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FEBRUARY 2018

COMPLIMENTARY

18 stories high

Office space

Retail space

Perfect for local events Open-air public plaza


TABLEOFCONTENTS

COVER STORY

14

IS THIS THE FUTURE OF DOWNTOWN FARGO? Block 9 has been discussed for years. Once complete with 18 stories, it will be Fargo's tallest building. From a surface parking lot to multi-purpose use, it'll include office space, retail, residential condos, an attached parking garage and a hotel, in addition to a new public plaza. Is this the future of Downtown Fargo?

14

FEATURED 22 LEGACY: OUR LOCAL YMCA'S 130+ YEARS OF IMPACT 52 FARGO GO RED FOR WOMEN LUNCHEON 56 JON WANZEK'S VALLEY OF BONES 80 THE LAST PAGE: LORI KOENIG

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52 4 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

56

6 39 42 45 48 50

RECURRING Editor's Letter 5 Things to Eat & Drink Health & Wellness Spotlight Grate Insights Culinary Spotlight Mixologist of the Month

61 66 69 71

RESOURCES Event Calendar Live Music Trivia Drink Specials


FARGO MONTHLY | FEBRUARY 2018

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ON THE COVER FEBRUARY 2018 | VOLUME 8 ISSUE 2

Is This The Future of Downtown Fargo? On the cover this month is a rendering of the Block 9 project. The development is expected to break ground in 2018 with a hopeful debut planned for 2020. Photo submitted by Kilbourne Group.

FEBRUARY 2018

COMPLIMENTARY

18 stories high

Office space

Retail space

Perfect for local events

Open-air public plaza


PHOTO BY Hillary Ehlen

FROMTHEEDITOR

A picture is worth...

T

his month's story on the YMCA allowed me to sit and listen to individuals and families share their experiences. Some were able to bring in old photographs of time well spent in the facility, and it was amazing to see their faces light up as they showed me the photos. Others brought in their stillyoung families — kids under the age of 10 with plenty of memories left to make during their childhood and now all I've been able to think is, "please remember to take pictures." During this month's process, I turned 23 and while I know I'm not old yet, between my birthday and working on this issue, I was stirred to look back on my life and the memories I've already made — even causing me to look through old photos from my parents. • Photos of me and my grandpa when I was really little — my grandpa who is now 94 years old.

• Photos of me and my sister playing piano and riding horses together — when we didn't live on opposite sides of neighboring states. • Photos of my cousins — one who died way too young and others who I see, because of distance and schedules, maybe once every several years. • Photos of best friends — lovely ladies who will continue to be living in North Dakota as I move 2,000 miles away in May. • Photos of my parents — who, like me, continue to grow older every day. I forget that sometimes. As I flipped through the snapshots, I found myself reliving the emotion from the forgotten memories now frozen in time. There is a unique power in a photograph. Now, I get that in our world of Facebook and Instagram, taking photos means something different. We need to always look picture-perfect because we automatically assume the photo is going to go on social media. That mindset makes me sad.

6 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

kara@spotlightmediafargo.com

This experience reminded me to: 1. Cherish time with loved ones because you never know when those times will become fewer or stop completely. 2. Take more photos of the PEOPLE you love, not things. 3. Snap a photo of the moment you're in instead of trying to create the perfect moment. We take things for granted. We forget we're creating memories in our everyday moments. We also forget to take photos of people. When I get to the end of my life, I don't want a box (or, let's be honest, a phone or computer) full of that cute latte from the local coffee shop down the street or a million sunset photos (*as I raise my hand* — completely guilty of the latter).

One day, when our minds are foggy, a photo might be all we have to look back on — the only thing to spark our memory. Or it could be treasured by a loved one after we're gone, and I promise you, they aren't going to care how you looked in the photo. They're just going to be happy to see you. Either way, I want to start taking more photos that matter and I'm thankful for the wonderful people with the YMCA — for the sparkle in your eyes and the love in your smile as you showed me your dear, sweet memories.

Kara Jeffers, Editor


FEBRUARY 2018

Volume 8 / Issue 2

Fargo Monthly Magazine is published 12 times a year and is free. Copies are available at more than 500 Fargo-Moorhead locations and digitally at fargomonthly.com.

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BLOCK 9 14 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


Kilbourne Group's progress on Downtown Fargo's upcoming multipurpose complex

D

owntown Fargo is building in exciting ways. The population of residents living in the downtown neighborhood is growing for the first time in decades and as a result, new living spaces are coming online, offering more choices to those making the move. The growth of technology-driven companies downtown prompted Fortune magazine to dub it “America’s Most Undervalued Tech Hub.” I cannot overstate the powerful positive impact I believe R.D. Offutt Company’s decision to become our development partner and to relocate its headquarters to Downtown Fargo will have on our entire community for decades to come. Having the significant presence and legacy of RDO in the heart of Fargo’s Central Business District is a game changer. RDO’s new home, Block 9, is today a surface parking lot at the center of the most walkable street in our region. The corner of Broadway and Second Avenue North has been a surface lot since it’s mixed-use buildings were lost to fire in 1976. Kilbourne Group has been dreaming of and fine-tuning a project that will add wonderful new experiences to our urban core that you can only have in Downtown Fargo.

BY Mike Allmendinger President Kilbourne Group

As a co-developer, RDO’s investment will equal approximately two-thirds of the total cost of this project. Along with providing office space for the employees currently at RDO’s Fargo and Moorhead field support offices, the project will include 30,000 square feet of office space that will be available for lease. In addition, the upper floors of the building will consist of 11 condominium units available for sale — three of which are currently under negotiation.

For anyone following the progress of Block 9, it has been a long journey from idea to execution. In fact, there is still a long road ahead for this to come to fruition. We asked several of the people who were integral to Block 9 what this means for the future of the community.

Scott Neal

President Real Estate Division of R.D. Offutt Company

“R.D. Offutt Company is excited to bring our offices to the Block 9 project. We believe that this project will be a tremendous centerpiece for Downtown Fargo and that our involvement shows the strong commitment our company has to the community and its roots.”

Charley Johnson

President/CEO Fargo-Moorhead Convention and Visitors Bureau

"Block 9 is going to be a great addition to downtown. I'm particularly excited about the new plaza that will take place right next to it. I think the plaza will be a huge bonus and provide an opportunity for more activation. Downtown is already active but this will create a defined focal point throughout the whole year. It'll be a great space to utilize in the summer and, with an ice skating rink, perfect in the winter."

15


Michael J. Olsen

Crisis Communications and Public Relations Consultant

"As a long-time resident of Fargo, I see Block 9 as the next logical step toward the reinvention of our downtown. Growing up here in the '50s and '60s, downtown was always vibrant, exciting and just a tad mysterious. This development has all of those traits, and will create a true center of town, complementing all that surrounds it."

Melissa Rademacher

President and CEO Downtown Community Partnership

"The positive momentum Downtown Fargo is currently experiencing is truly amazing. Fargo is a destination itself with a spectrum of experiences and opportunities for people of all ages and interests while offering a strong sense of place filled with vibrant culture, art and commerce. "The Downtown Community Partnership believes that a key ingredient for creating a diverse downtown is to offer a unique combination of retail, restaurants and events that create a memorable experience for all ages. The DCP is a catalyst for change, helping to draw a new customer base to Downtown Fargo. We believe the announcement of these two projects, the Block 9 tower along with the plaza, will only complement and impact Downtown Fargo in a positive manner. "The plaza has an amazing opportunity to become a key centerpiece of the community. The goal of daily, weekly and monthly programming could attract hundreds of thousands of visitors per year to the Downtown Fargo area. Events can help expose a wider portion of our community to the unique assets located in the heart of Fargo with the added benefit of engaging local merchants, artists and entrepreneurs to consider living and opening a business here."

16 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

In 2010, we held Downtown Fargo: An Urban-Infill Competition to gather ideas for Block 9. The contest garnered 160 design entries from 23 countries. Thousands of community members and visitors attended an open house gallery and voted for their favorite design. Nearly all of the designs included a mid-rise, mixed-use building and a highly activated civic plaza gathering space for the community. In 2015, we engaged SOM, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP, to design the project. With projects in more than 50 countries, SOM is known for designing some of the most iconic buildings in the world, including the John Hancock Center, the Willis Tower and the Burj Khalifa, which is currently the world's tallest building. This year, we have found a hospitality partner that fits the vision of Block 9 perfectly. Aparium Hotel Group will be the hospitality management partner for

"... Block 9 will be a celebration of downtown Fargo’s renaissance, creating uniquely Fargo experiences that locals can get excited about and a destination visitors will seek out."


the to-be-named hotel and restaurant within Block 9. Known for creating one-of-a-kind, hyper-localized hotels and restaurants around the country, the Chicago-based hotel group will oversee operations for the hotel and food and beverage components, as well as lead the charge on the branding, programming and positioning of this highly anticipated development. We have found a strong and unique hotel partner in Aparium. Aparium’s track record of unique projects across the Midwest (Aparium.com) promises a hospitality experience that reflects and amplifies all that is unique and vibrant about Fargo. With Aparium as our hospitality partner, Block 9 will be a celebration of Downtown Fargo’s renaissance, creating uniquely Fargo experiences that locals can get excited about and a destination visitors will seek out.


Joel Vettel

Executive Director Fargo Park District

"We are certainly excited about any partnership, especially with great partners that can provide us an opportunity of expanding the amenities for our community. We really look at this as an opportunity to combine forces to create a space that will be instrumental in bringing people together. When you start talking about that public square and footprint that allows for people to congregate in a variety of ways, it certainly is an incredible opportunity to provide that, not only to the folks in our community, but we know that we get a tremendous amount of visitors that are looking for opportunities for entertainment and engagement. "What's really exciting is that this is a space that could be utilized year-round. People are constantly looking for opportunities to get outside, do things that are unique and congregate as a community. Whether it's music, food, festivals or skating, all of those things are excellent opportunities for us to really partner with that group. At the end of the day, the Fargo Parks District is in the business of the quality of life for our community and wellness for our community. "Two things that get us really excited is that it'll be an outdoor ice skating rink that will not only provide skating for a couple of months out of the year, but it will have a cooling unit underneath, allowing us to keep that icerink colder and frozen longer. Instead of the traditional two-three months that we get out of an outdoor rink, we're going to get five or six months. Also, being in a location that allows people to gather and have other events going around it — shopping, engagements for food — it almost brings in a Rockefeller Center feel in a much smaller scale while still providing the same level of engagement. "During the warmer months, we really look at this as a public square where we're going to be able to host public events. One of the biggest ones we're looking at is an outdoor theatre setting. We're going to have a stage and we've looked at a wonderful sound system for outdoor events. We'll look at doing smaller events on a regular basis. The model we built this around has the possibility of doing up to 200 events every year. Based on the ice skating rink in the winter and the use as a public square during the warmer months, to do things like concerts or outdoor art opportunities, we would program it as a year-long space — bringing in a variety of events that aren't only popular but gather people together for the engagement piece."

18 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

"How does a project in Fargo attract the attention of these world-class companies? By being Fargo."


THIS ENTRY TIED FOR 1ST PLACE “Fargo 365” by David Witham, Doug Meehan, Anna Ishii and Hannah MattheusKairys, Philadelphia, PA

“Downtown” Dave Anderson

Sanford Health Senior Public Affairs Specialist

"The Kilbourne Group's Block 9 project is firm evidence of Downtown Fargo’s next evolutionary step — from a great downtown to an outstanding downtown of the future and a model for communities across the country. At Sanford Health, we know from experience that healthy communities are not reflected solely by the wellness of their people, but also by the vitality and vigor of their spaces and places — the neighborhoods and villages in which people of all ages live, work, shop, play and learn. We’re committed to the growth of downtown, and we’re excited about this project by our neighbors, the Kilbourne Group. Downtown’s future continues to look very bright."

Aparium seeks local people investing in their community to become part of the Fargo project. There are opportunities to invest in this Downtown Fargo hospitality experience and become part of the momentum that continues to grow. The hotel in Block 9 will consist of 110 hotel rooms across five floors, as well as a ground floor flagship food and beverage venue. True to Aparium’s signature style and anchored in its “translocal hospitality” concept, the hotel and restaurant will be constructed and programmed with local influences to best capture the spirit of Fargo and engage with the greater community. Block 9 will also feature multiple meeting and event spaces, condominiums with sweeping views of downtown, class A office space, additional ground floor retail and an expansive, open-air public plaza that will be programmed yearround with exciting events, concerts and

celebrations for locals and visitors alike to enjoy. The development is expected to break ground in 2018 and debut in 2020. How does a project in Fargo attract the attention of these world-class companies? By being Fargo. They visit downtown and experience our restaurants, craft breweries and coffee houses, art galleries and local shopping, and they know it’s a momentum they’d like to be a part of. We are grateful to R. D. Offutt Company, whose commitment to bringing its headquarters to downtown Fargo makes this project possible, to the City of Fargo for its partnership and to all the partners and supporters who have joined us on this journey. Our team continues to work diligently to move the Block 9 project forward. We are excited to share this progress with you.

Mark Nisbet

North Dakota Principal Manager Xcel Energy

"I am pleased by the tenacity of the Kilbourne Group in keeping this project moving forward even though there have been some setbacks. I am a past chair of the Downtown Community Partnership and realize how this will leverage and enhance the investments of time and money made by many people who believed in the concept of a vibrant and economically dynamic downtown. "I think this is another giant step forward in the momentum Fargo and North Dakota are gaining on the national stage. Our strong educational system, our willingness to embrace and welcome entrepreneurs and our growing tech sector are making the whole metro area an attractive option for the highly qualified workforce we need to continue to grow."

19


Legacy

20 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


localYMCA's years impact Our

T

130+ of

he YMCA has been making an impact in our community for more than 130 years. We met with individuals and families who've been a part of the organizations past and present to share stories and hear the reasons why they continue to support the Y. From aquatics to youth programming, learn more about the Y experience through the eyes of some who know it best.

BY Kara Jeffers PHOTOS BY Hillary Ehlen, Jesse Hoorelbeke and submitted by the YMCA

21


at the Y. I was the oldest of five siblings and we were all swimmers. I probably quit the Gators at age 14 because I swam in high school. From then on, I didn’t participate in Gators, but I still hung out at the Y.

Aquatics

with the Selbo family

G

reg, Pam, Britt and Brock Selbo sat down with us to explain their experience within the YMCA’s Gator program.Their oldest son, Gabe, was also a Gator swimmer but was unable to join in on the interview.

When did your YMCA experience begin? Greg Selbo: My experience at the Y started with another generation — my dad. He was a Y person and he actually lived at the Y on Robert’s Street. His family had moved to Grand Forks and he wanted to finish high school at Fargo Central, so he lived at the Y when they used to have rooms on the upper level. I became a Y rat somewhere along the way because we went there almost every day for swimming lessons and other activities. I was on the swimming team, the Gators,

1844

YMCA Timeline 22 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

Twenty-two-year-old George Williams started the first Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) in London, England, a refuge of Bible study and prayer for young men seeking escape from the hazards of life on the streets.

Pam Selbo: My first Y memories are in the old Y attending dances on Friday and Saturday nights. As far as swimming goes, I wasn’t a competitive swimmer. All of my lifeguarding and water safety instructor (WSI) training was through the Y but I guarded with the Park Board. However, I had a friend who lifeguarded at the Y and they didn’t run as tight of a ship as they do now because I’d sub for her occasionally. No one ever asked my name. She must have just paid me on the side. Britt Selbo: I learned how to swim in the small pool by my parents and also took swimming lessons. I started Gators the summer I turned six and swam all the way through high school. It was year-round — 10 practices a week in the summer, five practices a week during the school year. We were at swim meets every weekend. There was rarely a weekend we weren’t traveling for Gator swim meets. During my senior year of high school, I hurt my

1851

Retired Boston sea captain, Thomas Valentine Sullivan, working as a marine missionary, noticed a similar need to create a safe “home away from home” for sailors and merchants. Inspired by the stories of the YMCA in England, he led the formation of the first U.S. YMCA at the Old South Church in Boston.


YMCA Legacy A capital campaign raised $3.6 million to construct a new state-of-the-art Aquatic Center at the Downtown YMCA. The project was to replace the current 53-year old pools. Greg recollects the “Olympic-sized” pool “I remember when the Y was built with a brand-new, 25-yard, four-lane pool. It was so funny because they advertised it as the first Olympic-sized pool in Fargo but of course, it was about a quarter of an Olympic-sized pool.”

shoulder so I started coaching Gators. The spring after my sophomore year, I took my lifeguarding and WSI classes at the Y and then when I moved back to Fargo at age 29, I started a job with the YMCA in financial development. I did this for two years and have now been the Aquatics Director for six and a half years. Brock Selbo: I was taught swimming lessons at the Y, as well. I still see one of my teachers from time to time and she still references how she taught me the butterfly. It was, “Kick, kick, wiggle, kick, kick, wiggle.” It’s been 32 years and she still says that whenever I see her. I was the youngest in the family so the Gators had already been a part of the family lifestyle. I got into it the summer I was turning six and absolutely loved it.

1882

The initial meeting was held to organize a YMCA in Fargo.

What do you love about the Y, specifically with the Gators swimming program? Brock Selbo: Being brought up within the YMCA community, I feel a desire to help promote it. I’ve been a member since I came back from college. I’ve enjoyed participating in the different events, whether it’s the Paul Harvey Golf Tournament or the Thanksgiving Day Burn the Bird 5k or any other special events the Y puts on. Greg Selbo: I think Brock is right, and Britt and I were having some of this discussion on the swimming program. When I grew up and when they were growing up, the swimming practices were at the Y. You went to the Y and you hung around for three hours. It was a congregating place and still is. Britt Selbo: It definitely was. During hours not in school, we were pretty much at the Y all of the time. We would recruit our neighbor friends to be on the team with us and then all of their siblings were on the

team. That’s just where we grew up. Pam Selbo: Weekends were traveling with the Gators to different swim meets, so you’d be at the swim meet all day and then you’d get back and what did the kids want to do? They wanted to swim in the pool at the hotel — for fun. We always smelled like chlorine. Greg Selbo: Swimming is a great sport. You have the inter-team relationships but these kids also knew other kids and families all over the state. Plus, the nice thing about swimming is your competitor is next door but it’s even moreso the clock. If I can swim my best time, then I won that race whether I took first or not. Britt Selbo: It’s fun, too, because swimmers that I swam with, their kids are now taking lessons in our programs. I teach the children of past competitors from other towns, too. The friendships you made at swim meets will last a lifetime.

1886

On October 29, 1886, Fargo-Moorhead’s first YMCA was chartered and incorporated. Along with other railroad Y’s across the U.S., this facility served the workers on the Great Northern Railway.

23


M

ohamed Khaadi's first experience with the YMCA was when he was seven years old and at a friend's birthday party. "It was one of the best experiences I had as a kid," he said. "Afterward, I talked with my parents about going to the Y and we opened a membership."

Fitness

Since then, Khaadi has utilized different fitness components the Y has to offer. He works on his own training but also helps other kids who use the Y — including his 11 brothers and sisters — reach their goals.

with Mohamed Khaadi

1903

The YMCA’s building at the Northern Pacific Railway was sold and plans began to secure a new location. At the time, there were 411 members. The Y purchased 37 acres of land on the northwest shore of Big Cormorant Lake for YMCA Camp Cormorant, one of the earliest residence camps in the U.S. 24 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

1903

Community leaders raised $50,000 to build the first YMCA facility on the corner of Roberts Street and First Avenue North. This YMCA building served the community until 1962.


YMCA Legacy

Were you still involved at the YMCA in high school? "My family ended up moving way south for my freshman year of high school. I didn't really like the gym I started going to down there because the atmosphere and playing style was not the same as the YMCA. We ended switching back to the Y and from my freshman to senior year, I would go to night basketball on Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays from 6:30-9 p.m. Then I'd workout afterward." How did you start working there? "I graduated from Fargo Davies in 2016. I did a year of college but decided to take time off to stop wasting money until I found a career I could fully commit to. I had a conversation with someone in the youth programs at the Y and she told me they were hiring. Now, I work the front desk, so I scan people in, give memberships and new cards, and help with whatever concerns the members have. I also work in the Xerzone." Tell us about your involvement with Xerzone: "I work Friday nights from 4-8 p.m., which is the busiest time for adults to come and drop off their kids. I deal with some of the funniest, craziest kids while I'm there. Usually, it's the same kids who come in every shift, which helps you build relationships. For example, one of the kids who comes in is part of the basketball program on Saturday mornings so I see him all the time there. I'll take him on a

Friday night when we're in the Xerzone not doing anything and I can help him with some basketball skills he can use the next morning."

are on their lunch breaks — bankers and lawyers and they are there religiously, every day. The cool thing about noon ball, too, is it's all ages — 18- to 70-year-olds.

What other areas do you utilize? "I'm in the gym a lot and the locker rooms because they have the saunas and whirlpools. I try to get in the pool often, but I can't swim very well. It's still pretty fun.

"You're on a team and you get to see how people played basketball years ago versus now. There is a guy who has come to noon ball for 40 years. He's been going since he was a kid and the rules have not changed. The rules are you play a game and then wait a game and if you don't, you can't play. He said things have been like that for years."

"When I'm there with my friends, we play basketball. We get there around 7 p.m. and play until the gym closes at 10:30, then we immediately hit the weights. We try to do as much as we can while still running on the treadmills, going back and forth to keep our stamina up. Some of us have been offered a chance to play at Fergus Falls College and we were told to work on our stamina. "You have to be able to get to the gym and weightlift. Once we ended up doing that, we really saw how connected people are. The trainers, if you need help, are instantly there to help you with anything or if you were to ask another member who is working out for advice or help, they'd answer the question or assist in a heartbeat." Tell us about noon ball: "Around 30-40 guys come in every day at noon to play basketball. It's mostly businessmen who work downtown and

1905-1961

The YMCA facility at Roberts Street and First Avenue North served the community for 56 years with amenities including sleeping rooms, an indoor track, pool, fitness center and youth leadership programs.

What is your favorite thing about the Y? "My favorite thing about the YMCA is probably the basketball and how often you see those people every day. I've been able to transition into playing in the mornings with the older men and getting to know guys I wouldn't have known if I hadn't played basketball. We've made a lot of good connections, especially with the older generations who give us a lot of advice. You can ask them any questions about both basketball and life and you get some of the best advice you otherwise wouldn't have received. "I also love the mini-communities in basketball and the weightlifting room — whatever you partake in. It's smaller families underneath a larger community, the Y as a whole. The YMCA is more of a community than anywhere else I've been."

1905-1961

$1,000,000 was pledged to build a new facility.

25


Group Fitness with Jane Anderson

J

ane Anderson worked at the Wells Fargo across the street from the Downtown YMCA. She started working out on her lunch breaks in the mid-1980s. While attending group fitness classes, she would think, "Oh, it would be so much fun to teach, but I could never do that because I’m a banker." One day, however, she was in a class where the instructor didn’t know her. The instructor approached her asking, “What club are you here from?” Jane said, “I belong to this club." "You’re not an instructor?” "No." "You should be." That was all it took.

1961

Y Members raised $1,235,387 and groundbreaking on the new Fargo-Moorhead Family YMCA was held. C. Warren Litten chaired the campaign, William Schlossman, John L. Gunkelman and Fred Scheel were in charge of special gifts.

26 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

1962

The Fargo-Moorhead Family YMCA moved into their building at 400 First Avenue South in 1962 with 801 Y members.


YMCA Legacy

What did the instructor training program look like? "For the Y-certification, at that time, they brought someone in. It was a two-day training and we had to take a written exam about kinesiology and 32-count movements. It was pretty extensive. Kathy Rogers, who was an instructor at the time, was my mentor. I can remember the first time she had me do a warm-up. I forgot to warm-up half the body parts because I was so nervous." What classes have you taught? "The first class I taught was Step — it was a high impact class back in the leg warmer days. I've taught Step, Circuit, Boot Camp, Boxing Aerobics, BODYPUMP®, BODYFLOW®, BODYVIBE®, CXWORX® and Spin. I have four Les Mills certifications and I’m teaching three of them — I’m not doing BODYVIBE®. I teach four formats — Cycle, CXWORX®, BODYPUMP®, BODYFLOW® — and teach about five classes a week. I started teaching in 1996 and I’ve never left the Y or taught anywhere else. "When we first started Cycle, it was at the Y on Broadway. We had six bikes down in the basement. It was a dungeon. We would have maybe three people show up. It took a long time for that program to kick in. That would have been 1997. Then we were on a racquetball court and went into the big studio where we'd have to roll the bikes in and out every time. We finally got the cycling studio in 2011, which was a big deal."

How have you seen the Y change during your time? "I think one thing with group fitness is it’s all cyclical. What we did 10 years ago, we might not do now but in another 10 years, it’ll come back again. It’s evolving all of the time and it takes a lot of work to keep up with the latest. I love Les Mills because they send us education every three months, that way you know it’s all state-of-the-art, up-to-date and safe. All you have to do is memorize choreography. I’m hoping it keeps my brain sharp." Do you have any advice for people who want to get involved in teaching group fitness? "If it’s something you're passionate about, go for it. Step out of the comfort zone. It takes a long time to get fluent in teaching. I’ve been doing it for 20+ years and it’s like my second arm right now, really easy. I see new instructors and it’s a struggle. It takes a long time, so stick with it. A lot of people think you just stand on the stage and it’s really easy but it's not, especially if you’re teaching a Les Mills program with all of the choreography. It’s an hour of choreography, so you put the music on and you can’t have any notes out because that’s a Les Mills no-no. You have to be on queue and prep for the next move and it’s a lot."

1963

KinderKamp, the YMCA’s first preschool program, launched at the downtown YMCA.

Why the Y? "I think, for me, the biggest thing is the members. They’re like family. I used to work full-time so I'd teach on my lunch hours and then early mornings. Now I’m retired from the bank, so it’s more flexible, but I still do early mornings because I have a group following that’s been with me for 20 years. It’s crazy that I’ve had some of the same people in my class for that long. "It’s also the little things that I love. For example, a member who goes to my classes answered a social media question about what inspires you about exercise, and she tagged me and said, 'My Body Pump instructor, Jane Anderson, because she makes working out fun and pushes me to work harder.' I was just in awe. It’s stuff like that when you don’t feel like you’re making a difference. All it takes is just one person to make your day." What impact do you think the Y makes in the community? "When I think of the YMCA, I think it’s the groundwork of the community. They are so involved in the youth and the elderly — check out their Silver Sneakers program — and they help with the scholarship programs. I feel like there are so many outreach programs that are making a difference in so many different groups of people’s lives."

1970

The Y kicked off a capital campaign to build an addition to the Fargo-Moorhead Family YMCA, including four racquetball/ handball courts, a running track and a free weight area.

27


Youth Programming with the Magelky family

1971

The Heritage Club was formed, a group that believes in ensuring that the mission of the YMCA continues in the future through their estate planning and/or lifetime gifts.

28 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

1976

The first Rudy Harris Handball Tournament was held in honor of Rudy Harris, executive director of the Fargo-Moorhead Family YMCA from 1939-1942. He positively influenced the lives of hundreds of youth and was a pioneer and leader for the sport of handball at a local, regional and national level.


YMCA Legacy

J

osh and Aliceyn Magelky — along with their children Elizabeth, Caroline and Abram — sat down with us to explain their experience with the YMCA's youth programming.

How did you get involved in the Y? Aliceyn Magelky: My hometown had a Y, and I actually was a swimming instructor and a lifeguard there, so it’s always been the place to be. I was also a swimmer in high school so when I came to college here, I wanted to continue to workout and swim and the Y was the only place that had a pool. When Josh and I got together, I told him, "You have to be a member here. Let's get a family membership." It's been like that ever since. Josh Magelky: I'm from North Fargo and grew up going to the Downtown Y. I had swimming lessons and basketball in the winter, working out and doing that stuff growing up. It just seemed natural for the kids to be a part of the Y, too. We're also lakes people, so it's very important that our kids know how to swim. That was ingrained in both of us. AM: Our kids have certainly been more involved. Unfortunately, we've probably

1980

been less involved using the workout portion of it, but with our kids there, it's been a really good thing and gets both Josh and I more involved.

"Do we have to stay home with you? Can we go to School's Out Day Camp?" And I'm like, "I guess. I was hoping we could spend some time together ..."

JM: We've also used the daycare option. And our kids have all went through swimming lessons. We've had a really good experience all around.

Why do you think the Y is important to the community? AM: I just think it's an opportunity for all types of people to come together and it really doesn't matter your age, sex, weight or economic background. It's an opportunity and a place for people to do what they love in a lot of different ways. Our kids get to be active and that's important to us. It's honestly not too expensive, either, and they love it and have fun.

AM: We've been really excited about the changes in aquatics, too. It's incredible having the new facility. It's a great addition to have for the kids. Then later on, with Elizabeth entering Kindercamp — she actually had Mrs. Franchuk. I anticipated that Caroline was going to be there, but I couldn't make it work with our schedules. Abram will do Kindercamp, most likely. It was something that was such a fantastic experience. What do the kids love to do at the Y? AM: Abram likes basketball and Xerzone, Elizabeth also likes Xerzone and Caroline's favorite part is the swimming pool. I also wish more kids would do the School's Out Day Camp because our kids love it. I don't work full-time, so I don't utilize it as often as I could, but sometimes they say,

The Y raised more than $1,080,000 for new courts, a youth room, renovation of the women’s locker room, a child care and swimming pool.

JM: I think the Y is great because there are several different options under one roof. One person can go swimming, one can play basketball or do gymnastics, and you can drop your kids off for a little bit. It's so convenient. Seeing my kids get to do a lot of the same things I did is also amazing. I think the stability of the YMCA is always key. In my opinion, I feel like it's going to be here when my kids have kids. It's a great asset to the community.

1984

The Y raised $1,065,000 to improve energy efficiency and for the major interior renovation of the program areas.

29


There were campfires with singing and storytelling. Counselors would tell spooky stories. At the time that I went, there were no girls at the camp. I can remember wanting to be a counselor when I was older. The older kids also got to go on a day canoe trip at the end of the week. Mike Dawson: When I went, girls were allowed. I went for the dances at the end of each week and I had a new girlfriend at camp every year. It was fun meeting kids, making those connections, and the comradery of the camp was a big deal. I was a big fan of the activities: swimming, volleyball, playing games out in the field.

Summer Camp

I remember a specific time where we saw a red moon up in the sky. Nobody knew what it was, so the counselors came up with stories that gargoyles were going to come out and get us. Then the counselors would throw rocks at the cabins and frighten the kids inside — all in fun, of course. Another great part of the experience is looking back at the photos of your cabin and seeing kids from around town that you would recognize. I also enjoyed getting letters from my parents.

with the Dawson family

T

om Dawson — along with his sons Mike and Alex — sat down with us to explain their experience with Camp Cormorant and the generations of their family that's been involved.

Tell us about your experience with Camp Cormorant? Tom Dawson: I would have gone to the camp in the 1960s — one week each summer for several summers. I sold saltwater taffy, initiated by the YMCA, to pay my way. A certain amount of each sale went to registration. Most kids sold saltwater taffy to earn their way to camp. I would say there were probably 50-60 kids each week. We would load up on a bus from the Y on Roberts Street and parents would pick us up at the end of the week.

1989

YMCA Child Care Services were launched when School Age Programs began at Madison and Jefferson elementary schools in Fargo. A facility in Downtown Fargo, which became the Y on Broadway — an adult fitness center — was donated by Dr. Cal Fercho. 30 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

Alex Dawson: I first went when I was 10 or 11 years old. I didn't like to be away from home, but I have very fond memories of camp. I would go with my brother — we bunked together one of the years. I also remember getting letters from mom and dad — they would send candy and we would stash it under our bunks. I learned how to ride a horse and shoot archery at camp. I also liked the dances. The campfires were fun and I enjoyed when each cabin would put on a skit. I think I went three or four years. I would say there were definitely more than 100 kids there each week we went.

1990

The first Paul Howry Golf Tournament was held in honor of Paul Howry, a man who gave generously to the YMCA in spirit, mind and body. Tournament proceeds benefit YMCA participants with mental or physical disabilities.


YMCA Legacy

Tom Dawson's grandfather, Charlie Dawson, kept detailed journals for years with his stories and memories from his time at Camp Cormorant in the 1910s. Below are a few sections of his entries. "I arrive at Lake Park 2:30 and leave on wheel for camp with heavy rain clouds and thunder spurring me on. About 6 miles from Camp, it sprinkles but I intend to ride as long as possible. It stops and I make camp 4:00 and receive general welcome ... within 5 minutes it pours. Pretty lucky for me."

Camp Cormorant "brochure"

"While walking to Cormorant, we got chased thru a pasture by a bull, believe me, we got over the fence in double quick time." "Big candy hunt is special feature this P.M. ... hiding directions and instructions for older fellows candy hunt, we do the job right, they will have to travel about 7 miles before finding their candy."

Mike and Alex Dawson attending a summer of Camp Cormorant together.

Tom, what did the experience look like for your grandfather, Charlie Dawson? TD: He has journals full of stories. He would take the train to the camp with his bike. He was dropped off at Lake Park, eight miles from the camp, and would bike the rest of the way. When you think of how young he would've been, that was a long way at the time. It was a real excursion. But he absolutely loved camp. You can tell by reading all of his journal entries.

Tom Dawson's grandfather bought the YMCA sign in front of Fercho.

1992

Paul Finstad became president. He started working at the Y in 1975 as a locker room attendant and working other jobs with members and youth programs. He led the Y for 24 years and retired in 2017.

1995

The Eide Bailly Award was created in honor of Eide Bailly, a man who led with courage and always explored a better way of doing things. He served on the Y’s board and other committees.

31


Early Learning with the Franchuk family

S

andy Franchuk — along with her son Ryan, his wife Tara and their children Nash, Parker and Brooklyn — sat down with us to explain her experience with the YMCA's Early Learning Center, especially in her role as a coordinator for KinderKamp.

Tell us about your experience with the Y from the beginning: Sandy Franchuk: KinderKamp is the name of the preschool we have at the Fercho YMCA. This is my 28th year there. The first two years, I was a teacher and ever since then I've been a coordinator. I feel so lucky because being a grandma is the best thing in the world, and being a teacher — and I get to do both. The grandkids aren't actually in my group, but I get to be there and see what goes on. Only one Franchuk in each group, we say. During the school year, it's KinderKamp, and that's nine months just like a regular preschool. During the summer, there is Busy Beaver Camp, which is the same age group. Tara Franchuk: Busy Beaver Camp is only one week long and has nine different sessions that go through nine different

1997

A capital campaign raised $3,300,000 to construct a new branch facility in the West Acres area, renovate Camp Cormorant and the Family YMCA. The Schlossman Family YMCA opened in south Fargo complete with climbing wall, childcare center, fitness space and a youth/team center. An original barn structure was used for part of the YMCA. 32 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

1999

Larger locker rooms and a free weight area were added to the Schlossman Family YMCAWest. The $1,200,000 was paid out of the YMCA’s operation budget. Y-South, a full-time child care center for ages infant through preschool, opened on South University Drive in Fargo. This center has since expanded and is now located just north of the Microsoft campus.


themes. Depending on what your kids are interested in depends on which you go to.

YMCA Legacy

SF: Themes could include cooking, dinosaur week, camping and then during each week, we'll go on a field trip. For Busy Beaver Camps in the summer, there are scholarships. If you apply and are eligible for it, the child can get that experience and it's all taken care of.

A photo of Sandy Franchuk teaching.

Is this all part of the Early Learning Center? SF: Yes, there is a full-time child care center, there's the afterschool program, there's the drop-in care and then the preschool. There's just so much to preschool. More than just doing paperwork. We're fortunate at the Y because it offers all the different activity areas. Our hope is the children come out of preschool with a positive attitude toward school because if they like school, they'll have a passion for it and succeed. They think they're just there to have fun, but it's amazing how much they can learn. What's a day in KinderKamp look like? SF: When they first arrive, it's free-play time. Then we have circle time where we sing songs and do different activities. This week our theme was community helpers so we talked about different jobs in the community. Many of the children dressed up and acted them out. Today was also swimming day so we did that and came back to read a story. Other days, it might be our day to go to kids gym, practice our handwriting or doing show and tell. There's Monday/Wednesday/Friday and then Tuesday/Thursday programs. What do you love most about the Y? SF: I'm very biased because KinderKamp is my program. I've had the same teachers for 20-30 years so we've become a family. It's like home.

TF: It's easy with grandma there. It works with our everyday lives. It worked out with Brooklyn and now it's working out with the boys. Ryan Franchuk: It's not just KinderKamp. They also have drop-in care if you want to go workout — two hours a day. That's perfect for us when we want to work out or do another activity there. TF: When you're a member of the Y, you're able to get discounts on swimming lessons and other activities, which makes things more accessible. Also, for utilizing the preschool, we get an even better deal at the membership, so it actually makes it all one package together. Overall, we enjoy it. We like that they have pools and all of the other fun things like basketball, gymnastics and group fitness classes for me. There's a little bit of everything. Any fun stories about children you've seen go through the program now all grown up? SF: We've already had several children of children because all of us have been there so long. When we see the families in the community, most of the time the child has

2000

A capital campaign raised $1,700,000 to add a childcare facility and renovate and add fitness space to the downtown YMCA, including group fitness studies and expansion of the fitness center. Y on Broadway was sold, consolidating the downtown operation.

changed so much we can't even recognize them, but we still recognize the parents. I just heard from a mom that her daughter was a senior in high school and she'd had a boyfriend for two years. It wasn't until they set up their graduation open house pictures that they realized they had been in the same preschool class together at the Y. That was a fun story. What is the importance of KinderKamp? SF: I truly think people value preschool more and more. I was just going through some files last week and what I'm teaching in preschool is what we taught in kindergarten 30 years ago. The academics have really moved down so I think parents feel it is so important that their child gets this education. With some families I know, this is a financial burden for them, but they're willing to because they know how important it is. We provide the children with a great experience and hope they come out well-rounded and ready for kindergarten.

2004

A state-of-the-art fitness facility, along with expanded School Age Program areas were added to Schlossman Family YMCA-West. The $1,750,000 cost is being paid for out of operations.

In 2000, the YMCA served more than 34,000 individuals. 33


School Age

with the Wilson/ Fiechtner family

2005

The YMCA opened a new full-time child care center in West Fargo at the Lodoen Community Center. The center has since expanded and moved to 13th Avenue in West Fargo.

2006

In collaboration with Calvary United Methodist Church, the YMCA opened a full-time child care center in the Osgood neighborhood.

2008

To reflect the expanded reach of programming, the official name of the association was changed to YMCA of Cass and Clay Counties.


YMCA Legacy From left, Jackie's children: McKenzie, Aliviah, Ashlynn and Sofiya.

J

ackie Wilson — along with her children Sofiya and Ashlynn Fiechtner and McKenzie and Aliviah Wilson — sat down with us to explain their experience with the YMCA's School Age program while also utilizing the financial assistance the Y offers.

What has your experience with the YMCA been like? "My experience with the YMCA schoolage program has been amazing. We're a part of the Jefferson program, which is run by Taylor O'Dell and she is so amazing with the kids. The other staff members are all great, too, especially Ms. Judy. My kids are very fond of Taylor and Ms. Judy. We have only been with the program since July but they already feel like a second family to us."

2008-2011

Major gifts allowed for updates at YMCA Camp Cormorant, including building improvements, new cabins and a new campfire amphitheater.

What do you and your children love about the program? "I have three children in the program and, in total, I have four children. What my children love most about the program is the fun they get to have and how welcomed they feel. At their last daycare, they were bullied and they hated going. They hate when they miss days at the YMCA. "My favorite part is knowing my kids are finally happy and that they love going to daycare. That and I know if there are any problems, the staff will tell me. As a parent, I love knowing my kids are in a safe environment. I know if my kids needed to tell staff something, they could. If someone was hurting them, they would be comfortable saying something and it would be taken care of." Tell us about utilizing financial assistance: "Receiving the financial assistance has made a huge difference in our life. Not only do I have daycare for my three girls to pay for, but I have an almost 2-yearold in a separate daycare I pay for every month. On top of that, I still have rent, car

2009

The ‘Downtown YMCA’ was officially named the ‘Fercho YMCA’

insurance, groceries, etc. The little bit of help for us has made a huge difference and we are so thankful. It means new pairs of shoes for my girls this month or we might be able to get new clothes. "For some people, that's a very easy task, but for me — I would struggle and wonder if I was going to be able to do that. To have the opportunity to be a part of this program has meant not only so much to me but to my family." Why are you thankful for the YMCA? "No matter if you're receiving assistance or not, they treat you with the same respect and kindness. They treat you like family. I really love that about the YMCA and I don't just feel like a paying parent. I feel like I belong there, that I matter and my children matter. I would like to say thank you to everyone who makes and has made it possible for not only me but for anyone who needs it to be able to receive financial assistance. Know that the money given is used for a really great cause and without the amazing people out there, I don't know what my family would do. You're all rock stars."

2010

The YMCA and Sanford Health partnered on plans to build a new facility in southwest Fargo.

Over 1,000 children experienced a summer adventure at YMCA Camp Cormorant in 2011. 35


Remember When T

YMCA Legacy

he namesake of the Fercho YMCA, Cal Fercho, and the son of the namesake of the Schlossman YMCA, Brad Schlossman, share with us some of their favorite memories from their time at the Y throughout the years.

First large donation "Back in about 1990 or so Rudy Harris, who was the secretary of the Y at the time, was at the office getting an eye exam and he said, 'Cal, remember all those years you went to the Y and you never paid anything?' I said, 'That was nice of you, Rudy.' Then he said, 'Why don't you do something nice for the Y?'

Dr. Cal Fercho

Retired from Fercho Cataract & Eye Clinic in 1992 Sneaking in "We couldn't get into the Y at night and we liked to shoot baskets at night, so one of the things we used to do is we would go to the back of the Y, right next to the police station, go up the fire escape, up onto the roof, lift the cover off of the weight room and drop down. Then we'd play basketball for an hour or so and go out the front door."

2011

Family Wellness, a partnership between the YMCA and Sanford Health, opens in southwest Fargo. In 2011, the YMCA served over 41,000 individuals, more than 18,000 of them being youth.

"At that time, I owned the Y on Broadway. We decided a good thing would be to give it to the Y, so I gave it to them with a parking lot and everything, all paid for. That sort of got them over the hump, they needed extra space for a while." Namesake "Ten years ago, Paul Finstad took me out for lunch and he said, 'Cal, we've been thinking about naming the Y after you.' I said, 'Really? That'd be nice.' And that was the end of the conversation. I figured they'd never actually do that. Then we had lunch again and he said, 'Cal, we're serious about that, and the board is for it.' It happened and I've done a lot for the Y since then."

2015-2016

A capital campaign raised $3.66 million to construct a new $6 million, state-of-theart aquatic center at the downtown YMCA. The project was to replace the current 53-year old pools.

Brad Schlossman West Acres CEO

Earliest memories "When the new Y was built, I spent a fair amount of time there — electric train races, which sound crazy. You'd bring your tracks, train and oval and you'd set it up, running them around this little circle. I can't remember if all of my siblings grew up going to the Y, I would assume so, but I know my brother Bill did because he was so much better at the train races." Opening the Schlossman branch "There was a need for expansion in the southwest part of Fargo. I wasn't heavily involved in the details, but I was in the Building and Grounds Committee for a while and part of those discussions. The land was owned by a partnership that my father, Bill Schlossman, was involved in and it was all acquired in long-term thinking for West Acres. My father wouldn't have been in the groundbreaking because he died in 1994. It would have been underway but it was my mother's decision, with consultation with us kids, to support the Y at that point, knowing it's what my father intended."

2017

Stephen Smith became president. He started working at a YMCA in Seattle, W.A., in 1985 as a lifeguard and swim instructor.

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5

EAT & DRINK

If you're looking for some new food and drink options to try, check out what we've found for this month's local suggestions.

steep me "kick ur kold" Tea This tea has handcrafted herbs of ginger root, rosehips, holy basil, orange peel, lemon peel, lemon myrtle, lemon grass, echinacea, cinnamon, licorice root, mullein and eucalyptus. It'll boost your immune system and is good for sinuses. It's also caffeine free so it's perfect to take before bed and let the herbs work their magic as you sleep. Steep Me A Cup of Tea

SteepMe.com 3139 Bluestem Dr, West Fargo

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crepes

CafĂŠ Amaury is located inside of The Red Silo and gives you a true taste of France through Chef Benoit's crepes. Featured here are the ham and cheese, Nutella and almond and honey walnut. The Red Silo

TheRedSilo.com 12 Broadway N, Fargo

Waakye

Coq Au Vin

A traditional French benchmark brings free range chicken breast slow roasted with pearl onions, wild mushrooms, tomatoes, potatoes and bacon. Toscana

ToscanaDowntown.com 202 Broadway N, Fargo 40 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

The Spice Grille opened its doors at the end of November and brings foods like this staple meal in Guana which consists of rice and beans, egg, stir-fried beef and mixed veggies, spaghetti, gari and coleslaw. The Spice Grille

The-Spice-Grille.business.site 28 Moorhead Centre Mall, Moorhead


mi familia enchiladas

Mi Familia Taco Company offers authentic Mexican food to the Fargo area. This month's featured meal includes two corn tortillas filled with barbacoa (or your choice of meat) and covered with tomatillo sauce and cheese served with rice and beans. Mi Familia Taco Company

Facebook.com/MiFamiliaTaco 4474 23rd Ave, S, Suite A, Fargo

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HEALTH & WELLNESS SPOTLIGHT

the frosting on the

BY C.J. English | PHOTO BY Hillary Ehlen

I

have a theory. My theory is that everyone already knows what to do to lose weight and that we also know what is healthy for us and what is not. When it comes to losing weight and being healthy, not knowing what to do is NOT the problem. The problem is figuring out how to do it within our crazy-busy lives.

42 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

If we break "crazy-busy" down, it includes a mash-up of stuff like assorted bad habits, poor time management and family or social eating obligations. Pile stress on top of all of that and voilá, you have a recipe for weight gain, even though you know what to do. If there is an ingredient list of lifestyle choices that make up your weight gain cake, then there is also frosting — the one ingredient that can make or break even the best cakes. In this analogy, the frosting can only be one thing — the most


C.J. English is a Fargo native and the Amazon Kindle Best Selling Weight Loss Author of WTF am I supposed to eat? A dieters manifesto. In 2015, her breakout memoir "AFFAIRYTALE" debuted at #1 in Diaries and Journals. When she is not writing, she can be found locally at Rejuv Medical Aesthetic Clinic where she sees clients privately for weight loss coaching.

significant thing; the thing that affects all other things. In a conversation with my teenage daughter recently, I shared with her what I thought the single most important decision of her life would be — who she picks to be her significant other. I told her that who she picks to marry will influence every other decision she will make for the rest of her life, thus making that one decision the most important one of all. Your significant other is the frosting that can make bad things sweet or be so terrible you can’t even finish the cake. For all things big or small, this person’s influence is tremendous. So in this month of love, where we honor our anatomical and emotional hearts, let’s spend our time with someone who won’t give us heart disease or an emotional stress eating habit. If you are single and pondering a commitment to a forever kind of love, consider your commonalities or lack of, as they relate to your health, weight and overall self-care. Lifestyle choices such as cooking together instead of eating out or agreeing that the extra money you spend on quality food is worth it, are as important as any other green or red flags. If you have already found your significant other and are looking for ways to get him or her to come around, good luck. I'm not the person for this situation. In fact, I’m

Your significant other is the frosting that can make bad things sweet or be so terrible you can’t even finish the cake. hopeless here.* In all my years of helping people lose weight, none — yes none — have been successful long-term without genuine support from the individual who shares their bed, their kitchen and their life. In my house, what he eats — I eat. What I eat — he eats. What we eat — our kids eat. We support each other and encourage one another toward healthy habits. We also overindulge together more than with anyone else, sabotage each other with temptations and occasionally bring home random bite-sized foods dipped in chocolate, out of love. We do more of the former than the latter. The influential push-pull we have over each other is powerful with the ability to swing one another in the wrong direction or support them along the path that leads them to be their best self. Considering who you will spend your life with or how you will positively impact the life of the one you love will mean more on Feb. 14 than any chocolate covered candy. *Not entirely hopeless, actually I’m more an eternal optimist. So, if you can’t find the one or already have the wrong one — become the one.


ATE

IN

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GR

T

SIGH

I cheese jokes?

I Camembert it. By Nikki Berglund Photos by Hillary Ehlen

Nikki Berglund is a Fargo native and the owner of Luna Fargo, a local neighborhood restaurant specializing in casual upscale comfort food using fresh and local flavors and ingredients whenever possible. She is also the third generation to operate her family liquor store, Bernie’s Wines and Liquors. She has passed her Level One Sommelier Certification with the intention of becoming a Level Two Certified Sommelier in the near future. She is also currently studying to become a Certified Cheese Professional, aka a "cheese monger."

don’t know about you, but this time of year makes me a little goofy inthehead.Theholidays are over, the excuses for excessive eating and drinkingaregoneandthere is seeminglyno end in sight tothearctictemperatures. It can be downright depressing sometimes. I will do anything to fight off those blues … even write anarticlefilledwithterrible cheesejokes.Fulldisclosure, I have been known to roll my eyes, turn up my nose and even openly mock people who use cheese puns.So,aspenancefor my cattiness,Icombedthrough every bad cheese joke I could possibly find and came up with these little gems.

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1

What is Jay Z’s favorite cheese? Brie-yoncé 1

Little Lucy Brie/Shafer Dry Riesling: Since using local ingredients is kind of our thing at Luna, it makes me happy to find such incredible cheeses in our own backyard. Minnesota’s own Redheaded Creamery is kicking butt and taking names in the cheese world and though they are considered youngsters, they are already winning awards left and right. As far as the wine goes, I'm not a huge Riesling drinker, but a dry riesling can be something special, and this one is no exception. Made with organic grapes, and with a flavor profile of grapefruit and white peaches, the acidity of the wine marries well with this little hunk of love.

What's a Pirates favorite cheese? Chedd-AAAAAARGH 2

Barely Buzzed/Corazón del Indio Red Blend: I have a confession to make, this is not really a Cheddar, but there were only so many bad cheese jokes that didn’t just totally suck. This unique cheese is referred to by the company as an “American original” because there truly is nothing quite like it. At Luna, it sits in the Cheddar section of our cheese case and is one of the most popular cheeses we sell. Its unique edible rind made from ground espresso and lavender may sound odd, but it is oh so delicious. Since it's full-bodied like a Cheddar, it makes an excellent partner to this full-bodied red wine from Chile. This beautifully structured blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Carménère and Syrah tastes like a $30 bottle but retails for more like $18 a bottle.


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4

Where do they put the crazy cheese? In the Emmental(er) asylum 3

Emmentaler/Lagunitas 12th of Never: I am more of a wine gal myself but am quickly learning from my peers that a great cheese and beer pairing can be just as heavenly as the perfect wine and cheese pairing. If you like plain old American Swiss cheese, you will adore Emmentaler. This Alpine-style cheese in all its buttery, nutty, fruity deliciousness makes a great melting cheese and an equally good eating cheese. Although traditionally made in Switzerland, this one comes from Edelweiss Creamery in Wisconsin. (We sure do love our Midwest cheesemakers.) The Lagunitas Pale Ale makes a nice compliment the sweet and nutty components of this cheese.

4 What hotel do mice like to stay in? The Stilton

Stilton/Fargo Brewing Company Sodbuster: In this case, the cheese is nowhere near local but the beer sure is. Stilton is an English cheese, considered by many to be one of the best cheeses in the world. If you like a really funky blue cheese, you are going to love Stilton. Usually, when I pair blue cheese I think of a sweet dessert wine such as Port or Riesling, which does make a wonderful pairing, but it turns out a nice heavy dark beer such as this Porter from our boys at Fargo Brewing Company is amazing as well.

As I re-read my work, I find myself rolling my own eyes at these absurd jokes and wondering to myself, how did I get here? The good news though is that at the end of the day, there are some really tasty pairings going on here as well. Let me leave you with my favorite cheese joke of all time: What do you call cheese that doesn’t belong to you? Nacho cheese. That one gets me every time. The best of the worst, shall we say. The Gouda and the bad. I’ll stop now. 47


CULINARY SPOTLIGHT

d o blo oranges The envy of commodity citrus By Eric Watson Photo by Hillary Ehlen

48 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


MAKES APPROX. 2 CUPS

Blood Orange Salsa Ingredients • • • • •

4 ea. Blood Oranges, segmented 1/8 cup Red Onions, diced 1 Tbsp. Fresh Cilantro, chopped 1 Tbsp. Fresh Lime Juice 1 tsp. Fresh Jalapeno, finely minced

• To Taste Extra Virgin Olive Oil • To Taste Kosher Salt & Fresh Ground Black Pepper

professionals waste no time in putting them to use.

D

uring the winter months, chefs and bartenders get the opportunity to experiment with interesting citrus — meyer lemons, kumquats, clementines and mandarins to name a few. Even ruby grapefruit takes on a deeper red color and intense flavor that is lacking the rest of the year. Blood oranges are available for a relatively short period of time so culinary

Blood oranges are like many other citrus in that their color and flavor vary greatly depending on the time of year and of course the growing conditions at hand. Early season blood oranges tend to have a lighter red colored flesh while their later season counterparts are typically a deep red. A more intense flavor profile tends to accompany the improved color. Blood oranges are a naturally occurring fruit, not a hybrid. They are richer in vitamins than most oranges and provide an increased level of antioxidants. They typically taste sweeter and contain less acidity. Nutrition and taste aside, blood oranges are just straight up beautiful and delicious.

Preparation • Combine all ingredients in a bowl and season with salt, pepper and olive oil to taste. • Allow salsa to sit for approximately 20 minutes and serve with your favorite fish, chicken breast or pork tenderloin. Garnish with shaved fennel.

I’d recommend adding blood oranges to a breakfast fruit platter, juicing them for mimosas, making a citrus salsa or simply eating like any other orange. Just remember to not eat a blood orange while wearing a nice white shirt. Blood orange juice can leave some stains. When I moved to Fargo-Moorhead I couldn’t find a blood orange anywhere. I still don’t see them often but luckily, they are carried by area grocers on and off throughout the winter months. If you still haven’t tried blood oranges I would certainly suggest you do. You only have a couple of months left.

Eric Watson is the owner of Mezzaluna, Rustica Eatery & Tavern and Mosaic Foods in Fargo. He is also the co-founder and past president of the Fargo brand of the American Culinary Federation.

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ST

MI

LOG O I X

of the Month

cullen ross @ Pub West

3140 Bluestem Dr., West Fargo PubWest.pub

Instead of trying your regular drink, mix it up next time with a delicious shot. Bartender Cullen Ross from Pub West shares one of his creations with us, bringing you a sweet and creamy taste to enjoy during the chilly winter months.

BY Kara Jeffers PHOTOS BY Hillary Ehlen

50 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


Q&A TELL US ABOUT WORKING AT PUB WEST.

This is my second bartending job and it'll be one year in March. I didn't know much about it before I got in here, but I jumped right in. When I got here, I discovered it was something I was really passionate about. I like how busy it gets. I like being bogged down and having to move super fast. It makes time go by quickly and it's fun to be able to multitask and get everything taken care of.

DO YOU HAVE A SPECIFIC BARTENDING STYLE?

No, not yet. I'm still trying to figure out what my niche is. Bartending for me is somewhat similar to cooking. You want to make sure your flavors aren't overwhelming and that there is a subtlety to it. With the drink I'm making today, for example, if you do a little too much rum, it'll burn. If you do too much cinnamon or whiskey, that's all your going to taste. I like to pretend I'm cooking when I make it, like subbing out the real ingredients with the liquor.

ARE THERE ANY BARTENDING/ MIXOLOGIST TRENDS YOU'RE SEEING?

Mostly, I notice a lot of seasonal drinks are becoming more popular. It seems like the hip drinks during the summer will be more of the Moscow Mules. In the winter, you'll get the creamier drinks.

TELL US ABOUT THE DRINK YOU'LL BE MAKING.

I made it up, actually. My roommate and I were messing around making drinks, thought it up and decided to try it. It's a creamier drink with vanilla vodka and banana liquor. It'll have whipped cream and caramel on top and dark rum with Fireball — or any cinnamon whiskey.

"BANANAS FOSTER" • 1/4 oz. Cruzan Black Strap Rum • 1/4 oz. Fireball Cinnamon Whisky • 1/2 shot Stoli Vanil • 1/2 shot DeKuyper Créme De Banana • 1/2 shot of cream • Whipped cream • Caramel • Nutmeg Fill a shaker with all of the ingredients. Shake the mixture and pour into a shot glass. Top it off with whipped cream, caramel and nutmeg.

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Fargo Go Red for Women Survivor Story and Q&A with Jessica Lundgren BY Kara Jeffers PHOTO BY Hillary Ehlen

G

o Red for Women is the American Heart Association's (AHA) nationwide movement encouraging women to band together to fight heart disease. This year's local event is at 11 a.m. on Feb. 15 at the Radisson Hotel in Fargo. Attendees will hear from survivors and experts on how to identify their risk for heart disease and stroke, as well as tips for prevention. AHA Regional Director Jessica Lundgren, whose region includes the Fargo-Moorhead area, volunteered to share her story and thoughts on the impact the AHA and Go Red for Women event has for those battling heart disease.

52 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


About Jessica Jessica Lundgren is a Regional Director for the American Heart Association. Currently living in a small town north of East Grand Forks (Alvarado), Minnesota, with her husband, she grew up in St. Thomas, North Dakota, and is a University of North Dakota alumna. Her hobbies include riding horses, golfing, camping and kayaking. She has one brother who resides in Fargo and her parents live in Manvel, North Dakota.

by and asked if we were okay since I was sitting down in the middle of the fairway. In true denial form, I smiled and waved and said, 'Yes, we’re fine,' even though I had suddenly gone blind and was very confused. "Within minutes, my vision completely came back along with an increasingly bad headache. Aaron asked multiple times if I wanted to go to the emergency room. I refused because I was determined to make the most of this beautiful day. I continued to be in denial as he golfed five more holes and I rode along in the golf cart.

Jessica's Story

"On October 11, 2015, I was out golfing with my husband, Aaron. I felt great all day and had no signs or symptoms. While at a golf course, I teed off on the first hole. I had a great shot and hopped in the cart with Aaron. We drove to our balls, which were now close to the green. As I got out, I went to reach for my wedge and couldn’t find it. I was next to the cart feeling my way around when Aaron asked what I was doing. I told him I couldn’t see my clubs. He replied that they were directly in front of me. How could I not see them? "At that point, I realized I had lost my vision. I suddenly became very confused. I was extremely calm because I was very much in denial that it could be anything major. Two elderly women on a cart drove

"Once we were on hole six, my mother called. We talked for a few minutes and she finally asked, 'Why are you riding in the cart and not golfing?' I told her what had happened. She convinced me to immediately get back to our vehicle and have Aaron drive me an hour to the emergency room. "Once we were in the emergency room, the doctor looked at my risk factors and was convinced it was a migraine. I was young, very active and a non-smoker. At

that point, no one even mentioned the word, ‘stroke.’ He decided to take the safe route and do an MRI and CT scan. "When the doctor came back, he stared at me with this kind of empty, confused look on his face. The only words I remember him saying were, 'You’ve had a stroke.' I could tell that my mother, father and husband understood the severity of the words this man has just spoken. I, however, didn’t. As a human, I think we tend to associate pain with severity. I was in hardly any pain, so I thought, it can’t be that bad. My first reaction was, 'Okay, so what do we do now?' "They discovered that by that time, I had already had two Ischemic Strokes that affected my Occipital Lobe in my brain. After months of tests and treatment, the final diagnosis was that as I swung my golf club on the first hole that day, I tore open my left vertebral artery in my neck. As the artery was trying to close the tear, it was clotting just like a cut on your hand would. The tear was so large that the clots were breaking off and traveling to my brain. As time went on, my neurologist discovered that the tear had not only caused a total of four Ischemic Strokes, but also a pseudoaneurysm on my brain. "After months of treatment and procedures, I am lucky to say that I am fully recovered with no major lasting effects. If it weren’t initially for the stroke warning signs that my mother had known, I would never have gone to the emergency room. If it weren’t for the research that has been done and the funds that have been raised, I would not have been treated with newer technology such as Cerebral Angiograms that helped diagnose the root cause of my strokes. The nurses, doctors and surgeons at Sanford Medical Center in Fargo and Altru Medical Center in Grand Forks were remarkable."

"I was in hardly any pain, so I thought, it can’t be that bad." 53


Q&A with Jessica How did you get involved with the AHA?

"As I was lying in my hospital bed after my initial stroke, I realized the company that I was currently working for was great, but I needed to be involved in something bigger. This technology, these doctors, they had just saved my life. I needed to give back. My husband was sitting in a chair next to my hospital bed and found a job opening with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. I instantly knew that it was something I wanted to be a part of. After applying, the process went quickly and I instantly felt at home with this amazing organization."

What does the AHA do exactly and how does it help people?

"When I am presenting to a group of people, kids and/or adults, I always say, 'We are working to build lives free of cardiovascular (heart) disease and stroke.' "Our organization’s mission is to improve the lives of all Americans and we provide public health education in a variety of ways. We’re the nation’s leader in CPR education training. We help people understand the importance of healthy lifestyle choices. We provide science-based treatment guidelines to healthcare professionals to help them provide quality care to their patients. We educate lawmakers, policymakers and the public as we advocate for changes to protect and improve the health of our communities."

What does your job consist of on a dayto-day basis?

"My job consists of giving schools the opportunity to participate in an amazing heart health program that directly correlates with the curriculum they are already providing their students. The Jumprope for Heart and Hoops for Heart programs are widely spread throughout this area. Students, parents, teaching staff and families have fun learning how to take 54 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

Event Information care of their hearts while raising money to help us further the work we can do towards heart and stroke research."

Who

Tell us about the upcoming Fargo Go Red for Women Luncheon:

Fargo Go Red for Women Luncheon

"The Go Red For Women Luncheon is our largest fundraiser of the year for the Go Red For Women Movement in North Dakota. But it’s also more than a fundraiser — it’s an opportunity to spread the word about Go Red For Women and share the message that heart diseases and stroke are the number one cause of death for women. Attendees at the event can expect a lot of fun, with a social hour and silent auction, but they can also expect to be educated and inspired with information on how they can help minimize their risk of heart disease and an inspiring keynote speaker."

How does something like this event help women who utilize the AHA?

"Back in 2004, when the Go Red For Women Movement began, we had a problem: more women than men were dying of heart disease and stroke, yet only 1 in 5 women knew that heart disease was her greatest health risk. This event and hundreds like it that take place across the country have helped to raise critical funds to help educate women about their risk and fund women-centered research. The results are astounding. Today, 293 fewer women die every day from heart diseases and stroke thanks to the efforts of Go Red."

Anything else you’d like to add?

"Most people will be affected by heart disease and/or stroke at some point in their lives, whether it's yourself or a loved one, and I encourage everyone to know the warning signs and symptoms. To find the signs and symptoms to look for, or to give back, visit our website at heart.org."

American Heart Association

What

When

February 15 from 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Where

Radisson Hotel Fargo 201 5th St. N, Fargo

To learn more

Fargo Go Red for Women Luncheon Heart.org/FargoGoRed

If you would like to be involved with events like the Fargo Go Red for Women Luncheon, Heart Walk or a local Jumprope for Heart event, reach out to Jessica at Jessica.Lundgren@Heart.org.


CTION U R T S N O C FROM

TO

g n i c u d o r P Film

56 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


BY Kara Jeffers PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY Bad Medicine Films

F

ormerly the president and owner of Wanzek Construction, Jon Wanzek has been pursuing other ventures, including the film industry. Wanzek established Bad Medicine Films in 2012, a North Dakota-based corporation to produce and finance independent films. 2015, one of his friends, a commercial paleontologist discovered a valuable T-Rex in the Badlands gave him the inspiration for his newest film, Valley of Bones. Continue to read as we learn more about both Wanzek's film ventures and the most recent release. While most may consider a career in construction to film producing a major switch, Wanzek does not. "I had a lot of creative ideas and skills from managing construction projects that were useful in my role as a Film Producer. Coordination and building a film from a script and managing the team is like building a project from a blueprint." He had never really thought about film producing, but he enjoyed making and exploring the development of films. He was also inspired by Western North Dakota and the ranch he owns out there. In 2009, he purchased Pitchfork Ranch, a 4,000-acre working cattle ranch near Amidon, in the North Dakota Badlands.

Wanzek's newest film, Valley of Bones, was released nationwide in theatres in the fall of 2017 and was just recently released on DVD and Digital. "The movie was filmed on the Pitchfork Ranch and the idea was based on the real Tyrannosaurus Rex, that my friend discovered and a fictional story was built around it,� he said. Wanzek worked with two groups of writers and took the project into production. "Producing Valley of Bones was very interesting and a thrilling process," Wanzek said. "I have met many people in the industry and have had the privilege to take part in all the steps of making a movie from the concept through production and


Valley of Bones Anna (Autumn Reeser), a passionate but disgraced paleontologist, embarks on a journey through the badlands of western North Dakota in search of a potentially historic fossil. Word reaches Anna that Wes McCoy (Steven Molony), a recovering meth addict with unpaid cartel debts, has stumbled upon a large Tyrannosaurus Rex tooth. Determined to find the bones at any cost and undo her past mistakes, she teams up with McCoy, along with her late husband’s brother and her estranged son, and finds herself entangled in a dangerous game that tests whether she will move on from her past or be consumed by it. The film was written by Dan Glaser (Pinching Penny), Steven Molony (Efficiency) and Richard M. Lewis. It was produced by Jon Wanzek (10,000 Saints), Dan Glaser, Steven Molony, Luke Dylan Taylor (31, Little Men), Janek Ambros (Imminent Threat, 10,000 Saints) and Brandon Heitkamp (Bad Frank, Oxenfree). Executive producers are Jon Wanzek and Brenda Robinson. Story by Jon Wanzek. Available: Amazon, Apple TV, Walmart, etc. 58 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

then distribution. My distributor was Smith Global Media/Sony. I worked with Harry Smith and also got to meet his brother, Will Smith." The film was released nationwide on September 1, 2017 on 300 screens. "The adventure in the badlands and producing this movie were a once in a lifetime experience." Other than producing Valley of Bones, Wanzek said, "Although there are no long-term goals, I’m always looking for more stories to produce and hoping to do something locally again." Being from the area, Wanzek is happy to stay local with his talents. "I'm from Fargo and have never thought about pursuing the film industry anywhere else," he said. "I want to work on local projects and film in North Dakota."

In relation to future plans, "I'm currently working on concepts and scripts that could be written and produced," he said. "I also occasionally review scripts submitted to me by people in the industry or locally." Wanzek also has his hand in many different business activities including real estate, venture capital and investing and supports several charitable organizations around the community, including Boys Scouts of America, Fargo Diocese Projects (St Mary’s, Sts Anne & Joachim, and St James Basilica), Real Presence Radio, YMCA, Theodore Roosevelt Foundation, Churches United, Dakota Medical Foundation and through Wanzek Family Foundation. "Fargo is my hometown, and I've always been able to be active in the community and give back," he said. "I like to work on projects that are local and help the community and people who live here."

To learn more about Jon and his activities, visit: wanzek.us


FEBRUARY EVENT CALENDAR

STAY UP-TO-DATE WITH WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE AREA.

1 Million Cups

Every Wednesday from 9:15-10:15 a.m.

Join the vibrant entrepreneurial community of Fargo-Moorhead and Emerging Prairie by participating in an event filled with guest speakers, plenty of coffee, ideas and excellent networking opportunities. 1millioncups.com/fargo The Stage at Island Park

333 4th St. S, Fargo

Carrie's Twisted Art

Every Thursday from 7-9 p.m.

These public classes are a great place to learn painting techniques of all different types while working with a variety of materials. With a fun learning atmosphere, you can create many things your heart desires at the cost of just $30 per person each class. Call 701-5408712 to register, seating is limited.

1

carriestwistedart.com Carrie's Twisted Art Studios

300 Main Ave. Suite 110, Fargo

Trans Mentor Program

Every Saturday from noon-4 p.m.

This is a group through the Pride Collective and Community Center that is led by Faye Seidler and offers advice and support for individuals within the trans community or who have questions about it. There is also a free clothing drive during this time as well where anyone can come by and pick out clothes, and try them on in a gender-neutral environment, as they would like. pridecollective.com Pride Collective and Community Center

1105 1st Ave. S, Fargo

Grief Journeys For Men Support Group

Every third Tuesday of the month from 10-11:30 a.m.

This is a free ongoing grief support group for men who have experienced a loss through death. This group is free and open to the public. For more information or questions, call (800) 237-4629 and ask to speak to the bereavement department. hrrv.org Hospice of the Red River Valley

1701 38th St. S, Fargo

WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

Downtown Dogs Fargo

Totally Gay 80's Dance Party

Downtown Dogs Fargo is a club that was created to bring likeminded local dogs and their humans together. This weekly gatherings and events are an opportunity for dog people to get together and socialize while the pups play. All dogs must be up-to-date on vaccines and medications. All breeds and sizes are welcome.

This is a 21+ event with a $10 cover.

Every Tuesday at 7 p.m. (Weather Permitting)

facebook.com/DowntownDogsFargo Dike East Dog Park

Friday, February 2 from 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m. fmpride.com Radisson Hotel Fargo

201 5th St. N, Fargo

Fargo Force vs Muskegon Lumberjacks Friday, February 2 at 7 p.m. scheelsarena.com SCHEELS Arena

5225 31st Ave. S, Fargo

600 3rd St. S, Fargo

Downtown Fargo Sampler

Monster Jam 2018

Saturday, Friday 3 from 1-4 p.m.

Friday, February 2 at 7 p.m. & 3 at 3 p.m.

Tickets are $15-$65.

Hosted by EHP CrossFit. This event is 21+ and costs $25. Order tickets online at Eventbrite.

1800 University Drive N, Fargo

201 5th St. N, Fargo

fargodome.com Fargodome

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Facebook: Downtown Fargo Sampler. Downtown Fargo District

I Won't Back Down: A Tribute to the Late Tom Petty featuring FM Artists

Winter Exhibition Reception

Saturday, February 3 from 7-9 p.m.

This event is 21+ and costs $15. Doors open at 7 p.m.

This event is free to members, partners and Native artists, $10 for nonmembers and $5 for students.

670 4th Ave. N, Fargo

704 1st Ave. N, Fargo

Friday, February 2 at 8 p.m. jadpresent.com Sanctuary Events Center

SPORTS

FAMILY

plainsart.org Plains Art Museum

COMMUNITY

FOOD & DRINK

A&E 61


1

Pancake Breakfast

Saturday, February 3 from 7-11 a.m.

This event costs $8.

Moorhead Masonic Family Center

1815 11th St. N, Moorhead

The True Story of the Three Little Pigs Saturday, February 3 at 2:30 & 5 p.m.

Cooking Class: Croissants - Master Laminated Doughs Tuesday, February 6 from 6-9 p.m.

This class costs $50. squareonekitchens.com Square One Kitchens

1407 1st Ave N, Fargo

A sensory-friendly production is only at 2:30 p.m.

Movie Night: Little Shop of Horrors

333 4th St. S, Fargo

6 12th St. N, Fargo

Kids Flicks: The Lego Ninjago Movie

IF: First Assembly Local Gathering

All seats are $3. Small soda and popcorn for $2.

Tickets are available online for $20.

fmct.org The Stage at Island Park

Saturday, February 3 at 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. fargotheatre.org Fargo Theatre

314 Broadway N, Fargo

Live Ska

Saturday, February 3 at 7 p.m.

Tickets are $5 for The Wicked Bees (Fargo), The Big News (Oklahoma City) and Mad Dog and the 20/20's (Lincoln). The event is open to all ages. redravenfargo.com Red Raven Espresso Parlor

Tuesday, February 6 at 7:30 p.m. wildterraciderandbrewing.com Wild Terra

February 9 from 6-9 p.m. & 10 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. firstassembly.fm First Assembly Fargo

3401 25th St. S, Fargo

Prof's Day Off Tour with Dwynell Roland, Cashinova, Willie Wonka & Kipp G Friday, February 9 at 8 p.m.

This event is 21+ and costs $20. Doors open at 7 p.m. jadepresents.com Sanctuary Events Center

670 4th AVe. N, Fargo

916 Main Ave., Fargo

Coffee & Cocoa Crawl

Fargo Force vs Muskegon Lumberjacks

$10 entry and all ages welcome.

Saturday, February 3 at 7 p.m. scheelsarena.com SCHEELS Arena

5225 31st Ave. S, Fargo

The True Story of the Three Little Pigs Saturday, February 4 at 2 p.m. fmct.org The Stage at Island Park

333 4th St. S, Fargo

Saturday, February 10 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. downtownfargo.com Downtown Fargo

210 Broadway N, #202, Fargo

Kids Flicks: Wonder

Saturday, February 10 at 10 a.m. & 1 p.m.

All seats are $3. Small soda and popcorn for $2. fargotheatre.org Fargo Theatre

314 Broadway N, Fargo


2

The Erotic Art Show Opening Party

Movie Night: Clue

This is a free event and open to all ages.

wildterraciderandbrewing.com Wild Terra

Saturday, February 10 at 7 p.m. redravenfargo.com Red Raven Espresso Parlor

916 Main Ave., Fargo

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Zach Deputy

Saturday, February 10 at 8 p.m.

This event is 21+ and costs $15. Doors open at 7 p.m. jadepresents.com Fargo Brewing Company

610 N University Dr., Fargo

Red Fang with BrĂźtalĂźr

Saturday, February 10 at 9 p.m.

This event is 21+ and costs $17. Doors open at 8 p.m. jadepresents.com The Aquarium

226 Broadway N, Fargo

Tuesday, February 13 at 7:30 p.m. 6 12th St. N, Fargo

2

Post-Traumatic Funk Syndrome's My Funky Valentine

Wednesday, February 14 at 8 p.m.

This event is 21+ and costs $25. Doors open at 7 p.m. jadepresents.com Sanctuary Events Center

670 4th Ave. N, Fargo

Cooking Class: French Cooking with Your Valentine February 14-16 from 6-9 p.m.

This class costs $145. squareonekitchens.com Square One Kitchens

1407 1st Ave N, Fargo

18th Annual Winter Blues Festival

Fargo Go Red For Women Luncheon

Tickets are $28. Check locations online, call or order online. Also at the door.

Tickets can be purchased online.

Saturday, February 10 from at 4 p.m. fargobluesfest.homestead.com Ramada Inn Ballroom

3333 13th Ave. S, Fargo

Thursday, February 15 from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. heart.org/FargoGoRed Radisson Hotel Fargo

201 5th St. N, Fargo

Avenged Sevenfold - The Stage World Tour

Willie, Waylon and Johnny Cash as the Highwaymen "A Musical Tribute"

Tickets are from $25-$75. Doors open at 5 p.m.

This event is for all ages and costs $30. Doors open at 7 p.m.

Sunday, February 11 at 6:25 p.m. fargodome.com Fargodome

1800 University Drive N, Fargo

Galentine's Day Craft Party!

Tuesday, February 13 at 6:30 p.m.

Hosted by Unglued. Tickets are $40 and can be purchased online. Facebook: FARGO: Galentine's Day Craft Party! Prairie Den

122 1/2 N Broadway Dr., Fargo

Thursday, February 15 at 8 p.m. jadepresents.com Fargo Theatre

314 Broadway N, Fargo

Fargo Force vs Tri-City Storm February 16 & 17 at 7 p.m. scheelsarena.com SCHEELS Arena

5225 31st Ave. S, Fargo


1

1

LazyLightning420 featuring Erik Berry and Marc Gartman

Saturday, February 17 at 7 p.m.

This event is 21+ and costs $8. Doors open at 5 p.m. jadepresents.com Fargo Brewing Company

610 University Dr. N, Fargo

Q105.1 Presents: Starset - Immersion: Part 1 with Palisades, Grabbitz and Year of Locust Saturday, February 17 at 7 p.m.

This event is for all ages and costs $18.50. Doors open at 6 p.m. jadepresents.com Sanctuary Events Center

670 4th Ave. N, Fargo

Movie Night: Uncle Buck

Tuesday, February 20 at 7:30 p.m. wildterraciderandbrewing.com Wild Terra

6 12th St. N, Fargo

Cooking Class: Seafood & Shellfish - The Essentials Wednesday, February 21 from 6-9 p.m.

This class costs $65.

Theatre NDSU presents Tartuffe February 22-24 at 7:30 p.m.

$15 for adult tickets, $12 for seniors, $8 for students and free for NDSU students. ndsu.edu/performingarts Walsh Studio Theatre, Askanase Hall

1497 12th Ave N, Fargo

8th Annual Unglued Craft Fest

February 23 from 5-9 p.m. & 24 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Friday night tickets are $15 for advanced or $20 at the door. Saturday's event is free. Facebook: 8th Annual Unglued: Craft Fest Plains Art Museum

704 1st Ave. N, Fargo

New Direction 7

February 23-25 at 5:30 p.m.

This event is for all ages. Three-day passes are available online for $30. Single-day passes will be available at the door for $12 per day. Doors open at 5 p.m. aquariumfargo.com The Aquarium

226 Broadway N, 2nd floor, Fargo

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Classic Albums Live performs Dark Side of the Moon

squareonekitchens.com Square One Kitchens

Friday, February 23 at 8 p.m.

Downtown Books & Brews

fargotheatre.org Fargo Theatre

1407 1st Ave N, Fargo

Thursday, February 22 at 7 p.m.

This month's chosen book is No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need by Naomi Klein. Front Street Taproom

614 Main Ave, Fargo

This event is for all ages and costs $30. Doors open at 7 p.m. 314 Broadway N, Fargo

Explore Lake Life Expo

February 23 from 3-8 p.m. & 24 from 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Tickets are $5 per adult or $10 per family. Free admission with Home & Garden Show ticket. Tickets can be purchased at the door the days of the event. explorelakelife.com Civic Center, Downtown Fargo

2017 4th St. N, Fargo


2

Red River Valley Home & Garden Show

February 23 from 3-9 p.m., 24 from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. & 25 from 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Regular admission is $10. Check details online for the discounts available. Children 18 and younger are free. Parking is $5. hbafm.com Fargodome

1800 University Drive N, Fargo

Movie Night: Back to the Future Tuesday, February 27 at 7:30 p.m. wildterraciderandbrewing.com Wild Terra

6 12th St. N, Fargo

Prairie Capital Summit

Wednesday, February 28 from 1-5 p.m.

DOWN THE ROAD The City 94.5 Presents: Josh Ritter Thursday, March 1 at 8 p.m. jadepresents.com Fargo Theatre

314 Broadway N, Fargo

To register for the event, go to the Eventbrite page.

Theatre NDSU presents Tartuffe

333 4th St. S, Fargo

1497 12th Ave N, Fargo

Eventbrite: Prairie Capital Summit The Stage at Island Park

March 1-3 at 7:30 p.m.

ndsu.edu/performingarts Walsh Studio Theatre, Askanase Hall

Theatre NDSU presents Tartuffe

Fargo Bacon & Beer Festival

$15 for adult tickets, $12 for seniors, $8 for students and free for NDSU students.

jadepresents.com FARGODOME

February 28 at 7:30 p.m.

ndsu.edu/performingarts Walsh Studio Theatre, Askanase Hall

1497 12th Ave N, Fargo

Saturday, March 10 at 6 p.m. 1800 University Dr. N, Fargo

North Dakota Cyber Security Conference

Thursday, March 15 from 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m. ndsu.edu/conferences/cybersecurity Memorial Union, North Dakota State University

1401 Administration Ave., Fargo

Calendar Girls

March 16-18 & 23-25

fmct.org The Stage at Island Park

333 4th St. S, Fargo

The Looney Lutherans

Sunday, March 18 at 4 p.m. jadepresents.com Sanctuary Events Center

670 4th Ave. N, Fargo


LISTEN TO THE

MUSIC

STAY ON THE SCENE WITH OUR GUIDE TO FARGO-MOORHEAD’S LOCAL MUSIC.

FEBRUARY 1ST - 3RD THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1 Matthew Griswold - Junkyard The Max Johnk Quartet - HoDo Two Way Crossing - Windbreak Jon Moorman - Front Street Kathie Brekke & 42nd Street - Jazz at Delta FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2 Tucker'd Out - Junkyard Someday Heroes - Dempsey's The Deadbeats - Lucky's 13 Two Way Crossing - Windbreak 32 Below - Shotgun Sally's Nick Wood - Front Street Low Standards - Pickled Parrot Eric Jacobson - Drekker Mick n Rich - Spirits Lounge

66 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3 Nathan Pitcher - Junkyard Pat Lenertz Band - Dempsey's Guys and Dahls - Lucky's 13 Rhyme or Reason - Windbreak Wicked Garden - Shotgun Sally's Jack Winders - Front Street Low Standards - Pickled Parrot JT Kennelly Band - Drekker Mick n Rich - Spirits Lounge Heart and Soul - Urban 42

FEBRUARY 4TH - 10TH SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4 Open Mic Night w/ Jam Band - Windbreak Open Turntables - Front Street MONDAY, FEBRUARY 5 David Allen Ho' - Junkyard Open Mic Night w/ cmptrdstr - Front Street

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 Jack & Kitty - Junkyard WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7 Warren Christensen - Junkyard Vinyl Night w/ Vinyl Giant - Front Street THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 The Lollygaggers - Junkyard Deb Jenkins Band - HoDo Vinegar Strokes - Alibi Lounge Bobby McClendon - Windbreak Hot Lunch - Front Street Kathie Brekke & 42nd Street - Jazz at Delta FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9 Lonesome Dan Kase - Junkyard Jennifer Lynn Band - Dempsey's GC and the Krus - Lucky's 13 Bobby McClendon - Windbreak Redline - Shotgun Sally's John and Sean - Front Street Downtown Sound - Pickled Parrot


Matt Johnson - Drekker Brothers Bertrand - Spirits Lounge

THE AQUARIUM

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10 Tobias Jansen - Junkyard Q5 - Dempsey's GC and the Krus - Lucky's 13 Pop Rocks - Windbreak Slamabama - Shotgun Sally's Treo'Soul - Front Street Downtown Sound - Pickled Parrot Jake Lynch - Drekker Brothers Bertrand - Spirits Lounge Dan Christianson - Urban 42

FEBRUARY 11TH - 17TH SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11 Jessica Vines & Conor Lee - Junkyard Open Mic Night w/ Jam Band - Windbreak Open Turntables - Front Street MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12 Dylan Boehmer - Junkyard Open Mic Night w/ cmptrdstr - Front Street TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13 The Cropdusters - Junkyard WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 Tucker'd Out Duo - Junkyard Vinyl Night w/ Vinyl Giant - Front Street THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15 Gina Powers - Junkyard Live music TBA - HoDo Tyler Hammond - Windbreak Just A Peace Sign - Front Street

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16 Skipjacks - Junkyard Poitin - Dempsey's John Janousek - Lucky's 13 Whiskey River - Alibi Lounge Tyler Hammond - Windbreak Tripwire - Shotgun Sally's Matty J - Front Street Valentines Dance Party - Pickled Parrot Guys and Dahls - Drekker Wenesdai and the Weekend - Spirits Lounge SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17 Boxstore Bird - Junkyard DJ Shawn Who - Dempsey's Big and Hungry - Lucky's 13 October Road - Windbreak Kissing Company - Shotgun Sally's Anthony Chaput - Front Street Valentines Dance Party - Pickled Parrot Jon Walters - Drekker

Wenesdai and the Weekend - Spirits Lounge Dan Christianson - Urban 42

FEBRUARY 18TH - 24TH SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 18 Jon Walters - Junkyard Open Mic Night w/ Jam Band - Windbreak Open Turntables - Front Street MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19 Anthony Chaput - Junkyard Open Mic Night w/ cmptrdstr - Front Street TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20 The Cropdusters - Junkyard

67


LOCAL MUSIC

VENUES THE ALIBI LOUNGE 1340 21st Ave. S, Fargo

DELTA HOTELS BY MARRIOTT FARGO 1635 42nd St S, Fargo

DEMPSEY’S

226 Broadway N, Fargo

DREKKER BREWING COMPANY 630 1st Ave. N, Fargo

FRONT STREET TAPROOM 614 Main Ave., Fargo

THE HODO LOUNGE 101 Broadway N, Fargo

JUNKYARD BREWING COMPANY 1416 1st Ave. N, Moorhead

LUCKY'S 13

4301 17th Ave S, Fargo

PICKLED PARROT 505 3rd Ave. N, Fargo

SHOTGUN SALLY’S 1515 42nd St. S, Fargo

SPIRITS LOUNGE & CASINO 3803 13th Ave. S, Fargo

URBAN 42 KITCHEN & BAR 1635 42nd St. S, Fargo

THE WINDBREAK 3150 39th St. S, Fargo

68 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21 Kwaician - Junkyard Vinyl Night w/ Vinyl Giant - Front Street THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 Pat Lenertz & Matty J - Junkyard Willie Waldman Project - HoDo Rhyme or Reason - Windbreak Bondy's "Underground Lounge" - Front Street Kathie Brekke & 42nd Street - Jazz at Delta FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23 Tristan Larson - Junkyard DJ Alec's Vinyl Night - Dempsey's The Cropdusters - Lucky's 13 Devon Worley - Windbreak October Road - Shotgun Sally's Travis Naegle - Front Street Someday Heroes - Pickled Parrot Ali Rood - Drekker Twice as Hard - Spirits Lounge SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24 Nick Leet of High on Stress - Junkyard Wild Hands w/ TBA - Dempsey's Gordy Bridgeford - Lucky's 13 Blue English - Alibi Lounge Downtown Sound - Windbreak 8th Hour - Shotgun Sally's Jake Lynch - Front Street Someday Heroes - Pickled Parrot Twice as Hard - Spirits Lounge Funk Commission - Urban 42

FEBRUARY 25TH - 28TH SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25 Beer & Hymns with Good Shepherd Lutheran Church - Junkyard Open Mic Night w/ Jam Band - Windbreak Open Turntables - Front Street MONDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Amanda Standalone - Junkyard Open Mic Night w/ cmptrdstr - Front Street TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27 The Cropdusters - Junkyard WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 28 Jan Severson - Junkyard Vinyl Night w/ Vinyl Giant - Front Street


69

8:30 p.m.

606 Main Ave., Fargo

Rhombus Guys Pizza

8 p.m.

404 4th Ave. N, Fargo

Sidestreet Grille & Pub

8 p.m.

675 13th Ave. E, West Fargo

Three Lyons Pub

MONDAYS

7 p.m.

1405 Prairie Parkway, West Fargo

Bar Nine

7 p.m.

614 Main Ave., Fargo

Front Street Taproom

8 p.m.

612 1st Ave. N, Fargo

Pounds

7 p.m.

1710 Center Ave. E, Dilworth

Red Hen Taphouse

7 p.m.

4474 23rd Ave. S, Fargo

Prairie Brothers Brewing Co.

8 p.m.

103 Main Ave. W, West Fargo

Town Hall Bar

8 p.m.

4445 17th Ave. S, Fargo

Fargo Brewing Ale House

7 p.m.

1414 12th Ave. N, Fargo

Herd & Horns

7 p.m.

701 Main Ave. E, West Fargo

Work Zone

7:30 p.m.

7 p.m.

221 Sheyenne St., West Fargo

The Silver Dollar Bar & The Flying Pig Grill

8 p.m.

Pepper's Sports Cafe

2510 University Drive S, Fargo

8:30 p.m.

Hooligan's Bar & Grill

3330 Sheyenne St., West Fargo

7 p.m.

3140 Bluestem Drive #105, West Fargo

Flatland Brewery

7 p.m.

202 Broadway N, Fargo

VFW: Downtown Fargo

9 p.m.

Labby's Grill & Bar

1100 19th Ave. N, Fargo

7 p.m.

610 University Drive N, Fargo

Fargo Brewing Company

7 p.m.

Dave's Southside Tap

803 Belsly Blvd., Moorhead

7 p.m.

325 10th St. N, Fargo

Bomb Shelter

8 p.m.

1608 Main Ave., Moorhead

JC Chumley's

8 p.m.

630 1st Ave. N, Fargo

Drekker Brewing Company

Fargo Billiards and Gastropub

3234 43rd St. S, Fargo

WEDNESDAYS

TUESDAYS

FEBRUARY TRIVIA

7:30 p.m.

Rosey's Bistro

212 Broadway N, Fargo

8:30 p.m.

OB Sports Zone

22 Broadway N, Fargo

8 p.m.

6-8 p.m.

Dempsey's

226 Broadway N, Fargo

8 p.m.

The Bowler

2630 University Drive S, Fargo

7:30 p.m.

420 Center Ave., Moorhead

Vic's Bar & Grill

Three Lyons Pub

675 13th Ave. E, West Fargo

FRIDAYS

THURSDAYS

8 p.m.

1635 42nd St. S, Fargo (Inside the Delta Hotels By Marriott Fargo, former Ramada)

Urban 42 Kitchen & Bar

SUNDAYS

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE WITH GENERAL OR THEMED TRIVIA AT SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE AREA BARS AND RESTAURANTS.


DRINKSPECIALS FARGO

Acapulco 1150 36th St. S, Fargo

CHECK OUT OUR GUIDE TO LOCAL DRINK SPECIALS! FOR A MORE IN-DEPTH LISTING, VISIT FARGOMONTHLY.COM

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Domestic bottles $1.99, $2.25 Malibu, $2 select whiskey, 99¢ tap beers 2-6pm

$2.25 import bottles, $2 Bombay Sapphire & Hendrick’s, $1.99 select rum, 99¢ tap beers 2-6pm

Select wine by the glass $2.50, Absolut Vodka $2.50, $4 homemade Sangria, 99¢ tap beers 2-6pm

Happy Hour 11am-2pm and 6-9pm, $5 Margaritas, $1.99 domestic beer, $4.50 select tequila

Happy Hour 11am-2 pm and 6-9 pm, $5 Margaritas, $2.25 import beer, $4.50 select tequila

Happy Hour 11am-2 pm and 6-9 pm, $5 Margaritas, $1 off specialty drinks, $4.50 select tequila

$1.50 off cocktails and beers all day, $2.50 Bloody Mary special

3:30-5:30pm half 3:30-5:30pm half 3:30-5:30pm half 3:30-5:30pm half 3:30-5:30pm half 3:30-5:30pm half off Margaritas, off Margaritas, off Margaritas, off Margaritas, off Margaritas, off Margaritas, $3 Sangrias, $3 $3 Sangrias, $3 $3 Sangrias, $3 $3 Sangrias, $3 $3 Sangrias, $3 $3 Sangrias, $3 Barbacoa bottles of beer and bottles of beer and bottles of beer and bottles of beer and bottles of beer and bottles of beer and 3241 42nd St. S, $3 off all glasses $3 off all glasses $3 off all glasses $3 off all glasses $3 off all glasses $3 off all glasses Fargo of wine, half off of wine, half off of wine, half off of wine, half off of wine, half off of wine, half off everything behind everything behind everything behind everything behind everything behind everything behind the bar after 9pm the bar after 9pm the bar after 9pm the bar after 9pm the bar after 9pm the bar after 9pm

3:30-5:30pm half off Margaritas, $3 Sangrias, $3 bottles of beer and $3 off all glasses of wine, half off everything behind the bar after 9pm

522 Broadway N, Fargo

$3.75 Jack Daniel's, Happy Hour 4-8pm: 50¢ off everything

$3.25 import & craft bottles, Happy Hour 4-8pm: 50¢ off everything

Happy Hour 4-8pm: 50¢ off everything

$2.75 Windsor, Happy Hour 4-8pm: 50¢ off everything

$2.95 Captain Morgan, Happy Hour 4-8pm: 50¢ off everything

$3.50 Crown Royal/Crown Apple, $2.95 Bloody Marys and Caesars until noon

$3.25 Stoli, Happy Hour 4-8pm: 50¢ off everything

The Boiler Room 210 Broadway N, Fargo

Half off all drinks and apps 4-6pm and 10pm-midnight

Half off all drinks and apps 4-6pm and 10pm-midnight

Half off all drinks and apps 4-6pm and 10pm-midnight

Half off all drinks and apps 4-6pm and 10pm-midnight

Half off all drinks and apps 4-6pm and 10pm-midnight

Half off all drinks and apps 10pm-midnight

Half off all drinks and apps 4-6pm and 10pm-midnight

Bomb Shelter 325 10th St. N, Fargo

2-for-1s all day

College ID Night: $7 cover ($14 without ID) for free taps & wells 9pmmidnight

2-for-1s all day

3-for-1s 9pmmidnight

2-for-1s all day

2-for-1s all day

Borrowed Buck’s Roadhouse 1201 Westrac Drive, Fargo

Any Monday of your birthday month: receive a free 40oz. bucket of booze, 8-11pm: $2 domestic bottles for everyone

8-11pm: $2 tall taps, wells & teas

50¢ taps, $1 Captain Morgan and teas 8pmmidnight

2-for-1 domestic bottles, Jack & Jack Honey 8pm-midnight

7-9pm: $7 all you can drink, 9-11pm: $2.50 tall taps, teas, Morgans & bomb shots

7-9pm: 79-cent teas, 9-11pm: $2.50 tall taps, teas, Morgans & bomb shots

The Bowler 2630 University Drive S, Fargo

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

(Inside the Fargo Inn & Suites)

Happy Hour 4-7pm: drinks as low as 50¢, $2 domestic bottles 9-11pm

Happy Hour 4-7pm: drinks as low as 50¢, $3 Bulliet Bourbon & Rye and $10 buckets of domestic beer 9-11pm

Happy Hour 4-7pm: drinks as low as 50¢, pull tab Happy Hour replay 9-11pm

Happy Hour 4-7pm: drinks as low as 50¢, $3 Captain Morgan and Seagrams 7 9-11pm

Happy Hour 4-7pm: drinks as low as 50¢, $3 Windsor and Ketel One Vodka 9-11pm

Happy Hour 4-7pm: drinks as low as 50¢, $3.50 Crown Royal/ Crown Royal Apple and Ciroc 9-11pm

Happy Hour 4-7pm: drinks as low as 50¢, $3.50 domestic pitcher and $3 Tanqueray 9-11pm

Bulldog Tap 4265 45th St. S, Fargo

$3.50 tall domestic taps 6pm-close

$2.75 domestic bottles 8pm-midnight

$3.50 UV and Bacardi 8pm-midnight

$3.25 Captain Morgan, $3.75 Crown Royal 8pm-midnight

$3.75 Stoli and Jack Daniels 8pm-midnight

$3.50 Smirnoff and Windsor 8pm-midnight

$3.50 tall domestic taps and import bottles all day

The Bismarck Tavern

* This is not a full list of specials. Specials subject to change. For updated and entire list of specials, go fargomonthly.com.

The Box 1025 38th St. SW, Fargo

71


MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Chub’s Pub & Package Place 421 University Drive N, Fargo

Big Mug Monday 8pmclose: $5.95 new mug, $3.95 refills

8pm-close: $1 off taps & wells (including craft beers)

Big Mug Wednesday 8pm-close: $5.95 new mug, $3.95 refills, $1 off Captain Morgan

8pm-close: 50¢ Busch Light Taps, $2.95 Ice Hole & Fireball

Beer & A Bump Night 8pmclose: domestic beer & a shot for $7, $2.95 Old School Long Island Teas & Stumplifters

8am-noon: $2.95 Bloody Mary’s & Caesars, 8pm-close: $3.95 Crown Royal, $2.95 PBR & Busch Light pounders

Sunday Funday 12pm-2am: $1 Off all drinks in your Chub's gear

Dempsey’s 226 Broadway N, Fargo

$3.50 Bacardi, Malibu and Morgan starting at 9pm

$2.50 domestic taps and well drinks starting at 9pm

Old School Night starting at 9pm: $3 Old Style, High Life and Hamms

$4 specialty or import bottled/ tap beer starting at 9pm

$3.50 Old Style and $5 Jameson starting at 9pm

$3.50 Old Style and $5 Jameson starting at 9pm

Happy Hour prices 4-7pm, employee prices for all 7pmclose

D’Woods Lounge 3333 13th Ave. S, Fargo

$2.75 domestic bottles, $3 Bacardi

$2.75 domestic bottles, $1 off Martinis

$3.50 Stoli and domestic taps

$3.50 Crown Royal and taps

$3.75 teas, $3 Windsor

$3 Smirnoff and Captain Morgan

½ off all bottles of wine 4-11pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pmclose: $1 off tap and bottled beer, cocktails and wine by the glass

$2 off Beer flights 3-9 pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off tap and bottled beer, cocktails and wine by the glass

$2 off Crafted cocktails 3-9pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pmclose: $1 off tap and bottled beer, cocktails and wine by the glass

$3 off wine flights 3-9pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off tap and bottled beer, cocktails and wine by the glass

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pmclose: $1 off all tap and bottled beer, cocktails and wine by the glass

$1 off Bloody Marys, Mimosas and Screwdrivers noon-5pm

$1 off Bloody Marys, Mimosas and Screwdrivers noon5pm

$3.50 Crown Royal

$2.95 Bacardi

$2.75 Windsor

$2.95 Captain Morgan, $3.95 Jack Daniel's

$3.50 Stoli, $3.25 Jim Beam

$3.50 import and craft bottles, $3.95 Jagermeister

$2.75 vodka and Windsor

$4 pints 4-6pm

$4 pints 4-6pm

$4 pints 4-6pm

$4 pints 4-6pm

$3 select whiskey, $3 import and domestic microbrew bottles all day, Happy Hour 4-7pm

Happy Hour all day: $1 off all taps, wells and domestic bottles

$3.50 Stoli, Goldschlager and Icehole, $2 wells and domestic bottles 8-10pm, Happy Hour 4-7pm

$4 Bloody Marys 2-6pm, $3.50 Chuck Norris, $3.50 rum all day, $2 wells and domestic bottles 8-10pm Happy Hour 4-7pm

All specials from the week apply (excludes $2 wells and domestics)

$5 build-yourown Bloody Mary or Mimosa bar 11am-4pm

$5 build-yourown Bloody Mary or Mimosa bar 11am-4pm, all day Happy Hour, half price tap beer all day

Doolittles Woodfire Grill 2112 25th St. S, Fargo

Empire 424 Broadway N, Fargo ​Fargo Brewing Company 610 University Drive N, Fargo

* This is not a full list of specials. Specials subject to change. For updated and entire list of specials, go fargomonthly.com.

Fort Noks Bar of Gold 52 Broadway N, Fargo

Frank’s Lounge 2640 52nd Ave. S, Fargo

Front Street Taproom 614 Main Ave., Fargo

Golf Addiction 4474 23rd Ave. S, Fargo Granite City 1636 42nd St. S, Fargo

$15 bucket of $2.50 tap beers beers (any 5 all day (use beers), $4.50 mugs), Happy Long Island Teas and Margaritas, Hour 4-7pm: $1 Happy Hour off all taps, wells 4-7pm: $1 off all and domestic taps, wells and bottles domestic bottles Happy Hour 4-6pm and 9pm-midnight: $1 off spirits, wine and beer

Happy Hour 4-6pm and 9pm-midnight: $1 off spirits, wine and beer and half price wine glasses and bottles

Happy Hour 4-6pm and 9pm-midnight: $1 off spirits, wine and beer, $4 Tito's Vodka

Happy Hour 4-6pm and 9pmmidnight: $1 off spirits, wine and beer and $1 off bottles and cans of beer

$4 Grey Goose and Crown Royal, $5 off any Frank's apparel

Happy Hour 4-6pm: $1 off pints, $5 Flight of the Month

Happy Hour 4-6pm: $1 off pints, $5 Flight of the Month

Happy Hour 4-6pm: $1 off pints, $5 Flight of the Month

Happy Hour 4-6pm: $1 off pints, $5 Flight of the Month

Happy Hour noon-5pm: $1 off pints, $5 Flight of the Month

Mulligan Monday: 2-for-1 taps

Twosday: $2 domestic bottles

Apple Winesday: Half price appetizers and wine

Thirstday: $2 Green Cup Fills

$5 domestic pitchers

$5 cocktails 3-6pm and 9pm-close

$5 cocktails and $6.75 growler fills and $7.50 pitchers 3-6pm and 9pm-close

$5 cocktails 3-6pm and 9pm-close

$5 cocktails and $6.75 growler fills and $7.50 pitchers from 3-6pm and 9pm-close

$5 cocktails 3-6pm and 9pm-close

72 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

Half off select wine all day

$2 Green Cup Fills

$1 PBR Pounders & $2 Green Cup fills (22oz. of beer in a Green Golf Addiction Cup) Bottomless Mimosas noon-5pm for $7.99


MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 10pm-close: $2 off all drinks

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 10pm-close: $2 off all drinks

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 10pm-close: $2 off all drinks

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 10pm-close: $2 off all drinks

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 10pm-close: $2 off all drinks

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 10pm-close: $2 off all drinks

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 10pm-close: $2 off all drinks

Herd and Horns 1414 12th Ave. N, Fargo

All day Happy Hour: $2 off appetizers and $1 off drinks

$3 Busch Light and PBR pounders, $3 Bud and Bud Light 16oz. drafts from 7pm-close

Mug Night 7pm-close: $5.75 mugs with $3.75 domestic tap fills, $2 upcharge for craft

Tea Night: $3.50 16oz. teas

Labby’s Grill & Bar 1100 19th Ave. N, Fargo

3pm-close: $2.95 U-Call Its, Happy Hour 3-7pm: $2.95 premium well drinks, domestic taps & bottled beer

All day: $3.50 jumbo teas, $5.25 top shelf, Happy Hour 3-7pm: $2.95 premium well drinks, domestic taps & bottled beer

8pm-close: 32oz mugs $3.95, Happy Hour 3-7pm: $2.95 premium well drinks, domestic taps & bottled beer

F&F Poor Boy Pounders $2.95/$3.25, Happy Hour 3-7pm: $2.95 premium well drinks, domestic taps & bottled beer

9pm-close: $1 off domestic bottled beer & premium well, Happy Hour 3-7pm: $2.95 premium well drinks, domestic taps & bottled beer

11am-3pm: $3.95 mimosas, screwdrivers & bloodies, 9pm-close: $1 off domestic bottles & premium well drinks, Happy Hour 3-7pm

Lucky’s 13 Pub 4301 17th Ave. S, Fargo

$2.50 short domestic beers

$3 Coronas, Corona Lights and Dos Equis Amber 3pmclose

$3.50 tall domestic taps 3pm-close

Half price bottles of wine, $2.50 PBR and Hamms Pounders 3pmclose

Happy Hour 3-6pm

9am-4pm $3 Mimosas and $6.75 BLT Bloody Marys

Luna Fargo 1545 University Drive S, Fargo

Happy Hour 5-6pm & 9-10pm: $2 off wine or beer by the glass & 1/2 price cheese plates

Happy Hour 5-6pm & 9-10pm: $2 off wine or beer by the glass & 1/2 price cheese plates

Happy Hour 5-6pm & 9-10pm: $2 off wine or beer by the glass & 1/2 price cheese plates

Happy Hour 5-6pm & 9-10pm: $2 off wine or beer by the glass & 1/2 price cheese plates

Happy Hour 5-6pm & 9-10pm: $2 off wine or beer by the glass & 1/2 price cheese plates

Happy Hour 5-6pm & 9-10pm: $2 off wine or beer by the glass & 1/2 price cheese plates

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm: $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm: $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm: $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm: $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm: $3 select beer and drinks

Hennessy's Irish Pub 4323 45th St. S, Fargo

Mezzaluna 309 Roberts St. N, Fargo

NFL Special: $15.50 bucket of pounders

* This is not a full list of specials. Specials subject to change. For updated and entire list of specials, go fargomonthly.com.

The Northern 325 10th St. N, Fargo

Happy Hour 5-7pm

Happy Hour 5-7pm

Happy Hour 5-7pm

Happy Hour 5-7pm

Happy Hour 5-7pm

Happy Hour 5-7pm

NoBull Smokehouse 609 NP Ave, Fargo

$5 mules 4pmmidnight

$3 teas 4pmmidnight

4-10pm: buy a glass or bottle of any wine and get the 2nd for a penny

Bucket Special 4-10pm: buy 3 bottles get two free

Happy Hour 10pm-close: 2-for-1s tap beer/single shots

Happy Hour 10pm-close: 2-for-1s tap beer/single shots

Rum Monday: $3 Malibu and Captain Morgan

$3 Long Island Iced Teas and 23oz domestic taps

Whiskey Wednesday: $3 Bison Ridge and Windsor

Barcardi Party: $3 Bacardi White, Limón or Black Razz

$3 UV Vodka

$3 Bloody Marys and Caesars with UV Vodka until 4pm

U-Pay-The-Day tap beer 8-10pm, 9-11pm: $2.75 OB Beers, Booze & Bombs

1-U-Call-It on tap beer, bottles and drinks 7-9pm, 9-11pm: $2.75 OB Beers, Booze & Bombs

O’Kelly’s 3800 Main Ave., Fargo Old Broadway City Club 22 Broadway N, Fargo Old Broadway Grill 22 Broadway N, Fargo OB Sport Zone 22 Broadway N, Fargo

Happy Hour 3-6pm: 2-for-1 domestic taps and bottles

74 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 6-10pm: 2-for-1 domestic taps and bottles

Happy Hour 3-6pm: 2-for-1 domestic taps and bottles

Happy Hour all day

$2.95 Bloody Marys, Mimosas, Skip-N-Go Naked 11am-2pm

Wine Night from 4-9pm $5.95 domestic pitchers 6-10pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm: 2-for-1 domestic taps and bottles

Happy Hour all day, $1.25 off all drinks and $3 Mimosas

Happy Hour 3-6pm: 2-for-1 domestic taps and bottles, 9-11pm: $2.75 OB Beers, Booze & Bombs

$2.95 Bloody Marys, Caesars and Mimosas 11am2pm, 9-11pm: $2.75 OB Beers, Booze & Bombs

$2.95 Bloody Marys, Caesars and Mimosas 11am-2pm


MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

$5 Domestic Jars, $3 Captain Morgan & Tootsie Pops

$2 Domestic Taps (7-10pm), $3 Domestic Bottles & Ice Hole, $8 Well Jars

$5 Domestic Jars, $3.50 Fireball, $4 Crown Royal until 10pm

$5 Domestic Jars, $4 Jack Daniels, Long Island Teas & Chuck Norris until 10pm

$2 off wine and liquor flights 3pm-close, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

$2 off culinary cocktails 3pmclose, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

Happy Hour Happy Hour Happy Hour Happy Hour Happy Hour all 3-6pm and 9pm3-6pm and 9pm3-6pm and 9pmPounds 3-6pm and 9pm$4 signature close: $4 signature close: $4 signature close: $4 signature close: $4 signature day: Mules, $5 40oz ​6 12 1st Ave. N, Mules, $5 40oz Mules, $5 40oz Mules, $5 40oz Mules, $5 40oz Fargo bottle beers and $6 bottle beers and $6 bottle beers and $6 bottle beers and $6 bottle beers and $6 32oz Fruitopias 32oz Fruitopias 32oz Fruitopias 32oz Fruitopias 32oz Fruitopias

Happy Hour all day: $4 signature Mules, $5 40oz bottle beers and $6 32oz Fruitopias

Pickled Parrot 505 3rd Ave. N, Fargo

Porter Creek Hardwood Grill ​1 555 44th St. S, Fargo

Half price draft beer 3pm-close, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

Half price bottles of wine 3pm-close, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

$2 off Margaritas

$2 off all top shelf liquors

$2 off all glasses of wine and half price bottles

$3 craft and import beers, $2 domestics and $1 off taps

Rhombus Guys 606 Main Ave., Fargo

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 10pm-close: $2 off tall beers, $1 off short beers and shot drinks

Drink Local Night 8pm: $3 Proof products and $1 off local beers, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 10pm-close

Half off glasses and bottles of wine starting at 6pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 10pm-close

$4 pints of Rhombus beer starting at 9pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 10pm-close

Rick’s Bar 2721 Main Ave., Fargo

$3.05 Captain Morgan, $3.45 tall domestic taps 4:30pm-close

$3.75 Crown Royal, $3.95 Crown Black

$2.95 Bacardi and domestic bottles 4:30pmclose

Rooter’s Bar 107 Broadway N, Fargo

$2 12oz. domestic draws all day

$2.50 domestic bottles all day

Radisson 201 5th St. N. Fargo

SUNDAY

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

$2 off Mimosas, Bloody Marys and Caesars

$2 off Mimosas, Bloody Marys and Caesars

$3 Deep Eddy Vodka starting at 8pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 10pm-close

$4 craft beer pints and 2-for-1 wells starting at 9pm

Bloody Mary Bar 11am-4 pm, $5 well vodka, $6 premium vodka, $3 youcall-its for service industry all day

Mug Club Night $3.75 Jack Daniel's and teas

$3.25 UV Vodka

$3.25 import and specialty bottles $3.25 Ice Hole shots

$3.35 tall domestic taps all day $2.75 well drinks 4:30pm-close

$2.50 Captain Morgan and Windsor all day

$2.50 teas, $7.50 domestic pitchers

Happy Hour 4:30-6:30pm: 2-for-1 drinks

$2.50 Homemade Bloody Marys with beer chaser 10am-4 pm

Happy Hour all day

Local Night: $3.30 Proof's 2 Docks Vodka and $1 off local brews from N.D., S.D., and Minn., Happy Hour open-7pm: $1 off all drinks

$3.30 Captain Morgan, $3.85 Crown Royal, Happy Hour open-7pm: $1 off all drinks

$3.30 Deep Eddy Vodka, $3.85 Jack Daniels, Happy Hour open-7pm: $1 off all drinks

$3.25 domestic bottles; $3.85 Icehole, Fireball and Dr. McGillicuddy's, Happy Hour open-7pm: $1 off all drinks

$4.30 Bloody Marys and Caesars, $3.30 Mimosas

$4.30 Bloody Marys and Caesars, $3.30 Mimosas

Shotgun Sally’s Rock & Roll Saloon 1515 42nd St. S, Fargo

3pm-close: $3 Jameson, Absolut and Deep Eddy

3-6pm-$3.50 Bacardi & Smirnoff, $4 Jack Daniels & $4 Dubliner, 6pmmidnight: $3 tall domestics & $5 tall crafts, 9pm-close: $2 off Patron

3-6pm-$3.50 Bacardi & Smirnoff, $4 Jack Daniels & $4 Dubliner, Ladies Night: $5 at the door/Free Well drinks for ladies from 9pmmidnight

3-6pm-$3.50 Bacardi & Smirnoff, $4 Jack Daniels & $4 Dubliner, 9pm-midnight: $5 mug at the door with $2 wells & domestic taps refills

3-6pm-$3.50 Bacardi & Smirnoff, $4 Jack Daniels & $4 Dubliner, 9-11pm: $2 wells & domestic bottles

11am-2pm: $10 bottomless mimosas, Bloody Marys & domestic taps, 9-11pm: $2 wells & domestic bottles

11am-2pm: $10 bottomless mimosas, Bloody Marys & domestic taps, Industry Night 9pm-midnight: $3 top shelf, $2 calls & $1 wells

Sickie's Garage 3431 Fiechtner Drive S, Fargo

$3 Jack Daniel's and Redbull shots, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9-11pm: $2.50 domestic taps and wells

Big 98.7 Happy Hour 4-6pm with 98¢ domestic taps, Q105 $1.05 drink tickets 7-9pm, $2 Sailer Jerry and Absolut,

Rock 701 $1.07 drink tickets 5-7pm, $2 Sailer Jerry and Absolut, $3 Jack Daniel's and Redbull shots

$2 Sailer Jerry and Absolut, $3 Jack Daniel's and Redbull shots, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9-11pm: $2.50 domestic taps and wells

$2 Sailer Jerry and Absolut shots, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9-11pm: $2.50 domestic taps and wells

Happy Hour 9pm-close: $4.99 appetizers, $1 off domestic pints, wells, and wine, $2 off domestic talls, $2 off featured craft brews

Friday Happy Hour 3-6pm & 9pm-close: $4.99 appetizers, $1 off domestic pints, wells, and wine, $2 off domestic talls, $2 off featured craft brews

The Round Up Saloon 4501 Urban Plains Drive, Fargo

76 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


* This is not a full list of specials. Specials subject to change. For updated and entire list of specials, go fargomonthly.com.

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Sidestreet Grille & Pub 404 4th Ave. N, Fargo

$3.75 Irish Whiskeys (feat. Jameson), 75¢ off craft and import taps and bottles, $5.50 Sidestreet Scratch teas

All day Happy Hour, 50¢ off all drinks and beers, $2.50 pounders, $1 off wines, Mike's Hard drinks and ciders

$2.50 domestic pints, 75¢ off Bells and Deschutes, $3.75 Jameson, $4.75 Sidestreet Gingers

$3.75 Mexican beers, 75¢ off tequilas, margaritas and Mexi-mules

$3.50 Absolut and Stoli, $4 Summit, $3.25 Nordeast and Leinenkugels

$3.75 Jim Bean and Jack Daniels', $1 off local beers and spirits

Service Industry Sunday Funday: $2 off pitchers, $1 off you-call-its for service industry employees, $3.50 Deep Eddy drinks

Slammer’s Sports Bar & Grill 707 28th Ave. N, Fargo

$3.15 Miller High Life bottles $3.40 Bacardi Limon and Sailor Jerry's

$3.15 Bud and Bud Light bottles

$3.15 Bud and Bud Light bottles $3 White Zin and merlot wines

$3.15 Coors Light and Mich Golden Light bottles

$3.15 Bud and Bud Light bottles, $3.40 Captain Morgan

$3.75 Bloody Marys and Caesars, all day well specials $2.75

$2.80 all wells, $5.25 Busch Light pitchers

Speck’s Bar 2611 Main Ave., Fargo

$2.95 pounders

$3 Bacardi and Jim Beam

$2.95 Morgan $3.95 Jack Daniel's

$2.95 whiskeys and Barefoot wines

$3.25 import and craft beers, $3.25 Smirnoff

$3.25 UV Vodka

$2.75 wells, $3.35 20oz. taps

Spirits Lounge 3803 13th Ave. S, Fargo

Happy Hour drink specials all day: $3 jumbo domestic beers and $1 off well pours

2-for-1 cocktails all day, Happy Hour 4-7pm: $3 jumbo domestic beers and $1 off well pours

$4 mule drinks all day, Happy Hour 4-7pm: $3 jumbo domestic beers and $1 off well pours

$4 Mojitos all day, Happy Hour 4-7pm: $3 jumbo domestic beers and $1 off well pours

Happy Hour drink specials open-4pm

Happy Hour drink specials all day

Sports Bar 619 NP Ave. N, Fargo

$2.50 tap beer pints, $3.50 talls

$2.50 Stoli and $3.50 Stoli with energy drink

College Night: Half price domestic pitchers

$2.95 Jack Daniel's, Captain Morgan, Bombay Sapphire and Grey Goose

½ off pitchers 7-10 pm

½ off pitchers 7-10 pm

$3 pounders, $3.50 Bloody Marys

Tailgators Sports Cafe 1322 Main Ave, Fargo

6-10pm: $3.50 tall Crown Royal, $3 UV Vodka

6-10pm: $3.25 Happy Hour bottles, $3 Captain Morga

6-10pm: $8.50 domestic pitchers, $3 wells and Ice Hole shots

6-10pm: $2.75 Schnapps shots, $3.75 Gator Teas and import bottles

6-10pm: $3 Bacardi and Windsor, $3.50 Chuck Norris or Jag Bombs

Noon-10pm: $3.25 Happy Hour pints and bottles, $1 off whiskeys, $4.25 Bloody Marys

Noon-10pm: $3.25 Happy Hour pints and bottles, $1 off whiskeys, $4.25 Bloody Marys

$2 off everything 3-6pm, $5 glasses of vegan wine, half price vodka and cognac after 9pm

$2 off everything 3-6pm, half price tequila and rum after 9pm

BYO Wine Night ($7 corkage fee) and half price bottles of wine, $2 off everything 3-6pm, half price whiskey and gin after 9pm

$5 sparkling wines, $2 off everything 3-6pm, half price beer and wine after 9pm

9pm-close: half off all beer, glass wine, single shot well pours

9pm-close: half off all beer, glass wine, single shot well pours

$3 Captain Morgan

$6 domestic pitchers

$3 Windsor

$3 domestic pounders and bottles

$3 teas

Happy Hour 11am-5pm

$2 off jumbo 32oz. Margaritas

$2 off PBR pounders, $1 off Mojitos

$1 off Proud Mary Pina Colada

$2 off all tequila shots

$1 off Cadillac Margaritas, $2 Margaritas 9pmclose

$1 Let's Get It On Lemonades, $1 Sangria, $2 off Margaritas 9pmclose

9-10pm: everybody drinks free, 1011pm: $2 drinks, 9-11 pm: $2 bomb shots

9-11pm: $2 drinks and bomb shots

9pm-midnight: $3 drinks and 2-for-1 shots

$3.30 Captain Morgan, $3.50 Long Island Iced Tea

$3.30 Bloody Mary and Caesars, $3.30 import bottles

$3.30 Bloody Mary and Caesars, $6 domestic pitchers, $8 import pitchers

Twist 220 Broadway N, Fargo

VFW: Downtown

202 Broadway N, Fargo

Vinyl Taco 520 1st Ave. N, Fargo

The Windbreak 3150 39th St. S, Fargo

4-7pm and 9-11pm: $1 off all drinks

4-7pm and 9-11pm: $1 off all drinks

4-7pm and 9-11pm: $1 off all drinks

Ladies Night: Ladies drink free (select taps and wells) 9pmmidnight, 9-11pm: guys get $2 drinks, $2 bomb shots

Woody’s Bar 1550 32nd Ave. S, Fargo

Happy Hour All Day ($1 off all drinks)

$3.30 Captain Morgan, $3.30 Bacardi and Flavors

$3.30 Deep Eddy Vodka, $3.30 glasses of bota box wine

$3.85 Crown Royal, $3.85 Jack Daniel's

Happy Hour all day

77


MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

$3.50 tall domestics and Jameson

$3 Captain Morgan and Titos Vodka

$3 teas and Deep Eddy Vodka, $1 off taps and wells from 11am-7pm

$7 domestic pitchers and $3 Icehole all day. Service Industry Night with $3 you-call-its from 10pm-close

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $2 off appetizers, $1 off drafts, $1 off bar pours, $1 off house wines

Free trip through the Bloody Mary bar or free mimosa with purchase of breakfast entrée, Happy Hour 9pm-close: $2 off appetizers

Happy Hour all day: $2 off appetizers., VIP Day, free trip through the Bloody Mary bar or free Mimosa with purchase of breakfast entrée Happy Hour all day: $1 off talls, wells, and glasses of wine, Server Industry Day: $1 off all drinks with Server Training card, blvd Apparel Day: $1 off all drinks while wearing blvd Gear (max of $2 off)

WEST FARGO

* This is not a full list of specials. Specials subject to change. For updated and entire list of specials, go fargomonthly.com.

Bar Nine 1405 Prairie Pkwy., West Fargo

$3.50 tall domestics, Stoli and Jack Daniel's

$1 off all taps and bottled beers

Mug Night: $5 purchase and $4 refills on domestics and wells

Blarney Stone 1910 9th St. E, West Fargo

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $2 off appetizers, $1 off drafts, $1 off bar pours, $1 off house wines

VIP Day: Mug club members get an extra $1 off discounted beer, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $2 off appetizers

Irish Trash Can Wednesday: $4.50 Irish Trash Cans 5pm-midnight

VIP Day: Mug club members get an extra $1 off discounted beer, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $2 off appetizers

Blvd Pub 3147 Bluestem Drive, West Fargo

Happy Hour 3-6pm: $1 off talls, wells, and glasses of wine, 6-close: talls for the price of shorts, $3.50 Bacardi and Bacardi flavors

Happy Hour 3-6pm: $1 off talls, wells, and glasses of wine, 6-close: $3.25 all Long Island Teas

Happy Hour 3-6pm: $1 off talls, wells, and glasses of wine, 6-close: 2 for 1's on domestic pints and well drink

Happy Hour 3-6pm: $1 off talls, wells, and glasses of wine, 6-close: half off bottles of wine. $1 off all Moscow Mules

Happy Hour 3-6pm: $1 off talls, wells, and glasses of wine, 6-close: $1 off Crown and Titos

8am-noon: Bloody Bar, $4 Bloodys, $3.50 mimosas, 7-close: $3.50 shots of Fireball and Icehole including flavors

Hooligans 3330 Sheyenne St, West Fargo

Mug Night: $7 mug and fill, $3 domestic and $5 non-domestic refills

$4 tall domestic taps, half-price bottles of wine

$2.50 domestic bottles

Tea Night: $5 colossal teas

$3.50 well drinks all day

$2 pounders, domestic pitcher and a large pizza for $20

$8 pitchers of beer, $8.99 ultimate Bloody Marys, $3 Mimosas

Pub West 3140 Bluestem Drive, West Fargo

$3.50 tall domestic beer, $4.50 tall craft beer

$3.50 Captain Morgan and Bacardi

$3.50 Jack Daniel's, Jim Beam and Jameson, $4.50 Crown Royal

$3.50 UV, Wave and Tito's Vodka

$3.50 Windsor, $3 solo cups: Bud Light, Coors Light, Miller Lite

$3 solo cups: Bud Light,Coors Light, Miller Lite

Happy Hour all day, Service Industry Night: $3.50 youcall-its

Happy Hour 3-6:30pm, 8pmmidnight: $7.50 Coors Light pitchers and $3.75 Crown Royal

Happy Hour 3-6:30pm, 8pm-midnight: $7.50 Miller Lite pitchers, $3 Jack Daniels and Jag, $3.75 Long Island Teas

Happy Hour 3-6:30pm, 8pmmidnight: $7.50 Bud Light pitchers, $3.50 Windsor and Smirnoff

8pm-midnight: $3 Fireball, $3.50 Tito's Vodka, $5 Vodka Red Bulls, $3.50 Chuck Norris, Ninja Turtles and Jag Bombs

Happy Hour noon-6:30pm, 8pm-midnight: $3 import bottles and Tarantula Tequila, $3.50 Captain Morgan, Bacardi and Jameson

Happy Hour all day, Service Industry Night 10pm-close: $3 well drinks

Silver Dollar Flying Pig 221 Sheyenne St, West Fargo

Happy Hour 4:30-6:30pm

Happy Hour 4:30-6:30pm

Happy Hour 4:30-6:30pm

Happy Hour 4:30-6:30pm

Happy Hour 4:30-6:30pm

Happy Hour 4:30-6:30pm

Happy Hour 4:30-6:30pm

Spicy Pie 745 31st Ave. E. Ste. 110, West Fargo

$3 pounders, $2.50 domestic bottles, $1 off import bottles

$3 shots (excluding top shelf pour)

75¢ off all whiskeys

$1 off Margaritas (to go with Taco Thursday)

$1 off whiskey, rum, vodka and gin (excluding top shelf pour)

$1 off whiskey, rum, vodka and gin (excluding top shelf pour)

$4 Bloody Marys and Caesars

Three Lyons Pub 675 13th Ave. E, West Fargo

Mug Night: $2 32oz. mug, fill for the price of a pint 7pm-close

$3 you-call-its on domestic pints and wells 7pm-close

Tall beers for the price of short 7pm-close

$3 glasses of house wine, all Martinis $5 7pm-close

$3.50 Jameson and $1 off bottled beer 8pm-close

$4 Milagro Margaritas 8pm-close, $3.50 Bloody Marys, Caesars and Mimosas until 6pm

Happy Hour All Day

Town Hall Bar 103 Main Ave. W, West Fargo

$3 Captain Morgan, $3.50 Crown Royal & Washington Apples 7-11pm

$3 32oz. domestic Mongo Mugs, Ladies night $1 off drinks, $3 shots 7-11pm

Happy Hour 3-7pm, $3 Windsor and Wu Tang shots 7-11pm

$3 Cristal & Limon, domestic pitchers $6 7-11pm

Fireball Friday $3, Extended happy hour 3-8pm and 7-11pm

Sex with Strangers $3, 10am-1pm $4 Bloody Marys & Caesars 7-11pm

$2.75 pounders all day, Service Industry Special: $2 well drinks & domestic beer 7-11pm

Rookies 715 13th Ave. E, West Fargo

78 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

Happy Hour 3-6:30pm, 8pmmidnight: $3 domestic pitchers and Shiner Bock bottles, $3.50 Deep Eddys, $4 Angry Balls shot


MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

$5 Tru Tap Mules, 3-6 p.m. and 10 p.m.-1am: $1.25 all liquor, wine and beer

$3 off all Martinis, 3-6pm and 10pm-1am: $1.25 all liquor, wine and beer

Half price bottles of wine, 3-6pm and 10pm-1am: $1.25 all liquor, wine and beer

$2.75 16oz. domestic taps, 3-6pm and 10pm-1am: $1.25 all liquor, wine and beer

3-6pm: $1.25 all liquor, wine and beer

11am-4pm: $6 Deviled Bloody Mary's, $2.50 Mimosa Flutes, $9 Mimosa carafes

11am-4pm: $6 Deviled Bloody Mary's, $2.50 Mimosa Flutes, $9 Mimosa carafes

​VFW: West Fargo 308 Sheyenne St., West Fargo

$2.50 regular domestic beers and Windsor

12 inch pizza and a pitcher of beer for $11

$3 Bacardi, Morgan, Mike’s Hard Lemonade or Wine Coolers

$3 domestic 25oz taps, $3.50 25oz Shock Top, $5 25oz Stone's Throw, $3 import bottles

Work Zone 701 Main Ave. E, West Fargo

$3 Jag shots, $3 Tuaca, Mug Special $6.50 with $3.50 refills

$3 Bacardi and Ice Hole

$3 Dr. Mac shots, Mug Special: $6.50 with $3.50 refills

$3 Captain Morgan, Malibu and Jag

$3 Jack and Jims

$3 Bloody Marys and Caesars, $3 craft and imports

$5.50 domestic pitchers, $3.50 Buccas, $3 Bloody Marys and Caesars

Dave’s Southside Tap 803 Belsly Blvd., Moorhead

Happy Hour 3-6pm, $3.50 tall domestic taps 7pm-close

Happy Hour 3-6pm, $2.50 domestic bottles and wells 7pmclose

Happy Hour 3-6pm, $3 Captain Morgan and Fireball 8pm-close

Happy Hour 3-6pm, $6.50 domestic pitchers 8pm-close

Happy Hour 3-6pm, $3.50 Stoli and Bacardi 8pm-close

$3.50 Long Island Teas and Crown Royal 8pm-close

$3.50 tall domestic taps and import bottles all day

JC Chumley’s 1608 Main Ave., Moorhead

$4 domestic mug fills 8pmmidnight, Happy Hour 4-6:30pm: $2.50 domestic taps, bottles & wells

Happy Hour all day: $2.50 domestic taps, bottles & wells

$4 Busch Light mug fills, $5 domestic mug fills & Long Island Teas 8pm-midnight, Happy Hour 4-6:30pm: $2.50 domestic taps, bottles & wells

$1 off import pints 8pmmidnight, Happy Hour 4-6:30pm: $2.50 domestic taps, bottles & wells

$3.50 Fireball 5pm-midnight, $3 domestic bottles and Captain Morgan 8pm10pm, Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

$2 Mimosas, $5 Bloody Mary's & Caesars 11am4pm

Game Day! $5 Bloody Mary's & Caesars, Happy Hour all day

Jerry's Original Music Club 1500 11th St. N, Moorhead

7pm-midnight: $3 Captain Morgan, $4 Jack Fire shots, $3 Fireball shots, Happy Hour 4pm-7pm: $3.25 16oz taps, $3.25 single-shot rails

7pm-midnight: $1 12 oz domestic taps, $4 Jack Fire shots, $3 Fireball shots, Happy Hour 4pm-7pm: $3.25 16oz taps, $3.25 single-shot rails

7pm-midnight: $4 Jack Fire shots, $3 Fireball shots, ladies get free domestic taps and wells with $10 cover, Happy Hour 4pm-7pm: $3.25 16oz taps, $3.25 single-shot rails

7pm-midnight: $5 domestic pitchers, $4 Jack Fire shots, $3 Fireball shots, Happy Hour 4pm-7pm: $3.25 16oz taps, $3.25 single-shot rails

7pm-midnight: $3.50 pounders, $4 Jack Fire shots, $3 Fireball shots, Happy Hour 4pm-7pm: $3.25 16oz taps, $3.25 single-shot rails

7pm-midnight: $3.50 pounders, $4 Jack Fire shots, $3 Fireball shots, Happy Hour 4pm-7pm: $3.25 16oz taps, $3.25 single-shot rails

Mick’s Office 10 8th St. S, Moorhead

$2.50 Captain Morgan, $4 domestic mug fills, $4 bomb shots 8pm-midnight

$3 domestic pints, $3.50 select import pints 8pmmidnight

Ladies Night 8pm-midnight: $2.50 pounders and you-call-its

$2.75 wells, $4 domestic mugs, $3 Busch Light and Old Style mugs, jell-o shot raffle 10pm-close

$2.75 pounders, $3 Ice Hole 8pm-midnight

$5 endless Mimosas 11am4pm, $8 pitchers 11am-4pm

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm, $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm, $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm, $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm, $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm, $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 1-7pm, $4 scratch teas

Happy Hour 1pm-midnight

Happy Hour 1-7pm, $5 all-you-can-drink for ladies 9pmmidnight, $3 pounders (all day) $2 Captain Morgan & $3 bomb shots 9pm-midnight

Happy Hour 1-7pm, $3 perfect pint of Guinness and Irish car bombs 9pmmidnight

Happy Hour 1-7 pm, 11am-2pm: $10 all-you-can-drink Mimosas, Bloody Marys and domestic taps

Happy Hour from 1-7pm and $5 domestic pitchers

$2.75 22oz grande beers, $4 Sam Adams, Red’s Apple and Bell's specials 4-6pm

$6 pitchers of Bud Light, Shock Top, Miller Light, Coors Light and Nordeast, drink specials 4-6pm

$6 pitchers of Bud Light, Shock Top, Miller Lite, Coors Light and Nordeast 9pm-close

Grand beers $2.75 (all day)

Ladies night 8-10pm $5 pitchers

Late night Happy Hour 9pm-midnight

$5 pitchers all day

Bloody Mary special

​Tru Blu Social Club 915 19th Ave. E, West Fargo

MOORHEAD

Rustica Tavern 315 Main Ave., Moorhead O’Leary’s Pub 808 30th Ave. S, Moorhead

Happy Hour 1-7pm, $5 domestic mugs, $6 import mugs 8pm-midnight

Speak Easy 1001 30th Ave., S, Moorhead

2-for-1 drink specials from 4-6 pm and $2 domestic bottles 7pm-midnight

2-for-1s 4-6pm

$5.25 pitchers of Budweiser, Mich, Amber Boch, Bud Light, Miller Light and Foster, drink specials 4-6pm

$2.75 Captain Morgan

2-for-1s 8-11pm

$2.75 whiskeys

Vic’s Bar & Grill 427 Center Ave, Moorhead

Happy Hour all day: 50¢ off all drinks, $4 Bloody Marys and Caesars

79


THELASTPAGE

Poetry of Place

BY Lori Koenig | PHOTO BY Hillary Ehlen

Dedicated to the People of Fargo and to the Red River Valley Writing Project

Downtown Fargo Bright clean cold and bold A place for misfits The Edge of the Earth A Painted Piano A Spirited Room Not long ago an outpost A rugged stop on the Northern Pacific railway Now, hip with an edge, not a sharp edge, but an edge nonetheless. Bikers with Green Hair Blondes with acrylic nails and coral dresses Bison Statues Bras on Broadway Edwardian Lamp posts with sweaters and beads Saloons and Scan Design There are Singers and Marathoners Artists, Architects and Radio DJ’s Booksellers and Coffee Hounds Cinema, Popcorn, Oils and Tea. A place for you and A place for me Downtown baby!

?

Lori Koenig works at Fargo North High School teaching Creative Writing, British Literature and Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition. She also teaches World Film at North Dakota State University. Koenig has an MFA in Theatre from UNC Greensboro and postgraduate work in English and Rhetoric from Wake Forest University and NDSU. Koenig was a 2014 Teacher Fellow to the Red River Valley Writing Project. "It was there that I really reclaimed myself as a writer," she said. She has also written poetry, plays, short stories and creative non-fiction for many years. In the community, Koenig serves on the board for the Fargo Moorhead Community Theatre and is a Teacher Consultant for the Red River Valley Writing Project. She is also involved with the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards. She has started a new writer's group called the Fargo Moorhead Writer's Salon with the goal of establishing "a safe space for people to write and share their writing."

The Last Page is a new space to highlight community members of all ages who are helping to create culture in the Fargo-Moorhead area, making it such a wonderful place to live. If you know someone who is making a difference — maybe through their art, volunteering or just being a good person — email kara@spotlightmediafargo.com or reach out to us on Twitter and Facebook and let us know.

80 | FEBRUARY 2018 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


Profile for Spotlight

Fargo Monthly February 2018  

Block 9 has been discussed for years. Once complete with 18 stories, it'll be Fargo's tallest building. From a surface parking lot to multi-...

Fargo Monthly February 2018  

Block 9 has been discussed for years. Once complete with 18 stories, it'll be Fargo's tallest building. From a surface parking lot to multi-...