions to the Bay Area Smiles professionals at the iconic “Tooth Caboose” landmark orthodontics practice Plant City. The husband and wife met in dental school at the University of Southern California. “As a pediatric dentist, I’ve learned immense patience and unconditional love,” shared Dr. Bejarano, also a University of Florida graduate. She completed her residence in Pediatric Dentistry at Miami Children’s Hospital. For the past two years, I have truly enjoyed the Tooth caboose and our wonderful patients. It has been a pleasure to work with such great families- they do a great job raising their children here! “I feel blessed to experience

each child’s uniqueness and be part of their lives in a small way,” she added. In her free time, Dr. Bejarano enjoys tennis, traveling, and time with family and friends. Dr. Ruffolo, whose completed undergraduate work at the University of Colorado, grew up in San Dimas, California, a western frontier town established in the 1800s. “I enjoyed riding horses, hiking mountain trails, and swimming in the creek. We even had orange groves and strawberry fields,” he explained. “I’m really enjoying Plant City because it already feels like home.” Of his orthodontic work with both adults and children, Ruffolo offered, “I especially love the mental discipline, planning and precise execution required to see patients of any age happy when their new beautiful smile is revealed!”

The couple, who are planning ahead for their own family, is excited to collaborate Dr. Howard Howell, Dr. Steve Slavkin, Dr. Gene Whitehead and Dr. Michael Stewart. Together they form a fantastic team of professionals. The orthodontic practice Dr. Howell established in 1977 at Thonotosassa Road and Baker Street is home to six highly regarded specialists who provide the finest in family dentistry and orthodontic care. He considers Drs. Bejarano and Ruffolo great assets to the practice now serving its third generation of families. “They will experience great joy and gratification as they watch our patients grow and evolve physically and personally throughout their orthodontic treatment.” Dr. Slavkin agrees. “Our newest team members will ensure that Bay Area Smiles patients have a comfortable and best experience.” Stellar Staff The twelve orthodontic and pediatric assistants who work alongside the doctors have proven priceless to the practice. Dr. Howell

appreciates their “caring hearts and service in community outreach as well.” Dr, Slavkin added, “This staff and our office organizers make our job easier because they help patients feel relaxed and happy.” Referrals Since the full range of sedation dentistry with a certified pediatric anesthesiologist is available, other dentists refer especially apprehensive patients or those with special needs. Also invaluable are patients’ opinions, with some traveling long distances for treatment. Attorney Nancy Pistilli Hurst recommends Tooth Caboose for adults, too. “Orthodontic work in my 50s to correct misalignment is the best money and time I’ve ever invested in myself. At no age do your teeth become less important.” Trustworthy Lifelong Learners The Bay Area Smiles practitioners invest a great deal of time in continuing education courses for updates on best behavior management techniques, clinical methods, and equipment. Because of their extensive dentistry experience with children and orthodontics, parents can trust the Tooth Caboose specialists with their family’s smiles, and age need not be a factor. Your “Bright Smiles” future! For consultation regarding the best suited orthodontic appliances— Invisalign®, ClearCorrect or Traditional Braces—or to help overcome fear of treatment, call 813-752-3555 today. An online “Request an Appointment” form and Dental Library are also available at bayareasmilesfl.com.

Bay Area Smiles “The Tooth Caboose” 2005 Thonotosassa Rd. Plant City, FL 33563 813-752-3555 www.bayareasmilesfl.com PAGE

44


FOCUS On Medical

(This is a paid advertisement)

Heysek and Kepes Radiation Oncology S cared and troubled after receiving a cancer diagnosis, the caring staff at Heysek and Kepes Radiation Oncology will treat you like family and not simply a patient. Operating since March 5, 1996, they’re conveniently located on the South Florida Baptist Hospital campus. Once inside, you’ll enter subdued, comfortable rooms with soft lighting, pleasant art work, reading materials, puzzles, goodies, and coffee. Striving to treat the whole person, the staff organizes individualized resources: counselors, nutritionists, and appointments. Dr. Randy Heysek and Dr. Kathryn Kepes identify the cancer type and then create a treatment

plan in an effort to overcome the disease. Various forms of radiation therapy are used in attempting to prevent cancer cells from dividing. On site nurses, certified radiation therapy technologists, and a medical physicist provide sophisticated treatment. Treatments may involve individualized radiation therapy, 3-D conformal therapy, high dose radiation for skin cancers, and intensity modulation radiation therapy. AccuBoost is an imageguided breast irradiation technique. The doctors use Valencia, a skin cancer treatment to spare deep surgery. The center houses Varian 600C linear accelorator, an extremely precise machine. Heysek and Kepes is well equipped and experienced in

treating cancers in a compassionate, respectful environment. Dr. Heysek earned a B.S. with honors in Biochemistry, continued at the University of Florida College of Medicine, interned at Baptist memorial Hospital in Memphis, and completed his residency in radiation oncology at the University of Maryland Cancer Center. Dr. Heysek is particularly interested in head, neck, and prostate cancer. He has served as Chief of Staff at Lakeland Regional Hospital and was a previous board member of the American Cancer Society (ACS). Earning her Doctor of Medicine degree from ST. Louis University, Dr. Kepes continued her education with earning an MBA from the University of Miami. She is especially interested

in breast and lung cancer. Dr. Kepes is also an Honorary Lifetime Member of ACS. According to Raquel Fernandes, staff nurse and office supervisor, “We try to make our patients feel like they are a part of our family.” Cancer is a challenge. The Heysek and Kepes team strives to provide total quality care with a difference!

Heysek and Kepes Radiation Oncology 303 N. Alexander St. Plant City, Fl 33563 813-719-7705 PAGE

45


FOCUS On Medical

(This is a paid advertisement)

Now Care Urgent Care and Weight Loss Clinic N ow Care Urgent Care and Weight Loss Clinic is conveniently located off Baker Street (US 92) in the historic district of Plant City, between the downtown area and Alexander Street. Many residents remember this as the old Chambers-Peacock building, as it had a long history of helping people in medical need--which contnues today. A Florida native, graduate of the University of Florida, and Kansas City, Missouri medical school graduate, Dr. Stephen Strait--a residency-trained and board-certified family physician--opened Now Care Walk-in Clinic in February 2005 after serving at a large urgent care clinic in Brandon. Since then, his facility has helped patients with anything from the common cold to emergency situations. Dr. Strait is able to help treat and relieve symptoms of sore throats, sinus infections, bronchitis, pediatric fevers, skin rashes and infections, lacerations, eye emergencies and much, much more. In addition, school, sport and DOT required physical screenings, flu shots, drug screenings, workers’ compensation injury evaluations, X-Rays, and lab tests are available on site. Currently named Now Care Weight Loss and Urgent Care Clinic, the medical center now supervises programs that include appetite suppressants, vitamin injections, and diet plans. Combined, these help patients control unhealthy eating

PAGE

46

habits and give them the power to attain the body they’ve always wanted. Whether a patient is seeking weight loss assistance or treatment of a medical issue, Dr. Strait’s mission is always to fulfill those needs, and in doing so, exceed their expectations for service, quality care, and value--all with minimal waiting time. Furthermore, Now Care strives to earn patients’ long-term loyalty by working to deliver more than promised, being honest and fair, and going the extra mile to provide exceptional personalized service that creates a pleasing medical experience. In many cases, when a regular physician is booked or an emergency arises, Now Care is there to provide quick and professional service, even after hours. Payments may be made with almost all insurance plans. Medicaid, Medicare, and workers’ compensation claims are accepted as well. Financing plans are also available.

Now Care Urgent Care and Weight Loss Cllinic 1009 W. Baker Street, Plant City, FL 33563 Phone: 813-759-1232 Web: nowcareclinic.com Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Saturday - Sunday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.


FOCUS On Medical

Manish Parekh, MD

(This is a paid advertisement)

Cindy Kelly, DO

Watson Clinic Family Healthcare Close to Home

F

amilies in the Plant City community have come to rely upon the expertise of Watson Clinic’s expert primary care specialists for many years. Conveniently located in the heart of the city at 615 E. Alexander Street, Watson Clinic Plant City offers a team of compassionate and highly experienced physicians and providers. The comprehensive roster of services they offer keeps patients

on the path to great health. Led by board-certified internal medicine physicians Dr. Manish Parekh, Dr. Cindy Kelly and certified physician assistant Lindsey Wells, the department offers a comprehensive roster of services designed to keep patients healthy and productive. They also provide hassle-free referrals to additional Watson Clinic physicians when more specialized care is needed.

“Establishing a family medicine physician of your own is perhaps the most important healthcare decision you’ll ever make,” says Dr. Parekh. “They can serve as a trusted medical partner throughout the course of your life, particularly in the area of prevention.” “Preventative medicine is an important part of what we do,” says Dr. Kelly, who has been with Watson Clinic for 19 years. “It’s essential that patients visit their primary physician regularly to stay up-to-date with potentially life-saving screenings, such as those aimed at detecting everything from high blood pressure and high cholesterol to the early signs of colon and breast cancer.” Ms. Wells works alongside Dr. Parekh to offer expanded appointment availability and

Lindsey Wells, PA-C

treatment accessibility. Her areas of expertise include general primary care services and the treatment of diabetes, hypertension, COPD and hyperlipidemia. “We all feel a tremendous kinship with the Plant City community,” she says. “They are so welcoming and treat you like family.” Conversely, that feeling of family is what’s drawn patients to Watson Clinic’s Plant City facility for decades. The Watson Clinic Plant City location also offers an on-site laboratory for quicker test results. To schedule an appointment with any member of the Watson Clinic Plant City team, please call 813-7192500.

PAGE

47


FOCUSBUSINESS

The Billy Herold’s Auto Sales team includes Tara Smith, Billy (seated) and his son Tony.

Billy Herold’s Auto Sales BY CHERYL JOHNSTON

F

or the last 41 years, Billy Herold has helped families find vehicles they need for prices they can afford. With a fondness for friendships and a lifelong passion for cars, he explained, “I’m going to work until I can’t anymore.” His business, Billy Herold’s Auto Sales, specializes in clean and dependable pre-owned vehicles priced typically under $10,000. “We have more expensive cars on occasion,” he added, “but our primary focus is assisting people

PAGE

48

with cars, SUVs, and pickup trucks in that lower-priced range.” The pre-owned car dealership’s reputation for integrity and a great inventory selection is well-known in the Winter Strawberry Capitol of the World. “We don’t buy auction cars,” Herold shared. “We call on about a half-dozen new car dealers to purchase their trades that are good cars, but perhaps a little older than what they can certify or like to stock in their used car area. We also purchase from individuals. We make

our vehicles as perfect as possible so they’re clean with nice interiors, road ready with good tires, and reliable.” “I suspect I’ve been involved in selling more than 25,000 vehicles in Plant City over the years,” Billy shared, “perhaps more than any one individual. “Repeats and referrals have built this business. Our reputation depends on folks who’ve been pleased with and proud of their purchase.” Billy Herold’s Auto Sales provides

customers with a 30-day unlimited warranty, regardless of the mileage. “Customer satisfaction is very important to us. In all these years, we’ve never had an issue.” With family settling here in 1925, Herold feels very connected to the community. “My love for cars is what drew me into the business,” he shared. “By the time I was 21, I had personally owned over 20 vehicles. In 1976, Herold left the restaurant management business to join the sales force at Wilson-Davis Ford here in Plant City. “After 25 years in new car franchises, I’m in a very good place right now,” he offered. Even though he’s at the semiretirement life stage, Billy is pleased. “This size operation allows me time to take care of customers, travel with my wife Sherri, and enjoy my grandkids, too.” He continued, “Because I still enjoy the business and especially the people, I plan to stay right here.” As time allows, Bill’s son Tony, a Pasco County Fire and Rescue first-responder, also assists at the dealership. Office assistant Tara Smith handles the paperwork. “We plan to remain a small, hands-on business and keep overhead costs to a minimum,” said Herold. “We like offering our customers the best price-value in town.” For parents looking for a reliable, inexpensive vehicle for a high school grad or college student, Billy can help. “We carry a great supply of nice vehicles for first time buyers on a limited budget.” When you’re in the market next for a great deal on an affordable, trustworthy vehicle, let Billy Herold put his experience to work for you. He’ll also offer his best advice if you’re looking to sell. Plain and simple, stop in. Billy Herold’s Auto Sales wants to earn your business!

Billy Herold’s Auto Sales 201 E. Baker Street Plant City, FL 33563-3417 813-767-6317 billyherold@hotmail.com


GIVE YOURSELF A REASON TO SMILE

59

$

500 Off

$

Cleaning,

Exam & X-rays

-OR-

(Reg. $305) Offer Expires 6/30/2017. Includes exam, cleaning & x-rays. New Patients Only. Offer Expires 6/30/2017.

at WaldenWoods

GENERAL DENTISTS 512 E. ALEXANDER STREET | PLANT CITY DENTALASSOCIATESWALDENWOODS.COM

Call today!

813-752-3030

D0150, D0330, D0272, D0210, D1110, D6010, D6012, D6013, D6040, D6050, D9310. IT IS OUR OFFICE POLICY THAT THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS THE RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED-FEE OR REDUCED-FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT. DN18996, DN20136

ADV21143

DENTAL A S S O C I AT E S

RAY GUTIERREZ, DMD | HELEN HOVEIDA, DMD

PAGE

49


REAL ESTATE

How To Get Rid Of Flood Insurance BY NATE DAVIS, FLORIDA MORTAGE FIRM

Ask me about Accident Forgiveness. With other insurance companies, having an accident can mean your rates rise as much as 40%. But with Allstate’s Accident Forgiveness, your rates won’t go up at all just because of an accident. Don’t wait! Call me today.

Feola Insurance Agency 813-752-2556

Feature is optional and subject to terms and conditions. Safe Driving Bonus® won’t apply after an accident. Allstate Fire and Casualty Insurance Co. Northbrook, IL © 2010 Allstate Insurance Co.

146433

1003 S. Collins St. Plant City ralphlfeolasr@allstate.com

I

t may be possible to get your home removed from a Special Flood Hazard Area, which could eliminate lender-required flood insurance. “You may submit an application to FEMA for a formal determination of the property’s location and/ or elevation relative to the SFHA,” according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The Special Flood Hazard Area is the area that has a 1-percent or greater chance of flooding in any given year. This area is also referred to by some as the 1-percent-annualchance floodplain, base floodplain or the 100-year floodplain. “After FEMA reviews the map-

change request, it will issue a Determination Document, either approving or denying the map change. If FEMA grants the map amendment or revision request, the property owner may no longer be required to pay flood insurance,” according to FEMA. The property owner may send the Determination Document to his or her lender/servicer and request that the federal flood insurance requirement for the structure be removed. It is common, however, for people not wanting to get rid of flood insurance. Just like automobile or life insurance, some people simply want it.

Florida Mortgage Firm (813-707-6200) is an Equal Housing Lender, NMLS #289323, NMLS #294701.

PAGE

50


PAGE

51


REAL ESTATE

Walden Lake Review BY NATALIE SWEET

T

he Walden Lake Community Association Board Meetings are the third Monday of each month at the Walden Lake Community Association office building on Griffin Boulevard in Walden Lake. The next meetings are scheduled for May 15th and June 19th at 7:00 PM. The meetings are open to all Walden Lake residents. Watch the announcement boards at all entrances for dates and times for special meetings and events. At the last meeting, officers and committee members were elected to the Board. This fiscal year Sharon Philbin is President, Michael Fiaschetti is Vice-President, Alicia Powell is Secretary and Bob Hunter is Treasurer. Committee Chairs and Members were also assigned. This year runs April to April. Repairs have been made to the walking path around the lake. There were many areas that had to be removed and repaved. The walking path is heavily treed, which leads to maintenance issues and over time the roots pull up the pavement, which can cause a tripping hazard. The City of Plant City has recently changed how the HOA water allotment is distributed. The HOA had a certain allotment per month and if the amount went over the allowed usage, the bill would be extremely high. Now the City is The April sales are as follows: Address 3429 Silver Meadow Way 3425 Silver Meadow Way 1459 Walden Oaks Place 1409 Teakwood Drive 1701 Brookstone Way 2907 Hammock Vista Ct. 1903 Paddock Drive 1506 Teakwood Drive 2708 Spring Meadow Dr. 2917 Clubhouse Drive 3323 Kilmer Drive 3306 Forest Hammock Dr. 3021 Sutton Woods Drive

PAGE

52

Sales Price $128,625 $168,000 $180,000 $195,000 $200,000 $210,000 $212000 $219,900 $235,000 $237,500 $256,000 $266,500 $365,000

giving an annual allotment which allows the HOA to control usage better by using more during the drought and less during the rainy season. During the month of April, there were 13 sales in Walden Lake and Walden Lake East. The average sale price in Walden Lake was $228,014 with an average of 33 days on the market. There are currently 27 active listings for sale in Walden Lake and Walden Lake East with an average list price of $288,637 and an average of 41 days on the market. There are 25 properties Pending Contract with an average list price of $253,642 and average of 37 days on the market. The market continues to remain strong and along with continued low interest rates, making this still an affordable time to purchase. If you have any question about these MLS statistics, please feel free to contact me at 813-758-9586. The United Food Bank is always in need of non-perishable items. Our HOA office is a drop off spot for non-perishables and you can contact the food bank directly. Please consider donating to the less fortunate. You may contact me about this article via email at NSweet@ KW.com or 813-758-9586.

Living Area 1622 1644 1487 1798 1903 2067 1676 2101 2009 2072 2286 2055 3336

Pool No No No Community None No No Community Yes No Yes Yes Yes

Garage 2 Car 2 Car 2 Car 2 Car 2 Car 2 Car 2 Car 2 Car 2 Car 2 Car 2 Car 2 Car 3 Car


PAGE

53


SPORTS

Athlete of the Month Steven Witchoskey BY ASHLYN YARBROUGH | PHOTOS PROVIDED BY STEVEN WITCHOSKEY

scholarship. Since then, he has received 14 Division 1 full-ride scholarship offers. After about a year of visiting colleges and forming relationships with coaches, Witchoskey made the decision that would impact not just the next four years, but the rest of his life. “It took a lot of praying, fasting, and talking with my parents and high school coaches, but I knew that Western Kentucky was where I was supposed to be,” he expressed. Not only is Witchoskey an incredible football player, but he’s also a four-year Varsity baseball player. He began his baseball career at age four and is currently an outfielder for the Cougars. “Our team is surrounded by the word ‘family.’” Witchoskey stated. “We are all best friends. I had the opportunity to early enroll at WKU in December, but I decided to stay home just so I could play with these guys. I look forward at every practice to sharing laughs and memories with the team that’ll last forever.” He has had a great season thus far and has hit three

homeruns this year! Witchoskey strives to succeed in academics and extracurricular activities just as much as athletics. He holds a 5.8 GPA and is a member of the Senior Executive Council. He goes out of his way to be intentional and personal with everyone he meets; thus, he was voted as Homecoming King, Most Athletic, and a Senior Superlative by the DHS student body. Witchoskey plans on majoring in exercise science at WKU in hopes of becoming a physical therapist. As he prepares to leave on June 4th, he continues to work on his mental and physical strength, as well as keeping Jesus Christ the center of his life in all he does. He urges all young athletes to listen to the coaches and adults in their lives because “they know more than you. Be humble.” Steven Witchoskey has made DHS and Plant City proud. His friends, family, and coaches are extremely excited to see the great things he will do in the years to come!

Steven Witchoskey will be attending Western Kentucky University on a full-ride scholarship this summer to play as a tight end on their football team.

A

s the school year comes to an end, the class of 2017 seniors are wrapping up their high school careers and preparing to start the next stage of their lives. Many will go to college, many will go into the work force, and very few will leave to pursue their dreams as a Division 1 athlete. Plant City native and Durant High School senior Steven Witchoskey has made his lasting mark on his school and community, and will be heading up to Western Kentucky University as a tight end on a full-ride football scholarship this summer. Witchoskey began as a flag football player at the age of five. He continued the recreational league sport until fourth-grade, when he was itching for something more competitive. He went on to play football for the Plant City Dolphins until 6th grade when he superseded the 140 lbs. Little League weight limit as a 160 lbs. 13-year-old! PAGE

54

Witchoskey never lost passion for the sport and picked it back up during his freshman year of high school on the Durant Varsity football team. “It’s a little deep, but football reminds me of life,” he said. “Every season you’re with a family and you work through failures and success. It really helps prepare you for the real world in the face of adversity. It’s all about mental strength, not just physical strength.” As a high school athlete, the main goal many kids work towards is getting recruited by a college coach. “You’re stressed out all four years, thinking you’re never going to get to play in college… and then comes the time you get your first scholarship offer and it changes your life around,” explained Witchoskey. For him, that life changing moment happened in January of his junior year when the University of South Florida called and offered him a

Witchoskey runs his route in the Senior All-Star football game at Raymond James Stadium.


PARK PLACE PLANT CITY GATE LOCATED AT 1809 N GORDON STREET 813-704-5924 MODEL CENTER OPEN MON-SAT 10-5, SUN 1-5 WE ARE LOCATED 1/2 MILE OFF SOUTH FRONTAGE RD

ONLY 3 MINUTES TO PARK RD OR ALEXANDER-BUCHMAN HWY THREE HOMES MOVE IN READY STARTING SOON!!

I-4 EXITS !!

Build YOUR Dream Home !! 12 models to choose from! LOTS OF CHOICES of HAND LAID BRICK, tile, countertops carpet, interior and exterior paint color and trims

ENERGY EFFICIENT NATURAL GAS!!! PRICES STARTING IN MID $200K’s INCLUDES 75 FT WIDE HOMESITE!! BUILT BY AN INDEPENDENT LOCAL BUILDER, building in Florida since 1979. JAYCOR Homes

FEES ONLY $250 PER YEAR

MOST MODELS WILL ACCOMMODATE TWO CAR GARAGE PLUS AN OPTIONAL DETACHED WORSHOP/GARAGE

>>>>ATTENTION RV’RS AND BOATERS!!! <<<< WE HAVE LOTS AVAILABLE THAT WE CAN BUILD YOU A DETACHED GARAGE BIG ENOUGH TO HOUSE YOUR BOAT OR RV

PAGE

55


SPORTS

Sports Team of the Month Lady Chargers Flag Football BY ASHLYN YARBROUGH | PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANDRE LEWIS

I

t has been said that whatever a boy can do, a girl can do, too... and look prettier while doing it. The Strawberry Crest High School Flag Football team is comprised of athletically skilled female students who pour their hearts and souls into the sport they love. The Lady Chargers Flag Football team is led by Head Coach Andre Lewis, and assistant coaches Eric Dolby and Latosha Lewis. Lewis did not grow up playing football, however, he had an incredible career in basketball. He played for the Western Kentucky Hilltoppers, the Southeastern Louisiana Lions, and even travelled to Germany to pursue his passion for the sport. Lewis has been coaching the Lady Chargers Flag Football team for seven years now, five as head coach. He is also a Driver’s Education teacher and the Boys Basketball Coach at SCHS. The SCHS Flag Football team is composed of 15 talented athletes.

PAGE

56

The 2017 Lady Chargers Flag Football team ended their season with a 3-6 record, and has a bond and competitive drive like no other

Many had never played the sport, but caught on quickly. “We had a lot of new girls this year,” stated Lewis. “Even though they were first-time players, they worked hard every day to get better and catch up with the veteran players.” The girls ended the season with a 3-6 record, three of the games being very close losses at the beginning of the season. “We were three plays away from our record ending 6-3,” explained Lewis. “It was very challenging going into the season like that, but I think that we did well and the girls pulled through.” Brooke Conyers, a senior for the Lady Chargers Flag Football team, stated that her favorite memory from this season was when they defeated Armwood High School in overtime. “It was a very close game all the way through,” Conyers expressed. “We just kept pushing until we came out on top and got the win.” Even in the face of adversity,

the Lady Chargers never lost the comradery of their team or strong work ethic. “Our girls are always willing to work on bettering their personal skills, as well as making the team better as a whole,” offered Lewis. Conyers described the bond between the girls like that of a family. “My favorite part about this team is how we work together as a whole unit. No matter if we win a game or lose it, we will still come together and push forward to the next task at hand.” The Lady Chargers have two captains that have led the team with impeccable character and dedication throughout this past season. Jordan Snapp, a four-year varsity player, and Marybeth Stewart. Both are seniors who are very experienced with the game and lead their fellow teammates by the examples they set on and off the field. The Strawberry Crest High

School Flag Football team is a testimony to perseverance and commitment. As the team grows and the athletes develop their skills to be even more competitive than they are already, there is no telling what accolades the Lady Chargers will reach in the seasons to come.

Senior player Brooke Conyers jumps to catch as pass during a game.


D S

ISCOUNT CREENING Marty Johnson

Inc.

®

Specializing in ReScReening & RepaiR Since 1983

Pool Enclosures Screen Rooms Lanais

Screen Entryways New Doors & Hardware Pet Screen & Pet Doors

Window Screens Vinyl Window Repairs Aluminum Repairs

5 Year Warranty on rescreening 10 Year Warranty on super-screening

We Will Meet or Beat Any Advertised Price! Free tes a estim

www.discountscreeninginc.com

813-752-3306

1406 W Knights Griffin Rd Plant City, FL 33565

lice & in nsed sure d PAGE

57


EXTRA

Leaders in Faith Dr. Jack Myers BY CHERYL JOHNSTON

S

pearheading the first-ever Easter Egg event at the Plant City stadium on Park Road, Dr. Jack Myers and his wife, Rev. Marie Myers of Life Family Church were excited to hide 30,000 eggs and witness 125 salvations with 14 water baptisms that day. When the international evangelists moved here seven years ago to establish a base, they recognized how “the community’s unique teamwork of local officials, businesses, and individuals protected the familyoriented focus and decided “This is home.” Pastor Jack loves “seeing lives changed with the Gospel,” noting, “It’s wonderful watching how God transform’s people’s circumstances and perspective once they surrender to Him.” Focus: Share a brief bio. Born in Portsmouth, Virginia in 1966, I grew up in a military home with one younger brother and a sister who died in a car accident at age 20. Our parents divorced, so my mother worked three jobs to keep us in private Christian schools in Tampa. I was saved at Spencer Memorial Baptist Church in Tampa at age 12 and at 17 was filled with the Holy Ghost with the evidence of speaking in tongues at Bayshore United Methodist. At 19, I married 18-year-old Marie. After experiencing a major encounter with God at age 26, we moved to study at Rhema Bible Training Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma (1996-97). I answered the call of God on my life and was ordained through Rhema. I’ve also completed a doctoral degree in 2007 through Life Christian University (LCU). We’ve been in ministry 21 years of our 32-year marriage now. Seven years ago, we felt led of the Lord to establish a home base for our evangelism and international

PAGE

58

Dr. Jack and Rev. Marie Myers

missions work. After looking at Clearwater, Tampa and Orlando, we were drawn especially to Plant City. Together, we pastor Life Family Church and serve internationally through evangelism crusades as Jack Myers Ministries Missions. Our campus also houses LCU – Plant City, which Marie directs.

anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and power, and how he went around doing good and healing all who were under the power of the devil, because God was with him.” There must be a balance with the Gospel. Jesus was very balanced. Not only did He have the Word, but He also moved in the Spirit.

Focus: Describe your wife’s roles. Marie is the hub within the wheel. She is the administrator, my right arm. I could not run with the vision without her help. She’s a gifted speaker and five-fold ministry teacher in her own right; loves helping women, administrating our missions work, and directing LCU here. She’s also mother to our sons, John and Joshua, who also serves with us.

Focus: How do you relax? There must also be a balance in our own life between ministry and recreation. I enjoy martial arts conditioning every other day. On Wednesdays at church, I’m teaching a little to children, too.

Focus: A favorite Scripture verse? Acts 10:38 – “…how God

Focus: What’s your favorite way to share Jesus? Recently, a woman with two children approached me for gas money. While pumping fuel into her car’s tank, I learned she didn’t attend church. So, I asked, ‘If

you died today, where would you spend eternity?’ She invited Christ into her life right there and then came tears of relief. I like to meet a person’s physical need and look for opportunities to discuss their spiritual life. We do this in our miracle healing crusades, too. I invite, ‘Why don’t you come to one of our services,’ or ‘Can I recommend you to someone, so you can experience a good church.’ Jesus said, ‘Go and make disciples.’ Sometimes we need to hold somebody’s hand. Inviting provides a golden opportunity to mentor and disciple. All are welcome at Life Family Church, 600 W. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. For details, call 813-708-2783 or visit online at LifeFamilyChurch.net or www. JackMyersMinistries.com.


EXTRA

Fish Tales Breaking Rules BY MIKE GOODWINE

T

Zack Langford from Syngenta (orange), Steve Mathis, owner of Mathis Farms (white), and Layla Drawdy from Diamond R Fertilizer enjoyed catching fish after I broke my rules.

here’s a bunch of hidden rules most anglers live by, but they don’t talk about. Like taking a picture of the first caught, no matter how big it is. Here’s another one, no was has a drink before the first fish is put in the boat. You’ve probably never heard of these rules because every fisherman has their own personal rules. Sometimes these rules hold true, so we stick to them no matter what. Sometimes we break these rules and then mentally destroy our confidence in catching a fish that day. On my last charter I broke one of my rules I usually live by. Here’s the rule. If my boat breaks down, never try to continue fishing. Just pack it up and call it a day. Nine times out of

ten the day gets worse after having boat problems. Since it was a beautiful day, I was baited up and my clients were ready to fish, so I decided to make the best of a bad situation. I put my faith in God and not in myself, and He blessed us with an awesome fishing trip. My clients caught so many snook they lost count and they had a blast catching reds. Will I break my fishing rules from here on out? Probably not, but I’m a firm believer that a little faith can move mountains. To book a fishing trip with Capt. Mike Goodwine, call 813-707-4733 or go to Blackneckadventurescharters.com.

PAGE

59


EXTRA

Candy’s Corner BY CANDY OWENS

Y

ou deserve a MEGA MACK! There’s nothing like a commercial showing a picture of a steaming, juicy burger to send hungry folks to a fast food drive thru, right? Or how about a Taco Party Pack, a Chicken Plank Family Box, or even a Pizza Crowd Pleaser? Today’s families seem busier than ever. Rushing between work, school, and soccer practice leaves parents scrambling for time. The thought of preparing hot, nutritious meals from scratch has become pretty much a once-in-a-while thing for families on the go. Sadly, the majority of meals today come from a drive-thru or quick service counter. Back in my day…(which was a long time ago!), families ate what was prepared at home, seated around the table with family members or off of TV trays as a special treat. If there was mention of eating out in a restaurant, then a date and time was decided upon and was attended by the whole family. You see, eating in a restaurant was not an everyday thing, it was special! People made plans, people took time, and people spent time enjoying their food and each other. Without question, everyone was neatly dressed and on their best behavior. People looked forward to eating in a restaurant and savored every moment of this special time. When my Father took our family out to eat, it was almost always on the weekends and would usually be to a restaurant in Lakeland. If my Father said we were going to Tampa, then that was extra special and would be a trip to Spanish Park, Valencia Gardens, Las Novedades, or The Columbia Restaurant. Now that was Florida fine dining! If my Father said we were going to Lakeland, it would usually be to one of several restaurants like: Morrison’s Cafeteria, The Smoke House, Jimbo’s Bar-B-Que, Reececliff’s, Steak-nPAGE

60

Shake, Vito’s, Talk-of-the Town, The Fox Fire, Red Lobster, Sambo’s, or McDonald’s. You see….Plant City did not have a McDonald’s, so we had to drive all the way to Lakeland for what is considered today to be “fast-food.” Out of the list of restaurants, we would usually end up at The Smoke House or Morrison’s Cafeteria. The Smoke House Restaurant was a small place on Hwy 92 next to the old Publix warehouse in the Wabash area. It looked like an old house that had been converted and had dark wood wall paneling. The Smoke House had what I considered to be the best Bar-B-Que I have ever eaten. They served: Chicken, Ribs, Beef, and Pork. I remember that from a small child to a teenager, I never changed my order, not even once. It was always a Bar-B-Que Beef sandwich, French fries, baked beans, and an ice-cold Coca Cola to drink. When it was time for dessert, you would wash your hands quickly in water with lemon in the little silver fingerowls at each person’s plate. Then it was ”LOOK OUT!” Here comes their famous “Upside Down Chocolate Fudge Cake!” The dish of chocolate cake also had vanilla ice cream, bubbling hot fudge, whipped cream, and a cherry. It was so rich and so thick and it was marvelous!! The majority of times we ate in Lakeland were spent at Morrison’s Cafeteria across the street from Munn Park. Upon entering the doors of this wonderful apex of great dining, you walked to your left down a narrow hallway towards the clang of heavy dishware hitting plastic trays and the smell of a Sumptuous Smorgasbord filled with the tastiest of dishes. Morrison’s offered a long list of daily entrees on a framed white-on-blackfelt-letter board mounted on the wall alongside the waiting line. There would be: Pepper Steak, Chicken and Dumplings, Meatloaf, Spaghetti, Liver and Onions, Fried Chicken, Shrimp

Creole, Chopped Steak, Roast Beef with New Potatoes, Trout or Spanish Mackerel Amandine, Stuffed Peppers, Fried Shrimp, and my favorite— Turkey and Dressing. When you made it to the front of the line, you would get your very own tray (which was sometimes hot and still dripping from a recent washing) and your silverware which was bundled in a starched linen napkin. You would slide your tray along the stainless steel railing in front of a long line of food offerings. And that took concentration! If you moved your tray too fast, then you’d slam into the person’s fingers curled around the tray ahead of you. If you were too slow, then you’d hold up the line of hungry people behind you. Morrison’s showed you their food before you ordered it, displayed and arranged in perfect rows. As you slid your tray along the rails very carefully, the servers behind the counter would smile and greet you with: “Serve you, Ma’am?” or “Serve you, Sir?” You would slide your tray past beautiful salads of every kind. There would be tossed salads, carrotraisins salads, apple salads, Jello salads, Jello squares with fruit inside, cottage cheese, pasta salads, tomato aspic salads, and my favorite—the Tony Salad, which was a mixture of iceberg lettuce, ham, Swiss cheese, black and green olives, onions, and a mayonnaise based dressing with Parmesan cheese sprinkled on top. Yum! Yum! Next, you’d slide your tray past the hot entrees and I would always get Turkey and Dressing, Chicken and Dumplings, Spaghetti, or Roast Beef with New Potatoes. The side items were next: mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, green beans, corn, greens, squash, blackeyed peas, okra, and my all-time favorite vegetable— macaroni and cheese! HA! HA! They had the best Mac and Cheese, covered with a cheesy crust. That was so-o-o good. Passing by the breads you could choose frorn corn sticks, corn muffins, garlic bread, and the world’s best cloverleaf yeast rolls. And oh, the dessert choices! Egg custard, strawberry shortcake, fruit

pies, and slices of cake that looked monstrous in size—so much to choose from. You had to be careful or you’d look down and your tray would be covered with food. I can even remember the pats of butter placed on individual little cards with wax paper on top. The cold drinks were lined up in cascading tall drink glasses with slushy ice and were arranged in straight lines. When you and your party had reached the end of the railing, a somber operator eyeballed your tray while touch-typing on her broad keyboard at lightning speed, and in one swift and smooth swing of her arm, tore off the printed tally slip and stuck it on the side of your wet drink glass. Then, an African-American server in a jacket and bow tie would whisk your food tray into the dining area and arrange the items on your chosen table with great efficiency. My Father would collect the paper tally slips and tip the servers with a quarter on each tray. Back then, your meal would be right at $1.00 for salad, entrée, vegetable, bread, dessert, and drink—if you can believe that? My sister and I felt very grown up after selecting the food items we wanted for our very own tray. Morrison’s Cafeteria served delicious food, provided a stimulating atmosphere with entertaining servers, and allowed children and adults to dine as equals. Decades have come and gone since Morrison’s Cafeteria and The Smoke House Restaurant closed their doors. The sad thing is that I know I will never again taste that delicious and crusty Mac and Cheese or the juicy Turkey and Dressing, nor will I bite into one of those Bar-BQue Beef sandwiches, or will I ever get a chill down my spine like I did when I swallowed a mouthful of that “world famous” “UPSIDE DOWN CHOCOLATE FUDGE CAKE!” But……..I’m sure glad I did!


EXTRA

Wanda’s

Words of Wisdom BY WANDA “LEWIS” ANDERSON

H

appy Mother’s Day to all the Moms! Thank God for memories. Certain scents or smells often take you back in time to a special memory. My kids will tell you that every time they smell Pine Sol, they think of their child hood. Well, that’s because my Mother always cleaned with Pine Sol and it’s also my favorite cleaning product. Here’s a few tips when using Pine Sol: Did you know that flies hate Pine Sol? To make your own fly repellant mix 1/3 water, 1/3 vinegar and 1/3 original Pine Sol in a spray bottle and spray the area. Pine Sol is great for keeping raccoons away. Simply mix equal parts of water and Pine Sol and spray in your outdoor trash cans. The smell is repulsive to most animals. Not only does the trash can smell nice, but the cleanser keeps away the raccoons and flies, too. This is great for outdoor parties when flies are swarming. To keep kitchen trash cans smelling nice, place a Pine Sol soaked paper towel in the bottom of the trash can. If you have trouble keeping your pets from peeing in the house, try

cleaning the area with Pine Sol and water. Pets like to pee on ammonia cleaned surfaces since urine contains ammonia. Unlike many household cleansers, it doesn’t contain ammonia. So if you avoid ammonia products, you avoid the problem. Every time I smell Listerine I think of my Dad. To this day, you can always find a bottle of Listerine in my parents’ home. Let me share with you some helpful tips using Listerine. Run out of deodorant? You can dip a cotton ball in some Listerine and dab it under your arms. It will do the trick in a pinch. If you have a toothache, try dabbing a little Listerine on the area to ease the pain. If you’re stung by a wasp or bee, try applying Listerine to the sting for some quick pain relief. To help kills germs in your laundry, try adding a cup of Listerine to the wash with your favorite laundry detergent. Not only does it kill germs, but it cleans your washing machine as well. Wishing a special Mother’s Day to my Mother who is my role model, my friend, my hero. Until next time relax, enjoy and be thankful… PAGE

61


EXTRA

Affordable Day Away On the Sunny Side - St. Petersburg BY BARBARA ROUTEN

O

nce known as a community for retirees, St. Petersburg—the Sunshine City—has experienced a lively downtown revival with great food, art, shops, sports and spectacular wall murals. Approximately 50 miles from Plant City, it’s a culturally rich day trip. Plan your route to include the scenic 430-foot Sunshine Skyway Bridge, rated third in the Travel Channel’s list of top 10 bridges worldwide. St. Petersburg’s Waterfront Arts District, facing Tampa Bay, has many parks where music festivals, open-air theaters and activities such as boating, bicycling and Segway tours occur. The St. Petersburg Municipal Marina hosts hundreds of motor and sailboats and has a public boat launch. Walk or use the yellow-and-red Downtown Looper trolley to explore the district. Stops around North Straub Park are free. Downtown St. Petersburg has several world-renowned art venues. Architect

PAGE

62

Yann Weymouth designed the stunninglyshaped Dalí Museum, which contains many of Salvador Dalí’s most famous paintings. The Museum of Fine Arts houses artifacts that span 5,000 years. See unique, artisan-made jewelry and serious and whimsical glass, wood, metal and leather artwork at Shapiro’s Gallery of Contemporary American Crafts and other small galleries and shops. Also in the arts district are the Palladium and Mahaffey theaters, where you can take in Broadway shows, Florida Orchestra concerts and performances by world-class showmen. Available by trolley, the Central Arts District contains The Chihuly Collection at the Morean Arts Center. Admission tickets to the large exhibit of colorful and imaginative blown-glass installations designed by world-renowned artist Dale Chihuly also include a fascinating live glassblowing demonstration at the Morean Glass Studio & Hot Shop.

A horse-drawn Cinderella carriage takes visitors on a night tour of downtown St. Petersburg. The community’s Saturday Morning Market is one of America’s top 20 and largest in the Southeast, featuring live music, artisan food, flowers, crafts and ready-to-eat meals. Through May, it’s in the Al Lang Field parking lot. A summer market, from June to August, opens in shady Williams Park. For sit-down dining with remarkable views of Tampa Bay, small aircraft traffic

or thunderstorms rolling across the water, enjoy meals at the Hangar Restaurant & Flight Lounge in the Albert Whitted Airport. Beach Drive also has many waterfront sidewalk cafés or air-conditioned restaurants. And be sure to end your day at Paciugo Gelato. Ask for a free taste— though all the flavors are wonderful, the violet gelato is distinctively delicious.


PAGE

63


PAGE

64


EXTRA

Heather’s Health Tips

What are you doing wrong? BY HEATHER DYKSTRA

Y

ou may not know it, but there’s a formula to finding the healthiest and fittest version of you. It’s an experiment for each individual but if you take the time to listen to your body, you will start to see progress. Some people need very little cardio while some need a lot. Some people can eat whatever they want while others have to watch their food intake. You have to find what works for YOU. It may not be the same formula that works for your friend. But, these two topics are always across the board for everyone. 1. NUTRITION! It is so important to eat well. Notice I didn’t use the word diet because there are so many “diet” foods and drinks that are bad for you. Eating every few hours is key. Work your way around the perimeter of the grocery store for fresh foods. Try to cook at home as much as possible. Watch salt and cut sugar. Drink more water.

2. EXERCISE! Find something that motivates you and gets your heart rate up. Make sure you stay in YOUR training heart rate zone to be sure you’re getting the most out of your workout. A heart rate monitor with chest strap is the most accurate. Most monitors will guide you and tell you if your heart rate is too low or high, but some do not. If that’s the case, follow this formula and keep an eye on your watch: Take your age and subtract it from the number 220. That’s your MAX heart rate. Do not let your heart rate go above that number. To stay in the BEST training zone, you want to be between 50-85% of your MAX. Take your MAX number and multiply by .50 to find the lowest number you should be at. Take your MAX number and multiply by .85 to find the highest number you should be at. Try to stay between this range. You should start noticing a difference with your workouts pretty quickly just by paying attention to your body.

PAGE

65


EXTRA

Meghan is pictured in Caen, France, one stop in the SLU 301 program.

Meghan Cole Volunteer of the Month BY TARYN STORTER

P Along with other First Baptist Church students on the group’s Miami Mission Trip, Meghan Cole served the community of Miami during Spring Break this year.

lant City High School student Meghan Cole has a huge passion for the people of her community. This is evident in her more than 100 community service hours to date. She’s worked with Interact Girls for three years, volunteered with First Baptist Church of Plant City, and has participated in numerous community events throughout the years. As President of the PCHS Interact Service Club, formerly known as Civinettes, Meghan has participated in many events including feeding the homeless, Lights of Love, Walden Lake Fall Festival, the Rotary Back-to-School Fair, Raider Color Run, Relay for Life fundraisers, and more. First Baptist Church of Plant City has also made an impact on Meghan’s service career. Her faith has inspired her to help with community events like Vacation Bible School, Summer Salt (Sports

and Arts Camp), Fall Festival, and the Egg Drop. It has also given her the opportunity to travel and serve other areas. She has gone on over five mission trips to cities such as Miami, New York, Nashville, and Atlanta. For four years, Meghan has been a part of the Leadership Team for First Baptist Youth and has completed service projects with them as well. She also traveled with Student Leadership University to Washington, D.C. and to Europe while learning what it takes to be a great leader. In addition, Meghan has been able to assist with other city events, such as the South Florida Baptist Hospital’s Foundation fundraiser, Diamonds and Denim. Meghan Cole is an incredible asset to the Plant City community. Without a doubt, this young woman’s heart for serving others will continue to make the world a better place.

About the Writer:

Meghan is involved each year at Ignite Weekend, an opportunity for Plant City community youth to serve in many different aspects. PAGE

66

Plant City native and PCHS freshman Taryn Storter, 15, loves history, serving with Interact Girls and competing in various events through FFA. She serves currently as the JG Smith FFA Chapter President, and was recently elected as the Plant City SR. FFA Treasurer and the Hillsborough County Federation FFA Secretary. She serves as well on the Youth Leadership Team at First Baptist Church of Plant City. Taryn hopes to one day attend the University of Florida to obtain degrees in Marketing and Communications and eventually work for Walt Disney World.


EXTRA

Brendan Rollyson Volunteer of the Month BY TARYN STORTER

I

n Plant City, we have students with a heart for service. Many believe this starts in high school, but truly, we have amazing youth who begin serving our community long before their ninth grade year. Brendan Rollyson is an eighthgrade Tomlin Tiger with a passion for serving the city of Plant City. In addition to eight years as a Boy Scout, he has worked alongside First Baptist Church of Plant City and helps to feed the homeless with Friends in the Park each month. Brendan’s heart for the homeless began at a very young age. In his third year of elementary school, his heart was moved when he noticed a homeless man on the side of the road, holding a sign that read: “No food, no job, no hope.” To offer some hope, Brendan created a care package for the man. This encounter really developed Brendan’s, “passion for the homeless,” in the words of his mother, Tara Rollyson. Since August, Brendan has partnered with Friends in the Park, an organization that prepares daily evening meals for the homeless of the Plant City community. He helps one night a month, baking desserts and serving them along with the dinner provided

by Susan Batley and others. The Boy Scouts are also a huge part of Brendan’s life. Presently, a Life Scout, he is only one rank away from Eagle Scout, the highest the organization offers. He is also the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader in Troop 5. Additionally, scouting has given Brendan the opportunity to join a Leadership Society, The Order of the Arrow. During the weekend-long Flaming Arrow adventure in Lake Wales, he and his group repaired a bridge for their service project. Brendan’s home church, First Baptist Church of Plant City, has also allowed him to serve the community. Among many projects, he participated in CareFest. Through this opportunity, he was able to assist an elderly woman in caring for her yard. He mowed, pulled weeds, and cleaned up until her yard practically sparkled. Brendan Rollyson is a great student who has served his community through feeding the homeless, working with the Boy Scouts, and assisting his church. Keep your eye on Brendan, Plant City. He is going to do amazing things.

Brendan is preparing cookies to serve the homeless. He bakes a variety treats for his night with Friends in the Park.

About the Writer: Plant City native and PCHS freshman Taryn Storter, 15, loves history, serving with Interact Girls and competing in various events through FFA. She serves currently as the JG Smith FFA Chapter President, and was recently elected as the Plant City SR. FFA Treasurer and the Hillsborough County Federation FFA Secretary. She serves as well on the Youth Leadership Team at First Baptist Church of Plant City. Taryn hopes to one day attend the University of Florida to obtain degrees in Marketing and Communications and eventually work for Walt Disney World.

Brendan Rollyson is a 14-year old, 8th grader at Tomlin Middle School, where he serves as Secretary of the National Junior Honor Society. PAGE

67


DINING

Taco Rey Mexican Grill BY CHERYL JOHNSTON

T

aco Rey was voted Best Mexican through the 2017 Readers’ Choice Awards presented annually by Focus Magazine. The menu is packed with authentic Mexican favorites for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Customers can simply walk up to the counter and order meals for takeout or be seated for table service. Dining in includes chips and salsa while you wait. It’s obvious from the traffic flow in the restaurant that Taco Rey is a favorite spot for many frequent diners. And one look at the extensive menu demonstrates the variety of choices to meet every appetite. Have you tried a Mexican breakfast lately? Just reading the breakfast choices will make you crave a great morning meal. You might also learn a few things, too. Start your day with Huevos Rancheros (fried eggs) or Huevos Con Chorizo, a la Mexicana, or con Jamon (ham). Also available are burritos, chilaquiles, machaca (steak with egg), corn tacos or gorditas

(with egg, ham, or potato). For those wanting only a simple snack, appetizers include Nachos, Guacamole, Queso, Tamales and Chicharron de Harina. To treat the family at home, the menu offers family size portions of Pico de Gallo or salsa, rice, refried beans with cheese, corn or flour tortillas, French fries, Chile Toreado, avocado and guacamole. Pambazo, Hamburguesa y Papas (French fries) and traditional Tortas ( sub with meat choice , beans, mayo, lettuce, tomato, cheese, avocado and jalapeno pepper) make for a quick and easy lunch, as so the soups. Sopas (soups) offered are 1) Caldo de Res (beef soup with cabbage, potato, carrots & zucchini served with sides of rice, cilantro, onions and three tortillas); 2) Pozole (pork soup with hominy, served with 3 tostados; and 3) Menudo (tripe soup with hominy and a red chili pepper base, served with lime, onions, cilantro and three tortillas). Prefer green and leafy? Choose from either a Taco Salad or the

This oversized Chimichanga was served piping hot so the cheese inside the delicate flour shell blended flavorfully with the chicken. PAGE

68

The tasty Carne Asada dinner includes flank steak sizzled with onions and peppers, served along with refried beans, Mexican rice, tossed salad, and three heated tortilla shells.

Fiesta Ensalada, which is a grilled chicken salad with lettuce, tomato, avocado, onion and bell pepper. The meat choices for tacos (tripa or lengua), gorditas, tostadas and huarache includes Al Pastor (seasoned pork), Barbacoa (Grilled Beef), Bistec (Steak), Carnitas (shredded pork), Chicharron (pork skin), Chorizo, Fajita Pollo (Chicken) or Fajita Res (Beef). Tortillas are available in corn or flour. Other popular lunch items are empanadas, quesadillas and burritos, including vegetarian. The dinner portion of the menu is titled “Los Mejores – Our Best.” Meals are served with Mexican rice, refried beans, and some with a small salad. Entrée items such as Alambre, Albondigas, Barbacoa, Bistec en Salsa Roja con Nopales, Bistec Ranchero, Burritos, Carne or Combo Asada, Carnitas, Chicharron or Puerco en Salsa Roja, Chile Relleno, Enchiladas, Fajitas Buenas, Flautas, Mega Quesadilla, Milanesa de Pollo, or Tortas de Pollo en Chipotle. Seafood dinners are also a specialty at Taco del Rey. Of the

10 different choices, the most popular are the Camarones a la Diabla (spicy shrimp), Fajitas del Mar, and Mojarra (red snapper). Also popular are Coctel de Camarones (shrimp cocktail), Shrimp Tacos and Tostadas, either Ceviche (marinated raw fish) or Camaron (shrimp). Seafood soups include Caldo de Camarones and the serious Sopa de Mariscos that contains shrimp, squid, octopus, mussels, surimi, tilapia, carrots and potatoes. For large events, the restaurant sells meat by the pound – broiled beef or shredded pork. The 2017 RCA winner for Best Mexican has something for everyone, as well as items kids love. With generous serving sizes, flavorful selections, speedy service and exceptionally reasonable prices, its popularity will continue to increase. If you haven’t been yet, give it a try soon. We’re certain you’ll be impressed enough to return and refer others.

Taco Rey Mexican Grill

1818 James L. Redman Parkway Plant City, FL 33563 813-754-2100 taco-rey.com Hours: Open daily 9AM-9PM


PAGE

69


PAGE

70


PAGE

71


DINING

ts ingredieshnshred ded

BBQ Sides

Smoked Fish Dip RECIPE BY LAYLA KEELER DRAWDY

T

his is always a popular snack for gathering around the backyard grill or as a treat to take to parties.

PAGE

72

Fi • 1lb fresh Smoked d ne bo de & m Cheese • 1/2 cup soft Crea m ea Cr ur • 1/2 cup So o ay M p cu • 1/2 arlic • 1 tbsp Minced G

Directions

opped Dill • 2 tbsp fresh Ch d Pickled Jalapeños pe • 1/4 cup Chop (more for hotter) sh Lemon Juice • A squeeze of fre • Kosher Salt • Pepper

en hours minimum. Ev erate for at least 4 rig ref d an up all it Mix better the next day. rs d/or Saltine Cracke Serve with Ritz an


Beat the Heat

Try our Summer Menu

Blueberry Milkshakes while supplies last! Parkesdale Market 3702 W Baker St Plant City FL 33563 813-752-0502 www.parkesdale.com PAGE

73


can’t miss

events AREA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATIONS Attend all graduations in person at Florida State Fairgrounds Expo Hall, 4800 N. US Hwy. 301, Tampa May 23 (Tuesday @8PM) – Durant High School May 24 (Wednesday @ 4PM) – Plant City High School May 26 (Friday @ 9AM) – Strawberry Crest High School Hillsborough County Public Schools will also air all traditional high school graduations live on cable (Tampa Bay Arts and Education Network - TBAE). Ceremonies will also be archived for viewing on demand. Tune in to Spectrum Cable channel 635 or Frontier Cable channel 32, or online at http://graduation.hcpswebcasts.com.

MAIN STREET FOOD TRUCK RALLY

May 26 Friday

“Hispanic Heritage” Event 5 – 9 PM Union Station Train Depot 102 N. Palmer St., Plant City Free to the public Info: Karen Collins 813-659-4209 www.facebok.com/PlantCityFoodTruckFestival Join your neighbors at this multi-cultural family outdoor dining experience in the McCall Park / Train Depot area of the historic downtown. Great food and fun await!

MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONIES May 29 Monday

11 AM – 1 PM American Legion Post 26 2207 W. Baker St., Plant City Info: Alvin Mcgary, 813-752-8608 Website: http://www.facebbok.com/alpost26 Please join us as we honor those that have served in our nation’s armed forces.

PAGE

74

MAY

JUNE

18 THURSDAY

1 THURSDAY

• PC Chamber’s Business After Hours Walden Lake Car Wash Celebrating 6-Year Anniversary 5:15 – 7 PM 1414 S. Alexander Street Plant City, FL 33563 Info: Norm Nelson 813-754-3707

• PC Chamber of Commerce 2017 Bowling Tournament 2 - 6 PM Prizes for: 1st & 2nd place, best of the worst, best dressed, worst team score, best team score $150 per 4 player team Registration form at plantcity.org Family Bowl 2250 US Hwy 92, Plant City Info: 813-754-3707 $150 per 4 player team

19 FRIDAY • Unity in the Community Golf Tournament Website: http://www.unityinplantcity.org/ Info: Sharon Moody 813-453-7134

20 SATURDAY • Strawberry Classic Cruise-In 4pm- 8pm Union Station Depot 102 N. Palmer St. Info: 813-754-3707 Free event

21 SUNDAY • Pot Luck Rock Swap 2 – 4 PM Free event! Bring a covered dish, any rocktastics you might like to swap and join us for a familyfriendly get together! Feel free to bring bikes, scooters, balls and Frisbees. Sodas plus bottled water available for a $1 donation. RSVP at https://www.facebook.com/ events/292386091196369 Mike Sansone Park, 1702 N. Park Rd. Info: www.facebook.com/groups/rockingPlantCity

26 FRIDAY • Main Street Food Truck Rally “Hispanic Heritage” Event 5 – 9 PM Union Station Train Depot 102 N. Palmer St., Plant City Free to the public Info: Karen Collins 813-659-4209 www.facebok.com/PlantCityFoodTruckFestival

29 MONDAY • Memorial Day Ceremonies 11 AM – 1 PM Please join us as we honor those that have served in our nation’s armed forces. American Legion Post 26 2207 W. Baker St., Plant City Info: Alvin McGary, 813-752-8608 Website: http://www.facebbok.com/alpost26

3 SATURDAY • Free, Beginner-Friendly Workout at CrossFit Plant City 9 – 10 AM Kids 10+ accompanied by parents are welcome, too. CrossFit Plant City 1402B Mercantile Ct. Newcomers, please arrive 10 minutes early to complete waiver & chat. RSVP: text 813-230-7126

5 MONDAY • Square Dance Lessons 7:30 - 9:00 PM Strawberry Square - “Square Dance Capital of the South” since 1979 The most active square & round dance programs in Tampa Bay area; teaching & dancing squares, rounds, & lines at all levels; 10-week program; Casual dress, partner not needed, great wooden floor. 4401 Boot Bay Rd., Plant City Info: 813-752-0491 or e-mail Keith (keithuns@ yahoo.com or Marty (mvanwart@tampabay.rr.com) $3 per lesson

10 SATURDAY • Tactical Titan hosts TitanRig Tournament 10:30 - 11:30 AM Cash prizes for one male & one female Pre registration. $10 entry fee due on race day. First round will be timed, then top 4 times move to finals. Hillsborough County Fair Grounds 215 Sydney Washer Rd., Dover • NRA New Shooter Seminar 1:00 - 2:30 PM Presented by Handgun Basics www. handgunbasics.com Geared toward people who have recently purchased or inherited a firearm for the first time, thinking about purchasing a firearm, or need a quick refresher. 90-minute class for 18-over U.S. citizens provides overview of Gun Safety,Firearm types and parts, Magazines, Ammunition, Sights, On the Range, Gun Cleaning and Storage. Class will be held in Plant City. Location/Instructions provided after registration and before class date. Note: Seminar does not have a practical shooting (live fire) session. Seminar does not meet the requirements for training to obtain a concealed carry license in Florida. Info: 813-567-3100


ONGOING 1914 Plant City High School Community Center, 605 N. Collins St. Hosts several ongoing opportunities: • 1) Quintilla Geer Bruton Archives Center History/Genealogy library & archives research facility) Tues. 10AM-6PM; Wed.-Sat. 1-5PM Evenings by appointment • 2) East Hillsborough Historical Society Classroom Gallery Art display by East Hillsborough Art Guild members Thursday - Saturday, 1-5PM Evenings by appointment • 3) Pioneer Museums Tour schedule: call 813-757-9226 E-mail: qcenter@tampabay.rr.com

MONDAYS WEEKLY • Plant City Daybreak Rotary Club 7 AM South Florida Baptist Hospital Community Rm. Info: George Banning, 813-759-1638

1ST & 3RD MONDAYS MONTHLY • Improvement League of Plant City 7 PM Historic Glover School Conference Room 5104 Horton Rd. Info: William Thomas, 813-757-6760

2ND & 4TH MONDAYS MONTHLY • Plant City Commission Meeting 7:30 PM City Hall, 302 W. Reynolds St. City Clerk: 813-659-4237 (December: 2nd Monday only)

2ND MONDAY MONTHLY • Plant City Garden Club 10 AM (Sept. thru May) info: Christy Linke; 732-322-8392

3RD MONDAY MONTHLY • Family Community Advisory Council (FCAC) 5 - 6:30 PM The Children’s Board Family Resource Center at East County invites residents to its Family Community Advisory Council (FCAC) monthly meetings to discuss ideas and bring to management’s attention services or programs needed or wanted. Children will enjoy the FCAC Playgroup care, crafts, & activities while the adults meet. 639 E. Alexander St., Plant City Info: Ladislao Sanchez 813.752.8700

1ST TUESDAYS MONTHLY

2ND THURSDAYS MONTHLY

1ST SATURDAYS MONTHLY

• Economic Development Corp. Meeting 2 PM @PC Chamber unless announced 106 N. Evers St. Info: Jake Austin, 863-712-0655

GFWC Junior Woman’s Club of Plant City 7 PM @1110 N. Wheeler St. Info: Lisa Rhodes, 813-376-8294

• Free, Beginner-Friendly Workout at CrossFit Plant City 9 – 10 AM Kids 10+ accompanied by parents are welcome, too. CrossFit Plant City 1402B Mercantile Ct. Newcomers, please arrive 10 minutes early to complete waiver and chat. RSVP via text to 813-230-7126

FRIDAYS WEEKLY 1ST TUESDAYS MONTHLY (SEPT-MAY) • Arts Council of Plant City 7 PM Chamber of Commerce Public Room 106 N. Evers St. Info: Dodie White, 813-752-5156

2ND TUESDAYS MONTHLY • GFWC Woman’s Club of Plant City 10:30 AM @1110 N. Wheeler St. Info: Nancy Miller, 813-754-2544

2ND & 4TH TUESDAYS MONTHLY • American Legion– Norman McLeod Post#26 6 PM @2207 W. Baker St. 813-752-8608 Info: Nancy Miller, 813-754-2544

• Top 40 Country Fried Fridays| 9PM – 2AM Uncle Mike’s Smokehouse Grill 106 E. SR 60 813-737-4444

FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS WEEKLY • Music in The Loft @Krazy Kup Fridays 6:33-8:33 PM; Saturdays 8:33-10:33PM 101 East J. Arden Mays Blvd. 813-752-1220; Facebook

3RD SATURDAYS MONTHLY • Strawberry Classic Car Show 4-8 PM 102 N. Palmer St., Historic Downtown Plant City Info: 814-754-3707 or peggy@plantcity.org www.plantcity.org

• Live Music @O’Brien’s Irish Pub Fridays 530-8:30 Acoustic; Saturdays 9PM ‘til close 1701 S. Alexander St. 813-764-8818

TUESDAYS WEEKLY • Plant City Lions Club 12 Noon @BuddyFreddy’s Restaurant 1101 Goldfinch Drive Info: Tony Lee, 813-752-7202 • Recovery for Life 6:30 - 8PM 12-step Bible-based program to help w/addictions Lorena Jaeb Rainbow House 504 N. Palm Dr., Plant City Info: Debbie Ray 813-763-1562

WEDNESDAYS WEEKLY • Walking Club 7:30AM for 45-minute walk Meet @Bruton Library Info: Susan Miles 813-757-9215 • Plant City Kiwanis Club 12 Noon Info: David Wolf 813-717-9300

THURSDAYS WEEKLY • Toastmasters (Chapter 4051) 7:30 - 9L00 AM PC Chamber Community Room 106 N. Evers St. Info: April Lubrano 813-545-1607 • Hillsborough County Entrepreneur Services 9AM - 4PM @PC Chamber, 106 N. Evers St. Dottie @813-204-9267 re: consultation

PAGE

75


PAGE

76


MOTHERS & DAUGHTERS Created by Calvin R. and Jackie Mathews

MOTHERS & DAUGHTERS

M

any of you are blessed that your mother is living. Although my mother demised October 3, 2002, she still lives with me because of her teachings--both by precept and example. I was blessed to have a great relationship with my mother. That may not be the case with some of you. No matter what category you are in ask yourself this question, what would I do if she was not here? The Bible employs us to honor our father and mother. You are responsible for the way you treat and respect your mother. Starting this month, make a point of loving and appreciating your mother so you have no regrets when she is gone. - Pastor Timothy Knighten, Sr.

ACROSS 1. Swallow hard 5. Legend maker 10. Basilica wing 14. “Robinson Crusoe” author 15. Tithe 17. Cane 20. Daughter & mother 23. Gerbil, for one 24. Liquid meas. 25. Coffee substitute 26. Senseless 28. Burro 29. “__ Abner” 31. Lute’s cousin 34. X 35. Flower part 36. Ovine cry 39. Place to sleep 40. Vapor 41. Mother & daughter 48. Creamy white 49. Steep gully 50. Writer Jong 54. Portable shelter 55. Nightclub 58. __ row; lined up 60. Cruise ship 61. S.A. nation 62. Smelter’s material 63. Dr. __ Hunt; role on “Grey’s Anatomy” 65. Bad joke 67. Casablanca’s location 70. Run __; become mired 72. Blaze extinguishers 75. __ Sharif 77. Onassis, to pals 78. __-la-la 81. Madonna role 82. Fluid-filled pouch 84. Ogden resident 86. Jezebel’s hubby 87. End of life 88. Looked for 90. __ Boothe Luce 91. Mother & daughter 97. Otherwise 100. Sea creature 101. Ending for infirm or custom 102. Singer Joan 103. Cut off 104. Biblical book 106. Depot: abbr. 107. Too heavy 110. Polo, for one 112. Eases 117. Annex, often 119. Curé d’__; St. John Vianney 120. Mother & daughter-in-law

125. 126. 127. 128. 129. 130.

Steady flow Praised highly Oneness Military force Iron Son of Adam

35. 36. 37. 38. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 51. 52. 53. 55. 56. 57. 59. 64. 66. 67. 68. 69. 71. 72. 73. 74. 76. 78. 79. 80. 83. 85. 86.

DOWN 1. Men 2. Eerie sighting, for short 3. Drawn-out 4. Fine, for example 5. Part of speech: abbr. 6. Word with a silent “p” 7. Take apart 8. Radiation dosages 9. Second-largest cell phone co. 10. Branch 11. Piece of cookware 12. Word with way or well 13. Jacket style 14. Recolors 16. Birds that cannot fly 18. Costly violin 19. Non-face cards 20. New Deal agcy. 21. Unfamiliar 22. Greek letter 27. Suffix for correspond or transcend 30. Middle file drawer, perhaps 32. __ fro 33. __ loss; confused 1

2

3

4

5

14

6

9

10 16

29

43

11

30

44

31 37

38

45

48

18

32

55 62 67 73

56

47

58

75

87 91

92

99

103 110

94

112

113

128

95

80

107

108

109

96

114

115

116

117

118

123 126

79

102 106

122

78 86 90

105

121

125

77

101

111 120

53

60

85

93

104

52

66

89

100

51

71

76 84

88

65

70

83

59

64

69

82

98

50

63

74

34 40

46

57

68

81

19

27

33

39

49

61

13

26

36

54

12

17

25

35 42

89. “__ Lazy River” 90. On account of: slang 92. “Gloria in excelsis __!” 93. TV’s “Say __ to the Dress” 94. Cable network out of Atlanta 95. Up __; risen 96. Envious 97. Common street name 98. Bank offerings 99. Fat-shunner of nursery rhyme 104. Ballplayer’s feat 105. Touch on 107. Religion 108. Pretentiously talented 109. Eliot’s initials 111. Mrs. Dithers of “Blondie” 113. Preposition 114. Pt. of a week 115. Suffix for Jean or Bernard 116. Pronouns 118. Path 121. “__ Woman”; ’72 Helen Reddy hit 122. “Me __ Shadow” 123. Ames and Asner 124. In just a __; soon

22

24

28

97

8

21

23

72

7

15

20

41

by Calvin R. & Jackie Mathews

Wily Drinking spot Direction indicator From __ Z Very large number Coolidge, for one Surpassing Rhapsody Gallery display Mouse chaser Watching Fruit salad ingredient Hostel Bee’s follower Plane schedule abbr. Uninteresting speaker Golf shop purchases Time period, for short Greek marketplace Mundane Devastate Quality of character City on the Missouri Soothing beverage Stadium shout __ up; disgusted Common contraction Coastal inlet Soothsayer Thonburi resident Seldom occurring Aid in wrongdoing __ as a bell Lunched Laundry soap brand

119 124

127 129

130

© Puzzle Features Syndicate PAGE

77

E L L O M A N S

S P R A T

C O R A

R O S A I V O R T E N T A R G M F I R E E V I T D E A T L E

D W Y P E A S

H O M E R O M A H A

B I S O R E R O C E N S A S D Y C E E L O S E A I & R A M M Y

G U L P E F O E N O N N T G A S L S T L Y Y

A C U R A D O N A T A J U D D & L P O S T I L E M B A A N N C A R T A R R O T R O OW E C O A O M A R C U T O U G H A P U L A R Y A B A T E U T H T T O U T P R E

A P E R A M O M N U M S I T A C O T E R & A Y O I N A N G R G R O U A R I A H A N T E T & J B A E S T A S E L H E M O E D U S S S

Mothers & Daughters

S E T T A N A OM I I N A N E R T E N M I S T M Y E R I C A L I N E R O A N E R N D T R A A H A B C L A R E U L I E T Z F A T L A R S A B I T E N I T Y E T H


Keel & Curley Winery Two Henrys Brewing Company Florida’s Premier Winery, Brewery, and Cider house! 5210 Thonotosassa Rd, Plant City, FL

813-752-9100

Weekly Happenings at the Winery Tuesdays – Team Trivia, 6 pm Wednesdays – Come out to the Winery

$10 Rainbow Cider Flights Thursdays – Ladies Night! Karaoke 6pm BOGO on first round. ½ off select appetizers! Fridays & Saturdays – Uncorked! Live Music on the Deck! 7 – 11 pm.

Full Menu available 7 days a week! Open for lunch & dinner

www.keelandcurleywinery.com

www.twohenrysbrewing.com


Expanded Heart Care In Plant City

STEMI Care Now Available in Your Community An ST elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) is one of the most deadly types of heart attacks, occurring when blood supply to the heart is blocked for a prolonged period of time. The best treatment is having specialized cardiac procedure within 90 minutes of first receiving care from emergency medical personnel. A STEMI can be complicated by cardiogenic shock (the heart can’t pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs), so it’s extremely important to get to the closest hospital specializing in heart care as fast as possible. South Florida Baptist Hospital has been providing exceptional heart care for many years, performing procedures such as diagnostic catheterization and stent placement since 2010. There is now a new choice for expanded cardiac services, thanks to the launch of our STEMI program. We have a specially trained team on hand, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Our experienced cardiac and interventional team treats all your heart care needs.

Providing Specialized Cardiac Care to Plant City Since 2010 For a referral to a cardiologist: (855) 314-8352 | SouthFloridaBaptist.org BC1700911-0217


RussellsWesternWear.com TAMPA • WESLEY CHAPEL • BRANDON • LAKELAND OCALA • BRADENTON • LAKE CITY

Profile for Floyd Publications

FOCUS Plant City 16-05  

FOCUS Magazine Plant City Edition Issue 16-05 May 2017

FOCUS Plant City 16-05  

FOCUS Magazine Plant City Edition Issue 16-05 May 2017

Profile for focusmag
Advertisement