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JUNE 2017

COMPLIMENTARY

THE

TINY HOUSE ISSUE


PHOTO BY Paul Flessland FROM THE EDITOR

Big Thoughts ON TINY LIVING

W

hen I say this issue has been in the making for years, I'm not being facetious. From nearly the inception of this magazine, we have been dreaming of doing an issue entirely devoted to the concept of tiny homes. What would make some people cringe, we find utterly intriguing. How could a family of four live in a space under 700 square feet and not go crazy? What would entice someone to want to leave behind most of their belongings and live in a space roughly the size of one small garage stall? With shows such as "Tiny House Nation" and "Tiny House Hunters," We became fixated on watching people minimize their lives and move off the grid, away from their white picket fences. The more we watched, the more we began to understand and even admire this concept. These were not crazy people, they were highly intelligent individuals who made a life decision to focus on home, not house. They chose to simply eliminate the clutter, move away from material things and simplify their life. As one homeowner put it, they had a need to create life experiences for

their daughter and live an intentional life. In a nation overrun by material possessions with many people falling into debt trying to build the American dream, I no longer see anything crazy about wanting to live a simpler life. After spending two plus years searching the area and spreading the word of this hopeful issue, we have finally gathered a few locals that prefer to think big and live small. Whether you live in a 10,000-square-foot home or an efficiency apartment, this concept can inspire us all to minimize the material things that weigh us down.

Thank you for reading! Tracy Nicholson

TRACY NICHOLSON Associate Publisher/ Editor tracy@spotlightmediafargo.com


DESIGN&LIVING TEAM At Design & Living, our goal is to create a publication that is just as much fun to read as it is to view. Here are the writers, designers, photographers and contributors who so affably use their time and talents to tell a story and give our pages purpose.

BECCA

PAUL

JESSE

ASSISTANT EDITOR

PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTOGRAPHER

OPP

FLESSLAND

Opp writes print and social media content for Design & Living Magazine. She earned her degree in English education with an emphasis in communications from NDSU. On the weekends, Opp likes to fix up her 114-year-old house.

Flessland is a Minnesota native, Concordia College graduate and owner of Paul Flessland Photo. He specializes in editorial, commercial and landscape photography serving the Midwest. Flessland is also currently an editorial photographer for Spotlight Media.

HOORELBEKE Hoorelbeke is a former professional baseball player turned photographer. He is the owner of J. Alan Paul Photography in Fargo and a veteran editorial photographer for Spotlight Media. Hoorelbeke specializes in editorial, commercial, architectural and landscape photography.

SARAH

TREVER

TYRONE

ERIN

DESIGNER

CONTRIBUTOR

CONTRIBUTOR

CONTRIBUTOR

GEIGER Geiger is a MSUM graduate with a BFA and an emphasis in Graphic Design. She is the lead publication designer for Design & Living Magazine, Fargo Monthly and Fargo Inc! magazines at Spotlight Media.

HILL

Hill founded Trever Hill Design in 2009. Hill works on both residential and commercial design projects around the FM and lakes area. He is also a co-owner of The Private Collection, a furniture rental and home staging business.

LESLIE Leslie founded Heritage Homes in 1995. It is a custom residential home building company serving the FM metro and lakes areas. He currently serves as the Home Builders Association of FargoMoorhead's president. He is also a director on boards of the North Dakota Association of Builders and National Association of Home Builders.

LARSON Larson is the Inbound Marketing Manager at HotSpring Spas and Pool Tables 2. She graduated from Concordia College in 2015. When not at HotSpring, she enjoys teaching violin and piano lessons and performing in the FargoMoorhead Symphony.

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MEET THE TEAM

MIKE

LAYNE

TRACY

BECCA

TANK

ANDREW

MATT

SARAH

RYAN

LIZ

JOE

ERICA

SAM

NATE

PAUL

HEATHER

SCOTT

PAM

JENNY

PAUL

JESSE

KELSEY

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SCOTT

ETHAN

Meet Spotlight Media's Other Magazines

NDSU College of Business' Scott Beaulier When Scott Beaulier started last June as the dean of the NDSU College of Business, he was more than just a new hire. He represented a changing of the guard—a fresh, young face to oversee the school's move into a new era of business education. We check in with him this month for a one-year recap of his time at the helm.

Where Are They Now? The third-annual "Where Are They Now" issue catches up with Bison football coaching legend Rocky Hager. The Harvey, North Dakota, native talks to us about his career, what he's building in New Jersey and why he can't stay away from the game. Numerous other former athletes are featured throughout the magazine giving readers evidence of how strong Bison Pride is after the athletes' college days are over.

Weekend Getaways Some might not always think of the tri-state area to be the ultimate vacation destination, but it's time for many to recognize the beauty of what's in our proximity and embrace it. This month, Fargo Monthly worked with the tourism departments of each state to come up with a handful of great weekend getaways in North Dakota, Minnesota and South Dakota so that you can take full advantage of a Midwest summer (or all seasons, in some cases). Ready, set, mark your calendar and pack your car!

Learn more about Spotlight Media at spotlightmediafargo.com


JUNE 2017 Design & Living Magazine is a free publication distributed 12 times a year. Our mission is to showcase all that the Red River Valley has to offer in terms of interior design, architecture and landscaping, profiling the people that make these possible. We also strive to provide a quality and fun reading experience and improve the way of life in our community. The publication is mailed to homes across the US and has stand distribution throughout North Dakota and Minnesota.

PUBLISHER

Spotlight Media LLC

PRESIDENT

Mike Dragosavich

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER ASSISTANT EDITOR

Andrew Jason Tracy Nicholson Becca Opp

DESIGN/LAYOUT

Sarah Geiger, Matt Anderson, Ryan Koehler

CONTRIBUTORS

Erin Larson, Tyrone Leslie, Trever Hill, Becca Opp, Tracy Nicholson

COPY EDITORS WEB EDITOR ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS OPERATIONS MANAGER SALES MANAGER ADVERTISING/SALES CLIENT RELATIONS MANAGER SOCIAL MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHY

SALES ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT BUSINESS OPERATIONS INTERNS PROJECT ADMINISTRATIVE INTERN ACCOUNTING INTERN VIDEOGRAPHY INTERN DELIVERY

Erica Rapp, Becca Opp, Tracy Nicholson Samantha Stark Liz McLain Heather Hemingway Layne Hanson Tracy Nicholson, Paul Hoefer, Tank McNamara, Scott Rorvig Jenny Johnson Becca Opp, Tracy Nicholson, Samantha Stark J. Alan Paul Photography, Paul Flessland, STUDIO THREE BEAU/Travis Beauchene, Gilbertson Photography, Chris Hawley Architects, Phil Stahl Architects, Erin Larson, HotSpring Spas and Pool Tables 2, Skaff Apartments, Brett Quernemoen, Julie Friederichs, Maia Skarphol, Kelly Binfet Pam Mjoness NIck Hackl, Tatiana Hasbargen Kelsey Wolters Kyle Gliva Scott Cramer Mitch Rapp, Hal Ecker, Nolan Kaml, Tom Wegner, Kent Hagen, Thomas White

Design & Living Magazine is published by Spotlight Media, LLC. Copyright 2017 Design & Living Magazine & designandlivingmagazine.com. All rights reserved. No parts of this periodical may be reproduced or distributed without written permission of Design & Living Magazine and Spotlight Media, LLC is not responsible for, and expressly disclaims all liability for, damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance on such information. Spotlight Media, LLC accepts no liability for the accuracy of statements made by the advertisers.

ADVERTISING: 701-478-SPOT (7768) spotlightmediafargo.com Send change of address information and other correspondence to: Spotlight Media Inc. 15 Broadway N. Suite 500, Fargo, ND 58102 or info@spotlightmediafargo.com


2017

contents

JUNE

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FEATURE STORY

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LIVING LARGE IN TINY SPACES This May, we invite you to view three tiny houses right here in the FM and surrounding areas and to meet the homeowners who are living happily in less than 700 square feet. See inside of these efficient designs and find out how dreaming big has inspired these young, adventurous individuals to build small.

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SKAFF APARTMENTS

If you've rented an apartment in the FM area in the past 20 years, you may have resided in a Skaff Apartment. These days, the Skaff family is creating a new, more refined rental and taking a less traditional approach with their beautiful Stone West Village complex.

FUN HOUSE PRESS

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Printmaking is an artistic medium with a language all its own. While giving us a tour of their tiny studio, Cameron Peterson and Nettie DuBord of Fun House Press told us all about making monotypes, linocuts and the magical process of polymer plate lithography.

THE BEAUTY OF BASEMENTS

Follow Trever Hill Design as he shows us what it takes to refinish, remodel and update any basement to create a more livable space you'll love. We'll transport you to three basements that will take your breath away.

THE QUEEN OF CLEANUP WEEK

Kelly Binfet is the queen of cleanup week and this year, she took us along for the ride. We followed Binfet as she searched for treasures. She also shared her do's and don'ts for cleanup week, which could come in handy for any amateur picker year-round.

NEXT MONTH: LAKE LIVING

ON THE COVER

This tiny house in the country was designed and built by Richard Wright near Hawley, Minnesota. Can you believe that he lives in 260 square feet?

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Once again, we escape to the lakes for our highly anticipated Lake Living issue. Take a road trip with us as we conquer the land of 10,000 lakes and tour stunning year-rounds, rustic fishing cabins and quaint lakeside boutiques.

For more exclusive, original content,

FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @designandlivingmagazine


HBA EDITORIAL DESIGN&LIVING

5 A

Tyrone Leslie founded Heritage Homes in 1995. It is a custom residential homebuilding company serving the FM metro and lakes areas.

ways to position yourself for

HOMEOWNERSHIP

By Tyrone Leslie, HBA President, Heritage Homes

cademic research shows that homeownership provides a wide range of social benefits and strengthens the nation’s people and its communities. If 2017 is the year you’ve decided to purchase a new home – whether as a first-time or move-up buyer – it’s wise to start preparing now. Following a few simple tips will help put you in a better position to find a home that’s right for you.

Check Your Credit Score Even if you’ve purchased a home in the past, stricter credit requirements are making it more challenging for some buyers to find home loans. Having a favorable credit score can make a difference in your ability to be approved for a loan. It’s good to check periodically to ensure you aren’t being unfairly penalized for old debts, which can sometimes linger on credit reports. Borrowers with scores in the low 600s and even high 500s can still find lenders who will qualify them, but borrowers should strive for scores in the mid- to upper-700s to land the best rate.

Sell Your Current Home If buying a new home is contingent on the sale of your current home, it’s a good idea to start the process by reaching out and consulting with your Realtor. Ask him or her about your best strategy to sell your home quickly, but at the right time and for the best price possible. You’ll want to identify any maintenance issues your home has, and determine if, how and when each one will need to be addressed. You can also ask your Realtor if making any upgrades to your current home would be worthwhile and result in a favorable return when it comes time to sell.

Prioritize Your Must-Haves First-time home buyers should take the time to determine what their needs are, especially regarding size, location and amenities. But even seasoned homeowners will find that having a must-have list can save significant time by helping them avoid listings that may look great in the photos, but in reality, won’t meet their needs. Home buyers should always prioritize the items on their checklists, as most will need to compromise on certain items to fit within a realistic budget.

Determine What You Can Afford Don’t let your maximum loan approval amount dictate what your homebuying budget should be. You are the best person to judge what you can realistically afford. Experts say that your total monthly home expenses should not exceed more than one-third of your gross monthly income. You’ll also need to determine how much you’ll need in order to cover any loan fees and closing costs.

Evaluate Potential Contractors If you are planning to build a new home, make sure to choose a contractor carefully. You will be working closely with him or her on one of the biggest projects of your life. Make sure the company is properly licensed and insured. Get a detailed contract including a summary of the work to be done, a description of materials, the total contract price, or how the price will be calculated, and specific timelines. Ask how long the contractor has been in business. Request references. Ask about warranty work and the company's service policies.

June is National Homeownership Month! 22

There are many resources available to you locally in your journey. Check out online resources from the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development in both Minnesota and North Dakota, your local city government's website, the HBA's website at hbafm.com and the F-M Area Association of Realtors' website at fmrealtor.com.

DESIGN & LIVING J U N E 2 017

The HBA of FM promotes an environment in which members and their businesses can prosper.

For more information, contact: hbafm.com info@hbafm.com facebook.com/ HBAFargoMoorhead twitter.com/hbafm Blog: homebuildersassociation. areavoices.com


OUTDOOR LIVING DESIGN&LIVING

BY Erin Larson, Inbound Marketing Manager, HotSping Spas and Pool Tables 2

IDENTIFYING QUALITY

Outdoor Furniture

C

reating a beautiful, outdoor living space is a rewarding experience. Sadly, many don’t enjoy their backyard furniture as vague product descriptions have led them astray. Their once pristine wicker chair now feels like last year’s Christmas tree. The white painted side table is most frequented by squirrels since becoming too shakey to balance a beverage, and let's not forget lounging chairs notorious for fading their first summer and flipping over in our strong, Midwestern winds. Fortunately, I work with people who have taught me quite a bit on the subject. From an inside perspective, here’s how to spot outdoor furnishings that will stand the test of time.

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Here on the plains, wind is the No. 1 cause of damaged outdoor furniture, so the first thing I’d look for is style type. Whether it’s a table, couch or chairs, look for items with low centers of gravity (bulk of weight close to the ground). This creates an anchor effect so the furniture does not easily tip over. This means a sophisticated Parisian bistro table with skinny, long legs is a no-go. Instead, look for wide-set, heavy bases paired with thicker seat cushions to compensate for lost leg room. Additionally, it’s best to avoid cloth-backed seating. The wind gives heavy-topped furniture with wide pieces of cloth backing a parachute effect. We all know how much damage in dings, bent legs and tearing this can cause. Try opting for breathable mesh, grated or low-rise back and side styles that allow the breeze to flow through or around them.

The second biggest outdoor furniture problem is weathering from the sun and precipitation. Vibrantly colored cushions turn dull and even translucent from UV rays. Meanwhile, the rain, snow, heat and pounding winds tatter threads, peel paint and rough-up surface areas. For fabrics, the most favorable option for preventing fading is to buy cushions that are tight-knit and UV-resistant. The tightknit weaves don’t allow as much UV ray or precipitation penetration. To have this with a naturally UV-resistant fabric gives you double protection. Personally, I’d also make sure I can flip over the cushions so when I do eventually notice some fading, they’ll look new again. Examples include solution-dyed acrylic material, polyester and polyethylene blends. Note: Some companies rename common materials like these with their own special name in an attempt to seem exclusive. In this case, just ask what is in the material.


OUTDOOR LIVING DESIGN&LIVING There are also many styles of cushionless outdoor furniture that are weather resistant and maintenancefree. My favorites include synthetic materials such as polyethylene (a faux wood often used to make faux wicker) and aluminum. Neither will weather or corrode. As a bonus, if aluminum furniture is powdercoated (see right), this is ideal. “Powder-coated” means instead of using an industrial spray painter, a dry, colored powder was applied and then heated to “cure” it onto the metal. Due to this process, items are less prone to peeling and wearing. Lastly, there’s nothign more annoying than a new piece of furniture that looks perfectly sturdy on the packaging, but ends up wobbly in reality. To counter this, the easiest thing you can do is test it if it’s on display. Sit on the seat or set something on top. Do the legs or arm rests wiggle even a little? Odds are if it wiggles a little inside of a showroom building, it will only be worse outdoors.

If you’re still unsure, check out how the furniture is put together. In general, the more screws and bolts that you need to assemble at home, the bigger the opportunity for something to come loose or irreparably fall apart. Arguably, the sturdiest outdoor furniture will be welded (see left) or molded. Welded furniture parts are bonded via fusion, which melts the base metal to join two metals together. This creates a strong bond that does not easily break or warp. Welded outdoor furniture often comes in large welded segments that are then assembled with minimal hardware. Molded outdoor furniture is formed when a manufacturer pours liquid metal or a synthetic material like polyethylene into a furniture-shaped mold and lets it harden to become one solid piece. This can create an even stronger bond than welded furniture. At the end of the day, the most important factor here is that you enjoy using your outdoor furniture.

For more information, contact: Erin Larson - HotSpring Spas and Pool Tables 2 701-364-3725 elarson@fargohotspring.com hotspringnd.com 26

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TINY HOMES DESIGN&LIVING

cross the country, people are making big lifestyle changes by living small. Within these pages, we have curated content that reflects the concept of "intentional" living. We'll introduce you to tiny homeowners right here in the FM and surrounding areas who built their homes in less than 700 square feet. See inside of these efficient designs and find out why going tiny was the right decision for these innovative individuals.

BY Becca Opp & Tracy Nicholson

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DESIGN&LIVING TINY HOMES

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DESIGN&LIVING TINY HOMES

Tiny Home Tour T R A V I S & B R I T TA N Y B E A U C H E N E

pon first impression, Travis and Brittany Beauchene are like any young, married couple. However, with U their little family on the grow, this couple decided to think big and build even smaller. Re-evaluating the traditional American dream, the Beauchenes defined their values and discussed how they wanted to instill those values in their daughter, Millie. Forging their own path, the Beauchenes set aside their materialistic belongings and are instead focusing their energy on creating experiences.

A TINY TEAM Both aged 28, Travis and Brittany Beauchene have known each other since kindergarten. The two own and operate a creative business, STUDIO THREE BEAU, where Travis is an artist, photographer and graphic designer and Brittany oversees the administrative details. The two also live in a 660-squarefoot space where they work from home and are raising their one-and-a-halfyear-old daughter, Millie.

BY Becca Opp & Tracy Nicholson | PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED BY Travis Beauchene

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THE SMALL SPECS 500 square-foot footprint "We're a really good team," Travis Beauchene said.

160 square-foot loft

"We love working together, for sure. I like to be involved in whatever he's doing. Millie and I will hang out in the studio when he is painting or working. Millie loves to help paint. She says 'pay-pay' all the time and wants to be involved," added Brittany Beauchene.

660 square feet total

HOW IT BEGAN

THE LAND

"It really started once we knew Millie was going to be born. We had long conversations about how we wanted her to grow up. From there, we realized we wanted a small space and to put value on experiences, the outdoors and to not be materialistic-having fewer things, but appreciating those things more," Travis Beauchene explained.

"We went into it saying, 'We're not going to move forward with this until we find the right lot. If that's five years from now, so be it,'" Brittany Beauchene explained. However, the couple was so excited that they were looking at lots every weekend.

When Millie was born, the Beauchenes were living in an 1,800-square-foot home in Moorhead that they loved. However, the Beauchenes soon realized they were not utilizing all of the space. "We had a very small kitchen in that house, which was almost a deal-breaker, thinking that we needed this big kitchen. I found that I wasn't even using the whole kitchen, and we were always on this couch or in this little area. We had purchased all these things and spent all this time on these rooms, and I walked through it," Brittany Beauchene said. "We had a ton of stuff in storage in the basement, no clue what was down there, and we just looked at each other and said, 'What are we really doing?'" "We had some trees at that house and were a bit tucked away, but just found that was a gateway to, 'Oh my gosh, we want even more. We'd love to have a little more land and be more private.' We wanted some water and found out that was a big value for us," Brittany Beauchene continued. That was how the couple began thinking about building a tiny home. It also wouldn't be the first time that Travis and Brittany Beauchene shared a small space. When they lived in Washington D.C., the couple had a 400-square-foot studio apartment. "We loved it. That was a big eye-opener, in D.C.," Brittany Beauchene recalled.

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Late one night in their Moorhead house, the Beauchenes found their lot by pure luck after about a month of searching. "Millie couldn't sleep, so I was on the couch with her. I was looking in our price range for lake lots. We found one that was for sale next to our current lot," Travis Beauchene said. They then contacted the realtor, who told them about an unlisted, adjacent lot. "We went there, and we just felt it," said Travis Beauchene. The lot is located in Rochert, Minnesota, which is a small township about 15 minutes northeast of Detroit Lakes. It's by the Tamarac Wildlife Refuge, Cotton Lake and Pickerel Lake. Their acreage has a peninsula that juts out onto the water upon which the Beauchenes have made their tiny home. On the other side of the pond is Minnesota state land, so no one can ever build on it. Although their land appears to be secluded, it is just 10 minutes from big amenities and their nearest neighbor is only 600 feet away. THE TINY HOUSE Travis and Brittany Beauchene's home is a permanent structure, meaning that it is not on wheels. The whole process took a year-and-a-half from start to finish, while the build itself took only nine months. The Beauchenes designed the structure and chose all of the finishes, then partnered with a builder to make their

dream a reality. "It wasn't a spec home. We did draw it out with pen and ink. It came from the brain, and that was really fun," Travis Beauchene said. "We researched like crazy to find everything from light switches to faucets," added Brittany Beauchene. SMALL CHALLENGES "One of the biggest challenges was utilizing every square foot. Our kitchen was a bit of a challenge too, because we were used to buying in bulk and now we buy everything for a couple days in advance. I don't know if I'd call that a challenge though," said Travis Beauchene. "I had way more perceived challenges going into it," said Brittany Beauchene. "After they poured the foundation, we were walking around and I thought, 'Oh boy, this is it.' We taped out the house to plan where we wanted furniture in the driveway of Travis's parents' cabin. Our house fit on a driveway. The biggest surprise for me was that there weren't challenges. Cleaning is a dream. The honey-do list has gone to the outdoors." "That's a list that I love," Travis Beauchene elaborated. "We get to do these things. That's a very fortunate way to look at it." "My dream is to have a little homestead and be as self-sufficient as we possibly can. I love the challenge of that. What exactly can we live off of and how can we bring that about on our own, teaching Millie to work alongside us and find value in that way of life as well?" Brittany Beauchene said.


DESIGN&LIVING TINY HOMES

RAISING A TINY FAMILY For the Beauchenes, raising Millie in a tiny house feels right. Brittany Beauchene shared, "It feels very natural. It feels right, like we're giving Millie her best chance. I want her to look back on her childhood and think, 'That was a magical time.'" "We feel that now when we wake up and look out at the water," Travis Beauchene said. "I just want her to have a space and a life that feels that way all the time, if I can. Now I feel like we're in the space and the headspace where we can give her that. Spaces can transform who you are. That's been very amazing." Even envisioning Millie getting older, the Beauchenes have already started talking about how to best give Millie privacy. "I see her having her space here too. She has her room, and we've talked about building her a little clubhouse and being able to offer her cool things like that," Brittany Beauchene said. The couple also plans to homeschool their daughter in the space. In Travis Beauchene's studio, located just down the drive from their tiny house, Millie gets to experiment with art. "It's really neat with the space, just what Millie is exposed to," Travis Beauchene said. "She'll be working with me. Right now, I'm working on this huge painting for our house. I'll be holding her in my arm, and she says, 'Cool da-da.' I love how she's seeing all of this stuff right up close, and its not just in a book or on a digital screen." However, the Beauchenes realize that tiny house living isn't ideal for everyone. "We never want to say, 'This is the way to do it.' We always preach that you should stay true to yourself and this is our truth," Travis Beauchene articulated.

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The Beauchenes' tiny house features a full kitchen along the south wall. Floating shelves give the space an open feel. You may also notice a few space-saving hacks including a magnetic spice rack, magnetic knife strip and half-sized appliances.

The north view shows the Beauchene's shelving unit with a built-in space for their piano. You can also see the cement floors, which is the actual foundation that Travis and Brittany Beauchene sealed off themselves. This is the main source of heat, which the couple has found to be both efficient and economical.

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When taking in the east view, you can see why the Beauchenes fell in love with their lot. In the corner, there is a standing desk where the couple does online work for STUDIO THREE BEAU.

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TINY HOMES DESIGN&LIVING

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DESIGN&LIVING TINY HOMES The loft serves as the master bedroom. It also has access to a patio which doubles as a car port. In the winter, Travis and Brittany Beauchene fit both of their cars underneath the overhang.

Millie's room is on the main floor and is large enough to fit a queen-sized bed. Also in the room is a very special piece of art. "We have a drawing in Millie's room that we did together as kindergartners. We recognize

For more information, please contact: 701-866-9121

each other's handwriting. It's the real deal, so we framed that and that's on one of her walls," Travis Beauchene said.

You can also follow Brittany Beauchene's blog at

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TINY HOMES DESIGN&LIVING

Richard Wright and his girlfriend, Ruvie Chitemere, sit in front of the tiny house built by Wright.

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DESIGN&LIVING TINY HOMES

Tiny House in the Country RICHARD WRIGHT

etween driving through traffic and spending nearly all of your paycheck on rent, city life can B be stressful, which is why Richard Wright said goodbye to his urban apartment and built his own tiny house in the country. He told us what it's really like to live inside of 260 square feet and about the challenges of leaving material possessions behind. Read on to find out how he survived his first winter and see the amazing space that makes it all worthwhile.

BY Becca Opp | PHOTOS BY Paul Flessland

After getting his master's degree in architecture from NDSU, Wright was living with a burden that affects many young adults today: student loan debt. He was also dwelling in an apartment and becoming increasingly disillusioned with spending a large portion of his paycheck on rent. It was then that he recalled his experience as a student. While in school, Wright was inspired by professional skier and host of "Tiny House Nation" Zack Giffin, who travels in a tiny house from slope to slope. "I finished architecture school, and I really wanted to have my own space," Wright said. He then took part of every paycheck and put it toward materials for the tiny house.

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DESIGN&LIVING TINY HOMES

THE SMALL SPECS 260 square feet

A LITTLE HELP FROM A FAMILY FRIEND After working on the tiny house in a friend's driveway and even at his church, Wright needed a place to put down roots. Luckily, he was able to strike a bargain with a family friend that would benefit everyone. "I've known her since I was a kid and we'd always come out here and help her with the farm. Now that she's getting a little older, she actually wasn't sure how much longer she is going to stay out here, so it was fortunate that I ended up talking to her," Wright said. He has agreed to help maintain the farmhouse and outbuildings in exchange for keeping his tiny house on her land on the outskirts of Hawley, Minnesota.

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DESIGN&LIVING TINY HOMES TINY LEARNING CURVE After he had already started building it once, Wright redesigned and rebuilt the bookshelf to display some of his favorite photos.

Wright designed this double sink to have removable covers that can convert into a single sink or extra counter space.

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One of Wright's favorite features is the sunroom, which doubles as an additional sleeping area.

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DESIGN&LIVING TINY HOMES

"You end up prioritizing things and then you're much more organized, so when I sit down in here, I have a book that I've never read or I have a book that I really enjoy. You get the richness of life and take all of the junk away." - Richard Wright

TINY LEARNING CURVE Because he tackled the construction by himself with occasional assistance from his girlfriend, Ruvie Chitemere, the entire project took Wright a lot longer than anticipated. What he originally hoped to accomplish in four months, or one summer, Wright has spent the last two years perfecting. This is partially because Wright redesigned some features of the tiny house until he found exactly what he wanted. "I built some things and then I ripped them out and rebuilt them," Wright laughed. In the end, those little changes made a big difference. However, if he had to start all over again, there are still some things Wright would like to do differently. "Weight was the biggest thing. There's so much that you have to take into consideration. If I did this over again, I would've done steel studs and lighter materials," said Wright. "The trailer is everything when it comes to the tiny house. Then you're talking about weight, what kind of material you can use, how big it is, how tall it is-it was a really big deal in the beginning," Wright explained. Before he started building, Wright spent hours in AutoCAD redistributing weight on his drop axle trailer. Although Wright is an Estimator at D&M Industries in Moorhead, he had to teach himself a few new skills along the way when building his tiny house. "It was more of a learning experience because I went through architecture school, got my masters, and I really wanted to learn electrical, plumbing and propane. I had never done any of that, so this was my intro," Wright said. "There was a little learning curve there."

SMALL ADJUSTMENTS

The corrugated metal wall is a big wow-factor in this tiny bathroom.

After making the big transition to tiny living, Wright made a small lifestyle adjustment by paring down his material possessions. Though it was difficult to let go of the bigger things, Wright felt a sense of satisfaction from eliminating the unnecessary.

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On the left, you can see the heated shelter Wright built for the water tank.

FIRST WINTER When he finally moved to his current location, Wright rushed to winterize his tiny house in preparation for the cold weather that was quickly approaching. From his research, he knew that many tiny homeowners rely on boat heaters as their main heat source, so he installed a direct vent boat heater in his own tiny home. After he installed the heating system, Wright faced a big challenge during his first winter in the tiny house. "There's no septic system here, so what I ended up doing during the winter­—because the water would freeze—I just ended up making my own heated shelter for the water tank," said Wright. He also tried using leaf bags for extra insulation, but replaced them with hay bails around the bottom of the trailer.

SETTLING DOWN WITH FREEDOM TO ROAM Now, Wright can haul his tiny house all over the U.S. without needing an oversized permit. However, he doesn't see himself going anywhere any time soon. He also doesn't think he could bear to part with the product of all of his hard work. Years from now, Wright can see himself turning the tiny house into a little lake cabin. "To me, it's temporary. It's all about that next step of life. For me, it was all about student loans. Once my student loans were done, this gave me a lot of freedom. I didn't know where I was going to go, where I was going to move to or if I was going to be here. I liked the mobility of it," Wright explained.

A LITTLE ADVICE To anyone thinking about building a tiny house, Wright says, "Do your research and have fun with it." He also recommends that you avoid putting yourself in harm's way and to have your plumbing, electrical, and propane done by a professional. For more information: Visit Wright's blog at richardstinyhouse.weebly.com. builtbywright@gmail.com

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DESIGN&LIVING TINY HOMES

A Tiny House Team MAIA AND GABRIEL SKARPHOL

or some, going tiny is a big adventure. This is true for married couple Maia and Gabriel Skarphol, who took F on a tiny house build after attending a workshop in the Twin Cities. It just so happened that both Gabriel Skarphol and his father-slash-master-carpenter, John Skarphol, are quite experienced with construction. Collectively, the Skarphols have 18 days of physical labor invested in the build. See how far they've come and find out where they plan to go when their tiny house on wheels finally hits the road. BY Becca Opp | PHOTOS BY Paul Flessland and Maia Skarphol

TINY INSPIRATION One year ago, Maia and Gabriel Skarphol took a class in Minneapolis, Minnesota, through a company called Tumbleweed Tiny House. Based out of Sonoma, California, the company designs 65 to 887-square-foot houses, many of which are on trailers. Their weekend workshop was intended for anyone who was curious about building a tiny house. Though they had been considering adopting a minimalist lifestyle, it wasn't until after the workshop that Maia and Gabriel Skarphol got serious about going tiny.

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THE SMALL SPECS 172 square feet

TWO TRADESMEN AND A TEACHER After attending the workshop, the couple enlisted the help of Gabriel's father, John Skarphol, who works for local construction firm R.L. Engebretson. Gabriel Skarphol follows in his father's footsteps working for T.F. Powers Construction and Maia Skarphol is an art teacher at Carl Ben Eielson Middle School and a freelance photographer. Over the last year, this team of three has invested 18 days of physical labor into building a tiny house. "Maybe one or two weekends a month we work on it," Maia Skarphol said. "The reason it's spanning a year is because Gabe and I are paying for it out of pocket. We didn't take out any loans, so as we save money, we buy material and then we use it, save money, buy material, use it. That way when it's done, it's all paid for."

THE CONSTRUCTION PROCESS

THE TRAILER To start, the Skarphols modified designs from Tumbleweed Tiny House Company. Then they bought a 24-foot trailer, which was the second largest size available to them. "The bigger you get, the harder it is to go down the road," Maia Skarphol said. Gabriel Skarphol and a friend actually drove from Fargo to Colorado to pick up the trailer because it would have been more expensive to deliver.


DESIGN&LIVING TINY HOMES

THE LUMBER The next step was to purchase lumber. Luckily, Gabriel's sister, Kara Skarphol, works for Casselton Lumber and was able to help them choose materials. This build really turned into a family effort. For the exterior, the Skarphols chose cedar and for the interior they went with knotty pine. 53


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Kimchi, the Skarphol's corgi, supervised the build.

THE BUILD

DAY 3

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DAY 1

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DAY 10


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DAY 11

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The Skarphols went with a metallic, copper roof to complement the theme of their interior design, which will have copper accents throughout.

DAY 14

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DAY 16

To transport their tiny home, the Skarphols have a Ford F-150 truck

DAY 17

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TINY BUILDING CHALLENGES When it comes to tiny houses, "They're not as easy to build as you think," John Skarphol said. "There's different things you have to do to be able to put them on the road. Gabe and Maia learned a lot through that class–what specifications you have to have, heights, widths, windows, things like that. They don't make a lot of products for tiny houses, so you have to make your pieces to fit, otherwise everything is too big." To remedy this, Gabriel Skarphol and John Skarphol did a lot of custom woodwork themselves. The climate in North Dakota is another challenge. During the winter, the Skarphols will need to cover the bottom of their trailer so the plumbing doesn't freeze. They will also need a reliable heating system, so John Skarphol plans to install a Sony mini-split unit for heating and air conditioning. Another concern is mold build-up, which is common in tiny houses. Of course, that can be prevented with good ventilation. When talking about these challenges, Maia Skarphol said, "We wouldn't be at this stage without him (John Skarphol), and we really appreciate his support, time and hard work."

John and Gabriel Skarphol custom-built the staircase.


DESIGN&LIVING TINY HOMES

TINY TRAVELERS

A LITTLE GET-TOGETHER

The Skarphols knew that their relationship could survive living in a tiny house because after they got married, the couple moved to South Korea and taught English for a year, where the two became comfortable sharing tight quarters.

Once it is complete, the Skarphols plan to have a tiny house opening for the public.

When they returned to the U.S., the Skarphols did not pursue the typical American dream. "When we moved back, we weren't looking for something really huge by any means," Maia Skarphol said. At 700 square feet, the home the Skarphols are currently living in during the construction of their tiny house is also on the small side. Though they aren't yet minimalists, the two have already cut their belongings in half and plan to do so once more before moving into their tiny house.

"Normally people have house warming parties, so we thought it would be fun to have a tiny house opening. Normally when we're working on it, total strangers stop by. They literally stop, park their car, walk up and strike up a conversation with us, even though we don't know them. We thought it would be fun to give the opportunity, not just to family and friends, but anyone who wants to come see it," Maia Skarphol said. She is also making a video documenting the build for her students, who are very intrigued by their teacher's tiny house.

LITTLE HOUSE ON THE LAKE After opening their tiny house to the public, the Skarphols hope to claim one of the vacant lake lots that Maia Skarphol's mother owns and live in the structure year-round with their two dogs, a corgi named Kimchi and a basset hound named Ole.

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Part One

Tiny Design with Chris Hawley Architects

A

s part one of our threeissue series on tiny design, Chris Hawley of Chris Hawley Architects takes us inside some of his favorite home projects with smallerthan-average footprints. We asked Hawley to offer us insight on the upside of BY Tracy Nicholson PHOTOS BY J. Alan Paul Photography, Gilbertson Photography, Chris downsizing. Hawley Architects, Stahl Architects, Paul Flessland

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ABOUT THE TINY DESIGN SERIES Part two in July will send us to lakes country for a special feature on tiny lake living. Part three in August will take us to the backyard to learn everything you need to know about small-scale designs for sheds, pool houses, backyard office spaces and dreamy playhouses.


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Q&A with

Chris Hawley Q Why do you think the idea of tiny

houses and living small has gained popularity recently?

A "I think people are realizing that they need less stuff. As a result of getting rid of their belongings, they find they have too much space and can live a full life with less. Not to mention there is freedom from the stuff owning the person." Q As an architect, how is designing

small spaces different than a typical home project?

A "The process is the same no matter what you are designing. However, designing smaller has to be much more calculated and exacting because there is little room for 'slop.' As a part of this, you really have to evaluate needs versus wants and be really critical of how you use every space you plan to be in." Q What is the smallest home you've

designed?

A "We have done 10-by-12-foot cabins for weekend stays, but that kind of project is probably not a long-term stay kind of home. That being said, I would say the most functional home that we have done is probably a 560-square-foot summer home that has three bunk rooms, a nice bathroom, full kitchen, open kitchen/living/dining, fireplace, TV area and mechanical room. And, it’s perfect for sleeping up to 12 people–really fun." Q You previously lived in an

880-square-foot home. How did you make it work for your lifestyle?

A "It was perfect for 10 years when our kids were smaller and I wasn’t working out of my house so much. As soon as the kids started having friends over and I started to have employees, it wasn’t working anymore. To be honest, I really miss that house and loved every bit of it. It was always enough until it wasn’t. I always kid that we are

going to buy it back someday when our kids have decided to move on and I want to scale back, but that may never happen." Q What kind of feedback do you hear

from people and clients who live in smaller homes?

A "I think they like the feeling of not being burdened with having 'too much' or 'waste' and that it allows them a lot of freedom. They have more money to do the things that they love to do, like take trips, have hobbies and focus on the things that they always wanted to do." Q What kind of design and space

challenges do tiny homeowners face?

A "I think that they are deliberate about what they buy, and the kinds of things that they choose to be a part of. If they buy something, there has to be a home for it. If there’s no spot for it, then maybe they don’t need it." Q Have you noticed a difference in

homeowners of small or tiny homes after downsizing?

A "Absolutely, they seem to be more available to spend time on the things that they really love– travel, spending time with friends, exploring their community and seeing the world." Q Do you recommend any resources

for people interested in smaller home lifestyles?

A "I think people can really pull some great ideas from Sarah Susanka's book 'The Not So Big House.' The whole concept of that book is little house living. Living with just enough. We actually did a remodel that was featured in the book."

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Inside Tiny Design Part One

This is Hawley's previous residence of nine years and first small-home project. Its footprint is 880 square feet and is currently the home of Zack and Kelly Dawson. When Hawley took on this personal project, he created a superefficient design to manage his family of four as well as his architecture business.

Hawley had bought the home from an architect who had put in the unique kitchen windows. Sitting at the kitchen table gave them a perfect view of the yard.

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ABOUT THE SHEDEAU His office space was a specially designed shed in the backyard that was fondly referred to as the "Shedeau".

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To maximize a small bedroom, Hawley designed and fabricated this unique crib and child's bed combination unit for his two daughters. The panels were designed to come off and the girls could talk to each other through a little hole between the beds.


DESIGN&LIVING TINY DESIGN

"This is probably one of my favorite rooms in my old house," said Hawley. "We got to the point where 800 square feet was just not enough for the four of us. So, we went downstairs and the whole lower level was kind of our master suite. We had a little hang-out movie room adjacent to our bedroom. And the girls took over the second floor. What was fun about this is, it was my office, it was a movie room, an extra room outside of the bedroom and we had our own bathroom. It kind of felt like a condo in the basement."

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We had a little hang-out movie room adjacent to our bedroom. And the girls took over the second floor. What was fun about this is, it was my office, it was a movie room, an extra room outside of the bedroom and we had our own bathroom. It kind of felt like a condo in the basement."

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The Hawleys kept the original footprint intact but instead got clever with their selections. A full-size refrigerator would have taken up too much counter space, so they chose to spread their refrigeration amongst four drawers. "I would do drawer refrigerators again, even in a high-end home," said Hawley. "Sarah loved that the kids could reach the food easier, and we could manage the food a little better. We got everything in there. But it was just a tiny, little farmhouse kitchen."

Hawley had bought the home from an architect who had put in the unique kitchen windows. Sitting at the kitchen table gave them a perfect view of the yard.


TINY DESIGN DESIGN&LIVING

This three-bedroom home located in Evelyn’s Acres in South Fargo was once referred to as the Little House Workshop, LLC, and was a collaboration with three architects: Amanda Thomas, Chris Hawley and Phil Stahl. Hawley was the lead designer/architect on the project. The project was part of a series of tiny home prototypes created by Thomas, Hawley and Stahl.

Add renderings

Models by Stahl Architects, Chris Hawley, Lead architect.

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DESIGN&LIVING TINY DESIGN

This is the former office of Jade Presents and a great representation of maximizing a small space. Architects on the project were Hawley and Phil Stahl.

The design of this modern home features a sideways murphy bed created by Hawley through Stahl Architects.

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Luthern Social Services Renderings and Caption

Mobile Housing

About 10 years ago during the oil boom in Watford City, North Dakota, Hawley, who was working for Stahl Architects at the time, was put on a project to help create schemes for temporary and transitional living arrangements. The project was halted as the boom settled, but these plans show the creative design behind using a park model type, tow-behind camper and creating a transitional home. The intention was to create mobile housing that could have various layouts to accommodate a family. Each of the units would be shipped as a singular piece, then additional pieces could be added on to create more bedrooms as needed. "They were really cute, little cottages and we did a bunch of schemes. The idea was that they were all the same dimension– they fit on the back of a truck and you haul them down the road and it was an instant house for under $50,000," said Hawley. "So, all you would need is step up for plumbing, septic and power and then you'd insulate the bottom. All the units came with a unit for a single stall garage."

The 20-Year Plan

One of the most unique design concepts we'd heard of is when Hawley worked closely with one husband and wife duo to create the perfect 20-year plan for their home, giving them ample projects well into retirement. "One was an attorney, the other a doctor. All their friends were retiring, going to Arizona or buying houses on the lake," explained Hawley. "They said, 'We don't want to do that. We want to travel, but we still want to live in our house." So instead of building a retirement house, they took on a retirement project. They're busy people and they like to do things. So, I created a master plan for them to do a project on their house over the next ten to twenty years. Every two years I get a phone call and I go and meet them and we talk about the next phase. They do this room-by-room but they don't change the footprint at all. It's kind of like this evolution over time. They might say, 'Okay, this year we're going to remodel the pantry and the half bath this year.' So, they have their master plan and they focus on that. In addition to the detailed drawings, they get a computer model to use as a tool."

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This 1,925-square-foot home was designed by architects Phil Stahl and Dave Uhlir is located in Downtown Fargo. It features a custom, murphy bed system designed by Hawley. This house, including the murphy bed, was once featured on HGTV and in Dwell magazine.

This is a more traditional, maple murphy bed design by Hawley in the Downtown Fargo home of Dan and Paula Wilson. Built-in shelving and maple woodwork by Schmidt Brothers frames in the murphy bed which folds up to create a fully-functioning, expansive office space. Hawley designated areas for computer storage, TV display and a desktop that can be shifted forward when the bed is lowered.

"This project is still one of the coolest things that I've ever done," said Hawley. "Living small, not adding a bedroom on to the house, we designed a murphy bed where the bed flips down. When the bed's not in use, it flips up. The legs for the bed are actually a coat hook concept. There are three holes in the top of the cabinet to lock it in. It's basically one-room living and trying to figure out how to make one room do more than one thing. We call this the transformer room, it was a guest bedroom, mudroom, coat closet, or it can be a studio, sewing room and craft room. "

"It's basically one-room living and trying to figure out how to make one room do more than one thing." - Chris Hawley, Chris Hawley Architects

Architect, Phil Stahl being interviewed by HGTV in a Downtown Fargo home.

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For more information, contact: Chris Hawley Architects 2534 University Drive S. #3, Fargo 701-478-7600 chrishawleyarchitects.com


DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN APARTMENT &LIVING SHOPPING LIVING

STONE WEST VILLAGE

BY Tracy Nicholson PHOTOGRAPHY BY Paul Flessland, Aerial photography courtesy of Skaff Apartments, Groundbreaking photos by Brett Quernemoen

I

f you've rented an apartment in the FM area in the past 20 years, chances are you may have resided in a Skaff Apartment. These days, the Skaff family is paving the way for a new, more refined rental and taking a less traditional approach with their beautiful Stone West Village complex. Meet the passionate family behind the concept and see how combining their unique talents resulted in redefining the community experience. 81


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Aerial photos of Stone West Village

Sam J. Skaff and his dad, the late Sam F. Skaff pening their doors this past November, the entire Skaff family worked together to create a community experience through unique amenities and upscale design one might only find in a luxury home. Sitting down with their family, we were introduced to Sam and Laneil Skaff, the owners of Skaff Apartments, along with three of their four children: Jenna Stowers, Julie Stoe and Nate Skaff. Each has grown into their own role and enhanced the family business, even taking trips around the nation to scout out new living arrangements and styles that could be incorporated into our midwest terrain.

Digging up Dirt

Twenty-three years ago, Sam Skaff purchased 22 acres of land that would this year become the site for Stone West Village. The property begins with single family homes, then transitions to twin homes, apartments and two-story apartments. Once owning apartments solely in Moorhead, Sam Skaff wanted to expand into Fargo. His father had originally started the company in 1957 and built his first four-plex in 1962.

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"I talked to my dad because he’s pretty wise," said Sam Skaff. "I said, 'Dad, would you come over here and take a look at this land I’m ready to buy?' So, he came over here, stood on the land and I said, 'Would you pray with me over this?' We prayed, and at the end, I said looking at the land with no roads or anything, 'Who would be stupid enough to buy this?' My dad looked at me and said, 'Son, get your checkbook out as fast as you can.' I said, 'Dad, I don’t have any money.' He said, 'Well, what are banks for? Now go.' So, I left, I worked hard on it, and bought it. Two weeks later I got a phone call and someone offered me double. Of course, I didn’t sell it, but I called up dad and said thanks." Back in the day, Sam Skaff would take his family on field trips through bumpy dirt roads, telling tall tales of what might be there someday. "It’s been a family dream and it's years later, and that’s why it’s working so well," said Sam Skaff. "It really is a good area. It’s close to West Acres, it’s close to a lot of workplaces, the interstate and medical. Laneil and I were hoping we could pass this on to the family, so it’s been a long time with the company.


DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN APARTMENT &LIVING SHOPPING LIVING

Breaking ground as a family

of what’s happening here. We have pushed our dad out of his box a bit," said Julie Stoe. "I believe we were one of the firsts that had that commercial space on the bottom, besides downtown."

Focusing on the People I’m thrilled that my kids enjoy it because it’s tough work."

The Concept

The Skaffs are proof that when an entire family shares a passion, anything is possible. "We had this vision for a luxury complex in this area," said Nate Skaff. "Seventeenth Avenue was just so busy, and we’ve seen this concept everywhere else like Phoenix and Minneapolis and we began talking about bringing it to Fargo, the commercial and apartments in mixed-use. We wanted to really create that community atmosphere." "It's unlike anything in Fargo," said Julie Stoe. "No one has amenities like we have here. A lot of people don't even know we exist back here. Anytime we see the residents, they tell us how happy they are with the spaces and how much they love the amenities. We have a lot of one and two-bedroom units that don't have that second living room area like the two-story units. With these other spaces, they can have that second living room too." In addition, heat and water are paid and residents here are offered community spaces with free internet and heated underground parking with additional storage areas above their stalls. Below the residential units, residents have a variety of services at their fingertips. "You can come down and get your hair done, alterations, go shopping, get a massage, chiropractic care and have lunch or coffee," said Julie Stoe. "I think we have always tried to be on the cutting edge

When the Skaff family zeroed in on what type of resident would want to live here, two groups came to mind. "We focused on the people that may be moving out of their house, maybe 50 and older, that had a nice house," said Laneil Skaff. "At the same time, we’re multi-generational, so these are also for the young professional who wants a nice place, who loves amenities and community. The young professionals nowadays are very much wanting community, just like the older generation. We feel like both ends of the spectrum are looking for a place to land, a place to interact with others and a place to have their family when there’s not enough room in their apartment." For the older generation, the Skaff family knew that moving into an apartment was probably a downsize, which made providing those extra amenities and transitional spaces even more important. "If they left their fire pit and their big lawns, closets, offices and spare rooms, they’ll still have those things here," explained Jenna Stowers. "We have the courtyard to enjoy and guest rooms they can rent—even conference rooms and units with dedicated dining rooms they can use, so leaving those things behind is not so difficult when they're moving into a place like this." The Skaff family knows a thing or two about what tenants like. At one point or another, all of the kids have lived in Skaff properties and so has their grandma.

All in the Family

When their children were younger, Sam and Laneil Skaff had no intention of having them work in the family business, and now their son Nate Skaff is the vice president of the company. Recently, their youngest daughter, Julie Stoe, has taken over marketing and

"I have two things that I’ve been fortunate to have drilled into me. I have the same vision that my dad taught me - that God's first, family second, work is third. The second thing is that they [my kids] don't have to be here, but they want to be here. I’m pretty excited about that and I’m not planning to retire anytime soon." - Sam Skaff

human resources while their middle daughter, Jenna Stowers, is starting to take over the design."Now, we couldn't be prouder," said Laneil Skaff. "They each are gifted in such different areas and yet all have such drive and passion. My oldest daughter is a music teacher in the cities and she is changing kids' lives teaching music. To watch them figure out the terrain has really been exciting." "We really enjoy it," said Julie Stoe. "It’s a big legacy that he’s passed down to us. Everyone says that working with family can be challenging, but it’s also so much fun. I really love that we have a large passion for what my dad has built. That’s why I have learned to love working here, because of what he’s done, and we get to grow with that. Being the youngest, I also like to push the envelope and see if we can modernize the way we do things."

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TOUR THE PROPERTY Interior Design

Inside, Skaff offers residents 13 different nooks where they can spend time outside of their unit. There are three main entrances with beautifully designed spaces where residents can come and wait for their ride, study or hang out. There's also a large conference room at the south entrance that residents can reserve for meetings or gatherings. "All of the design and décor is rooted from my mom," said Nate Skaff. "Every color on the building is her. We didn’t have a designer. As Jenna’s been able to come in, that’s been huge to have her to help take over a lot of that. My assistant Lydia, along with Julie, has also helped her put a lot of these spaces together." The Skaffs love to support the businesses located just below their units. To show off Eco Chic Boutique's farmhouse style, many of their community spaces and furnished units feature Magnolia Home furniture and the boutique's unique decor. Other design features include custom reclaimed wood tables by Finnu and industrial lighting from Etsy artisans. "We wanted to cater to these people and give them something that they’ll really enjoy. To do that right away, we would have had to go very cheap. So instead, we took our time to do it right," said Sam Skaff. It's been fun to see the business in our building expand," said Jenna Stowers. "Eco Chic Boutique has expanded and taken more space. Adae salon and Core Health Chiro have also taken more space, so it’s been fun to see them thrive here."

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Community Room

In the community room, residents will not find any stiff, commercial furniture that is typically used in apartments and hotels. Here, residents can enjoy the views of the courtyard, reserve the space to host dinner parties in the full kitchen, have friends for coffee or hang out in the reading nook. The Skaffs created this space to be on trend, warm and comfortable. "We wanted this community room to be very urban," said Laneil Skaff. "I feel like it really lends itself toward a homey, comfortable feel so people can come in here and relax and enjoy. We tried to make it industrial, urban and comfortable all rolled into one."

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DESIGN&LIVING APARTMENT LIVING

In the reading nook, Laneil Skaff created the design details using a technique she found online to handmake the book wall art, carefully bending back edges to create art using triangles and squares, then gluing maps and patterns on the inside covers.

Creating Community

A reclaimed wood wall and custom, reclaimed wood tables create warmth and character. "We didn't match all of the chairs and there are various seating areas—we wanted it to feel like home," said Jenna Stowers. To get the rustic, modern look, the Skaffs did their homework and spent ample time researching design trends to emulate throughout their community spaces. "All of the wood used for the tables is reclaimed from churches in Minnesota and custom made by Josh Humble of Finnu," said Nate Skaff.

"Our residents have taken it upon themselves to create events," said Jenna Stowers. "One resident was gracious enough to actually make a homemade meatball meal for the Stone West community. Some of the ladies have coffee every other Thursday. It’s not by Skaff Apartments, they’ve just created their own little community and events. We’ve had birthday parties in here, work parties, wedding receptions, Christmas parties and even Thanksgiving." Recently, the Skaffs hosted their own event inviting all residents to a grill-out in the courtyard. These events help residents to meet one another and they're able to show them how the grills and firepits work. "It's really just the community experience we wanted to offer our residents. They can choose to be as involved or uninvolved as they want, but it seems like most people, no matter what age, are longing for that community feel," said Julie Stoe.

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Courtyard

In the courtyard, the Skaff family catered to all of their residents with not one, but three fire pits with planters. A long community table is made to fit ten people and all of the tables are movable to accommodate any occasion. Two built-in, outdoor kitchens provide space for grilling and prepping food.

A walking path allows residents to explore the grounds, including the creek, waterfall and screenedin porch. "We really thought of the residents and where many of them were coming from—nice houses, second homes down south—and wanted to give them the same amenities they had in their home," explained Nate Skaff.

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Sinking Slab? BEFORE

AFTER

We Can Help!


DESIGN&LIVING APARTMENT LIVING

"We are a family-owned company that cares about people. We want to serve people. We don’t just rent apartments." - Nate Skaff

The screened-in porch has a transparent garage door that opens to an outdoor kitchen and fire pit, with the option for a drop down screen to protect guests from mosquitos.

Game Room

With a game room like this, residents here are never bored. The game room can be used during the specified hours or reserved for private gatherings. The expansive entertainment room includes a dining area with kitchen and wet bar, a large flatscreen TV, pool table, ping-pong, shuffleboard, arcade and an indoor bocce ball court.

Rooftop Terrace

Another outdoor space for residents to enjoy is the rooftop terrace. This space offers an outdoor kitchen, dining area, couch, fireplace and outdoor TV.

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APARTMENT LIVING DESIGN&LIVING

Yoga & Fitness Studio

Across from the game room, residents are welcome to use the yoga and fitness studio and even reserve it for private events. "A lot of residents will bring their own DVDs or plug in their phone to do their own workout," explained Julie Stoe. "We are also planning on having a yoga instructor come to the studio starting in June."

Theater Room

The theater room is the only space where residents are asked to have a reservation to use. With twenty state-of-the-art theater chairs and six modes of theater lighting, this room is a popular amenity for Superbowl and birthday parties.

Guest Suites

For visiting family or friends, Stone West Village residents can rent one of the gorgeous guest suites with full kitchens. "Many of our residents have moved out of a nice home and at times they still want that guest room for visitors," said Stoe. "My mom did pretty much every design detail in here, I just helped her. She has a really great, traditional style and I always pair very modern. So, we really join each other's style in discussing what to do with some of these spaces. The residents have used these a lot and seem to love them." 92

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DESIGN&LIVING APARTMENT LIVING

Apartments

As one of their more contemporary units, this two-bed, two-bath features dark cabinets with rustic alder accents. The kitchen offers stainless steel appliances, soft-close cabinets and a pantry. Residents here love the spacious laundry room and master suite that can easily fit a king-sized bed. Stone West Village also offers various fully furnished units, complete with dishware and pans for those traveling on business who are in need of a short-term home.

Two-Story Units

Unlike anything we've seen before, the Skaffs showed us their unique two-story units. They currently offer four different styles of two-story apartments. This unit is a three-bedroom with custom, rustic maple cabinets by Mill Creek Custom Cabinetry. The farmhouse chic kitchen features an open concept with island, French door fridge and freezer along with a convection oven. "All of the two-stories and three-bedroom units have this upgrade where they have gas fireplaces and tile backsplash with under cabinet lighting," said Nate Skaff. On the main level, this unit offers a drop zone, half bath, laundry room and master suite with a massive walk-in closet and soaking tub. The second level offers another master suite with a walk-in closet, an additional guest room and laundry room.

For more information, contact Skaff Apartments Stone West Village 4955 17th Ave. S, Fargo 701-277-9481 skaffapartments.com/ communities/stone-west-village

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DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN

FROM BLAND BASEMENT TO

LOVELY LOWER-LEVEL

W

ith some of the most stylish homeowners now referring to their upgraded basements as "lower levels", we called on Trever Hill Design to show us just how these once-hidden spaces are being transformed. Hill shows us that with a little design know-how, any outdated basement can become a beautiful and betterutilized extension of the home. Take a tour with Hill as he reveals three basement makeovers that have their homeowners longing to live in the lower-level. BY Becca Opp & Trever Hill PHOTOGRAPHY BY J. Alan Paul Photography BEFORE PHOTO CONTRIBUTED BY Julie Friederichs

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DESIGN DESIGN&LIVING

BEFORE

BASEMENT 1

THE FRIEDERICHS FAMILY O

riginally built in 1999, this home belonging to the Friederichs family had a basement that was overdue for an update. When working with this family of six, Hill understood that comfort was a top priority. When Hill was at Market, he found a deep sectional from Four Hands. After checking the measurements, he knew it would be perfect for them. Beyond comfort, it also had great lines. "Sectionals are great in basements for their casual feel with ample seating for family and friends," Hill said. He also chose high-back, slip-covered accent chairs. "These chairs swivel as well, which is great for anyone wanting to watch TV or move for conversation and redirect to the sectional," Hill added. During the refinish, Hill and the Friederichs worked with Patrick Field from Signature Improvements as the contractor. Hill selected all of the finishes including the wallpaper, stone and carpet. They also worked with Mill Creek Custom Cabinetry on the shelving. "I wanted the shelving to float, guiding the eye to the wallpaper and carpet with LED lighting adding depth from below. This gives the illusion of a more expansive space, as you can clearly see the continuance of the flooring and wall covering," Hill explained.

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AFTER


GET THIS LOOK Sectional - Four Hands, McNeal & Friends Accent chairs - Four Hands, McNeal & Friends Coffee & side table - Arteriors, McNeal & Friends Fiddle leaf fig tree - Furniture Mart Baskets - NPD, McNeal & Friends Console table - Ashley Furniture HomeStore Art - HomeGoods Accessories - McNeal & Friends, HomeGoods Pillows -HomeGoods Greenery accents - Furniture Mart Fireplace & stone - Hebron Brick Accent tile - Ceramic Tileworks Carpet - Carpet World Wallpaper - Philip Jeffries, McNeal & Friends Sconces - Wayfair Floating stand & mantel - Mill Creek Custom Cabinetry


The Ericksons' dog, Reggie, enjoys lounging on the sectional too.


DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN

BASEMENT 2

THE ERICKSON FAMILY T

he Erickson family decided to finish their basement to create more entertaining space for their household of four, which includes two young children. The Ericksons built their newly constructed home in 2016 and wanted the basement to feel like an extension of the light and airy upstairs. Once again, Hill was on the hunt for the perfect sectional. "I wanted to find a durable sectional that was light and fresh. One of the criteria Danielle explained was that she wanted a chaise lounge on part of the sectional. I found one at Furniture Mart and it couldn't have been any more perfect for their space. The color was amazing, the size was perfect and the final test was comfort. Everything checked out," said Hill. After he found the sectional, Trever ordered barstools and started searching for accessories. "What we ended up with was a soft, inviting and fresh space for the family to spend time or to host friends for entertaining," Hill conveyed.

GET THIS LOOK Contractor - Titan Homes Bar & fireplace - Wood plank tile Sectional - Furniture Mart Accent Pillows - McNeal & Friends/HomeGoods Art - HomeGoods Sofa table - Unclaimed Freight Furniture Floor lLamp - HomeGoods Barstools - McNeal & Friends Accessories - HomeGoods

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DESIGN DESIGN&LIVING

BASEMENT 3

THE BITTNER FAMILY Jeremy and Brooke Bittner wanted to transform their spacious basement into a man cave and the ultimate place to entertain. Before Trever Hill, this basement was sheet-rocked and the bar had been installed by the previous owner. "When working with the Bittner's their main focus on the basement was a man cave for Jeremy and also a space to entertain with. I knew it needed to feel masculine and solid," Hill said. Being that Jeremy Bittner is an avid sports fan, one of Hill's priorities was to find a way to hang three TVs, which allow the Bittners to keep an eye on more than one game at a time and never miss a play. Throughout the process, Hill based his designs off of what was important to Jeremy Bittner. "When talking with Jeremy, I found out he loves wine and wanted a place to store it all. I came up with the idea to utilize the space under the stairwell as a wine cellar. I did a sketch for them on the overall idea, and they loved it," said Hill. After coming up with a design, Hill collaborated with the Bittner's contractor, the owner of Complete Home Projects, who was also the original builder of the home. Hill added a total of five stacked stone pillars to the space along with an entire wall of wallpaper and reclaimed wood to coordinate with the reclaimed wood behind the preexisting bar.

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DESIGN DESIGN &LIVING &LIVING SHOPPING DESIGN

GET THIS LOOK Contractor - Complete Home Projects Stacked stone pillars - Hebron Brick Wallpaper - McNeal & Friends Sofa table - McNeal & Friends Ottoman - Wayfair Accent chair - HomeGoods Pillows - McNeal & Friends Art - SCHEELS Home & Hardware Stools - McNeal & Friends Accessories - HomeGoods Bar table - Ashley Furniture HomeStore

For more information, contact Trever Hill Design 701-715-3077 treverhilldesign@gmail.com treverhilldesign.com

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DESIGN&LIVING HOME

A Fashion Photographer AT H O M E

Elisabeth Eden, also known as Bethy Iepson, is a fashion photographer, world traveler, wife and mother. Originally from Moorhead, Minnesota, Iepson now lives and runs her successful business, Elisabeth Eden Photography, right here in Fargo. We'll take you on a tour of her home of seven years and tell you about the changes in store for the Iepson family. BY Becca Opp | PHOTOGRAPHY BY Paul Flessland 105


HOME DESIGN&LIVING

Purchasing a Home of Her Own Iepson bought the home for herself in the fall of 2010. "I actually bought it when I was single. Brett and I got married in 2012, so for those first couple years, a lot of the major projects weren't finished yet," Iepson said.

Developing a Family (and a Home) Along with their small boys, Clark (2 1/2) and Miles (8 months), Bethy and Brett Iepson have made this home their own. "The house was needing a lot of cosmetic work when I bought it," said the worldly photographer. For example, the hardwood floors in their living room were so damaged that Iepson decided to paint stripes over them. More recent updates included removing popcorn ceilings, which were a later addition to the home, and painting a dark accent wall in the living room.

Feeling Nostalgic Iepson grew up in a 1912 farmhouse in South Moorhead. Coincidentally, this house was built in the same year and shares features similar to those in her childhood home, including wood trim and a grand, wooden staircase. "It just reminded me so much of the home I grew up in, I fell in love with it right away. I wanted to live in it," Iespon said.

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DESIGN&LIVING HOME

107


HOME DESIGN&LIVING The wood trim and staircase aren't the only remnants of the past in the Iepsons' home. Several pieces of vintage furniture were left behind by the previous owner, including a dresser and a retro television. Clark, the elder of the two Iepson children, traveled down the staircase.

These posters represent all of the destinations that the Iepsons have visited so far, save for one. The Iepsons plan to visit Chicago in the near future.

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HOME DESIGN&LIVING

The dining room features a table that was handmade by Brett Iepson.

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HOME DESIGN&LIVING

From Eyesore To Eye-Catching The kitchen underwent one of the biggest transformations out of all of the rooms in the home. When Iepson first moved in, the kitchen boasted a yellow refrigerator, mustard countertops, brown cabinets and a rust-colored, linoleum floor. Now, these former eyesores are unrecognizable. The Iepsons have beautified their kitchen by painting the cabinets white, resurfacing the wood floors and giving their countertops a faux copper finish.

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The refrigerator features a magnetic spice rack, which is both functional and aesthetically pleasing.


DESIGN&LIVING HOME

The Iepsons have also created an open shelving unit in their kitchen space.

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Iepsons On The Move Although they have absolutely loved living here, the Iepsons will soon move to a more spacious home in South Fargo. One perk of this change is that their growing boys will no longer have to share a room, making nap time a dream for the whole family.

DESIGN&LIVING HOME

To keep up with the Iepsons on the move, you can follow Bethy on Instagram at @elisabeth.eden for lifestyle photos and more.

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ARTIST DESIGN&LIVING

ARTIST FEATURE

FUN HOUSE PRESS Studio Tour

P BY Becca Opp PHOTOGRAPHY BY Paul Flessland

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rintmaking is an artistic medium with a language all its own. Though some readers may be familiar with screen printing, there are many other printmaking techniques to explore. Here to help us do just that are Cameron Peterson and Nettie DuBord of Fun House Press. Join us as we tour their tiny studio and see where the magic happens.


DESIGN&LIVING ARTIST

1 17


ARTIST DESIGN&LIVING

THE ARTISTS

Peterson and DuBord first met when they were students at MSUM. Today, they are a couple and have their own printmaking studio called Fun House Press. "We just don't like the idea of Serious House Press," Peterson laughed. Peterson mostly works with monotypes and linoleum cuts, while Dubord focuses on polymer plate lithography.

MONOTYPES

Every monotype print is unique. This technique involves creating an image on a nonabsorbent surface, or matrix, and transferring that image onto paper. Because almost all of the ink is used when producing one print, the printmaker has to reapply the ink to the matrix for each subsequent edition. Although the printmaker may use the same image over and over again, subsequent editions of a monotype print have subtle differences from their predecessors because the ink is applied differently each time.

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ARTIST DESIGN&LIVING

- CAMERON PETERSON

LINOCUT PRINTS

Linocut prints involve cutting a design into a piece of linoleum, applying ink to the surface, and using it like a stamp to transfer the design onto a piece of paper. This can be done by hand or by using a press.

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Though he recently had his work on display at the Rourke Art Museum, Peterson's newest project is a linocut series of the fifty states. Peterson has also taught after-school classes. "I was talking to little children and I was using all this printmaking jargon and I could see their eyes roll back into their heads. Then one kid goes up and said, 'So you make really cool stamps?' And I said, 'Yeah, that's what I do,'" Peterson smiled.


ARTIST DESIGN&LIVING P O LY M E R P L AT E L I T H O G R A P H Y

When describing polymer plate lithography, DuBord said, "Litho is kind of like magic because it looks like it should not work, but it does."

Polymer plate lithography involves drawing on a treated polyester plate with a grease medium, which makes the drawn areas ink-loving and the undrawn areas waterloving. Ink and water don't mix, so ink adheres to the plate. Then, paper is placed on top of the plate with a tympan, which acts as a buffer that ensures pressure is distributed evenly. Finally the paper, plate and tympan are sent through the press and the image is transferred onto the paper. This process can also be done by hand. Unlike traditional lithography, which uses a stone or aluminum plate, polymer plate lithography is non-toxic and economical because it needs none of the harsh chemicals used for etching and cleanup.

Though she has experimented with polymer plate lithography, DuBord wasn't always a printmaker. "I've been interested in art all my life, but never acted on it until I turned thirty," DuBord said. "I went to Moorhead State and enrolled in the art department, took several classes and printmaking sucked me in."

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DuBord continues to seek out further knowledge of lithography by attending workshops and learning from fellow artists. "It's always good to learn from another artist's perspective in polymer plate lithography," said DuBord. In addition to attending workshops with Amanda Heidi at the Plains Art Museum, DuBord was able to participate in an extremely reputable printmaking workshop last year.

"Cameron gave a wonderful present to me. He paid the tuition for me to go to Frogman's Printmaking Workshop in Omaha, Nebraska, last summer, and that's one of the top printmaking workshops in the country. It's a great community of printmakers—a great sharing environment," DuBord said of the energizing experience.

Recently, DuBord made 200 prints for Giving Hearts Day. "That was a challenge. I didn't think this process could print 200, but I did it," DuBord explained.

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ARTIST DESIGN&LIVING

As the name of their studio suggests, DuBord has fun with her art.

A SUSTAINABLE STUDIO SPACE

Fun House Press has been in their studio for four years now. Though it is small, Peterson and DuBord have made good use of their space. For example, Peterson and a friend designed and built work stations anchored to the walls that fold down if needed.

- NETTIE DUBORD

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"The dream someday is something bigger, but for now we've made an economical use of a small space. You use the space you have, and it works. We do what we do and it makes us happy," Dubord said. The couple also share a communal space outside of their studio with neighboring artists. In addition to making their space efficient, the artists of Fun House Press try to reuse materials and reduce the amount of toxins produced during the printmaking process. DuBord said, "Traditional lithography is very toxic and you need very good ventilation." "We've tried very hard to keep this as chemical-free as we can," Peterson added. Their secret is vegetable oil, which they use to clean the oil-based lithography ink.

For more information, please contact: Fun House Press 701 219-9605 109 1/2 Broadway N. Unit L, Fargo quareup.com/market/fun-house-press You can also find them on FaceBook by searching Funhouse Press, Printmakers

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DESIGN&LIVING REPURPOSE

Queen The

of Cleanup Week

BY Becca Opp PHOTOS BY Paul Flessland and Kelly Binfet

K

elly Binfet is the queen of cleanup week and this year, she took us along for the ride. We followed Binfet as she searched the streets for hidden treasures that she could transform into repurposed pieces. She also shared her do's and don'ts for cleanup week, which would come in handy for any amateur picker. 129


DESIGN&LIVING REPURPOSE

WHAT SHE LOOKS FOR One thing that Binfet is always on the lookout for is reclaimed wood. She especially likes painted wood that she can use to make patio chairs for their e famous deck. Binfet also has to mak wet not is d woo imed recla sure that her to able be to has she use beca n or rotte reuse it.

Recently, Binfet and her husband made this window box out of reclaimed wood.

Even her headboard is made out of reclaimed wood that Binfet picked off of the curb.

Binfet finds broken adirondack chairs that she can add reclaimed wood to and make sturdy again.

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REPURPOSE DESIGN&LIVING

THE DO'S AND DON'TS OF PICKING: 1. Drive carefully. rds when Binfet recommends using your haza because k driving around during cleanup wee ent stops. frequ ing mak your vehicle will likely be 2. Start early. go picking Binfet has found that the best time to ning on mor the in early is k wee nup clea during le start peop n the weekend because that's whe . curb the on out putting their "junk" use it'll 3. "If you see something, stop, beca Binfet. said k," bloc the e circl be gone if you 4. Don't get confrontational. picking. Binfet is no stranger to the dangers of rite find, favo her For example, Binfet almost had er her und from out right n a vintage dresser, take

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DESIGN & LIVING J U N E 2 017

my hands nose. "I was out of my car and I had going to was 'I , said on on top of it, and the pers found dy alrea I y. sorr 'I'm , said I grab that,' and , but little a it.' I think would have challenged me had I and out ers I had taken one of the draw don't leave already put it in my car. I've learned far my by is one that and one, good a it if it's " bed. grab favorite thing that I've ever g family However, Binfet often takes her youn ys tells alwa she members picking with her, and a with ing deal h wort isn't them that one piece er. pick al confrontation et said. 5. "You can't take everything," Binf e, Binfet spac ge stora ed limit has she use Beca n picking. whe back has occasionally had to hold e out figur her ed help also However, this has ts. wan y reall she es which piec


PARADE OF HOMES DESIGN&LIVING

Mike Hanson has building in his blood. He is a third-generation builder and has more than 24 years of experience in the construction industry. His family business, Hanson Bros. Construction, has been building homes in the FM area for over 60 years.

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Monica Hart is an NDSU graduate with a degree in interior design, received her NCIDQ certification and has been practicing for almost 20 years. She has owned her business, Monica Hart Interior Design, for nearly nine years. Hart is an active member of the Home Builder's Association, a board member for Home Builder's Care and is a member of NDID.


DESIGN&LIVING PARADE OF HOMES

Designed

to the Nines BY Becca Opp PHOTOS BY Paul Flessland

T

he 2017 Spring Parade of Homes might have ended in May, but you haven't missed your chance to see this stunning parade home. Built by Mike Hanson of Hanson Brothers Construction in collaboration with local interior designer Monica Hart, each with three growing kids of their own, this floor plan was created with families in mind. Anyone lucky enough to call this place home would have a beautiful backdrop for the chaos that comes along with having a full house.

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PARADE OF HOMES DESIGN&LIVING

Interior design and staging - Monica Hart Interior Design

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DESIGN&LIVING PARADE OF HOMES Living Room Hart not only selected the finishes throughout the home, but also staged it for the Parade of Homes. This living room is an exquisite example of her skills.

A Family-Friendly Floor Plan From the very beginning of this build, Hanson and Hart both worked to ensure this home had a family-friendly floor plan. "Mike and I worked on the floor plan together. He had a plan in mind, and then we went over it and tweaked it. He has three kids, I have three kids, we really thought, 'Okay, so if this is going to be for a family, what would we want if it was for our families?' I just think we came up with a great, livable floor plan that uses every square foot, which is important," Hart explained.

Powder Room The powder room features an accent wall dressed in a wonderful wallcovering that makes what would usually be an inconspicuous space stand out.

Entry Off of the entry, which leads to one large, open-concept living area, is a powder room and home office.

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Mudroom The mudroom was one of those things that Hanson and Hart found to be a necessity for their own respective families, so they carefully planned a space with a drop zone, open storage and a large walk-in closet. A pocket door can shut this area off so guests don't have to see the organized chaos.

This closet is right off of the mudroom.


DESIGN&LIVING PARADE OF HOMES

Interior design and staging - Monica Hart Interior Design

Open Kitchen The brightest star in this kitchen is the stunning cabinetry designed by Beth Kemmer (CKD, CLC) from Wood Specialists. These cabinets feature one of the newer custom stains available through Wood Specialists.

This cabinet was designed to open vertically.

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PARADE OF HOMES DESIGN&LIVING

HOME CREDITS Model home - Hanson Bros. Construction Interior design and staging - Monica Hart Interior Design Cabinetry - Beth Kemmer CKD, CLC at Wood Specialists Flooring - Carpet World Lights - Valley Lights Paint - The Coatings Authority Wallcovering in powder room - Monica Hart Interior Design

One Big, Happy Collaboration When asked how he began collaborating with Monica Hart Interior Design, Hanson said, "I realized that it helps the homeowners to have help with the finishes. People don't realize how many things there are to pick out. She helps keep it all on track. It's been a huge benefit. It keeps the stress level for the customer down, so they're happier with the project, and obviously, what she does helps make the house look nicer too, so everybody's happy in the end."

Master Bedroom Upstairs, the master bedroom is just one of four bedrooms–two of which have window seats–along with a large, conveniently located laundry room.

The shelving in this master closet may look like an upgrade, but it actually comes standard with any Hanson Brother's build.

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DESIGN&LIVING PARADE OF HOMES Master Bath With double sinks, floating cabinets and a freestanding tub, this luxurious bath is the crowning jewel of the master suite.

The master bath also features a spacious walk-in shower with accent tile.

For more information, contact: Monica Hart Interior Design 3481 University Drive S. # 203, Fargo 701-235-4929 monica@monicahartid.com monicahartid.com Hanson Brothers Inc. 2402 12th St. N, Fargo 701-235-7971 mike@hansonbrosinc.com hansonbrosinc.com Note: At the time of print, this house was still on the market.

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Design & Living June 2017  

Across the country, people are making big lifestyle changes by joining the tiny house movement. We'll introduce you to tiny homeowners right...

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