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MAY 2017

COMPLIMENTARY


PHOTO BY J. Alan Paul Photography

Retail FROM THE EDITOR

THERAPY

F

rom time to time, we all need a little therapy. After surviving another long winter, it was time to introduce our new assistant editor, Becca Opp, to my favorite kind–retail therapy. Twice a year, Design & Living hits the streets of Fargo, Moorhead and West Fargo in search of the area's most unique finds to freshen up your spring and summer style. Now just to be clear, I am not immune to the appeal of an occasional online shopping spree, but I also understand how that affects our local economy. Over the past 10 years, I've seen too many local businesses with great products and services end up closing their doors. That is one reason why I feel this issue is less of a novelty and more of a necessity. If we want a thriving community, we need to support the businesses just outside of our doors. While I'm on the topic of fantastic, local shopping, I cannot possibly write about this issue without touching on the amazing day we had at the Eco Chic Design Conference. We shopped at an array of local vendors, ate Ree Drummond inspired lunch box meals and marveled at Drummond's charming, southern drawl as she described

her transition from a city girl to ranch life and a Food Network cooking show. Once again, event founder, Maria Bosak, went above and beyond piecing together this day of inspiration, intermixing two national celebrities and a few local talents like Grain Designs, Julie Alin and Trever Hill. Maria amazes me. On her third remarkable Design Con, she somehow managed to snag us right in our midwest hearts again, finding and bringing speakers that would inspire us and most importantly, relate to us. Make sure to check out our photo album commemorating the day as well as our exclusive interviews with 'The Pioneer Woman' and HGTV's Chip Wade. Thank you for reading! Sincerely,

TRACY NICHOLSON Associate Publisher/ Editor tracy@spotlightmediafargo.com


DESIGN&LIVING TEAM At Design & Living, our goal is to create a publication that is just as much fun to read as it is to view. Here are the writers, designers, photographers and contributors who so affably use their time and talents to tell a story and give our pages purpose.

BECCA

PAUL

JESSE

SARAH

ASSISTANT EDITOR

PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTOGRAPHER

DESIGNER

OPP

Becca Opp writes print and social media content for Design & Living Magazine. Opp earned her degree in English education with an emphasis in communications from NDSU. On the weekends, she likes to fix up her 114-yearold house.

FLESSLAND Flessland is a Minnesota native, Concordia College graduate and owner of Paul Flessland Photo. He specializes in editorial, commercial and landscape photography serving the Midwest. Flessland is also currently an editorial photographer for Spotlight Media.

KARI

LANGSDORF RASMUS CONTRIBUTOR

Rasmus is a partner at designingwomen2, grew up surrounded by art and the homecrafted. Having put her BA in political science and english and an MA in human resources to good use in her earlier careers, she is now thrilled to use her left brain to create beautiful spaces.

HOORELBEKE Hoorelbeke is a former professional baseball player turned photographer. He is the owner of J.Alan Paul Photography in Fargo and a veteran editorial photographer for Spotlight Media. Hoorelbeke specializes in editorial, commercial, archictural and landscape photography.

PAUL

TYRONE

CONTRIBUTOR

CONTRIBUTOR

SORUM Sorum is an architect and a builder with his firm Sorum Design-Build, located in Fargo. He is an NDSU graduate with a masters of architecture from The Ohio State University. His additional experience includes working for a prestigious design firm in New York City and teaching design at the University of Southern California.

GEIGER Geiger is a MSUM graduate with a BFA with an emphasis in Graphic Design. She is the lead publication designer for Design & Living Magazine, Fargo Monthly and Fargo Inc! magazines at Spotlight Media.

LESLIE Leslie founded Heritage Homes in 1995. It is a custom residential home building company serving the FM metro and lakes areas. He currently serves as the Home Builders Association of FargoMoorhead's president. He is also a director on boards of the North Dakota Association of Builders and National Association of Home Builders.

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MEET THE TEAM MIKE

TRACY

TANK

BECCA

SARAH

RYAN

NICOLE

JOE

ERICA

NATE

PAUL

HEATHER

RYLEE

PAM

JENNY

PAUL

JESSE

KELSEY

MATT

ETHAN

SAM

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LAYNE

DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017

ANDREW

Meet Spotlight Media's Other Magazines

Open for Business Are drones and automated systems the next two big industries in North Dakota? A number of business and political leaders seem to think so. In this wide-ranging cover story, Fargo Inc! covers everything from drone racing to precision agriculture to self-driving cars. They also preview the upcoming Drone Focus Conference 2017, and U.S. Sen. John Hoeven even makes an appearance.

NFL Life with Kyle Emanuel NDSU's footprint in the National Football League is continuing to grow. From talented football stars like Kyle Emanuel to distinguished coaches peppered around the league, the Bison connections are getting stronger. We dip into the NFL this month to examine a few of the NFL connections.

Flavor Awards 2017 Winners We had the people of Fargo-Moorhead nominate and vote for their favorite local dishes and dish over the course of the last few months to find the best of the best in the local dining scene. And now, after an overwhelming number of responses and support, we're showcasing what came out on top in our second annual Flavor Awards.

Learn more about Spotlight Media at spotlightmediafargo.com


DESIGN& LIVING MAY 2017 Design & Living Magazine is a free publication distributed 12 times a year. Our mission is to showcase all that the Red River Valley has to offer in terms of interior design, architecture and landscaping, profiling the people that make these possible. We also strive to provide a quality and fun reading experience and improve the way of life in our community. The publication is mailed to homes across the US and has stand distribution throughout North Dakota and Minnesota. PUBLISHER

Spotlight Media LLC

PRESIDENT

Mike Dragosavich

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER ASSISTANT EDITOR

Andrew Jason Tracy Nicholson Becca Opp

DESIGN/LAYOUT

Sarah Geiger, Matt Anderson, Ryan Koehler

CONTRIBUTORS

Maria Bosak, Tyrone Leslie, HBA of F-M, Katie Sullivan, Trever Hill, Becca Opp, Tracy Nicholson

COPY EDITORS WEB EDITOR ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS OPERATIONS MANAGER SALES MANAGER MARKETING/SALES SOCIAL MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHY

SALES ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT DELIVERY

Erica Rapp, Andrew Jason, Becca Opp, Tracy Nicholson Samantha Stark Nicole Houseal Heather Hemingway Layne Hanson Tracy Nicholson, Paul Hoefer, Tank McNamara, Jenny Johnson Becca Opp, Tracy Nicholson, Samantha Stark Paul Flessland, J. Alan Paul Photography, Maria Bosak, Morgan Schleif, Northern Stories, Katie Sullivan, Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique, Thomas Rex Kemmer, Dan Francis Photography, Alan Kasin at Notion Media, renderings provided by Lux Communities Pam Mjoness Mitch Rapp, Hal Ecker, Nolan Kaml

Design & Living Magazine is published by Spotlight Media, LLC. Copyright 2017 Design & Living Magazine & designandlivingmagazine.com. All rights reserved. No parts of this periodical may be reproduced or distributed without written permission of Design & Living Magazine and Spotlight Media, LLC is not responsible for, and expressly disclaims all liability for, damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance on such information. Spotlight Media, LLC accepts no liability for the accuracy of statements made by the advertisers.

Spotlightmedia ADVERTISING: 701-478-SPOT (7768) spotlightmediafargo.com Send change of address information and other correspondence to: Spotlight Media Inc. 15 Broadway N. Suite 500, Fargo, ND 58102 or info@spotlightmediafargo.com


contents FEATURE STORY

2017 MAY

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SPRING INTO SUMMER SHOPPING GUIDE

Grow your style with our 2017 "Spring into Summer" Shopping Guide. Blooming with fresh finds, this locally sourced guide is sure to elevate your interior space and prep the exterior of your home for outdoor entertaining.

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DESIGN CONFERENCE RECAP

If you didn't make it to the 2017 Eco Chic Design Conference or if you just want to look back on memories that were made, we've provided in-depth coverage of the day. You can see the photos and read all about our once-in-a-lifetime interviews with The Pioneer Woman Ree Drummond and HGTV's Chip Wade.

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TOP PERGOLA TRENDS IN THE MIDWEST

If you have goals of someday adding a pergola to your patio or garden, you are not alone. With a little help from Deckmasters, we've compiled a list of the best pergola trends of 2017.

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CURB SHOPPING

Meet Kelly Binfet. Not only is she the community outreach coordinator for Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Red River Valley, she is also an expert curbshopper. Find inspiration for cleanup week in the found furniture that Binfet has collected over the years.

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GUIDE TO AVOIDING HOME CONSTRUCTION NIGHTMARES

New construction can sometimes cost more than anticipated because of unforeseen problems. However, there are surprisingly easy steps you can take to help prevent nightmares when building your custom home.

ON THE COVER "Illusions" by Stephanie Fontaine from Furniture For Less

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DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017

NEXT MONTH: TINY HOUSE ISSUE Don't miss our first-ever "Tiny House" issue. To prove that bigger doesn't always mean better, we'll take readers inside a few local tiny homes where square footage is swapped for a simpler life. Meet the homeowners who believe efficient design is the most creative design.


HBA EDITORIAL DESIGN&LIVING

Do your homework before you By Tyrone Leslie, HBA President, Heritage Homes

DIY

This home was an entry on the 2016 Remodeled Home Tour by Western Products. Its kitchen remodel involved opening up the walls and trading the kitchen table space for a large island that seats four.

T

he desire among home owners to tackle repair and remodeling projects has risen with the popularity of Pinterest, design blogs and the prevalence of home improvement stores. Before attempting to recreate the gorgeous bathroom from your Pinterest board in your own home, consider the following:

planned. If timing is a priority for your weekend warrior, call a professional remodeler to get your project completed.

· Safety - Without the proper training and preparation, a do-it-yourselfer can, and has, landed in the emergency room. Unfamiliarity with new tools and techniques can lead to accidents. Follow product directions and safety procedures and always use proper safety equipment. A good rule of thumb for any homeowner is to avoid projects that require a license.

May is National Home Remodeling Month, and we're taking this opportunity to let you know the Home Builders Association of Fargo-Moorhead has members to help you with all your home renovation needs. Most professional contractors understand that home owners may want to work on their own homes, but those pros have also been called to fix many mishaps along the way.

· Time - Even professional remodelers sometimes need extra time on projects when they find surprises behind walls. Troubleshooting these issues often takes more time and expertise than originally

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DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017

· Cost - Many of the products purchased from the DIY market, although designated by a name brand, are not always the same quality available to contractors. It is also important to verify the terms of the product warranty. Many warranties become void by improper installation.

The Remodelers Council is a committee of the HBA of FM that was formed in 1990 to deal with issues affecting the remodeling segment of the building

This year's Remodeled Home Tour is September 23-24.

Tyrone Leslie founded Heritage Homes in 1995. It is a custom residential homebuilding company serving the FM metro and lakes areas.

The HBA of FM promotes an environment in which members and their businesses can prosper.

industry. They hold meetings every other month for networking, informative sessions and conducting council business. Remodelers join the council to improve their business management skills, network with peers, perform community service and work for the betterment of the industry. Visit hbafm.com/remodelers to see the list of current members. Visit hbafm.com/findamember to search the entire HBA membership by service. Through the Remodeled Home Tour, the Council aims to highlight industry members. The Tour will be September 23-24, the second weekend of the Fall Parade of Homes. It features area remodeling projects, offering a way for remodelers to show off their work and for home owners to get ideas for updating kitchens, bathrooms, basements and more. If you have recently remodeled and are interested in showing off your project, talk to your remodeler or contact the HBA at 701-232-5846.

For more information, contact: hbafm.com info@hbafm.com facebook.com/ HBAFargoMoorhead twitter.com/hbafm Blog: homebuildersassociation. areavoices.com


DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN CONFERENCE

2017

Eco Chic

DESIGN CONFERENCE Recap

Featuring Ree Drummond & Chip Wade

I

f you didn't make it to the April 22 Eco Chic Design Conference at the SCHEELS Arena in Fargo, this is your chance to see some of the most memorable moments of the day. This year, event founder and owner of Eco Chic Boutique, Maria Bosak once again knocked it out the park with guest speakers, The Pioneer Woman-Ree Drummond of Food Network and HGTV's Chip Wade. Get a glimpse inside this full day of food, fun, shopping and inspiration, including behind-the-scenes interviews with the most anticipated speakers of the day.

BY Becca Opp and Tracy Nicholson PHOTOS BY Morgan Schleif, Paul Flessland, Tracy Nicholson and Becca Opp

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DESIGN CONFERENCE DESIGN&LIVING

"Our goal with the Design Conference has remained the same from the very first day this idea struck: deliver an event that inspires you, encourages you and leaves you feeling a sense of joy." Maria Bosak Eco Chic Design Conference founder

A Day at Design Con 10 a.m.

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Doors opened and 1,400 guests were greeted with a gift of exclusive vendor coupons and goodies. Local vendors offered shopping and socializing with specialty coffees, breakfast, lunch boxes and dessert by Cracked Pepper, Ladybug Latte, Libby's Cupcakes and Michele's Table.

DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017


DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN CONFERENCE

2 p.m.

The show began with an introductory video that prepared the crowd for the day's host, Patrick Kirby, to hit the stage. At this time, the stage was empty, but ready for an overhaul.

2:15 p.m.

The guys of Grain Designs showed the crowd how to create focal points with reclaimed wood and barn doors, using the stage as a blank canvas.

3:15 p.m.

Event founder Maria Bosak took the stage and offered advice from her own farmhouse project on updating kitchens and creating a vision board. She then demonstrated the joys of chalk paint by refinishing a set of cabinets right there on stage.

3:30 p.m.

After the addition of focal points and a fresh coat of paint on the cabinets, the stage was ready for some finishing touches. Then local designers Julie Alin of SCHEELS Home & Hardware and Trever Hill of Trever Hill Design and The Private Collection demonstrated proper staging and design techniques.

Photo by Morgan Schleif

Photo by Morgan Schleif

Photo by Morgan Schleif

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DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN CONFERENCE

4 p.m.

The day's first celebrity speaker, HGTV's Chip Wade, took the stage. Wade spoke of his beginnings as an engineer and his present-day career. He offered valuable tips on how to orchestrate your perfect design around your everyday life.

5:15 p.m.

All attendees took a dinner break with offerings from local vendors and the arena. Those with a special, reserved ticket made their way to a private room to attend "Dinner with Ree." These guests dined with Drummond and enjoyed a catered dinner made entirely with Drummond's famous recipes.

Photo by Morgan Schleif

6:30 p.m.

Keynote speaker Ree Drummond took the stage to an ecstatic audience on their feet. Drummond spoke about her early beginnings as a blogger and her much applauded career as The Pioneer Woman on Food Network. She took questions from the audience and spoke of her family, sharing embarrassing stories from her youth and the challenges of transitioning to life on the ranch.

8 p.m.

VIP seat guests were invited on stage for a meet-and-greet with Ree Drummond, Chip Wade and Grain Designs.

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DESIGN CONFERENCE DESIGN&LIVING

"The space-saving and feature-wall aspect of a barn door is not going to go out of style anytime soon." Blain Mikkonen Grain Designs

"I've been a fan of Ree since Tate and I started dating, so I'd say 12 or 13 years. Before she had the TV show and her first cookbook, I would read her blog every day because I wanted to know what was happening. It was almost as if my day couldn't go on until I knew what was happening with Ree. " Maria Bosak Eco Chic Design Conference founder

Photo by Morgan Schleif

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Design & Living's booth designed with vintage furniture from The White House Co. and floral provided by Love Always Floral.

Photo by Morgan Schleif

"We all look for inspiration and try to cram beautiful images into our own spaces and in fact, it just doesn't work. The best case scenario is that you end up with a pretty picture. The worst case is you don't do it right and it doesn't function well." HGTV's Chip Wade


DESIGN CONFERENCE DESIGN&LIVING

"I grew up on the seventh fairway of a golf course, so when I first told my friends from my hometown of Bartlesville and my college friends at that time that I was getting married and moving to a ranch in the country, they fell on the floor laughing. I was the last person on earth anyone thought would live in the country, so they started calling me 'Pioneer Woman.'" Ree Drummond, The Pioneer Woman Photo by Morgan Schleif

The Pioneer Woman, Ree Drummond, invited the audience's littlest fans on stage where she polled them on their favorite foods and offered a picture opp for the parents.

Photo by Morgan Schleif

Near the stage, VIP seating offered guests the ultimate experience with bottle water, gorgeous flowered cupcakes and specialized gift bags filled with goodies, coupons and Ree Drummond's latest cookbook. VIP guests also got a meet-and-greet after the show with on-stage photos with the guest speakers.

Photo by Morgan Schleif

Get Social! If you have photos from the event and want to share, make sure to use the hashtags #EcoChicDesignCon and #DesignCon17. You can also get event updates, home inspiration, remodeling tips and Eco Chic's Design Conference Recap sent straight to your email. Subscribe at iloveecochic.com/email For more information, contact: Eco Chic Boutique 955 17th Ave. S, Fargo 701-356-6600 iloveecochic.com

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DESIGN CONFERENCE DESIGN&LIVING

Exclusive Interview

INTERVIEWED BY Tracy Nicholson

HGTV's Chip Wade Q&A

HAVE YOU EVER BEEN TO FARGO OR NORTH DAKOTA?

"No I was so pleasantly surprised by everything. I was eager because I'd never been here and I always like to see new places. I have actually driven through the state on my way to some outdoor projects, but I just remember it being very cold."

HAVE YOU MADE IT OUT TO ANY OF OUR LOCAL RESTAURANTS YET? "I haven't made it out much yet, but Maria's husband Tate and I did go to breakfast this morning at Village Inn, which was good. I love to eat. I've been cruising around with Tate last night and this morning. He and the boys from Grain Designs are fantastic folks. I don't know what it is, but there's something about the people in this area and the

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Minneapolis area that really remind me of home. There's just an authenticity to it and everyone I've met, especially Maria and Tate, have been so gracious and so kind."

WHERE ARE YOU ORIGINALLY FROM?

"I was born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia. That's where my business is and where all of my family is, so we're real close with family. We have about three generations deep there, so we are about as native as it gets."

HOW DID YOU END UP ON TV AND WHAT WAS THAT LIKE WHEN YOU FIRST STARTED? "A lot of people think that everyone on television is seeking television out, but it was kind of the opposite scenario for

me. I started out as an engineer. I went to Georgia Tech, studied engineering and then one day, as I was sitting in my cubicle doing my engineering, nerdy work, and an email came across my desk and it said there was a show called "Designed to Sell" that was moving to Atlanta, so they were actually looking for people to renovate homes. "I had never struggled for selfconfidence, so I thought, 'Don't they need a young hot-shot engineer?' I sent back a little self-promotion paragraph and one thing led to another and I ended up getting cast as a sidekick character on the show. That was over 10 years ago and now 14 shows later, we're still cranking along. So, to answer your question, spam, I guess is the moral of the story."


DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN CONFERENCE

DO YOU TYPICALLY SHOOT FOR TV ALL YEAR?

and getting the experience of knowing what's possible and that kind of just sparked the interest."

"One of the beauties of shooting in the south is that it is acceptable to shoot most of the year, but typically we try to cram it into about a six-month window. But, we try to make it as efficient as possible. The shows that I work on are fairly large-scale. They usually go between $60,000 and $100,000 per episode of renovation budget. And we usually are doing five to seven projects at a time."

WHAT DID YOU THINK WHEN MARIA BOSAK ASKED YOU TO COME SPEAK IN FARGO?

"It's amazing. One of my favorite things to do is to talk to folks who are interested in bettering their homes or interested in doing things themselves. I've done over a thousand renovations in the past 10 years, so I don't say that I've seen everything, but I've come very close. I just love to be a resource and share my experience on how I've done it wrong, but more so, 'This is the way I've found that really allows us to get those top level results, efficiently and to the point.' I love to talk to people who are eager to learn."

WHAT IS A REALISTIC TIMEFRAME FOR THE PROJECTS WE SEE ON TV? "On TV, we do it very quickly. For the scale of projects we do on the show, you should be able to accomplish these in a two to three-month time frame. Also, on TV I manage and execute all of the construction on all of my television shows. In real life though, things are completely different. I have an architecture and design firm. We don't do construction for folks outwardly, but we do architecture and design services nationwide."

DO YOU HAVE ANY ADVICE FOR PEOPLE SEEKING TO REMODEL?

"The biggest thing people can do is to start with a plan, prior to ever reaching out to your builder or general contractor. This isn't always the case, but builders are not typically designers. So, getting that plan completely flushed out and then bringing that to them, makes the entire process go faster, even though you might think it's adding an additional step."

WHAT HAS YOUR GROWING FAME BEEN LIKE FOR YOUR FAMILY AND KIDS?

"I have a wife and three little kiddos: 3, 5 and 8. I have two boys and a girl with Mara, my daughter, in the middle. We have a great time. They all think they're famous because they've been on episodes. Mack, my 8-year-old, always asks me when he's going to be on TV again. It's a really fun thing. My family's really involved and they all come to the set. I work with my dad, my mother and sisters all the time, so we're very integrated. I've got a very talented family, so we all just kind of enjoy the experience. My dad was also an engineer, he was amazingly talented. I learned all of my trades and all types of skills from him. To this day, he's still the hardest working guy I ever met and it's

HOW DO YOU BALANCE ALL OF YOUR PROJECTS, YOUR BUSINESS, THE TV SHOWS AND YOUR FAMILY?

"You don't actually have to have a designer or a contractor give you the inspiration that is most vital. Walking around your own life with your phone or your notes can provide more valid input for a quality design than anything else." Chip Wade

a joy to work beside him, although he's retired now. "My wife's name is Paulie. We actually went to Georgia Tech together, she was a CPA and graduated as valedictorian. Believe it or not, we were both actually cheerleaders–I got suckered into it after I went to college, but it ended up being great. I got a full scholarship and I met my wife. Out of college, we started in separate paths with her as a CPA and me going into television. But now, she's a controller over all three of our businesses. She actually runs our real estate branch—the design and architecture side is not really her wheelhouse. People always ask

assuming that Paulie did the design, but she doesn't do any of that. That's kind of my piece of it."

HAVE YOU ALWAYS HAD THE PASSION FOR BUILDING?

"Well, I started out in more of the electrical engineering arena, but I just always had that passion for building. Growing up, we always had a workshop. That's where my dad taught me about tools at a young age. We have pictures of me running a chop-saw when I was 6 years old when we were remodeling the basement. I look back now as I have an 8-year-old and think, 'What was he thinking?' But, it was really all about teaching the proper ways to use tools

"It can get crazy, but busy is one of the best types of problems. I feel it's kind of my personality. I'm very high energy and I'm better when I'm firing on all cylinders. We have a full architecture and design firm, a real estate brokerage and a production company, in addition to doing television shows. But, they all play off of one another and they all further our ability to give our clients an elevated level of service."

DO YOU HAVE ANYTHING NEW ON THE HORIZON?

"A lot of new. I'm coming out with a couple of brand new things this year. In addition to servicing our architecture, design and real estate clients, I produce digital experiences for a number of different brands in the home and lifestyle categories. We do a lot of architecture rendered environments for product photography. What's really exciting is that we are transforming the whole digital point-of-purchase experience. "A lot of what I'm going to be touching on, even today, is showing a vision of what everyone is going to be experiencing when they go out shopping for a new couch or hardwood flooring, light fixtures or a kitchen faucet. Completely virtually, but also making that purchase from a digital platform. Nobody's seen it yet, but I'm creating it and working on it for a lot of big brands right now. I'm also coming out with a new furniture line this fall. It's all going to

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DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN CONFERENCE

be multi-purpose furniture. Later this year, I'm also coming out with my first set of architectural design plans for homes."

WE'VE SEEN YOU DO LANDSCAPE OVERHAULS AND INTERIOR REMODELS. WHICH ONE CALLS TO YOU MORE?

"On television, you predominantly see interior renovations. About 80 percent of the work we do is interior. I love interiors, but if I had to nail down one thing I love to design, it's actually exteriors. I am passionate about landscape design. That's actually where I started when I was in high school. I had a landscape company and I almost didn't go to college. I just feel as though I make compelling spaces fairly easily and it's something that is gratifying. You can do things on the outside that you can't do on the inside.

WHERE DO YOU GET THIS DRIVE TO BE SO CREATIVE AND INNOVATIVE?

"I am very driven by creating something new and for productivity. I do not like to sit still. I like to see things accomplished and I like to set up the idea. I'm always creating concepts. Now what I'm setting up for is surrounding myself with talented individuals that can help me execute that vision so I can be off

creating the next concept. It's really that drive to create something that's never been done before and solve problems that have never been solved. Even with me moving to producing my own content on television, I just have a passion for it."

CAN YOU EXPLAIN YOUR ROLE AS A TELEVISION PRODUCER?

"We actually ended up winning an Emmy for our show, 'Elbow Room,' which is still the only Emmy that HGTV has ever won. I was mostly proud of my team. I ask my team to execute at a high level that in the moment does not give them a return, the cameras go away and might not even be shown on television, but it's about what's been created, more so than my contribution. It's the amazing individuals surrounding me. We're a real family. The guy who does my camera work is still the same guy who did my audition tape 11 years ago."

WE HEARD YOU'RE AN AVID GUITAR PLAYER. IS THIS STILL ONE OF YOUR OUTSIDE HOBBIES AND WHAT ELSE DO YOU LIKE TO DO IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

"Yes, I've played guitar for more than 25 years now. I love it and it's something that I do to relax and get away. I don't get to play nearly as much as I'd like

to anymore. I've actually gotten into hunting, believe it or not. I hunt mainly whitetail. I actually didn't hunt at all until a year-and-half ago. I'm someone who's either all in or all out, so once I tried it, I was all in. I've also heard there's some great hunting in this area so I might have to come back for that. I'm trying to get my family into hunting as well. Something I'm trying to do more of is creating experiences for us as a family."

WHEN YOU GET ON THAT STAGE, WHAT DO YOU WANT THE PEOPLE AT THE DESIGN CONFERENCE TO WALK AWAY WITH?

"A lot of it is about inspiring. I'm going to break them down so I can build them back up again. I plan to show them that if they can answer a few questions, how great renovation could be? Renovation can be stressful, but imagine if you knew exactly what it was going to look like, exactly how it was going to feel and how much it would cost. If you could figure out all of those without spending a dollar, wouldn't that take the pressure off? It's actually possible, but it takes a cognizant process put in place and you don't get there by doing the traditional means. We all look at the inspiration and try to cram beautiful images into our own spaces and, in fact, it just doesn't work. The best case scenario is that you

end up with a pretty picture. The worst case is if you don't do it right and it doesn't function well. "I think people have the wrong mentality about inspirational images as well. Even if it's on the cover of Better Homes & Gardens or one of your favorite magazines, it's easy to think that it must function well because an architect or designer put that together but, the real bummer is that it's not always the case. I've actually created spaces that have been on the cover of magazines and I live in one of those in my own home. But, there are still spaces that I think are beautiful, but I despise the space because it doesn't live the way it needs to. "I actually spend the first 80 percent of my time designing spaces for clients, completely devoid of their style. So, I take your Pinterest boards and ideas and shelf them and create a completely personalized, universal design, completely devoid of style. From there, I start weaving in that last 20 percent of your style. Patience and right process always win."

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?

"I look at magazines. I look at a ton of online imagery, not necessarily just the Pinterest and the Houzz sites. I use a lot of blind google searches, then images spark inspiration and I actively search based on that idea that pops into my head. You don't actually have to have a designer or a contractor give you the inspiration that is most vital. Walking around your own life with your phone or your notes can provide more valid input for a quality design than anything else. An exercise that I love to give everyone is, take a week and write down anything that your spouse or kids do, anything that creates a bind or negative feeling. The dirty dishes in the sink or the clothes on the floor that you don't like, tabulate those things. Those are the active gold nuggets that we use as designers to solve problems. I'm going to show that today, that it's all about proximity and the tactical layout of spaces that end up solving so many more problems organically. Having that list first, before you go to any designer or construction professional, might be the biggest key to getting you what you want."

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Exclusive Interview INTERVIEWED BY Tracy Nicholson

The Pioneer Woman Ree Drummond You weren't dreaming. The Pioneer Woman, Ree Drummond, really did come to Fargo to be the keynote speaker at the 2017 Eco Chic Design Conference. We had to pinch ourselves too when we met Drummond behind-the-scenes for an exclusive interview and photoshoot. Before she went on stage, Drummond sat down with the editor of Design & Living Magazine, Tracy Nicholson, to talk about her blog, Food Network tv show and other exciting new adventures. In her Oklahoma accent, Drummond charmed us with her responses to all of our questions. If you've ever seen her show, you know what we mean. 48

DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017


DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN CONFERENCE

Q&A HOW HAVE YOU ENJOYED FARGO SO FAR?

"So far, so good. It looks a lot like Oklahoma. It feels a little bit like home, just with different accents. It is my first time in North Dakota and I'm 48 years old. It's amazing how similar it feels to where I live in Oklahoma: nice and flat with big, beautiful skies. It's really fun to go to a state that I've never been to. I brought my 17-year-old daughter, Paige. It was a little bit of a last minute decision. Now she can mark North Dakota on her list of states that she's visited."

CAN YOU TELL OUR READERS HOW IT ALL BEGAN WITH THE COOKING SHOW AND THE BLOGGING? "It started on a complete whim. I started as a blogger in 2006, and there were certainly blogs then, but it wasn't quite as prevalent as it would become. I just started with a personal blog, free software online and no plan at all except that I would post photos and my mom would read it. It enabled me to express a creative side that I didn't know I had. I lived in the country for 10 years at that point, so maybe it stored up and needed to come out somehow. It was just really a natural evolution. I started posting recipes months later and a couple years later, my first cookbook came out, so if I'd have planned it all ahead of time, there's no way. I couldn't possibly have done it because it was such a natural evolution."

CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT THAT FIRST COOKBOOK? WHAT WAS IT LIKE?

"Obviously, I had no idea what I was doing. I had been a food blogger for a couple of years and taught myself photography. That book came out in 2009, and I look back at the photos and I cover my face with my hands because the photos were not good, but I love it because it was me. I wasn't trying to make it something it wasn't, so I just did photos of my kids and my dogs interspersed with the food. Even though I look at it now and could say, 'Oh this should be better,' I wouldn't change a thing about it. It was my first cookbook."

CAN YOU TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THE MERCANTILE, THE SPRING LINE AND THE FALL COOKBOOK YOU HAVE COMING UP?

"My husband and I bought an old building on Main Street in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, and slowly developed this vision for The Pioneer Woman Mercantile. We opened it last October. It was blood, sweat, tears, blood sweat tears, blood, sweat tears, over and over, but it's been so rewarding. Things I didn't think I'd be as interested in, I'm really interested in. I love the aspect of the store. I thought I would be totally invested in the food, which I am, but my attention always seems to be on the products, so it's a lot of fun. We're about six months in and we're starting to hit our stride. We've worked out most of the kinks, of course, there are always going to be kinks, but we feel like, 'Maybe we can do this thing.' "I've been working on my fall cookbook coming up in October, hoping I'll get it done. I'm not one of those people that do things well in advance. I'm always running.

"It was really fun to write, and the illustrator, Jacqueline Rogers, is amazing. She really brought Little Ree to life. I'm working on the second Little Ree right now. It involves a blueberry pie. Of course, there has to be food."

I THINK OUR MIDWEST READERS CAN REALLY RELATE TO YOUR MORE CASUAL, FAMILY-FRIENDLY STYLE OF COOKING. WE LOVE YOUR AUTHENTICITY AND THAT YOU'RE NOT AFRAID TO MIX FRESH INGREDIENTS WITH CANNED ITEMS. IN YOUR COOKING SHOW CAREER, HAVE YOU EVER BEEN PRESSURED TO VEER A DIFFERENT DIRECTION? "The production company that I work with has never tried to tell me how to cook or how I should cook, so it's good. I have a nice partnership with them. Food Network has never tried to get me to

cook a different way. Of course, on the internet, you hear about things like that, but it just wouldn't be right for me to completely change the way I cook on TV and then not cook that way at home. The truth is I live in Pawhuska, Oklahoma. I can't go to Whole Foods to grab something on the way home. I have a small grocery store, I can do bulk shopping and I have a lot of staples on hand. I try to use fresh ingredients. I love sushi and I love all kinds of food, except bananas, but cooking for my familymy husband is a cowboy, so meat and potatoes, a couple of picky kids along the way, two kids that'll eat anything...I cook the way that we eat. As you said, it's definitely authentic. When it comes down to Wednesday night, cooking a dinner, I just want to tell people that it's okay. Not everything is out of the can, obviously. That wouldn't

"My spring line at Walmart has been my favorite collection so far. It's all very bright with happy florals and geometric patterns. I just love it. It completes me."

IS YOUR FAMILY INVOLVED IN THE MERCANTILE?

"Yes. It's a total family affair. My daughter, Paige, works as a barista. My boys help out busing tables. My husband comes in and he eats, but then he'll meet folks and take pictures. My father-in-law parked himself in front of the door, and he's our unofficial greeter. He loves to talk, so he finds out where everybody's from. What I love about it is that it doesn't require me to travel. I meet so many people from different places without leaving my hometown."

HOW MANY COOKBOOKS HAVE YOU PUBLISHED SO FAR? "Four. This will be my fifth."

CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT YOUR CHILDREN'S BOOK SERIES?

"Yes, I had a children's book series about my dog, Charlie, and I have five books in the Charlie series, but we launched a new series this year called Little Ree. It just came out about 10 weeks ago. It's sort of autobiographical. It's about my transition into the country told through the perspective of a little girl. It's not my story. I didn't move to the country as a little girl, but it's a parallel to my story.

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DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN CONFERENCE

"That changes a lot. It's probably five favorite things. One of them is chicken parmesan, of all things, and it's not the best, authentic Italian version. It's very Americanized. Chicken fried steak­—we don't eat it very often, but when we do they're like putty in my hands. We like to do breakfast for dinner a lot with biscuits and gravy or things like that. They love Tex-Mex quesadillas. It'd be hard for them to unite into one favorite meal. Every kid has their own favorite."

HOW MUCH TIME DOES SHOOTING THE SHOW TAKE OUT OF YOUR LIFE? "On a full year, we'll shoot 39 episodes, and that's a total of 15 weeks a year that I'm really tied up with shooting. They come about five times a year for about three weeks at a time."

DOES THE FOOD NETWORK CREW STAY IN PAWHUSKA?

be healthy, but you can do a little mixing in of ready-made ingredients with fresh and it's good."

WHAT MAKES THE PERFECT RECIPE?

"Oh gosh, well again, if it doesn't have bananas. I don't like bananas. I like to drive that point home. The perfect recipe is something that results in what you want to eat. I prefer cooking to baking. Baking, to me, is very precise and it's about perfection. Cooking is more about flying by the seat of your pants. Even if you don't have something, you can sub in something else. You can't do that a lot in baking. I think the perfect recipe, there probably is no such thing, but if it results in something that you love or your family loves, to me that's perfect."

FROM WATCHING YOUR SHOW,

IT SEEMS LIKE YOU CAN MAKE ANYTHING, BUT IS THERE ANYTHING THAT YOU JUST CANNOT PERFECT?

"Yes, and it's big. It's artisan bread from scratch. I'll make it and it's fine and it tastes like bread, but I just can't nail it. It's different every time. It's my nemesis."

DO YOU HAVE A RECIPE THAT YOU'D CONSIDER THE BEST?

"I can say that my cinnamon rolls are the best in the world, and I thank my mom for that. It's actually her recipe, so I can't take all of the credit. Anything quick like a chocolate sheet cake from scratch, no problem, total confidence. Steak, all of the predictable things I can whip up, no problem."

WHAT IS YOUR FAMILY'S FAVORITE MEAL?

"They stay on the ranch or they rent houses in Pawhuska, wherever they can find a bed basically. Since the mercantile opened, it's interesting because they're having a hard time finding places to rent. TV is just busy. It's the busiest thing I do, for sure. It's also the most demanding. Everything else I can do from home. I do my cookbooks at home at my own pace, but with TV production, there's no fooling around. When it's over, it's like having a baby, and then you have these shows."

WE UNDERSTAND THAT YOU WERE ONCE A CITY GIRL. WHAT CAREER PATH DID YOU TAKE AFTER COLLEGE? "Yes, city girl, even when I lived in my town in Oklahoma I would have called myself a city girl. That's where the nickname, 'Pioneer Woman,' came from because when I told my friends that I was marrying a cowboy and moving to the country, they busted a gut laughing. I grew up in Oklahoma, but it was more of a town setting, home of Phillips Petroleum, so it was a bit more of a cultured upbringing than Pawhuska.

I went to USC and believe it or not, I majored in gerontology. I worked after college in the marketing realm geared toward aging Baby Boomers. That was what I was doing, and now here I am: food blogger, cookbook author and my dad's like, 'Wait, what was that college education for?'

I UNDERSTAND THAT YOU DO A LOT OF TOUGH CHORES ON THE RANCH. IS THERE ANYTHING THAT YOU WON'T DO?

"I wouldn't say I do a lot of tough chores. I leave that to my husband and kids. I will pitch in if they are shorthanded when they need me. That's not my strong suit, but there's nothing I wouldn't do. Blood and things like that don't bother me. My father was a surgeon, so maybe that's why. I seem to always be the gate opener. I give shots. I don't do the heavyduty work where they have to wrestle the calves to the ground. I'm happy to leave that to those with experience."

HOW ON EARTH DO YOU JUGGLE EVERYTHING?

"It's hard. I do the things that I really enjoy. I get a lot done when I love doing it. There are so many things that people are chasing me on a daily basis, and there are lots of loose ends. I just became okay with going to bed at night and not having everything done. My dad used to tease me that I only did what was fun and it's kind of true still."

WHAT DID YOU THINK WHEN MARIA BOSAK FROM FARGO CALLED YOU ONE DAY AND SAID, "WE WANT YOU TO COME TO NORTH DAKOTA AND SPEAK AT THE DESIGN CONFERENCE?"

"I was excited. It sounded like an amazing event. I loved the idea that she basically started it on a whim. This isn't something that some corporation set up, like a trade-show entity. It really came from a place of passion, and I really respected that and could relate to that because that's how Pioneer Woman started."

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DESIGN&LIVING OUTDOOR LIVING

in the Midwest BY Becca Opp | PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED BY Deckmasters

If you have goals of someday adding a pergola to your patio or garden, you are not alone. Before you schedule a trip to the lumberyard, you might want to get up to speed on the pergola trends that are considered best by many in the Midwest. With a little help from Deckmasters, we've compiled a list of pergola trends in 2017. 53


DESIGN&LIVING OUTDOOR LIVING

Midwesterners are melting over dark colors. For example, chocolate is very popular at the moment. Regardless of the color you choose, pergolas can filter light and prevent your tan from baking in the hot summer sun.

With the push of a button, people lounging beneath their pergolas can control which way the sun shines its harmful rays. It's no wonder that motorized, remote-controlled, louvered pergola covers are growing in popularity.

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OUTDOOR LIVING DESIGN&LIVING

Pergolas are for leisure, but not having to put as much time and effort into their upkeep is a luxury. Aluminum with wood embossment is a popular choice because it doesn’t resemble the cheap look of other low-maintenance options like some vinyl or fiberglass. What really sets aluminum apart is that it comes with an embossed wood grain that looks like the real thing. However, it does not require painting or staining.

Summer nights can be cold, but the best barbecues last long after dark. To ensure everybody is having a good time, folks are attaching infrared heaters to their pergolas to keep their friends and family members from getting too chilly at night. Conversely, people are also installing ceiling fans to help control heat on summer days.

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DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017


Right angles are in. People in the Midwest are going for a classic look with large, square columns on their pergolas. To keep their pergolas from looking too similar to the ones in their neighbors' backyards, trendsetting Midwesterners opt for different sized columns. Other popular trends include tapered, paneled and stone columns.

For more information, please contact: Deckmasters 5507 53rd Ave. S, Fargo 701-232-4001 deckmasters.net


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SHOPPING DESIGN&LIVING

Metal Watering Can Baker Garden & Gift

Bottle Bird Feeder Best for Birds Baker Garden & Gift

Celestial Ceramic Pot Baker Garden & Gift

Concrete Planters Holland's Landscaping & Garden Center

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Folding Adirondack Seashell on Chocolate SCHEELS Home & Hardware

Live-Edge Concrete Water Feature Custom-built with stained concrete top and galvanized metal Beyond Outdoors


Hi, Bye Doormat Baker Garden & Gift

Wild Woolies Felt Birdhouse Shotwell Floral

Copper Plant Stand By Kalalou, white-washed with copper base and NDI floral McNeal & Friends

Bronzed Architectural Planter Cast stone composite planter Natural Environments Landscaping & Outdoor Living

Fire Pit Poker Handmade in Minnesota Baker Garden & Gift

Blown Glass Bird Bath Baker Garden & Gift


DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

"There's several Air collections by Homecrest, and we love them all! The Air products are based on an 'empty box design,' where water runs through the air bucket design. The time it takes to dry after a rainstorm is now measured in seconds rather than minutes. Using Homecrest’s double layer sling design, stretched over an all-aluminum subframe, Elements Air and Grace Air both offer a stylish and maintenance-free solution for outdoor seating."

Marquis Spring Green Planter Baker Garden & Gift

KELLY MCCOMB Western Products Elements Air Outdoor Furniture Airo2 Collection, Homecrest Outdoor Living Western Products

Lloyd Flanders Woven Porch Rockers Natural Environments Landscaping & Outdoor Living

Milano Terra Cotta Vase Yellow, frost-proof glaze Shotwell Floral

XLarge Big Green Egg Two-level cooking grid SCHEELS Home & Hardware

Polished Rock Owl and Mushroom Shotwell Floral

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Repurposed Metal Whale Planter or beverage cooler McNeal & Friends

Grace Air Collection Airo2 Collection, Homecrest Outdoor Living Western Products

Dahlia Outdoor Torch Baker Garden & Gift

Citronella Firestarters by Down to Earth Baker Garden & Gift


DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Bird, Bee and Bug Houses By Derek Jones Baker Garden & Gift

Folding End Table Seashell on Chocolate SCHEELS Home & Hardware

Blue Glaze Terra Cotta Vase Frost-proof pottery Shotwell Floral

Handcrafted Birdhouse Stand Henri Stonecasters Shotwell Floral

Terra Cotta Glazed Architectural Planter Natural Environments Landscaping & Outdoor Living

Bullet Grill Diablo by Bull Grills Beyond Outdoors

Orange Glaze Oversized Planter Natural Environments Landscaping & Outdoor Living

"This is completely custom built by hand in our shop. To create this, they used a combination of galvanized metal, pine, palette wood and finished the piece with a patina finish to give it a more rustic look. Our team originally built this one for the home show, but these can be custom designed and ordered to fit any patio or outdoor kitchen." Plant & Herb Stakes Shotwell Floral

MEGAN NORLING Garden Center Manager, Beyond Outdoors

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SHOPPING DESIGN&LIVING

UUNI Wood Fired Pellet Oven SCHEELS Home & Hardware

Lloyd Flanders Sectional & Woven Cocktail Table Elements Collection Natural Environments Landscaping & Outdoor Living

Lavender Ceramic Planter Baker Garden & Gift

OH Stackable Chair Jasmine by Umbra, Indoor/Outdoor use Scan Design

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DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017

O.W. Lee Creighton Lounge Chair Natural Environments Landscaping & Outdoor Living

Lady Bug House Wild on Wildlife Baker Garden & Gift


DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Grey Band Architectural Planter Cast stone composite planter Natural Environments Landscaping & Outdoor Living

Hanging Planter Rack Moorhead Antique Mall

Teal & Bronze Glaze Planter Natural Environments Landscaping & Outdoor Living

Garden Sign Moorhead Antique Mall

Farmhouse Pottery Match Set & Striker McNeal & Friends

Emory Cushion collection Airo2 Collection, Homecrest Outdoor Living Western Products

Black Glaze Architectural Planter Cast stone composite planter Natural Environments Landscaping & Outdoor Living

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DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

White Pitcher, Tea Leaf Orbs, and Cement Pear, Geometric Table on LoLoi Rug Eco Chic Boutique

WHEN HOSTING A PARTY, PRESENTATION IS EVERYTHING. FROM AESTHETICALLY PLEASING PLACE SETTINGS TO STONE CHEESE BOARDS, THIS GUIDE WILL SERVE UP THE FRESHEST STYLES OF THE SEASON. 71


SHOPPING DESIGN&LIVING

Get Real Solid Beechwood Small Spoons Zandbroz Variety

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Natural Wood Barstool Everything Amish

Large Amber Fieso Vase Others

Wherever You Are Map Poster and Bezalel & Babel Wall Hanger Frame MINT + BASIL

Spoon Painting on Wood O'Day Caché

DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017

Lakehouse Kitchen Hand Soap by Stonewall Baker Garden & Gift

Fork Painting on Wood O'Day Caché


SHOPPING DESIGN&LIVING

Helen's Table Rolling Pin MINT + BASIL

Peanut Bowl Mud Pie, Feridies Gourmet Peanuts Shotwell Floral

Magnolia Farms Produce Crates from the Magnolia Home Collection by Joanna Gaines on Loloi Rug Eco Chic Boutique

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DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017

Rosemary Mixologist Kit Urban Agriculture, by master mixologist Harry Chin Baker Garden & Gift


DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Light Brown Amadora Mug Others

Marble Cheese Board Charcoal by TAG Scan Design

Counter Height Dining Set Three Piece set Furniture for Less

Bloomingville Canister Zandbroz Variety

Dragonfly Mugs by Always Azul, Colorado potters c.lizzy's

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SHOPPING DESIGN&LIVING

Get Real Solid Beechwood Spoon Zandbroz Variety

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DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017

Country Chic Soiree Painting by Linda Hilbrands Vintage table, truck and glass vases Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique

Industrial Chair Reclaimed from Concordia College The White House Co.

Salsa Bowl Duo Mudpie Shotwell Floral

Get Real Solid Beechwood Salad Servers Zandbroz Variety


SHOPPING DESIGN&LIVING

Bloomingville Dinnerware Zandbroz Variety

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Handmade Tuscan Serving Board Scan Design

Danica Studio Apron Zandbroz Variety

Swedish Dishcloths Holland's Landscaping & Garden Center

Magnolia Home Cafe Chair by Joanna Gaines HOM Furniture

Morandi Bud Vase Others

Dish Towels By TAG Scan Design

DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017


SHOPPING DESIGN&LIVING

Vintage Glassware The White House Co.

Lines Pitcher Others

Mirdinara Kitchen Tea Towels MINT + BASIL

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Loloi Throw Pillow in navy/pink Eco Chic Boutique

Small Amber Fieso Vase Others


DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Bloomingville Quote Mug Shotwell Floral

Hand-painted Ceramic Mugs by 3 Lazy Horses, a South Dakota potter Unglued

Vietri Setting Fish condiment bowl, salad plate, Lastra Aqua dinner plate, Sara ruffled placemat, Juliska Josephine linen napkin, Vietri Fuocco flatware McNeal & Friends

Wine-O's Felted wool wine markers McNeal & Friends

Retro Dining Chair The White House Co.

Chocolate Bowl Shotwell Floral

Pretty Patterns Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique

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DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Tufted Chair with Accent Pillow The White House Co.

LIVE YOUR BEST LIFE THIS SUMMER, EVEN WHEN THE HEAT CAUSES YOU TO RETREAT INDOORS. YOU WON'T MIND SPENDING TIME INSIDE WHEN SURROUNDED BY THE COOLEST FURNITURE AND DECOR, WHICH WE'VE CURATED JUST FOR YOU. 85


SHOPPING DESIGN&LIVING

Powell Shelf Furniture for Less

Concrete Base Edison Lamp DW2

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DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017

Agean Sea Bowl Northern Home Furniture & Design

Ampersand Pillow Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique

Wood Clock Cabinet Furniture for Less

Ceramic Urn Northern Home Furniture & Design

Natural Iron Indigo Bar Stool DW2


DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Crimped Metal Wall Clock Mounted on galvanized wood plank HOM Furniture

Zara Chair Leather with bronze frame Northern Home Furniture & Design

Handcrafted Embroidery by Elizabeth Mattson Unglued

Woven Rugs Red Silo Studio

Sine Felt Gray Hanging Light Vita Copenhagen Underbrush Gallery

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SHOPPING DESIGN&LIVING

Recycled Newspaper Rovers McNeal & Friends

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DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017

Reclaimed Wood Clock Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique

Serving Trays with Sphere Polygon Wire SCHEELS Home & Hardware

Litchfield Cocktail Table Shown with Fresh Cut Vivacious Hydrangea centerpiece Northern Home Furniture & Design

Obelisk Table Lamp DW2

Octavios Tray HOM Furniture

Himalayan Salt Table Lamp SCHEELS Home & Hardware


DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Margot Sofa by Gus, Midnight Velvet with gold legs Scan Design

Woven Vases All Across Africa NDI Floral, dyed sisal fibers and sweet grass McNeal & Friends

Architect Chair SCHEELS Home & Hardware

Fog Branchy Mosssphere McNeal & Friends

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DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Throw Pillows Grace 1972

Reclaimed Wood String Art Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique

Jute and Wood Upholstered Stool HOM Furniture

Two's Company Wooden Frames Zandbroz Variety

Accent Pillows Moorhead Antique Mall

Urbanology Bookcase Ashley Furniture HomeStore

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Copper Pot with Succulents DW2

Baloo Chair Fjord, brushed steel legs Scan Design


DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Klorey Demin Accent Chair Ashley Furniture HomeStore

Blue Linen and Rope Pillow Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique

Concrete Lamp SCHEELS Home & Hardware

Floor Poufs Unglued

Klorey Khaki Accent Chair Ashley Furniture HomeStore

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DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Stickley Prairie Spindle Bedroom Norris queen comforter, Limbert window bench, bowfront chest in Mahogany, featuring Charcoal and linen accent pillows with Euro shams Northern Home Furniture & Design

TEND TO YOURSELF WITH FURNITURE AND DECOR THAT WE'VE HAND-PICKED FOR YOUR BED AND BATH. INSPIRED BY NATURAL TEXTURES, THIS COLLECTION WILL MAKE YOU WANT TO RISE AND SHINE A LITTLE EARLIER JUST TO ADMIRE YOUR SURROUNDINGS. 95


SHOPPING DESIGN&LIVING

Accent Pillow The White House Co.

Lafco Diffuser & Candle McNeal & Friends

Linen Fringe Relax Pillow Northern Home Furniture & Design

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Sweet Dreams Home Sweet Home pillow by Handmade 521 Vintage accent pillows Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique


DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Lakehouse Soy Candle by Stonewall Baker Garden & Gift

Woodrow Wastebasket by Umbra Scan Design

Accent Pillow The White House Co. Ambiance Company Candles Grace 1972

"These candles are from Ambiance Company. It is a stay-at-home mom in Florida who started making hand-poured soy candles out of her garage, so they're all-natural and the wicks are untreated wood. Many candles can give people headaches because they are made of chemicals, but these are not. They are very family friendly, safe and come in all of these amazing scents." Rag Garland Grace 1972

AUDRA MEHL Grace 1972

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DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Copperline by Michael Dunn Underbrush Gallery

BRING THE OUTDOORS IN THIS SUMMER WITH ART THAT WAS INSPIRED BY NATURE. FROM FORGED METAL, GLASS AND WOODEN MOSAICS TO SCENIC LANDSCAPES, THIS COLLECTION FEATURES AN ARRAY OF MEDIUMS TO BRING ORGANIC SERENITY TO ANY ENVIRONMENT. 99


SHOPPING DESIGN&LIVING

"Our Farmer" Copper Art by Liz Walberg c.lizzy's

"Beneath the Surface 1" by Jessica Wachter, mixed medium on paper, 25" x 37" jessicawachter.com

"Illusions" by Stephane Fontaine Furniture for Less

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Nest Art Painting by Linda Hilbrands Burlap Rustic Chic Boutique

Enameled Copper Mirror by Liz Walberg c.lizzy's


DESIGN&LIVING SHOPPING

Handmade Mosaic Houses by Jo McFarlin - Jo's Studio One c.lizzy's

"Faded into the Land" by Jessica Wachter, mixed medium on paper, 7" x 22" jessicawachter.com

"Misunderstood" By Jessica Wachter, oil on canvas, 48" x 30" jessicawachter.com

"Mystic Forest" Grace Feyock HOM Furniture

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CONSTRUCTION DESIGN&LIVING

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DESIGN & LIVING | M AY 2 017


DESIGN&LIVING CONSTRUCTION

GUIDE TO

Avoiding Home

CONSTRUCTION Nightmares

New construction almost always costs more than anticipated due to unforeseen problems. That’s why many people often hold back from pursuing the custom home of their dreams. Fortunately, there are several surprisingly easy steps you can take to avoid costly nightmares when building your custom home.

WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY Paul Sorum

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The first step may seem obvious. Be intentional about the qualities and types of spaces your new home must have to be advantageous for you and your family. In other words, create a mission statement for your new home. Decide the exact kind of spaces your family needs to best function and then decide what the overall goal of your home is. Your home's mission statement will set a benchmark for success and continue to focus your thoughts and energies on meeting that benchmark for success. Your mission statement can be abstract or an eclectic combination of aesthetic and functional requirements.

I had a client who wanted to create a place of "healing and hospitality" on their lakefront property. This was reflected in all aspects from their open living room with a stone fireplace and space for music to the flow through their hallways. Another client wanted a home that reflected the look and feel of their first Cape Cod-style home in Maryland blended with a lodge feel. This produced a beautiful blend of natural wood cabinets, flooring and beams with the Cape Cod exterior

color scheme. It was an unexpected but beautiful combination for a waterfront property. Although very different in their missions, both of these clients had thought about what their home needed to provide for them at a high level. Because of this, both were very successful in achieving the home of their dreams and enjoying the design and construction process.

The second step is to find an architect or home designer who understands and embraces the mission of your new home. Don't limit your search for the right designer. Interview three or more. While meeting home designers, ask them if they have ever designed a home that has a special purpose or a defined mission. Listen closely to their stories of past projects and ask probing questions about the design and construction process. The more questions you ask, the more you’ll understand how the designer works. You will also get a clear idea if they will fully embrace the mission you are on or if they have their own agenda for your home. Go with the designer that embraces your mission.

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DESIGN&LIVING CONSTRUCTION The third step to avoiding construction nightmares is to ask potential home designers how they transition from the design process to construction. This is where many construction problems lay since there tend to be discrepancies between how a home is designed and how it’s actually supposed to be built. The more tightly the design and construction process are integrated, the more nightmares you will avoid in construction. Also, ask your potential designers how cost control is implemented in the design process and how the designer ensures construction goes smoothly. In an ideal world, the designer is the builder or the designer works closely with your builder to ensure communication of design and construction techniques continues after the design is complete. Before you choose the designer of your new home, be sure to ask your potential designer about builders that would be best to build their design. Then, interview those builders to ensure they understand your vision and mission.

No design and construction process is perfect, but being on a mission focuses your energies in the right direction. And, researching your options to find the best design and construction professionals will pay off with a smooth and economical design and construction process. Lastly, remember to always check the designer's and builder's references closely. Most people do not like making cold calls, but it is especially important to call designers' and builders' references. If a designer or a builder has made past clients happy, those past clients will enjoy telling you about their home, so do not hesitate to call them. The information you get from references will be invaluable in shining a light on the design and construction process you can expect to experience. As a helpful list, here are some additional things to remember about home builders: • Every builder has essentially the same cost of labor and materials. Be suspicious of a builder who says they will save you a lot of money because of the deep exclusive discounts they receive on materials and labor. There is a market rate for everything in construction and you will end up paying that market rate regardless of what a builder tells you upfront. When it comes to custom homes, run away from a builder that promises deep discounts. • Ask builders if they use technology such as building information modeling (B.I.M.) which will save time and money by doing accurate quantity estimates in planning construction. If they don't use the latest technology, you will be missing out on cost and time savings afforded by this technology. • Watch for undue overhead of home builders like expensive showrooms and opulent office space. You are

For more information, contact: Sorum Design - Build Paul Sorum 701-219-5601 paul@sorumdesignbuild.com sorumdesignbuild.com

paying for that expensive space in the price of your new custom home. • It does not matter if a builder has their own crews or subcontracts most labor. The cost savings are in the quality of the management of the process, not in how the labor is hired. A well managed and integrated design-build process eliminates price padding by the many trades involved in the construction process. This is where the real cost savings in construction are found or lost. • Ask a potential home builder if they will work on a costplus basis. This is the most cost effective way to build a custom home. In a cost-plus construction process, every expenditure is open book and homeowners have access to every receipt and invoice. This upholds transparency as the builder is paid a percent of the cost of materials and labor. One of the big advantages of cost-plus is that you have control of the details of the project without incurring a lot of time and headaches. Another advantage of cost-plus construction contracts is the homeowner typically does not pay more for changes or upgrades during construction.


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TRENDS DESIGN&LIVING Photo courtesy of IMS

The outside of IMS still looks much as it did in 1915 and the inside retains its original charm. This vacant warehouse, with its wood floors, large atrium and brick walls, was perfect for its new tenant. In 1985, it became Minnesota’s largest renovated building. The open atrium bathes the building’s interior with natural light. D’Amico serves up lunch in the courtyard. It’s hard to imagine that this was once a stifling factory. It looks like your favorite coffee house on steroids. Give me a latte, Wi-Fi, a comfy chair and I may never leave. Long before the industrial style became a thing, IMS embraced its history and made it cool. Today, IMS houses over 170 unique businesses. The businesses offer hand-made light fixtures, fabrics of every texture, color and material, along with sleek contemporary furnishings and classic furnishings that never go out of style. However, this building is only open to the trade, but that doesn’t mean the average consumer can’t access this building. Just grab your favorite designer and you’ve landed yourself an invitation to IMS.

On my most recent visit, I sat down with two friends. The first, Karen Ellman, owns showroom CFG, filled with beautiful contemporary furnishings. I asked her to tell me about some of her best-selling items. “Motion. Motion desks, motion chairs, motion sofas. People love their high-tech furniture,” she claimed. “And animal hides. Both real and faux are also selling well.” To illustrate her point, she showed me this brushed steel ottoman with a hide cover (left). When asked about today’s hot colors, she stated that very neutral colors with some blue are hot in upholstered furniture. To check her facts, she pulled out her most recent orders. Eighty percent were in the gray and taupe tones and 20 percent were in the blue.

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DESIGN&LIVING TRENDS

Beige sofa, blue chair, brushed stainless and “aged” rugs are all popular items at the CFG showroom. And finally, Ellman pointed to her rugs. She claimed that antique rug styles were making a resurgence. What makes them current is that they look like they’ve been "well-loved and worn.” (Huh. Well, worn makes it look current. Now there’s an oxymoron.) Next, I visited with my life long friend, LeAnn Paterson. She has been in the design business for, as she said, “Who’s counting?” When asked what she sees throughout the building, she claimed a little bit of everything. “Rustic, mid-century modern and Hollywood glam are all in vogue.” When asked to explain Hollywood glam she said, “look for mirrors, smooth texture, rich fabrics, silks and softer colors like pink, blue, silver and brushed brass with very little wood.” When asked to describe rustic she said, “mix old west, Adirondack and prairie styles together. It has raw metal and wood and cozy furniture that leans masculine. If it were a personality, it would be rough around the edges.”

The rustic style is still on-trend. Pair comfy furniture with raw wood then mix in some metal and there you have the current version of rustic.

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This feather wreath, framed like a museum quality artifact, was found at Holly Hunt.

After visiting with friends, I let my eyes wander to items that caught my interest.

Nature Inspired I’ve been accused of making my house look like a natural history museum. I can’t help it. I find rocks, bird nests, drift wood and feathers fascinating. When I traded in my last car, we found no less than 15 rocks in cup holders. So it may not surprise my friends that I dig the nature-inspired finds.

Throughout IMS I saw ikat, tribal, traditional, muted tones, vibrant colors and abstract designs.

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This table base made not just of rawedge, but a trunk makes for a great conversation piece.

Rugs Rugs are so versatile. They define a room, create warmth and provide interest. Several vendors have dedicated complete showrooms just to rugs. Regardless of your style, you’ll find a rug to love at IMS.

The agates, used as artistic accessories, were found at CFG.


This picture in the KDR showroom shows just one aisle of fabrics it displays.

This bedroom uses no less than 11 patterns of a similar blue. When the same hue is used, the patterns soothe rather than compete. All fabric and wall coverings in this photo are from VillaNova found at KDR.

Fabrics If you really want to create a home that is unique to you, choose your own fabric for upholstered pieces, draperies and pillows. IMS is a great resource for fabrics. Sure, the internet is filled with images of fabric, but there is nothing like touching a full-sized piece to inspire the imagination. Whether you are looking for muted texture, vibrant silks or traditional houndstooth, you’ll find samples to spare at the many fabric vendors.


DESIGN&LIVING TRENDS

Hand-Made Light Fixtures Think of these hand-made light fixtures as functional art. Are you an average cook? Who will notice when illuminated by these statement pieces? These creations boast cool white tones, warm copper tones and rainbow colored fixtures. All are from Bahir Lighting.

Can you say "oo-la-la?" Holly Hunt has one of the largest and most diverse showrooms at IMS. They carry traditional pieces of heirloom quality tables, side chairs and chandeliers. Recently, they added more outdoor furniture. These outdoor pieces are so comfortable, stylish and wellmade that many clients are now pulling them indoors to be used during the other nine months of the year. As representative Tate Libera Swanson claimed, “Outdoor furniture can withstand a girl’s night with wine, kids with grape juice and the family pet.”

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These pieces, available at Holly Hunt, showcase the detail in today’s traditional furniture.

They also carry a wide variety of mid-century modern pieces, recently adding the museum quality line of Vladimir Kagan. This line has been making classic pieces since the late 1940s.

Overwhelmed by the internet options? Worried that the quality, color or finish isn’t what you’ll want? Grab your favorite decorator and take a trip to IMS. Sit on that sofa, touch the fabrics, find the unusual and watch out for the local ghost, Basil. Did I forget to mention the ghost? Oh well, maybe I will in the next article.

Circa 1968. Back, way back, before IMS existed - LeAnn Patterson (back left) and Kari Langsdorf Rasmus (front second from left) For more information contact: designingwomen2 Kari Langsdorf Rasmus kari@designingwomen2.com 701-476-0938 129


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COORDINATING THE WET BAR Compromising with the original cabinetry of the basement's wet bar, Beth Hanson repainted the light wood cabinets in a more modern gray tone to complement the upgraded trim throughout the main living area.


DESIGN&LIVING REMODEL ABOUT NVISION Nvision Building & Remodeling has been a full-service, Moorhead-based contractor for the past nine years. Normandin is a licensed general contractor in Minnesota and North Dakota and is a member of the Home Builder’s Association of Fargo-Moorhead. He does a wide variety of projects like decks, basements, kitchens, bathrooms, whole-house remodels and new construction. See more of Nvision's remodel projects

AFTER

BEFORE

POST REMODEL The Hanson's basement remodel took about a month-and-a-half to complete. "A project like this one is not too difficult. It's pretty straightforward," said Normandin. "A basement remodel can be expensive, but it all depends on the finishes. Most typical basements run about $30,000, but if you have a specialty design with cabinets, for example, or surround sound or even adding better insulation, that can raise the cost." "Before the remodel, we never wanted to hang out down here," said Layne Hanson. "Now we use the space all the time. It's great to have a place for the kids when their buddies come over, just to hang out."

For more information, contact: Nvision Building & Remodeling Corey Normandin 218-233-0999 nvisionremodeling.com

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DESIGN&LIVING REPURPOSED

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f you don't love shopping at the store, take a look outside your own front door. That's what Kelly Binfet does during cleanup week each year. Binfet is the queen of curb shopping. Many of the furniture pieces in her home, Binfet has picked from the side of the road, but you'd never know it. While giving Design & Living a tour, Binfet showed us all of her finds.

BY Becca Opp PHOTOS BY Paul Flessland and Kelly Binfet

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This chair was from one of Binfet's neighbors who set it on the curb during cleanup week. Meanwhile, she found the stool and metal bin on the side of the road.

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DESIGN&LIVING REPURPOSED

Growing up, Binfet’s parents would find things on the curb. At the time, Binfet did not share her parent’s passion for repurposing and sometimes found it to be a bit embarrassing. However, that all changed when Binfet started a family of her own. "When we

Binfet found this wheelbarrow and repurposed it as a planter for in her garden.

Binfet has even found birdhouses to decorate her fence posts.

first got married, we didn't have a lot of money. My husband's pretty handy, and I like to repurpose stuff and I like old and thrift store stuff," Binfet said. Now Binfet takes her own kids picking, and sometimes even her nieces and nephews.

An orange handle added interest to the wooden fence in the backyard.

Binfet uses this found green chair at her kitchen table.

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Although she has dabbled in selling repurposed furniture and decor, Binfet is the community outreach coordinator for the Ronald McDonald House here in Fargo. In their spare time, Binfet and her husband like to work on projects around their house.

Binfet and her husband have not only refurbished furniture, but also their home itself. For example, they removed the doors of their upper kitchen cupboards to showcase Binfet's teapot collection.

Binfet also collects mason jars and used them as a centerpiece for her dining room table. For example, Binfet's husband has transformed one of Binfet's curbside finds into an extension of their kitchen cabinets.

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Design & Living May 2017  

Grow your style with our 2017 Spring into Summer Shopping Guide! Blooming with locally sourced finds, this guide is sure to freshen up your...

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