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“What does it take to be the first female anything? It takes grit, and it takes grace.� Meryl Streep


Cover 70

Omani Gold Journey to the middle east in search of yellow permit, three spot pompano and much more. by Clare Carter King

Features

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32

44

Being born into fly fishing royalty doesn’t necessarily mean you are drawn to the same waters as your family.

Exploring New Zealand waters with friends and finding trout along the way always makes for the perfect summer day.

A once in a lifetime opening day. Salmon may be few, but what you do find will take your breath away.

by Brooke Rosenbauer

by Amelia Jensen

by Harpa Hlin Thordardottir

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112

132

While not a difficult escape from England, the Czech Republic is a world apart in fishing, culture and transportation.

Prior preparation prevents poor performance, except in Costa Rica where everything is Pura Vida.

Those teaching moments that you will never forget and can’t live without.

by Nome Buckman

by Courtney Despos

A Little River of My Own

Not Your Typical Stag & Hen Escape

by Vera Carlson

Pool Party

Rolling With The Punches

Opening Day In Iceland

Time Well Spent

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C O N T R O L

OWN THE FIGHT with the most advanced patent-pending drag system ever designed. Infinite adjustment from zero to dead stop in a single drag knob rotation. Renders any previous perception of “smooth drag” to obsolescence. Completely sealed and maintenance free. Orvis innovation. American made. Advantage angler. orvis.com/miragereel

©2017 The Orvis Company

PROUDLY MADE IN THE U.S.A.

F R E A K


departments

Contents 7 28 30 31 31 42 58 62

58

Letter From the Editor A President’s Farewell 5 Things Every Angler Should Know We Hear You 2 Bags We Love Online Shirley Temple With a Fly Rod Young Women Need Rivers

SUMMER

10

10

Looking Forward

FOUNDATION

12 24

Ask the Industry Professional

100

Reading Between the Saltwater Line

GET TO KNOW

54 60 98 124 130

Lori-Ann Murphy Maxine McCormick Bessie Bucholz DUN Magazine Clare Carter King’s Fly Wallet

62

GEAR

56 88 128

8 Must Haves for Summer Travel Why It’s Worth It Great Buys Under $50

BASICS

66 96

Putting Your Fly Rod Together The Loop-To-Loop Connection

TYING

68 110

The Gotcha The Merkin Crab

110

FASHION

82

Get This Look

SAFETY

84

3 Key Elements to Improve Wading

SCIENCE

100 126

Fish Slime Kidneys of the Rivers

126

REFRESHMENT

144

6

Vodka Tonic

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JEN RIPPLE Founder & Editor-In-Chief jen@DUNmagazine.com

Janell Fannin Managing Editor

Meg Humphries Marketing Director

Mēgan Berns Editor-at-Large

Nome Buckman Contributing Editor

Grace Erin Associate Editor

Sue Fey Copy Editor Hope Halla Editorial Assistant

GENERAL INQUIRIES

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES

editor@DUNmagazine.com

ads@DUNmagazine.com

SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES

SUBMISSION INQUIRIES

subscriptions@DUNmagazine.com

editor@DUNmagazine.com

CONTRIBUTORS Joe Allison Arabian Fly Sport Fishing Erica Barker Kaitlin Barnhart Megan Berns Brandon Miller Photography Brian Grossenbacher Photography Bessie Bucholz Nome Buckman Bob Carlson Vera Carlson Deb Carr Brox Clare Carter King Anita Coulton Courtney Despos Jack Dudding Grace Erin Janell Fannin Sue Fey Brenda Galey

GGACC Foundation Megan C. Hess Rich Higginbotham Iceland Outfiitters Amelia Jensen Chris Korich Krystina Bullard Photography Kyla Kulp Lise Lozelle Maxine McCormick Geri Meyer Lori-Ann Murphy Donna O’Sullivan Rebekka Redd Mattias P. Rosell Brooke Rosenbauer Alisha Saley Shabazz High School Soul River, Inc. Harpa Hlin Thordardottir

 Follow us on Instagram instagram.com/DUNmagazine

PUBLISHER Fly Squared Media 316 Hidden Valley Road Dover, TN 37058 p.224.532.9160 FlySquaredMedia.com

On The Cover Clare Carter King photographed by Arabian Fly Sport Fishing releases a beautiful dorado into the Arabian Sea. Find more about Clare and Arabian Fly Fishing in our feature article.

Inside Cover Brittany Nickolas photographed by Brandon Miller Photography gracefully sliding, with gritted teeth, down to the river in Colorado.

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100% RECYCLABLE

i Green-Zine

EDITORIAL AND ADVERTISING OFFICE DUN Magazine 316 Hidden Valley Road Dover, TN 37058 DUNmagazine.com editor@DUNmagazine.com DUN Magazine ISSN #2573-3184 is published by Fly Squared Media, LLC, 316 Hidden Vally Road, Dover, TN 37058. The cover and contents of DUN Magazine are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission. All rights reserved in all countries. DUN Magazine assumes no responsibility for unsolicited photographs and manuscripts. Submissions cannot be returned without a self-addressed envelope. ©2017 Fly Squared Media. Printed in the United States of America.

GRIT


Looks Like We Made It A few words from our Editor-In-Chief

One very cold winter night, I saw an ad for a fly tying class at the local fly shop. Up until that moment, I didn’t even know there was such a thing photo Brian Grossenbacher Photography as a fly shop. That class, 10 years ago now, changed my life. From the moment I entered the shop, I simply fell in love with all things fly. Over the past 10 years, I have learned so much. Apart from what you’d expect – how to cast, how to read water, how to land a fish – I’ve learned that women have a very long and prominent history in this sport. Learning about our history gave me the confidence to step foot in my waders and know I belonged. Our predecessors put forth the grit needed to become firsts in our sport and they did it with an abundance of grace. From Dame Juliana, who wrote the first book on fly fishing in the 1490’s, to Cornelia Crosby, who marketed Maine and wrote a syndicated column on fly fishing, this grit continues on in today’s female anglers. In our inaugural print edition of DUN, it is my hope that you are inspired by the history makers of today. Our authors are amazing women who love the sport and want to share their stories with you. This edition includes articles by well-known anglers and anglers you have probably never heard of before. Each bring their unique experience and a certain “something” to the sport. We call that something “GRIT.” To my contributors and staff, a huge THANK YOU. I absolutely could not do this without you. Your enthusiasm, hard work and dedication not only humbles me on a daily basis, it inspires me. Thank you for having the grit and grace to become firsts. For my Managing Editor, Janell Fannin, who kept me going when things were more than overwhelming by telling me that “you eat an elephant one bite at a time,” the only response I have to that is best said in the words of Barry Manilow, “It Looks Like We Made It.”

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WHAT WAS

YOUR FIRST

ON THE

FISH FLY?


“Take care of the fish and the fishing will take care of itself.” Join TU: www.tu.org


summer

Looking Forward t0

In anticipation of long

Summer

days and warm nights

CUBA This summer I’m heading to Cuba to try my hand at tarpon, bones and permit on a liveaboard. As excited as I am to go, I’m also quite apprehensive, which is no surprise, since I always have a little bit of hesitation before a big trip like this. Biggest fear? Getting seasick and throwing up overboard … or falling off into shark infested water. Coming home with? Lots of Cuban rum and a few unwanted pounds! Jen

LOCAL FESTIVALS Growing up in a small Wisconsin town, I spent my summer swimming in the lake with my cousins and riding my bike to my friends’ homes. About the only thing that broke that rhythm was the much anticipated county fair and festivals like Pirate Fest and the Firemen’s Picnic. As an adult, attending the local fests and fairs is part nostalgia and part great fun. Only at a fest can you find a funnel cake, a pirate and some of the best music around. Oh, and did I mention the great people watching? Tanya - reader from Wisconsin

FARMERS’ MARKETS WET WADING Living in the Midwest, summers start late and end early. Fishing is usually in the full head-to-toe steelhead garb so many of us Midwesterners understand. As much as I love my waders, there is just something to be said about the freedom that comes with walking into a river with just a fishing shirt, shorts and wading boots on. Feeling the water push at my legs and the heat of the sun on my back always reminds me of when I first fell in love with this sport. Grace

My husband and I follow a whole food, primarily organic diet. The diversity of organic produce, grassfed beef and the sights and smells of the local farmers’ markets during summer is what I look forward to the most. Being able to sample the local honey, try the cold brewed, small batch coffee and pick up beets of every color is what it’s all about. Sharon - reader from Minnesota

ROAD TRIPS Some people re lucky enough to live at a beach where there’s shore fishing all year round. For the rest of us, summer brings with it warm waters and sand between our toes. For those of us who have been bitten by the fly fishing bug, there’s nothing like walking the beaches, sight fishing to what might be below. Now that’s what I call a great summer day! Caroline - reader from Texas What are you excited about this summer? Tell us what you are doing this summer at editor@DUNmagazine.com or use the hashtag #DUNwomen when posting on social media.

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QUIT WISHIN’ & GET FISHIN’!

See our complete line of fishing kayaks at


foundation

Ask The Industry

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Learn from their

professional

opinion

GRIT


foundation

If you could offer one piece of advice to a new angler, what would it be?

GERI Meyer Athena & Artemis Women’s Fly Shop

Rebekka REDD Rebekka Redd Fly Fishing RebekkaReddFlyFishing.com

It’s important to stay humble, open to learn, grow and to remember in this sport there are always lesser and greater anglers than ourselves. Learn as you go and don’t be overwhelmed by fly fishing at the beginning. The pros have spent a lifetime casting and landing fish to get where they are. Enjoy the sport and the places it takes you. Take your time to enjoy each level of learning you are at. Practice, be patient. No matter how good you become – keep that humility, and you’ll be well on your way to a lifetime of fly fishing fun, and if you can’t stay humble, the fish will certainly do that for you at the most inconvenient time. Good luck, good times, good friends and good sportsmanship. Tight lines and big fish. Rebekka is a full-time global traveling fly angler, TV personality, film director, photojournalist and author. She is an advisor for Thomas and Thomas Fly Rods and travel ambassador for Yellowdog Fly Fishing adventure travel company. 

LISE Lozelle Maven Fly MavenFly.com

For me fly fishing is more than just fishing, it’s a way to get grounded, unplug from my everyday and reconnect with nature. It’s not about the perfect cast or the biggest fish, it’s about letting go, having fun and finding happiness in the moment.  Remember that feeling, and when life gets crazy, just close your eyes and escape to those happy moments on the water. Lise is owner/founder of Maven Fly, Marketing Director at Casting for Recovery & an AFFTA Board Member. She is an entrepreneurial spirit with a passion for adventure.  She is the mom to one amazing daughter with special needs, who’s strength is a constant reminder that anything is possible. She lives in Austin, TX with her longtime veterinarian boyfriend, her daughter and two dogs.

WomensFlyShop.com

The best advice that I can give to a new angler is to remember that fly fishing is supposed to be fun. The learning curve is steep, but you can reduce some of the frustration by getting a guide or taking a class. For women, I generally suggest that if they feel nervous or intimidated, consider going out with a female guide (of course there are MANY male guides that are terrific, it’s just an issue of comfort for some). Most of all, look around and enjoy your experience. Be grateful for healthy fish and clean water, and don’t take yourself too seriously! Remember, there is such a thing as Fish Karma!!! Geri is the owner and operator of Athena & Artemis Women’s Fly Shop, and for over 10 years has been the co-owner of the Driftless Angler Fly Shop & Guide Service in Viroqua, Wisconsin, where she is also a guide. Introducing women to the sport of fly fishing and keeping them engaged is her #1 passion.

Jen RIPPLE DUN Magazine DUNmagazine.com

Walking into a fly shop as a new angler can be intimidating. I swore when I was a newbie that they spoke a different language. I found myself nodding along and pretending I knew what they were talking about. The best advice I can give a new angler is two-fold. First, know your history. Because I thought that women were “new” to the sport, I felt out of place. Then, I did some research and found out that the first book on fly fishing was written by a woman and published in 1497, that the way we tie material on the hook horizontally for our streamers is attributed to a woman, even the bait and switch method of fishing for billfish is credited to a woman. This gave me the confidence to know that I had a firm foundation and belonged on the water and in the fly shop. Second, ask questions. It’s OK to not know what someone is talking about in the fly shop. It’s OK to not be an expert, regardless of how long you’ve been fishing. Ask those questions. The angling community is filled more with people who just want to see more women in the sport and less with people who think they still belong at home. Jen is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of DUN Magazine.

Do you have a question for our experts or is there something you’re curious about? We want to hear from you. Email us at editor@DUNmagazine.com and your question could be featured in our Fall-Winter issue.

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A LITTLE

RIVER

OF MY OWN by Brooke Rosenbauer - photos by the author and her family

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I W A S N A M E D 18

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B R O O K E

after the trickling brook that quietly cascades through my bucolic childhood home in Vermont. My Mom is Margot Page, esteemed author of the fly fishing memoir Little Rivers: Tales of a Woman Angler and a founding member of Casting for Recovery. Through my Mom’s bloodline, I am the great-granddaughter of Alfred Waterbury Miller, known as Deac to his family, but to the rest of the world as Sparse Grey Hackle, the legendary writer, editor and author of Fishless Days, Angling Nights. My Dad is Tom Rosenbauer, who was basically spawned from a trout stream and has become the modern world’s authority on fly fishing through his countless books, TV shows, videos and podcasts. With all this nature and nurture from the fishing world, you would assume that I emerged from the womb wielding a fly rod permanently attached to my arm and an irrefutable talent for reading trout streams and tying extravagant wet flies. Well, an angling prodigy I am not. Although, I was pretty good at making flies from dinosaur stickers and Barbie shoes at age 6. This is the story of how, after 29 essentially fishless years on this planet, I decided to make fishing my own, in spite of it all. I have almost no recollection of fishing with my parents. Apparently it happened at least a few times, as they have both unearthed photographs of me in a goofy, ill-fitting vest, wildly flinging the rod around. In a few cases, I was caught dangling a few dejected looking fish in front of my blonde, puffy, tween bangs. I did grow up quite enjoying the natural world - splashing through rivers and tide pools and bumping around in the back of boats, dragging my little fingers through the water behind the stern. In most cases, little Brookie could be found scanning the horizon for frogs or turtles, and occasionally shouting “no big fish!” whenever the possibility of such a cruel capture became imminent. I was sensitive and loved the creatures of the earth. My fishy parents raised me as a child of nature whose playground encompassed the vast fields and streams behind my house where I caught (and occasionally released) frogs and worms and literally played with dirt. GRIT


Instead of following in the obvious footsteps of the Page-Rosenbauer family lineage, I drifted in my own direction towards sports and music. I did inherit my parents’ obstinate tendencies and, at the age of 10, announced that I had become a vegetarian, thus nailing the coffin shut for any further conversation about me eventually developing an interest in catching those ‘big fish.’

Then, on the brink of my third decade, I announced to my Dad that I wanted to attend the Orvis Fly Fishing School (and could he please pay for it). He looked at me with his mind flickering ...

IS SHE KIDDING? WHY NOW, AFTER 29 YEARS OF AMPLE OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN THIS Throughout the next two decades, I did SPORT DOES SHE WANT TO everything BUT fish, eventually converting my PICK UP A FLY ROD AND tomboy love for sports into a career in the health and fitness world. I lived in Boston, Washington, CAN’T I JUST TEACH HER D.C., and Latin America (where I found a cityTHAT STUFF … bred, non-fishing husband), earned a graduate degree in international health policy and happily DIDN’T I ALREADY? settled into my own fishless identity and fasttrack career path.

Upon first reflection, I felt silly; kicking myself for not absorbing all the angling wisdom that my parents indirectly bestowed upon me. Digging a little deeper into the subject, I realized something: I am not “rediscovering” or “reconnecting” with fly fishing. As a young child, there was never an authentic connection with angling. Fishing was something that my parents and other boring adults did, just like paying bills and reading the newspaper. I was perfectly content to tag along and look for turtles.

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Fishing became even less cool when, at age 10 and on the brink of adolescence, a figurative bomb exploded in my sheltered little world. My parents, with their fairytale story of two angling stars united across the universe, ended their marriage with divorce. While fishing had once been the seduction between them, I think in some ways, it had started to become a wedge, as family life and parenting became more complicated. It wasn’t the main wedge, but it had become intertwined into our family life - the good and the bad. As a teenager, I fought hard to distance myself from that “adult stuff” and find my own way. Fishing just wasn’t on my radar. Through high school and college, I had a laser focus on achievement: being the best of the best in academics, sports and music. With a priority on catapulting myself through life, climbing the ladder of achievement, I accomplished many things in a very short period of time. But, adulthood has a strange way of complicating things that once seemed crystal clear. When Wilson, my husband, finished business school, I felt a new emotion contentment. For the first time ever in my life, I wasn’t staring up at endless rungs in a ladder and clawing my way to the top. My career had settled into what I had always wanted, we were married and both of us had graduate degrees. We started lifting our eyes to gaze across the long skyline of life ahead of us. All of a sudden, I wanted to stop achieving and start filling in some of the gaps that had been left open. I yearned for the dirt and frogs and the sense of endless wonderment that comes with being in the natural world. When you have a laser focus, you miss the details: the ones that fill your soul and take your breath away. And I started to wonder if this whole fishing thing might be fun after all and if I might, in fact, be good at it. Although my parents never forced me to fish, my dad instilled in me the biological, scientific side of nature, which was his passion, and my Mom complemented those technical details with her gentle romanticism. No one can more delicately or eloquently write about the emotive side of fly fishing and the human connection with the natural world than she.

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My husband and I enrolled in the Orvis Fly Fishing School together. On the first day, I squirmed in my seat, embarrassed that the instructors knew who I was from my last name. During the practice time, I awkwardly tried to replicate, with my own body, the movements that I had seen my parents execute with ease over and over again. Although burned into my memory, my own body didn’t quite cooperate. A part of me expected that I would just pick up the rod and cast like a pro. The overachiever in me hated that I wasn’t perfect right away. Of course, my tension and frustration made my casting even worse. On the last day, we trudged through the pouring rain to practice some “real fishing” on the “real river,” the Battenkill. Waist-deep in the cold river, the skies opened up and it rained heavy, aggressive drops. I maneuvered my incredibly fashionable and well-fitting boots and waders to a hidden spot, where nobody could see me

clumsily flinging the line around, catching it on everything possible; my sexy boots, trees, branches, rocks and unknown objects on the bottom of the river.

AND THEN I GOT IT. It was me, the outdoors and my own spirit, united as one. The white noise of the downpour helped me to create my own little world. Suddenly, I felt freedom through my arms and wrists, channeling the years of angling bloodline. My husband stepped into view and I could tell from the grin on his face that he felt the same sense of exhilaration. In that moment, fishing became mine, ours and something for us to discover together. I also started to understand my parents and their crazy obsession in a new light. It felt like a handful of puzzle pieces that had been missing for years finally clicked together.

After the rainy fishing school experience, Wilson and I collected some hand-me-downs and embarked on our own. I started to crave the feeling of a perfect cast, even dreaming about it, as well as the sensation of being completely immersed in the natural world: the pressure of the cold water around my ankles, the smell of the river’s life and the eternal sound of the water’s voyage. The cold, the wet, the mud, the rocks, the sounds … I loved all of it. My first challenge was going out on my own and actually trying to catch something. Still a vegetarian, I declared to my husband that I didn’t actually care about hooking anything. I just liked being outside. My apartment in the Boston suburbs looks out onto a murky inlet of the Charles River. When I went out into my ‘backyard’ and caught a smallmouth bass and then three sunfish in a row, I left a gloating message on my dad’s voicemail.

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Then came saltwater casting lessons with my Mom. During a weekend getaway on the south shore of Massachusetts, we found a beautiful remote beach with some killer looking flats. Of course, along with the cooler and umbrella, she brought the rod and a box of chunky saltwater flies. My Mom is a sensitive soul, introverted, observant, gentle and sometimes even timid. On the water with a rod, however, she is a powerhouse woman, a warrior of the elements. I watched her slice through the wind, in complete control of what felt like hundreds of yards of line, narrating every step. We stood waist-deep in the waves, warrior women together, passing life’s knowledge through the generations. The next hurdle was fishing with the legendary Mr. Tom Rosenbauer, aka Dad. On a cool August morning on the Mettawee River behind his house, we spent what felt like hours crouched by the riverbank watching a fish feed. My Dad insisted on the crouching position so that we didn’t spook the fish. For the first 28 years of my life, this would have felt like agony. I’ve spent most of our “Father-Daughter” time trailing behind him as we tromped through the woods or along rivers, somewhat interested in his astute observations on fish habitats. But now, I was fascinated. We actually watched a trout feed for a few minutes, as it rhythmically nudged the surface and darted back to its waiting position.

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Then he expertly coached me through casting. To his delight, I was able to get the fly in the general vicinity of the fish instead of catching all the surrounding trees and bushes. We spooked it, (I’m not so great at the Rosenbauer Crouch yet), and walked away with no fish, but possibly something better… connection. You see, my dad and I don’t exactly share our innermost feelings, so although he says he never cared whether I fished or not, he sure was happy that I had decided to pick up a rod. As we were putting away the rods, dad turned to me and said, with raised eyebrows, “You are looking fishy… very fishy.” Coming from him, that meant a lot. Fishing also started to weave itself into my newly independent life and all the challenges that come with ‘adulting.’ Bursting my shortlived little bubble of contentment, Wilson was offered a great job in another city, far away from everything that I knew and loved. I called my dad in tears, Sitting on the banks of that murky inlet sobbing, contemplating my uncertain future and gazing out at the sun slowly fading behind the horizon of trees, I asked him for ‘Dad advice.’ He told me,

“ ”

GO FISHING. THAT ALWAYS HELPS.

Following his wise suggestion, I trudged out to the murky Charles. As I pulled in a few baby sunfish in the last flickers of sunlight, I felt a growing sense of calm. Through these experiences, fishing became more than knots and flies. It took on purpose: human connection, closeness to nature and an opportunity for peace and contemplation. I am not sure where this current will take me, but maybe I’ll get to catch a few ‘big fish’ someday. D

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foundation

Reading Between the

Saltwater Line Choosing the right

makes all the difference

W

e’ve all experienced it. You put a new line on your favorite fly rod and, just like that, your cast falls apart. It’s not you, necessarily. It’s the line. Pairing the right line to the setup is key. Pairing the right line to the conditions – also key. Let’s talk saltwater fly lines. It might seem like a no-brainer, but the fly line is arguably the most important part of the system. Without the line, it’s just not fly fishing (sorry, Nome). Recently, fly line manufacturers have inundated the market with all kinds of saltwater fly lines. Ask yourself, does it really matter that I fish that bonefish line for tarpon? Is there really a difference in those two lines or is it the same line repackaged? It can be confusing to say the least. Here’s our beginner’s guide for choosing the right line for saltwater fishing.

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foundation

The fly line, simply put, is a tapered plastic coating covering a core material. Yet, it’s so much more. It’s the key ingredient that transfers the energy from the rod to the fly. Unlike conventional fishing where the lure is the weight, our flies many times weigh little to nothing thus the need for the weighted line. The plastic coating and core vary depending on the goal and are important considerations when choosing the right line. Where and when you will be fishing is also an important factor. Fishing the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula in summer, for example, requires a hardcoated, stiffer core fly line to hold up in the heat. Chasing stripers in Nantucket requires a line designed for cold water with a more flexible core so the line doesn’t kink and coil. Both are saltwater fishing under extremely different conditions and require different lines. Once you’ve decided where and when, then the taper of the line should also play a major role. A long taper is better when a more delicate presentation is required - think bonefish flats fishing. A shorter, more abrupt taper is better for pushing the fly through wind - think oceanside Keys tarpon fishing. A shorter head length is better for short quick casts, whereas a longer head length makes presenting flies farther away easier with more accuracy. And, as if that isn’t enough to consider already, lines can come with textured and smooth finishes. It seems that you either love the textured line or you hate it. Some people love the swooshing noise it makes when they cast, and some don’t. The textured pattern reduces friction as it slides through the guides. Picking up your backcast is easier because there’s less surface contact and the line shoots farther with less effort. All great thoughts behind the textured coating. Personally, I’m not a fan of the textured line for one reason. The texture tears up my fingers something fierce and, especially in saltwater, it is literally like “pouring salt in an open wound.”

Just a thought.

A few additional thoughts: If you’re one of the anglers who likes to over-line your rods, take into consideration that this may not be the best practice with saltwater lines. Some lines, like the Tarpon Quickshooter for instance, are heavier for their line weight, so they are already over-lined.

DUN TIP

Always save the box and spool the fly lines comes in. That way you don’t need a bunch of different reels to store lines and it’s easier to remember which lines you own.

Nowadays, most fly lines come with loops on both sides for easy attachment. Do NOT cut the loops off. They work amazingly well for almost all fishing situations. In addition, It’s been my experience that floating fly lines float better and last longer if you don’t cut off the loop. Choosing a floating, intermediate or sinking line for saltwater really depends on the fishing situation. In general, when fishing on the flats or sight fishing, I choose a floating line because I can easily follow the line down to the fly and know where my fly is at all times in relation to the fish. When targeting fish in open water or when blind casting, I tend to choose an intermediate or sinking line since the surface movement of the water will not affect the fly as much and I’m not targeting an individual fish. These lines also allow me to use unweighted and lightly weighted flies at a deeper depth. When I’m on the tarpon flats in the Keys, where fish seem to appear out of nowhere and I have seconds to make a cast, a line like the Tarpon Quickshooter, which is a heavier line with a short head, is my go-to. If I’m targeting Tarpon in Tabasco, where the wind is non-existent, a less aggressively tapered fly line like the Amplitude Grand Slam is much easier to cast.

I love the fact that almost all of the higher end fly lines are multi-colored. I have a very difficult time understanding what 60 feet of line looks like and the change in color gives me a visual reference point. If you’re used to casting a short headed, aggressively tapered fly line, switching to a longer headed fly line will take some getting used to and vice-versa. Don’t let the bow of your guide’s boat be the first time you cast your set up. Read the box. The back of the box will tell you about the line. In closing, a smart man once told me, go to the best college you can afford. It’s the same with fly lines. Once all the above is taken into consideration, purchase the best line you can afford.

In fly lines it matters. All lines are not created equal. D

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photo Shabazz High School, Madison WI, Project Green Teen Environmental Ed


A President’s farewell by Susan Fey, Copy Editor

Former President, Southern Wisconsin Chapter of Trout Unlimited Two years ago, when I stepped into a trout stream I was generally thinking about bugs, flies and fish. I was often contemplating the unparalleled joys of playing hooky. I might have stopped to roll a rock off the bottom and scan its underside for evidence of the local food chain. I might or might not have attempted to identify the swarm of flying objects at the edge of my vision before tying on a Pass Lake or a Caddis. I’d scan for fishy water within casting range and would soon be lost in the transporting rhythm of fishing. Things have changed. These days, before I even get to the water, as I pass the stream regulation posting, I think of the fisheries biologist who knows that particular stream well enough to nurture its trout through thoughtful management. I picture the stream shocking crew harnessed to their galvanized scow, slogging carefully upstream, scooping up woozy browns to measure, record and release. I am reminded of citizen monitors who patrol the banks after summer storm events or tend the finicky monitoring equipment anchored in the cold stream. As I approach the water, I’m more likely to notice recent or ancient evidence of stream bank improvements. I can now picture the ‘lunker crew’ wrestling 70 pound timbers into place or hammering home stubborn spikes in the waning light of a summer dusk. I can feel that hot knot of muscle between the shoulder blades that screams STOP a long hour before the work is done. I see a tangle of pierced and tattooed high school kids, working with the practiced choreography of a road crew. I see the hearty crew of the ‘Corps of Recovery’ taking a well-deserved rest beside a creek, having cleared acres of stream-choking debris. Tying on a homemade scud, I see a dear friend in a yellow pool of lamplight creating tiny works of art at his vise, telling the rest of us we can too. As I strip off line to cast, I am humbled by the memory of our chapter’s best casters dropping tiny flies into perfect, impossible drifts, time after time. When the day closes down and I’m propped against my tailgate, peeling off soggy waders, I may notice the broad sweep of the handsome valley and think of the farmer who preserved his acres along the stream, or the developer who turned down a career-making sale to save the lovely bluff. I see county boardrooms and tiny town halls lined with articulate, passionate defenders of our spring creeks, waiting for their turns to speak. And when I reach for the cooler to fish out an icy beer, I’m now going to see my colleague astride a barstool smiling out from under his umbrella of cigar smoke as we wait for the rest of our esteemed board to gather on the last Tuesday of the month.   As I drove home after running my last board meeting as Chapter President, I decided to take tomorrow off ...

I’m going fishing and my chapter is going with me. D Spring-Summer 2017 .

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5 Things Every Angler Should

Know

by Janell Fannin, Managing Editor

1

Don’t wait for the perfect opportunity to go fishing. Something always comes up ... go anyways.

2

Honor the code, respect other anglers’ space and time ... when fishing from a boat communicate where you’re casting. Be mindful of your backcast and be a good fishing buddy.

3

Sandwiches always taste better when you’ve been fishing all day.

4

When you get skunked on the water and must cry, cover your face with your buff.

5

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2 Bags We Love We Hear You I am a 68 year-old male who has been fly fishing fresh and salt waters since the late 1950’s. I’m well beyond the “how-to” stage, own all the fly fishing gear I’ll ever need, fished all the destinations I’ve been interested in, and find the current offering of fly fishing magazines boring.  That is, until I discovered Dun Magazine.   I’ve been aware of more and more females getting involved in the sport over the last 20-30 years and, to me, Dun Magazine proves that you’re here to stay.  From what I’ve read thus far, you have a lot to offer and your presence will surely help the problems fly fishing will face in the coming years.   I am delighted to read about the sport I love through the eyes of the opposite gender.  From the few issues I’ve read, they provide a fresh perspective on all aspects of fly fishing, some of which I’ve never really considered before.  I’m getting a better idea of what to expect from the women I run into along the stream and, more importantly, I’m getting a better idea of what they expect.  I look forward to future issues.   I guess it sounds odd hearing such praise from an old fly flinger like me.  Maybe it’s because I’ve “been there, DUN that” that I want everyone to experience the pleasure and joy fly fishing has given me these many, many years.  I’m not sure if the phrase is still in vogue, but “You Go Girls!”   All the best, Henry Hegeman

Thanks Henry, you made our day. It’s letters like these that let us know we are on the right track! Jen Ripple

Summer is the time for traveling. Whether it’s a day at the beach, a weekend away or an extended vacation, finding the right bag to pack for your trip can prove difficult. Here are two of our favorites on the market today.

Fishpond - Horse Thief Fly Fishing Tote MSRP $89.95 This waxed cotton tote by Fishpond makes the perfect overnight bag. True to the Fishpond standard, the interior lining is made from 100% recycled water bottles. It has a water-resistant main zipper and the molded bottom makes the bag stand up perfectly on its own without falling over. We love the Earth color of this bag. It simply goes with everything! FishPondUSA.com

Watershed - Largo Tote MSRP $129.00 Dry bags are a must if you’re going anywhere near the water. Nothing ruins a day like soaking your phone or your keys. The Largo Tote by Watershed is our favorite dry bag. Available in a variety of colors, we love this bag because it’s stylish and doesn’t look like a utilitarian dry bag and yet is big enough to fit all of the items we bring with us on the boat. DryBags.com

We want to hear from you. Tell us what you think at editor@DUNmagazine.com.

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Pa r l o

y t

P o by Amelia Jensen

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For me, some of the best days on the water involve more than just fishing. While we often endure seemingly endless streaks of harsh conditions while fishing, one’s appreciation of calm, blue-sky days can also become magnified. I’m reminded of a particular day, the last day of our annual trip to New Zealand. We’d planned a trip on the water with our friends Serge and Sharron and their pups. Outings with these friends always prove to be an adventure and I expected nothing less that day. Our hike to the river started out by scrambling down a steep cliff to reach the valley bottom. There were boulders the size of basketballs stacked like cordwood, loose enough to quickly roll your ankle. It wasn’t until the last third of the descent that we hit the classic boot-skiing type rock you hope for. We watched the cloud of dust fill the air as we each descended, making sure none of us bit the dust and went down head first.

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The day’s exploration took us to a river that has a steady gradient, one fast riffle after another. It was full of likely looking, classic edge water for browns and pocket water and pools for rainbows. It isn’t a river known to have many rainbows, but we’d explored a tributary of the river earlier in our trip and found them. We chose our route carefully with two Jack Russell Terriers leading the charge, (but not quite able to swim the heavier current on their own). After tramping downstream as far as possible, (without taking on a nasty bush bash), we stopped at the mother of all pools. It was a stunning, long glide of faster water with classic edges at the head. This lead into a drop in depth and a widening with a few nicely placed boulders: perfect holding water for a few trout. Our friend Serge started working the water on the near side, as it was obvious there were a few nice fish holding deeper in the crystal clear pool. He had a few takes on a nymph, but then decided there was one brown trout that he had to try for, holding in shallow water just upstream. Meanwhile, a few rises popped on the far seam line of the main pool, tempting us to cross and have a go. Dave, Sharron and I made our way across the river downstream of Serge and positioned ourselves on the high cliff side. Together, we sighted a few fish that were surfing the currents. I decided to use a long drydropper set up. Dave positioned himself higher up on the bank to spot for me, as he could see the fish’s movement in the gin-clear water. The fish were swaying to feed on subsurface emergers and only sporadically rising. I re-learned a couple valuable lessons that day. First, always trust my spotter! Second, when fishing a pool with multiple current speeds and current breaks, I have to ensure that my casts land far enough upstream, and in a consistent line of current to get a decent drift, but not so far as to line the fish feeding in the tail-out of the

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pool. Also, when fishing rainbows in gin-clear water, the timing of the cast is paramount given their propensity to surf and weave in searching feeding cycles. While the water was gin-clear, I had glare and couldn’t see the fish most of the time. It was a huge advantage having Dave spotting from high on the bank, compared to where I was positioned at water level. He was able to see when it was best to cast to a fish that had come up in the water column and was in a good position to take my nymph. He was also able to communicate just how far to cast to not spook fish that had moved back into the tail-out to feed. Each cast involved an immediate mend or two to ensure the right drift. All the while, my good friend Sharron was taking it all in, ready to net whatever feisty rainbow I hooked up. The fact that we were all able to take part in the moment is what made the whole fishing experience such a fun, engaging time. GRIT


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Of course the day would have been incomplete if the dogs didn’t have their fun. At day’s end, half way up the steep bank, our two furry friends chose to take a classic Jack Russell detour and chase after a possum. They ran miles away up-valley as the sun continued to sink lower and lower in the evening sky. Every time we fish with Serge we know the inevitable calls of their names will echo through whatever valley we’re fishing. Serge’s French accent rings in our minds with fond memories. “Trout!!! Skoota!!!” Who could have asked for anything more out of that day? Not me. Not only did we have the valley to ourselves, we were spent physically and were filled up with lasting memories shared with friends. It still stands out in my mind as one of the best days we’ve had in a decade of traveling to New Zealand.

We stayed at that pool for more than 3 hours as it kept producing fish willing to feed. The visuals were incredible. A few bigger fish came to hand that involved lengthy downstream fights, crossing one fast rapid after another, well downstream, to finally land the fish. It’s an adrenaline rush running after your buddy with your camera in hand, hoping your camera will stay dry and that you don’t trip and drown your electronics. It’s a special occurrence in New Zealand to find a pool with good numbers of feeding rainbows and browns that will continue to feed after you catch one after another in close proximity. Except for the average size of fish, it reminded Dave and me of our cutthroat waters back in Alberta.

Eventually we were fished out at that spot and decided to have lunch. The hot afternoon sun had set in hard. Being so damn hot, we all decided we needed a swim. My friend Sharron loves to swim and volunteered to go first. Keep in mind that the river had some white water in spots, and my nerves kicked in before I finally got the guts to take the plunge with her. I quickly found out that it couldn’t have been more refreshing and fun! No funky currents pulled us under and no big Kiwi eels came to say hi. Cooling off, along with the steady push of the river flow had us all taking turns swimming the waves over and over again. We had found our own little amusement water park in the heart of the Canterbury high country. It was hard to leave that pool, but eventually we made our way upstream, fishing as we went.

Adventure is at the core of who I am and I reflect on that day with the perfect contentment only a summer day brings. D

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online

DUNmagazine.com

Visit our website for more fly fishing, take aways, stories, guides, knowledge and DUN digital.

DUN Take Aways The Smallmouth Everyone on staff at DUN Magazine is in love with Smallmouth. If you have not fished for Smallies on the fly, you should put this predator on your list. What is a SMALLMOUTH? A Smallmouth is a popular freshwater game fish which is part of the SUNFISH family. Yes, you read that right! HABITAT: Their native habitat is the upper Mississippi, the Ohio, lower Missouri, the Ohio, lower Missouri watersheds and most ... DUNmagazine.com/tags/dun-take-away

Lifestyle

Education

All Kayaks Are Not Created Equal

Outside the Box

Jen Ripple

Nome Buckman

Last year at ICAST I was introduced to the new “fly fishing kayak,” appropriately called the MAYFLY. Now, let me just be completely honest here. I do not kayak. I’ve been in a kayak maybe twice in my life, and we’re not talking a KAYAK ...

Thinking outside the box can come naturally to anyone. You have to allow yourself to come up with many ridiculous notions and let the scintillating schemes come forward. The trick is to recognize the ridiculous from the possible. One fall day, many moons ago, I brushed by some milkweed plants ripe-n-ready to ...

DUNmagazine.com/lifestyle/

photo Nicole Watson

Scientific

DUNmagazine.com/tags/education

Wild Nicole Watson

Laurentian Great Lakes steelhead are a complex stock of fish. The population is a mixture of hatchery-released and wild, naturally reproduced fish originating from many different streams. Knowing the natal streams of the fish is important to best managing this species, as it allows for targeted insertion and management to the areas that are the major contributors to the total lake population. Fortunately, we may be able to determine the natal stream of a fish by looking at its otolith ... DUNmagazine.com/tags/scientific photo Nome Buckman

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OPENING DAY IN

ICELAND by Harpa Hlin Thordardottir - photos by Iceland Outfitters

THE OPPORTUNITY TO FISH OPENING DAY IN ICELAND BECOMES THE FISHING TOUR OF A LIFETIME

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I

was offered the opportunity to join a fishing party opening day on the Laxá in Dölum River in Iceland, in June 2016. Salmon river openings are always fun. Although the catches are few, there are always big salmon caught and you are lucky if you are the one catching! We were three couples and decided to divide the river into three beats and fish with three shared rods. Great company, beautiful river, good food and the chance of catching a big salmon. A few days before the opening, we started to hear news from other rivers opening in the area. There were salmon everywhere and we were getting more and more excited. We arrived at the lodge the night before and I drew the lowest beat (section of the river), which is usually the best draw so early in the season. After a long night, with hardly any sleep, we were ready to start fishing at 7 am sharp. We started well, catching two salmon in the morning (the top beat got seven). It was such horrible weather the first day - rain and a strong, freezing wind, but it was impossible to stop fishing. Salmon were showing themselves everywhere big, strong and beautiful sea-liced salmon.

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On day two, we woke up to a beautiful sunny day; no wind, and Iceland was as beautiful as it gets! The landscape is so florescent green that you can almost see the grass grow… birds singing and the river so crystal clear that you can see every movement in the water. I started the day landing a beautiful 83 cm salmon and shortly after that, my biggest salmon so far took the fly. What excitement! From the moment it took, I knew that I had never hooked a salmon this big before (96cm). The feeling when it started showing itself… ‘madre mía’! I was so

afraid I was going to lose it, and the tension was so high that for a second, I wondered if my heart could take it. I think it is safe to say that these were the most exciting 20 minutes of my life. I am so grateful for not having lost it, and that I managed to land it safely, and admire it for a short moment. The joy of catching that salmon equals the happiness of catching my first salmon, 16 years prior. The joy of releasing it and seeing it swim away, strong and powerful, was the icing on the cake. It made the whole experience complete and perfect.

THE OPENING PARTY LANDED 42 SALMON IN TWO AND A HALF DAYS OF FISHING. I WILL ALWAYS CHERISH THE MEMORY OF THIS OPENING, AS IT IS HIGHLY UNLIKELY I WILL LIVE TO SEE ANOTHER OPENING QUITE AS PRODUCTIVE, OR THRILLING, AS THIS ONE. D

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get to know

Lori-Ann MURPHY DUN: Who is the most interesting person you’ve ever guided? L-A: Meryl Streep. The most amazing mimic I have ever known! And a cool gal. DUN: How long have you been a guide? L-A: Since 1990. So I guess 27 years! OMG.  DUN: Why did you start guiding? L-A: Free gear! Orvis Guide Rendezvous 1989, Chico Hot Springs, Livingston, Montana, 16 guys and me. We had an amazing time and then went on to guide on our home waters. The lifestyle works for me. I like being a sportswoman!  DUN: What’s the most embarrassing thing that’s happened to you while guiding? L-A: Just the other day I ran into a flat in front of all the morning guide traffic in San Pedro ... then there was the time I pushed my drift boat into the river without it being connected to the bowline ... and it wasn’t fun when I saw my boat and trailer headed downhill in my lane not connected to my truck - yep, let her ram the tailgate to save lives.  DUN: Where do you guide? L-A: San Pedro, Belize.  DUN: When you travel to fish, do you hire a guide? L-A: Yes. I have learned from the very best guides. I have PTSD from little things like closing the lid too loud on the cooler or a cranial shot to a tarpon’s head. But, that is how I learned and continue to learn the waters I want to fish.  DUN: Who has been your biggest inspiration? L-A: Rick Ruoff. I learned a bit about how he looks at water - and where to find the fish.  DUN: If you could give a piece of advice to an aspiring guide, what would it be? L-A: ”Hero to Zero.” This is the life of a fishing guide. Don’t get stuck on either. Have fun and be safe! Some of my most memorable days have been when we were skunked. 

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photo Erica Barker, San Pedro Belize

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get to know

8 Questions With A Seasoned Guide

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gear

8 Must Haves for Summer

When the

Travel

bug hits, be ready

Jen Ripple and Debby Moore enjoying the live music at the Eagle Fest Town Picnic. Jen’s Cook Rose Gold Sunglasses are never far away. 58

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gear Orvis - River Guide Tech Shirt

Costa Del Mar - Cook Rose Gold Sunglasses

This fishing shirt isn’t just any fishing shirt. It is that quick dry shirt you can wear anywhere. We are all about versatility and this comfortable, breathable yet UPF 30+ shirt is it. It’s that goto that keeps you cool even when it’s really hot on the front of that flats boat. MSRP $89.00 Orvis.com

Patagonia - Women’s Tech Fishing Skort The skort may just be the perfect invention. Who doesn’t love the look of a skirt on the boat with the freedom of shorts? This tech skort is perfect. Quick dry of course and made with spandex (go ahead, eat that donut for breakfast). Wear it longer or cinch up the sides and make it shorter. And those colors …

These aviators are so pretty you won’t want to take them off indoors. The rose gold color is subtle yet noticeable and the sleek design is so light it’s like protecting your eyes without wearing sunglasses at all. Polarized with their 580 lenses, you feel your eyes relax as soon as you put them on. They make great glasses to wear whether you’re in the boat or out. MSRP $239.00 CostaDelMar.com

Fishpond & Chaco - Native Z2 Sandal Did you know that Fishpond and Chaco had a baby? It’s called the Native Z2 and the strap is brown trout. Wrap around toe design that we love in our Chacos and $5.00 from each pair purchased goes to Western Rivers Conservancy. Win-Win! MSRP $110.00 FishPondUSA.com

MSRP $59.00 Patagonia.com

TFO - Padded Travel Rod Case

Patagonia - Away From Home Shorts These shorts have just the right amount of pockets and are the perfect length. Not too long and not too short. We love them because they’re super comfortable, made with nylon and spandex, and weigh only 5 oz when you’re packing them in your suitcase! They also have a utility keeper in the right place for your hemostat. They’re also 50+ UPF! MSRP $79.00 Patagonia.com

Orvis - Safe Passage Drop Bottom Duffel There’s nothing fun about returning from a fishing trip abroad and opening your suitcase with still-wet clothes now mixed with clean clothes. This bag solves that problem. It has two compartments so you can stow your wet and dry clothes separately. It’s vented so you can even store your wet waders. It’s even got a side pocket for your shoes. It’s like they read our minds!

Looking at this case you think how can something that size fit so many rods? But it does. We can pack 15 rods in this case and still have plenty of room. It rolls up tight and protects our rods perfectly. It’s also softsided so we’ve never had any issues carrying it onboard. MSRP $50.00 TFOrods.com

Orvis - Gone Fishing Straw Sunhat Nowadays it’s all about protecting your skin from the elements. Not only is this wide brim hat the perfect for the midday siesta or the local farmer’s market, it’s our everyday wear beach fishing in the salt. You know you want one. MSRP $96.00 Orvis.com

MSRP $229.00 Orvis.com

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ABOVE: Maxine delivers a fly accuracy cast at the World Championships in Estonia. (photo Mattias P. Rosell) RIGHT: From left to right, Evgeniya Roschupkina (RUS), Maxine McCormick (USA), Anna Hedman (SWE) and Donna O’Sullivan (USA) proudly display medals earned at the 2016 World Championships in Flycasting. (photo Mattias P. Rosell) OPPOSITE PAGE: Maxine and her coach Chris Korich celebrate. (photo GGACC Foundation)

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IS HOW HER COACH, CHRIS KORICH, DESCRIBES MAXINE MCCORMICK. For those of you who haven’t heard, Maxine became the youngest GOLD medalist and WORLD CHAMPION in history last summer, at the sanctioned World Championships in Flycasting. She not only beat all female competitors in fly accuracy, but outscored every male competitor, except her coach, at only

12 years old!

Maxine McCormick

by Megan Berns - Editor at Large

also other people who have helped me or helped with equipment and tips that I also look up to: Donna O’Sullivan, Steve Rajeff, Travis Johnson, Gary Anderson, Whitney Gould and Simon Gawesworth. I also look up to others that I have met, and they were really nice to me: Mia Sheppard, April Vokey, Tim Rajeff, Val Atkinson and so many more that the list would be too long.”

Shirley Temple with a

LroD“

y f

This young and talented now teenager also “enjoys softball and track, is taking an archery class and wants to take a woodworking class.” You may be asking yourself how old she was when she first started casting. Maxine says “I started going on a few of my dad’s fishing trips when I was 8, but I didn’t really start to practice my casting until I was 9. Do the math. She has accomplished this feat in only 3 years.

Truly amazing!

“I love fishing. My favorite fish are trout and steelhead, but I have also caught bass and bluegill.” Maxine’s favorite river right now is the McCloud River in Northern California. According to her father, Glenn McCormick, she has also recently taken up spey casting. She doesn’t stop at fishing and casting, but also ties flies. “My favorite flies to tie are soft hackles.” When asked what she is most proud of, Maxine said, “I have had lots of proud moments with fishing and casting, but I think winning a gold medal in accuracy at the World Championship and beating all the men except for my coach was one of my proudest moments.” So who does she look up to? “That’s a hard question. I look up to so many people because so many people have helped my casting and fishing. My dad because he always seems to catch a lot of fish when others aren’t, he has always supported me and it’s fun to spend time with him. Chris Korich because he has taught me so much and is the best casting coach. There are

Maxine really wants to be a veterinarian when she grows up. “I really like animals and my friend and I want to have our own vet practice. I also want to fish all over the world and be the best caster, like Steve Rajeff ... My friends think that it’s really cool that I do something different like fly casting. They were all so proud of me after the World Championship and my school even had a celebration for me when I got back.”

What type of equipment does this now 13 year-old like to use? “My favorite rods to cast and practice with are an older Fenwick fiberglass rod and an older Fenwick graphite rod that my coach balanced perfectly for me with double taper lines and Hardy reels. I think they are 40 years old. I like them because they allow me to feel the line and are great for roll casting. For fishing, I mostly use an 8’6” 5wt Sage RPL or whatever else my dad sets up for me.”

“My most memorable moments in casting are when I scored better than my coach in tournaments, when I beat Steve Rajeff in an event at the Nationals, when I made the All American Team for the first time and going to Estonia for the World Championship. For fishing, it was when I landed two rainbow trout at the same time on the McCloud River, one on my dry fly and one on my dropper, and when I caught my first steelhead. I guess all of my fishing trips are memorable. I also think a lot about the fish camps that I went to because they were so much fun.” So what does dad have to say about everything? “It’s really amazing. Every time I watch her cast, she amazes me with her efficient stroke and controlled loops ... I think most who watch her cast think the same thing I do; how in the world does she do it?” A great competitor, Maxine McCormick is a fly casting extraordinaire. GOOD THINGS REALLY DO COME IN SMALL PACKAGES. D

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get to know

Putting It In A little more

perspective

At 9, she won her first

Junior gold medal

in Trout Fly Accuracy

D photo

onna

O’Sull

about Maxine’s accomplishments

She also captured bronze in the 2-hand Salmon Fly distance event.

ivan

At 11, she became the youngest ever to make the

photo Ray Gralak

All American Team

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get to know

photo Jani Harruksela

The final Trout Accuracy cast at the 2016 World Championships

Ric photo

h Hig

ginbo

tham

At 12, she scored

99/100,

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YOUNG Paige Dixon with a nice rainbow. photo Kyla Kulp

5 Reasons Young Women Benefit from Fly Fishing

A

s she pauses to acknowledge the river rolling around her knees, she hears a fish slap the water. She smiles, opens her fly box and envisions that fish filling up her net. She’s a teenage girl, and her only concern for the day is exploring a river and being detached from the world; something she’s begun to crave. She’s not worrying about what she looks like, counting all the ways she isn’t adding up or fearing what her friends are doing without her. She doesn’t know that this river time is relaxing her brain, building up her physical and mental strength and challenging her perspective of the world. The one thing she does know is that this is a special place for her. Even though her mom usually has to convince her to go, she’s always glad whe she does. She needs the rivers and the rivers need her.

photo Kyla Kulp

5 reasons why we need to lead young women to the sport of fly fishing:

1. They find mental rest. Teens today face pressure, in the form of social media, that most of us never experienced in our formative years. With all the texting, snapping, tagging and being constantly inundated by the opinions of others, the pressure for teens to perform is not confined to school; it’s there every waking hour of the day. Since all of our multitasking takes place in our temporal and frontal lobes, scientists are finding that cognitive functioning can be deeply affected by over-use of electronics (Dr. Gary Small, UCLA Memory and Aging Research Center). This constant interaction is taxing on brain function and can have a negative effect on their mental health.

WOMEN

Ani Landis chooses a fly. photo Kyla Kulp

The best outlet for tired brains is time in nature; and fly fishing is even more efficient for helping teens find rest as it allows the angler to ‘check out’ mentally. Brenna Burgos, (from Rods, Reels, and Heals) states, “The teenage years are hard, trying to be cool, be liked, get good grades, make your parents proud. It was always so nice to be out of all of it for a moment and only focusing on my fly and watching for a take (with my dad).” With each fish they release and cast they make, fly fishing helps teens find their way back to the basics - to a primal, simpler way of being, which for most is the reset they need to do life effectively. It doesn’t hurt that many fly fishing destinations happen to be without cell service.

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2. They find perspective. Teenage girls are well-known for being dramatic, irritable and easily unhinged. These behaviors are often derived from fear, stress or trying to make sense of the hormones they are wallowing in. But when you take a teenage girl to the river, she easily gets away from focusing on herself and busies herself interacting with nature, naturally forgetting to focus on the negatives in her life.

NEED

by Kaitlin Barnhart

RIVERS 3. They find strength. “I’m only 14 years old, but I’ve had to deal with some pretty tough stuff in life. Just standing in the river fixes it, even if I’m not fishing. The water pushes against me, but I can stay standing. I’ve learned that water shows me my strength, so I want to take care of the water,” states Riley Brook, fly angler with Soul River, Inc.

The metaphors in fly fishing that relate to handling life’s trials are numerous and are often stumbled upon somewhere along our journey in the river. This not only alters our perspective, but gives us strength. When I hear things like what Riley said, it makes me beam, because I know that she gets it. She understands the power that comes from time on the river. But the strength is found only through experience. Some young women have to battle their fears, such as; fearing an animal will attack or she won’t know how to untangle her line or she will fall while wading. But as she persists, she fights through the mental and physical battles and becomes a stronger woman because of her experiences. Fly fishing builds her confidence, teaches her about her strength and provides moments of learning that will affect her in years to come.

This develops from the natural switch from being an actress (all teenagers believe they are performing on center stage), to a spectator of the great outdoors. When you’re in the seat, instead of on stage, you get to rest and enjoy the show in front of you. Nature doesn’t care what you look like or what you say, so you are able to be yourself. Plus it’s kind of hard to say you hate your life when you’re whispering to a fish (it’s possible, but unlikely). The teenager’s perspective of herself is also challenged when fly fishing because she is consistently taking risks and making decisions on which fly to choose and where to float her fly. This makes her feel capable and empowered when she finds success. That new-formed opinion of what she is capable of can mature her in a way that she may not find outside of fly fishing, as it offers a unique experience. The more fish she catches, the more she begins to identify herself as a “fly fishing bad ass,” which is important for her self-esteem, her self-worth, and her identity, (and is much cooler than being able to text 5,000 words per minute). But one of the most important ways fly fishing challenges a young woman’s perspective is by forcing her to notice the cycles of nature, to see for herself the changes in the river and to form her own connection and opinion with the environment. As she turns into an explorer, she learns that there is much still left to discover and protect in the world (and maybe in herself).

RIGHT: Riley Brooks makes a cast to some nice looking holding water.

photo Soul River, Inc.

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YOUNG

Maylee Barnhart photo Kyla Kulp

Bella Jones proudly displays her catch. photo Krystina Bullard Photography

WOMEN 4. They connect with their bodies. The teenage girl’s body is the focus of many ploys to sell products in the modern world. Because they live in a culture that appears to value women by the size of their bodies, so many of our daughters end up with body image issues and struggle to stay focused on their talents and abilities. As a planet, we need girls growing into women who are not distracted by the size of their jeans or their reflection in the mirror, but instead are out blessing the world with their creativity and ingenuity. Fly fishing is a way for young women to connect their brains to their bodies in a positive way.

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As fly fishing depends on the coordination of the angler’s muscles to present a fly delicately or to wade through a river without falling, young women learn to depend on and think about their bodies differently. They start to think less about what their body looks like and more about what it can do, which is an important building block for the development of a healthy body image.

NEED Yes, when teenage girls first put waders on they giggle and feel goofy. But after a while, the waders turn into an essential piece of gear that helps them access their favorite outdoor place. When they are stalking a fish, the last thing they think about is what they look like, which gives them a rest from that inner-voice that can sometimes be their worst enemy. Warning: They will continue to try to look at themselves in your sunglasses, so just know they aren’t really paying that close of attention to you. Also, try not to laugh at them when they continue to take a myriad of selfies, even though there is no cell service.

RIVERS 5. They join a cycle of healing. Dr. Wallace J. Nichols, author of Blue Mind, states, “Together in the water there is sweetness, hope, fearlessness, confidence, beauty, serenity, community, joy, poetry, opportunity, movement, patience, empathy, mystery, independence and a new memory waiting. This is the opposite of the dry neglect, abuse and decline of the past. This is Blue Mind.” Isn’t this what we hope for young women: that they find a place of reprieve from being torn down and a place where they will be built up? As most of us can conclude, the river is a powerful force because we go to the river to find something we can only get there. Call it healing, time with a creator, self-care or anything you like. The truth is you get something there or you would not keep going. That ‘something’ needs to be shared with future generations, because just as Dr. Nichols states, “Water is medicine,” and when we get filled at the water, we want to take better care of the water.

In a world with so much need for medicine and mental health intervention, and with extreme climate conditions affecting our rivers, it leads us to ponder if we put in the extra effort to lead youth to the rivers, could the water heal our hurting population and could we heal the water by bringing them there? Final Thoughts: As I teach youth fly fishing through The Mayfly Project, working with children in foster care specifically, I realize how important it is for these children to experience fly fishing for their own mental health. Continue to bring the young women in your life to the river and show them the value that is found through casting a fly. Make it fun, spend time with them and take them on wild adventures. At some point, hopefully they will find themselves back to those sacred places. D

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Veronica “Kika” Jones and her guide. photo Krystina Bullard Photography

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basics

Getting Back to Some

Basics

we think you should know.

A Tip To Putting Your Fly Rod Together

I love it when you learn a new trick to something that you’ve been doing your whole fishing career. Many of you already know this one, but for those of you who don’t – you’re going to thank me for putting in something so basic. It will be an “A-Ha!” moment. Assemble your rod from the tip down. Here’s the step-by-step for those of you who need it: First: After unscrewing the cap and removing your fly rod sock, remove the tip piece of your rod. Next: Remove the second to the tip section and attach to the tip. Next: Continue on down to the butt section. Next: Place the sock in the tube and close. Last: GO FISHING! This way of assembling your fly rod removes the step of having to try to find a place to set the butt section of the rod during assembly. If you’re like me and a bit neurotic about scratching your rod, this is a life-saver!

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The Gotcha Makes 1 Fly

This fly is probably the most popular bonefish fly ever created, and for good reason. The pattern is simple to tie and easily adaptable for many fishing situations. Varying the size, weight and color of this fly can represent anything from small shrimp to little baitfish, and be fished effectively on skinny or deep flats.

Hook: TMC 811S #2 - 8 Thread: Color to match wing 6/0 Weight: Bead chain or lead eyes Tail: Mylar tubing

Body: Body braid Wing: Craft fur Flash: Krystal Flash

FIRST - Attach the thread above the hook point and lay down a thread base. Return the thread to the tie in point. NEXT - Cut a 2” piece of braided mylar tubing and remove the cotton core. Attach the tubing to the top of the hook shank with the material extending past the hook bend. Remember to leave at least two hook eyes of hook shank bare to attach the eyes and wing. NEXT - Attach the eyes on top of the hook shank. Adding a drop of super glue will help hold them in place and make the fly much more durable. NEXT - Take a 4” piece of flat braid and attach it to the top of the hook shank behind the eyes. Wrap the material in touching turns down the shank to the base of the tail and then wrap back to the eyes. Figure 8 wrap the braid around the eyes and tie the material off in front of the eyes on the underside of the hook shank. NEXT - Clip a clump of craft fur from the patch. Prep the hair by grasping the tips of the hair with your thumb and index fingers and gently remove the “under fur” as you would with nautral hair. NEXT - Flip the fly over and attach the wing to the underside of the hook shank with the tips extending to just beyond the length of the tail. Make sure the wing stays on the top of the hook shank and does not spin. NEXT - Take two strands of Krystal Flash and fold them around the thread. Attach the flash to the top side of the wing. Trim the flash to the same length as the wing. LAST - Build a smooth head in front of the eyes and whip finish.


tying

“I caught my first bonefish on this pattern.” Jen Ripple

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Oman by Clare Carter King - photos by Arabian Fly Sport Fishing

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O

man … the name alone conjures up images of the desert, sand dunes and camels. This is the place that I now call home and where my husband and I have started our fishing business: Arabian Fly Sport Fishing. Most people’s first reactions are “Oh yeah, I saw the movie Fly Fishing in Yemen. Is it like that?” Well we haven’t built our own river and stocked it with wild salmon, that’s for sure. Our business is saltwater fishing. Oman has over 2000 kilometers of coastline - from rugged, unforgiving cliffs that plunge into the depths of the ocean, to beautiful flat sandy beaches that stretch for miles. There is an abundance of exciting saltwater fishing to experience. Situated in the Middle East, below the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the next question I usually hear is, “How safe is it?” I can honestly say, as a blonde female, I have never felt safer. The Omani people are THE most welcoming and friendly community I have ever had the pleasure of meeting. I would quite happily, and often do, travel the length of the country on my own and camp out under the stars without any worries whatsoever. We arrived here in September 2014 and spent over six months exploring every inch of shoreline we could access by car, camping as we went. I’m not going to lie, it was tough and there were days I would have loved to give up and go home. In the end, the experience gained, as well as the outstanding fishing we have discovered, has been worth all the blood, sweat and tears shed along the way. Well I have shed … my husband is South African, so he’s a little tougher than I … on the outside anyway! Our aim was to create a company that offers professionally guided, tailor-made fishing trips throughout Oman; giving the global fishing community a chance to experience the adrenaline-pumping fishing that has been hidden away in this rugged, remote and beautiful country. Rich in culture and history, with so many exciting outdoor activities like diving, camping, desert safaris, trekking, whale and dolphin watching and wadi bashing, (swimming in the natural freshwater pools), it is the perfect destination for the avid fisherman, as well as their family and friends. Over the past decade, Oman has been working diligently to improve their roads and promote tourism destinations across the country. Our clients now have access to beautiful, newly built, 4 and 5 star hotels, even in very remote locations. After all, a comfortable night’s sleep is a necessity after an adrenaline-packed day on the water.

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The author releases a dorado into the sea.


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We now have two fishing locations up and running. There are not many places in the world where you can sight cast to Indo-Pacific permit, tailing in only a few inches of water, with your feet firmly on dry sand. Although slightly smaller than their Atlantic cousins, they are just as feisty and just as nerve-wracking to target on fly. Imagine standing on the beach, waves lapping gently around your toes, not a care in the world, rod at the ready and scanning the crystal blue water in front of you. As a wave picks up, you spot a flash of silver and an oval silhouette riding in towards shore. With your heart rate rapidly increasing, you run to get ahead of the fish as he reaches the shallows and starts scouring the sandy bottom for tasty crab and shrimp morsels. You can see him so clearly. His mouth agape, large eyes scanning the bottom as he hunts. Putting a cast out, you wait. Time stands still. Strip. Strip. You move your fly in front of him. He sees it and stops to tilt on his side for a better look, as you hold your breath. Tail up and mouth wide open, he inhales your fly and you set the hook. From here on it’s a blur; the water erupts and line starts to scream through your fingers as he angrily takes off, attempting an escape to the deep blue depths of the Arabian Sea … and that’s only half the excitement of catching your first piece of

Omani Gold!

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Our second destination is boat-based fishing and allows our clients to target multiple species. Our boat is docked right in front of the hotel our clients stay in, and the drop-off is just meters from shore, allowing you to maximize your fishing time on the water without traveling long distances. It also means we have the unique ability to fish both in-shore and off-shore within minutes of leaving the dock. Every day is tailormade to our clients’ needs and requests. The mornings can be spent fishing the secluded coves and beaches or casting poppers along the cliff faces, sight fishing to schools of queen fish, large pods of milk fish, a group of big hungry bluefish, 3 spot pompano, Omani bream or one of the many trevally species we have here. Your fishing skills will certainly be put to the test. The afternoon, after a hearty lunch, is the perfect time to sit back and relax while you troll the edge of the drop-off in search of billfish and dorado. But don’t get too comfortable, for when the bite is on, all chaos breaks loose. The sight of a billfish hitting the teaser, being teased in, swimming under the boat before turning back in search of your fly, his bill breaking the surface of the water as he clamps down on your fly and you set the hook is not to be missed. Once hooked, their aerial displays and tail-walking on water will leave you hoarse from screaming. If that’s not enough to get your blood pumping, you can end the day casting to large schools of tuna and bonito busting on the surface while you are surrounded by a pod of over 5,000 dolphin or a friendly local whale shark. Now heading into our second official season, I am excited to see what it will bring. With new areas to explore and exciting species to target, no day is ever boring. I feel very privileged to have this amazing fishing at my doorstep. D

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fashion

Get This River fashion that makes you

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Look

twice

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fashion

RE A U O Y BE WHO the on off. d n a r e wat Finding the perfect hat is tough. This one works for us.

$25

Dress for LF E S R U O Y

Most bags are too bulky and hold surprisingly little. This bag has a lot of room and sits comfortably at the waist. Orvis.com

Orvis.com

$219

The perfect quick-drying and breathable fitted fishing shirt.

$89

Patagonia.com

ing h s i F y l F M? UNIFOR

. S S A P I’LL The attention to detail and simple extras make these boots go from boring to a must. JoulesUSA.com

$165 $110

These leggings can be worn under your waders or stand alone. They are quick-drying, breathable with UPF +50. FisheWear.com

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3

safety

Key Elements to Improve Your Wading Skills by Anita Coulton

As a licensed fly fishing guide, competitive angler and health care professional, a question that I hear quite frequently from fishing clients usually goes something like this: “What can I do to improve my wading and feel more confident in the water?” Having a sports science background, my response is sometimes preceded by a seemingly long lull, as I ponder all that goes into delivering an effective response that the client will understand and be able to easily implement. I’m sure we’ve all been fishing with that one friend who can, seamlessly, walk confidently and securely through torrid, crazy, fast running water without even batting an eye. Some people just have the ability to reach all those good spots where the fish hang out. If you’re like me, you may have tried to emulate these so-called water warriors, in privacy, of course, so as not to embarrass yourself. This activity may, or may not, have ended successfully. As a competitive angler, I’ve had the opportunity to witness some world class anglers whose fishing and wading ability far exceeds those of mortal men. These anglers are undeniably in a class all their own, and have my utmost respect. Disclaimer: Don’t attempt to do anything these anglers do. Observing wading from a clinical perspective reveals a dynamic, functional activity that is as unique as each body of water we walk through. With so many facets involved, I’ve chosen to keep it simple and narrow it down to three key areas of focus. Included also are some simple activities that you can implement in your daily routine to improve your ability to safely navigate your home waters. I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention that being equipped properly for this activity is crucial. Proper waders, footwear, a staff, polarized glasses and the like that help us and keep us safe are crucial for an enjoyable day on the water, and ensure that we return home when the day is over. Please keep in mind also that this activity can be inherently dangerous, and should only be performed by those who are comfortable with the risks involved.

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photo Brenda Galey

Let’s get started by focusing a bit on an often overlooked physical component, flexibility. Many folks look at stretching as a mundane, uncomfortable activity that yields little benefit. Let me try and simplify why flexibility is so important. Remember that song, “the thigh bone’s connected to the hip bone?” Well, there’s quite a bit of truth there. In simple terms, the skeletal and muscular systems work hand-inhand to move us about whether we’re fishing or doing chores less enjoyable. When muscles are in a shortened state (what we call tight), compensations occur and other structures may be compromised. This can (and often does) lead to injury. Common areas affected with wading are the hamstrings, calves and quadriceps. To compound this, muscles that become fatigued will also tend to tighten up. A prime example most of us can relate to is the stiffness we feel following prolonged standing in one spot. A few simple stretching activities daily can pay off big and improve the way you move, both on and off the water.

Let’s go.

GRIT


safety

STRETCH As a general rule, stretches should be done gently and should be held for 30 seconds and repeated two to three times.

Hamstring stretch: Perform with legs straight while sitting up tall. Gently pull toes back to increase stretch.

photo Joe Allison

photo Joe Allison

Calf stretch: Leaning against a wall or table, maintain heel on ground. Keep your leg straight to stretch calf. For soleus stretch (lower part of calf), bend knee while keeping heel down.

Quad stretch: Pull one leg behind you. Make sure to have support. Keep knees together.

Understanding how flexibility relates to how you feel and move both on and off the water is a game-changer when it comes to mustering the drive to perform stretching on your own. For the majority of my patients, I recommend a daily stretching regimen. continued on next page

photo Joe Allison

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safety

BALANCE Another area of importance with regards to wading is balance. Balance can be a challenging component to improve, but when you do, you’ll find yourself much more comfortable in the stream. Balance is nothing more than maintaining your mass (center of gravity) over your feet (base of support).

Doorway balance: Standing on one foot. A good starting goal is being able to balance 30 seconds on one foot, and work up from there. Use a doorway for support, as needed. As you improve, and feel more comfortable, you can try balancing with your eyes closed. As you’ll see, taking your sight out of the equation makes this activity much harder.

Scientifically speaking, there are three key factors that affect your balance. Vision is paramount and input from your eyes tells you whether or not your environment is moving. Somatosensory is input from your body, mainly feet and joints, that quickly relay information regarding the surface that you’re standing on (very important when walking in water). Your vestibular system is comprised of your inner ear and helps your body determine which way is up. These three components, working together are what help us remain upright. With just a few activities, improving balance can be simple and fun. When working on any balance activity, safety is always top concern. To avoid falling, do only activities that you are comfortable with, and I recommend having something to stabilize yourself such as a doorway or counter. Foam balance: To challenge your somatosensory system, try balancing with one foot on a piece of foam or a rolled up towel. This activity on an unsteady surface will challenge us all, and will help with improving stability. Start off with holding on for balance and progress to doing the same with your eyes closed for even more of a challenge.

photo Joe Allison

Cone taps: The ability to reach outside your base of support while maintaining balance is another important skill. Start slow with reaching short distances while holding on for support. As you progress, you can reach farther and challenge yourself. Start with 10 repetitions on each foot and progress as you feel you are able.

photo Joe Allison

photo Joe Allison


safety

STRENGTH The final component that I’ll share is the one that will most likely have the largest impact on your ability and comfort level in the water. Strength. Having adequate strength is, ultimately, what ties these three components together. Getting stronger does not require hours at the gym or even a membership. Simple activities performed with inexpensive equipment at home will suffice. If you are new to this activity, get clearance from your healthcare provider prior to starting. Strength for wading involves mainly the legs, hips and glutes (aka … the butt). I’ve chosen to use a simple resistance band. These bands are readily available and often color-coded to indicate different resistance levels. Find the resistance that you feel most comfortable with. With strength activities, I try to get as specific to wading as I can. I’ve chosen a few of my favorites to share. Start with doing each exercise 10 times. Standing hip flexion: Standing with one leg behind you. Bring leg forward in slow controlled manner. Control the resistance as you lower your leg, holding on for support. This exercise will strengthen the muscles needed to walk in current or deep water.

Standing hip abduction: Standing with resistance coming from the side. Pull against the band moving leg in the opposite direction from resistance. Maintain upright posture. Be sure to work both sides. This exercise improves your ability to stand and fish in swift moving current.

photo Joe Allison

Wall squat: Performed against a wall with a physio ball or just a towel on the wall that slides, bend legs and keep back straight. Keep knees and toes in good alignment. Don’t go lower than quadriceps (thighs) parallel with the floor. Weight should be primarily on your heels. This activity strengthens all the major quadriceps muscles, as well as your glutes, used for wading.

photo Joe Allison

As far as frequency is concerned, stretching and balance can be performed every day as you have time. Strengthening is recommended two to three days per week. With a little bit of focused time spent at home working on your flexibility, balance and strength, you can greatly improve your ability and feel more comfortable and confident negotiating your favorite stream. Start slowly and progress at your own pace. Well, what are you waiting for? Go improve your wading ability, get out there, have some fun and be safe. Oh, and leave a few fish for me, k? photo Joe Allison

Anita Coulton is a NY/PA licensed fly fishing guide with Cross Current Guide Service and guides on the Upper Delaware River. She is also a licensed Physical Therapist Assistant with Drayer Physical Therapy.

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gear

Why It’s Worth It

It’s a big chunk of change, but here’s why we think it’s worth every penny.

Designed with the fly angler in mind, Jackson’s Mayfly is easy to maneuver, stable enough to stand on and is the last kayak you’ll ever need to buy.

Hatch Storage

Hinging hatch system designed to be fly line friendly

Jackson Kayak - Mayfly MSRP $1,899.00 JacksonKayak.com

Rod Tip Tubes

The tubes are easy to use while on the water. They allow you to safely store your rods while paddling or fishing.

Width

The Length

Longer length 12’ 8” for increased speed and tracking

“I was a little nervous to try kayak fishing, but after landing my first fish within site of the ramp, I felt instantly comfortable sitting and standing on the Mayfly.” Editor-In-Chief, DUN Magazine Jen Ripple

Increased width-34” for enhanced stability while seated and standing, beginner-friendly

The Seat

Sit-on-top designed for fishing waters that range from trout streams, to lakes and ponds and inshore flats

YakAttack

YakAttack track systems to add accessories and customize placement within reach

Reel Storage

Unique reel storage options, including padded reel pockets and custom-molded features for securely mounting rods pointed forward or backwards

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Power-Pole®

Designed for easy attachment of a PowerPole® anchor system

GRIT


gear Werner - Shuna: Hooked Bluefin Limited Edition Paddle MSRP $275.00 - 2 piece WernerPaddles.com

2 sections

2 sections for easy storage and travel with a snag free Smart View Adjustable ferrule creating the solid feel of a 1-piece paddle with blade adjustment

Material

Carbon blend Straight shaft, Standard Diameter in longer lengths for wider boats and raised seats

Blade

Dihedral shape allows for stable forward paddling. Custom shaped, low profile reinforcement spine provides enhanced blade maneuverability

HD Graphics

The Jackson Kayak “Bluefin” is a proprietary process adding bold, bright color to this premium paddle

Kōkatat - Aries PFD MSRP $99.00 Kokatat.com

Entry

Adjustable low-profile front entry design makes it easy to get in to and out of

Design

The low-profile, highback design of this PFD makes it super comfortable for all your on the water activities

Flotation

Gaia® soft low-density foam is free of CFC ozone depleting materials and provides safety in whitewater, sea kayaking and fishing while giving unrestricted freedom of motion

Certifications

United States Coast Guard approved with UL/USA, ULC/Canada and CE certifications

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not your TYPICAL

stag & hen

ESCAPE

by Vera Carlson - photos by Bob and Vera Carlson

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WE WERE SHOWN TO OUR ACCOMMODATION, WHICH WAS A SPOTLESS B & B IN THE VILLAGE AND WE SLEPT VERY WELL, DREAMING OF WHAT WE HOPED THE TRIP WOULD BRING; TROUT AND GRAYLING GRABBING OUR FLIES.

live in the Lake District of England. I am a qualified casting instructor with the Game Angling Instructors Association and have fished my entire life. In February, my husband and I went to the British Fly Fair in England and met a Czech fishing guide named Petre Axamit, who showed a film of the fabulous fishing for wild trout and grayling in the mountainous region of the Czech Republic. He appeared very honest and spoke excellent English, so we asked him for the best time of year to visit his country and hastily made arrangements to fly out and fish with him for a week. We booked flights to Prague for June and eagerly wished the weeks away until our trip. Prague, by the way, is a very popular destination for stag and hen weekends, so we were lucky to get a flight out. We already had 9’, 4wt rods, reels and lines, so not a lot of extra kit to buy; we replenished the fly boxes, packed our hip bags with sundries and dusted off the chest waders and boots. We were off, but not to a good start. The plane was delayed leaving Manchester and by the time we arrived in Prague, it was very late evening. Petre picked us up and drove us on the very twisty, mountainous roads for a couple of hours … in fact I don’t think we met a vehicle or saw another person on the journey: not exactly a welcome party. We eventually arrived in Vrchlabi and unpacked the car. We were shown to our accommodation, which was a spotless B & B in the village and we slept very well, dreaming of what we hoped the trip would bring; trout and grayling grabbing our flies.

Our morning briefing was brilliant. Petre showed us a map of the region and the rivers we would be fishing, gave us caps to wear and introduced us to Czech hospitality with a glass of Chuckleberry wine. The first place Petre took us was below a weir, and I knew he had taken us there to check out our casting. We caught a few trout here and, by then, our guide was satisfied we weren’t going to scare every trout in the river, so he took us to fish the river properly.

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WE FOUND OURSELVES SCRAMBLING OVER BOULDERS THE SIZE OF A FAMILY CAR ...

Even though it was June, it was cool, and when we moved to rivers higher up in the mountains, thermals were necessary. The scenery was wonderful. Despite being very low, the rivers were powerful and we did not wade too deep. Although we didn’t see trout rising, when we presented a dry fly in the runs, the hungry trout snaffled the fly straight away. There didn’t appear to be a big hatch, but a black Klinkhammer or a small sedge, carefully cast with an aerial mend to slow it down, proved difficult to resist. We fished the Labe, Jizera and Upa rivers and they were all different. We fished hard the whole week and had an amazing time. The evenings we spent dining at a local restaurant, with high quality food which was very cheap compared to England,

replacing the energy we had lost during the day. Most of the rivers were very difficult to access; we found ourselves scrambling over boulders the size of a family car, slithering down the scree banks on our bottoms to reach the river or wishing we had knowledge of mountain climbing to get to the pools. Once by the water we relaxed. It was so peaceful that you forgot how difficult it would be to get back to dry land. I wouldn’t say the fish were large … the biggest would be 1.5 lbs and what we caught we had to work for, but it was so enjoyable. We never saw another angler, smelling the pine trees, hearing the river rushing past and thinking that maybe on the next cast a trout or grayling will take my fly was truly amazing. Spring-Summer 2017 .

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“ “

OUR GUIDE HAD AN AMAZING SENSE OF HUMOUR AND ONE DAY, BECAUSE I HADN’T CAUGHT A FISH ALL DAY AND IT WAS ALMOST 6PM, HE MADE ME WEAR MY CAP BACK TO FRONT UNTIL I DID.

Petre was very patient and fascinated by some of our very tiny olive and black Klinkhammers, tied on a size 28 hook. The grayling loved them and we caught many. He taught us how to ‘Czech nymph’ correctly, (it was invented in his country), and he was also willing to learn some of the casts we use when river fishing, which he had never seen before. My husband and I are both qualified casting instructors in England, so teaching him to do left shoulder casting, single speys and tension casts was easy and he soon picked them up and we knew he would add them to his skill set. Our guide had an amazing sense of humour and one day, because I hadn’t caught a fish all day and it was almost 6pm, he made me wear my cap back to front until I did. I became more determined than ever not to look so silly and eventually landed a trout in the white water under the weir. Petre drove us to fishing every day in his red Skoda and his driving got more scary by the day as we ventured further in to the mountains. He was so used to the twists and turns and hairpin bends in the road that he took them at speed. It was definitely a white-knuckle ride going to and from the river, so I am pleased it was relaxing once we were there. I would most definitely go back to the Czech Republic. It is within easy reach of the UK and is all wild fishing. There are absolutely no stocked fish and they are hungry and ready to grab a well-presented fly. A guide is essential and I would recommend Petre. D

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basics

Getting Back to Some

Basics

we think you should know

The Loop-to-Loop Connection The loop-to-loop connection is one of those simple, but really complicated things. Once you are comfortable making this connection, you can use it for all sorts of things. The most common use for the loop-to-loop connection is connecting your leader to the fly line. Gone are the days of having to know how to tie a nail knot just to go fishing. A loop-to-loop connection is also used when connecting your fly line to backing and it can be used to connect bulky bite tippet to your class tippet when fishing saltwater or for toothy critters. There has been a lot of debate over this connection. Many anglers automatically cut the loops off their lines. We here at DUN use the connections for almost every fishing situation. We find these fail less for us compared to nail knotting the leader to the line. In fact, these connections have helped our lines last longer. The loops can wear out over time. It’s important to check the condition of your loop to make sure the line is not cracked or wearing out. Properly making the connection is the biggest factor in ensuring the loops last. Here are the steps to properly connect your leader to your fly line using a loop-to-loop. First: Uncoil your new leader from the package. Successfully completing this step is the hardest part of making the connection. Next: Take the pre-made loop in the leader and pass the fly line through it. Next: Find the end of the leader and pass this end through the loop in the fly line. Last: Pull the entire leader through the loop in the fly line and seat the knot. The knot should look like a square when completed.

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ELITE LEVEL RODS AT A PRICE THAT WON’T MAKE YOU PEE YOUR WADERS. Designed by Bob Clouser, the Clouser Series provides uncompromised versatility. From tiny dries to hulking streamers these wonderfully light rods deliver with an easy loading, progressive action - just what you need to launch a Clouser Minnow a country mile. Visit TFORODS.COM to find out more.

POWER TO THE ANGLER.


get to know

Bessie BUCHOLZ The New Zealand Program Director for Yellow Dog Flyfishing Adventures talks with us about bananas, Chapstick and how she fell in love with fly fishing.

Best career advice? How can I say “listen to your heart” without sounding trite and unoriginal? Ah, whatever, it’s the truth—you have to follow your intuition and

How long have you been in the industry? I started fly fishing at a young-ish age, but didn’t officially get into the industry until 2011 when I joined the guide staff at the Old Baldy Club in Saratoga, Wyoming immediately after graduating from the University of Virginia. If ever there was a pivotal moment in my life, it was when I decided to resist the pull towards a life and career in the city and move back out west to try my hand at guiding. As an Art History major with no interest in working at a museum, I suppose I should have seen this coming. Best guilty pleasure? I love to draw and practice calligraphy, so I sometimes just can’t help but doodle in the middle of a meeting (I promise I can draw and listen at the same time). However, when I’m feeling especially naughty, I like to enjoy a shocking amount of cream in my coffee. Best advice for traveling light? Do you really need that electric toothbrush? How about that hair dryer? I have to ask myself these questions a lot. Toiletries are one thing that can be easily down-sized or scaled back due to the fact that lots of lodges and hotels provide the basics anyhow and some nonessential items tend to be bulky (like that hair

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dryer that I probably don’t need). But I would be lying if I said I travel lightly in terms of the clothes I bring—as a fashion hound, I can’t help myself from over packing. My justification is that I would rather have something and not need it than need it and not have it.

do what you think will truly make you happy (forsaking the opinions of others who may think they know your best interests better than you do). Indeed, my career at Yellow Dog would not have materialized had I not taken a huge leap of faith and left my job and life in New Zealand to approach this company about building the NZ program from the ground up. I did it because I knew that my heart yearned to be back out west and because I used to daydream about a job like this. While I loved my life there, a little voice in my head kept telling me to step away from the desk and get back into the fishing industry. The decision power I have granted to my heart is a little crazy to some, but it has always served me well in life. But really, every job I’ve held until today was initiated by a bit of gut instinct combined with sheer gutsiness. One of my favourite sayings is “you either make dust or you eat dust” – so to follow that, I’d say that you really can’t wait for something great to happen to you. You have to go out there and chase it! GRIT


Best fish ever caught? I think the most incredulous I have ever felt upon landing a fish was when I caught an 11 pound brown (my personal best) in New Zealand late in the season last year. I was so surprised to have actually landed it, of course, and my hands were shaking for hours after I put her back into the river. But I will really never forget the rush of euphoria that came over me when it finally reached the net after the most dramatic and stress-inducing fight I’ve ever had with a fish. It was a great feeling and an unforgettable moment in my angling career. If you could fish with one angler, past or present, who would it be? Oh gosh, I hate to be trite again, but you totally set me up on this one. It’s gotta be Joan Wulff. She is really the one who paved the way for the rest of us ladies. But if I had to choose a man to fish with, it would be Ernest Hemingway—if for no other reason than for a great story! Best fly fishing adventure? For sure, without question, Bolivia. The name of the country is synonymous with the word “adventure!” I’ve been enamoured with Amazonia since I was a little girl, so to finally be immersed in that primordial environment was truly incredible--breathing the heavy, humid air, hearing the thousands of insects sing from within the jungle and observing the magnificent flora and fauna that I only knew from pictures. But aside from the butterflies and the macaws and the lush natural beauty of the place, the fishing is something unto itself—especially for those who appreciate classic freshwater angling. To fish gin-clear, freestone rivers in the heart of the rainforest for exotic species that are known for their ferocity and size is really an adventure that can’t be beat. Whether it’s the aggressive Golden Dorado or the permit-like Pacu or even the mighty Yatorana, there is no shortage of diversity or excitement in the fisheries of Tsimane in Bolivia. But on top of everything else, the opportunity to encounter the native people of this remote part of the world is what truly completes the experience. Their gentle and curious personalities, their fascinating culture and their total mastery of jungle life is so cool to witness and it is the one detail of that trip that really stuck with me. I really can’t say enough about these beautiful and resourceful people and I have so much respect for the simple lives that they lead. Best way to spend a day on the water? Any time you can combine good company with a sensational insect hatch before other anglers are tuned in, it’s hard to go wrong. Oh yeah, I am

really big on making sure that lunch is aboveaverage awesome where possible, so I make sure to have cherries, pickles, beef jerky, killer sandwiches (with chips layered in) and avocados in the cooler, along with plenty of beer and Fresca! Best childhood memory? When fishing? Or just in general? Ha—this is a tough one because I grew up on a ranch in rural Wyoming and therefore my childhood was extraordinary, unique and very fun as a result of my imaginative nature and wild surroundings. I’d have to say that looking for antler sheds on horseback was one of my favourite things to do. I did have to dismount one time to “water the bushes,” but I was too short to get back on the horse by myself afterwards, so I remember walking through sagebrush for what seemed like hours until I found a ‘stool’ to help me get back on my ride. I think I may have been crying at the time because I was alone and somewhat lost, but it is a precious memory nonetheless.   When did you first fall in love with fly fishing? Probably on a horseback pack trip with my best friend in the Absaroka Mountain Range (in Wyoming) when we were still teenagers. The experience was so special as it combined many of my favourite hobbies: hiking, horseback riding, camping and fishing. We caught enough cutthroat to feed an army, yet we only filleted a few of them since we were already wellprovisioned on the trip. It is so fun to catch beautiful trout who are feeding indiscriminately on little dries and catching large numbers of them in such a spectacular setting will make anyone a convert to the sport of fly fishing.   When I have downtime, I ... ? Downtime? I’m not sure what that means! I am planning a wedding (my own, which is in less than three months), going to my friends’

weddings, expanding my program and therefore traveling a lot for my job at Yellow Dog, keeping fit, acting as a landlord (landlady?), taking care of three dogs, and keeping up with a fiancé who shares my love for fishing and hunting, as well as gardening and a good cocktail. Having a busy social and professional life is what makes me tick and gives me fulfillment, but in the rare moments of calm, I really like to indulge my inner creative side through sketching and painting. I also love reading, but I usually devour books when I am traveling (my eyes are shut within three minutes of my head hitting the pillow each night when I am home). One product I never leave home without is? Chapstick. I think the Simms chapstick is the best and I have three tubes of it on my desk right now, but I also love Lucas’ Papaw Ointment, which is a magical Australian ointment that I formed a cosmetic crush on during my New Zealand years.   Do you have any fishing superstitions? I am not too terribly superstitious when it comes to fishing, as I’m a pretty big believer in the fact that you create your own luck out on the water. Most precautions I take before I go fishing are grounded in reason and knowledge of fish behaviour. Now, since that’s a boring answer, I will say that the “no bananas in the boat” rule is one I will abide by—mostly because other folks get legitimately freaked out when I don’t and so I’d rather just keep the peace and bring an apple instead.   What is the one bucket list fish you have never caught but want to? Let’s see … probably an indo-pacific permit! Oh, but I’d really love to catch a GT on the fly. Or a milkfish. Or an arapaima. Or a redfish. Ugh, look what you’ve started!! D

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science

Fish by Alisha Saley - photos by Brandon Miller

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science

Slime Spring-Summer 2017 .

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science

Every time

I land a fish, my mind and body go through a wave of emotions:

SHOCK - “Wow, do I really have a fish on? Is it just a snag or can I begin the battle to the net?” EXCITEMENT - “I wonder what kind it is? How big it is?” FEAR - “I hope I am not hurting it. How can I catch and release this fish as quickly and safely as possible?”


science I have always been told that my mind over-analyzes my actions, however in this case, I think it serves as a great reminder. A reminder to every angler that how we handle our fish can severely influence their life after.  We have all felt it. The soft and slick body of a trout as we try to release its fragile jaw from the fly. Have you ever questioned what that slickness really is? Or does? Fish mucus, often referred to as “fish slime,” is produced in the goblet cells of the epidermis layer of the fish (outermost layer of skin).  Humans also produce mucous, however, ours serves a different function in the body. Human mucous is produced in the goblet cells of the mucous membranes that line our respiratory, intestinal, urinary and reproductive passages. The coating serves as a lubricant for the passage of materials, while also keeping the areas healthy by maintaining a moist environment. As in humans, the mucus created by fish goblet cells also serves to maintain conditions, however, it is present externally on the surface of the fish. The mucus, present in all fish, is a combination of compounds that aid in protecting the fish, much like our skin protects us. Each community of fish has its own chemical make-up within the mucus, because factors that are produced are specific to the species and environment in which it lives. The mucus is a mechanical defense against parasites and pathogens, blocking them from entering the body. There have also been studies that show osmoregulatory and locomotive functions (Van Oosten 1957, Rosen and Cornford 1971). Osmoregulation is crucial for fish to maintain osmotic pressure within their cells while in the water. By regulating the concentrations of ions flowing in and out of the body, the fish can keep a correct balance between its internal concentrations and the concentrations found in the water column. Without the regulation, these ions would accumulate and become toxic for organs such as the kidneys and their skin. This mucus allows proper release and uptake of ions while also providing a barrier for unwanted molecules. Because the chemical make-up of the mucus varies along genetic and environmental conditions, research is very interested in looking at specific compounds that aid in protecting some of the most economically important species, such as the rainbow trout.


science


science One study took mucus from the coat of rainbow trout and isolated the compounds to see what protective properties it holds. They found that along with an overall mechanical defense, the mucus specifically contained the proteins lysozyme and protease ,which function to destroy gram-positive bacteria and clear any suspension of gram-negative bacteria, respectively. (Hjelmeland et al 1983). Because the mucus contains a high diversity of compounds, it is able to specifically target and destroy invaders, keeping the skin of the fish free from infection and disease. As an active scientist, I question how these natural defenses may be able to serve in a broader purpose. Sunscreen is a compound that is necessary for humans to protect our skin from UV-A and UV-B rays from the sun. I highly recommend the use of sunscreen, however, it is also important to note

that many of the sunscreens we use contain chemicals that are harmful to aquatic ecosystems. Science is making strides to compensate for this. One study showed that when combining fish mucus with a compound found in crustacean shells they were able to produce a “natural sunscreen” that doesn’t cause damage to our aquatic ecosystems - marine reefs in this scenario. They found that in conjunction, the resulting material was photoresistant (sun did not damage it), thermoresistant (heat/cold did not damage it), and that it had a high absorption of both UV-A and UV-B radiations (Fernandes et al 2015). There is another substance that is present in water bodies with predator fish species that could potentially be mistaken for this mucus. Fish slicks are used by seasoned anglers as a way to locate where predatory fish (for example speckled trout or redfish) have been feeding. Because both the mucus and slicks are compounds of “oily” nature, meaning they don’t mix well with water, it is good to note that the shiny surface you are seeing is not the result of mucus. Fish slicks can be created by two ways: 1) the predator fish eats smaller fish and “burps” up digested prey in the form of oil or 2) as the fish are feeding, small bits are missed and are left in the water column. In either scenario, the oil bands together (because of their hydrophobic, “water hating” nature) and floats to the surface (because of density differences). Some experienced anglers can actually smell the slicks and have noted scents of watermelon or fresh cut grass.


science

So why should this matter to people who fish? We want to keep our fish populations healthy and sustaining so that we can continue enjoying the sport. Any small acts that we can do as stewards of the land to maintain populations will help our natural resources team and will diversify our populations in the long run.


science

GRIT


science some ways we can alter our fishing habits to protect fish: It’s OK to photograph your fish, but catch and release as QUICKLY as possible.

Wet your hands before handling fish so that you don’t strip the oils and slime.

Use a rod size that matches the size of fish you expect to catch.

Keep the fish in the water as much as you can with it facing upstream to increase oxygenated water flow over the gills.

Use larger tippets for landing fish faster. Try not to drag the fish up on shore. Have a net with a small mesh or rubber basket.

When holding fish, do not squeeze and keep your fingers away from the gills. D

Use barbless hooks.

Remember: increased handling time equals Decreased survival rates.


tying

“It’s only the most famous crab fly ever ...”

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The Merkin Crab

Makes 1 Fly

This crab pattern, created by Del Brown, has probably accounted for more fly caught permit than any other pattern. This is not a realistic crab pattern, but acts more like a real crab compared to other patterns. This fly can be a little time consuming to tie at first, but the techniques are not complicated. This fly has launched a tying style appropriately called “Merkin” and can be applied to many other materials. There is a little art to shaping the body of the fly. The shape should resemble a rounded teardrop. Hook: TMC 811S 1/0 - #6 Thread: Chartreuse flat waxed nylon Weight: Plated lead eyes Tail: Brown barred neck hackle

Flash: Pearl Flashabou Body: Tan craft yarn Legs: Square white rubber legs Garnish: Red permanent marker

FIRST - Attach the thread near the hook eye, and lay down a thread base. Return the thread to two eye lengths from the hook eye and attach the eyes. NEXT - Move the thread back to the hook point and prepare four neck hackle feathers, matching them by length and width and removing the webbie feathers. The prepped feathers should be just slightly longer than the shank of the hook. NEXT - Take 2 of the feathers and set them one on top of another. Attach these 2 feathers to the far side of the hook with the curve facing away. Take the remaining 2 feathers and set them on top of each other and mount them on the near side of the hook with the curve facing you. This will create a ‘reverse prayer’ shape to the tail. NEXT - Attach three strands of Flashabou by folding them over your thread and tying them in on the top of the shank at the front of the tail. Trim the flash in irregular lengths slightly longer than the tail. NEXT - Cut several pieces of craft yarn to a length of 2 inches. Tie in the first piece at the base of the tail with the material sitting on the top of and perpendicular to the hook shank. Use x-wraps to secure the yarn. NEXT - Repeat this above step with each bunch touching the last to just behind the eyes. NEXT - Build a smooth head in front of the lead eyes and whip finish. NEXT - Take the fly out of the vise to trim. Press the yarn between your thumb and index finger and make the first cut up from the edge of the lead eyes towards the tail making a wedge. A curved set of scissor can be handy. Repeat on the other side. Make sure the back end is rounded towards the tail. NEXT - Place the fly back in the vise with the point up. Stretch a piece of rubber leg material across the bottom of the fly between the yarn strand. Wrap the rubber leg tightly around the hook shank and tie a square knot in the leg to secure it to the shank. Make sure you don’t trap any of the fibers. Start at the hook bend and evenly space rubber legs up the hook shank. LAST - Color a wide red band on the rubber legs, stretching the legs as you apply the marker. Trim the legs so the tips are red. Coat the thread body with a thin super glue to hold the legs in place and make the fly much more durable.

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pura vida by Nome Buckman, Contributing Editor 

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When expectations and reality collide, the results can still be ...

Pu

lling o R

t h he t i w

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W

hen you board your first leg of a big trip, your fishing expectations are the highest they will ever be and they remain so as you imagine all the possible things you will see and experience on the water while en route. Even though I’d consider myself a veteran angler who knows fishing is unpredictable at its best, I still love to daydream.  Fishing with great distances in between point A and point B can put a lot of stress on whether or not the trip was worth it.  I’m here to remind you to keep an open mind when traveling and not set too much pressure on fishing by having such high expectations.  Also, be open to any form of fishing, if that is your only option.  But first, let me set the record straight.  This trip’s agenda was not a fishing trip, but to have fun on the beach and in the mountains of Costa Rica with one day of fishing.  ONLY ONE DAY!  No pressure at all.   There are two major airports into Costa Rica: San Jose and Liberia.  We opted for Liberia as both beaches and mountains would be accessible.  Fortunately, the dry season was very dry and would continue.  Our coastal destination and home base was Playa Del Coco.   It took weeks of preparation and research to tie up enough flies for anything that might cross my path.  Originally I was going to do a DIY from the local beaches, but an opportunity to get out into the coastal waters was too tempting to pass up for my one day of fishing.  The fishing odds would be more in my favor, or so I thought. Initial communication about guides in the area told me that my guide was knowledgeable about fly fishing and was the go-to for the area.  Most of the boats would be charter trolling boats, but if the guides have knowledge of fly fishing or light tackle techniques, they will be able to put you on fish.  Fortunately, Costa Rica has a very rich ocean fishery.

... It took weeks of preparation and research to tie up enough flies for anything that might cross my path ...

It was established that I would not need to bring equipment and all would be supplied. Tempting as that sounded, I still brought one set up, knowing how easy it would be for a trip to go from good to bad without the comfort of my own gear.  They don’t have fly shops in Costa Rica.  Pay particular attention to that last sentence.  I did not follow that advice and ended up paying for it.   Spring-Summer 2017 .

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Our schedule was: Day one, river boat tour. Day two, rest. Day three, full day action adventure tour in the mountains with volcanic hot springs. Day four, rest. Day five, 8 hour fishing trip. Day 6, leisure departure in the late afternoon. For our non-fishing events, we went with an adventure tour company called El Coco Tours.  They were fantastic to work with and spot-on pairing us with the proper adventures and elegant, fully loaded condos.  The driver and bus El Coco Tours offers are well worth their weight in gold and a worry-free way to travel in Costa Rica where many of the remote mountain roads don’t even have road signs. Our river boat tour provided an amazing amount of wildlife and at the end of the day, I received a message saying the fishing trip had to be rescheduled to day two due to weather. That meant no rest until the end of the trip.  Thankfully, both my companion and I were willing to roll with it.   At 6 am the next morning, we found ourselves on the beach ready to head out.  We approached the waves and hopped into a 25ft boat.  I shook hands with the guide and he seemed excited to start the day.  As we made our way out of the cove, the guide asked what we would like to fish for.  I said anything that is available, as I like all fish, hoping this would make the guide trip easier for him.  He asked if we wanted to do any trolling and we were not interested in this, even if it was for Blue Marlin.  We were here to experience the coastal habitat and fly fish in the Pacific Ocean for the first time.  The northwest coastline of Costa Rica is loaded with rock ledges and islands that produces excellent cover for fish.  To the rocks we went, but we had to keep an eye out for rough water.   I was beyond excited and bouncing with anticipation. I put my fly rod together, strung it up and awaited arrival at our first area before choosing a fly.   Upon arrival, we came into a school of busting bonita.  At this point, I had trust in my guide that he would steer us right and that he understood the goals.  I showed him the flies I brought and asked what they were eating.  Anchovies. No sweat, I had that covered.

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... I had made a classic mistake. I did not pack a second rod. 120

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I popped on a fly and within a short time frame was seeing fish interested and following, but no commitments. I double checked that a floating fly was preferred rather than a deeper presentation.  Yes, the guide stated, as if I should not be second guessing him.  Even though my gut kept telling me to go deeper, I stuck with the floating fly because the reality was, I didn’t know anything about this water and he did - or so I thought.  After some time passed (more than I should have allowed), I switched to a deeper presenting fly and after two casts my rod snapped mid-cast.   I was horrified. It was still the beginning of the trip and in that instant, with the two parts in my hand, I replayed all the time and distance that was put into getting on this boat and the fact that I had made a classic mistake. I did not pack a second rod.  Then I remembered the guide was supposed to have equipment.  I asked if he had backup rods.  He did. Trolling rods.  My heart sank. Instantly, I lost all confidence in my guide.  Never again will I go so far without a second rod.  After a few moments of silence, my companion handed me my first Costa Rican beer of the day. It was a much needed lubricant for decision making and helped put the day’s goals back into perspective. What to do?  End the trip with a guide that wants to do nothing but troll, or find another way to make it happen?  I like to think I’m highly adaptable and if there’s a will, there’s a way.  I decided to make the best of the situation and use the only rod I now had available to me: a trolling rod, and use it as a casting rod.  As I was rigging it up with weight to use this rod with flies, the guide brought me some fresh cut bait.  I waved my hand and said NO THANK YOU. I was still only using flies, and I pointed to the bigger flies on my homemade foam roll.  

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He threw his hands in the air and looked to be saying good luck. I know he thought I would be more willing to troll to save the day, rather than spend hours casting a trolling rod with a fly.  He was so wrong.  I fumbled the few first casts before my childhood muscle memory kicked in.  For the next six hours, I did nothing but cast that trolling rod with flies. I hooked into rooster fish, tuna, bonito, barracuda and Spanish mackerel.  I was able to land some bonito and Spanish mackerel.  It was great to cast and see what would dart from the deep and what would bolt from the rocks.  Tuna in pods were swimming around like bad asses from “Gangs of New York” looking for others to rumble with.  I was having a blast and was still a part of the system of cause and reaction, which is the area of fly fishing I love the most.  

Now I can hear the words … is it still fly fishing if you don’t use a fly rod? I’m not here to debate that.  I’m an angler who wants to fish waters I will most likely never visit again, so I did what I had to do. I kept an open mind and found a way to make it happen, rather than be disappointed that fate had other plans.  For six hours, I fished while pinching myself to remind myself I truly was in Costa Rica fishing for exotic fish. At the end of the day, the guide came over, took his cap off and lowered his head.  I looked at my companion for hints as to what he was doing. To my surprise, he said “I take my hat off to you.  I know of no one else who would cast a trolling rod like that for so long and stick with it to make it work.  You have much heart.”  He even expressed an interest in using flies for his business. At first, I was still very annoyed with the guide for not representing himself properly. But, after I gave it some thought, I shook his hand at the end of the day with mutual respect. I know it took much for him to say what he did.  

PURA VIDA!

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get to know Take this quiz to find out how well you know

DUN Magazine 1

2

What year did DUN release the first edition?

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A

2013

B

2014

C

2016

D

2017

How many countries is DUN Digital read in?

A

less than 50

C

101 to 150

B

50 to 100

D

more than 151

6

Where did Jen Ripple learn to fly fish?

How many male authors has DUN had since its inception?

A

Zero

B

One

C

Two

D

3

5

A

Dryden, Ontario

C

West Bend, WI

B

Ann Arbor, MI

D

Manasota Key, FL

7

How many authors have been published in DUN?

A

35

C

73

B

59

D

103

Four

Where was DUN Magazine started? A

On Wallace Lake in West Bend, WI

C

Waiting for Tarpon in the Keys

B

On a Montana trout stream

D

During a layover in Denver

1) A - DUN released its first edition in Fall of 2013. 2) C - DUN has had two male authors: Hank Patterson and Knut Johan Ruud-Sandal. DUN has published photos by numerous male contributors. 3) A - The concept of DUN was conceived by Jen while fishing Wallace Lake.

Why did Jen Ripple start DUN?

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A

She had nothing better to spend her trust fund on

B

She lost her job and needed something to do

C

She looked for a women’s magazine and couldn’t find one

D

She was approached by advertisers to create it

4) C - Jen was writing an article for a Tight Loop Magazine and wanted to write for a women’s fly fishing magazine - and there wasn’t one. 5) D - DUN is currently being read in 156 different countries and counting. 6) C - DUN’s founder, Jen, learned to fly fish while living in Ann Arbor, MI. 7) C - DUN has published articles from 73 different authors, however some of the authors have been published multiple times.

GRIT


THE FINEST PERFORMING FLY ROD WE’VE EVER MADE.

The revolutionary new Winston AIR. Incredibly lightweight. Unbelievable performance. This super-premium series features a breakthrough design that combines our new SuperSilica™ resin system with high modulus Boron. The result? Truly remarkable fly rods that offer significantly less weight, more liveliness, an extremely broad casting range and higher responsiveness for superb accuracy and presentation. Available in weights 3 through 6.

winstonrods.com

T H E B O RO N ADVANTAGE


science

KIDNEYS OF THE Freshwater mussels (Unionidae) are of extreme importance to an aquatic ecosystem’s function and health. Probably the most well-known ecosystem service that mussels provide is ‘cleaning up the water.’ They are filter feeders; meaning they get their nutrients from straining small organisms and particles out of the water. Some species are even being reintroduced to areas of poor water quality, in hopes of decreasing the sediment and pollution load. One adult mussel can filter approximately 20 gallons of water a day! Now, think of the impact a large, healthy population of mussels could have on a river ecosystem!

by Megan C. Hess

Unfortunately, it is estimated that 70% of mussel species in North America are listed as: of special concern, threatened, endangered or extinct. Freshwater mussels are particularly sensitive to changes in their environment because of their limited mobility and complex life cycles involving fish hosts. Anthropogenic (man-made) changes to our land and rivers such as pollution, dams and water extraction, decline the diversity, abundance and range of these organisms. Increased sedimentation and pollution from agriculture and industry degrades water quality so much that mussels cannot thrive. The introduction of dams not only blocks the host fish passage for mussel larvae, but also alters the natural flow regimen of the river, changing productivity and therefore food availability for mussels. Water extraction and changing climate results in the increase of river temperatures and salinity, which creates unfavorable habitat conditions for certain species. These are just a few of the complications mussel populations face regarding human impacts on our land and in our waterways.

RIVERS

Mussels function in rivers similarly to the function of kidneys in the human body. These ‘kidneys of the river’ filter out unwanted particles and toxins. Not only are mussels cleaning up the water column and sediments, but they provide many other ecosystem benefits, including their importance in food webs and the cycling of nutrients from aquatic to terrestrial systems via hungry raccoons and muskrats, along with numerous water column and sediment nutrient cycling processes.

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Because mussels play such an important role in aquatic ecosystems and restorative conservation, it is important that we keep them and their habitats protected. One way to do this is by maintaining high fish diversity in waterways. Because mussel species are selective to their fish hosts, having higher diversity of fish will facilitate high diversity in mussel populations. And, isn’t it more fun anyway when you don’t know what species is on the end of your line? The next time you partake in catch and release of that mature, healthy fish, think of the positive impact you have on the mussel population by returning their host!

Mussel populations are slowly declining from our freshwater ecosystems via anthropogenic causes. Removing mussel populations from aquatic ecosystems is similar to removing both kidneys from your body … it would not function properly. There are many things you can do to help reverse this dangerous trend, including making your voice heard at local, regional, national and even global level discussions and decision making. You can have an impact on our aquatic ecosystems. Get out today, go get your feet wet and make your voice heard in any way possible to advocate for the health of our aquatic ecosystems! D

GRIT


science

photo Jack Dudding

ABOVE: Mantle lure display of the plain pocketbook mussel. The glochidia are packed away in this lure and when a fish bites it, it breaks open and the glochidia are spewed into the mouth of the fish to attach on to the gills. Note the eye spot and fish-like shape. RIGHT: Lampsilis bracteata (Texas fatmucket) from the San Saba River, Texas. Unearthed using SCUBA gear to go head first into giant submerged holes in the bank (just a little nerve-wracking). FAR RIGHT: Glochidia attached to the gills of a fish host, as seen through a microscope. BELOW: Female Tritogonia verrucosa (Pistolgrip) from the Trinity River near Dallas, Texas. BELOW RIGHT: Lampsilis cardium (plain pocketbook) mussel

photo Jack Dudding

photo Jack Dudding

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gear

Great Buys Under 50 When all your hard-earned

Dollars

matter

Sight Line Provisions - Skinnies These amazing cuffs have taken the industry by storm, and for good reason. We just can’t get enough of them! Bold and yet elegant like the fish they represent, show what’s in your sight line with one of these elegant, handmade pieces. MSRP $50.00 SightLineProvisions.com

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gear Leatherman - Juice CS3

Orvis - Tacky Collab Fly Box

For those of us who don’t feel comfortable carrying around a big pocket knife, this handy little tool is perfect. With just enough bells and whistles to make it a must have, you’ll never have to worry about forgetting your nippers, bottle opener or wine corker again! Don’t leave shore without it!

This clever collaboration between two of our favorite companies makes the perfect fly box. If at this point you don’t own a couple Tacky boxes, you’re missing the boat. Their sleek design easily allows you to carry 336 flies and takes up a lot less space than conventional boxes. The tacky mats are silicone and hold flies tighter while at the same time being much more durable.

MSRP $29.95 Leatherman.com

Loon Outdoors - Razor Scissors When new fly tiers ask what they should invest in, the answer always includes a good pair of scissors. Nothing is more frustrating than trying to cut material with a dull scissors. Like their name suggests, they are razor sharp and we love that one side is serrated and grabs the material. Oh, and that yellow loon handle makes them easy to find, even on the messiest of fly tying tables. MSRP $24.95 LoonOutdoors.com

MSRP $35.00 Orvis.com

De-Fishing Soap Catching fish is great, but smelling fishy isn’t. De-fish yourself with this unique formula which deactivates and washes away odors and oils. It’s one of our favs! Available in 3 oz bottles and 5 ml travel packs. MSRP 3 oz bottle $6.00 DeFishingSoap.com

Did you Know?

500

Hammerhead sharks can live in schools of more than 500 sharks. The strongest female swims in the middle. When she is ready to mate, she shakes her head from side-to-side to signal the other female sharks to move away so she is the center of attention.

500 5

Britannica Illustrated Science Library. Fish and Amphibians. Chicago, IL: Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc, 2008.

Americans throw away 35 billion plastic water bottles every year. And each one takes 500 years to decompose. Source: Brita

A male emperor angelfish lives together with up to five female mates. If the emperor angelfish dies, one of the females turns into a male fish and becomes the leader of the group.

Gross

The Atlantic hagfish is so slimy that it can make enough slime in one minute to fill a bucket.

Head, Honor. Amazing Fish (Amazing Life Cycles). Pleasantville, NY: Gareth Stevens Publishing, 2008.

Wow

The sailfish is considered the fastest fish and can swim as fast as a car travels on the highway.

Head, Honor. Amazing Fish (Amazing Life Cycles). Pleasantville, NY: Gareth Stevens Publishing, 2008.

Fish (Eyewitness Books), New York, NY: Dorling Kindersley Limited, 2005.

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get to know

Clare CARTER KING,

photo by Arabian Fly Sport Fishing

what’s in your fly wallet?

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get to know Our fishery in Oman is so diverse you never know what flies you may need each day. For that reason, I always make sure I have a broad selection.

photo by Arabian Fly Sport Fishing

For inshore, you can’t go far wrong with a variety of Clousers, some brushes and NYAPS (not your average poppers - designed by James Christmas). These work for all of our Trevally species, the Bluefish, Large Spot Pompano, Omani Bream and Queenfish. We are also lucky enough to have two species of permit here, the Trachinotus Africanus and the Trachinotus Blochii (Indo Pacific). For both of these, we use crab and shrimp patterns. I make sure to keep a selection of varying weights and colour combinations of these in my fly box. We occasionally find large schools of Milkfish, so a few of Wayne Hasleau’s milky dream flies are a must as well. I finish off with a selection of pink and also green Cam Sigler flies for trolling, which are ideal for all of our billfish (Sailfish, Striped Marlin and Black Marlin), as well as Dorado.

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Tim

by Courtney Des pos -

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ph oto s

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e

by Br an do n

M i ll er

l l e W

GRIT


Spent

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Being a Mom can be hard. Like, really hard. There is this overwhelming reality that you have been given this life to influence and to bring up someone who adds to society and ultimately leaves the world a better place. There is the hope that they will have a greater, positive impact than you did. Some days, it takes everything you have to hold it together, to keep everybody happy, to wake everyone up, get them off to school, go to work, come home, make dinner, get everyone to bed, and get everything ready for the next day. But, then there are those days where it all just falls in place. Those days are what makes it worthwhile.   It’s 4 a.m. and the alarm goes off. I roll out of bed with more energy than usual. I throw my clothes on and walk into his room. I gently rub his back and say, “Buddy, time to get up.” As he groggily awakes, he looks up at me and says, “Mama, is today the day? Is today the day we get to go? We get to fish?” I look at him and immediately feel happy that he’s so excited about the thing that I am passionate about. Today is the day. I’ve taken him fly fishing with me before, but today’s a little different. He’s grown older, taken an active interest and asked to go. Today we are fishing with a group and he’s so excited to be the big kid:  the big kid that gets to hang with the adults for the day. As I watch him hastily eat his breakfast, all I can think about is how thrilled I am to expose him more intimately to the lifestyle that has truly become my vitality. 

After we pick up our crew for the day, we drive to the water. We get out, stretch our legs and rig up. To make sure he understands safety while fishing, we spend some time talking about sun protection and the importance of glasses to protect his eyes. The education is beginning.  As we prepare, his anticipation grows. Today is the day. Today is the day I introduce him to this lifestyle. Today is the day I teach him to catch and release and conservation techniques. These are the things that are vital to pass along to him in order to carry this life, that I love so much, forward. Today I start impacting the next generation. Spring-Summer 2017 .

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We make our way down to the river; it’s a small stream with beautiful brookies.  As we slowly inch our way to the edge of the creek, I stop and bring to his attention the varying landmarks of the water. “See those pools of water? That’s where we’re going to cast. That’s where the fish are,” I tell him. I take the opportunity to tell him about fish habitat and what fish need to be happy and healthy. We talk about oxygenated clean water, light, protection and food. Eager to catch a fish, I put the rod in his hand and teach him how to hold the line. With my hands over his, I guide him through these first steps. I lightly touch on line management and I tell him to picture a clock as he casts: 10-2, 102, 10-2. We make a couple of casts to no avail. He becomes impatient, as we all do. Another teaching point. Then, the moment comes.  The cast has force, the line lays out delicately and like a lightning bolt, a fish hits the fly. The set is purposeful and the fish is hooked. We work together to strip line in and start talking through next steps. Keeping the fish in the water, I ask him to get the net. He scurries behind me to grab it and with the pure excitement that only comes with that first fish, he is back ready to net the fish. I guide the fish to the net and tell him to keep it in the water. Once netted, I take the opportunity to show him proper handling to aid in conservation. After removing the fly, I show him how to wet his hands in the creek and have him mirror me. He gently touches the fish while it’s still in the net and in the water, to feel the slimy coat. “This slime is the protective layer for the fish. Like our skin, the fish needs it to keep its body safe and healthy,” I say. We talk about different areas on the fish to be aware of and where vital organs are, as well as the importance of a soft hold in the right spots. I lift the fish from the water and net demonstrating correct techniques and place it back in. I encourage him to mimic me and hold the fish the same. Great hesitation appears as he squirms at the thought of touching the slime. I reassure him that it’s necessary to release the fish back to its home. He’s excited to be a part of the release and lifts as I do. We slowly lower the brookie into the water, facing upstream. I tell him to maintain the fish there to allow fresh water to run over it. He does as asked and as the fish regains energy, he carefully lets go and watches as it swim away unharmed. He looks at me and I can see a sense of accomplishment and contentment in his eyes that I have had yet to see.

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The day continues on and we repeat this series of events with each fish caught. We work on casting, different fishing techniques and flip rocks to look at bug life. At the end of the day, as we travel home and I tuck him into bed, we review the day. His last words before he is off to dreamland are, “Today was the best day of my whole life, Mom! Can we slay fish again soon?”   Our ability as parents to guide the next generation with a soft and detailed perspective is one of a kind. My passion is fly fishing and leaving an impact that allows this lifestyle to continue on year after year for the next generation of anglers who will fish our waters. The ability to align the outdoor experience

to their age and level is key. The beauty of this is keeping the next generation engaged and driven to carry forward what we love. The chance to teach our children our passion about conservation of the outdoor life is so important. As we instill in them the ability to be aware and present, to carry forward the ideals that make our world sustainable, we release something within ourselves. That is the beauty in it all.

That is the experience to remember for a lifetime. D

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refreshment

It’s Time For A Thanks for reading, now go get a

Refreshment

We recommended this one.

Vodka Tonic 2 oz Dry Fly Vodka 1 tbsp Fresh Squeezed Lemon Juice 1/2 tsp Fine Sugar 1/16 tsp Quinine Powder 2 dashes Orange Bitters Top Club Soda Garnish Half Lemon Round To Build this Cocktail Fill your favorite cocktail shaker with high quality, large cubes of ice. Add vodka, lemon juice, quinine powder, sugar and bitters. Shake the cocktail till chilled. Double strain into a chilled old fashion glass with fresh ice. Top with club soda and garnish. Immediately head to your nearest porch and enjoy.

“Always do sober what you said you’d do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut.” Ernest Hemingway

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for yourself.


hats bags wading belts skirted wool leggings merino wool tops neck tubes jackets

SHOP ONLINE www.FisheWear.com

Open Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. in Anchorage, Alaska at 511 W. 41st Ave, Suite 101

DUN Magazine Print - Spring Summer 2017  

The first edition of DUN magazine print

DUN Magazine Print - Spring Summer 2017  

The first edition of DUN magazine print