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#27 Report Summer 2011 â‚Ź17,50

Chris de Bode / Aernout Mik / Amirali Ghasemi / Taryn Simon / Rolls Tohoku / Doug Rickard / Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse / Michael Christopher Brown


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Chris de Bode / Aernout Mik / Amirali Ghasemi / Taryn Simon / Rolls Tohoku / Doug Rickard / Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse / Michael Christopher Brown


5 Editorial

foam magazine # 27 report

6 Portfolio Overview 8 On My Mind Jason Fulford, Helena Christensen, Simon Baker, David Campany, Martha Rosler & Philip-Lorca diCorcia 14 Interview Lev Manovich: Visualizing the Digital Universe by Gloria Sutton

Portfolios 35 Chris de Bode Exodus from Libya text by Max Houghton

55 Aernout Mik Shifting Sitting text by Sabine Maria Schmidt

75 Amirali Ghasemi Tehran Remixed text by Marta Weiss

21 In Memoriam Tim Hetherington

95 Taryn Simon A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters  I – XVIII

by Max Houghton

text by Geoffrey Batchen

25 Theme introduction Reporting a Hybrid World

115 Rolls Tohoku 31 March – 3 April 2011

by Marcel Feil

text by Marc Feustel

135 Doug Rickard A New American Picture text by Erin O’Toole

155 Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse Ponte City text by Clare Butcher

175 Michael Christopher Brown Libya text by Robert Hariman

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196 Photobooks by Sebastian Hau

201 Foam A ­ msterdam Exhibition Programme 218 Colophon


Editorial

destructive power of the tsunami in Japan captured in photos made by the local residents themselves. These two portfolios represent opposite ends of the spectrum within which photographic reporting is currently moving, shifting its ground in ways that are fascinating and inspiring in equal measure.

by Marloes Krijnen Editor-in-chief

While working on this issue, we received the very sad news that Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros had been killed on the frontline in Libya while covering the fighting between rebels and troops loyal to Qaddafi. At the same time the photo­ graphers Guy Martin and Michael Christopher Brown were seriously injured. We were stunned into silence as we were working with just this theme for this issue. Preparing Michael Christopher Brown’s portfolio for publication he was emailing us directly from hospital, which brought this sad event right to our desk. Last year, we presented Tim Hetherington’s series Sleeping Soldiers in the spring issue. We wanted to memorialize this exceptional photographer, and our thanks go to Max Houghton, a friend and colleague of Tim, for offering to write about Tim's extraordinary and enduring contribution to making images and telling stories.

More than any other medium, photography moves endlessly back and forth between objective registration and subjective expression. Photojournalism has always been regarded as a prime example of a photographic genre in which it’s essential to strive for the maximum possible degree of objectivity and therefore, or so it was assumed, reliability. But how reliable can any report be? Do we know what it doesn’t include, what has been left out? Do we know who the reporter is and why the report was compiled? Or for whom? A continual engagement in a critical discourse with itself and with others might almost be seen as part and parcel of journalism, including photojournalism.

Lastly we are extremely pleased with the extensive interview granted to us by Lev Manovich, an expert on new media and information technology, and of course with all the contributions to our regular feature On My Mind. • editorial

The death of photojournalism has been announced often enough, but in fact it’s still very much alive, even in its traditional forms. Indeed it is now going through a vibrant period of change and development. The ubiquity of the media, the enormous influence of the internet, the disappearance of traditional platforms, the digitalization of photographic equipment and the rise of amateur journalism have combined to bring about a reassessment of the craft of the photojournalist. As a result of these seismic changes in the field of photography, traditionally distinct genres are encroaching on each other’s territory. Painters and sculptors, video artists, writers and traditionally trained photojournalists increasingly work on identical subjects and influence each other with their critiques both of their own disciplines and of the power or powerlessness of the reality portrayed. These widely differing strategies for reporting on ‘the world’ are central to this issue of Foam Magazine, and each of the eight portfolios reveals a critical attitude towards the medium, whether it be work created by Michael Christopher Brown in Libya with the Hipstamatic application on his iPhone, Chris de Bode’s coverage of the exodus of refugees from that same North-African country, or Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse’s portrayal of a Johannesburg apartment tower and its residents. Or indeed the conceptual and methodical way in which Taryn Simon deploys the evidentiary capacity of photography in her latest series A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I - XVIII, striking pictures of young people in Tehran by Amirali Ghasemi or the specific use made of Google Street View by Doug Rickard. We are particularly proud of the portfolio of recent work by Aernout Mik and of the images showing the 5


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Portfolio Overview

Chris de Bode Exodus from Libya

Aernout Mik Shifting Sitting

Chris de Bode has photographed an exodus, a line of people on the move from a place in which they could no longer stay to a destination unknown or even nonexistent. To cover the spectacle of the mass departure of Bangladeshi migrant workers from Libya he took nearly 500 photos in a single day and found an artistic strategy that utilized the repetition and relentlessness that characterized his imagery of the human train.

Aernout Mik’s latest piece, Shifting Sitting, is neither a portrait of Silvio Berlusconi nor a theatrical re-staging of the accusations levelled against him. Nor is it a straightforward report or documentation. Instead, Mik’s video installation raises constantly fluctuating, interlinked motifs in its exploration of the murky boundaries between justice and politics, between judicial and executive power.

Rolls Tohoku 31 March – 3 April 2011

Doug Rickard A New American Picture

When the earthquake hit Japan on 11 March 2011, Aichi Hirano decided to distribute fifty disposable cameras to survivors displaced by the tsunami who had been evacuated to shelters in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture. Hirano provided some loose directions on sheets of paper asking people to take pictures of what surrounded them. Rolls Tohoku offers a deeply personal vision of the disaster from the perspective of those who have been directly affected.

Doug Rickard’s photographs merge his passion for the history of American photography with his gift for utilizing new technology. The style and subject matter of his current series, A New American Picture, is firmly grounded in the tradition of the American street photography that first drew him to the medium. Rickard makes street photographs without ever leaving the house simply by embarking on simulated road trips on his computer using Google Street View.

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Taryn Simon A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I – XVIII

In the series Tehran Remixed Amirali Ghasemi shows young urban Iranians socializing, their faces and other areas of exposed skin blanked out to protect their identities. The social activities depicted seem as though they could be happening in any city around the world. Yet the fact that the identities of the participants in these seemingly ordinary acts must be so starkly concealed underscores how specific the situation is to Iran.

Taryn Simon’s latest project is an extended meditation on the political economy of fate. Photography is the major vehicle for this meditation. The confrontation of science and art is made manifest in the work’s structure, which contrasts periodic tables of individual portraits with images that evoke social and political narratives, along with annotations to explain the connection of the two.

Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse Ponte City

Michael Christopher Brown Libya

Originally intended as a nuclear point in the upwardly mobile social cartography of Johannesburg’s Hillbrow, the 173 meter-high cylindrical apartment building Ponte City became an urban legend, and an essential part of visual renderings of the city. It was the conflicted spectacle of Ponte City that drew South African photographer, Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse, a British artist, to look more closely in rather than at the tower.

Michael Christopher Brown is documenting the face of battle in Libya by challenging the standard script for war reportage. The photographs’ colour tones are one clue that we are seeing aslant the usual conventions – and with that, across the distinction between art photography and photojournalism. By moving beyond stale conventions of documentary realism, they provide important resources for thinking about the political and ethical challenges of the 21st century.

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portfolio overview

Amirali Ghasemi Tehran Remixed


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Reporting a Hybrid World by Marcel Feil

So finally it had happened. After a hunt lasting almost ten years, American president Barack Obama was able to an­ nounce this week that ‘public enemy number one’ had been eliminated. An operation by US Navy Seals on Pakistani territory had put an end to the life of Osama bin Laden. Of course alongside the many relieved, satisfied or plainly delighted reactions to the news, many other responses could be heard, especially from Pakistan itself. Quite a few inhabit­ ants of that country openly expressed doubts about Obama’s announcement. The fact the president had said Osama was dead didn’t amount to proof it was actually true. After all, why would the Americans say that Osama’s body had immediately been buried at sea? Why had no photographs of the dead man been released? What did they have to hide? Clearly to many people the simple message that Osama bin Laden was dead wasn’t enough. They wanted to see it with their own eyes. They wanted proof. Don’t just tell us; show us the body. › 27

theme introduction

One of the functions of news images may be to provide convincing proof of the truth and accuracy of the original report. Over the past few decades fundamental changes have taken place in photo­ graphy and have caused major shifts within photo­journalism in particular to be addressed here.


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A consistently critical approach to material that reaches them and an endless checking of sources are of course inherent to the work of a journalist. Everyone in the journalistic profes­ sion knows that a piece of visual material on its own cannot render decisive proof. It requires the support of other mate­ rial, of eye-witness testimony, reports from correspondents, and images and facts from other sources. The mosaic of infor­ mation collected in this way makes the image of an event more complete – bearing in mind that absolute completeness is an illusion. We still have to work with fragmented and flawed reality, with a structure built out of bits and pieces.

Coinciding with these expressions of doubt and calls for visual evidence, something else happened that demonstrated the precise opposite. Within a day of Obama’s press conference, a photo of the dead Osama bin Laden did in fact appear on the internet. The long beard, the full lips – it was undoubtedly the face that has become such an icon. And yes, in view of the clearly visible injuries there could be little doubt he was dead. Yet for the many editors worldwide who were among those craving for visual proof, another doubt immediately arose: was the photograph genuine? Press agency ­Reuters, which initially released the picture with a warning that its au­ thenticity could not be ­verified, later withdrew it. Shortly after its withdrawal MSNBC wrote in its Photoblog that there was something wrong with the image: if you reversed it and then searched the internet, you would quickly find a matching photograph of Bin Laden alive. Some unknown person had digitally doctored it, adding a gunshot wound and blood. Before long Will Heaven of Telegraph Blogs had published a photo of an as yet unidentified man and demonstrated convincingly that it was the source for the wounds to the forehead of the ‘dead’ Bin Laden.

That has always been the case, so there is apparently nothing new here, but over the past few decades enormous changes­ have been taking place in journalism in general and in photo­ journalism in particular. They have everything to do with fundamental shifts in the visual landscape, which have by no means run their course and to a great degree can be traced back to a radical democratiza­ tion of photo­g raphic equip­ ment and to the powerful hold the media now have on soci­ ety. The Bin Laden example is one indication of this: in a general sense the hunger for images has increased aston­ ishingly and the power of the image has grown along with it, as has the abuse of that power. The opportunities open to large numbers of people, often anonymous, to make or dis­ tribute images have expanded exponentially at the same time. The result is an overwhelming growth in the quantity of visual material and in the means by which it can be distributed and displayed. The digitalization of the visual landscape and the unprecedented opportunities offered by the internet have led to an explosion of images, with many tens of millions being added every day, sophisti­ cated and naive, fascinating and nonsensical. The question we face in the twenty-first century is increasingly: how will we survive the image? The full-on bombardment of images that we are called upon to deal with at the start of a new millennium presents a number of paradoxes.

News images can function as evidence and to many of us they are a precondition for accepting initial reports as true.

These events, all of which took place within twenty-four hours, show once again that there is a worldwide hunger for images that make specific events visible. They can function as evidence and to many of us they are a precondition for accepting initial reports as true. At the same time it’s becoming clear that this provides many people with sufficient motivation to produce and distribute images of an extremely dubious nature. At press agencies, among editors and ­increasingly for influential bloggers, there’s a continual need to assess visual material: genuine, fake, manipulated, dubious, unverifiable... Nothing can be taken at face value; everything has to be thor­ oughly checked and researched before an agreed status can be attributed to it and it can be passed as fit for publication. The contest between real and fake, lies and truth, revelation and falsification permits no pulling of punches and is crucial to the journalist’s trade and to journalistic credibility. The speed with which that one fake photo of the dead Bin Laden was exposed as such (although admittedly it was far from brilliant) shows that editors, at least, possess between them sufficient knowledge and understanding to separate the wheat from the chaff relatively quickly.

The abundance and widespread use of photographs has in­ creased the value and significance of the image to a degree we could never have imagined. Newspapers make more and more space available for photographs on their front pages and often point to yet more on their websites, which include areas dedicated to photography, where video reports are available and where the multimedia approach is gaining in importance. One photo editor at The Boston Globe had an idea that was as brilliant as it was simple: publish a powerful selection of news photos on a blog. Not in modest formats, either, but at 990 pixels. In no time his Big Picture was among the top ten most visited blogs in the world. As if this kind of thing were not enough, The Guardian has launched an iPad version of itself 29

theme introduction

Although Osama’s death has now been confirmed by the ­Al-Qaida network, such reactions demonstrate that in many cases people find it essential to see images before they are willing to believe something. Visual material, whether in the form of photographs or film, is necessary to provide them with convincing proof of the truth and accuracy of the origi­ nal report. Seeing is believing. The images, or so we assume, speak the truth.


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Love Story Istanbul, Turkey. March 2007 Mohammad (28), a Turkoman, stutters ­ ervously and smokes incessantly. He is a n victim of the ethnic cleansing in Kirkuk. ‘Every night I cry myself to sleep: I miss my wife and my baby. I had to flee and left them behind in Iraq.’ Two weeks later his wife and baby unexpectedly fled from Kurdistan to I­stanbul. Mohammad has a smile from ear to ear. His beautiful wife is called Maroj, Arabic for ‘flower’. They dance to Turkish, English, Kurdish, Arabic and Turkoman music, but they remain wary: taking a portrait is out of the question. Maroj: ‘Just as I was feeding my little nephew I received a call on my mobile. It was ­Mohammad. “I’ve been kidnapped,” he cried. I was three months pregnant, let out a scream and fainted.’ ‘Turkoman people marry young, but I refused,’ says Mohammad. ‘I was already 25 and withstood all the pressure from my family. One day my mother fell ill. She had to go to

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theme introduction a doctor, a famous Iraqi cardiologist, Maroj’s brother. That’s where I first saw her and my heart skipped a beat. I knew it for certain: I wanted to marry Maroj.’ Two weeks after their first encounter Mohammad asked for Maroj’s hand in marriage. Both these Turkoman families are highly respected. Mohammad’s family has a permanent suite at the Sheraton in ­Baghdad. Maroj’s father was a four-star general in ­Saddam’s army. Both of them have had a ­personal chauffeur since childhood. Mohammad: ‘My father shouted into the phone that I shouldn’t be afraid. “I’ll deal with this,” he said. He negotiated with the kidnappers for eight days. I was locked up in a cellar and beaten with wooden sticks.’ ‘When Saddam was in power there was peace,’ Mohammad reminisces. ‘Then we went to the mountains to have barbecues, just like every other Turkoman and Kurd. The mountains and waterfalls are amazingly beautiful. Wherever I went I was respected by everyone. That was because of my money, but now there’s little of that money left. I had to leave behind

my house, my three cars, all my possessions in Kirkuk. Now I work in a jeans factory.’ Maroj: ‘My father gave his life for Iraq and I’ve got nothing to show for it. One night in Basra during the war, he lit a cigarette and that cost him his life; an Iranian sniper shot him. My mother was beside herself. She doused her body in petrol and set herself alight. She survived it, but she’s never been the same mother again.’ Maroj: ‘They were afraid I would lose the baby. All I could do was cry, the whole time he was kidnapped. I still cry now, every night. In Kirkuk I missed Mohammad and my father; in Istanbul I miss my brother.’ ‘Nowadays wealth is measured by how much ransom is paid to kidnappers and you have to pay a ransom to be able to bury the body of your son or father. I don’t understand why Iraq has become so violent.’ Maroj: ‘The only thing we want is peace, and that’s all. Our family is still in Kirkuk, but it’s only a question of time before things go wrong. Perhaps we’ll end up with absolutely nothing, except our love.’

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Six months after the kidnap their baby was born and the couple decided to flee to Istanbul. But Maroj kept on crying, so they tried returning to Kirkuk. ‘Just arrived, that very same night, my mobile phone rang,’ explains Mohammad. ‘Oh, you’re back from Istanbul,’ someone said. And they called again and again and again. There was nothing else I could do: I fled back to Istanbul, but this time for good. Even if we cannot get any official papers here, any insurance, and we pay the rent, food, a doctor, everything ourselves. There’s no future in Iraq. If need be the United Nations can send us to Somalia, as long as they organize something for us.’ Mohammad: ‘My father paid 180,000 dollars for my release. It was like a Hollywood film. I got out of my father’s BMW and ran towards Maroj, and Maroj ran towards me. We embraced each other and the world stood still.’


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called Guardian Eyewitness. ‘A great way to take advantage of the iPad’s beautiful display. The images are stunning,’ wrote the leading technology magazine Wired.

eager use of them. Look at the role of amateur journalism and the material available on sites such as YouTube during the recent upheavals in the Arab world.

At the same time, we have heard repeated claims over the past few years that photojournalism is dead or at least going through a profound crisis. A complex of causes underlies this conviction. First of all, of course, there’s the vast number of photographs around us. They are everywhere. We live in a world full of photos and videos: in the street, on public trans­ port, in newspapers, on computer screens, on television and now even in our own trouser pockets on the screens of our smart phones. Those who claim this is a photographic crisis believe that many citizens have become passive recipients of images, witless consumers who watch images pass by at an ever increasing rate. They simply don’t have the requisite time or ability, it is argued, to undertake thorough analysis and evaluation. In short, we are imagined to exist in a general state of inertia in the face of an overwhelming quantity of visual material.

In my view traditional photojournalism is far from dead. It still has a strong presence, and the tried-and-tested journalistic strategies and methods, like the power of their symbolism, are still valid. If there is indeed a crisis – and after all the points mentioned above are to a large extent simply facts – then the consequences need not be negative. A crisis often leads to a catharsis, taking us into a stronger position. This is the case with photojournalism. Although some still mourn its supposed demise, there is a great deal to suggest that something else entirely is going on. New professional practices are emerging, new strategies, new perspectives, adjusted techniques, and new forms of collaboration and ­presentation. Far from a crisis, a renaissance seems to be upon us. Last year Thomas Keenan and Carles Guerra put together an exhibition called Antiphotojournalism, based on a seminar of the same name that they gave at Bard College in New York. In the introductory text for the exhibition, shown at Foam among other places, they claim that ‘new methods of reporting the news, new imaginations of what the news might be, have challenged the hegemonic figure of the photojournalist at its core and given birth to the most interesting ideas. This critical approach […] has a multiplicity of forms such as film, video, slides, web-based presentations and many more. […] Sometimes the gesture is reflective. Sometimes the desire is evidentiary not in the old sense of simply offering the ‘evidence’ of im­ ages to an assumedly homogenous public opinion, but in a much more precise way: photographs have become evidence in war crime tribunals. Sometimes the innovation is techno­ logical, whether it involves working with hi-tech sources of advanced satellite imagery or the low-tech crowd-sourcing of participatory protest imaging. Sometimes the practices are archival. And sometimes the question is simply whether we need images at all.’

In practice it turns out that nowadays no form of reporting can avoid instantly influencing the nature of the event.

Then there is the declining im­ portance of the platforms on which photojournalists tradi­ tionally displayed their work. Competition from new me­ dia and from blogs of various kinds has caused a sharp drop in subscriber numbers and in sales of single issues, and therefore in advertising revenues, for newspapers and maga­ zines. Budgets for long-term photojournalistic projects, often in remote parts of the world, are under considerable pressure. Traditional media are certainly making money available for participation in new internet-based activities, but the costs often outstrip earnings. It turns out to be far from simple to make money with a website, a blog or an app. In editorial meetings, a combination of these two factors often leads to a decision to publish that one eye-catching photo that appeals to the emotions and will therefore achieve good ratings. Hardly any space is available for longer series and more in-depth projects, let alone for coverage that truly goes beyond the preoccupations of the day to concentrate on a specific subject for an extended period. Too expensive, too bulky, too complex, too slow.

Many of the works shown in that exhibition have an inter­ rogatory and investigative character. They are endeavours, options, proposals rather than categorical certainties. The entire exhibition is a ‘show of maybes’. It is this investigative character that highlights the critical approach of the con­ tributing photographers towards their profession. And it is their self-criticism and awareness of their own potentials and limitations that has led to new insights and new methods. It is not so much a matter of criticism from outside leading to change. Criticism from within is of immense importance because criticism carries change within it while at the same time confirming the value of the object criticized. ‘A critique – or maybe we should call it a deconstruction – of an object or an institution needs to remain attached to it, invested in

Finally, and I’m consciously limiting myself to a few main points, there is the democratization of the instruments of photography. Everyone nowadays has a mobile phone with a camera function; any of us can take a photo at any moment and no expertise is required to upload it, send it and add it to of the total supply of photographic and journalistic material. Familiarity with the tools and the opportunities they offer has become so widespread that this happens all the time. The layman belongs to a society so immersed in the media that a non-professional has such a level of knowledge and skill that the word ‘layman’ seems inappropriate. Everyone knows how the mechanisms of the media society work and many make 32


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it, contaminated by it. One only critiques something that one deems worthy of critiquing. This engagement implies, then, an affirmation of some possibility in the object, event, or practice that is being criticized. Every critique therefore commits itself to concretizing, realizing, or manifesting what those other possibilities might be.’

The inclusion of Mik’s portfolio in this magazine alongside work by classically trained photojournalists, made using new technology or stimulated by an awareness of a new audience, as well as work by a decidedly conceptual and methodical visual artist like Taryn Simon, and amateur reporting from Japan created by victims of the tsunami, causes a new configu­ ration of portfolios to emerge, each of which presents criti­ cism that is far from casual or detached. None of this work gives primacy to aesthetic considerations alone. It is precisely in new configurations and unexpected juxtapositions such as those found here that space is created for the viewer to form a unique, individual opinion about the world and about the role of photography as a representative and constitutive force. •

One form of self-criticism arises from an awareness that neu­ tral or independent reporting has become a virtual impos­ sibility, even though it is precisely what the words ‘report’ and ‘reporter’ imply, based on the assumption that something happens in the world and is recorded so that it can be present­ ed somewhere else. In practice it turns out that nowadays no form of reporting can avoid instantly influencing the nature of the event. The simple fact that reporters are around affects the behaviour of people on the spot. They know all about the power and mechanisms of the media, and how to use or abuse them, and they have the means to respond immediately. The media increasingly shape reality. The ultimate example of this is what’s known as the ‘photo moment’, a moment that would never have come about but for the existence of an image. And this is the case not only with conflicts or newsworthy events. The behaviour of many ordinary people who belong to the YouTube and Facebook generations can be traced back directly to media mechanisms, the ways we control our own self-image and influence visual representation. Genuine or otherwise, stage-managed or spontaneous? In current circum­ stances this question is being transformed from a problematic source of concern into a starting-point replete with options and potential.

All images and text Love Story from the project Baghdad Calling, 2008 © Geert van Kesteren List of works: p.26  Amman, Jordan, 2007 p.30  Southern Turkey, 2006 p.31  Amman, Jordan, 2007 © Geert van Kesteren p.28 & 33  all pictures taken with mobile phones by various people in Baghdad, Iraq, 2005–2007 © Baghdad Calling / Geert van Kesteren

The complex relationship between reality and the media and their reciprocal influence therefore produce not only moral and ethical dilemmas for photojournalists but extraordinarily interesting material for visual artists. Aernout Mik concen­ trates almost exclusively on the power of the media to create reality and on the stereotypical behaviour and images the media thrust upon us. There’s no more rewarding subject for Mik than Berlusconi’s Italy, which has often been described as a ‘mediacratie’. It is impossible to distinguish between Berlusconi the media tycoon and Berlusconi the prime min­ ister as both do all they can to win the favour of viewers and voters. Now that Berlusconi has for the ­umpteenth time been made the subject of a criminal investigation, putting him once again at the centre of media attention, the circus is in full swing and a fascinating game is underway, featuring accusations, denials and about-turns, in which the accused becomes the accuser and the viewer a participant, and noth­ ing is as it seems.

Geert van Kesteren (1966, The Netherlands) is a photojournalist based in Amsterdam. Van Kesteren regularly works for Stern, Newsweek, M magazine and many others. He has been following the situation in Iraq since 1994 and covering Operation Desert Fox. He was responsible for an exclusive interview with Uday Hussein, one of Saddam’s sons, collaborating with Uli Raus, a reporter at Stern. He has produced three books: Mwendanjangula! Aids in Zambia; Why Mister, Why?; and Baghdad Calling. Van Kesteren has received many awards. In 2009 he won the Infinity Award in Photojournalism of the International Center of Photography. The project Baghdad Calling was judged to be one of the 33 Best Dutch Book Designs of 2008 and at Picture of the Year International (POYi) received Judges Special Recognition as the Best Book. The project Why Mister, Why? became the book of the year at Primo del Libro Anno, PhotoEspaña and was awarded the Kees Scherer Prize in the Netherlands. In 1998 and 2006 Van Kesteren was declared Photojournalist of the Year in the Netherlands and in 2005 he was awarded a prize at World Press Photo. His works have been exhibited at Barbican Art Gallery, the British Museum, Les Recontre d'Arles and the Nederlands Fotomuseum in Rotterdam.

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Chris de Bode Exodus from Libya


Aernout Mik Shifting Sitting


Amirali Ghasemi Tehran Remixed


Taryn Simon A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I – XVIII

1.

Chehayeb, Fahim ( ), 1925 (exact birth date unknown) Automobile accessory store manager (retired), Aley, Lebanon

2.

Chehayeb, Hassan ( ), 27 Apr. 1951 Automobile accessory store manager, Aley, Lebanon

3.

Chehayeb, Rabih ( ), 08 Jan. 1981 Mechanical engineer, Doha, Qatar [Declined participation/couldn’t leave wife alone in Qatar]

4.

Chehayeb, Dana ( ), 05 Apr. 1987 Electrical engineer, Khatib Machinery Company, Aley, Lebanon

5.

Chehayeb, Ragheed ( Student, Aley, Lebanon

6.

Chehayeb, Sari ( Student, Aley, Lebanon

7.

Chehayeb, Ghassan ( ), 27 Apr. 1951 Automobile accessory store owner, Aley, Lebanon

8.

Chehayeb, Nadine ( ), 09 June 1981 Sales and PR manager, Kayan Apartments, Aley, Lebanon

9.

Chehayeb, Hanine ( ), 15 Mar. 1986 Sales engineer, Schneider Electric, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

10. Chehayeb, Amir ( Student, Aley, Lebanon

), 07 Feb. 1993 ), 10 Oct. 1996

), 24 Mar. 1988

11. Btaddini, Amal ( ), 11 Aug. 1953 Wedding organizer, Aley, Lebanon 12. Breiche, Rania ( ), 24 Sept. 1974 Math teacher, Ain Qeni, Lebanon [In labor] 13. Breiche, Jad ( ), 11 May 1997 Student, Ain Qeni, Lebanon 14. Breiche, Sari ( ), 01 Jan. 2000 Student, Ain Qeni, Lebanon 15. Breiche, Iad ( ), 09 Feb. 2010 Ain Qeni, Lebanon [Rania Breiche’s newborn baby] 16. Bou Sleiman, Rami ( Warehouse manager, Sannine, Beirut, Lebanon 17.

), 17 Mar. 1978

Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

18. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon 19. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar

20. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar 21.

), 20 Oct. 2003

El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

22. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

), 26 Mar. 2000

23. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate] 24.

Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

37. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate] 38.

Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

39. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon 40. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar 41. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar

), 20 Oct. 2003

25. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon

42.

26. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar

43. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

27. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar

44. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

28.

), 20 Oct. 2003

El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

29. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

), 26 Mar. 2000

30. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate] 31.

Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

45.

El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates ), 26 Mar. 2000

Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

46. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon 47. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar 48. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar

), 20 Oct. 2003

32. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon

49.

33. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar

50. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

34. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar

51. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

35.

), 20 Oct. 2003

El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

36. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

), 26 Mar. 2000

52.

El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates ), 26 Mar. 2000

Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

53. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon


d. Nazih Al-Danaf reenacting his death as Fuad Khaddage. Al-Danaf claims he was assassinated in his previous life as Khaddage while at his desk at the Dar El Taifeh in Beirut. Al-Risala Social Union Hall, Aley.


XIV

d.


17.

), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897. Computer engineer. 17.Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( Dubai, United Arab Emirates. 18.Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953. Owner, 5 Continents. Aley, Lebanon.

18.


XIV

19.

19.Btaddini, Feras ( 20.Btaddini, Yara (

), 01 Jan. 1979. Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence. Doha, Qatar. ), 20 Oct. 2003. Student. Doha, Qatar.

20.


f.

f. Sheikh Naim Hassan, Druze spiritual leader. Dar El Taifeh, Beirut. g. M  ilhem Btaddini’s identification papers and Ribal Btaddini’s Lebanese passport. Ribal is believed to be the reincarnation of his paternal grandfather, Milhem. Family file, Aley and personal document, Dubai.


XIV

g.


54. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar 55. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar 56.

), 20 Oct. 2003

El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

57. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

), 26 Mar. 2000

58. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate] 59.

Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

60. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon 61. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar 62. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar 63.

), 20 Oct. 2003

El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

64. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

), 26 Mar. 2000

65. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate] 66.

Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

67. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon 68. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar 69. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar 70.

), 20 Oct. 2003

El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

71. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

), 26 Mar. 2000

72. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate] 73.

Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

74. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon 75. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar

76. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar 77.

), 20 Oct. 2003

El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

78. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

), 26 Mar. 2000

79. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate] 80.

Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

81. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon 82. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar 83. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar 84.

), 20 Oct. 2003

El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

85. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate] 86. Btaddini, Julian ( Student, Manila, Philippine [Unable to participate] 87.

), 26 Mar. 2000

), 16 Feb. 2003

Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

88. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon 89. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar 90. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar 91.

), 20 Oct. 2003

El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

92. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

), 26 Mar. 2000

93. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate] 94.

Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

95. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon 96. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar 97. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar

), 20 Oct. 2003

98.

El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

99. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

), 26 Mar. 2000

100. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate] 101. Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates 102. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon 103. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar 104. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar

), 20 Oct. 2003

105. El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 106. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

), 26 Mar. 2000

107. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate] 108. Btaddini, Ribal/Btaddini, Milhem ( ), 16 Mar. 1986/22 Dec. 1897 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates 109. Btaddini, Fouad ( ), 04 Dec. 1953 Owner, 5 Continents, Aley, Lebanon 110. Btaddini, Feras ( ), 01 Jan. 1979 Senior facilities officer, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar 111. Btaddini, Yara ( Student, Doha, Qatar

), 20 Oct. 2003

112. El-Btaddini, Iad ( ), 04 Feb. 1981 Human resources and administrative manager, Maatouk Factories L.L.C., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 113. Btaddini, Malaika ( Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate]

), 26 Mar. 2000

114. Btaddini, Julian ( ), 16 Feb. 2003 Student, Manila, Philippines [Unable to participate] 115. Btaddini, Ribal ( ), 16 Mar. 1986 Computer engineer, Dubai, United Arab Emirates 116. Barakat, Samar ( ), 19 Nov. 1960 Homemaker, Aley, Lebanon 117. Barakat, ChĂŠrine ( Student, Aley, Lebanon

), 26 Oct. 1991

118. Barakat, Sameeh ( Student, Aley, Lebanon

), 27 Apr. 2000

119. Chehayeb, Samer ( ), 05 Feb. 1962 Automobile dealer, Aley, Lebanon 120. Chehayeb, Hatem ( Aley, Lebanon

), 15 Feb. 1967


Rolls Tohoku 31 March – 3 April 2011 Roll 005


Roll 010


Roll 016


Roll 002


Doug Rickard A New American Picture


Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse Ponte City


Michael Christopher Brown Libya


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PREVIEW Foam Magazine Issue #27 Report  

In this issue of Foam Magazine, we go on an investigative journey into photojournalism... This is an excerpt please to use the link below to...

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