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FLYFISHER C O N S E R VAT I O N

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spring/summer 2018

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E D U C AT I O N

an eye for redfish

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COMMUNITY

7 delicious shrimp patterns

BRIAN GROSSENBACHER Capturing Perfect Casts

DRIFT BOAT

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PACIFIC BEACH

FISHING

ADDICTION


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CONTENTS

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DRIFTING FOR SUCCESS JONATHAN WALTER & JEFF POWLES

Many good reasons exist to fish from a drift boat (or raft) on a river. First and foremost, it’s a fun way to spend the day floating, fishing and getting your fly in front of a lot of fish. An angler can cover more water in a day from a boat, which means more targets. This article will help you understand what’s needed to have a successful, fun, safe and productive day on the water.

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THE CONNECTION BETWEEN SALT AND BLOOD PRESSURE BRIAN GROSSENBACHER

Montana native and one of fly fishing’s most recognized photographers, Brian Grossenbacher, captures the essence of time spent shooting on saltwater flats. His travels have taken him to the ends of the earth and regardless where that end is, each one has a few things in common: adventure, water, fish, fly gear and cameras.

On the cover: Brian Grossenbacher Contents: Captain Tuck Scott

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SEA RUNS AND COHO – COLDWATER BEACH FISHING DAVID PAUL WILLIAMS

When the trout lakes are frozen, when the rivers are roiling with snow melt or too low and warm, grab the fly rod and face west where the coho and sea runs eagerly await. Hook a few, release all you catch, and go home knowing you’ve experienced tangling with wild fish.

DEPARTMENTS:

6 8 9 10 12 22 34 38 40 44 46 48

Editor’s Message Chariman’s Message President’s Message Community Conservation Photo Essay Fly Tying Casting Fly Fishing Skills Industry Partners Reviews Streamside Q&A

Contents

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EDITOR’S MESSAGE

I DAVID PAUL WILLIAMS David Paul Williams is an author (Fly Fishing for Western Smallmouth), editor, freelance magazine writer, writing teacher, lawyer, real estate broker, public speaker, and demonstration fly tyer, who has been fly fishing since Ike was president.

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n 1956 Woody Guthrie penned the lyrics to “This Land Is Your Land.” Fly fishers grew up knowing that we, the people, were stakeholders in millions of acres of federal lands administered by the United States Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and other federal agencies. In 2018, there is a concerted effort by well-funded organizations like the American Lands Council and American Legislative Exchange Council to effect a transfer of federal land into state hands. Some folks believe the transfer is a terrific idea suggesting that state governments are better equipped to manage land within their borders. The American Lands Council website talks about states tending “our public lands more like a park or a garden and less like a ‘hands-off, don’t touch’ Washington DC museum.” That statement implies that federal land, if transferred into state control, would lie fallow, perhaps merely improved with park-like structures. That implication rings false on examination of the money trail. The first impact economic impact of each state maintaining that now-transferred federal land is loss of most, if not all, federal dollars associated with that land. A 2014 study performed by University of Utah, Utah State and Weber State concluded transfer of federal lands to Utah would cost the state about $280 million without taking into account the loss of up to 5,000 federal jobs that generate another $236 million. The study offsets management costs against land lease and royalty payments, primarily from oil, gas and coal; and concludes the path to financial solvency is to aggressively lease the public lands to private corporations and individuals. That can only work in the near term because revenues will diminish over time as resources are depleted while management costs will continue to escalate. The state would be left with thousands of acres of land stripped of all income-generating resources. Fly Fishers International jumped into the public land and public access fray with both feet adopting a policy of Public Lands and Waters of the United States advocating for the “protection of public lands and waters of the United States for their ecological, recreational and economic function and value” and opposing public land transfers. FFI wrote Interior Secretary Zinke expressing “support of the provisions of Antiquities Act of 1906 and to express our opposition to executive action that seeks to administratively overturn a national monument.” Your organization was one of the many organizations and individuals that wrote Congressional leaders urging their “support for a new bipartisan budget agreement that provides relief from impending sequestration cuts and allows for strong annual funding of natural resources conservation in the Fiscal Year 2018 appropriations process.” FFI is also a member of the Standing Water Working Group of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership working to try to minimize the impact of rescinding the Clean Water Rule. Last year, after a change in administration within the EPA, FFI urged members to let the EPA know that anglers and conservationists still oppose the proposed Pebble Mine that peer-reviewed science concluded poses potentially “catastrophic” risks to the Bristol Bay watershed. Montana’s iconic Smith River is at risk from a proposed huge underground copper mine at the head of a critical tributary. FFI alerted members of the pending application and requested members provide comment to the Montana Department of Environmental Quality. Conservation is founding principle of Fly Fishers International, and your organization is proud to actively preserve and protect public lands, public waters and public fisheries.

Flyfisher Spring/Summer 2018


Board of Directors Tom Logan Chairman of the Board Burr Tupper Vice Chairman of the Board Development Committee Chair Tilda Evans Secretary Fly Fishing Fair Committee Chair

FLY FISHERS INTERNATIONAL 5237 US Highway 89 South, STE 11 Livingston, MT 59047-9176 (406) 222-9369 flyfishersinternational.org

Jim Maus Treasurer Finance Committee Chair

President/CEO Len Zickler | ceo@flyfishersinternational.org

Jim Schramm Legal Counsel

Operations Manager/Conservation/Webmaster Rhonda Sellers | operations@flyfishersinternational.org

Dutch Baughman Executive Committee Education Committee Chair

Editor in Chief David Paul Williams | editor@flyfishersinternational.org

Keith Groty Executive Committee Senior Adviser Dave Peterson Executive Committee Conservation Committee Chair Bruce Brown Membership Chair Kuni Masuda International Programs Committee Chair David Paul Williams Fly Fisher Editor in Chief

Education Coordinator Fair/Fly Tying Group Jessica Atherton | fair@flyfishersinternational.org Membership Coordinator - Members/Retailers/Guides Kat Mulqueen | membership@flyfishersinternational.org Casting Coordinator/Merchandise Nikki Loy | casting@flyfishersinternational.org Bookkeeper Sharon Cebulla | bookkeeper@flyfishersinternational.org Administrative Assistant/Museum Alex Williams | admin@flyfishersinternational.org Clubs and Councils Coordinator | Donor Information Lindsey Webster | clubs@flyfishersinternational.org

Rick Williams Conservation Senior Adviser Board Members Dave Boyer David Diaz Glenn Erikson Bud Frasca Don Gibbs Carole Katz Geoff Mullins Dennis O’Brien Tim Papich Jen Ripple Richard Ross Michael Schweit Molly Semenik Ron Sowa

FLYFISHER Flyfisher is published for the FFI by Bird Marketing Group Inc. PO Box 227A Eastport, ID 83826 Executive Publisher Jennifer Bird jbird@birdmarketinggroup.com Group Art Direction Terry Paulhus Office Administrator Kim Carruthers Editor in Chief David Paul Williams

Flyfisher is the official publication of Fly Fishers International, published two times a year and distributed by mail and online free to members. Send membership inquiries, fees and change of address notices to the FFI Headquarters at the address listed above. Flyfisher is produced for FFI by Bird Marketing Group Inc. Editorial & Advertising Inquiries: Editorial queries are welcome and should be sent to Bird Marketing Group Inc at the address listed above attention to the Editor. Email queries can also be emailed to dbird@birdmarketinggroup.com. Visit flyfishersinternational.org for the full writer and photographer guidelines. Advertising inquiries can be directed to jbird@birdmarketinggroup. com. Visit flyfishersinternational.org for Ad rates and spec guidelines. Reprints & Permissions All facts, opinions and statements appearing within this publication are those of the writers and are in no way to be construed as statements, positions, or endorsements. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written consent of the publisher. Copyright 2018 Fly Fishers International. Letters to the Editor Send your comments about any aspect of Flyfisher to the Editor at dbird@birdmarketinggroup.com. We will endeavor to reply to each letter. We reserve the right to edit all submissions. Letters published in Flyfisher become the property of Fly Fishers International.

Editor Derek Bird Copy Editor Jim Mclennan Department Contributors Conservation Tom Logan Fly Tying Jerry Coviello Casting Jeff Wagner Fly Fishing Skills Molly Semenik Contributors Paul Boals Loren Fairman Brian Grossenbacher Jeff Powles Jonathan Walter

Leadership Messages

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CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

O TOM H. LOGAN Chairman and Senior Conservation Advisor Tom H. Logan is a retired Certified Wildlife Biologist with 47 professional years in the research and management of endangered and other wildlife. He is a life member of Fly Fishers International, Senior Conservation Advisor, Certified Casting Instructor and Chairman of the Board. Tom teaches fly casting and tying, writes articles on the Biology of Fly Selection and Fishing and is owner of North Florida Fly Fishing Adventures. tomlogan@comcast.net www.northfloridaflyfishing.com.

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ne of the most common questions I’m asked at the Fly Fishing Shows is, “What does Fly Fishers International do?” That’s a good question, and with 6.5 million outdoors people identifying themselves as fly fishers, the inquiry should be no surprise. My answer was simple. Fly Fishers International (FFI) is a global organization that supports all fly fishers and strives to preserve their opportunities to fly fish. We do this through our conservation work and through teaching all aspects of fly-fishing skills. Conservation, of course, is a fundamental pillar to our continuing opportunities to enjoy fly fishing. Our natural resources, especially our wetlands from salt to fresh and warm to cold and their watersheds, must be properly conserved. Otherwise, their health and ability to support fish would diminish and their very existence would be threatened. Conservation practices and advocacy is a major FFI commitment and investment into the future of fly fishing and is why we have added new Internship and Scholarship Grants to our Conservation Grants Programs. These new grants will assist undergraduate and graduate students earn degrees as future managers of our natural resources. If you or someone you know may qualify, check the information on our website at flyfishersinternational.org under Projects & Programs. Also, look under Conservation/ Policies to review the FFI Conservation Policy Plan and our Policy on Public Lands and Waters of the United States for details of our philosophies regarding the biological, social and economic values of natural resource conservation. Collaboration is strategically important in matters of resource conservation. But, it is in the excellence of our educational activities where we distinguish FFI from other outdoor organizations. Education in all areas of fly fishing is another important pillar of our organization, and we commit substantial resources to education each year. Certainly, information on venues and opportunities to fly fish for all fish in all waters is beneficial, but it is the instructional information that helps us improve our fly-fishing skills and ultimately contributes to enjoyment of our fly-fishing experience. The new FFI Learning Center will very soon make dozens of downloadable curriculums, in-person workshops, videos and other instructional materials available to you on our website. Topics will cover all aspects of fly fishing that include fly-fishing safety and etiquette, aquatic entomology, casting, fly tying and conservation. Community is the third pillar and strength of how we define ourselves as FFI and what we do to enhance our sport and protect opportunities to fly fish. We are social beings who respond to the sense of being a part of something with others of common philosophies and interests. I’ve had new members tell me they joined FFI to find new friends with whom to fly fish. Others are impressed by our conservation advocacy or educational activities, but it is through the social media that we expand. Social media is an effective way to engage with more fly fishers and communicate what we do for them. Our fly-fishing community is growing in a way that constantly challenges us to seek new ways to provide value, support growth, and remain relevant. Please visit FFI on Facebook and Instagram to view and share what we do and encourage other fly fishers to support our many programs. I know many of you also are asked questions regarding what FFI does. Don’t pass up that opportunity. Think of yourself as an Ambassador of FFI—an Ambassador of Fly Fishing—and consider how valuable FFI is to you.

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

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he Fly Fishing Show season has wrapped up with the last show in Landcaster, PA. By all accounts our involvement in the shows was a very successful decision for FFI. FFI leadership was engaged at all of the shows to assist councils in the production of the events. Our decision to participate in these shows was rooted in the desire to continue to increase the awareness of FFI’s work as the primary voice for fly anglers. At the request of the show promoters, we focused on a clear and consistent presentation of the new FFI brand. The Furimsky’s (show organizers) were very pleased with our booth set up as well as our involvement in the “learning center”. There are still a number of improvements that can be made in our presence and involvement with the shows. We will recommend our continued involvement with the shows in 2019 and beyond. We also intend to consult with council presidents to discuss improvements for future shows. I will also be assisting with a few regional fairs in the Pacific Northwest. As a reminder, staff is available to assist with regional events if there is a need for both display material, brochures and/or posters. Consistency in branding and the presentation of our brand is of the highest priority. I am very happy to report this winter I accepted an appointment to the Board of Trustees for Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing. This is an incredible honor for me, as FFI desires to strengthen our relationship with PHWFF and expand our assistance in the education and rehabilitation of disabled veterans. In February I had the opportunity to attend a PHWFF training session In Long Beach, CA. On a number of fronts, PHWFF is doing an exemplary job, particularly focusing on program delivery. The primary takeaway for me was the importance of program delivery in the success of our organization at the membership, club and council levels. Engaging clubs and councils in program delivery particularly for fly casting and fly tying offers a particularly strong communication tie to our members regarding the mission and vision of FFI. Development of the FFI Learning Center curriculum will be very helpful in strengthening the tie between National and our members through opportunities for program delivery at the local level. Planning and preparations for the annual fair and Fishfest in Boise, ID continue. We have a very strong ground team in Boise and are benefiting from the marketing advice provided by the Bird Marketing Group. The team has successfully identified and secured commitments from key major fly-fishing vendors. Additionally, we have identified several celebrities, both from within the membership of FFI, as well as icons of our sport. If you have not made preparations to attend Boise, it’s important to do so now as hotel rooms are filling up. All in all it has been a very successful and productive winter. We very much look forward to the remainder of 2018 and moving our organization forward as the global voice for fly anglers in conservation, education and community.

LEN ZICKLER Len Zickler, currently serves as President and CEO of Fly Fishers International and Director at Large for the Washington Council of the FFI . He is a member of the Spokane Fly Fishers and Inland Empire Fly Fishing Club. Len is a life member of the FFI and Trout Unlimited.

MISSION The Mission of the FFI is to support,

VISION The Vision of the FFI is to support and promote fly

enhance and preserve fly fishing opportunities. Fundamental to this mission is environmental stewardship and education.

fishing for all fish and all waters. Our core connection is through education. We strive to be the best fly fishing educators in four areas: casting, tying, fly fishing skills and conservation.

Leadership Messages

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COMMUNITY

Council Presidents Chesapeake Council Pete McCall / Dianne Tidy president@ccifff.org Eastern Rocky Mountain Council Bruce Brown colo.bruce@gmail.com Eastern Waters Council Sam Decker samfishes@gmail.com Florida Council Tom Gadacz thomasgadacz@yahoo.com Great Lakes Council Dennis O’Brien dennissueob@aol.com Gulf Coast Council Mike Jackson mikej3865@gmail.com North Eastern Council Burr Tupper nhflyangler@gmail.com Northern California Council David Pellone 44dpellone@gmail.com Ohio Council Jeff McElravy jmcelravysr@cinci.rr.com Oregon Council Sherry Steele steelefly@msn.com South Eastern Council Dick Handshaw dick.handshaw@handshaw.com Southern Council Ron Knight ron79580@gmail.com Southwest Council Bill O’Kelly president@swcffi.org Texas Council Jerry Hamon president@texascouncilifff.com Upper Midwest Council Todd Heggestad theggestad57@gmail.com Washington State Council Carl Johnson flyfishalso@frontier.com Western Rocky Mountain Council Bud Frasca grizzking@aol.com

fly fishers had a Saturday morning breakfast, special programs and casting sessions. Jennifer Bird spoke on how to catch tarpon and the history of women in fly fishing, plus Peggy Brenner tied the Grey Ghost. High school students, the “Strikers”, visited the Expo and some participated in fly casting. The Casting Board provided an opportunity for those interested in Casting Certification. Fly-fishing events such as the FFI Florida Council Expo are made possible by the great volunteers and members we have in our organization. Captain Pete Greenan, David Olson, Karen and Rick Warfel, George Haseltine, and Craig Smothers put together a great event, which was promoted by Bill AuCoin and M. E. DePalma. We thank all those who volunteered and the exhibitors for their support. Your support for fly fishing, our Florida Council, and Fly Fishers International is greatly appreciated. Support your local clubs and become a FFI Member.

Florida Council If you wanted to know everything about fly fishing, casting, fly tying, and conservation issues in two days, YOU MISSED IT. Here’s some of what you missed at the 2018 FFI FL Council EXPO at the Plantation on Crystal River. Steve Huff’s great programs on how he participated in setting fly-fishing records and winning a place in the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame. Jon Cave showed how to put your fly on the target with his turnover cast. Frank Catino shared his thoughts on how to select the best fly line for any given situation. Leigh West gave tips on stealth wading on the flats. The amount of fly-fishing knowledge was incredible. The Expo featured 22 general programs, 13 casting programs, and featured fly tiers with four special fly tying small group programs. Women

North Eastern Council The North Eastern Council (NEC) of Fly Fishers International (FFI) is responsible ME

Chesapeake (PA-WV-VA-MD-DE) Eastern Rocky Mtn (WY-CO-NM-AZ) Eastern Waters (NY-NJ) Florida Gulf Coast (LA-MS-AL) Great Lakes(MI-IN) Northern California (CA-NV-HI) North Eastern (VT-NH-ME-MA-RI-CT) Ohio Oregon South Eastern (KY-TN-NC-SC-GA-AL) Southern (NE-IA-KS-MO-IL-OK-AR) Southwest (CA-NV) Texas Upper Midwest (MN-WI-IL) Washington (WA-AK) Western Rocky Mtn (UT-ID-MT-ND-SD)

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for serving members in the New England states, Canadian Atlantic Provinces and the Province of Quebec. In 2018, NEC manned the Learning Center at The Fly Fishing Show held in Marlborough, MA, and participated in the Fly Fish New Hampshire show. In addition, NEC provided fly tying, casting and instructors for events held at the Bear’s Den Fly Fishing Company in Massachusetts and Bass Pro in New Hampshire. NEC has held introductory fly-fishing classes in New Hampshire and Massachusetts as well as supporting a fly-fishing weekend for Dartmouth College students. NEC is also working with the various state Fish and Wildlife organizations promoting conservation and offering introductory classes in fly fishing and fly tying. NEC is providing tying classes and casting instruction for the FFI clubs in our area. In 2017-18, we supported conservation projects in Nova Scotia for salmon restoration on the Margaree River, and in Massachusetts for restoration of searun brook trout in the Cape Cod. We also supported a brook trout tracking program conducted by Dartmouth College on the Dead Diamond and Swift Diamond Rivers in New Hampshire.

Southwest Council Volunteers from the Southwest Council staffed a booth at the Fred Hall Show in Long Beach for five days from March 7-11, 2018. This show attracted in excess of 10,000 people, most of whom are conventional anglers. Staffers used the Trout in the Classroom display and a tying table to promote the clubs of the SWC and attract people to our sport. The tying table participants, mostly youngsters, learned how to tie a Woolly Bugger.

One of the highlights of this recent show was when Chuck Bonham, the California Department of Fish & Wildlife Director, stopped by our booth to express his appreciation for the work the SWC member clubs do with the Trout in the Classroom program. The SWC helps over 162 teachers/classrooms with over 10,000 rainbow trout fry released per year, with more clubs and more teachers participating every year. Deep Creek Fly Fishers is the standout club in the council sponsoring 47 classrooms. The SWC is grateful to the DFW as the egg deliveries are increasing each year and the program is moving more smoothly than ever.

Upper Midwest Council The Upper Midwest Council is excited to offer the 4th Annual Fly Fishing School in Rochester Minnesota. The UMC Fly Fishing School offers two separate courses including a Certified Casting Instructor Preparation course and a Fly Fishing School to learn about fly fishing. The Certified Casting Instructor Preparation course is for those interested in becoming a CCI. Two MCI instructors teach this course in an intensive two-plus day seminar. The course will prepare the participant to take the CCI exam. There is also a Fly Fishing School for beginners to advanced fly fishers wishing to learn and enhance their fly-fishing skills. Courses range from tying knots, tying flies to casting and reading the water when fly fishing. The last day of the school is on the water with experienced fly fishers allowing participants to practice the skills learned in the classes. The CCI Preparation course is June 20 to 22, 2018. The Fly Fishing School is June 22 to 24, 2018. For further

information and/or to register for either of these courses contact Todd Heggestad at theggestad57@gmail.com.

Texas Council This was the third year the Tarrant Regional Water District hosted the flyfishing festival on the Clearfork of the Trinity River. The event kicked off on Friday with a Celebrity Trout Tournament. Many of the “guides” for the tournament were Texas Council officers or board members with our own president’s team winning the tournament. The main festival on Saturday was attended by nearly 3,000 enthusiasts and the simply curious who came out to enjoy the familyfriendly event. Admission was free, the weather was great and the crowd was treated to a packed event schedule. The day featured presentations by fly-fishing experts, fly tying and casting lessons, fish-cooking demonstrations—even the Boy Scouts participated. The highlight of the day was the Big Trout Contest. Fly fishers from all over Texas and bordering states entered the friendly competition in which trophies were awarded to the best of the best. The event brought to the forefront the important role the Trinity River plays in our community and the sport of fly fishing. TRWD’s commitment to water quality and outdoor recreation benefits local residents and visitors alike. That commitment has created the opportunity for events and recreation on our river. This fly-fishing festival gave the Texas Council, Fort Worth Fly Fishers, Dallas Fly Fishers, and the Texas Women Fly Fishers an opportunity to showcase the elements that the Fly Fishers International offers (such as casting, fly tying, conservation, and flyfishing skills) at a community event.

Community

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CONSERVATION

To Conserve and Protect

A TOM H. LOGAN Chairman and Senior Conservation Advisor

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common theme in my conversations with our Fly Fishing Community continues to be that Fly Fishers International (FFI) must have and act upon a strong conservation philosophy. Conservation of our natural resources is essential for many reasons including assuring our opportunities to fly fish endure. I’ve encountered no one who disagrees with this premise, but I suspect few actually know how our organization meets this commitment and how you benefit. Conservation work of FFI is guided by policy and the leadership of the Conservation Committee (Committee) of the Board of Directors (BOD). The Committee generally recommends policy; awards conservation grants for local projects, internships and scholarships; and develops biological statements that are technically and legally sound for BOD issuance as

Flyfisher Spring/Summer 2018

public comment. A representative of each FFI Council serves on the Committee, and most members have some natural resource background and experience. Three Senior Conservation Advisors also serve the Committee who are responsible for technical review and preparation of biological opinions and position statements on behalf of the Committee. Fish, wildlife and their habitats are protected under state, national and international laws. State laws generally apply to non-migratory species, while national and international laws apply to migratory and internationally endangered species. They all generally prohibit “take” of species or “adverse alteration” of habitats with provisions to permit certain conditioned activities. They generally allow those activities that demonstrate provisions for avoiding adverse results and prohibit activities that would result in adverse


effects that cannot be avoided or mitigated. Hunting and fishing licenses are examples of such authorized provisions, as are conditioned permits to mine, dredge and fill wetlands and/ or alter upland habitats of endangered or threatened species. Provisions also facilitate public review and comment prior to permit issuance. Virtually every conservation issue that comes to the attention of the Committee involves the potential for adverse effect to species or habitats, requires conditioned authorization by permit, and provides opportunity for technical review and comment. These are the comments FFI provides. Other issues we evaluate involve proposals to change or replace existing rules or law. The point of all this is that proposals may arise to which the Committee would be philosophically opposed for various reasons; however, positions taken by FFI must be both consistent with sound science and provided in context of existing or proposed law in order to realistically influence public policy and decision that affects conservation of our natural world that supports our fly-fishing opportunities. We refer to this work of the Committee as Conservation Action. Partnering with other like-minded outdoor recreation organizations is very important to the scope and effectiveness of FFI’s Conservation Action. I’ve worked as staff for one private organization and worked with many others during my professional career (starting in 1966) as a wildlife scientist. A very exciting philosophical shift is emerging among these organizations. Private outdoor organizations traditionally have been very competitive with each other in what they do, their membership base and sources of funding. They now are

collaborating on conservation matters to speak with one much more powerful voice on conservation matters while still representing the respective recreational interests of their members. Fly Fishers International currently partners with more than 55 other outdoor organizations, mostly through our association with the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership. This allows us to pool our technical skills, staffs, volunteers and other resources to collectively monitor emerging conservation issues, track proposed legislation, provide input to staff drafting of legislation, make recommendations to agencies regarding management policy and collaborate in preparation of biological opinion and recommendations that are consistent with existing laws that protect our natural resources, public lands and waters and our recreational opportunities. Most importantly, we now provide collaborative comment and recommendations on behalf of millions of members and an outdoor industry that generates an estimated trillion dollars annually to our economy. Numbers and dollars count. This is more powerful than FFI could ever accomplish speaking alone, and we do this while remaining the only global organization in the partnership that represents fly fishers of all fish and all waters. The Committee has evaluated and commented on 19 conservation issues in the past seven months. Letters to agencies and policy makers were issued directly from FFI in some cases, but most were letters that included our input for submittal over signatures of dozens of our conservation partners. Topics of comment ranged from mining projects that threaten high quality wetland and

fishery resources, proposals to weaken protection provided under existing laws such as the Clean Water Act, protection of National Monuments, recommendations for mineral exploration and production to minimize adverse effects on public lands, and scientific standards for managing forage species of critical importance to marine sport fishes. We also commented on a proposed Conservation Education Act and supported designation of California’s Mokelumne River as a “Wild and Scenic River”. Furthermore, we are working with state agencies regarding development of a five-year management plan for the Lower Kings River in California’s Central Valley. We currently are monitoring and providing input through our partners regarding proposed legislation cited as the “Modernizing Recreational Fisheries Management Act of 2017” that intends to set scientific standards for management of mixed-use marine fisheries that includes both sport and forage species. I would be remiss if I did not also comment on the educational work Committee members have undertaken in their development of Conservation Curriculums for unveiling as the conservation component of the FFI Learning Center in August 2018. You will soon see new brochures to promote fly-fishing ethics, personal conservation on the water, and “catch and release” to improve safe handling of fresh and saltwater fishes under a “keep ‘em wet” philosophy. So, the next time you fly fish with a friend, perhaps a new friend, share with them a little about the FFI conservation work and ask them if they would like to support an organization that protects natural landscapes, their enjoyment of the outdoors, and their fly-fishing opportunities.

Conservation

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The Successful Drifter: Drift Boats 101 Authors: Jonathan Walter and Jeff Powles Illustrations: Paul Boals

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© Photo Chris Bird

The Successful Drifter: Drift Boats 101

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any good reasons exist to fish protection as well as protection from your partner’s casts), from a drift boat (or raft) on a sunscreen, and any personal items you may need. If you river. First and foremost, it’s a have a dry (waterproof) bag, use it. If you are going on fun way to spend the day floating, your own or with friends, make sure there is an adequate fishing and getting your fly in first aid kit, personal floatation devices, water, and snacks front of a lot of fish. An angler can or lunch. Lastly, don’t forget the camera. Our Drift Boat cover more water in a day from a boat, which means more Trip Preparation List is a good starting point, and you may targets. It is often done with a guide who has expertise wish to add other items based on your experience. Keep in mind that the clothing list may change based on and advice about fishing that particular stretch of water. seasons or guide recommendations. Often there is no access by foot or car, Specifically, waders may not be so the fish are less pressured. DRIFT BOAT TRIP necessary in the summer. If you Though it’s a great way to cover PREPARATION LIST do wade, it will likely be for short water, some challenges definitely periods of time and waders will be present themselves. When floating, TO DO: too hot when in the boat. Also, ask you will have more targets but fewer • Know name and contact about boots with or without studs or shots at them as you go drifting by. information of the guide cleats. The interior of some boats do Some people find this annoying and • Know meeting place and time not tolerate studs. Moreover, if the don’t fish from a drift boat after the • Know shuttle arrangements and standing deck is metal, metal studs first experience—each to his own. Fly cost (having spare keys is helpful) will be dangerously slippery. and rigging choices may be different, • Know what kind of gear/tackle/ fishing skills are needed casting and mending may be different, • Let someone not on the trip know and operating out of a boat is plain At the Put In where you will be and when you different. This article will help you After finding and greeting your will likely return understand what’s needed to have a guide, ask how you can help or what successful, fun, safe and productive he or she would like you to do first. TO BRING: day on the water. This may be rigging rods, putting on • Fishing license waders and boots, or simply showing • Rod/reel/line/leader What To Do Before the Trip the guide what gear you have brought • Hat and polarized sunglasses • Rain jacket Understand what river and what along for the day. • Change of dry clothes and extra section you are fishing and where to Your guide should let you know layers for warmth meet the guide. This may be at a fly how to proceed. First and foremost, • Waders/boots (ask about shop but might also be at a boat put in do not put anything in the boat or get studs or not) that requires directions. Plan ahead. into or out of the boat until directed; • Sunscreen/insect repellant You may not have an opportunity this rule applies all day. You should • Flies and tippet (many guides provide these, some at cost) to run into a store to replace that be told what you will be doing for • Water, snacks, camera forgotten item. Knowing the model the day, such as floating, wading, or • Prescription medications needed both. Directions will be given about and color of the guide’s vehicle can be • First aid kit, PFD’s (if guided, the standing or sitting in the boat, as well helpful as well as his/her cell phone guide usually has these) as deciding who is in the back or front number. It’s a good idea to know if you of the boat. will be required to help shuttle cars or Second, in many states, a safety talk is required and if there is an additional cost to do so. Inquire about what casting and fishing skills are necessary and any special is a good practice. Listen carefully to this. Hopefully, first aid and swift water rescue will not be necessary, but gear suggested or required. Here are some suggestions about clothing and gear: rain your prompt, appropriate participation in these unlikely jacket, waders, boots, a change of dry clothes, insulating circumstances will be crucial. For instance, do you know layers for warmth, a hat and polarized sunglasses (for sun where the first aid kit is in case the guide can’t get to it?

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Flyfisher Spring/Summer 2018


Lastly, do a final inventory of vehicles, keys, gear, etc. before launching. It is aggravating to have no car at the take out because you forgot to leave the keys for the shuttle service. Rowing back upstream is not an option.

Floating and Fishing The first item to settle is who is in the back or front of the boat. Some guides put the better caster in the back. This allows them to see, coach and direct the angler in the front. Some allow the anglers to decide, especially if the anglers are known and are of equal abilities. Our advice is to follow the guide’s preference. Anglers can always request a change later and should share the good fishing opportunities. The second item is understanding the clock face and where to fish. Follow your guide’s direction here. These instructions may be guide specific, season specific, rig specific, or river specific. For instance, you may be instructed to fish streamers in a different location (relative to the boat) than a dry fly. Here are some general rules, although your guide may modify these. Understand river right and left (Figure 1). The foundation of this direction is always from the perspective of an angler Figure 1

facing downstream. As one faces downstream, river right is on the right. If facing upstream, river right is now on the left. Understand the clock face. The center of the clock dial is in the center of the boat, usually where the guide is (Figure 2). This means that 3 o’clock for the front angler is behind him or her, not opposite the angler’s outstretched right arm. Likewise, 3 o’clock is ahead of the angler in the back of the boat. 3 o’clock is on river right, 9 o’clock is on river left. Equally important is that whatever “o’clock” one is referring to, it is the same place for everyone in the boat. Both anglers fish on the same side of the boat at the same time. This helps the guide help you with presentation and see your flies or indicators. When anglers start fishing on opposite sides of the boat, mid-air casting tangles and colliding rods are common issues. Also, if there are tangles, it is always the fault of the angler in the rear, as he or she can see what the front angler is doing and stay out of the way. Fish where the guide tells you (Figure 3). He or she knows the water better than you. Also, for the majority of the day you must cast forward so that you and the guide can manage the drift and keep track of the flies. In fact, in reference to the clock face, the front angler casts and fishes river right from 12:30-2:00, and the rear angler from 2:00-3:00, or the other side of the clock face on river left. Refrain from poaching your fellow angler’s water and don’t fish opposite or behind the boat unless agreed upon with the guide. Figure 2

The Successful Drifter: Drift Boats 101

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Casting distances are often determined by your casting ability. For example, if it is clear that you can only cast 25 ft. angler to fly, then the guide will usually position the boat to accommodate this. However, this puts the shadow of the boat closer to the target(s) and will spook more fish. Tune your casting before the trip. Understand terms such as ‘seam’, ‘pocket’ and ‘eddy’ (Figure 4). A pocket is the slower water behind an obstacle, such as a boulder. A seam is where fast water meets slower water and there are often seams on one or both sides of a pocket. Fish hang out in the slow water and wait for the fast water to bring food. An eddy is a place where there is slow water behind an obstruction (often near the bank) and the hydraulics are often such that the current is reversed back upstream. If the flow in the eddy is back upstream the fish in the eddy will be facing into the flow. Try not to cast through or over the boat. It is a dangerous practice to cast over or through the boat because the caster can hook the boat, the guide or the other angler. For instance, if you are right handed, in the front, and fishing river right, casting off the left shoulder is the safest practice, whether roll casting or overhead casting. Likewise, the rear angler must cast off the opposite shoulder if right handed and fishing river left. Learn to cast off the opposite shoulder before the trip. Pay attention to your surroundings. Know where that over hanging tree is behind you so your back cast doesn’t go into it and break you off right before the day’s best stretch of water. Figure 3

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Flyfisher Spring/Summer 2018

Follow instructions when hooking and playing a fish. If you have never fought a fish from a drifting boat before, let your guide know this so you may practice on land before you head down stream. Strike to the side. To hook a fish on a dry fly from an upstream position it is helpful to pause a moment before tightening the line. When nymph fishing, strike on any abnormal movement of the indicator. With streamers, a strip strike is often best. When playing the fish, sideways pressure is often best. Some guides will pull over and have you fight the fish; others will simply follow the fish downstream and land it quickly. General fly-fishing ethics says use barbless hooks, don’t play fish to exhaustion, wet your hands before touching the fish, don’t squeeze the fish, and minimize any out of water time. Have the camera ready before you take the fish out of the water.

Casting and Line Management Learning to cast better before you go is a valuable part of preparation. Contacting an experienced, FFI certified instructor will really steepen your learning curve. Here are some skills and guidelines you will find helpful. Figure 4


Cast, fish and move on. This means cast to your target, fish out that drift and then move on to the next target. You should constantly be looking for new targets downstream. There won’t be multiple casts to each target—only one or two—so be ready. For example, you might cast five feet upstream of a boulder to fish the soft pillow of water in front of the rock. Once your fly has been through that, you should immediately pick up all that line and cast to the pocket behind the boulder, or whatever target is obviously next. The angler in the rear may have another shot at the same targets. You will need to communicate with your fellow angler so each of you know who is casting to what target. Learn to pick up and lay down 30-40 ft. of line with no or minimal false casts. This is a core skill necessary for accomplishing the first task described above. Also, this allows the guide to keep the boat shadow farther from your potential targets and spooks less fish. If you have to make multiple false casts to get to this distance, you will miss targets and be exhausted (and sore) by noon. Also, knowing what type of fishing you will likely be doing before the trip will help. Casting nymphs, dry flies, and streamers will all be different. An experienced casting instructor will be able to help you prepare for this. Learn to shoot line efficiently. If you can only pick up

30 ft. of line plus leader, be able to shoot another 10 ft. with no or only one false cast. False casting takes time, tires you out, can spook fish, and makes you miss targets. Remember, the boat is moving and you get one, maybe two, shots at each target. Learn the roll cast and water tension cast. The roll cast creates a forward loop aimed at the target without making a standard back cast. This is helpful for casting multiple fly rigs, especially nymphs, and when space is limited. In the ‘water tension cast’ the back cast lands on the water briefly allowing the water to anchor the line for the next cast. This can be very helpful in wind, with weighted flies, and multiple fly rigs. Be accurate. Concentrate on the target (often a pocket, seam, or eddy), aim your loop there (it may take one false cast to line up the loop with the target), cast at the target and look for your fly there. If the boat is kept a constant distance from the bank, estimating distance is less of a problem. Practicing accuracy before you go will help all of your fishing. Minimize and manage slack. Uncontrolled slack is your enemy. It will ruin your pick up for the next cast. It will also prevent hooking the fish. Slack must be stripped in as you drift toward your target and/or before you pick up for your next cast. A good rule is not to have any more slack

Figure A

The Successful Drifter: Drift Boats 101

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out than you can take up by moving the rod 90 degrees in any direction. Any line you strip in must be managed so it doesn’t tangle. Ask the guide how best to do this in the boat if it is not obvious. Some boats/rafts have stripping baskets or small deck spaces for this. Keep these clear of fishing gear, lest it gets tangled with your line. Learn the roll cast pick up. This is an efficient way to get to the next target and also a great way to manage slack. As the boat drifts downstream, slack is created. Some of this is stripped in, but some can be pulled into a D loop for a roll cast pick up before the next cast. Make a roll cast above the water, an immediate back cast and then deliver on the forward cast to the target. Often the line stripped in can be shot on the delivery cast to the target. Understand why and how to mend and preferably learn the reach mend (Figure B). Mending is moving fly line so that the desired fly behavior is achieved, which is usually a drag free drift. It is a critical fishing skill. A water mend is any line manipulation after the line has landed on the water and is accomplished by picking line up off the water and placing it somewhere else, usually upstream. An aerial mend (Figure A) is line manipulation after the end of the cast but before the line hits the water, and the reach mend is the most common and most useful of these. It is done simply by reaching with the rod tip in the direction you want Figure B

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the line to land after the cast stops but before the line lands on the water. For example, you cast to slow water near the bank across a fast current tongue. The loop is aimed at the target but at the cast stop the rod tip is reached upstream so that the line lands upstream in the fast water. This prevents the fly from being dragged out of the target zone unnaturally. Learn to cast off the opposite shoulder. This is the skill you need to keep from casting over or through the boat. All you need to get over the opposite shoulder is rod tip and line. Putting your dominant hand in front of the opposite shoulder (right hand in front of the left shoulder for a right handed person) robs you of power. You wouldn’t hammer a nail like this, so don’t cast this way. Keep the rod hand on the dominant side of the body and tilt the rod so the tip is over the opposite shoulder. Hopefully this will help you prepare for your first or next drift boat trip. There’s no better way to see lots of water and cast to lots of fish that are often less pressured. A bit of knowledge about what to bring and what fishing and casting skills to have in hand can make for more hook-ups and more fun. Jonathan is a FFI Master Casting Instructor, Jeff is the Owner/Operator of Fish On Colorado, and Paul is an Owner/Partner in Yampa Rod Company.


The Connection Between Salt and Blood Pressure Brian Grossenbacher

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The Successful Drifter: Drift Boats 101

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The Successful Drifter: Drift Boats 101

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The Successful Drifter: Drift Boats 101

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Coldwater Beach Fishing for Sea Runs and Coho David Paul Williams

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Coldwater Beach Fishing for Sea Runs and Coho

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I

t’s spring. The dandelions are blooming, the winter’s growth of moss covers the roof and the lawn needs mowing. Dealing with that stuff can wait because the chum and pink salmon fry, doing what salmon fry have done each spring for eons, have popped out of the spawning gravel to make a beeline for the saltwater. Awaiting those slender morsels at river mouths and estuaries are hungry sea run cutthroat and resident coho salmon. Also eagerly awaiting that downstream migration are fly fishers who target the predators. Variations on the scene play out all along the west coast from Northern California to Prince William Sound.

Sea Run Cutthroat One of four general types of coastal cutthroat, the sea run cutthroat are born in freshwater, then spend the rest of their lives swimming back and forth between sweet and salt. Some fish live as much as eleven months in saltwater, only to dash into nutrient-poor streams to quickly spawn before heading back to saltwater. Other nearby populations may spend six months in forage-dense freshwater. The spawned-out “kelts,” having lost 30-40% of their weight, skinny and weakened

“When the trout lakes are frozen, when the rivers are roiling with snow melt or too low and warm, grab the fly rod and face west where the coho and sea runs eagerly await. Hook a few, release all you catch, and go home knowing you’ve experienced tangling with wild fish.” by the rigors of procreation, return to the sea where they immediately resume aggressively feeding. Unlike salmon and steelhead, sea runs are homebodies, rarely venturing far from their home waters. Sea run cutthroat spawn in big river systems such as the Skagit and Klamath, as well as tiny trickles making life history generalizations hazardous. Those adapted to big water may spend up to five years in fresh water before heading west. Others get the urge years earlier, even before they become sexually mature at age three or four. This

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migration variability occurs within same age classes and regional areas as specific populations have adapted to local conditions. The life-style distinctions challenge anglers because learning about one river or stream population does not translate into angling success when targeting a different population. Conservation of existing habitat and restoration of habitat degraded by poor logging practices, improper road-building techniques and thoughtless urban sprawl, is the key to continued successful spawning. Research has shown that coastal cutthroat, with their demonstrated sensitivity to habitat disturbance, low egg count in gravid females, and competition from aggressive steelhead and coho salmon, make watershed restoration critical. While in the saltwater, these teenage eating machines grow an inch a month before returning to spawn in freshwater. Only about 2% of smolts survive to make that first return spawning trip. Growth slows after that initial spurt. In some waters, it takes a full ten years for a fish to reach 16 inches. Full-grown mature adults may exceed 20 inches with some bigger fish possible. The Washington state record is six pounds and is the only state that distinguishes sea run cutthroat from the three freshwater varieties. Compared to the wealth of research on commerciallyvaluable salmon and steelhead, little is known about sea run cutthroat. The Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife and Coastal Cutthroat Coalition are working to add to the knowledge base. An early result of a tagging and recapture project revealed what biologists call site fidelity meaning the fish reside in the same general location with some fish being captured several times. Color, strength and determination distinguish coasties from their freshwater cousins. Oregon anglers call them “bluebacks,” so named for their blue steel backs, brilliant silver sides and faint orange under-throat slashes. Inch for inch, sea runs pull harder than other family members—the salty version launch themselves like miniature cruise missiles, getting air before falling back, only to repeat the process. These are fish to be treasured, protected and released even though only Washington mandates release in the saltwater.

Coho Salmon Fly fishers have been targeting coho since at least 1876, when Captain Cleveland Rockwell made history when he hooked and landed a coho on a fly near the mouth of the Columbia River. The development of fly fishing for coho largely fell to Puget Sound and southern British Columbia


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fly fishers due to the vagaries of geology. Salmon were so plentiful in Alaska that anglers need only target fish in the river estuaries while Oregon and Northern California lacked the islands, eelgrass beds, protected inlets and accessible bays that harbored the fish and kept them within reach of fly fishers. Early fly fishers wielded 14-foot rods, counterbalanced with heavy reels. Atlantic salmon flies soon gave way to local patterns that better imitated herring and sand lance, the two primary forage fish. Fly fishers who took their favorite trout rod to the beach frequently ended up regretting the decision as rods often broke under the strain of a running coho. In time, most fly fishers got smarter and equipment got better. Sharing a similar range with sea runs, coho salmon exhibit the same aggressive bite and tenacity of fight as sea runs, though the adult migratory coho dwarf sea runs in size easily doubling the weight of the largest trout. Coho are a four-year fish meaning they emerge from spawning gravel, spend either one or two years in fresh water, then head to the salt. Some stop in the protected inland waters of southeast Alaska, British Columbia’s Georgia Basin or Washington’s Puget Sound and never venture into the open Pacific. Less abundant food supplies means these inland fish, locally referred to as residents or rezzies, run four to six pounds as mature adults. The migratory or ocean fish head into the North Pacific where they follow the food, traveling hundreds of miles for up to two years before the call of duty has them bend back south. These ocean fish experience phenomenal growth, initially gaining over a pound a month when ocean conditions are favorable. Early returning ocean fish show up by July with the bulk arriving later in the month and into August. Some stocks stay out late continuing to gain weight in the fertile Pacific, not returning until December or even January. Unlike the submarine piloted by Clark Gable in Run Silent, Run Deep, coho run shallow and make themselves known to fly fishers by feeding on the surface or jumping for no apparent reason.

Fly Fishing the Salt The idea of tossing flies in the saltchuck started along the Washington and British Columbia coasts before most of today’s fly fishers were born. There is a wonderful and growing body of knowledge of how to fish for sea runs and coho. Roderick Haig-Brown, Les Johnson, and Steve Raymond captured this knowledge in their writings—essential reading as the starting pointing in puzzling out these fish. Freshwater river fishers have logjams, inside bends, tailouts,

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rocks and such that provide visual clues for finding fish. Saltwater anglers face a variety of habitats—cobble beaches, mud flats, eelgrass, oyster beds, sandy beaches, stream inlets and more—each of which will fish better at one tidal stage or another. The ocean tosses in the tide—the diurnal kicker that changes the water level ten or more feet twice a day. To suss out which location fishes best at which tidal stage, consult your best friend—the tide chart—so you can be at the selected spot at the most opportune time. Given that there are 2,000 miles of beach in Puget Sound alone, the learning curve to the uninitiated may seem overwhelmingly vertical. Several aids are available to make the curve climbable. Every beach, bay, estuary, or flat fishes best under specific tide conditions at specific times of year. Some will always fish best with a modest incoming tide. Some will always fish best on the last two hours of incoming and the first two hours of outgoing. Some will always fish best when the low tide turns. Take advantage of this pattern by fishing the same beach under different tide conditions. Make sure to record your success. Determine which tide works best for that specific beach, then move on to the next beach and repeat the process. Soon, no matter what the tide conditions, a quick log book review reveals which location will give the best shot at catching fish. Always fish the near water first. Sea runs are shallow-water sailors, cruising the shoreline, often in water mere inches deep. Make the first few casts from the shore before wading in. Once in the water, resist the inclination to make your way out as far out as possible and shoot out 100 foot long casts. Instead, stay shallow, or if you absolutely must wade till the water crests at the tops of your waders, turn around and cast towards the beach. That is where the trout are. Coho typically swim a bit farther out making wading, sometimes up to the wader tops, necessary. Wading deep to reach the offshore coho requires paying attention to a rising tide and an equal amount of attention to bow waves created by passing cruise and container ships. Flat calm water can turn into three-foot swells in seconds on an incoming bow wave. Fish structure and fish it thoroughly, then move on. Structure is best defined as any area that is different from the surrounding area. It may be a current-scoured depression, a big rock jutting from a cobble bottom, a wave-tossed cedar tree rootwad or something more permanent like a rock outcropping. Why structure? Simple. That is where the food chain starts. Algae and the little creatures that feed on them grow there or are washed in by the tide, followed by small baitfish, which in turn draw cutthroat and coho. Moths to the flame.


Thoroughly fish current seams, then target the next bit of structure. Just like in stream fishing where structure creates a back eddy populated by the biggest fish hanging out in the foam line, current sweeping past a rock, spit, or outcrop causes soft water on the inside front edge. These seams are cafeterias for schools of fish. The chow line forms on one side of the point during the outgoing tide, then switches to the other side on the tide change. Make long casts parallel to shore or angled out at 45 degrees, and fish them all the way back until you can see the fly, then let it dangle a bit before initiating the next cast. Long casts allow you cover more fish-holding territory, lessening the chance of spooking fish in the shallows with clumsy wading, glistening rod or human shadow. Fish the cast all the way back because fish have a tricky habit of following the fly well into the shallows before deciding to attack before it escapes. Birds are your tipsters. When on the water and you see birds, lots of birds, don’t be afraid of what happened to Tippi Hendren. Follow the birds. They will lead you to fish. Bonaparte gulls may be pecking krill with the sea runs or resident coho feeding underneath on the succulent slowmoving crustaceans. This calls for a krill pattern. Diving birds making a fuss over schools of baitfish are a call to arms. Be careful not to move directly on top of the bait ball. Get within medium casting distance, land the fly towards the edge of the ball, then move with the fish as they move. Try to match the size and color of the forage fish but the most important thing is to get your fly in the mix and make it move like a battered baitfish.

In March and April, every predator fish answers the call and lines up along estuaries and eelgrass shallows to chomp the chum salmon fry as they run the gauntlet to sea. Start small and sparse, then move to larger, fuller patterns as the survivors grow as the weeks pass. Remember high school when Friday night was spent cruising looking for some action? Coho and sea runs carry on that tradition every day of the week as they cruise the shoreline, hitting targets of opportunity. Anglers should cover ground until they find fish, then move with the school for as long as the fish stay within casting distance. Don’t make the mistake of continuing to flail water in the hopes that on the hundredth perfect cast and swing, that you will finally convince a super selective predator to eat. Unlike some educated trout, that is not the nature of coho and sea runs. Cast and move.

Flies That Catch Fish Aggressive, willing biters, sea run cutthroat and coho eat most anything smaller than they are. Sculpins and sandlance, amphipods and euphasids, herring and crab spawn—it’s all part of the “see food” diet consumed by these fish. A wellstocked saltwater box includes baitfish, gurglers, poppers, krill and a caddis dry fly that can be trimmed when the flying ants hit the water in September. When the trout lakes are frozen, when the rivers are roiling with snow melt or too low and warm, grab the fly rod and face west where the coho and sea runs eagerly await. Hook a few, release all you catch, and go home knowing you’ve experienced tangling with wild fish.

Dutch Baughman James Maus

2021 2021

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Coldwater Beach Fishing for Sea Runs and Coho

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FLY TYING

Shrimp Cocktail

JERRY COVIELLO Jerry is a Fly Tying Demonstrator and demonstrates his skills at local fishing clubs, the International Fly Tying Symposium in Somerset NJ and the FFI Fly Fishing Fair in Livingston MT. Jerry is a life member of FFI, and the FFI Fly Tying Group. He is serving on the FFI Fly Tying Group’s Board of Governors as Vice Chairman and a Fly Tying Award Evaluator. He is also a member of the Dyna-King Pro Team.

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ew of us would turn down a shrimp cocktail at a restaurant or party and I bet saltwater fish feel the same way. My first encounter with a shrimp pattern was in Barnegat Bay, Long Beach Island, New Jersey. My friend, Mike Kazik, invited me to come down to his house on Long Beach Island to fish the Bay for weakfish, or what we in New Jersey call sea trout or speckled trout. Weakfish are so named because of the soft mouth muscles that tear when they are hooked allowing them to get free. They can be found from Nova Scotia to northern Florida, but by any name, they are not a trout.

Flyfisher Spring/Summer 2018

We started out before sunrise and Mike got the boat situated on a spot he knew held fish. I had the usual patterns with me— Chartreuse Clouser Minnows, White Lefty Deceivers, even Bob’s Bangers and one tan Crazy Charlie. When Mike pulled out the chum bag and started chumming with shrimp, I tied on my tan Crazy Charlie. I started catching weakfish using a 3-inch strip retrieve. Then some blues decide to join the fun and shredded the fly, but it still kept catching fish. Weakfish and blues are not the only fish in the salt that eat shrimp. I have caught red drum, black drum, and stripers (rockfish for those of you in Maryland) as well.


I always read that a Crazy Charlie was a bonefish fly but when I learned it was used to imitate a shrimp, I figured it would work in the Northeast. Now I tie them in tan, pink and a variant one called a Gotcha—the difference is a tail off the bend of the hook. You can change the wing to either a craft fur, buck tail, calf tail or arctic fox. The body can be any color chenille, pearl braid, or a fine solid clear tube over Krystal Flash. Weight for the eyes can be bead chain, or you can use a dumbbell to make it sink fast. The Crazy Charlie’s hook point, when fished, rides upright so you do not snag the sea grass in the bay making it almost weedless. Tie the pattern in sizes to match the shrimp where you plan to fish. I tie in sizes 4 through 8. Many years ago before UV resin came into existence for fly tying, Bob Popovics tied a super realistic shrimp pattern called the Ultra Shrimp using fiveminute epoxy. I was not patient enough to wait five minutes or deal with the mixing of the two tubes of epoxy and I have seen what a mess epoxy can make of your vise if not careful. When UV resins came out, I started playing with them and liked the results.

Forget the drying wheel and motor; forget mixing tubes—all you need is a UV light with fresh batteries. I even found a rechargeable UV Light Kit from Solarez, and it immediately set the resin. On the cover of the Summer 2017 Fly Dresser magazine was a shrimp pattern with the shellback made from UV resin. The pattern was called the Awesome Opossum since it used opossum hair for the legs and body. I wanted to give this pattern a try as I was headed back to Long Beach Island. I substituted raccoon for opossum to get a brownish color. When testing the fly, I found that the weight of the resin turned the hook upside down. Adding weight to the underside of the hook corrected that problem. I used the fur guard hairs and Whiting Bug Fur, a new item I picked up to tie some Spey flies, for the feelers. The fur legs act as a soft weed guard, but if a fish hits it the hook will still penetrate through the soft guard hairs. Craft stores are amazing when it comes to materials for saltwater flies. The Ribbon Shrimp and the Organza Orange Krafla Shrimp both use an organza ribbon that comes on spools. I have also seen it in fly shops under the

name Sparkle Pseudo Hackle. The Ribbon Shrimp uses a pearl/ white organza for the body and feelers. The back is UV Resin, which means you should add weight to the underbody of the fly so it will ride correctly. This is a quick, easy and pretty realistic shrimp pattern. The Organza Orange Krafla Shrimp pattern is known as a salmon fly but is a good shrimp attractor pattern that uses grizzly hackle stems for feelers— the rest of the fly is orange hen hackle and alternating wraps of orange and pearl organza ribbon. Does adding eyes on shrimp patterns make a difference? Perhaps not but why take a chance? Sometimes it can be a small item on a fly that triggers a response. Shrimp eyes can be purchased—EP Fibers makes Crab/Shrimp eyes— or you can take short lengths of 30 or 50 pound monofilament and melt the ends to form a ball of melted monofilament. After it cools, color the monofilament balls with a black marker. Add a drop of UV Resin on top of the melted monofilament. This will give you a finished shrimp or crab eye.

Raccoon Shrimp (aka Awesome Opossum) Hook: Saltwater size 2 through 8 Thread: Tan Monocord 3/0 Beard/Feelers: Raccoon or Australian Opossum Fur and grey Whiting Bug Fur Rib: Clear mono Eyes: 50lb mono melted and treated with UV cured resin Body: Raccoon fur dubbing loop Underbody: Two strips of lead free wire Shellback: Tan Thin Skin cut to shape

Fly Tying

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Ribbon Shrimp Hook: Saltwater size 4 through 8 Thread: White 6/0 Underbody: Two strips of lead free wire Eyes: 50lb mono melted and treated with UV cured resin Feelers/Body: White organza ribbon Shellback: UV resin

Organza Orange Krafla Shrimp Hook: Saltwater size 4 through 8 Thread: Orange 6/0 Feelers: Grizzly hackle stems Legs: Orange hen hackle Body: White and orange organza ribbon

Pink Crazy Charlie Hook: Saltwater size 4 through 8 Thread: Orange 6/0 Eyes: Dumbbell or bead chain on top of the shank (turn hook in vise so the hook point is up) Underbody: UV pink Krystal Flash Overbody: Clear solid tubing Wing: Pink deer hair Overwing: Pearl Krystal Flash

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Flyfisher Spring/Summer 2018


Tan Crazy Charlie Hook: Saltwater size 4 through 8 Thread: Brown or tan 6/0 Eyes: Dumbbell or bead chain on top of the hook shank (turn hook in vise so the hook point is up) Body: Tan chenille Underwing: Pearl Krystal Flash Overwing: Brown deer hair

Gotcha Bonefish Fly Hook: Saltwater size 4 through 8 Thread: Pink 6/0 Eyes: Dumbbell or bead chain on top of the hook shank Tail: Pearl Krystal Flash (turn hook in vise so the hook point is up) Body: Pearl braid Underwing: Pearl Krystal Flash Overwing: Tan or white fur (in the photo I am using Raccoon Tail)

Ultra Shrimp Hook: Saltwater size 2 through 4 Thread: Tan 6/0 Mouth: Pearl UV Ice Dub Eyes: 50lb mono melted and treated with UV cured resin Flash: Pearl Krystal Flash Underbody: two strips of lead free wire (optional) Legs: Tan hen hackle Back: Supreme Hair Shellback: UV resin

Fly Tying

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CASTING

Change of Direction Casts

O JEFF WAGNER Jeff is Director of Sales Strategy and Analytics at SmartWool, Fly Casting Field Editor for Fly Fusion Magazine, Master Certified Fly Casting Instructor and most importantly husband and father of two.

ne of my favorite places to fish is the Green River below Flaming Gorge Reservoir near Dutch John, UT. It is a tailwater, idyllic in every way, with clear water and strong, healthy fish populations. Even better, access is easy with defined put-in and take-out points that are miles apart. This makes getting a little stretch of river to fish unencumbered a little easier. I don’t get to fish the river a lot, maybe a couple of times a year. I first started in the late ‘90s, which seems so long ago now. My favorite time to fish the Green is March. At that time the camping areas are just opening and you always take a chance on the weather. Driving across southern Wyoming in March can be treacherous. The drive to the canyon can be even worse, but that is what makes the fishing this time of year so good. Blue-wing olives and midges can abound and often the more inclement the weather the better. Several years ago I took my dad to the Green. The high that day was 28 degrees, reached at 8 a.m. Bundling up around noon after a late start due to the weather, we found ourselves in 20-30 mph winds with gusts even

“Given the cold and wind, the key was to stand in one place and cast to rising fish. We have probably all been in a situation similar and a good handle on how to change direction is critical. It can either make the day or cause more frustration with tangles, especially in windy situations.”

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higher. An upstream wind caused small white caps and some spray. The clouds came and went with short bouts of snow during the overcast periods. That was the bad part. The good part was that midges and BWOs were everywhere. What looked like breaking white caps were aggressively feeding fish causing more spray. It wasn’t the placid hatches where you can hear the slurps echo from the canyon walls, but it was awesome. Given the cold and wind, the key was to stand in one place and cast to rising fish. During the lulls in the weather, you could catch glimpses of fish eating, though the rises seemed sporadic. To cover the rise, it required quick change of direction cast without changing location. We have probably all been in a similar situation, and a good handle on how to change direction is critical. It can either make the day or cause more frustration with tangles, especially in windy situations.

Principles There are some guiding principles to casting. Longer stroke, easier cast, fly line follows the path of the rod, and pertinent to this conversation is the 180 degree principle. The first key to changing direction is making the back cast 180 degrees away from your target. This is probably the simplest and easiest way to change direction. A change of direction cast is simply a modification of other basic casts. The key is always the back cast. The setup for the back cast on a change of direction


can be quite simple. If the change of direction angle is slight, then only a corresponding slight change in the arm or wrist position is required. If that movement is uncomfortable or if a greater change of direction is required, then it might be necessary to rotate at the hips or change the placement of the feet. As with most casts, it is important to square up to the target with the shoulders as much as possible. This will help align the cast and body and drive the cast in the right direction. Assuming we have already covered the basic cast, the change of direction is just changing the setup and direction. Let’s use the clock to explain. Assume you are casting to a fish at 12 o’clock. Suddenly a fish rises at 2 o’clock. You want to cast to this fish because surely he is bigger and hungrier. To make this cast your back cast needs to be 180 degrees away from the where you want the front cast to go. If the fish is at 2 o’clock, when you pick up the line into the back cast, it needs to be toward 8 o’clock. This will set up the forward cast 180 degrees from 8 o’clock towards 2 o’clock and prevent the line from crossing in the air. The steps of this cast are the same as the pick-up and lay-down. Start with the rod tip low and the line straight on the water. Decide where you want your cast to go and make sure you face the target. Smoothly accelerate 180 degrees away from your target and stop in the back cast letting the loop unroll. Then accelerate to a stop in the front toward the target and drop the rod tip to the water as the fly line falls. Roll casts are also great change of direction casts. During the set-up of the D-loop make it 180 degrees away from your target. The roll cast change of direction can be used for a

large degree of direction change if the D-loop set up is 180 degrees from the delivery cast. False casting (back and forward continuous casting with no presentation; usually used to dry a fly or waste time and energy) can be done to change direction. The 180 degree principle applies here as well. The shorter the line being cast, the wider angle of change is possible. With roughly 30 feet of line in the air while casting, limit the angle change to 15 degrees per cast. After a forward false cast, the next back cast should be made pointing a few more degrees toward your ultimate back cast target which would, of course, be 180 degrees away from your final forward cast target. Make the incremental direction changes until the final target is aligned and a presentation cast made. This is a great method when fishing to rising fish and needing to dry a fly while changing direction without casting over the fish. The lob cast is not really a cast, but a repositioning of the downstream line to an upstream position. The lob is wonderful when fishing an upstream to downstream drift while facing across the river. This is the typical position for fishing nymphs and dry droppers. The lob is quite simple. The setup for this cast starts at the point where the downstream position creates tension against the rod. From this point the 180 degree principle comes back into play. With the line and rig downstream on tension, reposition the hand toward the target. The lob is exactly that. Rather than a regular cast with loop formation, the lob is a smooth acceleration but with a rounded rod tip path. Often this rig is with multiple flies and weighted flies. The weight

of the flies help facilitate the tension of the line to maintain during the lob. The rounded rod tip path and resulting wide loop in this case will keep the fly line a consistent distance from the tip. This makes downstream to upstream presentation with heavy flies or nymph rigs and no false casts possible. The final method is a little more complicated. It is a continuous tension cast and has a rounded back cast with a normal delivery cast. For this cast we will also start with the line on the water at 12 o’clock. The back cast does not have a defined stopping point, instead there is a curving at the end of the acceleration phase. The stop becomes a curve that transitions directly into the next forward cast. So, with the line on the water at 12 o’clock we choose a target, let’s say at 9 o’clock. The back cast will be made to roughly 2 o’clock. The stop becomes a rounded change of direction to 3 o’clock and transitions to the forward stroke toward the 9 o’clock position. During the rounded transition at the end of the cast the hand stays in the back cast position. The rounding motion can be done at the wrist or at the shoulder. I prefer using the shoulder as it offers better strength and control. This cast can often be done over the head where the pick-up in the cast above might be on the right side of the body and the delivery may occur and end in front of the caster. This cast can be done in a wide degree of angles, but typically less than 90 degrees. More often than not I use all of these casts in a day’s fishing. On the Green River’s cold, windy days, I used a variety of these casts. Practice them, learn them and I think you will find them easy and efficient tools in your casting quiver.

Casting

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FLY FISHING SKILLS

Sight Casting for Redfish

M MOLLY SEMENIK Molly Semenik moved to Birch Bay, Washington after guiding in Montana for 14 years. Currently, Molly offers fly-fishing instruction (singlehand and two-hand) and provides women’s fly-fishing destination travel. Molly wrote 25 Best Off the Beaten Path Montana Fly Fishing Streams, she is a Master Certified Casting Instructor, she is a member of the Casting Board of Governors, and she is on the Board of Directors for Fly Fishers International.

ost of my fly fishing for trout, salmon or steelhead occurs in conditions where I do not actually see the fish approach and take my fly. Generally, I cast to locations where I think fish might be. If no success, I re-cast to the next potential spot. Fishing this way keeps my nerves in check and I can fish calmly and methodically until I see a fish rise, or even better, rise and take my fly. Sight casting to a fish is a very different story— visceral, addictive and challenging. The stakes are higher and the approach more technical, both mentally and physically. The excitement and challenge of sight fishing is a key part of saltwater fishing for tailing redfish. In September of 2017, I had the pleasure of fishing for redfish near Beaufort, South Carolina. While not my first time fishing for redfish, this trip caused me to think about all the factors that make sight casting for redfish so challenging and fun. I will start planning another trip very soon. Here is the planning and preparation process I use.

Where To Go The first decision is choosing the location. It is important to know if fishing is the major goal of the trip or if local sightseeing is also of interest. If your intent is to fish and only to fish, then the average size of the fish might also influence your choice of location. Well-known locations for redfishing include the southeastern

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Louisiana coast from Cocodrie to the Mississippi state line. New Orleans serves as the primary hub for most destinations in St. Bernard, Plaquemines, St. Tammany and Jefferson parishes. Launch communities include Port Sulphur, Myrtle Grove, Lafittle, Delacroix, Shell Beach and Hopedale. Redfish also swim in other states ranging from the Mississippi coast to the Chandelier Islands, Texas, Alabama, Florida (both coasts), North Caroline and Georgia. I fished out of Beaufort, South Carolina with Bay Street Outfitters.

Planning the Trip and Gear Researching the tides is critical to the success of your fishing trip. Local fly shops and guides can help you with this. In some locations, high tides could bring fish into the marsh grass, while low tides might allow for walk wading on flats. The time of year and tide cycle might allow an angler to fish both a high and low tide in one day. If my schedule allowed, I would first determine the best fishing tide scenario and then pick my date for travel. Once the date is selected, my research continues. Now is the time to learn about redfish, tides, casting challenges and how to spot fish. Studying now will improve my chances to see and catch fish and make for a more fulfilling trip. As for tackle, I use a fast action 9-foot 8-weight rod and a short, 7.5 foot tapered leader ending in 20-pound monofilament.


Redfish When I travel to a new destination, I want to learn as much as I can about the fish and the environment they live in. During my trip to the Beaufort area (the “Low Country”), I was awed by the massive amount of waterways that are varied enough to support a year round fishery. I fished primarily for the young redfish (under three years of age), who live in shallows before going out to deeper water to spawn. Young redfish weigh about 12-15 pounds. The breeders or bull redfish live in deep

harbor channels or in the big water off the beaches and farther offshore. Bull redfish can weigh up to 25-30 pounds and live up to 60 years of age. Bulls are often targeted in the spring and fall. If bulls are your goal, that would be where I would begin my research as to where and when to go. In the Low Country during low tide, redfish can be found in mud flats with water so shallow that it just covers their backs, leaving their dorsal fins and tails exposed showing the angler where they are. As the tide rises, the fish move along the water’s edge and into the Spartina grass. When hunting redfish, you will find that they are typically in one of three distinct states: 1) laid-up, which is

the hardest situation and where the fly must land near their mouth; 2) cruising, where you need to cast well in front of the fish and hope they don’t change direction; and 3) tailing, where you want to present the fly just a few feet in front of their mouth. Casting to tailing redfish is the best and most fun of the three situations as the fish are looking down and distracted by feeding, allowing the angler to get closer for the greatest chance of a hook-up. Redfish eat crabs, mullet, mud minnow, menhaden and shrimp. Sometimes you can actually see the shrimp busting the water surface in front of a fish’s wake. Birds often swoop in and eat the jumping shrimp making for great time on the water.

© Photo Captain Tuck Scott

Fly choice depends on conditions. Best to check with local fly shops or your guide.

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For more on redfish fishing visit the www.gulfcoastflyfishingschool.com article Redfishing Tips: “Alabama Bonefishing” by Thomas R. Dampsey, FFI/CI.

Tides

Casting from a Boat Casting from the confined space of the bow of a stationary or still moving skiff presents casting challenges. Set your

feet as best you can—balancing on your toes in response to a rocking boat will get easier as the day progresses. When practicing at home, use a rope to imitate the bow of a boat.

Line management Think of line management in two areas: on the boat and while casting. The guide will have a strategy for boat line management. If you have a boat partner, they can be a tremendous help keeping the line from catching on things and informing you of when it is underfoot or tangled. Line management while casting is equally important. Keep slack to

© Photo Captain Tuck Scott

Understanding tides is key to understanding fish behavior and improving fishing success. When sight casting for redfish, we want the tail and dorsal fin to be exposed so we can see where they are. The window of opportunity for seeing them is influenced by the tide. As the tide lowers, the fish will follow the water

out to keep from getting stranded in low water. When the tide is rising, you have to find the fish before the water is too deep to see them. Tide charts are very helpful and can be found on the Internet. These tide charts will allow you to plug in your travel date to see if the tides will be conducive to good fishing conditions. The local fly shop and/or guides will be a critical resource along with the tide chart.

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a minimum while casting to better improve your accuracy. The guide will help you understand slack and stripping line. The less slack on the water the better. Your first strip should move the fly allowing the fish to see the fly and be in a good position to set the hook. Casting too short or too long is trouble. The target area is small and the fly needs to land in front of the fish. The best way to improve accuracy is to practice casting to targets for at least a month prior to the trip.

Casting with Wind Wind, unfortunately, can sometimes be just too severe and the trip is cancelled. Other times, it is just darn nasty; while other times manageable. The guide will keep the situation safe for both the guide and the caster. However, learning to cast in the wind is extremely helpful and doable. Casting in the wind is a topic for another article. I suggest hiring a casting instructor to teach you how to cast in the wind. If it is windy at home, go out and cast.

Saltwater Quick Cast When casting to the fish, two or three backcasts are all you typically need to get the line and fly out to the target. Learn the saltwater quick cast. This is a skill that must be practiced well in advance of the trip. Be able to shoot line out 40-50 feet. Locate a casting instructor to help master this skill as it is not something to learn the first day of fishing. After years of saltwater sight fishing, I have finally learned how to move fast while maintaining control—something that is not easy to do—but it sure is fun to learn. Many chances are missed by stepping on the line, coming up short, or messing up the set. And sometimes the fish

are just not interested. But, oh my when everything comes together, that moment makes all the studying, casting practice and effort worthwhile.

Learning to Spot Fish Learning to see fish is an acquired skill. Here are a few helpful tips. Ask your guide where the fish might be under rising or falling tidal conditions. Watch your guide. Look where your guide is looking. Polarized glasses (amber or copper lenses) and a brimmed hat are essential. If you can see the bottom, scan for color changes that may be fish moving over light-colored bottoms. Look for movement that doesn’t fit the environment. Look for fins and tails that might reflect sunlight, for water texture changes, for a wake, or a stirred up bottom such as mud puffs where fish may have been feeding. Watch for birds that may be eating bait.

The Adrenaline Rush All is fine as we motor to the most likely spot where a redfish might be found. We draw near, the engine is cut, and out comes the push pole. Silence. My legs start to feel weak while my breathing speeds up. Anticipation. A fish is spotted and the guide says, “Wait, not yet. We need to get into position for the best shot. NOW... CAST.” Only two things can happen—the fish was caught or not caught. If caught, life is good. If missed, it can be excruciating. Many things can and will go wrong. Some are of out of our control. But often mistakes are a result of under performance stemming from nerves and adrenaline. For me, it is what makes sight fishing so much fun, but also so darn frustrating when things don’t go well.

As I think back on my trip to Beaufort and look over my photos, the beauty of the surroundings is most vivid in my mind. What really captivated me was the marsh grass at high tide and the oyster beds at low tide. The grass mesmerized me; how it ebbed and flowed with the tides, how it blew in the wind, and how the color dominated the landscape. And if a tailing fish was in the mix, all the better.

Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters has been fishing redfish for twenty years and guided me on three different occasions. I am amazed at how much guides know and how much they love what they do. I asked Capt. Tuck several questions about fishing and his experiences as a guide. I summarized his comments below. His favorite aspects are hunting the fish and sight casting, the unique habitat where they live, and the way the redfish present themselves when tailing in the grass flats. Tuck is continuously awestruck by the varied visual images. Marsh grass is brown in the winter and the water brilliantly clear. During warmer months, the grass is deep green or light bright green, turning golden in the fall. He enjoys the camaraderie among the anglers and the fun they have. For him there is nothing like a clean visual sight casting situation where the angler makes the cast, the fish sees the fly, hunts the fly, the white mouth opens and eats the fly. Tuck suggests choosing the best tides that make for the best fishing. Seasonal winter tides are different than fall tides. He fishes only low tides in daylight during the cold months. In the spring and fall, he’ll fish low tide anytime of day. A high tide needs to big enough to get fish to tail in the grass.

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INDUSTRY PARTNERS

Guide For Life: Steve Huff SALTWATER GUIDE STEVE HUFF TALKS SNOOK, TARPON AND PURSUING A LIFETIME PASSION

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teve Huff, a man who has guided clients for thousands life-changing catches, says “Catching a tarpon will change your life”. And this comes from a man who was ten years old when his father gave him a rod and reel. A neighbor contributed a lure that Huff, not knowing any proper knots, attached the lure to the line and tricked a little snook. Huff soon customized his bicycle to carry a tackle box as he pedaled through the neighborhood in search of fishing spots. When other kids were dreaming of Mickey Mantle, Huff was reading books by Joe Brooks and Stu Apte, knowing that he wanted to be a fishing guide. Once he graduated from University of Miami, it was game on. For 30 years, Huff guided out of the Florida Keys where he quickly gained a reputation of putting clients on fish. One client booked him 45 straight days. On one trip, the client while indisposed, encourage Huff to cast the client’s rod. The result was a personal best 186-pound tarpon. Two decades ago, Huff swapped coasts and now operates out of the Everglades. In years past he guided 300 days a year but at age 72 he has now cut back saying, “I won’t fish on weekends.” On fishing days he wakes up in the morning knowing he’s going to be guiding one of his regular cadre

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of clients, many of whom he says have become good friends, “like brothers.” One such client Huff taught how to fly fish 49 years ago and he still guides him today. He says a reason for his guiding success is “I found out what made me happy at an early age.” What made Huff happy also made his clients happy and gained him well-earned accolades. The International Game Fish Association inducted him in the Hall of Fame in 2010, making him the first full time fishing guide to be honored.

Huff is also known as a permit guide—in part for putting clients on line class world records—and as the co-creator of the Merkin crab pattern. He says, “Permit are not honest fish” because you can make the perfect cast under perfect conditions, make the perfect strip and the permit won’t eat. Snook are “honest,” which is why he still describes himself as “smitten by snook” after all these years of tarpon, bonefish, and permit.


The Orvis Company: FFI Featured Industry Partner TOM ROSENBAUER TALKS CONSERVATION, NEW GEAR, AND COMPANY INITIATIVES

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hese are challenging times for retailers as the flyfishing industry witnesses the disappearance of some well-known national brands and the constriction of many others. On the other hand, there is The Orvis Company, which started when Charles F. Orvis opened his fishing tackle business in 1856 in Manchester, Vermont, now home to the flagship retail store. Tom Rosenbauer, Marketing Manager Orvis Rod & Tackle, says Orvis “is always trying to push the limits of product development.” The company is “constantly listening to guides, dealers, and customers” in an effort that has proved a simple, yet effective basis for long-term success. A recent example is the development of the Helios 3F and 3D. All the rods are made in Vermont and the workers can’t make them fast enough to satisfy demand. Another development is the line of ultralight waders for men and women that feature a seam strength about double the industry standard. Importantly, the women’s line is not

just a men’s wader with smaller feet. It is specifically designed for women, a choice that is part of the Orvis 50/50 On The Water campaign. That campaign is “a challenge to the rest of the industry for more gender-parity in the fly-fishing industry,” said Rosenbauer meaning more women guides, more women on the water, and more women in fly shops. When asked what new developments might be coming, he said, “That is top secret,” then added tongue in cheek, they might include something dealing with rods, reels and wading equipment. Orvis, a Fly Fishers International industry partner, shares the FFI conservation ethic. In the past, if a conservation issue had political overtones, Orvis shied away and would not get involved. The current political climate has prompted change. In addition to contributing 5% of pre-tax profits to various conservation-related projects, Rosenbauer noted much more involvement with important conservation issues like the Everglades, opposition to the Pebble

Mine and the proposed copper mine at the headwaters of Montana’s Smith River. Rosenbauer took pains to point out that Orvis is not anti-mining— mines simply need to be properly sited. He noted that even more valuable than the millions of dollars contributed over the years, is the personal time and efforts expended by the Perkins family and the Orvis employees on conservation efforts and the conservation message. Taking a stance on hot-button topics like climate change, might not be the best business decision, but Rosenbauer said, “Orvis owners and employees believe it’s the right thing to do.”

Industry Partners

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REVIEWS Children will enjoy the story, and adults will appreciate the sentiment. The book, released by Abrams Books, March 2018 ($17.99) includes colorful illustrations of nearly 80 flies and three pages concisely explaining fly fishing, catch and release and conservation. Highly recommended.

Recommended New Children’s Book Down by the River is an early reader book cleverly written by Andrew Weiner and brilliantly illustrated by April Chu. The plot follows a young boy who spends the day on the river fly fishing with his mother and grandfather. The book deftly touches on family, traditions, wisdom of grandparents, appreciating wildlife, and identifying bugs. These subjects are all referenced within the context of catching fish on the fly.

Terrafin Wading Boots by SoftScience™ The Soft Science Terrafins wading boots are new shoes that are so comfortable out of the box that wearing them is like hanging out on the front porch with old friends. Over the many decades of wading rivers and fishing lakes wearing different styles of wading boots, shoes and sandals, including some bearing a prestigious name plate and prodigious price, Terrafins are

www.jgerweckbamboorods.com

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Flyfisher Spring/Summer 2018

|

the most comfortable wading boots, shoes or sandals that have ever been on my feet. Score one for comfort at a reasonable price. But there is more to wading footwear than comfort. Keeping the wearer vertical when wading is another thing. I first tried the Terrafins when fishing out of my pontoon. They have a much slimmer profile than my more conventional wading boots so I had to tighten the straps on my fins. I typically spend more time using fins than oars to

jgcanerods@gmail.com


control my boat so wading boots need to hold up. The Terrafins provided good support for the entire day on the lake. The next test was on Oregon’s Umpqua River known for its bedrock ledges, uneven surfaces and challenging wading. Though I was a bit timid at first, as the day wore on, my confidence in the ability of these boots to grip and hold continued to grow. The pliable boot sole seems to mold itself around broken rock while also gripping solid surfaces. All day comfort and great traction are a winning combination. The lace-up boot upper is a woven breathable microfiber mesh that quickly dries at day’s end. The genius of the boot lies in Trileon™, a proprietary closed cell copolymer designed exclusively for SoftScience™. The company created a removable Trileon™ insole and nonmarking outsole. Together they provide a soft cushion for the feet and a slip-

resistant grip on moss-covered and water-polished rocks. These boots fit close. For wet wading, buy them in the same size as street shoes but go up one size if worn with waders to accommodate the neoprene bootie. Black and sage Terrafins retail for $89.95. Add $10.00 for sage camo. softscience.com

keepers. The lanyard will accommodate every size of sunglass bows. If the rubber keepers fail during the life of the lanyard, the artisan offers free replacement. A portion of proceeds from the sale of the lanyards is donated to Fly Fishers International.

Sunglasses Lanyard by Primavera Leathers This new lanyard makes dropping your sunglasses in the water a thing of the past. It is always a joy to come across a product that combines function with art and conservation. Primavera Leathers (primaveraleathers.com) makes a sunglasses lanyard that is truly a functional work of art. Handcrafted by Evenlight Eagles in North Carolina, the lanyard features corded leather, beads and dyed bone with adjustable rubber

Reviews

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STREAMSIDE Q&A

The World Through a Different Lens BRIAN GROSSENBACHER lives in Bozeman, MT with his wife and two daughters. In 2005, after 15 years of guiding, he started shooting when he and Jenny were asked to write Fly Fishing Montana. On a gamble, they used the photo budget for the book to buy a camera and two lenses. Before the book was published, he had already sold a handful of magazine covers and discovered a previously unknown passion for photography. He is now a regular contributor to dozens of outdoor and Fly Fishing magazines. In addition to exclusively shooting all of the action photography for Simms Fishing Products, he also shoots for Orvis, Mossy Oak, Buff, Costa, Bass Pro, Canada Tire, Karisma Resorts, Shimano, Brunton and many others. Brian has traveled extensively in North, Central and South America, Russia, Mongolia, New Zealand and the Bahamas shooting active lifestyle images.

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Derek: Do you have any memorable equipment failures when you’re out working? Brian Grossenbacher: Yes, I had a beauty. This has been several years ago now, but I had an amazing opportunity to go in and fish for Golden Dorado in Bolivia. This was before the lodges were established. We were on the Rio Pluma, and this was the only time that the river had been fished with traditional fly-fishing gear was a year earlier. It took us three or four days to even get into the jungle. We flew into Argentina, overnighted; flew into Santa Cruz Bolivia, overnighted; flew into Trinidad, overnighted. It was crazy, our flight from Santa Cruz to Trinidad was cancelled, so we had to charter a flight that we were overloaded. It was an absolute headache getting there. The first day we arrived at the Indian village, and this was like National Geographic type stuff with grass huts. The airstrip was still being used by drug runners, and it was a very narrow dirt airstrip. They didn’t want this airstrip to be visible, so you really only had about a meter clearance on either side of the wings of the airplane. Day one we went up river in the jungle and I’m not even walking in the water. It was a pretty rough trip. I mean we were carrying our own gear, we were eating what we caught, and camping out on the islands. We were going up a river that had a pretty substantial flow, very similar

Flyfisher Spring/Summer 2018

to the Galaxy River in Montana. As I’m walking beside the river, not even in the river, I slipped and literally threw my camera into the water. The water was off color, so I ran into where I saw it and reached around and grabbed it. It was probably under water for about 15 or 20 seconds. I pulled it out, immediately popped the battery out of it and powered the camera down. I shot with my backup camera for the next three days, and anytime the sun would pop out, I would, lay the camera in the sun with the lens off and the battery compartment open. By day five, I popped the battery in it and it fired up. My daughter still uses that camera today. DB: In your years as a guide and a photographer, what’s the most abnormal occurrence that you’ve witnessed? BG: As a guide, I have watched people catch two fish at once in three different ways. The most obvious one is fishing hopper-dropper and you get the simultaneous hit. That’s not that uncommon. The other one, which I’ve seen twice, is when you catch a smaller fish and a bigger fish with it. The most epic one was on the Upper Madison. This was early ‘90s and I can still see it. I can remember the angler, and I can still see exactly where we were on the Upper Madison. This huge flash came up underneath this hopper and I thought oh man, this is it, but a tiny fish squirted up and ate it. I was still trying to put everything together in my head as


we’re rowing down the river and he’s bringing in this little eight-inch fish. All of a sudden his rod bent over double. And the original fish that came up at the hopper grabbed the smaller fish, and had it in his mouth sideways. He did not let it go until we got it into the net. As soon as we got the big brown in the net, he relaxed his jaws, and the guy still had the rod doubled over. Of course the smaller fish then sprang out of the net, under the tension of the rod, and was shot fifty feet over our heads back in the middle of the river. The third one—I still don’t believe it happened—but we’re on the Galaxy River with a guy that literally it was his first day of fly fishing. I was teaching him to roll cast and we were nymphing and he eventually progressed. We had two nymphs on below an indicator. He ended up bringing in two fish, pretty small, one eight inches and one seven inches. He caught it on a bead-head Pheasant Tail—both fish were on the same fly. And it wasn’t even a big hook. It went through the first fish’s lip, and there was enough of a point sticking out, that the second fish that was going for the fly at the same time was foul hooked by the tail. DB: You’re one of the most

prominent fly-fishing photographers. How did you arrive at this point in your career and did you receive any notable breaks along the way? BG: My wife and I were asked to write a book on fly fishing Montana. At that point, we assumed we would buy the photos, and we were probably two-thirds of the way

through writing the book and they gave us the photo budget and our jaws dropped. It might have been $1,800 and there was no way that we were going to buy photos for 120page book. We gambled and went out and bought a camera and two lenses with the idea that both of us are on the water. She was guiding as well

at the time. We thought we’ll take the camera with us and we’ll get as many shots as we can. Then if we have to buy some at the end of the day, we will. It turns out that I was the only one that read the instruction manual to the camera, so I became the primary photographer. If anything really contributed to early success, by the time the book was published, I think I had half a dozen magazine covers. That was in 2005 – 2006 during the transition from film to digital. And a lot of the established photographers kind of hit a stumbling block when that occurred. There was a little bit of a vacuum where the magazines were starting to all go digital and that’s all I knew. DB: You have a very unique perspective on fly fishing, in that, as a photographer, you essentially observe and capture moments. What are some notable changes that you’ve observed over your career so far? BG: The biggest change, and the one that I’m absolutely not involved in, is social media. I’m embarrassed to say I do have a Facebook and an Instagram account. I think the last time I updated Instagram was March 2016. I just don’t like it. I never come away from Facebook feeling better than when I went in. In terms of taking a section of that question, about the moments that I capture, one thing that really sticks out in fly fishing is the act of casting.

Streamside Q&A

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I’ve been fortunate to fish with some truly great casters and great anglers. And the first time that I saw this was with Rick Hartman fishing on his home turf in Harlingen, Texas. I’ve never seen a caster like Rick, and some of the photos that I have from the couple days we fished together of him casting are truly amazing—just the physics behind it. He’s a real student and he practices the art. To see him carrying the bulk of a fly line, and to be able to capture the deflection of the rod tip as the loop is going forward… being able to capture that moment in time, has kind of created a sense of the perfect…especially going back and looking at the images and editing them. DB: In your mind, what are some of the greatest conservation challenges that fly fishing faces right now? BG: I’m kind of thinking locally, but it’s mining and development. I think back in 1996, we had a Canadian mining company that came in. According to the 1872 Mining Act, they were able to buy 200 plus acres right outside of Yellowstone. For $275 bucks they bought it, and President Clinton, I think, ended up settling with them for $61 or $62 million just for them to go away. There’s a similar mine that’s happening right now, again right

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Flyfisher Spring/Summer 2018

outside of Yellowstone Park, which would affect the Yellowstone River which is one of my all-time favorites. And then you can look at Alaska and I’ve been fortunate to travel and take my family up to Crystal Creek Lodge. I’ve become very good friends with Dan Michael, the owner of that lodge.

The Pebble Creek Mine is another hotspot. It just doesn’t make sense to put mines in areas where they could jeopardize the entire ecosystem. So much life depends upon the fish that move up and down the rivers in Alaska. It’s not just the humans that are working up there, but all the other

supporting cast and crew of wildlife like the bears, eagles, and osprey. You know, the entire ecosystem is potentially at risk. It’s just not right. And in terms of development, I started guiding in ’92, and started fishing extensively in Montana in 1990. Development happened so fast on the Upper Madison. The flight in there, for example, in the early 90s was kind of a little flight to wilderness. Then the movie, The River Runs Through It came out, and I don’t want to place the entire blame on that, but the movie came out and it kind of put Montana on the map. The next thing you know you’re on the banks of the Madison River and you can’t find a place to take a leak because you’re in someone’s backyard. And once those houses are built, they don’t go away. That affects the wildlife corridor, and it affects the view of the river. The Yellowstone kind of had the same thing. It was such a wild corridor for so many years. Then the second homes started springing up right on the banks of the river, and it’s just not right. You build a house like that, right in the view of the river, and you steal something from the general public every single day of the year.


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REGISTRATION GUIDE Registration opens May 30th, 2018 at 9am MDT

august 9-11, 2018 boise centre boise, idaho

Cover: Bryan Huskey

Guest speakers & celebrities Learning Center • EXHIBITORS FLY TYING & CASTING DEMONSTRATIONS 1-Hour Seminars • auctions & raffles & much more! THURSDAY / Friday / Saturday / 9am-5pm

$10 / day / adult FREE / kids 11 & under

www.flyfishersinternational.org


LODGING

To make a reservation under the Fly Fishers International room block: Phone in reservation requests at 208-489-2222 or 888-961-5000. Or use this link https://reservations.travelclick. com/76224?groupID=2033327 All guests must contact the hotel by July 16, 2018 and identify themselves as part of the Fly Fishers International Group to get the group rate. Guests will be responsible to make and pay for their own reservation (name, type of room, bed type, dates).  Guests pay for their own account upon departure.   The room rates are as follows: Room Type: single/double room rate Double Queen: $139 King: $139 Plus applicable tax.  The rate will be honored for our attendees two days before group arrival (8/4) and two days after (8/14) based on rate and space availability. Cancellation must be made 24 hours prior to scheduled check in or you will be charged per cancellation policy. Upon check-in, each guest will be required to present a valid credit card that will assure payment of room, taxes, and parking for length of stay and any ancillary services. Please Note: Underground self-parking can be accessed directly off Capitol Boulevard, available at a nightly rate of $15. Valet parking can be accessed by turning into our driveway off Front Street, available at a nightly rate of $22. The garage height clearance for valet and self-parking in the hotel’s garage is 6’8” maximum.

TRANSPORTATION Courtesy Shuttle & Driving Directions: We are excited to announce our new airport shuttle service that will begin February 1, 2018 for Block 22 Hotels which includes: Courtyard Marriott Boise Downtown, Hotel 43, and the Grove Hotel. Arrival: After picking up your luggage here in Boise, please give us a call at 208-333-8000. Please exit baggage claim proceed to the courtesy transportation pick-up area. We ensure that you will be picked up within a 15-minute window. The shuttles are black and display the Block 22 Hotel Logos. Departure: When heading back home we would like you to make a reservation for the shuttle at least 20 minutes prior to your required departure time for our property. Please call or visit the Guest Service desk in the lobby to check availability as soon as possible since the shuttles are first come first serve. Driving Directions: From 1-84 & Airport: Take the Vista / Airport exit. Go north on Vista to Capitol Boulevard and turn left on Capitol Boulevard after approximately one mile. The hotel is located on the left-hand side of Capitol Boulevard - just three blocks south of the Capitol Building - at the corner of Front Street and Capitol Boulevard.

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Welcome to Boise Idaho! Boise is Vibrant. First-time visitors often comment on Boise’s vibrancy. Its vitality. Its energy. With an active arts community and lively downtown filled with shops, restaurants, night spots and – yes – people, Boise is alive with entertainment options. Boise is Active. When in Boise, do as the locals do: get outside! The city’s mild, four­season climate and easy access to mountains, rivers, lakes and more, make it a haven for those looking to explore beyond the city. Boise is Unforgettable. Memories are made in moments. In the cheer of a crowd. The thrill of experiencing something new. Of something unexpected. That’s what makes Boise. Boise is extraordinary with so many different events, sports and other exhilarating experiences. Information above taken from the Boise CVB website

BOISE AREA FLY FISHING SHOPS The Idaho Angler 1682 S Vista Ave, Boise, ID 83705 Phone: (208) 389-9957 www.idahoangler.com TRR Outfitters 60 S Eagle Rd, Eagle, ID 83616 Phone: (208) 939-6065 www.trroutfitters.com ANGLERS Fly Shop 7097 W Overland Rd, Boise, ID 83709 Phone: (208) 323-6768 www.boiseanglers.com

2 LOCATIONS: Anglers Habitat (Meridian Village) 2483 E. Fairview Ave. Ste. 101 Meridian, ID. 83642 208-887-4863 Anglers Habitat 716 Blaine St. Caldwell, ID 83605 (208) 454-8188 anglershabitat@gmail.com www.anglershabitat.com

TOP FIVE THINGS TO DO IN BOISE

Boise is an outdoor-oriented city, blessed with a cold, clear, clean river running through its heart, thousands of acres of public foothills on its shoulders and mountains and white water close at hand. Boise’s a great place, but don’t take our word for it, explore Boise while you are visiting for the Fly Fishing Fair. Here are FIVE things to do in Boise. 1. Foothills Hiking and Biking. Boise has miles of public trails for hiking and biking with trailheads and parking only a mile from the Boise Centre. Trails for every preference, great loop hikes and rides, presenting a great view of the City and the Valley. Search online: “Boise Ridge to Rivers Trails”. Bike rentals: Georges Cycles (4 blocks from Boise Centre) georgescycles.com; Idaho Mountain Touring (5 blocks from Boise Centre) dahomountaintouring.com. 2. Walk or Cycle the Greenbelt. Boise has a continuous world-class, tree-lined, paved public pathway along the Boise River through town and well beyond. Free maps are available at the Fair

2018 FLY FISHING FAIR COMMITTEE Coordinator Jessica Atherton 5237 US Hwy 89 So., Ste. #11 Livingston, MT 406-222-9369 ext. 107 fair@flyfishersinternational.org Committee Chairperson Tilda Evans (Chair) Collbran, CO FFI President Len Zickler, Spokane, WA

Local Committee Don Knickrehm (Chair), Eagle, ID Rick Williams (Co-Chair), Eagle, ID Tim Mansell, Boise, ID Auctioneer Will Godfrey Auction/Raffle Dawn Zickler (Chair) Spokane, WA 253-380-5554 Book Signing Bill O’Kelly Newbury Park, CA


Information Center in the lobby of the Boise Centre West. Great for a stroll, a run, or family biking. Don’t have your bike? Check out Boise’s “Greenbike System” - search “boisegreenbike.” Or, rent a bike from George’s Cycles or Idaho Mountain Touring (see prior). 3. Bogus Basin. Owned and operated by a local non-profit organization, this full-service ski area, just 16 miles north of Boise, has developed a full-blown summer program, including mountain hiking and biking trails and ski lift to the top; the new thrill ride “Mountain Coaster” and the “Fun Zone”; summer tubing, bungee trampoline, and climbing wall. Food and beverage are available or bring your own. Mountain bike rentals are offered. 4. Farmer’s Markets. Boise has two separate Farmer’s Markets. Saturday mornings: free and open to the public. Capital City Public Market is much more than foods and fresh produce. There are many artisan vendors; typically, 130+ vendors filling 8th Street and Idaho Street (pedestrian traffic only on Saturday morning). Located adjacent to the Boise Centre. Boise Farmer’s Market is nearby, at 10th Street and Grove Street, located two blocks from Boise Centre, featuring local food and agricultural products. 5. Float the Boise River. A very popular summer activity is floating the Boise River in tubes or rafts, a great way to cool off on a hot August day. Begin at Barber Park, about 6 miles from downtown. Barber Park includes parking, picnic area, local nature trails, and a tube and raft rental facility (free air station for filling your tubes or rafts). Safe for children who can swim, with life vest (included with raft rental and available on request). Search: “Float the Boise River” or “boiseriverraftandtube”. The float takes 2 to 3 hours. There is a shuttle service from Ann Morrison Park (the float route end and take out) back to Barber Park ($3.00 p/p). Visit the Fair pages on flyfishersinternational.org for even more information about things to do in Boise! List compiled by Don Knickrehm, Fly Fishing Fair Local Committee Chairman.

Casting Jonathan Walter (Chair) Wheat Ridge, CO Vendor Management Bird Marketing Group jbird@flyfusionmag.com Cranbrook, BC Fly Tying Peggy Brenner (Chair) Milford, NH Doug Knight – Iron Fly Contest Caldwell, ID

Carl Ronk (Tying Assist) Alta Loma, CA Sponsors Rhonda Sellers, Operations Manager operations@flyfishersinternational.org Marketing Bird Marketing Group cbird@birdmarketinggroup.com Cranbrook, BC

Fly Fishers International Learning Center - 2018 Fair Offerings The Education Committee of the FFI reached its goal this summer and delivered over 30 educational offerings to the fly fishing community online. Fair-goers have the opportunity to experience these offerings first-hand and are encouraged to share their experience when they return home. The offerings have been designed to allow members, clubs and councils to deliver these courses in their home location. The Learning Center’s four focus areas include: Fly Tying, Fly Casting, Fly Fishing Skills and Conservation. Individuals can pick and choose what topics they may be interested in, build a new program for others, or augment an existing program. It is through education that the Learning Center provides opportunities that offer inspiration, create stewardship, and promote healthy and diverse fisheries that offer recreation and sustain ecological function that can be enjoyed for generations to come. Learning Center selections this year are aimed at the beginner fly fisher and are just a taste of things yet to come. Fly Tying Women’s Fly Tying Workshop (spans over three days) – WS #5A, 5B & 5C Beginning Fly Tying Workshop – WS #26 Bronze Fly Tying Award Workshop – WS #30 Fly Fishing Skills Where are They and What are They Doing? Understanding Freshwater Fish Behavior to Become a Better Angler – WS# 15 Women’s Fly Fishing Workshop (spans over three days) – WS# 31A, 31B, 31C Some Spots Really Are Better – WS# 36 Fly Fishing Knot Tying – WS# 57 A Comprehensive Introduction to Fly Fishing (co-ed 1-day) – WS# 58 Fly Casting Fear No Tree: Learn the Roll Cast! – WS# 8 Back to Basics Fly Casting – WS# 23, 45 Casting Skills Challenge – WS# 70 Conservation Conservation and the Fly Fisher – WS# 34

Photo Contest Carl Ronk (Tying Assist) Alta Loma, CA

Sandy Carpenter (Chair/Social Outreach) Punta Gorda, FL

John Kimura Alturas, CA

Kid’s Activities Charley Renn (Chair) Corvallis, OR

Volunteer Coordinator Sherry Steele Sisters, OR Women Connect Mary Ann Dozer (Chair/Fly Fishing) Sisters, OR Patty Lueken (Chair/Tying) Mountain Home, AR

2-Day Youth Camp Mike Clancy (Chair) Olympia, WA Other Lew Evans (Announcer) Colbran, CO

CONTENTS Page 2 Welcome to Boise

Page 3 Learning Center Volunteer Registration

Page 4-5 PHWFF Casting Competition Casting Instruction Conservation Keynote FishFest Authors’ Booth Ticketed Events

Page 6 Women Connect

Page 7 Youth Camp

Page 8-11 Workshops

Page 12-14 Workshop & Fair Registration

Page 15 Idaho Angler Guide to Fishing

Page 16 Fair Schedule

VOLUNTEERS, WE NEED YOUR HELP! The FFI’s annual Fly Fishing Fair would not be possible without the dedicated efforts of many volunteers. If you would like to pitch in and help, we want to know! There are a variety of volunteer options from helping at the auction/raffle tables, handing out registration packets, setup and take down tasks, or welcoming our attendees. As a thank you for helping you will receive free registration and a special gift! Sign Up Instructions You will need to do the following in any order 1. Go to flyfishersinternational.org under the EVENTS tab, to the Fly Fishing Fair pages. Click on the volunteer sign-up and follow the instructions to select your days and times to volunteer. 2. When we open online registration, select the volunteer signup option when you register

5237 U.S. Highway 89 S., Ste. 11, Livingston, MT 59047-9176 (406) 222-9369 • Fax: (406) 222-5823 fair@ flyfishersinternational.org flyfishersinternational.org

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Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing’s Inaugural Casting Competition

Conservation Keynote Address and Discussion Hour

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fter several years of hosting a national rod building competition and a fly tying competition, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing has introduced a national casting competition, with a goal of improved casting skill and accuracy. Based on the 5-Weight Combination Game modified to use hula hoops and pie plates as targets, each of the 24 PHWFF geographic regions will select a regional champion to attend the FFI Fly Fishing Fair to participate in the Inaugural PHWFF Casting Competition. This competition is open to PHWFF participants only, but spectators are welcome. Soccer Field 1 will be available to competitors for practice all day on Thursday, August 9 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. a.m., followed by the competition starting at 8 am on Friday, August 10. Awards will be presented Saturday at the BBQ. projecthealingwaters.org

Free Casting Instruction At the International Fly Fishing Fair! Boise, Idaho CASTING Join us at Ann Morrison Park for FREE: Casting Clinics-This is the place to go to solve casting problems, learn new skills or even have a video casting analysis---a powerful tool for improving your cast---all with FFI Certified Casting Instructors. The Casting Clinic will be available Friday, 8/10, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, 8/11, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Instruction is for all skill levels, beginner to expert. Bring your own rod, reel, and line or use one of ours.

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Free Video Casting Analysis And you thought your smart phone or tablet computer were only useful for emails, social media, and shopping. How about using these electronic devices to improve your fly casting skills? Join us on the casting field for a personal analysis of your casting technique using the video camera feature of a tablet computer. We’ll even supply the tablet computer or you can use your own phone or tablet. We’ll show you “before” and “after” video and you can see the improvements for yourself. Your instructors are two FFI certified Master Casting Instructors: Macauley Lord, former Head Instructor of the L.L. Bean Fly Fishing School in Freeport, Maine, and Willy George, President of the Golden Gate Angling & Casting Club in San Francisco, California. You can borrow a loaner rod or bring your favorite fly rod and matching line along with a standard tapered leader. Free Video Casting Analysis is offered as part of the Casting Clinic at Ann Morrison Park on Friday August 10 and on Saturday August 11. Spey Doctor- Join FFI Certified Two-Hand Casting Instructors gathering on the Boise River, Friday and Saturday 8/10 and 8/11 from 9-11 a.m. & 1-4 p.m. for a walk-up clinic to help diagnose and cure what ails your two-handed casting! The clinic is open to beginning and seasoned Spey casters looking to improve technique.

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ly Fishers International bestows awards upon several deserving recipients whose work in conservation is exemplary. The awards are presented to individuals who have made outstanding, lifelong contributions in conservation of fisheries and their habitats or in education of others in this field. After the conservation meeting there will be a keynote address and discussion in honor of an FFI award recipient, their conservation work and lessons they have learned. The session will be held on Wednesday, August 8, at the Boise Centre from 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Participants will be encouraged to engage in the discussion through a question and answer session. A social session with refreshments to allow participants to interact informally will follow. This is a unique opportunity to learn from and thank someone who has made life long contributions to conservation. The Conservation Committee of FFI hopes that you will be able to join us!

Fly Tying at the Fair

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he Fly Tying Group will have much to share and participate in on all aspects of fly tying this year at the Fair. All members are invited to attend the annual meeting Wednesday, August 8 as well as the Rendezvous with great food and raffle of fly tying materials that afternoon. We have some great workshops that begin Tuesday with a beginner and an intermediate Women’s Fly Tying workshops which take place a half day Tuesday, all day Wednesday and a half day on Thursday. Some other offerings include tying wings on salmon flies, controlling thread, small flies, working with deer hair, tying feather wings on streamers, stillwater & saltwater flies, working with Peacock Herl and more. You’ll be able to watch some of the best tiers in the world demonstrate their specialties Thursday, Friday and Saturday in the show hall. There will be a tying theater, a feature tier section and over 20 slots that will have a.m. and p.m. shifts. Be sure to drop by the FTG booth to visit about what we are doing to preserve the art form of fly tying for all fly fishers.


Stop By and Visit the Authors’ Booth

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e will have an interesting and eclectic group of authors again this year – from Molly Semenik signing her great book, 25 Best Off-the-Beaten Path Montana Fly Fishing Streams to Victor Johnson, Jr., signing Fiberglass Fly Rods: International Edition, as well as his other books on fly rods. Richard Stoll will be signing books on saltwater fly fishing for salmon and sea-run cutthroat, and Richard Twarog will sign his book on fly fishing the San Juan River. Jeff Morgan has three books to sign that suggest a depth of knowledge befitting somebody twice as old as he is. Don’t miss Gary Borger at the booth either. Gary will be casting, tying and signing books while at the Fair. All told, we’ll have at least nine different authors, and as we write this, we’re working on more. The booth will have three signing sessions per day, so make sure you set aside some time to come and talk to the authors and get a book or two signed!

FishFest

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on’t miss an all-new FishFest open 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily August 9th through 11th at Boise Centre. The show floor will be packed full of your favorite fly-fishing brands, gear and destinations including, fly-fishing tackle manufacturers like Orvis, Patagonia, RIO Products, Sage, Scientific Anglers and Simms as well as a variety of local fly shops, guides, lodges and artists! The event will include a fly casting pond as well as fly-tying and presentation theater featuring demonstrations and presentations from fly-fishing celebrities Gary Borger, Dave Whitlock, Brian O’Keefe and many others. Visit with your favourite authors and fly tyers from across the country, place your bid on some fantastic fly fishing swag in our silent auction, renew your FFI membership and make sure you bring the kids to join in some fun activities including casting, tying and identifying fish and bugs. This is a year you won’t want to miss! Admission to the FishFest and all associated activities are FREE with your advance registration or day pass entry. Day passes can be purchased for $10 and entry is always FREE for kids 11 and under.

1-Hour Seminars

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his year, the FishFest is hosting some spectacular 1-hour seminars on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, August 9 through 11 at the Boise Convention Center. Make sure to save some time to see speakers like Brian O’Keefe, Gary Borger, Frank Meek, Nate Brumley, the Idaho Angler, and Bruce Staples. You will find where to fish topics ranging from Cuba to Boise to Yellowstone. How to fish topics ranging from dry fly tactics, reading the water and Tenkara fishing. Seminars are free with your Fair registration or your day pass to the FishFest. They will run from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. each day. Check the Fly Fishing Fair webpages for a list of times, topics, and presenters.

TICKETED EVENTS Fly Tying Group Rendezvous

Join members of the FTG as they host their Rendezvous which includes a meal with all the trimmings. Renew friendships with fellow fly tiers and make some new tying friends.  Other activities include a fly exchange, silent auctions, special tying contests, a chance to use the Evergreen Hand, bucket raffles and a special contest to get your “Mystery Materials”.  Bring a set of your flies (one dozen) to participate in the Fly Switch.  Participants will be chosen at random to choose their choice of flies from the collection.  Advanced reservations are required, and space is limited so get your tickets when Fair registration opens! Date: Wednesday, August 8 Time: Noon to 4 p.m. Location: Boise Centre Cost: $40

IF4

International Fly Fishing Film Festival® consists of short and feature length films produced by professional filmmakers from all corners of the globe, showcasing the passion, lifestyle and culture of fly fishing. The films at this popular event are capturing the attention of anglers around the world. IF4™ contains exclusive content and is a must-see experience. Date: Wednesday, August 8 Time: 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Location: Boise Centre, Jr. Ballroom Cost: $15

Alive After Five

For 32 years, Alive After Five, a free outdoor concert series in the heart of downtown, has been a well-loved and highly anticipated community event. Every Wednesday throughout the summer, Alive After Five welcomes visitors and the Treasure Valley alike to the Grove Plaza from 5pm-8pm to experience Downtown Boise’s community at its finest. Live music and dancing, along with food, beer and wine and local vendors bring friends and families together. Check downtownboise. org for the 2018 concert schedule, released soon; we’ll see you on The Grove! The event starts at 5pm and lasts until 8pm and is free to attend.

Date: Wednesday, August 8 Time: 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Location:  The Grove Plaza Cost: FREE to the community

President’s Awards Dinner

Please join us for an evening of celebration! Every year we recognize the people who have made a difference in our organization and the sport of fly fishing.  Awards will be bestowed on those who have been chosen by the nomination and selection process.  Please join us as we honor our awardees. Date:  Thursday, August 9 Time:  6:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Location:  Boise Centre, Ballroom 400 Cost: $60

FFI Conservation Fundraiser

We invite you to join us for our most highly-anticipated and high-class evening of the Fair. The FFI Conservation fundraiser is a gala evening where friends come together to partake in some of Boise’s finest cuisine while supporting FFI’s conservation projects through the evenings silent and live auction events. Part of the proceeds will go to support a local conservation project. Come bid on your dream trip, fishing gear, art, framed fly-plate or the multitude of specialty non-fishing items. Date: Friday, August 10 Time: 6:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Location:  Boise Centre, Ballroom 400 Cost:  $50, Table of 10: $650

Closing BBQ

Let’s close the show with a great BBQ, full of fellowship, fun, laughter and the like! Date:  Saturday, August 11 Time:  6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Location:  Boise Centre Cost: $50 Three meal ticket cost: 1 President’s Awards Dinner, 1 Auction and 1 Barbeque for: $150 Seating is limited. It is recommended to purchase your meal ticket(s) during the registration process so you be sure to get a seat.

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FFI Women Connect

Welcome women anglers and fly tiers to the FFI Women Connect at the 2018 Fair. This is your opportunity to meet other women in a friendly and fun environment and add to your fly fishing skills. We look forward to meeting you! FFI Women Outreach: Please join one or all of our social activities. Come to the FFI Women Connect booth Thursday, Friday and Saturday in the show hall to meet and network with other women anglers and tiers. There will be morning coffee available and other goodies and activities throughout the three-day gathering. Women’s Outreach Ambassadors, identified with a ribbon on their nametag, you’ll see them teaching, taking a class and roaming about. By all means please introduce yourself and ask them about classes, skill levels, casting opportunities, casting certification and any other questions you may have.

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FFI Women Fly Tying Workshops: Learn to tie your own flies in this workshop for women, taught by women (WS #’s 5A, 5B and 5C for beginners and 6A, 6B and 6C for intermediate). Beginner or Intermediate levels; this is the place for you. You will tie various flies, building foundational tying techniques. Bring your vise and tools, or we will furnish them, for a very hands-on experience with real-time coaching from your instructors. You’ll walk away with flies to chase trout in Idaho and beyond. The price includes lunch on Tuesday and admission to the Fly Tying Rendezvous on Wednesday afternoon including lunch and fun activities. FFI Women Fly Fishing Workshop: This workshop will be held over three days, (WS #’s 31A, 31B and 31C) for all women anglers, beginner/intermediate/advanced. Each day, the program begins in the classroom with instructors who are passionate female fly fishers, and then moves to some prime water, fly rod in hand, to reinforce the skills and concepts learned in the classroom. Our vast pool of experienced and accomplished instructors will support all students, helping each to grow in the pursuit of the pleasures of fishing. There is a maximum of 16 students for this workshop and it will fill fast, so be sure to register on opening day!


FFI Youth Fly Fishing Camp 2018 Sponsored by Washington State Council of FFI

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o you know of any youth that are interested in learning about fly fishing? If you do, then plan on signing them up for the annual FFI Fly Fishing Fair Youth Camp. We are excited to be in Boise, ID. for the fly fishing event and teach youth about the sport of fly fishing. This year’s Youth Camp will be held on August 9-10 and will be an exciting two-day program, full of learning, fun and fishing. It is designed for ages 8-17 and will offer a wide variety of angling and aquatic education topics.

Instruction topics include entomology, fly tying, equipment and accessories, explanation of the balanced system, angler ethics, fishing safety, abeyance to regulations, catch and release, fly casting and finally, FISHING. The class will qualify a Boy Scout towards the Fly Fishing Merit Badge (need: scout’s leader name & address. A letter will be sent to the Boy Scout Master with the items that were accomplished). The camp will begin each day at 9 a.m. and conclude at 4 p.m. with a lunch break (lunch included) around noon. Anyone with special dietary needs, please attend to those individually. Please make mention of any allergy or diet restrictions when registering. The first day will be held at the Boise Centre, downtown Boise, in a classroom setting. The casting portion will be conducted on the second day at Ann Morrison Park, and the Fishing portion will

be at Julia Davis Park. We will meet the second day at Ann Morrison Park next to the Boise River at 9 a.m. Be prepared for weather. Rain may not prevent continuing the program, but should high wind or lightning be present, we will make alternate arrangements. Participants need a good hat/cap, sunglasses, sun screen, safety glasses for eye protection and a water bottle, along with any rescue medications needed also indicate any health issues or concerns when registering so we can be flexible to adapt to whatever conditions exist. We will all have a great time and a good experience. Class will be limited to the first 20 registrants for each day. All youth 11 and under must be accompanied by a parent/guardian. Folks interested in volunteering 
for this event, please go to the Fly Fishing Fair tab at our website www.flyfishersinternational. org to sign up. Volunteers will be needed to ensure the youth are safe and having fun. A number of the youth will be new to fly fishing and guidance will be appreciated. For questions feel free to email mtclancy39@comcast.net or call 253-278-0061. I’m looking forward to meeting our participants and another great FFI Youth Camp experience. Mike Clancy, Life Member FFI, Member WSCFFI Council, Co-Director NWYCFF Academy • A HOLD HARMLESS AGREEMENT must be signed by a parent or guardian for the youth to attend. This agreement will either be in your registration packet at the Fly Fishing Fair or available from the youth chairman on site. • All kids 11 years and under MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY AN ADULT. • Fill out the registration form on page 16 and include the information to register your youth. • If you (parent/guardian) are NOT planning to attend the Fly Fishing Fair but want to sign your youth up for the camp, fill out the attendee and the youth camp section only on pg. 16 and send in your payment, or contact the FFI office at 406-222-9369 to sign up.

WORKSHOP HIGHLIGHTS

This year you will find we have put together an extensive line-up of workshops designed to appeal all interests and skill-levels. We are excited for you to read through the next few pages and start your wish-list for the 2018 Fair!

A Few Highlights: This year The Learning Center launches its curriculum with a dozen educational workshops designed to develop and improve skills and knowledge in the areas of tying, casting, fly fishing skills and conservation. You will find these workshops highlighted with an “LC” icon in the workshop listing. FFI’s Women Connect Group will be hosting a three-day beginner tying workshop, a three-day intermediate tying workshop and a three-day fly fishing workshop. These workshops will be tailored to the students’ skill level and are led by Mary Ann Dozer, Patty Lueken and many others including Molly Semenik. The tying and casting workshops are vast - both in number and variety. Whether you are a beginner; an expert caster, looking to achieve your certification; a professional tyer, interested in earning the Fly Tying Group Bronze Award or virtually anywhere in between, you are guaranteed to find something of interest to you! Be sure to sign up as soon as you can, many of these workshops fill up quickly. And don’t miss out on our on-stream casting and fishing courses or the multitude of non-angling workshops with options to explore the area, learn about local issues or explore a craft. Finally, and most-importantly, we would like to extend a big thank you to the group of talented individuals who give of their precious time to teach these valuable courses. This world-class event, featuring over 70 skill-building and local interest workshops would not be possible without you. The workshop schedule and registration forms are also posted on the fair web pages at flyfishersinternational.org. Visit regularly to check for newly listings. 7


WORKSHOPS CASTING - TESTING ON-WATER

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Two Hand Casting Instructor Certification Exam - Various Instructors. Candidates must register in advance by emailing casting@flyfishersinternational.org The THCI exam is administered at a time and place arranged between the examiners and the candidate. The candidate will supply their own rod, reel, line, leader, yarn fly and valid Idaho fishing license. Wading is required for this exam. Other criteria can be found in the exam description online. TBA: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Advanced Class Limit: 4 Member fee: $300 (+$50 upon passing) NonMember fee: NA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 7 CASTING

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Learn Thee Most Elegant Skill in Fly Casting, The Double Haul - Les Rosenthal. HAS MOVED TO: Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Introduction to Casting Instructor Certification - James Sommercorn. The Casting Instructor (CI) is the basic instructor certification offered by the Casting Instructor Certification Program. I will provide an overview of the CI including the tenets of fly casting instruction, the requirements for certification, and resources for preparation. I will relate the principles of fly casting and methods of instruction to selected tasks of the CI Performance Exam and will describe elements of an effective process for achieving CI certification. Equipment: The workshop is directed primarily to CI candidates and others interested in CI certification. Instructors may find it useful as well. This is classroom only. Please be prepared to take notes. Tuesday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 25 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

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Fault Identification and Correction - James Sommercorn. Correcting casting faults is essential to effective fly casting instruction. The workshop will be based on CI Performance Task 22. Participants will have opportunities to perform, identify, and correct the common casting faults of Task 22 using Richards’ Six-Step Teaching Method. The workshop may be useful to instructors and to candidates for instructor certification. Equipment: Fly tackle used to teach. Have a copy of CI Performance Task 22 and Richards’ 6-Step Teaching Method. Tuesday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: Advanced Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

TYING

5A

Women’s Beginner Fly Tying Workshop - Patty Lueken, Kathy Crofts, Patty Gnuse. This is a sixteen-hour educational experience over a three-day span. You will tie flies to build foundational tying techniques and learn to handle various materials and tools. This is a hands-on experience with a lead instructor and multiple other instructors to provide individual attention. Lunch will be provided (the workshop fee includes a meal ticket for the Fly Tying Rendezvous on Wednesday). Equipment: Vise, tools and materials are provided. Bring a light if you wish and glasses if you need them. Let’s have fun and walk away with flies to fish! Tuesday: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Level: Beginner Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $100 NonMember fee: $125 Material fee: $80

6A

Women’s Intermediate Fly Tying Workshop - Patty Lueken, Charlotte Day. This is a sixteen-hour educational experience over a three-day span and dovetails with the Women’s Fly Fishing workshop that begins Thursday afternoon. You will tie flies to learn intermediate level skills, teach fly tying, and become confident to demonstration tie. You will also build and use a wing burner. Lunch will be provided (the workshop fee includes a meal ticket for the Fly Tying Rendezvous on Wednesday). Equipment: Need to bring a light, vise and tools. If you need vise or tools, the instructor will be in contact prior for any specific instruction or questions. Let’s have fun and walk away with flies to fish! Tuesday: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $110 NonMember fee: $135 Material fee: $80

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8 CASTING

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Learn the Penultimate Fly Fishing Skill, Distance Casting - Les Rosenthal. HAS MOVED TO: Saturday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Fear no Tree: Learn the Roll Cast - Molly Semenik, Trisha Campbell. The roll cast is a cast that can be used at anytime/ anywhere. It is easy to learn and fun to do. We will progress from the

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beginning and move into more advanced applications. This class is for the beginner to advanced caster. Equipment: Bring a fly rod/reel 4-6 weight with a 7-9’ leader/2-3x. Bring protective eye-wear and be ready to have some fun. Wednesday: 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $70 NonMember fee: $85

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A Functional Understanding of The Essentials of Fly Casting James Sommercorn. A textbook understanding of The Essentials of Fly Casting may be sufficient to pass the CI written exam however the CI performance exam and teaching require a functional understanding of the Essentials that allows their application in practice. This understanding relies on knowing the dynamics of the Essentials as they apply to properties of both the fly line and the fly rod which I will use to explain and analyze selected tasks of the performance exam. Although open to all, the workshop may be particularly useful for CI candidates. It is classroom only. Please be prepared to take notes. Wednesday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 25 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

CASTING - TESTING

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Certified Casting Instructor Exam-Workshop and Written Various Instructors. This portion of the CI exam is administered in a classroom setting. A workshop covering various aspects of the CICP and teaching is first, and the written test follows. Candidates must have registered in advance with the Casting Coordinator at casting@ flyfishersinternational.org. Candidtes that fail the written test are still eligible to take the performance portion of the exam. Equipment: Candidates may wish ot bring a pen and notebook. Wednesday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: Advanced Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $225 (+$50 upon passing) NonMember fee: NA

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MCI Exam - Various Instructors. Examinations will be administered to candidates that have prepared for the Master Casting Instructor exam. Candidates must register in advance with the FFI Casting Coordinator at casting@flyfishersinternational.org. Please note there is a new MCI exam as of March 2018 available on the FFI website under Casting. Equipment: Candidates should have a valid Idaho Fishing License as they will be casting on grass as well as water. Candidates supply the rod, reel, lines and leader they will use for the exam. The criteria are listed in the MCI exam on the website. Wednesday: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Level: Instructor Class Limit: 6 Member fee: $300 (+$50 upon passing) NonMember fee: NA

TYING

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Introduction to Thread Control and Materials Handling Wayne Luallen. This class will stimulate fly tying curiosity and open the student’s mind to new ideas with a goal of a superior fly in function and appearance. Emphasis will be on understanding “how” and “why.” Each student will leave with the desire and skills to be able to explore the “nature” of their materials as never before as well as the freedom to allow their materials to work for them. Equipment: A standard complement of tying tools (including two hackle pliers, at least two bobbin holders - preferably Matarelli style, hair stacker, and tying lamp) along with a notebook. All tying materials will be supplied. Wednesday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60 Material fee: $8

5B

Women’s Beginner Fly Tying Workshop - Patty Lueken, Kathy Crofts, Patty Gnuse. On the second day of this course, you will tie flies to build foundational tying techniques and learn to handle various materials and tools. This is a hands-on experience with a lead instructor and multiple other instructors to provide individual attention. Equipment: Vise, tools and materials are provided. Bring a light if you wish and glasses if you need them. Let’s have fun and walk away with flies to fish! Wednesday: 8:00 a.m. to noon Level: Beginner Class Limit: 8 Member fee: Paid with WS no. 5A NonMember fee: Paid with WS no. 5A Material fee: Paid with WS no. 5A

6B

Women’s Intermediate Fly Tying Workshop - Patty Lueken, Charlotte Day. On the second day of this course, you will tie flies to learn intermediate level skills, teach fly tying, and become confident to demonstration tie. You will also build and use a wing burner. Equipment: Need to bring a light, vise and tools. If you need vise or tools, the instructor will be in contact prior for any specific instruction or questions. Let’s have fun and walk away with flies to fish! Wednesday: 8:00 a.m. to noon Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 8 Member fee: Paid with WS no. 6A NonMember fee: Paid with WS no. 6A Material fee: Paid with WS no. 6A

FISHING ON-WATER

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Czeck Nymphing - Herb Grenke. Fishing with the members of the national team; John Saxton on the Truckee and Brown Hobson, “Orvis guide of the year”, in the Smokies. Students will receive a leader, “sighter”; that will enable them to guide multiple flies in the feeding zone. After a short classroom introduction and rigging; we will spend most of the time on the water learning presentations that catch fish. We will also learn recent innovations in tight line nmyphing. Equipment: Bring the longest lightest rod that you have. Check with local fly shops to select flies that are hot nymphs. These should be sparsely tied and heavily weighted. Go online to get a czech nymph fly. Wednesday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $80 NonMember fee: $95 Material fee: $5

OTHER

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Making A Furled Leader - James Fenner, Linda Fenner. Presentation/Demonstration of all steps involved in making a furled leader for fly fishing. Making a peg-board jig needed to make the leader. Wrapping thread/monofilament around the pegs to form the leader. Furling the leader. “Relaxing,” stretching and finishing the leader. Modifications, such as two-colored leaders and adding a metal tippet ring. If time permits, one or more attendees will make their own leader. Wednesday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $25 NonMember fee: $35

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Where Are They and What Are They Doing? Understanding Freshwater Fish Behavior to Become a Better Fly Fisher - Dave Peterson. This Learning Center workshop focuses on understanding the behavior of freshwater fish and the practical implications of fish behavior for the fly fisher. The workshop covers sensory abilities, cognitive abilities and learning, as well as time, temperature and oxygen levels and their effect on behavior. We will also examine feeding behavior and reproductive behavior. Finally, the need for shelter, comfort and food and their implications for locating fish will be discussed. Wednesday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Beginner Class Limit: 35 Member fee: $25 NonMember fee: $35

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Fly Fishing with Tenkara Rod - Luong Tam. This is a 3.5 hour, hands-on intensive classroom workshop for all levels. The classroom portion covers the fundamentals of tenkara rods, lines and user applications; includes a video demonstration of some advanced techniques of fly manipulations. For the hands-on workshop portion, students learn the fundamentals of tenkara casting using different types of small level lines. Plus, casting games and prizes! Tenkara rods will be available for student use. Wednesday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 24 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

NON-ANGLING

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Dutch Oven Cooking - Lew Evans. This is a hands-on class. The students do all the preparation and cooking. Along the way, you will have fun learning about the history of Dutch ovens and cowboy cooking. You will make friends for a lifetime. Sign up early because this class fills up fast. Equipment: All equipment and materials will be provided. Just bring your sense of humor. Wednesday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60 Material fee: $15

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9 CASTING

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How to Cast Super-Tight Loops, Back and Front - Macauley Lord. Amaze your friends with the tightness of your new loops at 40 feet. Come and learn how. Equipment: Bring an outfit that has a bright line so you can see it easily. Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Level: Intermediate/Instructor Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

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Special Occasion Presentations - Ewald Grabher, Mark Milkovich. A standard fly presentation isn’t always enough. From Corkscrews to Single Handed Speys, there are mends and casts that will do the job when conditions demand something special. This workshop explores the many ways you can accommodate wind, currents and obstacles to achieve the desired animated or dead drift, surface or subsurface presentation. Equipment: Rod and Reel Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Beginner Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $70 NonMember fee: $85

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Learn Thee Most Elegant Skills in Fly Casting, The Double Haul Les Rosenthal. Emphasizing the fundamental skills of eliminating


slack, smooth acceleration, appropriate casting arc, proper pause, and straight-line rod path. This class will improve your fundamental skills including false casting, determining how much line you can carry, shooting line and double haul. Equipment: Bring your 5-7 wt rod and reel with a size matched, bright floating line and a 7.5’ tapered leader with a bright yarn fly. Skills: False cast tight loops at 40’ & shoot line forward and back. Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 12 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

Hare’s Ear Nymph and an Elk Hair Caddis dry fly. No knowledge of fly tying needed. Equipment: All materials, tools and class DVD, for future reference, will be provided. Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Beginner Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $30 NonMember fee: $40

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assist students in learning the fly tying techniques necessary for tying the required flies for receiving the Bronze Fly Tying Skill Award. Three of the five required patterns for the program will be taught with emphasis on techniques. Knowledge of fly tying helpful. Equipment: Standard fly tying tools, lamp and variety of thread 6/0 or smaller. All other materials are included. Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $40 NonMember fee: $50

CI Prep Workshop – Don Simonson. This workshop provides an introduction and overview into what is required to become a FFI Certified Casting Instructor. Equipment: Rod, reel, line and note pad. Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 6 Member fee: $30 NonMember fee: $40

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Saltwater Fly Tying - Gary Hall. I will present flies that I have used both in the Sea of Cortez and the Pacific Ocean. We will tie a variety of common patters as well as a few creations of my own; each that work inshore, in the surf, and off shore. Equipment: Vise and tools to tie saltwater flies. A tube attachment is helpful. All materials, and printed directions will be supplied. Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 6 Member fee: $40 NonMember fee: $50 Material fee: $30

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Video Casting Analysis with Your Tablet or Smartphone Macauley Lord. Learn how to film and analyze anyone’s casting, including your own, on-the-spot using your tablet or smartphone. We will film each other making some core casts on the CI Test, then replay and analyze them. Along with CBOG Willy George and with Macauley Lord , attendees of this class will be invited to use what you’ve learned to teach the next two days in the Free Video Casting Analysis offered as part of the Casting Clinic. Equipment: Bring a smartphone or tablet (load and register the Hudl Technique App), the outfit with which you would teach beginners, and a bright fly line. Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: Advanced/Instructor Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $70 NonMember fee: $85

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Introduction to Tying Small Flies - Wayne Luallen. The class goal is to help each student discover that small flies generally require generally the same basic tying techniques as larger flies, but sometimes with a different twist. Strong emphasis will be placed on how to develop better control of thread. Flies will be easier to tie, more durable, more functional, and, better looking. Equipment: A standard complement of tying tools (including two hackle pliers, at least two bobbin holders - preferably Matarelli style, hair stacker, and tying lamp) along with a notebook. All tying materials will be supplied. Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60 Material fee: $8

Women Fly Fishing Workshop - Mary Ann Dozer, Kristy Aserlind, Robin Brown, Trisha Campbell, Kathy Crofts, Heather Hodson, Julie Meissner, Molly Semenik and Shauna Williams. The Women’s Fly Fishing Workshop is an educational experience, teaching both general concepts and specific skills, to women anglers regardless of skill level. This workshop runs over a three-day period (see 31B on Friday and 31C on Saturday). Topics include gear and equipment, rigging and knots, aquatic insects, casting, fly selection, & reading the water. Each includes classroom and on-the-water instruction. The instructors are a group of passionate female fly fishers including long time anglers, certified casting instructors and professional guides. On Friday and Saturday Morning we will fish the Boise. Equipment: Waders, boots, 4 to 6 wt. fly rod & line with 2 leaders and fly box. A list of suggested flies will be mailed to all students. If necessary, fly rods can be provided. Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Level: Beginner/Intermediate Class Limit: 16 Member fee: $275 NonMember fee: $300 Material fee: $15

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Effortless Casting - Mark Milkovich and Gary Turri. When you reduce casting effort, you can fine tune casting motions to increase both accuracy and distance with casting efficiency. Prior to the workshop, you will receive an e-mailed casting exercise to help them identify a new habit, casting with the minimum force their casts require. With the workshop experience and instructional materials, you can continue your effortless casting development following the Fair. Equipment: Fly Rod and Reel Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 6 Member fee: $70 NonMember fee: $85

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Back to Basics Fly Casting - Jonathan Walter. Whether you are an absolute beginner or have been fishing a while and want a tune up, this Learning Center class is for you! We will cover the fundamentals and application of a good casting stroke then students will work on casting drills that isolate necessary skills. This class covers; understanding how to cast a longer line, how to shoot line, appropriate use of the line hand, and how to manage making the next cast. Students will leave the class with an understanding of how to practice correctly. Equipment: Fly rod, 4-6 wt., with matching reel and line, 7.5-9 ft. leader, 0-2X. Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

CASTING - TESTING

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Certified Instructor Performance Exam - Various Instructors. The Performance portion of the Certified Casting Instructor exam covers 15 casting proficiency tasks and 7 instructing tasks including error analysis and correction. Candidates must supply their own rod, reel, line, leader and yarn fly. Criteria for these is found in the exam description on line. A valid Idaho fishing license is recommended as some casting, such as roll cast. May take place on water. Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Level: Advanced Class Limit: 10 Member fee: Paid with WS10 written exam NonMember fee: NA

CASTING ON-WATER

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Two Hand Casting - Find Your Power Stroke - Mark Huber, Rick Williams. The forward cast in two-hand casting is a complex symphony between the caster, rod and fly line. In this workshop, we will examine the forward casting stroke and break down each component helping you to find your power stroke on your forward cast and leading to a better understanding of adding power to the cast. Participants should have good anchors and d/v loops in their basic spey cast. Equipment: Bring a balanced two-hand rod/reel/line/leader setup. Lines should be short head (45’-55’) in length or Scandi shooting heads. Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: Advanced Class Limit: 6 Member fee: $70 NonMember fee: $85

TYING

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Beginner Fly Tying Workshop - Jerry Coviello. Did you ever wonder what is needed to learn how to tie flies? Ever ask; what are the flies needed to imitate what the fish are taking? What tools will I need? Everything you need to learn will be covered in this Beginner Fly Tying Workshop. You will also tie 3 files; a Woolly Bugger, Gold Ribbed

Selecting Natural Materials for Their Best Use – Steve Bailey. “Materials: the good, the bad, the ugly” could have been the title of this workshop. Not all natural materials are created equal. Learning what to look for in order to select/purchase the best materials for a given pattern will produce an easier to tie, better looking and better functioning artificial. Learn to choose bucktails, calftails, feathers, various hairs and other materials for their best usage depending on the fly pattern and how you want the pattern to fish. . I will tie a few flies to demonstrate best materials for a desired result. Equipment: Come prepared to take notes and pictures. Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 15 Member fee: $40 NonMember fee: $50

5C

Women’s Beginner Fly Tying Workshop - Patty Lueken, Kathy Crofts, Patty Gnuse. On the third day of this course, you will tie flies to build foundational tying techniques and learn to handle various materials and tools. This is a hands-on experience with a lead instructor and multiple other instructors to provide individual attention. Let’s have fun as women teach women new skills! Equipment: Need to bring a light, vise and tools. If you need vise or tools, the instructor will be in contact prior for any specific instruction or questions. Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to noon Level: Beginner Class Limit: 8 Member fee: Paid with WS no. 5A NonMember fee: Paid with WS no. 5A Material fee: Paid with WS no. 5A

6C

Women’s Intermediate Fly Tying Workshop - Patty Lueken, Charlotte Day. On the second day of this course, you will tie flies to learn intermediate level skills, teach fly tying, and become confident to demonstration tie. You will also build and use a wing burner. Let’s have fun as women teach women new skills! Equipment: Need to bring a light, vise and tools. If you need vise or tools, the instructor will be in contact prior for any specific instruction or questions. Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to noon Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 8 Member fee: Paid with WS no. 6A NonMember fee: Paid with WS no. 6A Material fee: Paid with WS no. 6A

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Fish Vision, Light, the Aquatic Environment, and Fly Design - Paul Beckmann. In this workshop, the visual environment of fish will be dissected. The goal is to give the participants new ways to think when designing and selecting flies. The visual capability of the fish, absorption of light by pigments in a fly and in the underwater environment, and the effects of light reflection and scattering will be introduced. This workshop is guaranteed to generate a few surprises even in the most experienced fly fisher! Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $30 NonMember fee: $40 Material fee: $5

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Bronze Fly Tying Skill Award Workshop - Jerry Coviello. There is no issue with a fly that is tied just to catch a fish, if that is all you want, but if you would liket to be an accomplished fly tier, this Fly Tying Skill Award Program is for you. This workshop is designed to

FISHING ON-WATER

31A

On-water Nymphing Techniques on the Boise River. - Chris Gerono. This small group workshop will be conducted on the Boise River through town. Chris will put the different nymphing styles and techniques to work as you learn how to best fool the wary trout that reside in this urban gem. Equipment: Fly fishing outfits, waders, boots, flies etc. Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 6 Member fee: $80 NonMember fee: $95

OTHER

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Starting and Maintaining a Fly Fishing Club - Thomas Gadacz. This is an interactive session. Several topics are discussed including; how to get started once you have a group of interested fly fishers; the steps necessary to establish a formal club and identify your goals; the types of documents such as by-laws, incorporation and taxexempt status; conduct of a meeting; attracting new members; meeting members’ needs; evaluating programs and projects; raising funds for activities; where to get some help; AND MORE! Bring your questions and concerns. Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 20 Member fee: FREE NonMember fee: FREE

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Conservation and the Fly Fisher - Dave Peterson, Brad Eaton. Fly Fishing Learning Center Conservation Module. The workshop will provide an overview of important conservation issues pertinent to the fly angler. Topics include personal conservation issues including catch and release practices and stopping the spread of invasives, among others. The session will also cover habitat conservation, restoration, access issues, conservation policy development, important laws and the FFI’s role in conservation. Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Level: Beginner/Intermediate Class Limit: 50 Member fee: $25 NonMember fee: $35

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Conservation at the Council & Club Level – Dave Peterson. The workshop will help council and club members to learn how to get a conservation program established and sustained at the regional level. Also, learn more about for FFI Conservation Grants program and how the grant can be used as a seed for much larger grants available. Round table discussion will be held to share ideas as well. Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Level: All Levels Class Limit: 20 Member fee: FREE NonMember fee: FREE

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Some Spots Really Are Better - Brad Eaton. Learn about why fish change locations and the reasons certain spots attract more fish. This seminar will show you how to identify the “higher percentage spots” and improve your odds on the water. A presentation will describe visual recognition features and reasons why these features are important. Interactive discussion will follow to analyze actual stream examples and apply key points. Equipment: No equipment needed. Content geared towards beginners and intermediate, but should be useful to all levels. Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $25 NonMember fee: $35

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Mindfull Casting - Herb Grenke. Most casting errors are caused by muscle tensions that interfere with properly presenting the fly. Phillip Caputo wrote; “casting requires a tranquil heart; indeed, fly fishing creates a tranquil heart.” Sports Psychologist Robert Nediffer taught me how to train athletes to be mindful. You will learn the correct concentration style to activate the muscles used to make a good cast. Equipment: Bring your favorite rod (and a tranquil heart). Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 12 Member fee: $60 NonMember fee: $75

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Council & Club Administration - Rhonda Sellers. Workshop will help club leaders understand their responsibility in club administration, including requirements to stay compliant with IRS and record retention. Other topics will include club resources that FFI can provide and helpful information about accessing club information on FFI’s website. Presentation will be followed by round table discussion to answer concerns of the leadership and how to address common issues facing clubs today. Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 15 Member fee: FREE NonMember fee: FREE

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Fly Fishing with Tenkara Rod - Luong Tam. This is a 3.5 hour, hands-on intensive classroom workshop for all levels. The classroom portion covers the fundamentals of tenkara rods, lines and user applications; includes a video demonstration of some advanced techniques of fly manipulations. For the hands-on workshop portion, students learn the fundamentals of tenkara casting using different types of small level lines. Plus, casting games and prizes! Tenkara rods will be available for student use. Thursday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 24 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

NON-ANGLING

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Basque History and Culture - Dan Aizpitarte. Brief lecture on origins of Basque Center, and development of Basque community in Idaho, including unique Basque language. Guided tour of Basque Museum, boarding house and historical “Fronton”. Concluding with introduction to adjacent Basque restaurants. Thursday: 10:00 a.m. to noon Level: All-Level Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $20 NonMember fee: $25

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Payette Brewing: Tour and Tasting - Steve Sutherland. Tour Payette Brewing with tour host Steve Sutherland. View the brewery production area including a discussion of the beer making process as well as how the equipment works. Finish the tour on the mezzanine and sample 4 of our amazing beers. Equipment: Please wear closed toes shoes. Participants must be 21 and older. Thursday: 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 25 Member fee: $30 NonMember fee: $40

FRIDAY, AUGUST 10 CASTING

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Back to Basics Fly Casting - Jonathan Walter. Whether you are an absolute beginner or have been fishing a while and want a tune up, this Learning Center class is for you! We will cover the fundamentals and application of a good casting stroke then students will work on casting drills that isolate necessary skills. This class covers; understanding how to cast a longer line, how to shoot line, appropriate use of the line hand, and how to manage making the next cast. Students will leave the class with an understanding of how to practice correctly. Equipment: Fly rod, 4-6 wt., with matching reel and line, 7.5-9 ft. leader, 0-2X. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

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Hands-on Teaching Technique - Jean-Francois Lavallee. What is it, when to use it, are you doing it correctly? Help your students become better casters by mastering this teaching technique. Equipment: 1 rod per 2 students. Pen and paper if you want to take notes. Friday: 10:00 a.m. to noon Level: Instructor Class Limit: 12 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

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Being a Casting Instructor Mentor Discussion Group Jonathan Walter, Bill Wheeler. This 2-hour discussion is for all MCI/CI’s that mentor candidates for the CI exams, all levels. Candidates are welcome to attend. Let’s share ideas and ways of mentoring amongst ourselves, as well as discuss good ways to prepare to be a mentor. Participants will be surveyed prior to the discussion by email and answers will be discussed anonymously during the workshop. We look forward to this first open discussion! Friday: 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Level: Instructor Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $25 NonMember fee: $35

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Slack Line Casting and Mending for More Fish - Floyd Dean, Janet Dean. Be Lord of the Rise and Queen of the Dries. With this workshop, you will improve your fishing prowess utilizing casting techniques gleaned from Floyd’s extensive library and his contacts with expert casters of today. Be a slacker! You will learn aerial casting and mending techniques that will help you put the slack where it counts. You will learn curve casting, insect presentations and how to adapt to various fishing situations. Equipment: Bring your favorite trout rod with a 9-foot leader and 4x tippet. We’ll supply the fly with no hook. Friday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $70 NonMember fee: $85

CASTING ON-WATER

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43

50

Understanding The New MCI Test - Steve Hollensed, Thomas Berggren. For examiners, MCI mentors, and MCI candidates. Workshop will provide an overview of how the new test operates with a focus on performance standards, test structure, and evaluation methods. Workshop chiefly targets MCI mentors and MCI candidates or examiners who just want a refresher. Equipment: Please bring a copy of the test. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Level: Instructor Class Limit: 25 Member fee: $25 NonMember fee: $35 Improve Your Back Cast and Loop Control - David Barron. This workshop will help you improve your back cast which sets up for your forward cast and improves your loop size and shape. The difference between a beginner and an advanced caster is their ability to control their loop size and shape. Your casting and fishing will improve dramatically once you’ve mastered these techniques. Equipment: A 5 or 6 wt rod with a matching floating line and 7.5 to 9-foot leader with a yarn fly. This is an interactive class. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 15 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

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Improved Accuracy and Loop Control - Willy George, Gail Gallo, Paul Gallo. We believe that accuracy is the Holy Grail of fly casting. The key difference between a beginner, intermediate, and advanced caster is their ability to consistently control their loop size and shape. Learn from three Master Casting Instructors with a wealth of fishing and tournament casting experience. This seminar will focus on your personal improvement by keeping the student-to-instructor ratio very low. Individual assessments will be followed by customized casting instruction,

10

drills, and games to improve your accuracy skills. Your fishing success will improve dramatically once you’ve mastered loop control. Equipment: A 5 or 6 weight fly rod and matching floating fly line with a tapered 7.5 to 9 foot leader (2X to 4X tippet) and yarn fly. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

Single Hand Spey - Bill Wheeler. This on the water class will emphasize a simplified approach to anchor location based up wind direction. Starting with “water-borne” double spey and snap C casts we will proceed to the “splash and go” anchor casts like the single spey and the snake roll. Equipment: Floating line with at least a 30-foot head and a polypropylene yarn fly with floatant available. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 5 Member fee: $60 NonMember fee: $75

MCI Preparation - Performance Tasks on Water, section 1B Thomas Berggren, Steve Hollensed. This workshop will focus on the new MCI Performance Test, Tasks on Water - Section 1B. We will cover the key points and teaching aspects and practice each of the tasks in section 1B, including roll, switch, single and double-spey, snap cast and snake roll. This workshop is mainly adapted for participants that are MCI mentors, MCI candidates, and all examiners. Equipment: The singlehand rod and line you practice and teach with. Maximum 9 ft, 7 wt. Task 22 (sunk line task)will be covered in the test. Bring an integrated or a full sinking line type 2 or denser if you would like to practice this task. Friday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: Instructor Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $25 NonMember fee: $35

TYING

51

Working with Peacock Herl - Chet Allison. In this class, you will learn different ways to tie in Peacock Herl and where to use the different ways of tying it in. You will learn where the dubbing loop is best used and where it is not such a good use. Equipment: Two peacock eye feathers, vice, tying tools, shepherds hook for the dubbing loop and black thread 6/0 or 8/0. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Level: Beginner Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $40 NonMember fee: $50 Material fee: $5

52

How to tie Intruder Steelhead Flies, Tube Flies, and Bunny Leeches (MOAL Leeches) - James Crislip. This 3-hour course is for everyone wishing to learn how to tie the 3 styles of steelhead patterns. Bring your own tying tools but not necessary (do not buy anything for the class, I will show a wide variety of specific tube tying tools) Equipment: Vice and tying tools (Can be borrowed from instructor). All other materials provided. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $40 NonMember fee: $50

76

Trout Flies - From Finesse to Bulk and Back Again! – Steven Fernandez. Wonder why your flies don’t look as good as your buddy’s flies? Having trouble tying with bulky materials? Why does your thread break all the time? This class will concentrate on techniques that will give you the flexibility to transition between delicate and bulky materials with ease and help you understand why thread and materials do what they do. Emphasis will be on thread, material control and manipulation as well as reduction of unnecessary thread wraps and amounts of material. Equipment: Standard fly tying tools: vise, bobbin, scissors, hackle pliers, hair stacker and extension cord. Tying materials will be provided. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Intermediate/Advanced Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $60 NonMember fee: $75

53

20, (or more), Tips For Tying Like A PRO: The details behind the stories... - FE Meek. This workshop dovetails with my program of the same name. I will demonstrate essential skills as well as an indepth look at the details behind the tips in a one-hour presentation. Two examples would be the taxonomy of hackles and the whip finish. Equipment: A questioning mind...as well as basic tying gear Friday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $40 NonMember fee: $50 Material fee: $5

54

Tying and Fishing Chironomids - Bob Wolfe. Chironomids make up more than 50% of a trout’s annual diet in lakes and ponds, and in many still waters, nearly 100% in early spring. This workshop is designed to take the mystery and intimidation out of fishing Chironomids. You will learn to tie highly effective patterns like “Trout Candy”, as well as the techniques and tackle to successfully fish them. Equipment: Tying vise and tools capable of tying small flies. A tying light is recommended. Materials provided. Friday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $40 NonMember fee: $50

55

The Classic Atlantic Salmon Fly - Part 1 Tip, Tag, Tail, & Butt - James Ferguson. Wanting to tie a classic Atlantic Salmon Fly? Need help on where to start? Part 1 of this series of workshops includes prepping the hook, tying the tip, tag and tail assemblies, and a butt if needed. Pattern proportions will be covered and applied to guide our tying. Participants should be at the intermediate or higher tying skill level. Equipment: Standard tying tools, burnishing tool, flat jawed pliers or hemostats to flatten stems. Black and White (or cream or primrose) 8/0 thread (flat thread) UTC 70 is a good one. Friday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: Advanced Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $60 NonMember fee: $75 Material fee: $15

FISHING ON-WATER

31B

Women Fly Fishing Workshop - Mary Ann Dozer, Kristy Aserlind, Robin Brown, Trisha Campbell, Kathy Crofts, Heather Hodson, Julie Meissner, Molly Semenik and Shauna Williams. The Women’s Fly Fishing Workshop is an educational experience, teaching both general concepts and specific skills, to women anglers regardless of skill level. This workshop runs over a threeday period (see 31B on Friday and 31C on Saturday). Topics include gear and equipment, rigging and knots, aquatic insects, casting, fly selection, & reading the water. Each includes classroom and on-thewater instruction. The instructors are a group of passionate female fly fishers including long time anglers, certified casting instructors and professional guides. On Friday and Saturday Morning we will fish the Boise. Equipment: Waders, boots, 4 to 6 wt. fly rod & line with 2 leaders and fly box. A list of suggested flies will be mailed to all students. If necessary, fly rods can be provided. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Level: Beginner/Intermediate Class Limit: 16 Member fee: Paid with WS no. 31A NonMember fee: Paid with WS no. 31A


56

Czeck Nymphing - Herb Grenke. Fishing with the members of the national team; John Saxton on the Truckee and Brown Hobson, “Orvis guide of the year”, in the Smokies. Students will receive a leader, “sighter”; that will enable them to guide multiple flies in the feeding zone. After a short classroom introduction and rigging; we will spend most of the time on the water learning presentations that catch fish. We will also learn recent innovations in tight line nmyphing. Equipment: Bring the longest lightest rod that you have. Check with local fly shops to select flies that are hot nymphs. These should be sparsely tied and heavily weighted. Go online to get a czech nymph fly. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $80 NonMember fee: $95 Material fee: $5

OTHER

57

Fly Fishing Knot Tying - Todd Heggestad, Lyth Hartz. This class is an introductory class on tying the typical knots used in fly fishing. The goal of the class is to prepare the student to learn the knots they would use on the water when fishing. This is an experiential class in which we will tie multiple knots from fly line to leader to tippet to fly. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Beginner Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $25 NonMember fee: $35

58

A Comprehensive Introduction to Fly Fishing; a co-ed one day workshop - Dutch Baughman, Dave Boyer, Barry Webster. This workshop is a comprehensive introduction to all aspects of fly fishing. Typically, students in this class have very little or no experience. This class and the accompanying notebook are intended to provide a lifetime source of fly fishing reference material. Topics discussed include casting, equipment, knots/rigging, entomology, fish behavior, etiquette, safety, strategies and tactics, preparing for a fly fishing trip, the fishing part of fly fishing, the catching part of fly fishing. Discussion includes these topics as they pertain to freshwater, warm water, and saltwater fly fishing. Equipment: If a student owns a fly rod, reel, vice and/or tools, they are encouraged to bring them. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Level: Beginner Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $25 NonMember fee: $35

59

Modern Tenkara/Keiryu Wet and Dry Fly Fishing - Naif Khoury. Learn fast paced wet/dry tenkara/Keiru fly fishing. Bring your rod(s) and we will rig them for dry, wet and streamer shallow water fly fishing, all species. Equipment: If you have them, a furled line; three feet, shorter than your rod, or a piece of 17lb flouro carbon the same length. Friday: 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $30 NonMember fee: $40

60

Dry Fly Academy - Nate Brumley. Flat out…the most informative dry fly presentation ever assembled! You’ll be introduced to 50 years of knowledge fishing exclusively a dry fly. Tons of instructional video, cutting edge techniques, and masterful strategies are all tailored to up your game on a dry fly. The treasure trove of information contained in this class will simply “blow you away!” Friday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 50 Member fee: $25 NonMember fee: $35

NON-ANGLING

61

Dutch Oven Cooking - Lew Evans. This is a hands-on class. The students do all the preparation and cooking. Along the way, you will have fun learning about the history of Dutch ovens and cowboy cooking. You will make friends for a lifetime. Sign up early because this class fills up fast. Equipment: All equipment and materials will be provided. Just bring your sense of humor. Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60 Material fee: $15

62

Basque History and Culture - Dan Aizpitarte. Brief lecture on origins of Basque Center, and development of Basque community in Idaho, including unique Basque language. Guided tour of Basque Museum, boarding house and historical “Fronton”. Concluding with introduction to adjacent Basque restaurants. Friday: 10:00 a.m. to noon Level: All-Level Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $20 NonMember fee: $25

63

Payette Brewing: Tour and Tasting - Steve Sutherland. Tour Payette Brewing with tour host Steve Sutherland. View the brewery production area including a discussion of the beer making process as well as how the equipment works. Finish the tour on the mezzanine and sample 4 of our amazing beers. Equipment: Please wear closed toes shoes. Participants must be 21 and older. Friday: 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 25 Member fee: $30 NonMember fee: $40

64

Tips and Tricks for Flavorful Fish - David Knickrehm. Chef David will share kitchen techniques, tricks and tips for butchery, cooking and presenting different species of salmon. Friday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $30 NonMember fee: $40 Material fee: $5

FRIDAY & SATURDAY, AUGUST 10-11 CASTING

65

THCI Prep Course - Todd Somsel, Mark Huber, Bruce Williams. This two-day course is for those interested in, or working toward the THCi Certification. The instructors go through the THCI Exam, demonstrating the casts and discussing important elements that will be evaluated during the exam. They will also go through many of the common spey-casting faults and corrections. This is a hands-on course with participants performing most of the THCI exam tasks. All instructors for this course are THCI’s. Equipment: Bring a two-hand rod set up with a short head line, waders, notebook and pencil. Friday and Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon each day Level: Intermediate/Advanced/Instructor Class Limit: 10 Member fee: $80 NonMember fee: $95

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11 CASTING

66

MCI Preparation - Performance Tasks on Grass, Section 1A – Steve Hollensed, Thomas Berggren. This workshop will focus on Section 1A of the new MCI Test (tasks on the grass). 1A. We will cover performance standards and task execution of each task. Workshop is intended for MCI mentors, MCI candidates, and EDP examiners. Equipment: Please bring a copy of the test and rod & line that meet test specifications. Appropriate leader and yarn fly. Eye protection. Saturday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Instructor Class Limit: 20 Member fee: $30 NonMember fee: $40

67

Improving Your Fly Casting Skills - Don K Simonson. Covers topics such as, improving fly casting skills, going beyond the basics for better line control, slack line casts, accuracy, mends/curves. Distance and casting in wind conditions. Intermediate/Advanced skill level casting narrow loops front and back with a minimum of 40 ft. Able to double haul. Saturday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 6 Member fee: $70 NonMember fee: $85

68

Curve Casts and Aerial Mends - Jim Wigington. Fly fishing streams can be challenging because of complex currents and obstacles. Fly fishers typically need to learn how to add slack to casts and how to curve casts to overcome these challenges. Participants in this workshop will learn when to use curve casts and aerial mends and how to make these casts. Equipment: A 5 or 7 wt fly rod, reel, appropriate fly line and leader. A yarn fly will be provided for the workshop. Saturday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 6 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

69

Double Haul for More Fish - Floyd Dean, Janet Dean. If you’ve ever dreamed of casting across the Madison River or going after Bonefish or Tarpon or you’ve been frustrated by not having that 10 extra feet to reach the big trout on the far bank, this class is for you. Here, we will take the confusion and mystique out of the double-haul. We will be using Floyd’s patented invention, The Accelerator Fly Casting Trainer, to provide multi-sensory feedback to develop the timing and feel necessary for a good double haul. Equipment: A 5-7wt fly rod with a 9-ft. leader in 4x or larger. I will supply the flies with no hooks. Saturday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $70 NonMember fee: $85

70

Casting Skills Challenge-Try out your casting skills with a fun challenge activity! - Molly Semenik, Jonathan Walter, Bill Wheeler and Rick Williams. The FFI’s new Learning Center’s “Casting Skills Challenge.” Come join us and either learn more about the Casting Skills Challenge or we can run you through one or all of the three levels: Bronze, Silver or Gold. The Casting Skills Challenge is a set of skills divided into three different levels that allow the caster to gauge their casting proficiency or provide a fun way to improve one’s casting. All casting skills can be applied directly to fly fishing. To learn more about the Casting Skills Challenge go to the FFI web page click on Education/Learning Center/Casting. Equipment: Fly rod/reel 4-6 weight with a leader 7.5-8 feet in length with a tippet of 0-2x. Saturday: 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 16 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

7

Learn the Penultimate Fly Fishing Skill, Distance Casting - Les Rosenthal. Distance casting is the penultimate skill because so many casting skills occur sequentially in 1.5 seconds! The further the cast, the bigger effect fundamental variations create. This class will begin with the fundamentals, quickly progress to false casting, shooting line forward and back, double hauling and then will teach you how to teach yourself skills to continue to improve your casting distance. Best results will be achieved if you can false cast 40’, shoot line forward and back, and double haul. Equipment: A 5-8 wt balanced rod and reel set up with a brightly colored floating line, tapered 7.5’ leader tapered to 15lb test tippet. Saturday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Intermediate Class Limit: 12 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60

CASTING ON-WATER

71

Improving the Single Spey and Snake-roll - Lee Davison. For those seeking tips and techniques to increase their understanding and ability to consistently perform the basic “constant tension” spey casts. Students will receive insight concerning the basic concepts and mechanical aspects related to each cast and hands-on methods used to enhance performance. Equipment: Rod, Reel, Line, Wading Equipment, Sun Protection, Drinking Water. Saturday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 6 Member fee: $70 NonMember fee: $85

FISHING ON-WATER

31C

Women Fly Fishing Workshop - Mary Ann Dozer, Kristy Aserlind, Robin Brown, Trisha Campbell, Kathy Crofts, Heather Hodson, Julie Meissner, Molly Semenik and Shauna Williams. The Women’s Fly Fishing Workshop is an educational experience, teaching both general concepts and specific skills, to women anglers regardless of skill level. This workshop runs over a threeday period (see 31B on Friday and 31C on Saturday). Topics include gear and equipment, rigging and knots, aquatic insects, casting, fly selection, & reading the water. Each includes classroom and on-thewater instruction. The instructors are a group of passionate female fly fishers including long time anglers, certified casting instructors and professional guides. On Friday and Saturday Morning we will fish the Boise. Equipment: Waders, boots, 4 to 6 wt. fly rod & line with 2 leaders and fly box. A list of suggested flies will be mailed to all students. If necessary, fly rods can be provided. Saturday: 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Level: Beginner/Intermediate Class Limit: 16 Member fee: Paid with WS no. 31A NonMember fee: Paid with WS no. 31A

TYING

72

Tying Effective Stillwater Flies - Norm Domagala. The class will go over the step’s in tying effective fly patterns for stillwater fishing. We will be using new modern materials and also standard fly tying materials. The class includes color photographs and recipes for each fly that we will be tying. We will go over Callibaetis dries and nymphs, damsel nymphs, and midge pattern’s. We will also go over methods, fly lines and leaders used in successful stillwater fly fishing. Equipment: A vice that will hold a hook tightly. Saturday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $50 NonMember fee: $60 Material fee: $20

73

The Classic Atlantic Salmon Fly - Part 3 Wings, Sides, Roofs, and Final Finish - James Ferguson. Part 3 will provide the instruction to complete the tying of the Classic Atlantic Salmon Fly. Winging construction, sides, cheeks, roofs, toppings, horns and heads are the elements addressed in this class. Different styles affecting proportion will be studied. Materials and handbook will be provided. The student should have taken Part 1 and Part 2. Equipment: White and black 8/0 or 70 denier thread, standard tying tools, and a rotating vise makes life easier. Saturday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Level: Advanced Class Limit: 8 Member fee: $60 NonMember fee: $75 Material fee: $15

OTHER

74

Winter on a Dry Fly - Nate Brumley. Explore the world of tiny bugs and big fish as they rendezvous at the surface in winter. You’ll learn critical insight about a fish’s winter feeding habits and learn how to utilize that information to set up and deliver in the hatch. Nate divulges all the secrets, strategies and insight you’ll need to open up a whole new fly fishing season. Some of the most exciting dry-fly fishing of the year happens after the first hard frost and this class prepares you for that experience with the right gear, knowledge of hatches, and perfect selection of winter dry flies. Saturday: 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Level: All-Level Class Limit: 50 Member fee: $25 NonMember fee: $35

11


Workshop Registration # Title-Presenter(s)

Student Initial Member Fee

1. Two Hand Casting Instructor Certification Exam - Various Instructors.

$50

$60

3. Introduction to Casting Instructor Certification - James Sommercorn.

$50

$60

4. Fault Identification and Correction - James Sommercorn.

$50

$60

5A. Women’s Beginner Fly Tying Workshop - Patty Lueken, Kathy Crofts, Patty Gnuse.

$100

$125

$80

6A. Women’s Intermediate Fly Tying Workshop - Patty Lueken, Charlotte Day.

$110

$135

$80

7. Learn the Penultimate Fly Fishing Skill, Distance Casting - Les Rosenthal.

$50

$60

8. Fear no Tree learn the Roll Cast - Molly Semenik, Trisha Campbell.

$70

$85

9. A Functional Understanding of The Essentials of Fly Casting - James Sommercorn.

$50

$60

11. MCI Exam - Various Instructors. 12. Introduction to Thread Control and Materials Handling - Wayne Luallen.

Subtotal

$300 (+$50 upon passing)

2. Learn Thee Most Elegant Skill in Fly Casting, The Double Haul - Les Rosenthal.

10. Certified Casting Instructor Exam-Workshop and Written - Various Instructors.

12

Nonmember Materials Fee

$225 (+$50 upon passing) $300 (+$50 upon passing) $50

$60

$8

5B. Women’s Beginner Fly Tying Workshop - Patty Lueken, Kathy Crofts, Patty Gnuse

Paid with WS#5A

6B. Women’s Intermediate Fly Tying Workshop - Patty Lueken, Charlotte Day.

Paid with WS#6A

13. Czeck Nymphing - Herb Grenke.

$80

$95

14. Making A Furled Leader - James Fenner, Linda Fenner.

$25

$35

15. Where Are They and What Are They Doing? Understanding Freshwater Fish Behavior to Become a Better Fly Fisher - Dave Peterson.

$25

$35

16. Fly Fishing with Tenkara rod - Luong Tam.

$50

$60

17. Dutch Oven Cooking - Lew Evans.

$50

$60

18. How to Cast Super-Tight Loops, Back and Front - Macauley Lord.

$50

$60

19. Special Occasion Presentations - Ewald Grabher, Mark Milkovich.

$70

$85

20. CI Prep Workshop – Don Simonson.

$30

$40

21. Video Casting Analysis with Your Tablet or Smartphone - Macauley Lord.

$70

$85

22. Effortless Casting - Mark Milkovich and Gary Turri.

$70

$85

23. Back to Basics Fly Casting - Jonathan Walter.

$50

$60

24. Certified Instructor Performance Exam - Various Instructors.

Paid with WS no. 10 written exam

25. Two Hand Casting - Find Your Power Stroke - Mark Huber, Rick Williams.

$70

$85

26. Beginner Fly Tying Workshop - Jerry Coviello.

$30

$40

27. Saltwater Fly Tying - Gary Hall.

$40

$50

$30

28. Introduction to Tying Small Flies - Wayne Luallen.

$50

$60

$8

5C. Women’s Beginner Fly Tying Workshop - Patty Lueken, Kathy Crofts, Patty Gnuse.

Paid with WS#5A

6C. Women’s Intermediate Fly Tying Workshop - Patty Lueken, Charlotte Day.

Paid with WS#6A

29. Fish Vision, Light, the Aquatic Environment, and Fly Design - Paul Beckmann.

$30

$40

30. Bronze Fly Tying Skill Award Workshop - Jerry Coviello.

$40

$50

31A. Women Fly Fishing Workshop - Mary Ann Dozer.

$275

$300

32. On-water Nymphing Techniques on the Boise River. - Chris Gerono.

$80

$95

33. Starting and Maintaining a Fly Fishing Club - Thomas Gadacz.

FREE

FREE

34. Conservation and the Fly Fisher - Dave Peterson, Brad Eaton.

$25

$35

35. Conservation at the Council & Club Level – Dave Peterson.

FREE

FREE

36. Some Spots Really Are Better - Brad Eaton.

$25

$35

37. Mindfull Casting - Herb Grenke.

$60

$75

38. Council & Club Administration - Rhonda Sellers.

FREE

FREE

39. Fly Fishing with Tenkara rod - Luong Tam.

$50

$60

40. Basque History and Culture - Dan Aizpitarte.

$20

$25

41. Payette Brewing: Tour and Tasting - Steve Sutherland.

$30

$40

$5

$15

$5 $15


# Title-Presenter(s)

Student Initial Member Fee

Nonmember Materials Fee

42. Understanding The New MCI Test - Steve Hollensed.

$25

$35

43. Improve Your Back Cast and Loop Control - David Barron.

$50

$60

44. Improved Accuracy and Loop Control - Willy George, Gail Gallo, Paul Gallo.

$50

$60

45. Back to Basics Fly Casting - Jonathan Walter.

$50

$60

46. Hands-on Teaching Technique - Jean-Francois Lavallee.

$50

$60

47. Being a Casting Instructor Mentor Discussion Group - Jonathan Walter, Bill Wheeler.

$25

$35

48. Slack Line casting and mending for more fish - Floyd Dean, Janet Dean.

$70

$85

49. Single Hand Spey - Bill Wheeler.

$60

$75

50. MCI Preparation - Performance Tasks on Water, section 1B - Thomas Berggren, Steve Hollensed.

$25

$35

51. Working with Peacock Herl - Chet Allison.

$40

$50

52. How to tie Intruder Steelhead Flies, Tube Flies, and Bunny Leeches (MOAL Leeches) - James Crislip.

$40

$50

53. 20, (or more), Tips For Tying Like A PRO: The details behind the stories... - FE Meek.

$40

$50

54. Tying and Fishing Chironomids - Bob Wolfe.

$40

$50

55. The Classic Atlantic Salmon Fly - Part 1 Tip, Tag, Tail, & Butt - James Ferguson.

$60

$75

31B. Women Fly Fishing Workshop - Mary Ann Dozer.

$5 $5 $15

Paid with WS#31A

56. Czeck Nymphing - Herb Grenke.

$80

$95

57. Fly Fishing Knot Tying - Todd Heggestad, Lyth Hartz.

$25

$35

58. A Comprehensive Introduction to Fly Fishing; a co-ed one day workshop - Dutch Baughman, Dave Boyer, Barry Webster.

$25

$35

59. Modern Tenkara/Keiryu Wet and Dry Fly Fishing - Naif Khoury.

$30

$40

60. Dry Fly Academy - Nate Brumley.

$25

$35

61. Dutch Oven Cooking - Lew Evans.

$50

$60

62. Basque History and Culture - Dan Aizpitarte.

$20

$25

63. Payette Brewing: Tour and Tasting - Steve Sutherland.

$30

$40

64. Tips and Tricks for Flavorful Fish - David Knickrehm.

$30

$40

65. THCI Prep Course - Todd Somsel, Mark Huber, Bruce Williams.

$80

$95

66. MCI Preparation - Performance Tasks on Grass, Section 1A – Steve Hollensed, Thomas Berggren.

$30

$40

67. Improving Your Fly Casting Skills - Don K Simonson.

$70

$85

68. Curve Casts and Aerial Mends - Jim Wingington.

$50

$60

69. Double Haul for More Fish - Floyd Dean, Janet Dean.

$70

$85

70. Casting Skills Challenge-Try out your casting skills with a fun challenge activity! - Molly Semenik, Jonathan Walter, Bill Wheeler and Rick Williams.

$50

$60

71. Improving the Single Spey and Snake-roll - Lee Davison.

$70

31C. Women Fly Fishing Workshop - Mary Ann Dozer.

$5

$15

$5

$85 Paid with WS#31A

72. Tying Effective Stillwater Flies - Norm Domagala.

$50

$60

$20

73. The Classic Atlantic Salmon Fly - Part 3 Wings, Sides, Roofs, and Final Finish - James Ferguson.

$60

$75

$15

74. Winter On a Dry Fly – Nate Brumley.

$25

$35

75. Introduction to Tying Small Flies - Wayne Luallen.

$40

$50

76. Trout Flies - From Finesse to Bulk and Back Again! – Steven Fernandez.

$60

$75

(Write in late addition workshops)

Workshops Total (Copy to “Workshops Total” page 14) REGISTRATION POLICIES

1. Registration opens May 30, at 9 a.m. and closes on July 23, at 7 a.m. MDT. All applications are processed on a first-come, first-served basis. 2. The FFI encourages use of the online registration system. Calling into the office takes additional time which can affect the ability to get enrolled. 3. No refunds will be given after registration closes July 23. All fees and meal tickets purchased will be forfeited. 4. All cancellations will incur a minimum $25 cancellation fee for processing, regardless of when the cancellation is received.

Subtotal

$ ____________

5. All meal tickets should be purchased prior to July 23 to guarantee a seat. 6. Changes in workshops during open registration are subject to availability of the workshops. Changes in workshops after registration closes or during If more than one registrant is signing up for workshops, initial the fair are at the discretion of the FFI. each workshop accordingly.

Please visit flyfishersinternational.org to review all workshops requirements and Fair Registration Policies.

Please include both pages of the Workshop Registration form with your Fair Registration.

13


2018 International Fly Fishing Fair Registration Mail/Fax Form Register online with a credit card at flyfishersinternational.org. Read the registration policies before submitting this form. EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION: All registrations submitted by 5pm on 6/30/18 will be entered into a special drawing! Attendee(s) Information: Please print clearly Name: Other Family Members included in this registration: Initials

Initials: Relationship to you:

Address: City: State: Zip: Phone:

E-Mail: Cell or contact # at the Fair

FFI membership: (members get discounted workshops)

My membership is current. Member #: Renew or join the FFI: One Year $35 / Senior One Year $25 /______________ I do not wish to join at this time

$

Fair Registration (Name badge, sponsor goodies, opportunity to access to all Fair activities! Note any ticketed or items with fees):

Individual: $35 Family: $45 Show Involved Individual: FREE Show Involved with Family: $10 ____________

$ $ $ $

(Show involved = workshop instructor, demonstrations, programs, or on site scheduled volunteer)

Exhibitor: FREE (with secured booth space)

$

Youth Camp August 9th & 10th: (Fill out the top portion for parent/guardian)

One day ($20.00/child) 9th or 10th Both days ($30.00/child) $ _________ Youth First & Last Name: _______________________ Beginner Some experience (1-2 years) Experienced Food allergies, diet restrictions, medications: __________________________________________________________ Note: Attach additional page if more than one child to be registered.

Workshop Total: (Find the Women’s Fly Tying and Fly Fishing in the Workshop Schedule) Total from workshop registration sheet(s)____________

$

$

Meals/Events:

Fly Tying Group Rendezvous 8/8: ______ x If4 Film Festival 8/8: ______ x FFI President’s Awards Dinner 8/9: ______ x FFI Conservation Fundraiser 8/10: ______ x Barbecue 8/11: ______ x Award, Auction & Barbecue (all three tickets): ______ x

$40 each $15 each $60 each $50 each or _____ $650 10-top table $50 each $150 each 3-pak ______

$ $ $ $ $ $

FFI Logo Pin: ______ x $6 each Idaho Sales Tax of 6% applies to all items, except Workshops.

$ $

Special Offers:

Grand Total: $

Payment Method:

Check enclosed

Credit Card:

Card #

Visa

MC

Discover

AMEX

Exp date:

Sec.#

Signature: Register online at flyfishersinternational.org and click on the “Register Now” button on opening day. Mail to FFI Fly Fisher Fair Registration, 5237 US Hwy 89 So. Ste. #11, Livingston, MT 59047 Or Fax with your VISA/MC/DISCOVER/AMEX info to: 406-222-5823 Be sure to attach all other completed forms including workshop selections, Youth Camp registration form etc. Registration opens May 30th, at 9 a.m. MDT and closes July 23, at 7 a.m. 2018. I have read and understand the Registration Policies from page 13. Go to flyfishersinternational.org for full policy disclosure. I choose to make a donation of this amount $

14

to Fly Fishers International.


Fly Fishers International – Annual Fly Fishing Fair Boise, Idaho August 7-11, 2018 Boise is very fortunate to have some great fly fishing in and around the City. Boise offers exceptional tailwaters, and a nearly world class spring creek. Some of our favorite close-by waters are described below.

Boise River Through Town The Boise River runs right through center of the city of Boise and is an amazing urban fishery. The river is located less than two miles from the The Idaho Angler, running from Lucky Peak Dam east of town, westward. A series of beautiful public parks parallel the river linked by the 35-mile long Boise Greenbelt system. The Boise River through town is a tailwater fishery. Its water runs cool and clear, providing great trout habitat. Fish include wild and stocked rainbow, wild brown trout, and native whitefish, with some of the wild trout reaching 24 inches or better. Anglers regularly catch fish 18 inches and larger.

Popular fishing areas (from the east to the west side of town) include the area around Highway 21, Barber Park downstream to Americana Blvd, and the north and south channels around Eagle Island downstream and further west. South Fork of the Boise An easy hour and 15-minute drive from Boise, the South Fork of the Boise is a tailwater fishery located in a breathtaking canyon dotted with large cottonwood trees and old ponderosa pines. There is no commercial development in the South Fork Canyon – just beautiful water, big rainbows, and solitude. Cold water releases from Anderson

Ranch Dam, support Southern Idaho’s premier blue-ribbon rainbow trout fishery with many fish in the 12 to 18-inch range, good numbers of fish around 20 inches, and enough reports every season of fish 25 inches or bigger to excite any angler. The South Fork is unique in that, by law, guiding is not allowed. Anglers must rely on their own skill as well as information and info from local fly shops. In early season, fishing is typically by drift boat; however, by late July when flows decrease, boats disappear, and anglers enjoy wading. Owyhee River The Owyhee River is one of the best brown trout fisheries in the country! The “O” is a tailwater fishery located about an hour and 15 minutes west of Boise near Adrian, Oregon. The fish average 16-20 inches, with larger fish commonly caught. The river runs through a small and beautiful desert canyon. The famous Trico hatch in late July. Grasshoppers, beetles and ants can also produce great results from mid-Summer to the first freezes of fall. For the non-fly fisher, Silver Creek Preserve is a wonderful place. Miles of hiking trails afford opportunities to view the ample wildlife of this area. Deer, coyotes, the occasional moose and hundreds of species of birds can be found within the preserve boundary. Photo credits: Fisherman in river – Joshua Roper Photography 15


FLY FISHING FAIR EVENT SCHEDULE Monday, August 6 9:00 to 4:00 p.m.

Friday, August 10 Board of Directors Meeting, Boise Centre

Tuesday, August 7: FishFest and Show Hall not open 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Fair Registration Desk Open, Boise Centre Workshops, Boise Centre, Ann Morrison Park and various locations Convention Decorator Set-up, Boise Centre Casting BOG meeting, Boise Centre

Wednesday, August 8: FishFest and Show Hall not open 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Noon to 4 p.m. 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. 5:00 p.m. to 8 p.m. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Fair Registration Desk Open, Boise Centre Workshops, Boise Centre, Ann Morrison Park and various locations Exhibitor Set-up, Boise Centre Fly Tying Group BOG Meeting, Boise Centre Council Presidents Meeting, Boise Centre Tying Rendezvous BBQ, Boise Centre Conservation Committee Meeting, Boise Centre Conservation Keynote Address & Discussion Hour, Boise Centre Reception for Life Members, President’s Club members and donors Alive After Five, Boise Centre Plaza International Fly Fishing Film Festival (If4), Boise Centre

Fair Registration Desk Open, Boise Centre Workshops, Boise Centre, Ann Morrison Park and various locations FISHFEST! – Boise Centre & Ann Morrison Park Exhibit Booths, Kids’ Activities, Demo Tying & Casting, 1-hr. Seminars, Casting Clinic & Video Analysis, Spey Doctor, Authors, 50/50 raffle(s), Silent Auction & Raffles. Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing Competition Ann Morrison Park, Soccer Field 1 FFI Conservation Fundraiser (cocktail hour, dinner, live auction), Boise Centre

Saturday, August 11 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Fair Registration Desk Open, Boise Centre Workshops, Boise Centre, Ann Morrison Park and various locations FISHFEST! – Boise Centre & Ann Morrison Park Exhibit Booths, Kids’ Activities, Demo Tying & Casting, 1-hr. Seminars, Casting Clinic & Video Analysis, Spey Doctor, Authors, 50/50 raffle(s), Silent Auction & Raffles. Barbecue, Boise Centre

LOCATIONS

Thursday, August 9 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 8:00 a.m. to Noon 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Fair Registration Desk Open, Boise Centre Workshops, Boise Centre, Ann Morrison Park and various locations FISHFEST! – Boise Centre & Ann Morrison Park Exhibit Booths, Kids’ Activities, Demo Tying & Casting, 1-hr. Seminars, Casting Clinic & Video Analysis, Spey Doctor, Authors, 50/50 raffle(s), Silent Auction & Raffles Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing Competition Practice Day for Competitors Ann Morrison Park, Soccer Field 1 Annual Membership Meeting, Boise Centre President’s Awards Dinner, (dinner 7:00, award ceremony 8:30), Boise Centre

Boise Centre (BC): 850 W. Front St., Boise, ID 83702 boisecentre.com 208.336.8900 Ann Morrison Park: 1000 S Americana Blvd, Boise, ID 83706 Alive After Five, The Grove Plaza: 827 W Main St., Boise, ID 73702

flyfishersinternational.org - Go to Events tab to the Fly Fishing Fair pages

Kids’ Activities Calling all young people!

W

ant to learn more about the sport of fly fishing and have some fun? Come by the Kids’ Corral in the show hall Thursday through Saturday at the Fair! Learn about the bugs that fish eat, tie a fly, learn a new knot by tying it yourself, see what’s inside a fish, and learn a basic cast! Join other youth for some fun and learn stuff about fly fishing!

Scheduled times may change, check our website at flyfishersinternational.org and go to the Fair pages or see the schedules posted onsite at the Fair for updates.

Fly Fishers International Contact: Jessica Atherton, Fair Coordinator | 5237 Us Hwy 89 So. #11, Livingston, MT 59047 | 406.222.9369 | flyfishersinternational.org

Flyfisher - Spring/Summer 2018  
Flyfisher - Spring/Summer 2018